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Sample records for re-os pyrite geochronology

  1. Scientific communications: Re-Os sulfide (bornite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite) systematics of the carbonate-hosted copper deposits at ruby creek, southern brooks range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, D.; Kelley, K.D.; Hitzman, M.W.; Zieg, J.

    2009-01-01

    New Re-Os data for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the carbonate-hosted Cu deposit at Ruby Creek (Bornite), Alaska, show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the carbonate-hosted Ruby Creek Cu-(Co) deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization pre dominantly occurred at 384 ?? 4.2 Ma, with an earlier phase possibly at ???400 Ma. The Re-Os data are consistent with the observed paragenetic sequence and coincide with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks within the Ambler metallogenic belt, some of which are spatially and genetically associated with regional volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. The latter may suggest a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization in the Ambler district. The utility of bornite and chalcopyrite, in addition to pyrite, contributes to a new understanding of Re-Os geochronology and permits a refinement of the genetic model for the Ruby Creek deposit. ?? 2009 Society of Economices Geologists, Inc.

  2. Re-Os geochronology of a Mesoproterozoic sedimentary succession, Taoudeni basin, Mauritania: Implications for basin-wide correlations and Re-Os organic-rich sediments systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Alan D.; Selby, David; Houzay, Jean-Pierre; Renne, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    The exceptionally well-preserved sedimentary rocks of the Taoudeni basin, NW Africa represent one of the world's most widespread (> 1 M km 2) Proterozoic successions. Hitherto, the sedimentary rocks were considered to be Mid Tonian based on Rb-Sr illite and glauconite geochronology of the Atar Group. However, new Re-Os organic-rich sediment (ORS) geochronology from two drill cores indicates that the Proterozoic Atar Group is ˜ 200 Ma older (1107 ± 12 Ma, 1109 ± 22 Ma and 1105 ± 37 Ma). The Re-Os geochronology suggests that the Rb-Sr geochronology records the age of diagenetic events possibly associated with the Pan African collision. The new Re-Os geochronology data provide absolute age constraints for recent carbon isotope chemostratigraphy which suggests that the Atar Group is Mesoproterozoic and not Neoproterozoic. The new Re-Os ORS geochronology supports previous studies that suggest that rapid hydrocarbon generation (flash pyrolysis) from contact metamorphism of a dolerite sill does not significantly disturb the Re-Os ORS systematics. Modelled contact conditions suggest that the Re-Os ORS systematics remain undisturbed at ˜ 650 °C at the sill/shale contact and ≥ 280 °C 20 m from the sill/shale contact. Moreover, the Re-Os geochronology indicates that the West African craton has a depositional history that predates 1100 Ma and that ORS can be correlated on a basin-wide scale. In addition, the Re-Os depositional ages for the ORS of the Taoudeni basin are comparable to those of ORS from the São Francisco craton, suggesting that these cratons are correlatable. This postulate is further supported by identical Os i values for the Atar Group and the Vazante Group of the São Francisco craton.

  3. Eaglet property, southeastern British Columbia: Re-Os geochronology, sulphur isotopes, and thermobarometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hora, Z. D.; Stein, H.; Žák, Karel; Dobeš, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 1 (2018), s. 157-166 ISSN 0381-243X Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Eaglet deposit * MINFILE 093A 046 * fluorite * celestite * molybdenite * sulphur isotopes * Re-Os geochronology * fluid inclusion microthermobarometry Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology http://cmscontent.nrs.gov.bc.ca/geoscience/PublicationsCatalogue/Fieldwork/Documents/2017/P2018-1.pdf

  4. Temporal evolution of mineralization events in the Bohemian Massif inferred from the Re-Os geochronology of molybdenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Haluzová, Eva; Creaser, R. A.; Pašava, J.; Veselovský, F.; Breiter, Karel; Erban, V.; Drábek, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2017), s. 651-662 ISSN 0026-4598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Re-Os * geochronology * molybdenite * Bohemian Massif * granite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2016

  5. Evaluating the utility of hydrocarbons for Re-Os geochronology : establishing the timing of processes in petroleum ore systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.; Creaser, R.A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    2005-07-01

    Oil from 6 Alberta oil sands deposits were analyzed with a rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) isotope chronometer, an emerging tool for determining valuable age information on the timing of petroleum generation and migration. The tool uses molybdenite and other sulphide minerals to establish the timing and duration of mineralization. However, establishing the timing events of petroleum systems can be problematic because viable sulphides for the Re-Os chronometer are often not available. Therefore, the known presence of Re and Os associated with organic matter in black shale, a common source of hydrocarbons, may suggest that bitumen and petroleum common to petroleum systems may be utilised for Re-Os geochronology. This study evaluated the potential of the Re-Os isotopic system for geochronology and as an isotopic tracer for hydrocarbon systems. The evaluation was based on Re-Os isotopic analyses of bitumen and oil sands. Hydrocarbons formed from migrated oil in both Alberta oil sand deposits and a Paleozoic Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposit contain significant Re and Os contents with high {sup 187}Re/{sup 188}Os and radiogenic {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os ratios suitable for geochronology. The oil from the 6 Alberta oil sand deposits yields Re-Os analyses with very high Re/{sup 188}Os ratios, and radiogenic Os isotopic compositions. Regression of the Re-Os data yields a date of 116 {+-} 27 Ma. This date plausibly represents the period of in situ radiogenic growth of {sup 187}Os following hydrocarbon migration and reservoir filling. Therefore, directly dating these processes, and this formation age corresponds with recent burial history models for parts of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. The very high initial {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os for this regression requires rocks much older than Cretaceous for the hydrocarbon source.

  6. Re-Os ages for Archean molybdenite and pyrite, Kuittila-Kivisuo, Finland and Proterozoic molybdenite, Kabeliai, Lithuania: Testing the chronometer in a metamorphic and metasomatic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, H.J.; Sundblad, K.; Markey, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Motuza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Seven 187Re-187Os ages were determined for molybdenite and pyrite samples from two well-dated Precambrian intrusions in Fennoscandia to examine the sustainability of the Re-Os chronometer in a metamorphic and metasomatic setting. Using a new 187Re decay constant (1.666 x 10-11y-1) with a much improved uncertainty (±0.31%), we determined replicate Re-Os ages for molybdenite and pyrite from the Kuittila and Kivisuo prospects in easternmost Finland and for molybdenite from the Kabeliai prospect in southernmost Lithuania. These two localities contain some of the oldest and youngest plutonic activity in Fennoscandia and are associated with newly discovered economic Au mineralization (Ilomantsi, Finland) and a Cu-Mo prospect (Kabeliai, Lithuania). Two Re-Os ages for veinhosted Kabeliai molybdenite average 1486 ± 5 Ma, in excellent agreement with a 1505 ± 11 Ma U-Pb zircon age for the hosting Kabeliai granite pluton. The slightly younger age suggests the introduction of Cu-Mo mineralization by a later phase of the Kabeliai magmatic system. Mean Re-Os ages of 2778 ± 8 Ma and 2781 ± 8 Ma for Kuittila and Kivisuo molybdenites, respectively, are in reasonable agreement with a 2753 ± 5 Ma weighted mean U-Pb zircon age for hosting Kuittila tonalite. These Re-Os ages agree well with less precise ages of 2789 ± 290 Ma for a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron and 2771 ± 75 Ma for the average of six Sm-Nd T(DM) model ages for Kuittila tonalite. Three Re-Os analyses of a single pyrite mineral separate, from the same sample of Kuittila pluton that yielded a molybdenite separate, provide individual model ages of 2710 ± 27, 2777 ± 28, and 2830 ± 28 Ma (Re = 17.4, 12.1, and 8.4 ppb, respectively), with a mean value of 2770 ± 120 Ma in agreement with the Kuittila molybdenite age. The Re and 187Os abundances in these three pyrite splits are highly correlated (r = 0.9994), and provide a 187Re-187Os isochron age of 2607 ± 47 Ma with an intercept of 21 ppt 187Os (MSWD = 1.1). It appears

  7. Temporal evolution of mineralization events in the Bohemian Massif inferred from the Re-Os geochronology of molybdenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Haluzová, Eva; Creaser, Robert A.; Pašava, Jan; Veselovský, František; Breiter, Karel; Erban, Vojtěch; Drábek, Milan

    2017-06-01

    Molybdenite is a common mineral accompanying Sn-W, Au, and base metal mineralizations located in different geotectonic units of the Bohemian Massif, but it is also widespread in granitoids and/or related quartz veins/pegmatites forming disseminated Mo mineralization. Thirty Re-Os ages were obtained for molybdenite samples from the Bohemian Massif to provide constraints on the timing and duration of mineralization event(s) within the framework of previously published geochronological data for the host and/or associated rocks. The obtained data for Sn-W-(Li) deposits in the Erzgebirge metallogenetic province indicate the predominance of one and/or multiple short-time mineralization events taking place between ˜319 and 323 Ma, with the exception of the Krupka deposit associated with the Altenberg-Teplice caldera where the data may suggest prolonged activity until ˜315 Ma. The ages of the Pb-Zn-(Au-Mo) Hůrky u Rakovníka and Fe-Cu-As Obří důl mineralizations from the exocontacts of the Čistá pluton and Krkonoše-Jizera Plutonic Complex, respectively, provide evidence for synchronous emplacement of the ore and the associated granitic rocks. In contrast, the Padrť Fe-As-Mo mineralization postdates the age of the associated Padrť granite. Disseminated Mo mineralization in Cadomian and Variscan granitoids and/or related to quartz veins/pegmatites provides Re-Os ages that overlap with the previously published geochronological data for the host rocks, suggesting coeval evolution. Molybdenite samples from the Sázava suite granites of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC) have resolvable younger ages than their host granites, but similar to the age of spatially related Au mineralization which is associated with the latest evolution of the CBPC.

  8. Fluid inclusion characteristics and molybdenite Re-Os geochronology of the Qulong porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Selby, David; Feely, Martin; Costanzo, Alessandra; Li, Xian-Hua

    2017-02-01

    The Qulong porphyry copper and molybdenum deposit is located at the southwest margin of the Lhasa Terrane and in the eastern region of the Gangdese magmatic belt. It represents China's largest porphyry copper system, with ˜2200 million tonnes of ore comprising 0.5 % Cu and 0.03 % Mo. The mineralization is associated with Miocene granodiorite, monzogranite and quartz-diorite units, which intruded into Jurassic volcanic units in a post-collisional (Indian-Asian) tectonic setting. Field observations and core logging demonstrate the alteration and mineralization at Qulong are akin to typical porphyry copper systems in subduction settings, which comprise similar magmatic-hydrothermal, potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration assemblages. Molybdenite Re-Os geochronology confirms the relative timeframe defined by field observations and core logging and indicates that the bulk copper and molybdenum at Qulong were deposited within 350,000 years: between 16.10 ± 0.06 [0.08] (without and with decay constant uncertainty) and 15.88 ± 0.06 [0.08] Ma. This duration for mineralization is in direct contrast to a long-lived intrusive episode associated with mineralization based on previous zircon U-Pb data. Our fluid inclusion study indicates that the ore-forming fluid was oxidized and contained Na, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Mo, Cl and S. The magmatic-hydrothermal transition occurred at ˜425 °C under lithostatic pressure, while potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration occurred at hydrostatic pressure with temperature progressively decreasing from 425 to 280 °C. The fluid inclusion data presented here suggests that there has been ˜2.3 km of erosion at Qulong after its formation, and this erosion may be related to regional uplift of the Lhasa Terrane.

  9. Multiple episodes of mineralization revealed by Re-Os molybdenite geochronology in the Lala Fe-Cu deposit, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhimin; Tan, Hongqi; Liu, Yingdong; Li, Chao

    2018-03-01

    The Lala Fe-Cu deposit is one of the largest iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits in the Kangdian copper belt, southwest China. The paragenetic sequence of the Lala deposit includes six hydrothermal stages: pre-ore pervasive Na alteration (I); magnetite stage with K-feldspar and apatite (II); polymetallic disseminated/massive magnetite-sulfide stage (III); banded magnetite-sulfide stage (IV); sulfide vein stage (V); and late quartz-carbonate vein stage (VI). Fifteen molybdenite separates from stages III to VI were analyzed for Re-Os dating. Our new Re-Os data, together with previous studies, identify four distinct hydrothermal events at the Lala deposit. Molybdenite from the stage III disseminated to massive chalcopyrite-magnetite ores yielded a weighted average Re-Os age of 1306 ± 8 Ma (MSWD = 1.1, n = 6) which represents the timing of main ore formation. Molybdenite from the stage IV-banded magnetite-chalcopyrite ores yielded a weighted average Re-Os age of 1086 ± 8 Ma (MSWD = 2.2, n = 7), i.e., a second ore-forming event. Molybdenite from the stage V sulfide veins yielded a weighted average Re-Os age of 988 ± 8 Ma (MSWD = 1.3, n = 7) which represents the timing of a third hydrothermal event. Molybdenite from the quartz-carbonate veins (stage VI) yielded a weighted average Re-Os age at 835 ± 4 Ma (MSWD = 0.66, n = 10) and documented the timing of a late hydrothermal event. Our results indicate that the Lala deposit formed during multiple, protracted mineralization events over several hundred million years. The first three Mesoproterozoic mineralization events are coeval with intra-continental rifting (breakup of the supercontinent Nuna) and share a temporal link to other IOCG-style deposits within the Kangdian Copper Belt, and the last Neoproterozoic hydrothermal event is coeval with the Sibao orogeny which culminated with the amalgamation of the Yangtze Block with the Cathaysia Block at 860-815 Ma.

  10. Origin of the volcanic-hosted Yamansu Fe deposit, Eastern Tianshan, NW China: constraints from pyrite Re-Os isotopes, stable isotopes, and in situ magnetite trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Beaudoin, Georges; Gao, Jian-Feng; Qi, Liang; Lyu, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The Yamansu Fe deposit (32 Mt at 51% Fe) in the Eastern Tianshan Orogenic Belt of NW China is hosted in early Carboniferous volcano-sedimentary rocks and spatially associated with skarn. The paragenetic sequence includes garnet-diopside (I), magnetite (II), hydrous silicate-sulfide (III), and calcite-quartz (IV) stages. Pyrite associated with magnetite has a Re-Os isochron age of 322 ± 7 Ma, which represents the timing of pyrite and, by inference, magnetite mineralization. Pyrite has δ 34SVCDT values of - 2.2 to + 2.9‰, yielding δ 34SH2S values of - 3.1 to 2‰, indicating the derivation of sulfur from a magmatic source. Calcite from stages II and IV has δ 13CVPDB values from - 2.5 to - 1.2‰, and - 1.1 to 1.1‰, and δ 18OVSMOW values from 11.8 to 12.0‰ and - 7.7 to - 5.2‰, respectively. Calculated δ 13C values of fluid CO2 and water δ 18O values indicate that stage II hydrothermal fluids were derived from magmatic rocks and that meteoric water mixed with the hydrothermal fluids in stage IV. Some ores contain magnetite with obvious chemical zoning composed of dark and light domains in BSE images. Dark domains have higher Mg, Al, Ca, Mn, and Ti but lower Fe and Cr contents than light domains. The chemical zoning resulted from a fluctuating fluid composition and/or physicochemical conditions (oscillatory zoning), or dissolution-precipitation (irregular zoning) via infiltration of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids diluted by late meteoric water. Iron was mainly derived from fluids similar to that in skarn deposits.

  11. Re-Os dating on pyrite and metal sources tracing in porphyry-type and neutral epithermal deposits: example of the Bolcana, Troita and Magura deposits, Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardon, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Many porphyry-type (Cu-Au) and neutral epithermal (Pb-Zn and Au ± Ag) ore deposits are encountered in the region of the Apuseni Mountains, located at the foot of the Carpathian chain in the Western Romania. These deposits are related to a Neogene andesitic volcanism. In order to demonstrate possible genetic relationships between the porphyry-type and neutral epithermal deposits, the Bolcana porphyry has been investigated since it is surrounded by a number of epithermal low-sulfidation veins with a Pb-Zn ± Au mineralisation. These veins are currently mined at the Troita and Magura sites. A structural analysis and a 3D modelling pf these deposits indicate that the geometry and orientation of fractures and mineralized vein are consistent both with direction of regional extension and with a NW-SE progression of the different andesitic intrusions. In order to establish precisely the temporal relationship between the different ore deposits, a Re-Os dating method has been developed and applied on pyrite which is ubiquitous in all of the deposits. This method enabled us to assign an age of 10.9 ± 1.9 Ma for the porphyry-hosted mineralization. The ages obtained for the epithermal systems are somewhat approximative as perturbations of the Re-Os system are observed for these environments. A fractionation of rhenium responsible for a significant enrichment in this element for the apical zone of the porphyry has been demonstrated. This enrichment is most probably related to a maximum boiling event, which may also explain a similar enrichment in arsenic for the pyrite in the same zone. The sources for the metals have been characterized at the district scale by combining two isotopic systems (Re-Os and Pb-Pb) on both pyrite and galena. The osmium data indicate that the Troita deposit has composition which is similar to that of the Bolcana porphyry. In contrast the results obtained for the Magura deposits indicate the Re-OS system has in this case been perturbed due to a

  12. Re-Os Geochronology Pins Age and Os Isotope Composition of Middle Triassic Black Shales and Seawater, Barents Sea and Spitsbergen (Svalbard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Hannah, J. L.; Bingen, B.; Stein, H. J.; Yang, G.; Zimmerman, A.; Weitschat, W.; Weiss, H. M.

    2008-12-01

    Absolute age control throughout the Triassic is extraordinarily sparse. Two "golden spikes" have been added recently (http://www.stratigraphy.org/cheu.pdf) within the otherwise unconstrained Triassic, but ages of stage boundaries remain controversial. Here we report two Re-Os isochrons for Anisian (Middle Triassic) black shales from outcrop in western Svalbard and drill core from the Svalis Dome about 600 km to the SE in the Barents Sea. Black shales of the Blanknuten Member, Botneheia Formation, from the type section at Botneheia, western Spitsbergen (Svalbard), have total organic carbon (TOC) contents of 2.6 to 6.0 wt%. Rock-Eval data suggest moderately mature (Tmax = 440-450° C) Type II-III kerogens (Hydrogen Index (HI) = 232-311 mg HC/g TOC). Re-Os data yield a well-constrained Model 3 age of 241 Ma and initial 187Os/188Os (Osi) of 0.83 (MSWD = 16, n = 6). Samples of the possibly correlative Steinkobbe Formation from IKU core hole 7323/07-U-04 into the Svalis Dome in the Barents Sea (at about 73°30'N, 23°15'E) have TOC contents of 1.4 to 2.4%. Rock-Eval data suggest immature (Tmax = 410-430°) Type II-III kerogens (HI = 246-294 mg HC/g TOC). Re-Os data yield a precise Model 1 age of 239 Ma and Osi of 0.776 (MSWD = 0.2, n = 5). The sampled section of Blanknuten shale underlies a distinctive Frechitas (formerly Ptychites) layer, and is therefore assumed to be middle Anisian. The Steinkobbe core was sampled at 99-100 m, just above the Olenekian-Anisian transition. It is therefore assumed to be lower Anisian. The two isochron ages overlap within uncertainty, and fall within constraints provided by biozones and the current ICS-approved stage boundary ages. The Re-Os ages support the correlation of the Botneheia and Steinkobbe formations. The nearly identical Osi ratios suggest regional homogeneity of seawater and provide new information for the Os seawater curve, marking a relatively high 187Os/188Os ratio during profound ocean anoxia in the Middle Triassic.

  13. Geology and Re-Os molybdenite geochronology of the Kurišková U-Mo deposit (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohút, M.; Trubač, J.; Novotný, L.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Demko, R.; Bartalský, B.; Erban, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2013), s. 271-282 ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : U–Mo ore deposit * Re–Os * molybdenite geochronology * genetic model * Gemeric Unit * Western Carpathians Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.744, year: 2013

  14. Zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os geochronology and geological significance of the Baoshan porphyry Cu polymetallic deposit in Jiangxi province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Liqiong; Wang, Liang

    2017-10-01

    Baoshan porphyry Cu polymetallic deposit belongs to Jiujiang-Ruichang Cu-Au ore field, which is a component part of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Cu-Au metallogenic belt. The U-Pb LA-MC-TCP MS dating of the zircons from Baoshan granodiorite porphyry yields an age of 147.81±0.48Ma (MSWD=1.07). Six molybdenite samples separated from Baoshan deposit are used for Re-Os dating and obtained the weighted average age of 147.42±0.84Ma and an isochron age of 147.7±1.2Ma. These ages suggest that the mineralization in the Baoshan deposit is genetically associated to the granodiorite porphyry, and the process of rock-and ore-forming is continuous. These data indicate that ages of intrusion and ore-body from Baoshan deposit are almost identical to other typical magmatic intrusion and deposits in Jiujiang-Ruichang metallogenic district. Tt is inferred that the Baoshan deposit was formed in the transition from EW-striking Tndosinian tectonic domain to NE-striking Paleo-Pacific tectonic domain.

  15. U-Pb, Re-Os, and Ar/Ar geochronology of rare earth element (REE)-rich breccia pipes and associated host rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Pea Ridge Fe-REE-Au deposit, St. Francois Mountains, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Selby, David; Slack, John F.; Day, Warren C.; Pillers, Renee M.; Cosca, Michael A.; Seeger, Cheryl; Fanning, C. Mark; Samson, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-rich breccia pipes (600,000 t @ 12% rare earth oxides) are preserved along the margins of the 136-million metric ton (Mt) Pea Ridge magnetite-apatite deposit, within Mesoproterozoic (~1.47 Ga) volcanic-plutonic rocks of the St. Francois Mountains terrane in southeastern Missouri, United States. The breccia pipes cut the rhyolite-hosted magnetite deposit and contain clasts of nearly all local bedrock and mineralized lithologies.Grains of monazite and xenotime were extracted from breccia pipe samples for SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology; both minerals were also dated in one polished thin section. Monazite forms two morphologies: (1) matrix granular grains composed of numerous small (minerals includes Re-Os on fine-grained molybdenite and 40Ar/39Ar on muscovite, biotite, and K-feldspar.Ages (±2σ errors) obtained by SHRIMP U-Pb analysis are as follows: (1) zircon from the two host rhyolite samples have ages of 1473.6 ± 8.0 and 1472.7 ± 5.6 Ma; most zircon in late felsic dikes is interpreted as xenocrystic (age range ca. 1522–1455 Ma); a population of rare spongy zircon is likely of igneous origin and yields an age of 1441 ± 9 Ma; (2) pale-yellow granular monazite—1464.9 ± 3.3 Ma (no dated xenotime); (3) reddish matrix granular monazite—1462.0 ± 3.5 Ma and associated xenotime—1453 ± 11 Ma; (4) coarse glassy-yellow monazite—1464.8 ± 2.1, 1461.7 ± 3.7 Ma, with rims at 1447.2 ± 4.7 Ma; and (5) matrix monazite (in situ)—1464.1 ± 3.6 and 1454.6 ± 9.6 Ma, and matrix xenotime (in situ)—1468.0 ± 8.0 Ma. Two slightly older ages of cores are about 1478 Ma. The young age of rims on the coarse glassy monazite coincides with an Re-Os age of 1440.6 ± 9.2 Ma determined in this study for molybdenite intergrown with quartz and allanite, and with the age of monazite inclusions in apatite from the magnetite ore (Neymark et al., 2016). A 40Ar/39Ar age of 1473 ± 1 Ma was obtained for muscovite from a breccia pipe sample.Geochronology and

  16. Zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os geochronology and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic constraints on the genesis of the Xuejiping porphyry copper deposit in Zhongdian, Northwest Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Cheng-Biao; Zhang, Xing-Chun; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Wang, Shou-Xu; Zhong, Hong; Wang, Wai-Quan; Bi, Xian-Wu

    2012-10-01

    The Xuejiping porphyry copper deposit is located in northwestern Yunnan Province, China. Tectonically, it lies in the southern part of the Triassic Yidun island arc. The copper mineralization is mainly hosted in quartz-dioritic and quartz-monzonitic porphyries which intruded into clastic-volcanic rocks of the Late Triassic Tumugou Formation. There are several alteration zones including potassic, strong silicific and phyllic, argillic, and propylitic alteration zones from inner to outer of the mineralized porphyry bodies. The ages of ore-bearing quartz-monzonitic porphyry and its host andesite are obtained by using the zircon SIMS U-Pb dating method, with results of 218.3 ± 1.6 Ma (MSWD = 0.31, N = 15) and 218.5 ± 1.6 Ma (MSWD = 0.91, N = 16), respectively. Meanwhile, the molybdenite Re-Os dating yields a Re-Os isochronal age of 221.4 ± 2.3 Ma (MSWD = 0.54, N = 5) and a weighted mean age of 219.9 ± 0.7 Ma (MSWD = 0.88). They are quite in accordance with the zircon U-Pb ages within errors. Furthermore, all of them are contemporary with the timing of the Garzê-Litang oceanic crust subduction in the Yidun arc. Therefore, the Xuejiping deposit could be formed in a continental margin setting. There are negative ɛNd(t) values ranging from -3.8 to -2.1 and relatively high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7051 to 0.7059 for the Xuejiping porphyries and host andesites. The (206Pb/204Pb)t, (207Pb/204Pb)t and (208Pb/204Pb)t values of the Xuejiping porphyries and host andesites vary from 17.899 to 18.654, from 15.529 to 15.626, and from 37.864 to 38.52, respectively, indicative of high radiogenic Pb isotopic features. In situ Hf isotopic analyses on zircons by using LA-MC-ICP-MS exhibit that there are quite uniform and slightly positive ɛHf(t) values ranging from -0.2 to +3.2 (mostly between 0 and +2), corresponding to relatively young single-stage Hf model ages from 735 Ma to 871 Ma. These isotopic features suggest that the primary magmas of the Xuejiping porphyries and

  17. The Re/Os Clock Revisited

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the proposed project of an accurate measurement of the relevant neutron cross sections of $^{186}$Os and $^{187}$Os is to remove the principal nuclear physics uncertainties in the analysis of the Re/Os cosmochronometer. The necessary cross section information will be obtained in complementary experiments at the nTOF facility at CERN and at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator. Transformation of these results into significantly improved stellar reaction rates will allow to evaluate the age of the elements in the framework of galactic chemical evolution models.

  18. Behavior of Re and Os during contact between an aqueous solution and oil: Consequences for the application of the Re-Os geochronometer to petroleum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdaoui, Fatima; Michels, Raymond; Reisberg, Laurie; Pujol, Magali; Poirier, Yannick

    2015-06-01

    Several recent studies have raised the exciting possibility that oils can be dated using the Re-Os radioisotope system. However the exact nature of the events dated by this technique often remains unclear. Geochronologic interpretation of Re-Os data for oils is hampered by our limited knowledge of how these metals behave in petroleum systems. In particular, it is difficult to understand how isotopic homogenization, an essential prerequisite for the development of an isochronal relationship, can be achieved at the scale of a petroleum basin. The mechanisms capable of fractionating the Re/Os ratio in a suite of oils are also poorly understood. For this reason, we have performed an experimental study aimed at investigating the behavior of Re and Os during a particularly widespread phenomenon in petroleum systems, the interaction of formation waters with oils during migration. Contact experiments between natural oils and aqueous solutions enriched in Re and/or Os were carried out for varying lengths of time (6 h to 5 months), at different temperatures (25-150 °C), over a wide range of metal concentrations in the enriched solution (0.001-100 μg/g for Re; 1 and 10 ng/g for Os). In addition, the effect of oil composition on Re-Os exchange at the water-oil interface was examined by testing two oils with very different properties. All of our results demonstrate that Re and Os are transferred massively and very rapidly from the aqueous solution to the organic phase. This is true regardless of temperature or oil composition. It is also true for a very wide range of metal concentrations in the aqueous solution, up to an apparent saturation level that exceeds natural concentrations in oils by several orders of magnitude. Given the efficiency of Re and Os transfer from water to oil demonstrated here, and assuming that our findings are applicable to natural conditions, water/oil ratios of only about 250 would be needed to explain the Re and Os contents of most oils, based on

  19. Dissecting the Re-Os molybdenite geochronometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur; Reich, Martin; Kilburn, Matt R; Guagliardo, Paul; Roberts, Malcolm P

    2017-11-22

    Rhenium and osmium isotopes have been used for decades to date the formation of molybdenite (MoS 2 ), a common mineral in ore deposits and the world's main source of molybdenum and rhenium. Understanding the distribution of parent 187 Re and radiogenic daughter 187 Os isotopes in molybdenite is critical in interpreting isotopic measurements because it can compromise the accurate determination and interpretation of mineralization ages. In order to resolve the controls on the distribution of these elements, chemical and isotope mapping of MoS 2 grains from representative porphyry copper-molybdenum deposits were performed using electron microprobe and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Our results show a heterogeneous distribution of 185,187 Re and 192 Os isotopes in MoS 2 , and that both 187 Re and 187 Os isotopes are not decoupled as previously thought. We conclude that Re and Os are structurally bound or present as nanoparticles in or next to molybdenite grains, recording a complex formation history and hindering the use of microbeam techniques for Re-Os molybdenite dating. Our study opens new avenues to explore the effects of isotope nuggeting in geochronometers.

  20. Neutron experiment for the Re/Os cosmochronometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, M.; Masaki, T.; Temma, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Shima, T.; Makii, H.; Mishima, K.; Ueda, H.; Igashira, M.; Ohsaki, T.; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2005-01-01

    We should clarify several problems for the Re-Os pair to be used as one of the good cosmochronometers. First, since 187 Os is formed and depleted by sequential neutron capture in stars, the effects should be corrected. Second, 187 Os is depleted by the neutron capture process through the excited state at 10 keV. It is very important to find a proper way to correct for the s-process contribution in deducing the age of the Galaxy. In order to correct for the effect mentioned above and to determine the age of the universe, we are planning to measure the neutron capture cross section of the first excited state (E excited =10 keV) of 187 Os, which is one of the key parameters in deducing the age of the Galaxy using the Re-Os cosmochronometer. In order to deduce the cross section we are preparing various detectors using a newly developed experimental method. In the present paper I briefly describe our experimental methods to accurately determine the neutron capture cross section of the first excited state of 187 Os. (author)

  1. Insights into Andean metallogenesis from the perspective of Re-Os analyses of sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.; Ruiz, J.R; Munizaga, F.M

    2001-01-01

    The source of metals and duration of mineralization for ore deposits are basic issues used to describe the metallogenesis of an area. In order to address these fundamental issues in the Andean Cordillera, we chose to analyze Re-Os isotopes in sulfides from twelve porphyry copper ore deposits that are spatially and temporally separated. Re-Os concentrates in sulfide minerals, and can thus provide genetic information on the source of metals and the timing of mineralization. The advantage of using Re-Os isotopes is that genetic and geochronologic information is obtained directly from the sulfide ore mineral, rather than by inferring chemical relationships from possibly unrelated alteration silicates. In this study we use the source of Os in low concentration sulfides as a proxy for the source of base metals. Initial ratios greater than the chondritic mantle (∼0.13) serve as indication of a crustal source for Os and, by inference, other ore forming metals. Molybdenite contains orders of magnitude more Re than the common sulfides and effectively no initial radiogenic 187 Os (Luck and Allegre, 1982). Therefore, it can be used as a high-precision geochronometer (McCandless, 1994; Stein et al. 1997). Re-Os data from low concentration sulfides and chronologic data from high concentration molybdenites highlight important processes within and among these Andean deposits.The low concentration sulfides contain between 5-30 ppt Os and 1- 30 ppb Re. There are two samples of hydrothermal and magmatic magnetite from Escondida that contain slightly more Re and Os than the other sulfides reported. The molybdenites have 187 Os concentrations that range from 5-2000 ppb, and Re concentrations that range from 60-3600 ppm. Mathur et al. (2000) and Mathur (2000) highlighted a strong relationship between the copper tonnage in Andean ore deposits and the Os initial ratio of sulfide minerals. The larger deposits have sulfide minerals with lower initial Os ratios than the smaller, less

  2. Late Carboniferous porphyry copper mineralization at La Voluntad, Neuquén, Argentina: Constraints from Re-Os molybdenite dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Mirta; Barra, Fernando; Domínguez, Eduardo; Ruiz, Joaquin; Valencia, Victor A.

    2008-07-01

    The La Voluntad porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in Neuquén, Argentina, is one of several poorly known porphyry-type deposits of Paleozoic to Early Jurassic age in the central and southern Andes. Mineralization at La Voluntad is related to a tonalite porphyry from the Chachil Plutonic Complex that intruded metasedimentary units of the Piedra Santa Complex. Five new Re-Os molybdenite ages from four samples representing three different vein types (i.e., quartz-molybdenite, quartz-sericite-molybdenite and quartz-sericite-molybdenite ± chalcopyrite-pyrite) are identical within error and were formed between ~312 to ~316 Ma. Rhenium and Os concentrations range between 34 to 183 ppm and 112 to 599 ppb, respectively. The new Re-Os ages indicate that the main mineralization event at La Voluntad, associated to sericitic alteration, was emplaced during a time span of 1.7 ± 3.2 Ma and that the deposit is Carboniferous in age, not Permian as previously thought. La Voluntad is the oldest porphyry copper deposit so far recognized in the Andes and indicates the presence of an active magmatic arc, with associated porphyry style mineralization, at the proto-Pacific margin of Gondwana during the Early Pennsylvanian.

  3. A multi-radioisotope approach to dating sedimentation : applying Re-Os organic-rich shale and U-Pb authigenic xenotime dating to the Shannon and Pennine Basins

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislawska, Maja Anna

    2013-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks are the most abundant hthologies on the Earth, covering over 70% of the planet’s surface. Quantitative dating of sedimentary rocks (especially those devoid of fossils) is critical to understanding the past events and rates and duration of processes that shaped the Earth. Recent advances in geochronology of sedimentary rocks, such as Re-Os dating of organic-rich shales and U-Pb dating of authigenic xenotime, allow precise depositional and early diagenetic ages to be obtained,...

  4. Re/Os cosmochronometer: measurement of neutron cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosconi, M.

    2007-01-01

    This experimental work is devoted to the improved assessment of the Re/Os cosmochronometer. The dating technique is based on the decay of 187 Re (t 1/2 =41.2 Gyr) into 187 Os and determines the age of the universe by the time of onset of nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis mechanisms, which are responsible for the 187 Re/ 187 Os pair, provide the possibility to identify the radiogenic fraction of 187 Os exclusively by nuclear physics considerations. Apart from its radiogenic component, 187 Os can be synthesized otherwise only by the s process, which means that this missing fraction can be reliably determined and subtracted by proper s-process modeling. On the other hand, 187 Re is almost completely produced by the r process. The only information needed for the interpretation as a cosmic clock is the production rate of 187 Re as a function of time. The accuracy of the s-process calculations that are needed to determine the nucleosynthetic abundance of 187 Os depends on the quality of the neutron capture cross sections averaged over the thermal neutron spectrum at the s-process sites. Laboratory measurements of these cross sections have to be corrected for the effect of nuclear levels, which can be significantly populated at the high stellar temperatures during the s process. The neutron capture cross sections of 186 Os, 187 Os and 188 Os have been measured at the CERN n TOF facility in the range between 0.7 eV and 1 MeV. From these data, Maxwellian averaged cross sections have been determined for thermal energies from 5 to 100 keV with an accuracy around 4%, 3%, and 5% for 186 Os, 187 Os, and 188 Os, respectively. Since, the first excited state in 187 Os occurs at 9.75 keV, the cross section of this isotope requires a substantial correction for thermal population of low lying nuclear levels. This effect has been evaluated on the basis of resonance data derived in the (n, γ) experiments and by an improved measurements of the inelastic scattering cross section for

  5. Re/Os cosmochronometer: measurement of neutron cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, M.

    2007-12-21

    This experimental work is devoted to the improved assessment of the Re/Os cosmochronometer. The dating technique is based on the decay of {sup 187}Re (t{sub 1/2}=41.2 Gyr) into {sup 187}Os and determines the age of the universe by the time of onset of nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis mechanisms, which are responsible for the {sup 187}Re/{sup 187}Os pair, provide the possibility to identify the radiogenic fraction of {sup 187}Os exclusively by nuclear physics considerations. Apart from its radiogenic component, {sup 187}Os can be synthesized otherwise only by the s process, which means that this missing fraction can be reliably determined and subtracted by proper s-process modeling. On the other hand, {sup 187}Re is almost completely produced by the r process. The only information needed for the interpretation as a cosmic clock is the production rate of {sup 187}Re as a function of time. The accuracy of the s-process calculations that are needed to determine the nucleosynthetic abundance of {sup 187}Os depends on the quality of the neutron capture cross sections averaged over the thermal neutron spectrum at the s-process sites. Laboratory measurements of these cross sections have to be corrected for the effect of nuclear levels, which can be significantly populated at the high stellar temperatures during the s process. The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 186}Os, {sup 187}Os and {sup 188}Os have been measured at the CERN n TOF facility in the range between 0.7 eV and 1 MeV. From these data, Maxwellian averaged cross sections have been determined for thermal energies from 5 to 100 keV with an accuracy around 4%, 3%, and 5% for {sup 186}Os, {sup 187}Os, and {sup 188}Os, respectively. Since, the first excited state in {sup 187}Os occurs at 9.75 keV, the cross section of this isotope requires a substantial correction for thermal population of low lying nuclear levels. This effect has been evaluated on the basis of resonance data derived in the (n, {gamma

  6. Comparison of Os-Os and Re-Os dating results of molybdenites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhi; Sun Weidong; Chen Jiangfeng

    2002-01-01

    Two molybdenite samples from the Middle-Low Reaches of the Yangtze River were dated by both Os-Os and Re-Os methods. Os-Os and Re-Os dating give identical age results for the two samples. An experiment of step distillation of Os-Os method suggests that no isotopic fractionation is observed between fractions obtained by the experiment. The results prove that the Os-Os method can avoid the problems in the Re-Os method, simplify the experimental procedure, give creditable age data, and have unique advantage that no quantitative extracting of Os is required

  7. Hydrocarbons dating by Re-Os method: experimental study of the Re-Os couple geochemical behaviour in oils during the evolution of a petroleum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdaoui, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    The Re-Os radiogenic system is well adapted to the dating of oils and bitumen. However the meaning of the obtained age is ambiguous. This is mainly due to gaps in our knowledge of the geochemical behavior and the speciation of Re and Os in oils. Specifically, use of the Re-Os geo-chronometer requires an understanding of how Re-Os behavior can lead to the fulfillment of the conditions necessary for the development of an isochron. These conditions are: i) the isotopic homogenization of oils at the scale of a petroleum field ii) the fractionation of Re from Os so as to obtain samples with various Re/Os ratios iii) the closure of the system during the period of radiogenic ingrowth of the daughter isotope, that is, from the time of the event of interest to the present day. Experimental investigation of the organic geochemical behavior of Re and Os in oils under various conditions, designed as analogs of the different stages of petroleum generation and evolution, were performed in order to evaluate the use of the Re-Os system as a geo-chronometer in the context of a direct use on petroleum. The possibility of Re-Os fractionation resulting from asphaltene loss during oil evolution was investigated by sequential asphaltene precipitation in the laboratory. This study determined that Re and Os are mainly located in the most polar asphaltene fractions, that is, in the first to precipitate. This study also demonstrated that Re/Os ratios are not disturbed by asphaltene loss during the evolution of oils, unless this loss is unrealistically large. Thus asphaltene precipitation during migration and emplacement is not responsible for the Re/Os fractionation required for the use of the geo-chronometer. The possibility of metal transfer from formation waters to petroleum was studied by performing contact experiments between oils and aqueous solutions of Re and Os of various concentrations over a wide range of temperatures and for varying periods of time. This study demonstrated a

  8. Thermal decomposition of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Popovic, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of natural pyrite (cubic, FeS 2 ) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of pyrite ore from different sources showed the presence of associated minerals, such as quartz, szomolnokite, stilbite or stellerite, micas and hematite. Hematite, maghemite and pyrrhotite were detected as thermal decomposition products of natural pyrite. The phase composition of the thermal decomposition products depends on the terature, time of heating and starting size of pyrite chrystals. Hematite is the end product of the thermal decomposition of natural pyrite. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Preparation and certification of Re-Os dating reference materials: Molybdenites HLP and JDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, A.; Wu, S.; Sun, D.; Wang, Shaoming; Qu, W.; Markey, R.; Stain, H.; Morgan, J.; Malinovskiy, D.

    2004-01-01

    Two Re-Os dating reference material molybdenites were prepared. Molybdenite JDC and molybdenite HLP are from a carbonate vein-type molybdenum-(lead)- uranium deposit in the Jinduicheng-Huanglongpu area of Shaanxi province, China. The samples proved to be homogeneous, based on the coefficient of variation of analytical results and an analysis of variance test. The sampling weight was 0.1 g for JDC and 0.025 g for HLP. An isotope dilution method was used for the determination of Re and Os. Sample decomposition and preconcentration of Re and Os prior to measurement were accomplished using a variety of methods: acid digestion, alkali fusion, ion exchange and solvent extraction. Negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry were used for the determination of Re and 187Os concentration and isotope ratios. The certified values include the contents of Re and Os and the model ages. For HLP, the Re content was 283.8 ?? 6.2 ??g g-1, 187Os was 659 ?? 14 ng g-1 and the Re-Os model age was 221.4 ?? 5.6 Ma. For JDC, the Re content was 17.39 ?? 0.32 ng g-1, 187Os was 25.46 ?? 0.60 ng g-1 and the Re-Os model age was 139.6 ?? 3.8 Ma. Uncertainties for both certified reference materials are stated at the 95% level of confidence. Three laboratories (from three countries: P.R. China, USA, Sweden) joined in the certification programme. These certified reference materials are primarily useful for Re-Os dating of molybdenite, sulfides, black shale, etc.

  10. The way to overcome the difficulty in Re-Os dating of molybdenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masuda, Akimasa

    1990-01-01

    When a molybdenite was dissolved and treated by the conventional chemical procedure, it was difficult to achieve the isotopic equilibrium between the 187 Os radiogenically accumulated in the molybdenite and 'common' Os added as a kind of internal standard, even after chemically complete decomposition. It is evident that this isotopic disequilibrium effect results in deterioration of Re-Os age for the molybdenite. A newly developed analytical technique employing a microwave digestion was found out to promote the isotopic equilibration of Os from two sources and to provide us with the ages concordant with those obtained by other geochronometers. (author)

  11. Re-Os Isotopic Constraints on the Chemical Evolution and Differentiation of the Martian Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Alan D.; Walker, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The (187)Re-187Os isotopic systematics of SNC meteorites, thought to be from Mars, provide valuable information regarding the chemical processes that affected the Martian mantle, particularly with regard to the relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE). Previously published data (Birck and Allegre 1994, Brandon et al. 2000), and new data obtained since these studies, indicate that the HSE and Os isotopic composition of the Martian mantle was primarily set in its earliest differentiation history. If so, then these meteorites provide key constraints on the processes that lead to variation in HSE observed in not only Mars, but also Earth, the Moon and other rocky bodies in the Solar System. Processes that likely have an effect on the HSE budgets of terrestrial mantles include core formation, magma ocean crystallization, development of juvenile crust, and the addition of a late veneer. Each of these processes will result in different HSE variation and the isotopic composition of mantle materials and mantle derived lavas. Two observations on the SNC data to present provide a framework for which to test the importance of each of these processes. First, the concentrations of Re and Os in SNC meteorites indicate that they are derived from a mantle that has similar concentrations to the Earth's mantle. Such an observation is consistent with a model where a chondritic late veneer replenished the Earth and Martian mantles subsequent to core formation on each planet. Alternative models to explain this observation do exist, but will require additional data to test the limitations of each. Second, Re-Os isotopic results from Brandon et al. (2000) and new data presented here, show that initial yos correlates with variations in the short-lived systems of (182)Hf- (182)W and (142)Sm-142Nd in the SNC meteorites (epsilon(sub W) and epsilon(sub 142Nd)). These systematics require an isolation of mantle reservoirs during the earliest differentiation history of Mars, and

  12. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatterer, Jörg C.; Wieder, Matthew S.; Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois; Brenowitz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated · OH footprinting. ► Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. ► High · OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels–Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ( · OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS 2 ) can produce sufficient · OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels–Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C–C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme’s active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels–Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to · OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop’s flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated · OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  13. A Re-Os Study of Depleted Trench Peridotites from Northern Mariana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T.; Snow, J. E.; Heri, A. R.; Brandon, A. D.; Ishizuka, O.

    2017-12-01

    Trench peridotites provide information about the influence of subduction initiation on the extent of mantle wedge melting. They preserve melting records throughout subduction history, and as a result, likely experience multiple melt extraction events leading to successive depletion of melt/fluid mobile major and trace elements. To track melting histories of trench peridotites, Re-Os and PGEs can be used as reliable tracers to constrain early melt extraction or re-fertilization events. The Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, being the largest intra-oceanic subduction system, provides an excellent area to study the formation of supra-subduction zone mantle and crust. Residual peridotite (harzburgite and dunite) samples were collected by dredging from the landward slope of the northern Mariana Trench. The samples are serpentinized to various extents (typical of abyssal peridotites), leaving behind relict grains of spinel, enstatite and olivine embedded within a serpentine matrix along with occasional interstitial diopside. Major element analyses of primary minerals reveal a wide range of variations in Cr# of spinels from 0.31-0.85 indicating 16-20% of melt fraction with dunites apparently experiencing the highest amount of partial melting. For Re-Os and PGE geochemistry, samples with high amounts of spinel (>4 vol %) and variable Cr# were chosen. Initial results show that bulk rock 187Os/188Os ratios range from 0.1113 to 0.1272. All of the samples are sub-chondritic, but in some cases, they are more radiogenic than average abyssal peridotites. Os abundances vary from 1-9 ppb. Sub-chondritic values can be attributed to the samples having evolved from a Re-depleted mantle source indicating a previous melt-extraction event. The cpx-harzburgites, having lower Cr# ( 0.4) are more radiogenic than ultra depleted dunites (Cr# 0.8), which might indicate preferential removal of Os during an apparent higher degree of partial melting experienced by dunites. The higher 187Os/188Os ratios of

  14. Re-Os dating of molybdenites from Southern India: implication for Pan-African metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, M.; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masuda, Akimasa

    1994-01-01

    Rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) dating of two molybdenite samples from the alkali granite and pegmatite of Ambalavayal in northern Kerala (S. India) yielded ages of 567 ±28 Ma and 566±77 Ma, respectively. These ages closely compare with the previously determined Rb-Sr whole rock age of 595±20 Ma Rb-Sr for granite, and K-Ar biotite age of 560±30 Ma for the pegmatite. Our study provides the first direct determination of the timing of ore mineralization associated with felsic magmatism in southern India, and reveals the fingerprints of a prominent Pan-African metallogenic event. This timing coincides with the formation of rare metal and gemstone-bearing pegmatites in different parts of southern India, Sri Lanka, Madagascar and East Antarctica. In most cases, the mineralizations are genetically related to felsic magmas emplaced along structural conduits, suggesting that the magmatism and metallogeny are related to deep-seated extension in the cratonized crustal segments of the Gondwana assembly. (author). 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Re-Os molybdenite dating of granite-related Sn-W-Mo mineralization at Hnilec, Gemeric Superunit, Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, M.; Stein, H.

    2005-01-01

    Re-Os molybdenite ages from the exocontact of the Hnilec granite-greisen body provide temporal constraints for tin, tungsten and molybdenite mineralization in the Gemeric Superunit, Slovakia. Two molybdenite separates were taken from a representative sample of the Sn-W-Mo mineralization at Hnilec and their Re-Os ages of 262.2 ± 0.9 and 263.8 ± 0.8 Ma (2-sigma) are in excellent agreement. The obtained Re-Os molybdenite ages are similar to recent but less precise electron microprobe monazite (276 ± 13 Ma) and U-Pb single zircon (250 ± 18 Ma) ages from the Hnilec granite intrusion, supporting a granite-related greisen origin for the Sn-W-Mo mineralization. Our precise Re-Os molybdenite ages resolve the long time controversy over the timing of high-temperature mineralization in the Gemeric Superunit. These Permian ages eliminate suggestions of an Alpine age. The sulphur isotope composition of the studied molybdenite is δ 34 S (CDT) = 1.71 ± 0.2 %o and is consistent with a magmatic sulphur source. Field observations indicate the lack of a broad contact aureole in the vicinity of the Hnilec granite body. Shallow level granite emplacement in schistose host rocks was accompanied by alteration and formation of tin-tungsten greisen in the upper part of the granite and exocontact molybdenite mineralization, both commonly lacking in other granite bodies within the Gemeric Superunit. (author)

  16. Method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-23

    A method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals is disclosed which in one embodiment includes forming a solution of iron (III) diethyl dithiophosphate and tetra-alkyl-ammonium halide in water. The solution is heated under pressure. Pyrite nanocrystal particles are then recovered from the solution.

  17. In-situ U-Pb, Hf and Re-Os isotopic analyses of the Xiangshan Ni-Cu-Co deposit in Eastern Tianshan (Xinjiang), Central Asia Orogenic Belt: Constraints on the timing and genesis of the mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunming; Xiao, Wenjiao; Zhao, Guochun; Ao, Songjian; Zhang, Jien; Qu, Wenjun; Du, Andao

    2010-12-01

    The timing and genesis of the major Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit in the Xiangshan intrusion have been studied based on newly obtained in-situ U-Pb, Hf and Re-Os isotopic analyses. The SIMS U-Pb zircon ages of the gabbro hosting the Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit indicate that the Xiangshan intrusion was emplaced at 279.6 ± 1.1 Ma (95% confidence level, MSWD = 1.30, n = 15). On the basis of combined geological and geochronological evidence, we suggest that the Xiangshan and other adjacent Ni-Cu deposits were formed in the same period. Sulphides have low common Os concentrations and high Re/Os ratios, similar to sulphide ores from the Duluth, Sally Malay and Voisey Bay complexes. The Re-Os isotopic data from the disseminated and massive ores from the Xiangshan intrusion do not form a single isochron, as they have different initial Os ratios. The Hf and Os isotopic data suggest that the Xiangshan intrusion and associated Ni-Cu-Co mineralization were derived from crustally contaminated mantle melts. The geochemical data show a tholeiitic affinity and a strong suprasubduction zone signature with negative Nb, Sr, and Ti anomalies similar to N-MORB and E-MORB. We suggest that the mafic-ultramafic rocks and associated Ni-Cu mineralization of the Eastern Tianshan orogen formed in an Alaska-type subduction zone-arc setting. Some diagnostic features of ridge-trench interaction are present in the Chinese East Tianshan orogen (e.g. granites, adakites, high-Mg andesites, near-trench magmatism, Alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic complexes, high-temperature metamorphic belts that prograde rapidly from low-grade belts, and orogenic gold deposits). The above distinctive rock groups are probably related to the same thermal event, ridge subduction, as in the Cenozoic orogen of Alaska. We suggest that ridge subduction is the most plausible mechanism to provide the necessary heat. Ridge subduction provides an important promising model for understanding many aspects of the evolution of the Chinese

  18. Re-Os isotope systematics of the Radio Hill Ni-Cu-PGE complex, West Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, L.R.; McBride, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Radio Hill Complex is one of several layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that were emplaced into the west Pilbara Craton at ca. 2.9 Ga. It is believed to be genetically related to other similar intrusions in the area which include the Munni Munni, Andover, Dingo and Maitland Complexes (Hoatson et al. 1999). The Radio Hill Complex is the only one of these intrusions to contain economic quantities of Ni and Cu at the present time. This relatively small intrusion (∼1200 m stratigraphic thickness) is divided into two zones, an upper gabbroic zone and a lower ultramafic zone, the base of which possesses massive magmatic sulfide mineralisation (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, magnetite). Re-Os isotopic data have been obtained for a suite of samples from underground, outcrop (gabbroic zone samples) and drill core. Os concentrations in the mineralised zone are very high, ranging from 19 to 191 ppb Os, with low Re/Os ratios ( 10,000), where R-factor is defined as the mass ratio of silicate magma to sulfide magma that it has equilibrated with. However, modelling of the Radio Hill ore system using Re, Os and PGE (Hoatson et al. 1992) concentrations suggest that the R-factor in the Radio Hill ore was low (100-900). Therefore, the initial Os isotopic composition of the ore should be radiogenic (high gOs >+500) if local crustal contamination triggered sulfide saturation. The slightly radiogenic initial Os isotopic composition suggests that the bulk parental magma was a crustally-contaminated magma. R-factor modelling further suggests that the parental magma to this intrusion was neither a basalt nor a pure komatiite, but more likely a contaminated komatiite (with a relatively high Os concentration). This agrees with the previous findings of Hoatson et al. (1992) who proposed a parental magma of siliceous high-magnesium basalt (SHMB) composition. Our Re-Os isotope modelling agrees with the trace elements, Nd and Sr isotope modelling of Hoatson et al. (1992

  19. Re-Os isotope and platinum group elements of a FOcal ZOne mantle source, Louisville Seamounts Chain, Pacific ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Hanyu, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Akira; Senda, Ryoko; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Fitton, Godfrey; Williams, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    The Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) is, besides the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain, one of the longest-lived hotspot traces. We report here the first Re-Os isotope and platinum group element (PGE) data for Canopus, Rigil, and Burton Guyots along the chain, which were drilled during IODP Expedition 330. The LSC basalts possess (187Os/188Os)i = 0.1245-0.1314 that are remarkably homogeneous and do not vary with age. A Re-Os isochron age of 64.9 ± 3.2 Ma was obtained for Burton seamount (the youngest of the three seamounts drilled), consistent with 40Ar-39Ar data. Isochron-derived initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1272 ± 0.0008, together with data for olivines (0.1271-0.1275), are within the estimated primitive mantle values. This (187Os/188Os)i range is similar to those of Rarotonga (0.124-0.139) and Samoan shield (0.1276-0.1313) basalts and lower than those of Cook-Austral (0.136-0.155) and Hawaiian shield (0.1283-0.1578) basalts, suggesting little or no recycled component in the LSC mantle source. The PGE data of LSC basalts are distinct from those of oceanic lower crust. Variation in PGE patterns can be largely explained by different low degrees of melting under sulfide-saturated conditions of the same relatively fertile mantle source, consistent with their primitive mantle-like Os and primordial Ne isotope signatures. The PGE patterns and the low 187Os/188Os composition of LSC basalts contrast with those of Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) tholeiites. We conclude that the Re-Os isotope and PGE composition of LSC basalts reflect a relatively pure deep-sourced common mantle sampled by some ocean island basalts but is not discernible in the composition of OJP tholeiites.

  20. U-Pb, Re-Os and Ar-Ar dating of the Linghou polymetallic deposit, Southeastern China: Implications for metallogenesis of the Qingzhou-Hangzhou metallogenic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanwen; Xie, Yuling; Liu, Liang; Lan, Tingguan; Yang, Jianling; Sebastien, Meffre; Yin, Rongchao; Liang, Songsong; Zhou, Limin

    2017-04-01

    The Qingzhou-Hangzhou metallogenic belt (QHMB) in Southeastern China has gained increasingly attention in recent years. However, due to the lack of reliable ages on intrusions and associated deposits in this belt, the tectonic setting and metallogenesis of the QHMB have not been well understood. The Linghou polymetallic deposit in northwestern Zhejiang Province is one of the typical deposits of the QHMB. According to the field relationships, this deposit consists of the early Cu-Au-Ag and the late Pb-Zn-Cu mineralization stages. Molybdenite samples with a mineral assemblage of molybdenite-chalcopyrite-pyrite ± quartz are collected from the copper mining tunnel near the Cu-Au-Ag ore bodies. Six molybdenite samples give the Re-Os model ages varying from 160.3 to 164.1 Ma and yield a mean age of 162.2 ± 1.4 Ma for the Cu-Au-Ag mineralization. Hydrothermal muscovite gives a well-defined Ar-Ar isochron age of 160.2 ± 1.1 Ma for the Pb-Zn-Cu mineralization. Three phases of granodioritic porphyry have been distinguished in this deposit, and LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating shows that they have formed at 158.8 ± 2.4 Ma, 158.3 ± 1.9 Ma and 160.6 ± 2.1 Ma, comparable to the obtained ages of the Cu-Au-Ag and Pb-Zn-Cu mineralization. Therefore, these intrusive rocks have a close temporal and spatial relationship with the Cu-Au-Ag and Pb-Zn-Cu ore bodies. The presences of skarn minerals (e.g., garnet) and vein-type ores, together with the previous fluid inclusion and H-O-C-S-Pb isotopic data, clearly indicate that the Cu-Au-Ag and Pb-Zn-Cu mineralization are genetically related to these granodiorite porphyries. This conclusion excludes the possibility that this deposit is of ;SEDEX; type and formed in a sag basin of continental rifts setting as previously proposed. Instead, it is proposed that the Linghou polymetallic and other similar deposits in the QHMB, such as the 150-160 Ma Yongping porphyry-skarn Cu-Mo, Dongxiang porphyry? Cu, Shuikoushan/Kangjiawang skarn Pb

  1. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  2. Structural phase transition and magnetic properties of double perovskites Ba2CaMO6 (M=W, Re, Os)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Kazuhiro; Wakeshima, Makoto; Hinatsu, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    Structures and magnetic properties for double perovskites Ba 2 CaMO 6 (M=W, Re, Os) were investigated. Both Ba 2 CaReO 6 and Ba 2 CaWO 6 show structural phase transitions at low temperatures. For Ba 2 CaReO 6 , the second order transition from cubic Fm3-bar m to tetragonal I4/m has been observed near 120K. For Ba 2 CaWO 6 , the space group of the crystal structure is I4/m at 295K and the transition to monoclinic I2/m has been observed between 220K. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ba 2 CaReO 6 (S=1/2) and Ba 2 CaOsO 6 (S=1) transform to an antiferromagnetic state below 15.4 and 51K, respectively. Anomalies corresponding to their structural phase transition and magnetic transition have been also observed through specific heat measurements

  3. Ab initio study of interstitial cluster interaction with Re, Os, and Ta in W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Wahyu, E-mail: wahyu.setyawan@pnnl.gov; Nandipati, Giridhar; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2017-02-15

    The stability of tungsten self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters is studied using first-principles methods. Clusters from one to seven SIAs are systematically explored from 1264 unique configurations. Finite-size effect of the simulation cell is corrected based on the scaling of formation energy versus inverse volume cell. Furthermore, the accuracy of the calculations is improved by treating the 5p semicore states as valence states. Configurations of the three most stable clusters in each cluster size n are presented, which consist of parallel [111] dumbbells. The evolution of these clusters leading to small dislocation loops is discussed. The binding energy of size-n clusters is analyzed relative to an n → (n-1) + 1 dissociation and is shown to increase with size. Extrapolation for n > 7 is presented using a dislocation loop model. In addition, the interaction of these clusters with a substitutional Re, Os, or Ta solute is explored by replacing one of the dumbbells with the solute. Re and Os strongly attract these clusters, but Ta strongly repels. The strongest interaction is found when the solute is located on the periphery of the cluster rather than in the middle. The magnitude of this interaction decreases with cluster size. Empirical fits to describe the trend of the solute binding energy are presented. - Highlights: • Systematic DFT exploration of tungsten SIA clusters from 1264 configurations. • Detailed structures of several most stable clusters are presented. • Novel finding of the trend of solute binding of Re, Os, and Ta with SIA clusters. • Empirical models that describe the trends of the solute binding energies.

  4. Ab initio study of interstitial cluster interaction with Re, Os, and Ta in W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of tungsten self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters is studied using first-principles methods. Clusters from one to seven SIAs are systematically explored from 1264 unique configurations. Finite-size effect of the simulation cell is corrected based on the scaling of formation energy versus inverse volume cell. Furthermore, the accuracy of the calculations is improved by treating the 5p semicore states as valence states. Configurations of the three most stable clusters in each cluster size n are presented, which consist of parallel [111] dumbbells. The evolution of these clusters leading to small dislocation loops is discussed. The binding energy of size-n clusters is analyzed relative to an n → (n-1) + 1 dissociation and is shown to increase with size. Extrapolation for n > 7 is presented using a dislocation loop model. In addition, the interaction of these clusters with a substitutional Re, Os, or Ta solute is explored by replacing one of the dumbbells with the solute. Re and Os strongly attract these clusters, but Ta strongly repels. The strongest interaction is found when the solute is located on the periphery of the cluster rather than in the middle. The magnitude of this interaction decreases with cluster size. Empirical fits to describe the trend of the solute binding energy are presented. - Highlights: • Systematic DFT exploration of tungsten SIA clusters from 1264 configurations. • Detailed structures of several most stable clusters are presented. • Novel finding of the trend of solute binding of Re, Os, and Ta with SIA clusters. • Empirical models that describe the trends of the solute binding energies.

  5. Absolute timing of sulfide and gold mineralization: A comparison of Re-Os molybdenite and Ar-Ar mica methods from the Tintina Gold Belt, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, D.; Creaser, R.A.; Hart, C.J.R.; Rombach, C.S.; Thompson, J.F.H.; Smith, Moira T.; Bakke, A.A.; Goldfarb, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    New Re-Os molybdenite dates from two lode gold deposits of the Tintina Gold Belt, Alaska, provide direct timing constraints for sulfide and gold mineralization. At Fort Knox, the Re-Os molybdenite date is identical to the U-Pb zircon age for the host intrusion, supporting an intrusive-related origin for the deposit. However, 40Ar/39Ar dates from hydrothermal and igneous mica are considerably younger. At the Pogo deposit, Re-Os molybdenite dates are also much older than 40Ar/39Ar dates from hydrothermal mica, but dissimilar to the age of local granites. These age relationships indicate that the Re-Os molybdenite method records the timing of sulfide and gold mineralization, whereas much younger 40Ar/39Ar dates are affected by post-ore thermal events, slow cooling, and/or systemic analytical effects. The results of this study complement a growing body of evidence to indicate that the Re-Os chronometer in molybdenite can be an accurate and robust tool for establishing timing relations in ore systems.

  6. Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in Qarachilar area, Qaradagh batholith (NW Iran): Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies and Re-Os dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Vartan; Moazzen, Mohssen

    2015-04-01

    disappearance display TH values between 300 and 360 °C. The data-point trend in TH(L-V)-Salinity plot may signify boiling of low-salinity fluids and distillation by superficial fluids. Therefore, it can be concluded that the ore-forming magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluids have most likely experienced boiling and also mixed with low temperature and low salinity superficial fluids. Occurrence of boiling is also supported by the coexistence of liquid-rich and vapor-rich 2-phase inclusions as well as multi-phase halite-bearing inclusions which homogenize in a similar range of TH. The calculated minimum pressure at the time of entrapment is estimated about 50 to 120 bar, which is equal to the hydrostatic depth of 500-1100 m. Stable isotope studies of O, H and S on the quartz and sulfide samples taken from quartz-sulfide veins-veinlets reveal a magmatic origin for the ore-bearing fluid and its sulfur content. The δ18O values for quartz and fluid are about 11.13-12.47 ‰ and 5.78-6.89 ‰ (SMOW), respectively, the δD values are about -93 and -50 ‰ and the δ34S values of sulfide minerals are about -1.37-0.49‰ (VCDT). Re-Os model ages calculated for molybdenite samples range between 25.19±0.19 and 31.22±0.28 Ma, referring to middle-late Oligocene, contemporaneous with the third metallogenic epoch in the Lesser Caucasus (especially Kadjaran and Paragachai PCDs in South Armenian Block).

  7. Ab initio calculations of mechanical properties of bcc W-Re-Os random alloys: effects of transmutation of W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojie; Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Ruihuan; Li, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Jijun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2016-06-03

    To examine the effect of neutron transmutation on tungsten as the first wall material of fusion reactors, the elastic properties of W 1-x-y  Re x  Os y (0  ⩽  x, y  ⩽  6%) random alloys in body centered cubic (bcc) structure are investigated systematically using the all-electron exact muffin-tin orbitals (EMTO) method in combination with the coherent-potential approximation (CPA). The calculated lattice constant and elastic properties of pure W are consistent with available experiments. Both Os and Re additions reduce the lattice constant and increase the bulk modulus of W, with Os having the stronger effect. The polycrystalline shear modulus, Young's modulus and the Debye temperature increase (decrease) with the addition of Re (Os). Except for C 11 , the other elastic parameters including C 12 , C 44 , Cauchy pressure, Poisson ratio, B/G, increase as a function of Re and Os concentration. The variations of the latter three parameters and the trend in the ratio of cleavage energy to shear modulus for the most dominant slip system indicate that the ductility of the alloy enhances with increasing Re and Os content. The calculated elastic anisotropy of bcc W slightly increases with the concentration of both alloying elements. The estimated melting temperatures of the W-Re-Os alloy suggest that Re or Os addition will reduce the melting temperature of pure W solid. The classical Labusch-Nabarro model for solid-solution hardening predicts larger strengthening effects in W 1-y  Os y than in W 1-x  Re x . A strong correlation between C' and the fcc-bcc structural energy difference for W 1-x-y  Re x  Os y is revealed demonstrating that canonical band structure dictates the alloying effect on C'. The structural energy difference is exploited to estimate the alloying effect on the ideal tensile strength in the [0 0 1] direction.

  8. Palynology, geochemistry and Re-Os age of the Lower-Middle Pennsylvanian stage boundary, central Appalachian basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geboy, N.; Tripathy, G. R.; Ruppert, L. F.; Eble, C. F.; Blake, B. M.; Hannah, J. L.; Stein, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    The central Appalachian basin (CAB) in the eastern United States contains complicated sedimentary sequences often with thin and discontinuous strata. As an economically important coal-producing region, the basin's architectural framework and depositional history are important to understand. Typically, eustatic marine incursions, marked with black shale deposits, are used for basin-wide correlation. The Betsie Shale Member of the Kanawha Formation represents one of these relatively thick and laterally extensive marine zones. This study examines the palynoflora of the Matewan coalbed, which conformably underlies the Betsie, in the context of a new Re-Os date for the Betsie Shale Member and additional geochemical measures. At its base, the Matewan contains abundant lycopsid tree spores, indicative of a submerged, flooded paleomire. Upsection, biodiversity increases to include small fern and calamite spores as well as cordaite pollen. Combined with an observed increase of inertinite, the diversification of palynoflora suggests surficial peat exposure and drying out of the paleomire. A S-rich (28 wt. %) shaley parting separates these lower and upper benches of the Matewan and may represent an initial marine pulse prior to the glacioeustatic incursion that ultimately flooded the Matewan and deposited the overlying Betsie Shale. The Betsie is organic-rich (3.05 - 4.89 wt. % TOC) with Re and Os content ranging from 320 - 1,200 ppb and 1.5 - 5.3 ppb, respectively. The highly enriched Re values result in notably high parent:daughter ratios (187Re/188Os = 3,644 - 5,737). The Re-Os isotopic data yield a Model 1 age of 323 ± 7.8 Ma (n = 7; MSWD = 0.63) with evidence that the true age lies closer to the younger end of the uncertainty. This age is consistent with previous paleontologic-based interpretations but represents the first directly measured radiometric date for the Betsie. An absolute age for the Betsie is a critical result, as the member is correlated with units in

  9. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  10. Preservation of an Archaean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: Evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithosphere stabilisation at 3.3 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Quinten H. A.; Klaver, Martijn; Reisberg, Laurie; Riches, Amy J. V.; Davies, Gareth R.

    2017-11-01

    Re-Os and platinum group element analyses are reported for peridotite xenoliths from the 533 Ma Venetia kimberlite cluster situated in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, the Neoarchaean collision zone between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. The Venetian xenoliths provide a rare opportunity to examine the state of the cratonic lithosphere prior to major regional metasomatic disturbance of Re-Os systematics throughout the Phanerozoic. The 32 studied xenoliths record Si-enrichment that is characteristic of the Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle and can be subdivided into five groups based on Re-Os analyses. The most pristine group I samples (n = 13) display an approximately isochronous relationship and fall on a 3.28 ± 0.17 Ga (95 % conf. int.) reference line that is based on their mean TMA age. This age overlaps with the formation age of the Limpopo crust at 3.35-3.28 Ga. The group I samples derive from ∼50 to ∼170 km depth, suggesting coeval melt depletion of the majority of the Venetia lithospheric mantle column. Group II and III samples have elevated Re/Os due to Re addition during kimberlite magmatism. Group II has otherwise undergone a similar evolution as the group I samples with overlapping 187Os/188Os at eruption age: 187Os/188OsEA, while group III samples have low Os concentrations, unradiogenic 187Os/188OsEA and were effectively Re-free prior to kimberlite magmatism. The other sample groups (IV and V) have disturbed Re-Os systematics and provide no reliable age information. A strong positive correlation is recorded between Os and Re concentrations for group I samples, which is extended to groups II and III after correction for kimberlite addition. This positive correlation precludes a single stage melt depletion history and indicates coupled remobilisation of Re and Os. The combination of Re-Os mobility, preservation of the isochronous relationship, correlation of 187Os/188Os with degree of melt depletion and lack of radiogenic Os addition puts tight constraints on

  11. Deformation properties of even-even Os, Pt, Hg nuclei and spectroscopic properties of odd Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg nuclei from self-consistent calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Desthuilliers-Porquet, M G; Quentin, P; Sauvage-Letessier, J

    1981-01-01

    Static properties of even-even Os, Pt, Hg nuclei have been obtained from HF+BCS calculations. Single-particle wave functions which come from these self-consistent calculations have been used to calculate some spectroscopic properties of odd Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, and Hg nuclei, within the rotor-quasiparticle coupling model. The authors' calculations are able to give a good description of most of available experimental data. (12 refs).

  12. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  13. Molybdenite Re-Os dating of Mo-Th-Nb-REE rich marbles: pre-Variscan processes in Moldanubian Variegated Group (Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drábek Milan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to contribute to the discussion concerning the age of rocks of the Moldanubian Variegated Group, we have undertaken Re-Os dating of molybdenite of banded carbonatite-like marbles (CLM from the graphite mine Václav at Bližná (Southern Bohemia, which belong to the metamorphic sequence of this group. The Re-Os model ages for the molybdenites range between 493 and 497 Ma and apparently correspond to the early stages of metamorphism connected with pre-Variscan rift-related tectono-metamorphic events, which affected and recrystallized sedimentary CLM material rich in Mo-Th-Nb-REE. The molybdenite bearing carbonatite like marbles situated in the footwall of Bližná graphite mine have been interpreted as carbonates with a large share of volcano-detritic material derived from contemporaneous primitive alkaline (carbonatite-like volcanism deposited in a shallow marine lagoonal environment. There is no geological evidence for the participation of fluids mobilized from host rocks in the formation of the CLM. Because the Re-Os chronometer in molybdenite is demonstrably stable through later Variscan facies metamorphism, the molybdenite chronometer has not been affected by subsequent thermal overprints associated with the Variscan orogeny.

  14. The Hadean upper mantle conundrum: evidence for source depletion and enrichment from Sm-Nd, Re-Os, and Pb isotopic compositions in 3.71 Gy boninite-like metabasalts from the Isua Supracrustal Belt, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Polat, Ali; Meibom, Anders

    2004-04-01

    Here we present Sm-Nd, Re-Os, and Pb isotopic data of carefully screened, least altered samples of boninite-like metabasalts from the Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB, W Greenland)that characterize their mantle source at the time of their formation. The principal observations of this study are that by 3.7-3.8 Ga melt source regions existed in the upper mantle with complicated enrichment/depletion histories. Sm-Nd isotopic data define a correlation line with a slope corresponding to an age of 3.69 ± 0.18 Gy and an initial εNd value of +2.0 ± 4.7. This Sm-Nd age is consistent with indirect (but more precise) U-Pb geochronological estimates for their formation between 3.69-3.71 Ga. Relying on the maximum formation age of 3.71 Gy defined by the external age constraints, we calculate an average εNd [T = 3.71 Ga] value of +2.2 ± 0.9 (n = 18, 1σ) for these samples, which is indicative of a strongly depleted mantle source. This is consistent with the high Os concentrations, falling in the range between 1.9-3.4 ppb, which is similar to the estimated Os concentration for the primitive upper mantle. Re-Os isotopic data (excluding three outliers) yield an isochron defining an age of 3.76 ± 0.09 Gy (with an initial γOs value of 3.9 ± 1.2), within error consistent with the Sm-Nd age and the indirect U-Pb age estimates. An average initial γOs [T = 3.71 Ga] value of + 4.4 ± 1.2 (n = 8; 2σ) is indicative of enrichment of their source region during, or prior to, its melting. Thus, this study provides the first observation of an early Archean upper mantle domain with a distinctly radiogenic Os isotopic signature. This requires a mixing component characterized by time-integrated suprachondritic Re/Os evolution and a Os concentration high enough to strongly affect the Os budget of the mantle source; modern sediments, recycled basaltic crust, or the outer core do not constitute suitable candidates. At this point, the nature of the mantle or crustal component responsible for the

  15. Pyrite in the Mesoarchean Witwatersrand Supergroup, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Ph.D. Petrographic, chemical and multiple sulfur isotope analyses were conducted on pyrite from argillaceous, arenaceous and rudaceous sedimentary rocks from the Mesoarchean Witwatersrand Supergroup. Following detailed petrographic analyses, four paragenetic associations of pyrite were identified. These include: 1) Detrital pyrite (derived from an existing rock via weathering and/or erosion). 2) Syngenetic pyrite (formed at the same time as the surrounding sediment). 3) Diagenetic pyrite (...

  16. Re-Os and Lu-Hf isotopic constraints on the formation and age of mantle pyroxenites from the Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Bizimis, M.; Haluzová, Eva; Sláma, Jiří; Svojtka, Martin; Hirajima, T.; Erban, V.

    256/257, July (2016), s. 197-210 ISSN 0024-4937 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100131203 Program:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Lu-Hf * mantle * pyroxenite * Re-Os Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.677, year: 2016

  17. Recent advances in quaternary geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.

    1983-01-01

    Significant progress has occurred in quaternary geochronology. These include both (i) improvements in Fission Track and Thermoluminescence dating, as well as (ii) new technologies for short-lived (i.e. with half lives 6 yrs) radionuclide measurements as with the 14 C or uranium series desequilibrium dating, and finally (iii) the emergence of entirely new dating approches as the Electron Spin Resonnance Method. The aim of this paper is to review these progresses and the new areas they open geochronology for the past-miocene times. (author) [pt

  18. Decomposition of pyrite and the interaction of pyrite with coal organic matrix in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Li, B.; Zhang, B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

    1999-07-01

    The thermal decomposition and reduction behaviour of pure pyrite crystals were studied under nitrogen and hydrogen atmospheres. Decomposition of pyrite in coal during pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis, and the behaviour of organic sulphur, are discussed. Temperature and pressure effects are considered. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Decomposition of pyrite and the interaction of pyrite with coal organic matrix in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Li, B.; Zhang, B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Conversion, Inst. of Coal Chemistry

    2000-10-01

    The thermal behaviour of pure pyrite was studied under nitrogen and hydrogen atmospheres in a pressurized thermal balance. The transfer of pyrite in coal during pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor. The results suggest that the indigenous hydro-carbon with hydrogen donor ability in coal can promote the reduction of pyrite in pyrolysis. At low temperatures, organic sulfur removal is almost the same in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of two coals. It is likely that indigenous hydrogen in coal is the dominant factor in organic sulfur elimination in the low-temperature stage. An increase of organic sulfur in pyrolysis of Hongmiao coal indicates that the lack of the indigenous hydrogen may be the key factor determining the transformation of pyritic sulfur into organic sulfur. Oxygen affects the conversion of pyrite into organic sulfur through the competitive consumption of hydrogen. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. THE DEPRESSION OF PYRITE FLOTATION BY THIOBACILLUS FERROOXIDANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The experimental studies on the microbial flotation of a pure pyrite sample using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was conducted in the laboratory. The results indicate that Thiobacillus ferrooaidans has strong depression effect on the flotation of pyrite. Thiobacillus f errooxidans can adsorb on the surface of pyrite in a very short time (a few min. ), changing the surface from hydrophobic into hydrophilic and making the pyrite particles to lose their floatability. Therefore, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is an effective microbial depressant of pyrite. It has also been pointed out that the depression of pyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is caused by the adsorption of the microbial colloids, but not by the oxidation effect.

  1. National Geochronological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revised by Sloan, Jan; Henry, Christopher D.; Hopkins, Melanie; Ludington, Steve; Original database by Zartman, Robert E.; Bush, Charles A.; Abston, Carl

    2003-01-01

    The National Geochronological Data Base (NGDB) was established by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to collect and organize published isotopic (also known as radiometric) ages of rocks in the United States. The NGDB (originally known as the Radioactive Age Data Base, RADB) was started in 1974. A committee appointed by the Director of the USGS was given the mission to investigate the feasibility of compiling the published radiometric ages for the United States into a computerized data bank for ready access by the user community. A successful pilot program, which was conducted in 1975 and 1976 for the State of Wyoming, led to a decision to proceed with the compilation of the entire United States. For each dated rock sample reported in published literature, a record containing information on sample location, rock description, analytical data, age, interpretation, and literature citation was constructed and included in the NGDB. The NGDB was originally constructed and maintained on a mainframe computer, and later converted to a Helix Express relational database maintained on an Apple Macintosh desktop computer. The NGDB and a program to search the data files were published and distributed on Compact Disc-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) in standard ISO 9660 format as USGS Digital Data Series DDS-14 (Zartman and others, 1995). As of May 1994, the NGDB consisted of more than 18,000 records containing over 30,000 individual ages, which is believed to represent approximately one-half the number of ages published for the United States through 1991. Because the organizational unit responsible for maintaining the database was abolished in 1996, and because we wanted to provide the data in more usable formats, we have reformatted the data, checked and edited the information in some records, and provided this online version of the NGDB. This report describes the changes made to the data and formats, and provides instructions for the use of the database in geographic

  2. Catalytic activity of pyrite for coal liquefaction reaction; Tennen pyrite no shokubai seino ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, K.; Kozu, M.; Okada, T.; Kobayashi, M. [Nippon Coal Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Since natural pyrite is easy to obtain and cheap as coal liquefaction catalyst, it is to be used for the 150 t/d scale NEDOL process bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant. NEDO and NCOL have investigated the improvement of catalytic activity of pulverized natural pyrite for enhancing performance and economy of the NEDOL process. In this study, coal liquefaction tests were conducted using natural pyrite catalyst pulverized by dry-type bowl mill under nitrogen atmosphere. Mechanism of catalytic reaction of the natural pyrite was discussed from relations between properties of the catalyst and liquefaction product. The natural pyrite provided an activity to transfer gaseous hydrogen into the liquefaction product. It was considered that pulverized pyrite promotes the hydrogenation reaction of asphaltene because pulverization increases its contact rate with reactant and the amount of active points on its surface. It was inferred that catalytic activity of pyrite is affected greatly by the chemical state of Fe and S on its surface. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The determination of uranium in pyrite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    An existing method for the determination of uranium in rocks and minerals is examined for the determination of uranium in materials containing pyrite. The results are comparable with those obtained by a spectrophotometric method, the precision (relative standard deviation) of the method for standards with U 3 O 8 contents of 1500 and 300 p.p.m. being 0,03 and 0,08 respectively when prepared in pyrite, and 0,15 and 0,06 respectively when made up with inert diluent. Full details of the procedure are given in accompanying appendices [af

  4. Fabrication and characterization of PDLLA/pyrite composite bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polylactic acid; Chinese herbal medicine; pyrite; scaffold; bone regeneration; cell culture. 1. Introduction ... research focuses on the direct cellular level effect of pyrite on bone cells. ..... optimal scaffold from the results of this paper. Although the.

  5. Pyritized ooids from the Arabian Sea basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.; Rao, Ch.M.; Reddy, N.P.C.

    Pyritized ooids in association with turbidites were observed in a box core collected at a depth of 3627 m from the Arabian Sea Basin. Ooids having a shallow water origin were transported to the present depth by turbidity currents or slumping...

  6. Nucleic acid interactions with pyrite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo-Marti, E.; Briones, C.; Rogero, C.; Gomez-Navarro, C.; Methivier, Ch.; Pradier, C.M.; Martin-Gago, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The study of the interaction of nucleic acid molecules with mineral surfaces is a field of growing interest in organic chemistry, origin of life, material science and biotechnology. We have characterized the adsorption of single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (ssPNA) on a natural pyrite surface, as well as the further adsorption of ssDNA on a PNA-modified pyrite surface. The characterization has been performed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The N(1s) and S(2p) XPS core level peaks of PNA and PNA + DNA have been decomposed in curve-components that we have assigned to different chemical species. RAIRS spectra recorded for different concentrations show the presence of positive and negative adsorption bands, related to the semiconducting nature of the surface. The combination of the information gathered by these techniques confirms that PNA adsorbs on pyrite surface, interacting through nitrogen-containing groups of the nucleobases and the iron atoms of the surface, instead of the thiol group of the molecule. The strong PNA/pyrite interaction inhibits further hybridization of PNA with complementary ssDNA, contrary to the behavior reported on gold surfaces

  7. Nucleic acid interactions with pyrite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateo-Marti, E. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850-Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mateome@inta.es; Briones, C.; Rogero, C. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850-Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Navarro, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Methivier, Ch.; Pradier, C.M. [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, UMR CNRS 7609. Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Pl Jussieu, 75005-Paris (France); Martin-Gago, J.A. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850-Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2008-09-03

    The study of the interaction of nucleic acid molecules with mineral surfaces is a field of growing interest in organic chemistry, origin of life, material science and biotechnology. We have characterized the adsorption of single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (ssPNA) on a natural pyrite surface, as well as the further adsorption of ssDNA on a PNA-modified pyrite surface. The characterization has been performed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The N(1s) and S(2p) XPS core level peaks of PNA and PNA + DNA have been decomposed in curve-components that we have assigned to different chemical species. RAIRS spectra recorded for different concentrations show the presence of positive and negative adsorption bands, related to the semiconducting nature of the surface. The combination of the information gathered by these techniques confirms that PNA adsorbs on pyrite surface, interacting through nitrogen-containing groups of the nucleobases and the iron atoms of the surface, instead of the thiol group of the molecule. The strong PNA/pyrite interaction inhibits further hybridization of PNA with complementary ssDNA, contrary to the behavior reported on gold surfaces.

  8. Genesis of uranium-gold pyritic conglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The ancient pyritic ore conglomerates have a common origin best exemplified by the Witwatersrand deposits. All contain detrital pyrite and uraninite, which are unstable in modern oxygenated environments and were deposited in a reducing atmosphere. The Rand reefs are not similar to modern gold placers. Placers result from the near incapacity of streams and currents to transport coarse gold. Placers as rich as Rand reef occur only in narrow paystreaks within 15 kilometers of a coarse-gold source. The board dispersion of gold in the reefs is due to solution transport of metal complexed as aurous sulfide, leached anoxygenically from crustal rocks, probably from sea-floor basalt, and precipitated by a slow reaction driven by the radioactive decay of detrital uraninite. Radiolysis of water on shallow marine unconformities resulted in diffusion of hydrogen to the atmosphere and a slight excess of hydroxyl free radical in the reef environment. The mild oxidizing tendency slowly dissolved uranium, precipitated gold, and oxygenated thucholite. These actions define a maturing process. A uraninite placer accumulating on an unconformity becomes progressively converted to a gold reef with little residual uraninite. The most mature reefs tend to grade toward the thucholite-seam type, very thin but exceedingly rich in gold. A combination of chemical attack and physical reworking accounts for the general thinness of mature reefs. Pyrite, like uraninite, decreases in abundance with increasing maturity; buffering by pyrite moderated the oxidative depletion of uranium. Where pyrite was scanty or absent, uraninite was completely dissolved by the effects of radiolysis and no ore formed

  9. Re - Os isotopic constraints on the origin of volcanic rocks, Gorgona Island, Colombia: Os isotopic evidence for ancient heterogeneities in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R.J.; Echeverria, L.M.; Shirey, S.B.; Horan, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The Re - Os isotopic systematics of komatiites and spatially associated basalts from Gorgona Island, Colombia, indicate that they were produced at 155??43 Ma. Subsequent episodes of volcanism produced basalts at 88.1??3.8 Ma and picritic and basaltic lavas at ca. 58 Ma. The age for the ultramafic rocks is important because it coincides with the late-Jurassic, early-Cretaceous disassembly of Pangea, when the North- and South-American plates began to pull apart. Deep-seated mantle upwelling possibly precipitated the break-up of these continental plates and caused a tear in the subducting slab west of Gorgona, providing a rare, late-Phanerozoic conduit for the komatiitic melts. Mantle sources for the komatiites were heterogeneous with respect to Os and Pb isotopic compositions, but had homogeneous Nd isotopic compositions (??Nd+9??1). Initial 187Os/186Os normalized to carbonaceous chondrites at 155 Ma (??Os) ranged from 0 to +22, and model-initial ?? values ranged from 8.17 to 8.39. The excess radiogenic Os, compared with an assumed bulk-mantle evolution similar to carbonaceous chondrites, was likely produced in portions of the mantle with long-term elevated Re concentrations. The Os, Pb and Nd isotopic compositions, together with major-element constraints, suggest that the sources of the komatiites were enriched more than 1 Ga ago by low (<20%) and variable amounts of a basalt or komatiite component. This component was added as either subducted oceanic crust or melt derived from greater depths in the mantle. These results suggest that the Re - Os isotope system may be a highly sensitive indicator of the presence of ancient subducted oceanic crust in mantle-source regions. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Re Os depositional ages and seawater Os estimates for the Frasnian Famennian boundary: Implications for weathering rates, land plant evolution, and extinction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Steven C.; Creaser, Robert A.; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Four TOC-rich shale intervals spanning the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) boundary were recovered in a drillcore (West Valley NX-1) from western New York (USA) and radiometrically dated using Re-Os. Two of the black shale intervals (WVC785 from ˜ 2.9 m below, and WVC754 from ˜ 6.4 m above the F-F boundary, respectively) yielded statistically overlapping ages with uncertainties of initial 187Os/ 188Os (0.45 to 0.47), reflecting contemporaneous seawater Os values, are low but similar to the value of 0.42 reported for the Exshaw Fm (Canada) at the Devonian-Mississippian boundary (ca. 361 Ma) [Selby D., Creaser R.A., 2005. Direct radiometric dating of the Devonian-Mississippian time-scale boundary using the Re-Os black shale geochronometer. Geology 33, 545-548]. This may suggest fairly constant and low global continental weathering rates during the Late Devonian, although in view of the short residence time of Os in seawater (˜ 1-4 × 10 4 yr), further measurements are needed to assess potential short-term variation in seawater Os ratios. Owing to low Os and Re abundances at the F-F boundary, our data are inconsistent with long-term volcanism and bolide impact as potential Late Devonian mass extinction mechanisms. In addition, the Frasnian-Famennian ocean appears to have been depleted with respect to Re, possibly indicating an exhaustion of the Re seawater reservoir owing to high burial rates of redox-sensitive elements under dysoxic/anoxic conditions leading up to the F-F boundary.

  11. Photodetachment of free hexahalogenometallate doubly charged anions in the gas phase: [ML6]2-, (M=Re, Os, Ir, Pt; L=Cl and Br)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Wang, L.

    1999-01-01

    We report the first observation and photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopic study of a series of hexahalogenometallates dianions MCl 6 2- (M=Re, Os, Ir, and Pt) and MBr 6 2- (M=Re, Ir, and Pt) in the gas phase. All of these species were found to be stable as free gaseous doubly charged anions. Photoelectron spectra of all the dianions were obtained at several detachment photon energies. The photon-energy-dependent spectra clearly revealed the dianion nature of these species and allowed the repulsive Coulomb barriers to be estimated. The binding energies of the second excess electron in MCl 6 2- (M=Re, Os, Ir, Pt) were determined to be 0.46 (5), 0.46 (5), 0.82 (5), and 1.58 (5) eV, respectively, and those in MBr 6 2- (M=Re, Ir, Pt) to be 0.76 (6), 0.96 (6), and 1.52 (6) eV, respectively. A wealth of electronic structure information about these metal complexes were obtained and low-lying and highly-excited electronic states of the corresponding singly charged anions were observed. Detachment from metal d orbitals or ligand orbitals were observed and could be clearly distinguished; detachments from the metal d-orbitals all occur at low binding energies whereas those from the ligand-dominated orbitals all take place at rather high binding energies. We also found a remarkable correlation between electron affinities measured in vacuo and the redox potentials obtained in the solution phase of these species. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  12. The effects of trace element content on pyrite oxidation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D. D.; Lyons, T.; Cliff, J. B.; Perea, D. E.; Johnson, A.; Romaniello, S. J.; Large, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    Pyrite acts as both an important source and sink for many different metals and metalloids in the environment, including many that are toxic. Oxidation of pyrite can release these elements while at the same time producing significant amounts of sulfuric acid. Such issues are common in the vicinity of abandoned mines and smelters, but, as pyrite is a common accessory mineral in many different lithologies, significant pyrite oxidation can occur whenever pyritic rocks are exposed to oxygenated water or the atmosphere. Accelerated exposure to oxygen can occur during deforestation, fracking for petroleum, and construction projects. Geochemical models for pyrite oxidation can help us develop strategies to mitigate these deleterious effects. An important component of these models is an accurate pyrite oxidation rate; however, current pyrite oxidation rates have been determined using relatively pure pyrite. Natural pyrite is rarely pure and has a wide range of trace element concentrations that may affect the oxidation rate. Furthermore, the position of trace elements within the mineral lattice can also affect the oxidation rate. For example, elements such as Ni and Co, which substitute into the pyrite lattice, are thought to stabilize the lattice and thus prevent pyrite oxidation. Alternatively, trace elements that are held within inclusions of other minerals could form a galvanic cell with the surrounding pyrite, thus enhancing pyrite oxidation rates. In this study, we present preliminary analyses from three different pyrite oxidation experiments each using natural pyrite with different trace element compositions. These results show that the pyrite with the highest trace element concentration has approximately an order of magnitude higher oxidation rate compared to the lowest trace element sample. To further elucidate the mechanisms, we employed microanalytical techniques to investigate how the trace elements are held within the pyrite. LA-ICPMS was used to determine the

  13. Pyrite Passivation by Triethylenetetramine: An Electrochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of triethylenetetramine (TETA to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite in H2SO4 solution had been investigated by using the open-circuit potential (OCP, cyclic voltammetry (CV, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance (EIS, respectively. Experimental results indicate that TETA is an efficient coating agent in preventing the oxidation of pyrite and that the inhibition efficiency is more pronounced with the increase of TETA. The data from potentiodynamic polarization show that the inhibition efficiency (η% increases from 42.08% to 80.98% with the concentration of TETA increasing from 1% to 5%. These results are consistent with the measurement of EIS (43.09% to 82.55%. The information obtained from potentiodynamic polarization also displays that the TETA is a kind of mixed type inhibitor.

  14. 40Ar/39Ar dating of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, D.; Masliwec, A.; Kuybida, P.; Hanes, J.A.; Hall, C.M.; Kenyon, W.J.; Spooner, E.T.C.; Scott, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    To overcome difficulties encountered in the customary method of determining the age of mineralization of sulphide ore deposits by analysing silicate material, the sulphide minerals themselves have been examined to see if they contained sufficient potassium and argon for 40 Ar/ 39 Ar age determination. Initial results indicate that this is the case for pyrite from the Geco ore body in northwestern Ontario, Canada. (U.K.)

  15. Bacterial leaching of pyritic gold ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Cashion, J.D.; Brown, J.; Jay, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Pyritic ores (pyrite and arsenopyrite) containing gold concentrations in excess of 50g Au/t can be processed to recover the gold by the removal of the sulphur from the ore. This may be achieved by roasting (producing sulphur dioxide emissions), pressure oxidation (expensive and suitable for large high grade deposits), pressure leaching (still currently being developed) or bacterial oxidation. The bacterial oxidation process is a well known process in nature but has only recently come under investigation as a economically viable and relatively clean method of gold recovery from deep low grade sulphidic ores. Samples were obtained from the Wiluna Gold Mine in Western Australia consisting of the original ore, six successive bacterial reactors and the final products. Moessbauer experiments have been performed at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures, and in applied magnetic fields. The main components of the iron phases which were present during the bacterial treatment were pyrite and arsenopyrite which were readily oxidised by the bacteria. Ferric sulfates and ferric arsenates were identified as by-products of the process with a small amount of the oxyhydroxide goethite. These results are in contrast to the similar study of the Fairview Mine in South Africa where principally Fe(II) species were observed

  16. Microprobe channeling analysis of pyrite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Ryan, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear microprobe analysis has provided much useful information about the composition of microscopic inclusions in minerals, mainly through the use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). However this technique, while powerful, does not provide any direct information about the chemical state, in particular the lattice location, of the elements in the mineral. This information is often of crucial importance in understanding the ore genesis. The technique of ion channeling may be used to identify lattice location, but many minerals occur as microscopic crystals. Therefore it is necessary to utilize a nuclear microprobe with the technique of Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). As many minerals contain interesting trace elements, it is necessary to measure both the yield of backscattered particles and the induced x-rays to get a clear picture of the lattice location of the elements in the crystal. CCM with PIXE was used to analyse natural pyrite crystals containing a variety of substitutional and non-substitutional elements and natural pyrite crystals from a gold bearing ore. In the latter case, evidence was obtained for two habits for Au in the 400 μm crystals: one as inclusions of Au rich minerals, the other substituted on the pyrite lattice sites. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  17. XAS studies on selenite reduction by pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Mingliang; Liu Chunli; Chen Fanrong; Charlet, Laurnet

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of aqueous Se (IV) with pyrite were systematically investigated in light of thermodynamic calculations and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The results from the speciation study reveal that the reduction product is Se (O) when natural pyrite reacts with Se (N) at pH≤5.65, while small amount of FeSeO 3 or iron selenides may be formed at pH 6.1. At pH≥6.94, due to the precipitation of Fe (Ⅲ) -oxyhydroxide, the formation of the thermodynamically most stable species, FeSe 2 , is inhibited. However, when the reactive nanopyrite-greigite was used for reaction, the thermodynamically most stable species, FeSe 2 , was found for the first time as the predominant product in the present study, suggesting that 79 Se can be immobilized in its most insoluble form, FeSe 2 , in Fe (Ⅱ) -sulfide containing environment. This study confirms that pyrite can significantly attenuate the mobility of Se by reductive precipitation, and that the reaction process does not produce protons under acidic or neutral condition when Se (O) is formed. (authors)

  18. Evaluation of pyrite and pyrrhotite in concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Marcelino

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well known that aggregate characteristics can intensively interfere in concrete behavior especially when sulfides are presented in the aggregates. The lack of consensus to content limit value of these deleterious sulfur compounds in concrete structures for dams has motivated several investigations worldwide. Within this scenario, this work presents a methodology to evaluate the presence of pyrite and pyrrhotite in concretes produced with aggregates containing sulfides. For the study, rock samples from the Irapé hydroelectric power plant area in Minas Gerais (Brazil were used. This plant was built in a geological site where the rock presented sulfide levels of at least 3%. These rock samples were first ground and then used as aggregates in mortars, which were, during almost one year, subjected to three different exposed conditions: temperature of 23° ± 2°C and relative humidity of 95 to 100%; calcium hydroxide solution diluted in water kept at two different temperatures: room temperature and 50° C. The presence and amount of pyrrhotite were obtained from a leaching process of the material (aggregate or mortar in a solution of hydrochloric acid. This procedure allowed also the evaluation of the pyrite content. The results showed that the amount of pyrite has remained virtually constant over time in the three exposure situations. This finding indicates that sulfur limits in aggregates should be set according to the type of iron sulfide presented and not solely by the total amount of sulfur.

  19. The Adsorption of Cu Species onto Pyrite Surface and Its Effect on Pyrite Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Cu species onto pyrite surface and its effect on flotation were investigated by using microflotation tests, first-principle calculations, and XPS surface analysis. The results indicated that the flotation of pyrite appears to be activated with CuSO4 only at alkaline pH, while being depressed at acidic and neutral pH. The adsorption of copper ions on pyrite surface was pH-dependent, and the adsorption magnitude of copper ions at alkaline pH is higher than that at acidic and neutral pH due to a strong interaction between O atom in Cu(OH2 and surface Fe atom except for the interaction between Cu atom and surface S atom. At acidic and neutral pH, there is only an interaction between Cu atom and surface S atom. The adsorption was relatively weak, and more copper ions in solution precipitated the collector and depressed the flotation of pyrite. XPS analysis confirmed that more copper ionic species (Cu(I and Cu(II are adsorbed on the pyrite surface at alkaline pH than that at acidic and neutral pH.

  20. Constraining the dynamic response of subcontinental lithospheric mantle to rifting using Re-Os model ages in the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C.; Class, C.; Goldstein, S. L.; Shirey, S. B.; Martin, A. P.; Cooper, A. F.; Berg, J. H.; Gamble, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the dynamic response of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) to rifting, it is important to be able to distinguish the geochemical signatures of SCLM vs. asthenosphere. Recent work demonstrates that unradiogenic Os isotope ratios can indicate old depletion events in the convecting upper mantle (e.g. Rudnick & Walker, 2009), and allow us to make these distinctions. Thus, if SCLM can be traced across a rifted margin, its fate during rifting can be established. The Western Ross Sea provides favorable conditions to test the dynamic response of SCLM to rifting. Re-Os measurements from 8 locations extending from the rift shoulder to 200 km into the rift basin reveal 187Os/188Os ranging from 0.1056 at Foster Crater on the shoulder, to 0.1265 on Ross Island within the rift. While individual sample model ages vary widely throughout the margin, 'aluminochron' ages (Reisberg & Lorand, 1995) reveal a narrower range of lithospheric stabilization ages. Franklin Island and Sulfur Cones show a range of Re-depletion ages (603-1522 Ma and 436-1497 Ma) but aluminochrons yield Paleoproterozoic stabilization ages of 1680 Ma and 1789 Ma, respectively. These ages coincide with U-Pb zircon ages from Transantarctic Mountain (TAM) crustal rocks, in support of SCLM stabilization at the time of crust formation along the central TAM. The Paleoproterozoic stabilization age recorded at Franklin Island is especially significant, since it lies 200km off of the rift shoulder. The similar ages beneath the rift shoulder and within the rift suggests stretched SCLM reaches into the rift and thus precludes replacement by asthenospheric mantle. The persistence of thinned Paleoproterozoic SCLM into the rifted zone in WARS suggests that it represents a 'type I' margin of Huismans and Beaumont (2011), which is characterized by crustal breakup before loss of lithospheric mantle. The Archean Re-depletion age of 3.2 Ga observed on the rift shoulder suggests that cratonic

  1. Graptolite graveyard: Re-Os dating of macroplankton at the Lower-Middle Ordovician boundary (Floian-Dapingian stage boundary), Tøyen Shale, southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, V.; Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.; Ahlberg, P.; Maletz, J.

    2017-12-01

    There exist only 16 radiometric ages for the entire 42 m.y. Ordovician Period. Stage boundaries are biostratigraphically defined by the first appearance of agreed on graptolite and conodont species. Cosmopolitan graptolites are common in the Ordovician and their relatively brief stratigraphic durations make them ideal for global correlations. The Floian-Dapingian stage boundary (Lower-Middle Ordovician boundary) is very poorly constrained, with an absence of radiometric dates for several million years below the boundary and poor statistics on ages in the lower Dapingian [1]. Here we use the Ordovician Tøyen Shale, widespread across southern Sweden and Norway with a highly-refined graptolite biostratigraphy, to add a new age constraint [2]. With drill core from Lerhamn, Sweden (samples from 35.75-36.70 m depth), we employ a novel approach to directly date the fauna. We physically extracted a well-preserved 5-cm fossil of macroplankton (graptolite) from organic-rich shales (up to 4% TOC) for Re-Os dating. The graptolite and its hosting shale together define a well-constrained Model 1 isochron of 469.4 ± 1.7 Ma (2s, MSWD = 1.7, n = 9) and an initial 187Os/188Os (Osi) of 0.802 ± 0.002 for seawater. The Osi documents sustained radiogenic Os input to seawater from the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian through the Early Ordovician, in concert with the Sr isotope seawater curve. The analyzed graptolite belongs to the species Pseudophyllograptus augustifolius, a member of the upper Floian fauna [2]. Our nominal age for the dated graptolite and the shale is lower Dapingian according to the 2017 GTS [1]. Therefore, the Re-Os age suggests the Floian-Dapingian stage boundary may be younger than currently accepted. As defined in the GTS, the Dapingian stage is only 2.7 m.y. (470.0 ± 1.4 to 467.3 ± 1.1 Ma); combined uncertainties could give the Dapingian a mere 0.2 m.y. duration (or a maximum of 5 m.y). Although uncertainties overlap, our first dating of the Lower-Middle Ordovician

  2. Molybdenum mineralization at Alpeiner Scharte, Tyrol (Austria): results of in-situ U-Pb zircon and Re-Os molybdenite dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langthaler, K.J.; Raith, J.G.; Cornell, D.H.; Stein, H.J.; Melcher, F.

    2004-01-01

    Vein-type Mo mineralization at Alpeiner Scharte occurs in the Penninic units of the western Tauern Window in the Eastern Alps. Three types of previously undated metagranitoids (central gneisses) are distinguished and preserve intrusive contacts with pre-Alpine metamorphosed supracrustal rocks. The granitic protoliths represent fractionated late to post-orogenic, calc-alkaline, I-type magmas with minor S-type components. The Mo veins are restricted to a biotite and alkali feldspar-rich gneiss variety and occur in E-W trending normally sub-vertical quartz veins with adjacent thin discontinuous garnet- and biotite-rich zones; the latter are interpreted as metamorphosed vein selvages. Prior to this work the age of the intrusive host rocks as well as the age of Mo mineralization were unknown. The pre-Alpine Mo deposit and its host rocks were affected by four Alpine deformation events (D 1 -D 4 ) and Young-Alpine regional metamorphism. The P-T conditions of this metamorphic event were ∼ 550 o C and ∼ 8 kbar and are in agreement with results of previous regional studies. Zircon grains from two orthogneiss samples were dated with the U-Pb method using ion probe techniques. Zircons from the metagranitic host rock of the Mo-veins yielded an emplacement age of 306.8 ± 3.8 Ma (2σ). A second sample from a more leucocratic gneiss lacking Mo-veins gave 305.0 ± 6.6 Ma (2 σ). Re-Os dating of molybdenite from the veins yielded an age of 306.8 ± 3.1 Ma in good agreement with the U-Pb zircon ages. This study confirms one of two alternative hypotheses discussed in the literature. lt supports the idea that vein-type Mo-mineralization in the western Tauern Window is genetically related to Late Carboniferous (Westphalian) granitoids that were emplaced during the late to post-orogenic stage of the Variscan orogeny. They do not constitute an Alpine metamorphic-hydrothermal deposit. This study further confirms the strength of the Re-Os molybdenite chronometer, in that it was

  3. Molybdenite Re-Os, zircon U-Pb dating and Lu-Hf isotopic analysis of the Xiaerchulu Au deposit, Inner Mongolia Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-xin; Nie, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Xue-ni; Jiang, Si-hong

    2016-09-01

    The Xiaerchulu Au deposit, located in the Southern Orogenic Belt (SOB) of Western Inner Mongolia (WIM), is hosted in an Early Permian (271-261 Ma) volcanic-plutonic sequence. Mineralization took place in silicified biotite granites or along the contact zone between the Neoproterozoic Baiyinbaolage Group and the biotite granite. In order to constrain the timing of the Xiaerchulu mineralization and discuss the petrogenesis of the hosting granites, molybdenite Re-Os, and zircon U-Pb and, Lu-Hf, and REE, geochemical, and Sr-Nd isotopic studies were completed in this study. We measured Re-Os isotopes of six molybdenite samples from the main ore body, which yielded a weighted average model age of 261.7 ± 1.5 Ma with a MSWD of 0.55, indicating that the time of mineralization was at ca. 262 Ma. High precision U-Pb dating for the studied granites yields Permian 206Pb/238U ages ranging from 271 to 269 Ma. These age data confirm that both the intrusion and related mineralization were initiated in Early Permian period. These granites are strongly peraluminous with A/CNK = 1.11-1.12, high SiO2-K2O contents, as well as containing biotite and muscovite, indicating a petrogenesis of typical S-type granites, the above consideration is also consistent with the result of discrimination diagrams. The Re contents of molybdenite, εNd(t), and zircon εHf(t), as well as the 176Hf/177Hf values of the granites, fall into the ranges from 1.153 to 2.740 μg/g, - 11.1 to - 9.3, - 8.8 to - 0.9, and 0.282358 to 0.282688, respectively. All of this evidence suggests that the metals were derived from a predominantly crustal source, the granites originated from crust in an extensional setting, and the rejuvenation of the continent may have play an important role during the ore-forming processes of the Early Permian epoch.

  4. Sediment unmixing using detrital geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Glenn R.; Johnstone, Samuel A.

    2017-11-01

    Sediment mixing within sediment routing systems can exert a strong influence on the preservation of provenance signals that yield insight into the effect of environmental forcing (e.g., tectonism, climate) on the Earth's surface. Here, we discuss two approaches to unmixing detrital geochronologic data in an effort to characterize complex changes in the sedimentary record. First, we summarize 'top-down' mixing, which has been successfully employed in the past to characterize the different fractions of prescribed source distributions ('parents') that characterize a derived sample or set of samples ('daughters'). Second, we propose the use of 'bottom-up' methods, previously used primarily for grain size distributions, to model parent distributions and the abundances of these parents within a set of daughters. We demonstrate the utility of both top-down and bottom-up approaches to unmixing detrital geochronologic data within a well-constrained sediment routing system in central California. Use of a variety of goodness-of-fit metrics in top-down modeling reveals the importance of considering the range of allowable that is well mixed over any single best-fit mixture calculation. Bottom-up modeling of 12 daughter samples from beaches and submarine canyons yields modeled parent distributions that are remarkably similar to those expected from the geologic context of the sediment-routing system. In general, mixture modeling has the potential to supplement more widely applied approaches in comparing detrital geochronologic data by casting differences between samples as differing proportions of geologically meaningful end-member provenance categories.

  5. Multiphase formation of the Obří důl polymetallic skarn deposit, West Sudetes, Bohemian Massif: geochemistry and Re-Os dating of sulfide mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovský, František; Ackerman, Lukáš; Pašava, Jan; Žák, Karel; Haluzová, Eva; Creaser, Robert A.; Dobeš, Petr; Erban, Vojtěch; Tásler, Radko

    2018-06-01

    The Obří důl Fe-Cu-As polymetallic sulfide skarn deposit is developed in a metamorphic series in the West Sudetes, Bohemian Massif. It consists of lenses of marble, calc-silicate rocks, and skarns. We studied the Gustav orebody, which is located few hundred meters away from the contact with a large, late-orogenic Variscan Krkonoše-Jizera Plutonic Complex (KJPC) emplaced into shallow crust. Mineralogical and fluid inclusion study evidence indicates that the main sulfide stage, dominated by pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, and chalcopyrite originated from aqueous hydrothermal fluids with salinity up to 8 wt% NaCl eq. with minimum homogenization temperatures ranging from 324 to 358 °C. These fluids mainly replaced carbonate-rich lithologies. Carbon, oxygen, and strontium isotope data in Ca-rich rocks imply total overprinting by channelized metasomatic fluid flow, which is most probably related to the intrusion of the KJPC, whereas δ34S values of sulfides argue for a magmatic source of sulfur. The Re-Os age of arsenopyrite overlaps published age data for the KJPC and suggests synchronous formation of the main sulfide mineralization and pluton emplacement.

  6. Platinum-group elements and gold in base metal sulfides, platinum-group minerals, and Re-Os isotope compositions of the Uitkomst complex, South Africa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trubač, Jakub; Ackerman, Lukáš; Gauert, Ch.; Ďurišová, Jana; Hrstka, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 2 (2018), s. 439-461 ISSN 0361-0128 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : binary alloys * copper compounds * economic geology * gold * iridium * isotopes * ore deposits * osmium * palladium * platinum * platinum metals * pyrites * Rhenium * rhenium alloys * ruthenium * solid solutions * sulfur compounds * crustal materials * mass-balance calculations * massive sulfides * mineralized zone * monosulfide solid solutions * platinum group elements * platinum group elements (PGEs) * platinum group minerals Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy; AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology (ARUB-Q) OBOR OECD: Geology; Archaeology (ARUB-Q) Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2016

  7. Thermal behaviors of mechanically activated pyrites by thermogravimetry (TG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Huiping; Chen Qiyuan; Yin Zhoulan; Zhang Pingmin

    2003-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of mechanically activated and non-activated pyrites were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) at the heating rate of 10 K min -1 in argon. Results indicate that the initial temperature of thermal decomposition (T di ) in TG curves for mechanically activated pyrites decreases gradually with increasing the grinding time. The specific granulometric surface area (S G ), the structural disorder of mechanically activated pyrites were analyzed by X-ray diffraction laser particle size analyzer, and X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. The results show that the S G of mechanically activated pyrites remains almost constant after a certain grinding time, and lattice distortions (ε) rise but the crystallite sizes (D) decrease with increasing the grinding time. All these results imply that the decrease of T di in TG curves of mechanically activated pyrites is mainly caused by the increase of lattice distortions ε and the decrease of the crystallite sizes D of mechanically activated pyrite with increasing the grinding time. The differences in the reactivity between non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites were observed using characterization of the products obtained from 1 h treatment of non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites at 713 K under inert atmosphere and characterization of non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites exposed to ambient air for a certain period

  8. Bacterial leaching of pyritic gold ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Cashion, J.D.; Brown, L.J. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Jay, W.H. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Chemical Engineering Department

    1996-12-31

    The bacterial oxidation process is well known in nature but has only recently come under investigation as a viable and relatively clean method of gold recovery from ores. However there is currently little information about the process at an atomic scale. It is known that the bacterial attack progresses preferentially along grain boundaries which is precisely where the gold has been deposited from aqueous infiltration. Samples have been obtained from the Wiluna mine in Western Australia consisting of the original ore, 2 pre-treatments, and from six successive bacterial reactors. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra taken at room temperature show only two quadrupole split doublets which can be ascribed to pyrite, FeS{sub 2}, and arsenopyrite, FeAsS. However, the presence of any superparamagnetic oxide or oxyhydroxide species would be expected to give a spectrum very similar to that of pyrite and would be undetectable in small quantities. At a temperature of 5K, a broad magnetically split sextet is observable with a mean hyperfine field of approximately 50T. This field is characteristic of magnetically ordered ferric iron surrounded by an octahedron of oxygens. The intensity and characteristics of this subspectrum alters through the series and interpretations will be given on the oxidation products of the bacterial leaching

  9. Bacterial leaching of pyritic gold ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Cashion, J.D.; Brown, L.J.; Jay, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    The bacterial oxidation process is well known in nature but has only recently come under investigation as a viable and relatively clean method of gold recovery from ores. However there is currently little information about the process at an atomic scale. It is known that the bacterial attack progresses preferentially along grain boundaries which is precisely where the gold has been deposited from aqueous infiltration. Samples have been obtained from the Wiluna mine in Western Australia consisting of the original ore, 2 pre-treatments, and from six successive bacterial reactors. 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra taken at room temperature show only two quadrupole split doublets which can be ascribed to pyrite, FeS 2 , and arsenopyrite, FeAsS. However, the presence of any superparamagnetic oxide or oxyhydroxide species would be expected to give a spectrum very similar to that of pyrite and would be undetectable in small quantities. At a temperature of 5K, a broad magnetically split sextet is observable with a mean hyperfine field of approximately 50T. This field is characteristic of magnetically ordered ferric iron surrounded by an octahedron of oxygens. The intensity and characteristics of this subspectrum alters through the series and interpretations will be given on the oxidation products of the bacterial leaching

  10. Thin film preparation of semiconducting iron pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smestad, Greg P.; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Fiechter, Sebastian; Hofmann, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut; Kautek, Wolfgang

    1990-08-01

    Pyrite (Fe52) has been investigated as a promising new absorber material for thin film solar cell applications because of its high optical absorption coefficient of 1OL cm1, and its bandgap of 0.9 to 1.0 eV. Thin layers have been prepared by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition, MOCVD, Chemical Spray Pyrolysis, CSP, Chemical Vapor Transport, CVT, and Sulfurization of Iron Oxide films, 510. It is postulated that for the material FeS2, if x is not zero, a high point defect concentration results from replacing 2 dipoles by single S atoms. This causes the observed photovoltages and solar conversion efficiencies to be lower than expected. Using the Fe-O-S ternary phase diagram and the related activity plots, a thermodynamic understanding is formulated for the resulting composition of each of these types of films. It is found that by operating in the oxide portion of the phase diagram, the resulting oxidation state favors pyrite formation over FeS. By proper orientation of the grains relative to the film surface, and by control of pinholes and stoichiometry, an efficient thin film photovolatic solar cell material could be achieved.

  11. Geochronology of the Thompson Creek Mo Deposit: Evidence for the Formation of Arc-related Mo Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C. D.; Coleman, D. S.; Stein, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Thompson Creek Mo deposit in central ID, has been categorized as an arc-related Mo deposit due to the location, grade of Mo, and relative lack of enrichments in F, Rb, and Nb, compared to the Climax-type Mo deposits. Geochronology from this arc-related deposit provides an opportunity to compare and contrast magmatism, and mineralization to that in Climax-type deposits. Distinct pulses of magmatism were required to form the Thompson Creek Mo deposit, which is consistent with recent geochronology from Climax-type deposits. Molybdenite Re-Os geochronology from five veins requires at least three pulses of magmatism and mineralization between 89.39 +/- 0.37 and 88.47 +/- 0.16 Ma. Zircon U-Pb ages from these mineralized samples overlap with molybdenite mineralization, but show a much wider range (91.01 +/- 0.37 to 87.27 +/- 0.69). Previous work from Climax-type Mo deposits suggest a correlation between a super eruption, and the subsequent rapid (<1 Ma) onset, and completion of Mo mineralizing intrusions. The longer life (3-4 Ma) for the Thompson Creek Mo deposit suggests that the mineralizing intrusions for arc-related Mo deposits may not need to have as high [Mo] as the Climax-type deposits. This study also finds a shift in the source of magmatism from the pre- to syn-mineralizing intrusions. Zircons from pre-mineralizing intrusions have much higher (15-60 pg) concentrations of radiogenic Pb than zircons from mineralized intrusions, which all have less than 15 pg, though whole rock [U] are similar.

  12. Origin and tectonic implications of the Zhaxikang Pb-Zn-Sb-Ag deposit in northern Himalaya: evidence from structures, Re-Os-Pb-S isotopes, and fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Li, Wenchang; Qing, Chengshi; Lai, Yang; Li, Yingxu; Liao, Zhenwen; Wu, Jianyang; Wang, Shengwei; Dong, Lei; Tian, Enyuan

    2018-04-01

    The Zhaxikang Pb-Zn-Sb-Ag-(Au) deposits, located in the eastern part of northern Himalaya, totally contain more than 1.146 million tonnes (Mt) of Pb, 1.407 Mt of Zn, 0.345 Mt of Sb, and 3 kilotonnes (kt) of Ag. Our field observations suggest that these deposits are controlled by N-S trending and west- and steep-dipping normal faults, suggesting a hydrothermal rather than a syngenetic sedimentary origin. The Pb-Zn-Sb-Ag-(Cu-Au) mineralization formed in the Eocene as indicated by a Re-Os isochron age of 43.1 ± 2.5 Ma. Sulfide minerals have varying initial Pb isotopic compositions, with (206Pb/204Pb)i of 19.04-19.68, (207Pb/204Pb)i of 15.75-15.88, and (208Pb/204Pb)i of 39.66-40.31. Sulfur isotopic values display a narrow δ34S interval of +7.8-+12.2‰. These Pb-S isotopic data suggest that the Zhaxikang sources of Pb and S should be mainly from the coeval felsic magmas and partly from the surrounding Mesozoic strata including metasedimentary rocks and layered felsic volcanic rocks. Fluid inclusion studies indicate that the hydrothermal fluids have medium temperatures (200-336 °C) but varying salinities (1.40-18.25 wt.% NaCl equiv.) with densities of 0.75-0.95 g/cm3, possibly suggesting an evolution mixing between a high salinity fluid, perhaps of magmatic origin, with meteoric water.

  13. A subduction wedge origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds and harzburgites from the Panda kimberlite, Slave craton: evidence from Re-Os isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, K. J.; Shirey, S. B.; Richardson, S. H.; Carlson, R. W.; Gurney, J. J.; Harris, J. W.

    2006-09-01

    An extensive study of peridotitic sulfide inclusion bearing diamonds and their prospective harzburgitic host rocks from the 53 Ma Panda kimberlite pipe, Ekati Mine, NWT Canada, has been undertaken with the Re-Os system to establish their age and petrogenesis. Diamonds with peridotitic sulfide inclusions have poorly aggregated nitrogen (bearing diamonds and indicates residence in the cooler portion of the Slave craton lithospheric mantle. For most of the sulfide inclusions, relatively low Re contents (average 0.457 ppm) and high Os contents (average 339 ppm) lead to extremely low 187Re/188Os, typically << 0.05. An age of 3.52 ± 0.17 Ga (MSWD = 0.46) and a precise initial 187Os/188Os of 0.1093 ± 0.0001 are given by a single regression of 11 inclusions from five diamonds that individually provide coincident internal isochrons. This initial Os isotopic composition is 6% enriched in 187Os over 3.5 Ga chondritic or primitive mantle. Sulfide inclusions with less radiogenic initial Os isotopic compositions reflect isotopic heterogeneity in diamond forming fluids. The harzburgites have even lower initial 187Os/188Os than the sulfide inclusions, some approaching the isotopic composition of 3.5 Ga chondritic mantle. In several cases isotopically distinct sulfides occur in different growth zones of the same diamond. This supports a model where C-O-H-S fluids carrying a radiogenic Os signature were introduced into depleted harzburgite and produced diamonds containing sulfides conforming to the 3.5 Ga isochron. Reaction of this fluid with harzburgite led to diamonds with less radiogenic inclusions while elevating the Os isotope ratios of some harzburgites. Subduction is a viable way of introducing such fluids. This implies a role for subduction in creating early continental nuclei at 3.5 Ga and generating peridotitic diamonds.

  14. Geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elworthy, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the multi-disciplinary research programme to unravel the geological history of the area, radiometric age determinations and isotopic analyses were carried out on intrusive and extrusive rocks from the Ahlmannryggen and Borgmassivet. The intention of the article is to review the radiometric age data so far reported for western Dronning Maud Land, and to construct a preliminary time frame for the geological evolution of this area. Isotope ratios that were determined includes Rb 87 , Sr 86 , Sr 87 , Sr 88 , Ar 39 , Ar 40 and potassium isotopes

  15. Fabrication and characterization of PDLLA/pyrite composite bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Polylactic acid; Chinese herbal medicine; pyrite; scaffold; bone regeneration; cell culture. ... Pyrite (FeS2, named as Zi-Ran-Tong in Chinese medicine), as a traditional Chinesemedicine, has been used in the Chinese population to treat bone diseases and to promote bone healing. The mechanical properties of ...

  16. Pyrite-coated granite cobbles at Lee Bay, Stewart Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brathwaite, R.L.; Skinner, D.N.B.; Faure, K.; Edwards, E.

    2014-01-01

    On the west side of Lee Bay on the northeast coast of Stewart Island, ventifact cobbles of pyrite-coated granite occur on the beach near the high tide mark and appear to be derived from a sand-cemented gravel deposit that forms a low bank at the back of the beach. The pyrite coat (up to 1 mm thick) completely covers the granitic cobbles and is zoned, with an inner zone of fine-grained colloform pyrite and an outer framboidal zone. Framboidal pyrite is typically formed in anoxic sedimentary environments. Subrounded grains of hematite, ilmenite with hematite blebs, magnetite, feldspar, biotite, quartz and zircon are present in the outer framboidal zone, with some ilmenite and hematite grains being partially replaced by pyrite. The assemblage of ilmenite-hematite-magnetite-biotite-zircon is similar both in mineralogy and size range to that found in heavy mineral beach sands. Sulphur isotope values of the pyrite coat are consistent with formation of the pyrite by microbial sulphate reduction of seawater sulphate. The framboidal texture together with the presence of grains of beach sand in the pyrite coating indicate that it was deposited in a low-temperature sedimentary environment. (author)

  17. Enhancement of Biofilm Formation on Pyrite by Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching is the mobilization of metal cations from insoluble ores by microorganisms. Biofilms can enhance this process. Since Sulfobacillus often appears in leaching heaps or reactors, this genus has aroused attention. In this study, biofilm formation and subsequent pyrite dissolution by the Gram-positive, moderately thermophilic acidophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans were investigated. Five strategies, including adjusting initial pH, supplementing an extra energy source or ferric ions, as well as exchanging exhausted medium with fresh medium, were tested for enhancement of its biofilm formation. The results show that regularly exchanging exhausted medium leads to a continuous biofilm development on pyrite. By this way, multiply layered biofilms were observed on pyrite slices, while only monolayer biofilms were visible on pyrite grains. In addition, biofilms were proven to be responsible for pyrite leaching in the early stages.

  18. Selective separation of pyrite and chalcopyrite by biomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraprabha, M N; Natarajan, K A; Modak, Jayant M

    2004-09-01

    Selective separation of pyrite from other associated ferrous sulphides at acidic and neutral pH has been a challenging problem. This paper discusses the utility of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for the selective flotation of chalcopyrite from pyrite. Consequent to interaction with bacterial cells, pyrite remained depressed even in the presence of potassium isopropyl xanthate collector while chalcopyrite exhibited significant flotability. However, when the minerals were conditioned together, the selectivity achieved was poor due to the activation of pyrite surface by the copper ions in solution. The selectivity was improved when the sequence of conditioning with bacterial cells and collector was reversed, since the bacterial cells were able to depress collector interacted pyrite effectively, while having negligible effect on chalcopyrite. The observed behaviour is analysed and discussed in detail. The separation obtained was significant both at acidic and alkaline pH. This selectivity achieved was retained when the minerals were interacted with both bacterial cells and collector simultaneously.

  19. Re-Os systematics of komatiites and komatiitic basalts at Dundonald Beach, Ontario, Canada: Evidence for a complex alteration history and implications of a late-Archean chondritic mantle source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Amitava; Sproule, Rebecca A.; Walker, Richard J.; Lesher, C. Michael

    2005-11-01

    Osmium isotopic compositions, and Re and Os concentrations have been examined in one komatiite unit and two komatiitic basalt units at Dundonald Beach, part of the 2.7 Ga Kidd-Munro volcanic assemblage in the Abitibi greenstone belt, Ontario, Canada. The komatiitic rocks in this locality record at least three episodes of alteration of Re-Os elemental and isotope systematics. First, an average of 40% and as much as 75% Re may have been lost due to shallow degassing during eruption and/or hydrothermal leaching during or immediately after emplacement. Second, the Re-Os isotope systematics of whole rock samples with 187Re/ 188Os ratios >1 were reset at ˜2.5 Ga, possibly due to a regional metamorphic event. Third, there is evidence for relatively recent gain and loss of Re in some rocks. Despite the open-system behavior, some aspects of the Re-Os systematics of these rocks can be deciphered. The bulk distribution coefficient for Os (D Ossolid/liquid) for the Dundonald rocks is ˜3 ± 1 and is well within the estimated D values obtained for komatiites from the nearby Alexo area and stratigraphically-equivalent komatiites from Munro Township. This suggests that Os was moderately compatible during crystal-liquid fractionation of the magmas parental to the Kidd-Munro komatiitic rocks. Whole-rock samples and chromite separates with low 187Re/ 188Os ratios (Gorgona Island, arc-related rocks and present-day ocean island basalts. This suggests that the Kidd-Munro komatiites sampled a late-Archean mantle source region that was significantly more homogeneous with respect to Re/Os relative to most modern mantle-derived rocks.

  20. Greigite: a true intermediate on the polysulfide pathway to pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benning Liane G

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of pyrite (FeS2 from iron monosulfide precursors in anoxic sediments has been suggested to proceed via mackinawite (FeS and greigite (Fe3S4. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of pyrite formation are not sufficiently understood because solid and dissolved intermediates are oxygen-sensitive and poorly crystalline and therefore notoriously difficult to characterize and quantify. In this study, hydrothermal synchrotron-based energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (ED-XRD methods were used to investigate in situ and in real-time the transformation of mackinawite to greigite and pyrite via the polysulfide pathway. The rate of formation and disappearance of specific Bragg peaks during the reaction and the changes in morphology of the solid phases as observed with high resolution microscopy were used to derive kinetic parameters and to determine the mechanisms of the reaction from mackinawite to greigite and pyrite. The results clearly show that greigite is formed as an intermediate on the pathway from mackinawite to pyrite. The kinetics of the transformation of mackinawite to greigite and pyrite follow a zero-order rate law indicating a solid-state mechanism. The morphology of greigite and pyrite crystals formed under hydrothermal conditions supports this conclusion and furthermore implies growth of greigite and pyrite by oriented aggregation of nanoparticulate mackinawite and greigite, respectively. The activation enthalpies and entropies of the transformation of mackinawite to greigite, and of greigite to pyrite were determined from the temperature dependence of the rate constants according to the Eyring equation. Although the activation enthalpies are uncharacteristic of a solid-state mechanism, the activation entropies indicate a large increase of order in the transition state, commensurate with a solid-state mechanism.

  1. Waste pyritic coal as a raw material for energetic industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasiorek, J. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Poznan (Poland). Dept. of Research and Technology

    1997-11-01

    Results are presented of large laboratory studies on coal desulphurisation with foam flotation method improved by application of bioadsorption of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria to the modification of superficial properties of pyrite particulates from hydrophobic to hydrophillic ones. Results of coal desulfurization with and without bioadsorption have been compared. Bioadsorption improved pyritic sulfur removal by 30% (for coal from `Sierza mine`, coal size 0.3 to 0.102 mm, S pyritic content 1.69%) after 6-week adaptation of bacteria and 30 min of bioadsorption. Bacteria concentration in 5% water suspension of coal reached 22 {mu}g of biomass cm{sup -3}. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Practical considerations of pyrite oxidation control in uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The problems posed by the oxidation of pyrite in uranium tailings include the generation of sulfuric acid and acid sulfate metal salts. These have substantial negative impacts on watercourse biota by themselves, and the lowered pH levels tend to mobilize heavy metals present in the tailings the rate of oxidation of pyrite at lower pH levels is catalyzed by sulfur and iron oxidizing bacteria present in soils. No single clear solution to the problems came from this study. Exclusion of air is a most important preventative of bacterial catalysis of oxidation. Bactericides, chemically breaking the chain of integrated oxidation reactions, maintaining anaerobic conditions, or maintaining a neutral or alkaline pH all reduce the oxidation rate. Removal of pyrite by flotation will reduce but not eliminate the impact of pyrite oxidation. Controlled oxidation of the remaining sulfide in the flotation tails would provide an innocuous tailing so far as acidity generation is concerned

  3. Chemical and sulphur isotope compositions of pyrite in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sulphide mineralization and their chemical evo- lution in relative .... properties and chemical compositions. Electron ..... from the sulphide lode provide clues to the chang- ing fluid ..... Raymond O L 1996 Pyrite composition and ore geneis in.

  4. Regional setting and geochronology of the Late Cretaceous Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenetic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Cook, Nigel J.; Stein, Holly

    2002-08-01

    The 1,500-km-long Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenetic Belt (BMMB) of Romania, Serbia and Bulgaria is a complex calc-alkaline magmatic arc of Late Cretaceous age. It hosts a variety of magmatic-hydrothermal Cu, Au, Mo, Zn, Pb and Fe deposits, including Europe's only world-class porphyry-copper deposits. Regional metallogeny can be linked to subduction of the Vardar Ocean during the Late Cretaceous, as part of the closure of the Neotethys Ocean that had separated Europe and Africa in the Mesozoic. Porphyry Cu-(Au)-(Mo) and intimately associated epithermal massive sulphides dominate in the central segments of the belt in southernmost Banat (Romania), Serbia and north-west Bulgaria. These districts are the economically most important today, including major active Cu-Au mines at Moldova Nouă in Romania, Majdanpek, Veliki Krivelj and Bor in Serbia, and Elatsite, Assarel and Chelopech in Bulgaria. More numerous (and mostly mined in the past) are Fe, Cu and Zn-Pb skarns, which occur mainly at the two ends of the belt, in Eastern Bulgaria and in Romania. This paper summarises some of the deposit characteristics within the geodynamic framework of terminal Vardar subduction. Heterogeneous terranes of the belt, including the Apuseni Mountains at the western end, are aligned parallel to the Vardar front following continental collision of the Dacia and Tisza blocks. All available geochronological data (numerous K-Ar and some U-Pb and Re-Os ages) are compiled, and are complemented by a new high-precision Re-Os date for the Dognecea skarn deposit, south-west Romania (76.6±0.3 Ma). These data indicate that magmatism extended over at least 25 million years, from about 90 to 65 Ma in each segment of the belt. Within Apuseni Mountains and Banat, where magma emplacement was related to syn-collisional extension in the orogenic belt of Carpathians, ore formation seems to be restricted in time and maybe constrained by a shared tectonic event.

  5. Moessbauer investigation of gold-bearing pyrite-rich concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, F.E.; Harris, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    A gold-bearing pyrite-rich concentrate of a refractory ore from the Golden Bear mine, northwestern British Columbia, and a pyrite-rich concentrate from Newhawk's west zone, Brucejack Lake area, northern British Columbia, containing 38 and 316 ppm Au and 0.57% and 0.19% As, respectively, have been investigated using 197 Au and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the Golden Bear sample, the gold is mainly chemically bound in the pyrite with minor amounts present as an Au-Ag alloy, whereas in the Newhawk sample, the gold occurs mainly as an Au-Ag alloy with a composition close to Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 and is only partly bound in the pyrite. Having mean isomer shifts of +3.2 and +4.0 mm/s with respect to a Pt metal source, the gold in pyrite exhibits shifts similar to those observed for gold in arsenopyrite. The nature of the lattice sites occupied by the gold in pyrite is discussed. (orig.)

  6. The effect of lizardite surface characteristics on pyrite flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Bo; Feng Qiming; Lu Yiping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two kinds of lizardite samples have different effect on the flotation of pyrite. ► Acid leaching changed the surface characteristics of lizardite mineral. ► The leached lizardite has less magnesium on its surface. ► The electro-kinetic behavior of lizardite aqueous suspensions is mainly a function of the Mg/Si atomic ratio on mineral surface. - Abstract: The effect of lizardite surface characteristics on pyrite flotation has been investigated through flotation tests, adsorption tests, zeta potential measurements, FTIR study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and sedimentation tests. The flotation results show that at pH value 9, where flotation of nickel sulfide ores is routinely performed, two kinds of lizardite samples (native lizardite and leached lizardite) have different effects on the flotation of pyrite. The native lizardite adheres to the surface of pyrite and reduces pyrite flotation recovery while the leached lizardite does not interfere with pyrite flotation. Infrared analyses and XPS tests illustrate that acid leaching changed the surface characteristics of lizardite mineral and the leached lizardite has less magnesium on its surface. It has been determined that the electro-kinetic behavior of lizardite aqueous suspensions is mainly a function of the Mg/Si atomic ratio on lizardite surface. So, the low isoelectric point observed in the leached sample has been linked to values of this ratio lower than that of the native lizardite.

  7. Spectral Induced Polarization of Disseminated Pyrite Particles in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, L. D.; Kessouri, P.; Seleznev, N. V.

    2017-12-01

    Disseminated metallic particles in soil, particularly pyrite, occur naturally or are enhanced by anthropogenic activities. Detecting their presence and quantifying their concentration and location is of interest for numerous applications such as remediation of hydrocarbon contamination, mine tailings assessment, detection of oil traps, and archaeological studies. Because pyrite is a semiconductor, spectral induced polarization (SIP) is a promising geophysical method for sensing it in porous media. Previous studies have identified relations between pyrite properties (e.g., volumetric content, grain size) and SIP parameters (e.g., chargeability, relaxation time). However, the effect of pyrite grains in porous media on the SIP response is not fully understood over the entire low-frequency range. We tested the relationship between the presence of pyrite grains and the change in electrical properties of the medium through an extended series of laboratory measurements: (1) variation of grain size, (2) variation of grain concentration, (3) variation of electrolyte conductivity, (4) change in the diffusion properties of the host medium. For the fourth set of measurements, we compared sand columns to agar gel columns. Our experimental design included more than 20 different samples with multiple repeats to ensure representative results. We confirm the strong relation between grain size and relaxation time and that between grain concentration and chargeability in both the sand and agar gel samples. Furthermore, our results shed light on the significance of the diffusion coefficient and the recently hypothesized role of pyrite grains as resistors at frequencies lower than the relaxation frequency.

  8. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 7. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology: Implications for the provenance and tectonic setting of Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Zhucheng Basin (Jiaodong peninsula, North China). Jin-Long Ni Jun-Lai Liu Xiao-Ling Tang ...

  9. Chronostratigraphy and geochronology: A proposed realignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalasiewicz, J.; Cita, M.B.; Hilgen, F.; Pratt, B.R.; Strasser, A.; Thierry, J.; Weissert, H.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a realignment of the terms geochronology and chronostratigraphy that brings them broadly into line with current use, while simultaneously resolving the debate over whether the Geological Time Scale should have a “single” or “dual” hierarchy of units: Both parallel sets of units are

  10. Chemical Interactions of Hydraulic Fracturing Biocides with Natural Pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolazio, Nizette A.

    In conjunction with horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing or fracking has enabled the recovery of natural gas from low permeable shale formations. In addition to water, these fracking fluids employ proppants and up to 38 different chemical additives to improve the efficiency of the process. One important class of additives used in hydraulic fracturing is biocides. When applied appropriately, they limit the growth of harmful microorganisms within the well, saving energy producers 4.5 billion dollars each year. However, biocides or their harmful daughter products may return to the surface in produced water, which must then be appropriately stored, treated and disposed of. Little is known about the effect of mineral-fluid interactions on the fate of the biocides employed in hydraulic fracturing. In this study, we employed laboratory experiments to determine changes in the persistence and products of these biocides under controlled environments. While many minerals are present in shale formations, pyrite, FeS2(s) is particularly interesting because of its prevalence and reactivity. The FeII groups on the face of pyrite may be oxidized to form FeIII phases. Both of these surfaces have been shown to be reactive with organic compounds. Chlorinated compounds undergo redox reactions at the pyrite-fluid interface, and sulfur-containing compounds undergo exceptionally strong sorption to both pristine and oxidized pyrite. This mineral may significantly influence the degradation of biocides in the Marcellus Shale. Thus, the overall goal of this study was to understand the effect of pyrite on biocide reactivity in hydraulic fracturing, focusing on the influence of pyrite on specific functional groups. The first specific objective was to demonstrate the effect of pyrite and pyrite reaction products on the degradation of the bromine-containing biocide, DBNPA. On the addition of pyrite to DBNPA, degradation rates of the doubly brominated compound were found to increase

  11. Re-Os systematics and geochemistry of cobaltite (CoAsS) in the Idaho cobalt belt, Belt-Purcell Basin, USA: Evidence for middle Mesoproterozoic sediment-hosted Co-Cu sulfide mineralization with Grenvillian and Cretaceous remobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintilan, N.J.; Creaser, R.A.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.

    2017-01-01

    We report the first study of the Re-Os systematics of cobaltite (CoAsS) using disseminated grains and massive sulfides from samples of two breccia-type and two stratabound deposits in the Co-Cu-Au Idaho cobalt belt (ICB), Lemhi subbasin to the Belt-Purcell Basin, Idaho, USA. Using a 185Re + 190Os spike solution, magnetic and non-magnetic fractions of cobaltite mineral separates give reproducible Re-Os analytical data for aliquot sizes of 150 to 200 mg. Cobaltite from the ICB has highly radiogenic 187Os/188Os ratios (17–45) and high 187Re/188Os ratios (600–1800) but low Re and total Os contents (ca. 0.4–4 ppb and 14–64 ppt, respectively). Containing 30 to 74% radiogenic 187Os, cobaltite from the ICB is amenable to Re-Os age determination using the isochron regression approach.Re-Os data for disseminated cobaltite mineralization in a quartz-tourmaline breccia from the Haynes-Stellite deposit yield a Model 1 isochron age of 1349 ± 76 Ma (2σ, n = 4, mean squared weighted deviation MSWD = 2.1, initial 187Os/188Os ratio = 4.7 ± 2.2). This middle Mesoproterozoic age is preserved despite a possible metamorphic overprint or a pulse of metamorphic-hydrothermal remobilization of pre-existing cobaltite that formed along fold cleavages during the ca. 1190–1006 Ma Grenvillian orogeny. This phase of remobilization is tentatively identified by a Model 3 isochron age of 1132 ± 240 Ma (2σ, n = 7, MSWD = 9.3, initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 9.0 ± 2.9) for cobaltite in the quartz-tourmaline breccia from the Idaho zone in the Blackbird mine.All Mesoproterozoic cobaltite mineralization in the district was affected by greenschist- to lower amphibolite-facies (garnet zone) metamorphism during the Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous Cordilleran orogeny. However, the fine- to coarse-grained massive cobaltite mineralization from the shear zone-hosted Chicago zone, Blackbird mine, is the only studied deposit that has severely disturbed Re-Os

  12. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglizaud, N.

    2006-12-01

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS 2 ). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH ≥ 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 , an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. ≥ -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 ± 0.8) x 10 -7 mol L -1 of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage (≥ 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 ) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10 7 L mol -1 . Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the saturation concentration allows the observation of

  13. Re-Os, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, and stepwise lead leaching isotope systematics in shear-zone hosted gold mineralization: genetic tracing and age constraints of crustal hydrothermal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Nägler, Th. F.; Schönberg, R.; Kramers, J. D.

    1998-06-01

    A combined Re-Os, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, and stepwise Pb leaching (PbSL) isotope study of hydrothermal (Mo-W)-bearing minerals and base metal sulfides from two adjacent shear zone hosted gold deposits (RAN, Kimberley) in the Harare-Shamva greenstone belt (Zimbabwe) constrain the timing of the mineralizing events to two periods. During an initial Late Archean event (2.60 Ga) a first molybdenite-scheelite bearing paragenesis was deposited in both shear zone systems, followed by a local reactivation of the shear systems during an Early Proterozoic (1.96 Ga) tectono-thermal overprint, during which base metal sulfides and most of the gold was (re-)deposited. While PbSL has revealed an open-system behavior of the U-Pb systematics in molybdenite and wolframite from the RAN mine, initial Archean Re-Os ages are still preserved implying that this system in these minerals was more resistant to the overprint. A similar retentivity could be shown for the Sm-Nd system in scheelite and powellite associated with the above ore minerals. Re-Os isotopic data from the Proterozoic mineralization in the Kimberley mine point to a recent gain of Re, most pronouncedly affecting Fe-rich sulfides such as pyrrhotite. A significant Re-loss in powellitic scheelite (an alteration phase of molybdenite-bearing scheelite), coupled with a marked loss of U in W-Mo ore minerals, complements the observation of a major Re uptake in Fe-sulfides during oxidizing conditions in a weathering environment. Pyrrhotite under these conditions behaves as an efficient Re-sink. Lead isotope signatures from PbSL residues of molybdenite, powellite, and quartz indicate a continental crustal source and/or contamination for the mineralizing fluid by interaction of the fluids with older sedimentary material as represented by the direct host country rocks. Our investigation reveals the potential of the Re-Os isotopic system applied to crustal hydrothermal ore minerals for genetic tracing and dating purposes. The simplified chemical

  14. Pyritic ash-flow tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castor, S.B.; Tingley, J.V.; Bonham, H.F. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site is underlain by a 1,500-m-thick Miocene volcanic sequence that comprises part of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. Rocks of this sequence, which consists mainly of ash-flow tuff sheets with minor flows and bedded tuff, host precious metal mineralization in several areas as near as 10 km from the site. In two such areas, the Bullfrog and Bare Mountain mining districts, production and reserves total over 60 t gold and 150 t silver. Evidence of similar precious metal mineralization at the Yucca Mountain site may lead to mining or exploratory drilling in the future, compromising the security of the repository. The authors believe that most of the pyrite encountered by drilling at Yucca Mountain was introduced as pyroclastic ejecta, rather than by in situ hydrothermal activity. Pyritic ejecta in ash-flow tuff are not reported in the literature, but there is no reason to believe that the Yucca Mountain occurrence is unique. The pyritic ejecta are considered by us to be part of a preexisting hydrothermal system that was partially or wholly destroyed during eruption of the tuff units. Because it was introduced as ejecta in tuff units that occur at depths of about 1,000 m, such pyrite does not constitute evidence of shallow mineralization at the proposed repository site; however, the pyrite may be evidence for mineralization deep beneath Yucca Mountain or as much as tens of kilometers from it

  15. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  16. Hydrogeologic and environmental impact of amjhore pyrite mines, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Vishnu D.; Rawat, Rajendra K.

    1991-01-01

    Drainage from active and inactive pyrite mines has produced chemical and physical pollution of both ground- and surface water in Amjhore region. In the present case, chemical pollution is caused by exposing pyrite minerals to oxidation or leaching, resulting in undesirable concentrations of dissolved materials. Pyrite mining suddenly exposed large quantities of sulfides to direct contact with oxygen, and oxidation proceeds rapidly, resulting in acidity and release of metal (Fe) and sulfates to the water system, eventually resulting in water pollution in the region. The magnitude and impact of the problem is just being recognized and, as the present and the future projected demand for clean water is of top priority, the present studies were undertaken. Mine drainage includes water flowing from the surface and underground mines and runoff or seepage from the pyrite mines. This article describes the various hydrologic factors that control acid water formation and its transport. The mine drainage is obviously a continuing source of pollution and, therefore, remedial measures mainly consisting of a double-stage limestone-lime treatment technique have been suggested. The present results will be used to develop an alternative and more effective abatement technology to mitigate acid production at the source, namely, the technique of revegetation of the soil cover applied to the waste mine dump material. Water quality change is discussed in detail, with emphasis on acidity formed from exposed pyrite material and on increase in dissolved solids. Preventive and treatment measures are recommended.

  17. The flotation of gold, uranium, and pyrite from Witwatersrand ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, P.J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Witwatersrand reefs contain gold, uranium, and pyrite in the following average concentrations: 0,001 per cent, 0,02 per cent, and 1,7 per cent respectively. The paper discusses the flotation of pyrite to produce a sulphide concentrate, reviews work done on the production of gold concentrates, discusses attempts to produce maximum concentrates, and closes with a review of processes for the simultaneous flotation of these three species. It is concluded that high recoveries of all three species can be achieved only if a rougher concentrate of perhaps 20 per cent of the feed (by mass) is produced, and it is suggested that reverse leaching (leaching before cyanidation) of this concentrate, followed by a cleaning flotation step for the recovery of the pyrite, would be more efficient than the routes employed at present [af

  18. Degradation of Diclofenac by sonosynthesis of pyrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabbaz, M; Entezari, M H

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the ability of synthesized pyrite nanoparticles (NPs) on the degradation of Diclofenac (DCF) as a model pharmaceutical pollutant. Pyrite NPs were synthesized by sonication with 20 kHz apparatus under optimum conditions. The effects of pyrite loading (0.02-0.20 g/L), DCF concentration (10-50 mg/L) and initial pH (2-10) on the degradation were investigated. The results revealed that the NPs have a great activity in the degradation of DCF with 25 mg/L concentration. A first-order kinetic model was found to match the experimental data. Complete degradation (100%) of DCF was achieved by pyrite within 3 min and 20 min in acidic and natural pH, respectively. To gain an understanding of the degradation mechanism and the role of pyrite, a UV-Vis spectrophotometer was employed to follow the DCF concentration. In addition, the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and the amounts of ammonium and chloride ions verified complete degradation of DCF in both pH values. The results demonstrated that Fe 2+ ions were generated by the pyrite surface and the hydroxyl radical (OH) was formed by Fe 2+ ions through the Fenton reaction. Based on using radical scavengers in the degradation process, OH was mainly responsible for the fast degradation of DCF. COD measurements confirmed that DCF finally degraded to further oxidized forms (NH 4 + , Cl - ). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of heterotrophic microbial growth on biological oxidation of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, E.A.; Silverstein, J. [University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2002-12-15

    Experiments were carried out to examine the possibility that enhanced growth of heterotrophic (non-iron-oxidising) bacteria would inhibit pyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans by out-competing the more slowly growing autotrophs for oxygen, nutrients or even attachment sites on the mineral surface. Glucose was added to microcosms containing pyrite, acidic mineral solution and cultures of A-ferrooxidans and Acidiphilium acidophilus under various experimental conditions. Results suggest that encouraging the growth of heterotrophic microorganisms under acid mine drainage conditions may be a feasible strategy for decreasing both the rate and the extent of sulfide mineral oxidation. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Sulfur isotope evidence for the contemporary formation of pyrite in a coastal acid sulfate soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.; Sullivan, L.A.; Prince, K.; White, I.

    2000-01-01

    The sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite (FeS 2 ), greigite (Fe 3 S 4 ) and pore-water sulfate was determined for a typical coastal acid sulfate soil (ASS). Greigite occurs only in the partially oxidised upper-most pyrite sediments as blackish clusters within vertical fissures and other macro-pores. The concentration of pyrite was an order of magnitude greater than greigite in this layer, continuing through the underlying reduced estuarine sediments. δ 34 S of pyrite (0.45 per mil) associated with greigite accumulations were distinctly different to the bulk average for pyrite (-3.7 per mil), but similar to greigite (0.9 per mil). Greigite is meta-stable under reducing conditions, readily transforming to pyrite. The transformation of iron monosulfides (including greigite) to pyrite is a sulfur-isotope conservative process and therefore, these observations indicate that pyrite is forming from greigite at the oxic/anoxic boundary

  1. A model of pyritic oxidation in waste rock dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.B.; Ritchie, A.I.M.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite can lead to high acid levels and high concentrations of trace metals in the water that runs off and percolates through pyritic material. This is the situation at the abandoned uranium mine at Rum Jungle in the Northern Territory of Australia, where pyritic oxidation in the waste rock dumps resulting from open cut mining of the uranium orebody has led to pollution of the nearby East Branch of the Finniss River, with trace metals such as copper, manganese and zinc. Mathematical equations are formulated which describe a model of pyritic oxidation within a waste rock dump, where it is assumed that oxygen transport is the rate limiting step in the oxidation process and that oxygen is transported by gaseous diffusion through the pore space of the dump, followed by diffusion into oxidation sites within the particles that comprise the dump. The equations have been solved numerically assuming values for such parameters as porosity, sulphur density and oxygen diffusion coefficients which are applicable to the waste rock dumps at Rum Jungle. An approximate solution to the equations is also presented. Calculations of the heat source distribution and the total SO 4 production rate are presented for both single size particles and for a range of particle sizes in the dump. The usefulness of the approximate solution, and of calculations based on single size particles in the dump in assessing the effectiveness of strategies to reduce pollution from such waste rock dumps are discussed

  2. Modelling the reactive-path between pyrite and radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Mingliang; Wu Shijun; Dou Shunmei; Chen Fanrong; Yang Yongqiang

    2008-01-01

    The mobility of redox sensitive nuclides is largely dependent on their valence state. The radionuclides that make the dominant contributions to final dose calculations are redox sensitive. Almost all the radionuclides (except 129 I) have higher mobility at high valence state, and correspond to immobilization at low valence state due to the much lower solubility. Pyrite is an ubiquitous and stable mineral in geological environment, and would be used as a low-cost long time reductant for the immobilization of radionuclides. However, pyrite oxidation is supposed to generate acid, which will enhance the mobility of nuclides. In this paper, the reaction path of the reactions between radionuclides (U, Se and Tc) and pyrite in the groundwater from Wuyi well in Beishan area of China has been simulated using geochemical modeling software. According to the results, pyrite can reduce high valence nuclides to a dinky-level effectively, with the pH slightly increasing under anaerobic condition that is common in deep nuclear waste repositories. (authors)

  3. The mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and leaching: A fundamental perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, A. P.; Gerson, A. R.

    2010-09-01

    Pyrite is the earth's most abundant sulfide mineral. Its frequent undesirable association with minerals of economic value such as sphalerite, chalcopyrite and galena, and precious metals such as gold necessitates costly separation processes such as leaching and flotation. Additionally pyrite oxidation is a major contributor to the environmental problem of acid rock drainage. The surface oxidation reactions of pyrite are therefore important both economically and environmentally. Significant variations in electrical properties resulting from lattice substitution of minor and trace elements into the lattice structure exist between pyrite from different geographical locations. Furthermore the presence of low coordination surface sites as a result of conchoidal fracture causes a reduction in the band gap at the surface compared to the bulk thus adding further electrochemical variability. Given the now general acceptance after decades of research that electrochemistry dominates the oxidation process, the geographical location, elemental composition and semi-conductor type (n or p) of pyrite are important considerations. Aqueous pyrite oxidation results in the production of sulfate and ferrous iron. However other products such as elemental sulfur, polysulfides, hydrogen sulfide, ferric hydroxide, iron oxide and iron(III) oxyhydroxide may also form. Intermediate species such as thiosulfate, sulfite and polythionates are also proposed to occur. Oxidation and leach rates are generally influenced by solution Eh, pH, oxidant type and concentration, hydrodynamics, grain size and surface area in relation to solution volume, temperature and pressure. Of these, solution Eh is most critical as expected for an electrochemically controlled process, and directly correlates with surface area normalised rates. Studies using mixed mineral systems further indicate the importance of electrochemical processes during the oxidation process. Spatially resolved surface characterisation of fresh

  4. Pyrite sulfur isotopes reveal glacial-interglacial environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Virgil; Sansjofre, Pierre; Rabineau, Marina; Revillon, Sidonie; Houghton, Jennifer; Fike, David A.

    2017-06-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle plays a key role in regulating Earth’s surface redox through diverse abiotic and biological reactions that have distinctive stable isotopic fractionations. As such, variations in the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases over Earth history can be used to infer substantive changes to the Earth’s surface environment, including the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Such inferences assume that individual δ34S records reflect temporal changes in the global sulfur cycle; this assumption may be well grounded for sulfate-bearing minerals but is less well established for pyrite-based records. Here, we investigate alternative controls on the sedimentary sulfur isotopic composition of marine pyrite by examining a 300-m drill core of Mediterranean sediments deposited over the past 500,000 y and spanning the last five glacial-interglacial periods. Because this interval is far shorter than the residence time of marine sulfate, any change in the sulfur isotopic record preserved in pyrite (δ34Spyr) necessarily corresponds to local environmental changes. The stratigraphic variations (>76‰) in the isotopic data reported here are among the largest ever observed in pyrite, and are in phase with glacial-interglacial sea level and temperature changes. In this case, the dominant control appears to be glacial-interglacial variations in sedimentation rates. These results suggest that there exist important but previously overlooked depositional controls on sedimentary sulfur isotope records, especially associated with intervals of substantial sea level change. This work provides an important perspective on the origin of variability in such records and suggests meaningful paleoenvironmental information can be derived from pyrite δ34S records.

  5. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1996-01-01

    This project is concerned with the physiochemical processes occuring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. The use of synthetic particles of pyrite as model electrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite is employed.

  6. Age of the granitic magmatism and the W-Mo mineralization in skarns of the Seridó belt (NE Brazil) based on zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) and molybdenite Re-Os dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M. de; Souza Neto, João A.; Archanjo, Carlos J.; Stein, Holly; Maia, Ana C. S.

    2017-11-01

    Over five hundred W-Mo skarns have been reported in the Neoproterozoic Seridó belt in the northeastern Brazil. The origin of these mineralizations has been attributed to metasomatic reactions occuring after the infiltration of hydrothermal fluids that are mostly derived from the plutonic magmatic activity that ranged between approximately 600 and 525 Ma. Here we date molybdenite using N-TIMS on Re-Os analysis of three major scheelite deposits (Brejuí, Bonfim and Bodó) hosted in the skarn horizons of the metasedimentary sequence. Molybdenite is an integral part of the mineralizations that include scheelite in skarns and, in the Bonfim deposit, gold concentrate in late brittle faults. The Re-Os ages are 554 ± 2 Ma (Brejuí), 524 ± 2 Ma (Bonfim) and 510 ± 2 Ma (Bodó). The age of the Brejuí molybdenite, however, appears to be anomalous based on the local geology of the deposit, which is located next to the contact of a batholith dated ca. 575 Ma. In turn, the Bonfim molybdenite yields similar ages in replicated samples with variable high Re contents. New U-Pb SHRIMP ages of four biotite (leuco)granite plutons vary from 577 ± 5 Ma to 526 ± 8 Ma, which overlap with molybdenite crystallization. These results indicate a close connection between the W-Mo mineralizations and the plutonic activity that intruded the belt after the peak HT/LP metamorphism. The latest pulses of felsic magmatism, which were contemporaneous with the emplacement of Be-Ta-Nb-Li pegmatites, therefore constitute a potential guide in the Seridó belt for prospective W-Mo deposits.

  7. Geochronologic inventory of Rio de Janeiro State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a geochronological study on the Rio de Janeiro State rocks, Southeast Brazil. It is based in a great volume of analytical results (Rb-Sr, U-Pb, Sm-Nd, K-Ar, Ar-Ar and fission tracks dating). It also evocates a little doubt on the Juiz de Fora Complex age: a transamazonic age and some doubts on the sedimentation age of Paraiba do Sul and Andrelandia groups, Costeiro Complex and the existence of a correlation between these litho-stratigraphic units. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Fission track geochronology of Eastern Ghats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virk, H S; Koul, S L; Singh, S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-12-01

    Fission track geochronology of Eastern Ghats has been established by using fission track technique in dating micaceous and accessory minerals occurring in the region. Annealing studies confirm that radiation damage fossil tracks can be erased in minerals under intense metamorphic episodes thus resetting the geological clock. The fission track ages of the minerals range between 450 +- 5 m.y. to 622 +- 148 m.y. It is concluded that f.t. ages of the minerals date the last metamorphic event of the Eastern Ghats, known as the Indian Ocean Cycle.

  9. The composition of pyrite in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits as determined with the proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huston, D.L.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F.; Ryan, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    Pixeprobe analysis of pyrite from Australian volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits indicate significant levels of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ba, Ag, Sb, Bi (from inclusions), As, Tl, Mo, Au, In, Cd (from nonstoichiometric substitution), Co, Ni, Se and Te (from stoichiometric substitution). Pyrite in massive sulfide lenses is enriched in trace elements compared to that in the stringer zone owing to hydrothermal recrystallization. Metamorphic recrystallization also 'cleans' pyrite of trace elements. High Au values occur in pyrite with high As content. Pyrite in stringer zones is enriched in Se relative to the overlying massive sulfide lenses and the surrounding alteration zones. (orig.)

  10. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Source of arsenic-bearing pyrite in southwestern Vermont, USA: Sulfur isotope evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, Helen, E-mail: helen.mango@castleton.edu [Department of Natural Sciences, Castleton State College, 233 South Street, Castleton, VT 05735 (United States); Ryan, Peter, E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu [Department of Geology, Middlebury College, 276 Bicentennial Way, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic-bearing pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater produced in late Cambrian and Ordovician gray and black slates and phyllites in the Taconic region of southwestern Vermont, USA. The aim of this study is to analyze the sulfur isotopic composition of this pyrite and determine if a relationship exists between pyrite δ{sup 34}S and arsenic content. Pyrite occurs in both sedimentary/diagenetic (bedding-parallel layers and framboids) and low-grade metamorphic (porphyroblast) forms, and contains up to > 2000 ppm As. The sulfur isotopic composition of arsenic-bearing pyrite ranges from − 5.2‰ to 63‰. In the marine environment, the sulfur in sedimentary pyrite becomes increasingly enriched in {sup 34}S as the geochemical environment becomes increasingly anoxic. There is a positive correlation between δ{sup 34}S and arsenic content in the Taconic pyrite, suggesting that uptake of arsenic by pyrite increased as the environment became more reducing. This increased anoxia may have been due to a rise in sea level and/or tectonic activity during the late Cambrian and Ordovician. Low-grade metamorphism appears to have little effect on sulfur isotope composition, but does correlate with lower arsenic content in pyrite. New groundwater wells drilled in this region should therefore avoid gray and black slates and phyllites that contain sedimentary/diagenetic pyrite with heavy δ{sup 34}S values. - Highlights: • Pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater in the Taconic region of Vermont, USA. • As-bearing pyrite δ{sup 34}S = – 5.2 to 63‰ with higher {sup 34}S as environment becomes more anoxic. • High sea level, tectonic activity create anoxia, with incorporation of As into pyrite. • New wells should avoid slate/phyllite containing sedimentary pyrite with heavy δ{sup 34}S.

  12. Source of arsenic-bearing pyrite in southwestern Vermont, USA: Sulfur isotope evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mango, Helen; Ryan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-bearing pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater produced in late Cambrian and Ordovician gray and black slates and phyllites in the Taconic region of southwestern Vermont, USA. The aim of this study is to analyze the sulfur isotopic composition of this pyrite and determine if a relationship exists between pyrite δ 34 S and arsenic content. Pyrite occurs in both sedimentary/diagenetic (bedding-parallel layers and framboids) and low-grade metamorphic (porphyroblast) forms, and contains up to > 2000 ppm As. The sulfur isotopic composition of arsenic-bearing pyrite ranges from − 5.2‰ to 63‰. In the marine environment, the sulfur in sedimentary pyrite becomes increasingly enriched in 34 S as the geochemical environment becomes increasingly anoxic. There is a positive correlation between δ 34 S and arsenic content in the Taconic pyrite, suggesting that uptake of arsenic by pyrite increased as the environment became more reducing. This increased anoxia may have been due to a rise in sea level and/or tectonic activity during the late Cambrian and Ordovician. Low-grade metamorphism appears to have little effect on sulfur isotope composition, but does correlate with lower arsenic content in pyrite. New groundwater wells drilled in this region should therefore avoid gray and black slates and phyllites that contain sedimentary/diagenetic pyrite with heavy δ 34 S values. - Highlights: • Pyrite is the source of arsenic in groundwater in the Taconic region of Vermont, USA. • As-bearing pyrite δ 34 S = – 5.2 to 63‰ with higher 34 S as environment becomes more anoxic. • High sea level, tectonic activity create anoxia, with incorporation of As into pyrite. • New wells should avoid slate/phyllite containing sedimentary pyrite with heavy δ 34 S

  13. Lattice location of gold in natural pyrite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besten, Jacinta den; Jamieson, David N.; Ryan, Chris G.

    1999-01-01

    The lattice location of gold atoms in naturally occurring Au-doped pyrite crystals has been investigated with a nuclear microprobe using ion channeling. The specimens consisted of 300-μm diameter pyrite crystals in veins embedded in a quartz matrix from the Emperor mine in Fiji. The specimens were prepared by standard geological specimen preparation techniques and the pyrite crystals were analysed in situ in the quartz matrix. Significant trace elements in the crystals, determined by Proton Induced X-ray Emission with a 3 MeV H + microprobe, were Cu, As, Mo, Zn, Te, Au and Pb. The Au concentration was about 0.2 wt%. By the use of 2 MeV He + ion channeling, the Miller indices of the lowest order crystal axes nearest to the normal were determined from backscattering yield maps from two-dimensional angular scanning and comparison of the resulting patterns with published gnomonic projections. Channeling angular yield curves were obtained from Fe, S, As and Au signals. The results indicate that at least 35% of the Au is substituted onto lattice sites

  14. Heterocoagulation of chalcopyrite and pyrite minerals in flotation separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Timothy K; Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M

    2005-06-30

    Heterocoagulation between various fine mineral particles contained within a mineral suspension with different structural and surface chemistry can interfere with the ability of the flotation processes to selectively separate the minerals involved. This paper examines the interactions between chalcopyrite (a copper mineral) and pyrite (an iron mineral often bearing gold) as they approach each other in suspensions with added chemicals, and relates the results to the experimental data for the flotation recovery and selectivity. The heterocoagulation was experimentally studied using the electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) technique and was modelled by incorporating colloidal forces, including the van der Waals, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. The ELS results indicated that pyrite has a positive zeta potential (zeta) up to its isoelectric point (IEP) at approximately pH 2.2, while chalcopyrite has a positive zeta up to its IEP at approximately pH 5.5. This produces heterocoagulation of chalcopyrite with pyrite between pH 2.2 and pH 5.5. The heterocoagulation was confirmed by the ELS spectra measured with a ZetaPlus instrument from Brookhaven and by small-scale flotation experiments.

  15. Thermoluminescence kinetics of pyrite (FeS2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, A.N; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Thermoluminescence of pyrite (FeS 2 ) has been investigated to study the kinetics of single peak glow curves. The material used normally exhibits one large and four small peaks. However a glow curve can be obtained with only the large single peak that is suitable for testing thermoluminescence kinetics. Glow curves from aliquots of a single natural pyrite crystal studied in detail contain two low intensity thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at ∼90 degree and ∼250 degree C, and two chemiluminescence (CL) peaks at ∼350 degree and ∼430 degree C. The CL peaks are largely removable by initially heating the sample chamber under vacuum, pumping through liquid nitrogen traps, and recording glow curves immediately after helium is introduced, procedures which reduce system contaminants that react with pyrite. The shape, the variation of the temperature of the peak maximum (T max ) with dose, and the retrapping to recombination cross section ratio σ of the large 250 degree C peak are better described by the general one trap (GOT) kinetic equation, the basic equation from which the 1st and 2nd order kinetic equations are obtained as special cases (see text), than by the 1st and 2nd order equations. 12 refs., 7 figs

  16. Os{sup 187}-isotope abundances in terrestrial and meteoritic osmium and an attempt to determine Re/Os-ages of iron meteorites; Anomalies dans l'abondance isotopique de l'osmium-187 dans l'osmium terrestre et meteoritique - Essai de determination de l'age des meteorites de fer au moyen du rapport Re/Os; Anomalii v rasprostranennosti izotopa osmiya-187 v zemnom i meteoritnom osmie i popytka opredeleniya vozrastov reniya/osmiya v zheleznykh meteoritakh; Anomalias en la abundancia isotopica del {sup 187}Os en el osmio terrestre y meteoritico. Ensayo para determinar la edad de los meteoritos de hierro por medio de la razon Re Os

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, W; Hoffmeister, W; Langhoff, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut) Mainz, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Geiss, J; Hirt, B; Houtermans, F G [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bern (Switzerland)

    1962-01-15

    The isotopic composition of a large number of Os-samples from terrestrial platinum ores and from iron meteorites has been investigated by mass-spectrometry. The observed isotope-ratios Os{sup 187}:Os{sup 186} in Os/Ir-ores and in Os-samples, extracted quantitatively from iron meteorites, vary in limit from 0.88 to 1.41. These variations may be explained by the production of radiogenic Os following the decay of Re{sup 187}, a natural {beta}-emitter with the lowest known {beta}-energy. Neutron activation analysis proves that Re and Os are common trace elements in iron meteorites. As dating of these bodies by conventional methods suffers from enormous difficulties, the application of the Re/Os method has been studied. From our experiments a primordial Os{sup 187}:Os{sup 186} ratio is assumed and 'minimum ages' are discussed. They differ widely and are found presumably in the range from 3.7 to 5.6x10{sup 9} yr. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie au moyen de la spectrometrie de masse la composition isotopique d'un grand nombre d'echantillons d'osmium provenant de minerais terrestres de platine et d'holosideres. Le rapport isotopique osmium-187/ osmium-186 observe dans l'osmiure d'iridium et dans les echantillons d'osmium extraits en quantite mesurable des holosideres varie entre 0,88 et 1,41. Ces variations peuvent etre expliquees par la production d'osmium radiogenicjue resultant de la desintegration du rhenium-187, emetteur naturel de rayonnements beta connu comme ayant la plus faible energie beta. L'analyse par activation des neutrons montre que le rhenium et l'osmium se trouvent communement a l'etat de traces dans les holosideres. Comme il est extremement difficile d'evaluer l'age de ces corps en recourant aux methodes classiques, les auteurs du memoire ont examine la possibilite d'utiliser le rapport Re/Os. Apres avoir assume de leurs experiences le rapport osmium-187/osmium-186, ils examinent la question des . Ceux-ci different sensiblement et

  17. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Fu, Xiao-Qi, E-mail: xzx19820708@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS{sub 2}(s) + 91NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO{sub 2}(g) + 6Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) + 78NH{sub 3}(g) + 26N{sub 2}O(g) + 2FeSO{sub 4}(s) + 65H{sub 2}O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  18. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS_2(s) + 91NH_4NO_3(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO_2(g) + 6Fe_2O_3(s) + 78NH_3(g) + 26N_2O(g) + 2FeSO_4(s) + 65H_2O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO_2, NH_3, SO_2 and N_2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  19. Iron isotope fractionation during pyrite formation in a sulfidic Precambrian ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Gault-Ringold, Melanie; George, Ejin; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2018-04-01

    The chemical response of the Precambrian oceans to rising atmospheric O2 levels remains controversial. The iron isotope signature of sedimentary pyrite is widely used to trace the microbial and redox states of the ocean, yet the iron isotope fractionation accompanying pyrite formation in nature is difficult to constrain due to the complexity of the pyrite formation process, difficulties in translating the iron isotope systematics of experimental studies to natural settings, and insufficient iron isotope datasets for natural euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) marine basins where pyrite formation occurs. Herein we demonstrate, that a large, permil-level shift in the isotope composition of dissolved iron occurs in the Black Sea euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. Specifically, iron removal to syngenetic pyrite gives rise to an iron isotope fractionation factor between Fe(II) and FeS2 of 2.75 permil (‰), the largest yet reported for reactions under natural conditions that do not involve iron redox chemistry. These iron isotope systematics offer the potential to generate permil-level shifts in the sedimentary pyrite iron isotope record due to partial drawdown of the oceanic iron inventory. The implication is that the iron stable isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrites may record fundamental regime shifts between pyrite formation under sulfur-limited conditions and pyrite formation under iron-limited conditions. To this end, the iron isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite may best represent the extent of euxinia in the past global ocean, rather than its oxygenation state. On this basis, the reinterpreted sedimentary pyrite Fe isotope record suggests a fundamental shift towards more sulfidic oceanic conditions coincident with the 'Great Oxidation Event' around 2.3 billion years ago. Importantly, this does not require the chemical state of the ocean to shift from mainly de-oxygenated to predominantly oxygenated in parallel with the permanent rise

  20. Production of ferric sulphate from pyrite by thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Application to uranium ore leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouas, C.

    1988-12-01

    A process for uranium extraction by oxidizing solutions of ferric sulphate produced by T. ferrooxidans from pyrite is developed. A new counting method specific of T. ferrooxidans is designed. An uranium resistant wild strain, with oxidizing properties as high as the strain ATCC 19859, is isolated. Optimal conditions for ferric sulphate production from pyrite are defined (pH 1.8, density of the medium 1.2%, pyrite granulometry [fr

  1. Comparison Analysis of Coal Biodesulfurization and Coal’s Pyrite Bioleaching with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen-Fen Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans was applied in coal biodesulfurization and coal’s pyrite bioleaching. The result showed that A. ferrooxidans had significantly promoted the biodesulfurization of coal and bioleaching of coal’s pyrite. After 16 days of processing, the total sulfur removal rate of coal was 50.6%, and among them the removal of pyritic sulfur was up to 69.9%. On the contrary, after 12 days of processing, the coal’s pyrite bioleaching rate was 72.0%. SEM micrographs showed that the major pyrite forms in coal were massive and veinlets. It seems that the bacteria took priority to remove the massive pyrite. The sulfur relative contents analysis from XANES showed that the elemental sulfur (28.32% and jarosite (18.99% were accumulated in the biotreated residual coal. However, XRD and XANES spectra of residual pyrite indicated that the sulfur components were mainly composed of pyrite (49.34% and elemental sulfur (50.72% but no other sulfur contents were detected. Based on the present results, we speculated that the pyrite forms in coal might affect sulfur biooxidation process.

  2. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E., E-mail: mateome@cab.inta-csic.es

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Successful adsorption of cystine on pyrite surface under several conditions. • Detailed XPS spectroscopic characterization of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface. • Spectroscopy evidence, oxidation and anoxic conditions adjust molecular adsorption. • Molecular chemistry on pyrite is driven depending on the surrounding conditions. • The cystine/pyrite(100) model is in good agreement with Wächtershäuser’s theory. - Abstract: We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions.

  3. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful adsorption of cystine on pyrite surface under several conditions. • Detailed XPS spectroscopic characterization of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface. • Spectroscopy evidence, oxidation and anoxic conditions adjust molecular adsorption. • Molecular chemistry on pyrite is driven depending on the surrounding conditions. • The cystine/pyrite(100) model is in good agreement with Wächtershäuser’s theory. - Abstract: We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions

  4. Silane-based coatings on the pyrite for remediation of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zenghui; Shi, Taihong; Wang, Shizhong; Huang, Xiongfei; Zhang, Tao; Tang, Yetao; Zhang, Xiaying; Qiu, Rongliang

    2013-09-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from the oxidation of pyrite and other metal sulfides has caused significant environmental problems, including acidification of rivers and streams as well as leaching of toxic metals. With the goal of controlling AMD at the source, we evaluated the potential of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and n-propyltrimethoxysilane (NPS) coatings to suppress pyrite oxidation. The release of total Fe and SO4(-2) from uncoated and coated pyrite in the presence of a chemical oxidizing agent (H2O2) or iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans) was measured. Results showed that TEOS- and NPS-based coatings reduced chemical oxidation of pyrite by as much as 59 and 96% (based on Fe release), respectively, while biological oxidation of pyrite was reduced by 69 and 95%, respectively. These results were attributed to the formation of a dense network of Fe-O-Si and Si-O-Si bonds on the pyrite surface that limited permeation of oxygen, water, and bacteria. Compared with results for TEOS-coated pyrite, higher pH and lower concentrations of total Fe and SO4(-2) were observed for oxidation of NPS-coated pyrite, which was attributed to its crack-free morphology and the presence of hydrophobic groups on the NPS-based coating surface. The silane-based NPS coating was shown to be highly effective in suppressing pyrite oxidation, making it a promising alternative for remediation of AMD at its source. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison Analysis of Coal Biodesulfurization and Coal's Pyrite Bioleaching with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Fen-Fen; He, Huan; Liu, Jin-Yan; Tao, Xiu-Xiang; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Yi-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans) was applied in coal biodesulfurization and coal's pyrite bioleaching. The result showed that A. ferrooxidans had significantly promoted the biodesulfurization of coal and bioleaching of coal's pyrite. After 16 days of processing, the total sulfur removal rate of coal was 50.6%, and among them the removal of pyritic sulfur was up to 69.9%. On the contrary, after 12 days of processing, the coal's pyrite bioleaching rate was 72.0%. SEM micrographs showed that the major pyrite forms in coal were massive and veinlets. It seems that the bacteria took priority to remove the massive pyrite. The sulfur relative contents analysis from XANES showed that the elemental sulfur (28.32%) and jarosite (18.99%) were accumulated in the biotreated residual coal. However, XRD and XANES spectra of residual pyrite indicated that the sulfur components were mainly composed of pyrite (49.34%) and elemental sulfur (50.72%) but no other sulfur contents were detected. Based on the present results, we speculated that the pyrite forms in coal might affect sulfur biooxidation process. PMID:24288464

  6. EARTHTIME: Teaching geochronology to high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, Britta; Buchwaldt, Robert; McLean, Noah; Rioux, Matthew; Bowring, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    The authors taught an educational module developed as part of the EARTHTIME (www.earth-time.org) outreach initiative to 215 high school students from a Massachusetts (USA) High School as part of an "out-of-school" field trip. The workshop focuses on uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating of zircons and its application to solving a geological problem. The theme of our 2.5-hour module is the timing of the K-T boundary and a discussion of how geochronology can be used to evaluate the two main hypotheses for the cause of the concurrent extinction—the Chicxlub impact and the massive eruption of the Deccan Traps. Activities are divided into three parts: In the first part, the instructors lead hands-on activities demonstrating how rock samples are processed to isolate minerals by their physical properties. Students use different techniques, such as magnetic separation, density separation using non-toxic heavy liquids, and mineral identification with a microscope. We cover all the steps from sampling an outcrop to determining a final age. Students also discuss geologic features relevant to the K-T boundary problem and get the chance to examine basalts, impact melts and meteorites. In the second part, we use a curriculum developed for and available on the EARTHTIME website (http://www.earth-time.org/Lesson_Plan.pdf). The curriculum teaches the science behind uranium-lead dating using tables, graphs, and a geochronology kit. In this module, the students start by exploring the concepts of half-life and exponential decay and graphically solving the isotopic decay equation. Manipulating groups of double-sided chips labeled with U and Pb isotopes reinforces the concept that an age determination depends on the Pb/U ratio, not the absolute number of atoms present. Next, the technique's accuracy despite loss of parent and daughter atoms during analysis, as well as the use of isotopic ratios rather than absolute abundances, is explained with an activity on isotope dilution. Here the students

  7. Electrochemical Properties for Co-Doped Pyrite with High Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchao Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hydrothermal method was adopted to synthesize nanostructure Co-doped pyrite (FeS2. The structural properties and morphology of the synthesized materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Co in the crystal lattice of FeS2 could change the growth rate of different crystal planes of the crystal particles, which resulted in various polyhedrons with clear faces and sharp outlines. In addition, the electrochemical performance of the doping pyrite in Li/FeS2 batteries was evaluated using the galvanostatic discharge test, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the discharge capacity of the doped material (801.8 mAh·g−1 with a doping ratio of 7% was significantly higher than that of the original FeS2 (574.6 mAh·g−1 because of the enhanced conductivity. Therefore, the doping method is potentially effective for improving the electrochemical performance of FeS2.

  8. Building Interactive Visualizations for Geochronological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeringue, J.; Bowring, J. F.; McLean, N. M.; Pastor, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since the early 1990s, Ken Ludwig's Isoplot software has been the tool of choice for visualization and analysis of isotopic data used for geochronology. The software is an add-in to Microsoft Excel that allows users to generate visual representations of data. However, recent changes to Excel have made Isoplot more difficult to use and maintain, and the software is no longer supported. In the last several years, the Cyber Infrastructure Research and Development Lab for the Earth Sciences (CIRDLES), at the College of Charleston, has worked collaboratively with geochronologists to develop U-Pb_Redux, a software product that provides some of Isoplot's functionality for U-Pb geochronology. However, the community needs a full and complete Isoplot replacement that is open source, platform independent, and not dependent on proprietary software. This temporary lapse in tooling also presents a tremendous opportunity for scientific computing in the earth sciences. When Isoplot was written for Excel, it gained much of the platform's flexibility and power but also was burdened with its limitations. For example, Isoplot could not be used outside of Excel, could not be cross-platform (so long as Excel wasn't), could not be embedded in other applications, and only static images could be produced. Nonetheless this software was and still is a powerful tool that has served the community for more than two decades and the trade-offs were more than acceptable. In 2014, we seek to gain flexibility not available with Excel. We propose that the next generation of charting software be reusable, platform-agnostic, and interactive. This new software should allow scientists to easily explore—not just passively view—their data. Beginning in the fall of 2013, researchers at CIRDLES began planning for and prototyping a 21st-century replacement for Isoplot, which we call Topsoil, an anagram of Isoplot. This work is being conducted in the public domain at https://github.com/CIRDLES/topsoil. We

  9. Carrier-microencapsulation using Si-catechol complex for suppressing pyrite floatability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, R.K.T.; Satur, J.; Hiroyoshi, N.; Ito, M.; Tsunekawa, M. [Hokkaido University, Hokkaido (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    2008-11-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is a common sulfide mineral associated with valuable metal minerals and coal, and it is rejected as a gangue mineral using physical separation techniques such as froth flotation and discharged into tailing pond. In the flotation, pyrite is frequently entrapped in the froth due to its hydrophobic nature. Formation of acid mine drainage due to the air-oxidation of pyrite in the tailing pond is also a serious problem. The authors have proposed carrier-microencapsulation (CME) as a method for suppressing both the floatability and oxidation of pyrite. In this method, pyrite is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide or hydroxide using catechol solution as a carrier combined with metal ions. The layer converts the pyrite surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and acts as a protective coating against oxidation. The present study demonstrates the effect of CME using Si-catechol complex to suppress the pyrite floatability: The bubble pick-up experiments showed that attachment of pyrite particles to air bubble is suppressed by the CME treatment at pH 4-10, Si-catechol complex concentration over 0.5 mol m{sup -3} and treatment time within 2 min. The Hallimond tube flotation experiments showed that the pyrite floatability is suppressed by the CME treatment even in the presence of typical flotation collectors such as kerosene and xanthate. SEM-EDX analysis confirmed that Si present on the pyrite surface treated by Si-catechol complex, implying that SiO{sub 2} or SiOH{sub 4} layer formed by the CME treatment convert the pyrite surface hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  10. Mechanisms of interaction between arsenian pyrite and aqueous arsenite under anoxic and oxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guohong; Gao, Tianyu; Hong, Jun; Luo, Yao; Liu, Lihu; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite affects the conversion and migration processes of arsenic in soils and waters. Adsorption and redox reactions of arsenite (As(III)) occur on the surface of pyrite, and the interaction processes are influenced by the arsenic incorporated into pyrite. This work examined the effects of arsenic content, pH and oxygen on the interaction between arsenian pyrite and aqueous As(III) and investigated the underlying mechanisms. The results indicated that arsenic incorporation led to a high content of Fe(III) in pyrite, and that As(III) was mainly adsorbed on pyrite surface and part of As(III) was oxidized to As(V) by the newly formed intermediates including hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation rate increased with increasing arsenic content in the pyrite and the presence of air (oxygen), and first decreased and then increased with increasing pH from 3.0 to 11.0. Hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide significantly contributed to the oxidation of pyrite and aqueous As(III) in acidic and alkaline solutions, respectively. Although pyrite oxidation increased with increasing arsenic content as indicated by the elevated concentrations of elemental S and SO42-, the percentage of released arsenic in total arsenic of the arsenian pyrite decreased due to the adsorption of arsenic on the surface of newly formed ferric (hydr)oxides, especially the ferric arsenate precipitate formed in high pH solutions. The present study enables a better understanding of the important interaction process of dissolved arsenite and natural pyrites in the study of groundwater contamination, arsenic migration/sequestration, and acid mine drainage formation.

  11. Brief review on and prospect of the development of geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuanhua; Dong Shuwen; Liu Dunyi; Ding Tiping; Shi Jing

    2003-01-01

    Geochronology is an important fundamental branch of modern geology, which was coming into being in the early 20 century and got rapid development in 1950s and 1960s. The common used and newly developed geochronological methods, such as U-Pb, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, Lu-Hf, 40 Ar/ 39 Ar, Fission Track, (U-Th)/He, TIMS U-series, cosmogenetic nuclides (including 14 C, etc.) and CFC and 3 H/ 3 He for young groundwater dating, are generally discussed in this paper on their some aspects of application and thermochronology. Through the statistics of geology and geochronological documents based on GeoRef and GDS data-base, we prospect that the geochronology in the international geologic society will get more and more important status in the near future, and suggest that the geologists in China may not neglect this kind of tendency. According to the using of geochronological methods in three GSA journals, we consider the U-Pb, 40 Ar/ 39 Ar and 14 C as the mostly used and reliable geochronometers in recent years. Also, it is recognized in this paper that thermochronology may have good future for low temperature history during mountain range exhumation and geomorphic formation, and young geological body such as ground water. (authors)

  12. Paleoredoc and pyritization of soft-bodied fossils in the Ordovician Frankfort Shale of New York

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Una C.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple beds in the Frankfort Shale (Upper Ordovician, New York State), including the original "Beecher's Trilobite Bed," yield fossils with pyritized soft-tissues. A bed-by-bed geochemical and sedimentological analysis was carried out to test previous models of soft-tissue pyritization...

  13. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-12-30

    The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG-DSC-MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10K/min from room temperature to 350°C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200°C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO2, NH3, SO2 and N2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between pyrite Stability and arsenic mobility during aquifer storage and recovery in southwest central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregg W; Pichler, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Elevated arsenic concentrations are common in water recovered from aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems in west-central Florida that store surface water. Investigations of the Suwannee Limestone of the Upper Floridan aquifer, the storage zone for ASR systems, have shown that arsenic is highest in pyrite in zones of high moldic porosity. Geochemical modeling was employed to examine pyrite stability in limestone during simulated injections of surface water into wells open only to the Suwannee Limestone with known mineralogy and water chemistry. The goal was to determine if aquifer redox conditions could be altered to the degree of pyrite instability. Increasing amounts of injection water were added to native storage-zone water, and resulting reaction paths were plotted on pyrite stability diagrams. Native storage-zone water plotted within the pyrite stability field, indicating that conditions were sufficiently reducing to allow for pyrite stability. Thus, arsenic is immobilized in pyrite, and its groundwater concentration should be low. This was corroborated by analysis of water samples, none of which had arsenic concentrations above 0.036 microg/L. During simulation, however, as injection/native storage-zone water ratios increased, conditions became less reducing and pyrite became unstable. The result would be release of arsenic from limestone into storage-zone water.

  15. Isotopic and microbiological signatures of pyrite-driven denitrification in a sandy aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Slomp, C.P.; Broers, H.P.; Bostick, B.; Passier, H.F.; Böttcher, M.E.; Omoregie, E.O.; Lloyd, J.R.; Polya, D.A.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Denitrificationdriven by pyrite oxidation can play a major role in the removal of nitrate from groundwater systems. As yet, limited information is available on the interactions between the micro-organisms and aqueous and mineral phases in aquifers where pyrite oxidation is occurring. In this study,

  16. Isotopic and microbiological signatures of pyrite-driven denitrification in a sandy aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.C.; Slomp, C.P.; Broers, H.P.; Bostick, B.; Passier, H.F.; Böttcher, M.E.; Omoregie, E.O.; Lloyd, J.R.; Polya, D.A.; Cappellen, P. van

    2012-01-01

    Denitrification driven by pyrite oxidation can play a major role in the removal of nitrate from groundwater systems. As yet, limited information is available on the interactions between the micro-organisms and aqueous and mineral phases in aquifers where pyrite oxidation is occurring. In this study,

  17. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, Dawei

    1996-01-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. Central to this research is the use of synthetic microsize particles of pyrite as model microelectrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite. The research focuses on: (a) the synthesis of microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution at room temperature, (b) the formation of iron sulfide complex, the precursor of FeS or FeS{sub 2}, and (c) the relationship between the semiconductor properties of pyrite and its interfacial electrochemical behavior in the dissolution process. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4, a suitable protocol for preparing microsize particles of pyrite in aqueous solution is given, and the essential roles of the precursors elemental sulfur and ``FeS`` in pyrite formation are investigated. In Chapter 5, the formation of iron sulfide complex prior to the precipitation of FeS or FeS{sub 2} is investigated using a fast kinetics technique based on a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The stoichiometry of the iron sulfide complex is determined, and the rate and formation constants are also evaluated. Chapter 6 provides a summary of the semiconductor properties of pyrite relevant to the present study. In Chapters 7 and 8, the effects of the semiconductor properties on pyrite dissolution are investigated experimentally and the mechanism of pyrite dissolution in acidic aqueous solution is examined. Finally, a summary of the conclusions from this study and suggestions for future research are presented in Chapter 9.

  18. Conditioning in the flotation of gold, uranium oxide, and pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stassen, F.J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of conditioning energy on the flotation of gold, U 3 O 8 , and pyrite was investigated in the range 0,1 to 100 kWh per tonne of dry ore for various combinations of conditioning time and impeller speed in a cylindrical conditioning tank. It was found that, when the conditioning energy was increased to between 5 and 10 kWh per tonne of dry ore, the total recovery and flotation rate of the valuable minerals (expressed as Klimpel parameters) increased substantially. The Klimpel parameters are dependent on conditioning energy, but are independent of conditioning time or impeller speed (at constant conditioning energy). The Klimpel parameters of the gangue are independent of conditioning energy. 23 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs

  19. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface; Retention et reduction de l'uranium a la surface de la pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglizaud, N

    2006-12-15

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS{sub 2}). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH {>=} 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}, an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. {>=} -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage ({>=} 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10{sup 7} L mol{sup -1}. Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the

  20. Petrogenesis of the Yaochong granite and Mo deposit, Western Dabie orogen, eastern-central China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaowen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Chao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hao; Su, Yang

    2015-05-01

    The Dabie orogen is among the most famous continent-continent collisional orogenic belts in the world, and is characterized by intensive post-collisional extension, magmatism and Mo mineralization. However, the genetic links between the mineralization and the geodynamic evolution of the orogen remain unresolved. In this paper, the Yaochong Mo deposit and its associated granitic stocks were investigated to elucidate this issue. Our new zircon U-Pb ages yielded an Early Cretaceous age (133.3 ± 1.3 Ma) for the Yaochong granite, and our molybdenite Re-Os dating gave a similar age (135 ± 1 Ma) for the Mo deposit. The Yaochong stock is characterized by high silica and alkali but low Mg, Fe and Ca. It is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs: Rb, K, Th and U), but strongly depleted in heavy REEs, and high field strength elements (HFSEs: Nb, Ta, Ti and Y). The Yaochong granite has initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7087-0.7096, and Pb isotopic ratios of (206Pb/204Pb)i = 16.599-16.704, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.170-15.618 and (208Pb/204Pb)i = 36.376-38.248. The granite has εNd(t) of -18.0 to -16.3 and εHf(t) values of -26.5 to -20.0. All these data indicate that the Yaochong granite is a high-K calc-alkaline fractionated I-type granite, and may have originated from partial melting of the thickened Yangtze continental crust. The Mo ores also show low radiogenic Pb isotopes similar to the Yaochong stock. Medium Re content in molybdenite (21.8-74.8 ppm) also suggests that the ore-forming materials were derived from the thickened lower crust with possibly minor mixing with the mantle. Similar to the Eastern Dabie orogen, the thickened crust beneath the Western Dabie orogen may also have experienced tectonic collapse, which may have exerted fundamental geodynamic controls on the two-stage Mo mineralization in the region.

  1. Geochronology, petrogenesis and tectonic settings of pre- and syn-ore granites from the W-Mo deposits (East Kounrad, Zhanet and Akshatau), Central Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, GuangMing; Cao, MingJian; Qin, KeZhang; Evans, Noreen J.; Hollings, Pete; Seitmuratova, Eleonora Yusupovha

    2016-05-01

    There is significant debate regarding the mineralization ages of the East Kounrad, Zhanet and Akshatau W-Mo deposits of Central Kazakhstan, and the petrogenesis and tectono-magmatic evolution of the granites associated with these deposits. To address these issues, we present molybdenite Re-Os dating, zircon U-Pb dating, whole rock geochemistry as well as Sr-Nd-Pb and zircon O-Hf isotopic analyses on the pre-mineralization and ore-forming granites. U-Pb dating of zircons from pre-mineralization granitic rocks yield Late Carboniferous ages of 320-309 Ma, whereas ore-forming granites have Early Permian ages of 298-285 Ma. Molybdenite Re-Os isotopic data indicate a mineralization age of 296 Ma at East Kounrad, 294 Ma at Akshatau and 285 Ma at Zhanet. The pre-ore and ore-forming granites are high-K calc-alkaline, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous I-type granites. The pre-mineralization granites are relatively unfractionated, whereas the ore-forming granites are highly fractionated. The fractionating mineral phases are probably K-feldspar, apatite, Ti-bearing phases and minor plagioclase. The pre-mineralization and ore-forming rocks are characterized by similar Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-O isotopic compositions ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.70308-0.70501, εNd (t) = - 0.5 to + 2.8, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.60-15.82, zircon εHf (t) = + 1.2 to + 15.6 and δ18O = + 4.6 to + 10.3‰), whole rock TDMC (Nd) (840-1120 Ma) and zircon TDMC (Hf) (320-1240 Ma). The isotopic characteristics are consistent with a hybrid magma source caused by 10-30% assimilation of ancient crust by juvenile lower crust. The geochronology and geochemistry of these granites show that the Late Carboniferous pre-mineralization granitic rocks formed during subduction, whereas the Early Permian ore-forming, highly fractionated granite probably underwent significant fractionation with a restite assemblage of K-feldspar, apatite, Ti-bearing phases and minor plagioclase and developed during collision between the Yili and Kazakhstan

  2. Flocculation of Pyrite Fines in Aqueous Suspensions with Corn Starch to Eliminate Mechanical Entrainment in Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophilic flocculation of pyrite fines in aqueous suspensions with corn starch was studied by measuring particle size distribution, microscopy observation and micro-flotation. Furthermore, the interaction of corn starch with pyrite was investigated by determining the adsorption density and based on zeta potential measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS analysis in this work. The results of the particle size distribution measurement show that corn starch can effectively aggregate pyrite fines, and the pyrite floccules (flocs are sensitive to mechanical stirring. The micro-flotation results suggest that the mechanical entrainment of pyrite fines in flotation can be effectively eliminated through the formation of large-size flocs. The zeta potential of pyrite particles decreases with the addition of corn starch. The XPS results prove that carboxyl groups are generated on the digested corn starch, and both iron hydroxyl compounds and ferrous disulfide on the pyrite surface can chemically interact with the corn starch digested by sodium hydroxide.

  3. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (exhibited substantial nitrate removal rate, lower sulfate accumulation (5.46 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N) and lower alkalinity consumption (1.70 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N) when compared to SOD (7.54 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N, 4.57 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N based on stoichiometric calculation). This research revealed that the PPAD process is a promising technique for nitrate-contaminated groundwater treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  4. Introduction to isotopic geochronology of pre-quaternary age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.

    1985-01-01

    The historical development of Geochronology is summarized, showing its strong relation to Physics. Considerations about radioactivity and its application to radiochronology are made, including the use of U, Th-Pb dating techniques. A vast list of bibliographical references is given for further consultation. (C.L.B.) [pt

  5. Adsorção de xantatos sobre pirita Adsorption of xanthate on pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Garcia Penha

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of adsorption of xanthate with alkyl chain of two (C2XK, four (C4XK and eight (C8XK atoms of carbon, on pyrite from Santa Catarina, Brazil. The results showed that pyrite surface changes from hydrophilic to hydrophobic when xanthate is adsorbed increasing the contact angle to 35º for C2XK, and to 90º for C4XK and C8XK. The rate of flotation of pyrite particles after adsorption increases with the increase of the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain in agreement with the results of contact angle measurements.

  6. Molybdenite Re/Os dating, zircon U-Pb age and geochemistry of granitoids in the Yangchuling porphyry W-Mo deposit (Jiangnan tungsten ore belt), China: Implications for petrogenesis, mineralization and geodynamic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingwen; Xiong, Bikang; Liu, Jun; Pirajno, Franco; Cheng, Yanbo; Ye, Huishou; Song, Shiwei; Dai, Pan

    2017-08-01

    The Yangchuling W-Mo deposit, located in the Jiangnan porphyry-skarn (JNB) tungsten ore belt, is the first recognized typical porphyry W-Mo deposit in China in the 1980's. Stockworks and disseminated W-Mo mineralization occur in the roof pendant of a 0.3 km2 monzogranitic porphyry stock that intruded into a granodiorite stock, hosted by Neoproterozoic phyllite and slate. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb analyses suggest that of the monzogranitic porphyry and granodiorite were formed at 143.8 ± 0.5 Ma and 149.8 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively. Six molybdenite samples yielded a Re-Os weighted mean age of 146.4 ± 1.0 Ma. Geochemical data show that both granodiorite and monzogranitic porphyry are characterized by enrichment of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) relative to high field strength elements (HFSE), indicating a peraluminous nature (A/CNK = 1.01-1.08). Two granitoids are characterized by a negative slope with significant light REE/heavy REE fractionation [(La/Yb)N = 8.38-23.20] and negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.69-0.76). The P2O5 contents of the Yangchuling granitoids range from 0.12% to 0.17% and exhibit a negative correlation with SiO2, reflecting that they are highly fractionated I-type. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7104-0.7116), low negative εNd(t) (- 5.05 to - 5.67), and homogeneous εHf(t) between - 1.39 and - 2.17, indicating similar sources. Additionally, two-stage Nd model ages (TDM2) of 1.3-1.4 Ga and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 1.2-1.3 Ga are consistent, indicating that Neoproterozoic crustal rocks of the Shuangqiaoshan Group could have contributed to form the Yangchuling magmas. Considering the two groups of parallel Late Mesozoic ore belts, namely the Jiangnan porphyry-skarn tungsten belt (JNB) in the south and the Middle-Lower Yangtze River porphyry-skarn Cu-Au-Mo-Fe ore belt (YRB) in the north, the Nanling granite-related W-Sn ore belt (NLB) in the south, the neighboring Qin-Hang porphyry-skarn Cu-Mo-hydrothermal Pb-Zn-Ag ore belt (QHB

  7. Re-Os dating of mineralization in Siah Kamar porphyry Mo deposit (NW Iran) and investigating on its temporal relationship with porphyry Cu-Mo deposits in the southern Lesser Caucasus, NW and central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Vartan; Moazzen, Mohssen; Selby, David

    2017-04-01

    The Neo-Tethyan basin closure in Iran is characterized by the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA), formed by north-eastward subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust during the Alpine orogeny. This belt also coincides with the porphyry copper metallogenic belt of Iran, which hosts many porphyry Cu-Mo deposits (PCDs) and prospects, such as Sungun (NW Iran) and Sarcheshmeh (central Iran). The Siah Kamar porphyry Mo deposit (PMD) is the first discovered porphyry molybdenum deposit on this belt, which is located 10 km west of Mianeh (NW Iran), with 39.2 Mt proved reserves @ 539 ppm Mo and 66.4 Mt probable reserves @ 266 ppm Mo. The host porphyry stock has quartz-monzonitic composition, which intruded the volcanic and pyroclastic rocks of Eocene age. Re content of molybdenites is about 10.44-41.05 ppm which, considering the several tens of ppm concentration, is comparable with porphyry Mo deposits (e.g., Climax in USA), being clearly distinguished from porphyry Cu-Mo deposits. Re-Os dating of molybdenites from this PMD has given model ages between 28.1±0.15 to 29.06±0.2 Ma, and isochron age of 28.0±2.1 Ma, corresponding to the middle Oligocene (upper part of Rupelian). Comparing the ages determined for Siah Kamar PMD with porphyry Cu-Mo mineralizations in the Lesser Caucasus indicates that it is younger than most of the dated PCDs and prospects there, especially those of upper Eocene, while it is a little older than Paragachay and first-stage Kadjaran PCDs [1]. In a regional scale of NW Iran, it shows a narrow overlap with vein-type Cu-Mo-Au mineralizations in Qarachilar (Qaradagh batholith) and is nearly coeval with Haftcheshmeh PCD, indicating that mineralization in the Siah Kamar PMD corresponds to the second porphyry mineralization epoch in NW Iran, proposed by [2]. Meanwhile, mineralization in Siah Kamar is older than all the porphyry Cu-Mo mineralizations along the central and SE parts of the UDMA, except the Bondar Hanza PCD in Kerman zone, which nearly

  8. Low temperature anaerobic bacterial diagenesis of ferrous monosulfide to pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Ravin; Southam, Gordon

    1999-07-01

    In vitro enrichment cultures of dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria precipitated FeS and catalyzed its transformation into FeS 2 at ambient temperature and pressure under anaerobic conditions. When compared to purely abiotic processes, the bacterially mediated transformation was shown to be more efficient in transforming FeS into FeS 2. This occurred due to the large, reactive surface area available for bacterially catalyzed diagenesis, where the biogenic FeS precursor was immobilized as a thin film (˜25 nm thick) on the μm-scale bacteria. The bacteria also contained the source(s) of sulfur for diagenesis to occur. Using a radiolabeled organic-sulfur tracer study, sulfur was released during cell autolysis and was immobilized at the bacterial cell surface forming FeS 2. The formation of FeS 2 occurred on both the inner and outer surfaces of the cell envelope and represented the first step of bacterial mineral diagenesis. Pyrite crystals, having linear dimensions of ˜1 μm, grew outward from the bacterial cell surfaces. These minerals were several orders of magnitude larger in volume than those originating abiotically.

  9. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    as substrates and NO3- as electron acceptor, in the presence of (FeS2)-Fe-55, to test for co-oxidation of FeS2, but an anaerobic microbial dissolution of (FeS2)-Fe-55, could not been detected. FeS2 and FeS were not oxidized by amorphous Fe(III) oxide in the presence of Fe-complexing organic compounds......Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3...... marine sediments and incubated at different temperatures for > 1 yr. Bacteria could not be enriched with FeS2 as substrate or with FeS and amorphous Fe(III) oxide. With FeS and NO3-, 14 enrichments were obtained. One of these enrichments was further cultivated anaerobically with Fe2+ and S-0...

  10. Copper-arsenic decoupling in an active geothermal system: A link between pyrite and fluid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Daniele; Reich, Martin; Deditius, Artur P.; Chryssoulis, Stephen; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Wrage, Jackie; Roberts, Malcolm P.

    2017-05-01

    Over the past few decades several studies have reported that pyrite hosts appreciable amounts of trace elements which commonly occur forming complex zoning patterns within a single mineral grain. These chemical zonations in pyrite have been recognized in a variety of hydrothermal ore deposit types (e.g., porphyry Cu-Mo-Au, epithermal Au deposits, iron oxide-copper-gold, Carlin-type and Archean lode Au deposits, among others), showing, in some cases, marked oscillatory alternation of metals and metalloids in pyrite growth zones (e.g., of Cu-rich, As-(Au, Ag)-depleted zones and As-(Au, Ag)-rich, Cu-depleted zones). This decoupled geochemical behavior of Cu and As has been interpreted as a result of chemical changes in ore-forming fluids, although direct evidence connecting fluctuations in hydrothermal fluid composition with metal partitioning into pyrite growth zones is still lacking. In this study, we report a comprehensive trace element database of pyrite from the Tolhuaca Geothermal System (TGS) in southern Chile, a young and active hydrothermal system where fewer pyrite growth rims and mineralization events are present and the reservoir fluid (i.e. ore-forming fluid) is accessible. We combined the high-spatial resolution and X-ray mapping capabilities of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) with low detection limits and depth-profiling capacity of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a suite of pyrite samples retrieved from a ∼1 km drill hole that crosses the argillic (20-450 m) and propylitic (650-1000 m) alteration zones of the geothermal system. We show that the concentrations of precious metals (e.g., Au, Ag), metalloids (e.g., As, Sb, Se, Te), and base and heavy metals (e.g., Cu, Co, Ni, Pb) in pyrite at the TGS are significant. Among the elements analyzed, As and Cu are the most abundant with concentrations that vary from sub-ppm levels to a few wt.% (i.e., up to ∼5 wt.% As, ∼1.5 wt.% Cu). Detailed wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (WDS) X

  11. The role of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans in pyrite weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, K.; Tsunekawa, M.; Ohtsuka, T.; Konno, H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper investigates the role of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans in pyrite weathering in order to clarify the effects of the bacteria on the dissolution behavior of pyrite and the formation of secondary minerals using Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) in addition to solution analysis. It was found that T. thiooxidans, when present with the iron-oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, enhanced the dissolution of Fe and S species for pyrite, whereas T. thiooxidans alone did not oxidize pyrite. Enhancement of the consumption of elemental sulfur and regeneration of Fe(II) ions were also observed with T. thiooxidans together with T. ferrooxidans, while this did not occur with T. ferrooxidans alone

  12. Pyrite: A blender plugin for visualizing molecular dynamics simulations using industry-standard rendering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, Nivedita; Durrant, Jacob D

    2018-05-05

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide critical insights into many biological mechanisms. Programs such as VMD, Chimera, and PyMOL can produce impressive simulation visualizations, but they lack many advanced rendering algorithms common in the film and video-game industries. In contrast, the modeling program Blender includes such algorithms but cannot import MD-simulation data. MD trajectories often require many gigabytes of memory/disk space, complicating Blender import. We present Pyrite, a Blender plugin that overcomes these limitations. Pyrite allows researchers to visualize MD simulations within Blender, with full access to Blender's cutting-edge rendering techniques. We expect Pyrite-generated images to appeal to students and non-specialists alike. A copy of the plugin is available at http://durrantlab.com/pyrite/, released under the terms of the GNU General Public License Version 3. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Selective separation of arsenopyrite from pyrite by biomodulation in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraprabha, M N; Natarajan, K A; Somasundaran, P

    2004-08-15

    Effective methods for selective separation using flotation or flocculation of arsenopyrite from pyrite by biomodulation using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans are presented here. Adhesion of the bacterium to the surface of arsenopyrite was very slow compared to that to pyrite, resulting in a difference in surface modification of the minerals subsequent to interaction with cells. The cells were able to effectively depress pyrite flotation in presence of collectors like potassium isopropyl xanthate and potassium amyl xanthate. On the other hand the flotability of arsenopyrite after conditioning with the cells was not significantly affected. The activation of pyrite by copper sulfate was reduced when the minerals were conditioned together, resulting in better selectivity. Selective separation could also be achieved by flocculation of biomodulated samples.

  14. Effect of inversion layer at iron pyrite surface on photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2018-03-01

    Iron pyrite has great potential as a thin-film solar cell material because it has high optical absorption, low cost, and is earth-abundant. However, previously reported iron pyrite solar cells showed poor photovoltaic characteristics. Here, we have numerically simulated its photovoltaic characteristics and band structures by utilizing a two-dimensional (2D) device simulator, ATLAS, to evaluate the effects of an inversion layer at the surface and a high density of deep donor defect states in the bulk. We found that previous device structures did not consider the inversion layer at the surface region of iron pyrite, which made it difficult to obtain the conversion efficiency. Therefore, we remodeled the device structure and suggested that removing the inversion layer and reducing the density of deep donor defect states would lead to a high conversion efficiency of iron pyrite solar cells.

  15. Pyrite Iron Sulfide Solar Cells Made from Solution Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Matt [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-03-21

    This document summarizes research done under the SunShot Next Generation PV II project entitled, “Pyrite Iron Sulfide Solar Cells Made from Solution,” award number DE-EE0005324, at the University of California, Irvine, from 9/1/11 thru 11/30/16. The project goal was to develop iron pyrite (cubic FeS2) as an absorber layer for solution-processible p-n heterojunction solar cells with a pathway to >20% power conversion efficiency. Project milestones centered around seven main Tasks: (1) make device-quality pyrite thin-films from solar ink; (2) develop an ohmic bottom contact with suitable low resistivity; (3) produce a p-n heterojunction with VOC > 400 mV; (4) make a solar cell with >5% power conversion efficiency; (5) use alloying to increase the pyrite band gap to ~1.2-1.4 eV; (6) produce a p-n heterojunction with VOC > 500 mV; and finally (7) make a solar cell with >10% power conversion efficiency. In response to project findings, the Tasks were amended midway through the project to focus particular effort on passivating the surface of pyrite in order to eliminate excessively-strong surface band bending believed to be responsible for the low VOC of pyrite diodes. Major project achievements include: (1) development and detailed characterization of several new solution syntheses of high-quality thin-film pyrite, including two “molecular ink” routes; (2) demonstration of Mo/MoS2 bilayers as good ohmic bottom contacts to pyrite films; (3) fabrication of pyrite diodes with a glass/Mo/MoS2/pyrite/ZnS/ZnO/AZO layer sequence that show VOC values >400 mV and as high as 610 mV at ~1 sun illumination, although these high VOC values ultimately proved irreproducible; (4) established that ZnS is a promising n-type junction partner for pyrite; (5) used density functional theory to show that the band gap of pyrite can be increased from ~1.0 to a more optimal 1.2-1.3 eV by alloying with oxygen; (6) through extensive measurements of ultrahigh

  16. Cu-As Decoupling in Hydrothermal Systems: A Link Between Pyrite Chemistry and Fluid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, M.; Tardani, D.; Deditius, A.; Chryssoulis, S.; Wrage, J.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.; Andrea, H.; Cinthia, J.

    2016-12-01

    Chemical zonations in pyrite have been recognized in most hydrothermal ore deposit types, showing in some cases marked oscillatory alternation of metals and metalloids in pyrite growth zones (e.g., of Cu-rich, As-(Au)-depleted zones and As-(Au)-rich, Cu-depleted zones). This decoupled geochemical behavior of Cu and As has been interpreted as a result of chemical changes in ore-forming fluids, although direct evidence connecting fluctuations in hydrothermal fluid composition with metal partitioning into pyrite growth zones is still lacking. Here we report a comprehensive trace element database of pyrite from an active hydrothermal system, the Tolhuaca Geothermal System (TGS) in southern Chile. We combined high-spatial resolution and X-ray mapping capabilities of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) with low detection limits and depth-profiling capabilities of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a suite of pyrite samples retrieved from a 1 km drill hole that crosses the argillic and propylitic alteration zones of the geothermal system. We show that the concentrations of precious metals (e.g., Au, Ag), metalloids (e.g., As, Sb, Se, Te), and base and heavy metals (e.g., Cu, Co, Ni, Pb) in pyrite at the TGS are significant. Among the elements analyzed, arsenic, Cu and Co are the most abundant with concentrations that vary from sub-ppm levels to a few wt. %. Pyrites from the deeper propylitic zone do not show significant zonation and high Cu-(Co)-As concentrations correlate with each other. In contrast, well-developed zonations were detected in pyrite from the shallow argillic alteration zone, where Cu(Co)-rich, As-depleted cores alternate with Cu(Co)-depleted, As-rich rims. These microanalytical data were contrasted with chemical data of fluid inclusion in quartz veins (high Cu/Na and low As/Na) and borehole fluids (low Cu/Na and high As/Na) reported at the TGS, showing a clear correspondence between Cu and As concentrations in pyrite-forming fluids and chemical

  17. Enhanced bioleaching on attachment of indigenous acidophilic bacteria to pyrite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, D. W.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, bioleaching has been widely applied on an industrial scale due to the advantages of low cost and environment friendliness. The direct contact mechanism of bioleaching assumes the action of a metal sulfide-attached cell oxidizing the mineral by an enzyme system with oxygen to sulfate and metal cations. Fundamental surface properties of sulfide particles and leaching-bacteria in bioleaching play the key role in the efficiency of this process. The aim of this work is to investigate of direct contact bioleaching mechanism on pyrite through attachment properties between indigenous acidophilic bacteria and pyrite surfaces. The bacteria were obtained from sulfur hot springs, Hatchobaru thermal electricity plant in Japan. And pyrite was collected from mine waste from Gwang-yang abandoned gold mines, Korea. In XRD analyses of the pyrite, x-ray diffracted d-value belong to pyrite was observed. The indigenous acidophilic bacteria grew well in a solution and over the course of incubation pH decreased and Eh increased. In relation to a bacterial growth-curve, the lag phase was hardly shown while the exponential phase was very fast. Bioleaching experiment result was showed that twenty days after the indigenous acidophilic bacteria were inoculated to a pyrite-leaching medium, the bacterial sample had a greater concentration of Fe and Zn than within the control sample. In SEM-EDS analyses, rod-shaped bacteria and round-shaped microbes were well attached to the surface of pyrite. The size of the rod-shaped bacteria ranged from 1.05~1.10 ? to 4.01~5.38 ?. Round-shaped microbes were more than 3.0 ? in diameter. Paired cells of rod-shaped bacteria were attached to the surface of pyrite linearly.

  18. Thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of ammonium nitrate in the presence of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan, Richard; Zhang Dongke

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between ammonium nitrate based industrial explosives and pyrite-rich minerals in mining operations can lead to the occurrence of spontaneous explosion of the explosives. In an effort to provide a scientific basis for safe applications of industrial explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite, ammonium nitrate decomposition, with and without the presence of pyrite, was studied using a simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analyser (DSC-TGA) and a gas-sealed isothermal reactor, respectively. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of ammonium nitrate decomposition were determined to be 102.6 kJ mol -1 and 4.55 x 10 7 s -1 without the presence of pyrite and 101.8 kJ mol -1 and 2.57 x 10 9 s -1 with the presence of pyrite. The kinetics of ammonium nitrate decomposition was then used to calculate the critical temperatures for ammonium nitrate decomposition with and without the presence of pyrite, based on the Frank-Kamenetskii model of thermal explosion. It was shown that the presence of pyrite reduces the temperature for, and accelerates the rate of, decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It was further shown that pyrite can significantly reduce the critical temperature of ammonium nitrate decomposition, causing undesired premature detonation of the explosives. The critical temperature also decreases with increasing diameter of the blast holes charged with the explosive. The concept of using the critical temperature as indication of the thermal stability of the explosives to evaluate the risk of spontaneous explosion was verified in the gas-sealed isothermal reactor experiments.

  19. Thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of ammonium nitrate in the presence of pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Richard; Zhang, Dongke

    2009-06-15

    The interaction between ammonium nitrate based industrial explosives and pyrite-rich minerals in mining operations can lead to the occurrence of spontaneous explosion of the explosives. In an effort to provide a scientific basis for safe applications of industrial explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite, ammonium nitrate decomposition, with and without the presence of pyrite, was studied using a simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analyser (DSC-TGA) and a gas-sealed isothermal reactor, respectively. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of ammonium nitrate decomposition were determined to be 102.6 kJ mol(-1) and 4.55 x 10(7)s(-1) without the presence of pyrite and 101.8 kJ mol(-1) and 2.57 x 10(9)s(-1) with the presence of pyrite. The kinetics of ammonium nitrate decomposition was then used to calculate the critical temperatures for ammonium nitrate decomposition with and without the presence of pyrite, based on the Frank-Kamenetskii model of thermal explosion. It was shown that the presence of pyrite reduces the temperature for, and accelerates the rate of, decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It was further shown that pyrite can significantly reduce the critical temperature of ammonium nitrate decomposition, causing undesired premature detonation of the explosives. The critical temperature also decreases with increasing diameter of the blast holes charged with the explosive. The concept of using the critical temperature as indication of the thermal stability of the explosives to evaluate the risk of spontaneous explosion was verified in the gas-sealed isothermal reactor experiments.

  20. Application of fuel cell for pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, H.; Ju, W. J.; Jho, E. H.; Nam, K.

    2015-12-01

    Once pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste reacts with water and air it produces acid mine drainage (AMD) and leads to the other environmental problems such as contamination of surrounding soils. Pyrite is the major source of AMD and it can be controlled using a biological-electrochemical dissolution method. By enhancing the dissolution of pyrite using fuel cell technology, not only mining waste be beneficially utilized but also be treated at the same time by. As pyrite-containing mining waste is oxidized in the anode of the fuel cell, electrons and protons are generated, and electrons moves through an external load to cathode reducing oxygen to water while protons migrate to cathode through a proton exchange membrane. Iron-oxidizing bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which can utilize Fe as an electron donor promotes pyrite dissolution and hence enhances electrochemical dissolution of pyrite from mining waste. In this study mining waste from a zinc mine in Korea containing 17 wt% pyrite and 9% As was utilized as a fuel for the fuel cell inoculated with A. ferrooxidans. Electrochemically dissolved As content and chemically dissolved As content was compared. With the initial pH of 3.5 at 23℃, the dissolved As concentration increased (from 4.0 to 13 mg/L after 20 d) in the fuel cell, while it kept decreased in the chemical reactor (from 12 to 0.43 mg/L after 20 d). The fuel cell produced 0.09 V of open circuit voltage with the maximum power density of 0.84 mW/m2. Dissolution of As from mining waste was enhanced through electrochemical reaction. Application of fuel cell technology is a novel treatment method for pyrite and heavy metals containing mining waste, and this method is beneficial for mining environment as well as local community of mining areas.

  1. On the genesis of pyrite-polymetallic deposits of the Rudnyi Altai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchkov, E.V.; Najdenov, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of lead isotope composition measurements in pyrite-polymetallic deposits of the Rudnyi Altai are presented. Porphyr dating by zirconium has shown isochronous age of 552 million years. Lead of galenites of various generations and galenite form of lead of pyrit provide similar lead-isotope values with model age of 370 million years. The isotopic-geochemical data obtained are interpreted as applied to the deposit genesis

  2. The influence of pyrite on the solubility of minjingu and panda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of pyrite rock on the solubility of Minjingu and Panda phosphate rocks. The rocks were ground to 100 mesh (0.045 mm) after which each phosphate rock was mixed with pyrite at P:S ratios of 1:4, 1 :3, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, and 3: 1. The mixtures were moistened and incubated ...

  3. Report on assessment of the mechanism of bacterially assisted oxidation of pyritic uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbert, B.B.; Scharer, J.M.; Knapp, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    The oxidation of pyritic minerals has been shown to be catalyzed by the presence of iron- and sulphur-oxidizing bacteria. Thiobacillus ferroxidans plays the most significant role in the formation and propagation of acidic conditions. Optimum growth conditions for the T. ferroxidans occurs at a temperature of 35 degrees C and pH of 2 to 3. Bacterially assisted oxidation of pyrite involves both direct and indirect contact mechanisms. The direct contact mechanism entails enzymatic oxidation of the insoluble sulphide moiety. The indirect mechanism involves bacterial oxidation of the dissolved ferrous component to the ferric state. The ferric iron, in turn, acts as the prime oxidant of pyrite and is reduced to ferrous iron. The re-oxidation of the dissolved ferrous component which is catalyzed by bacterial activity, completes the cyclic process. The rate of bacterial oxidation is affected by: the geochemistry and reactivity of the pyritic material; the amount of pyrite present in the waste material and the exposed surface area of the pyritic component; the availability of oxygen and carbon dioxide; the pH and temperature of the leach solution; and the presence (or absence) of organic inhibitors. Of the above factors, oxygen has been frequently identified as the rate limiting reactant in tailings

  4. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the inc......The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase...... in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4â10......-10 mol FeS2/gâs are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate...

  5. Influence of the Interaction between Sphalerite and Pyrite on the Copper Activation of Sphalerite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of pyrite on the activation of sphalerite was investigated by micro-flotation, copper adsorption experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical measurement. The micro-flotation test results showed that the recovery and flotation rate of sphalerite with copper sulphate as activator and butyl xanthate as collector were significantly decreased with the increasing content of pyrite in pulp. Cu2+ adsorption results indicated that the adsorption of Cu2+ on the sphalerite surface were decreased when pyrite was present in the pulp. XPS surface analysis demonstrated that the proportion of Cu+ species increased in the activation products on the sphalerite surface, but the total atomic concentration of Cu atom was decreased. Linear voltammetry measurement suggested that the current density of Cu+ species oxidizing to Cu2+ species was increased when sphalerite was electrically contacted with pyrite, which confirmed the increased proportion of Cu+ species on Cu-activation sphalerite surface when contacting with pyrite. These results indicated that there is not only a competitive adsorption for cupric ions (Cu2+, but the galvanic interaction between sphalerite and pyrite also has a significant influence on the copper activation of sphalerite.

  6. Spatial Mapping for Managing Oxidized Pyrite (FeS2 in South Sumatra Wetlands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Edi Armanto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to analyze spatial mapping for managing oxidized pyrite (FeS2 in South Sumatra wetlands, Indonesia. The field observations are done by exploring several transect on land units. The field description refers to Soil Survey Staff (2014. Water and soil samples were taken from selected key areas for laboratory analysis. The vegetation data was collected by making sample plots (squares method placed on each vegetation type with plot sizes depending on the vegetation type, namely 10 x 10 m for secondary forests and 5 x 5 m for shrubs and grass. The observations of surface water level were done during the river receding with units of m above sea level (m asl. The research results showed that pyrite formation is largely determined by the availability of natural vegetation as Sulfur (S donors, climate and uncontrolled water balance and supporting fauna such as crabs and mud shrimp.  Climate and water balance as well as supporting faunas is the main supporting factors to accelerate the process of pyrite formation. Oxidized pyrite serves to increase soil acidity, becomes toxic to fish ponds and arable soils, plant growth and disturbing the water and soil nutrient balances. Oxidized pyrite is predominantly accelerated by the dynamics of river water and disturbed natural vegetation by human activities.  The pyrite oxidation management approach is divided into three main components of technologies, namely water management, land management and commodity management.

  7. Calorimetric investigation on mechanically activated storage energy mechanism of sphalerite and pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhongliang; Chen Qiyuan; Yin Zhoulan; Hu Huiping; Wu Daoxin

    2005-01-01

    The structural changes of mechanically activated sphalerite and pyrite under different grinding conditions were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), laser particle size analyzer and elemental analysis. The storage energy of mechanically activated sphalerite and pyrite was measured by a calorimetric method. A thermochemical cycle was designed so that mechanically activated and non-activated minerals reached the same final state when dissolved in the same oxidizing solvent. The results show that the storage energy of mechanically activated sphalerite and pyrite rises with increased in grinding time, and reaches a maximum after a certain grinding period. The storage energy of mechanically activated pyrite decreases when heated under inert atmosphere. The storage energy of mechanically activated sphalerite and pyrite remains constant when treated below 573 K under inert atmosphere. The percentage of the storage energy caused by surface area increase during mechanical activation decreases with increasing grinding time. These results support our opinion that the mechanically activated storage energy of sphalerite is closely related to lattice distortions, and the mechanically activated storage energy of pyrite is mainly caused by the formation of reactive sites on the surface

  8. Source and Enrichment of Toxic Elements in Coal Seams around Mafic Intrusions: Constraints from Pyrites in the Yuandian Coal Mine in Anhui, Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei An

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrite, a mineral that can cause potential environmental issues in coal mining, is commonly found in coal seams around intrusions. In this paper, pyrites from the Yuandian Coal Mine (Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, Eastern China were studied using SEM, Raman and LA-ICP-MS. The pyrite morphologic and geochemical data suggest that (1 four pyrite generations are present (framboidal sedimentary pyrites (Py I in the original coal, coarse-grained magmatic pyrites (Py II in the intruding diabase, fine-grained metamorphic pyrites (Py III in the intrusive contact aureole, and spheroid/vein hydrothermal pyrites (Py IV in the cokeite; and (2 concentrations of cobalt, nickel, arsenic, selenium, lead and copper in the metamorphic pyrites are much higher than the other pyrite generations. We propose that mafic magmatism is the main contributor of the toxic elements to the intrusion-related cokeite at Yuandian.

  9. Effect of Pyrite on Thiosulfate Leaching of Gold and the Role of Ammonium Alcohol Polyvinyl Phosphate (AAPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pyrite and the role of ammonium alcohol polyvinyl phosphate (AAPP during gold leaching in ammoniacal thiosulfate solutions were investigated using pure gold foils. The results showed that pyrite catalyzed the decomposition and also significantly increased the consumption of thiosulfate. This detrimental effect became more severe with increasing pyrite content. Further, the presence of pyrite also substantially slowed the gold leaching kinetics and reduced the overall gold dissolution. The reduction in gold dissolution was found to be caused primarily by the surface passivation of the gold. The negative effects of pyrite, however, can be alleviated by the addition of AAPP. Comparison of zeta potentials of pyrite with and without AAPP suggests that AAPP had adsorbed on the surface of the pyrite and weakened the catalytic effect of pyrite on the thiosulfate decomposition by blocking the contact between the pyrite and thiosulfate anions. AAPP also competed with thiosulfate anions to complex with the cupric ion at the axial coordinate sites, and thus abated the oxidation of thiosulfate by cupric ions. Moreover, the indiscriminate adsorption of AAPP on the surfaces of gold and passivation species prevented the passivation of the gold surface by surface charge and electrostatic repulsion. Therefore, AAPP effectively stabilized the thiosulfate in the solution and facilitated the gold leaching in the presence of pyrite.

  10. Chalcopyrite Dissolution at 650 mV and 750 mV in the Presence of Pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubiao Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution of chalcopyrite in association with pyrite in mine waste results in the severe environmental issue of acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD. To better understand chalcopyrite dissolution, and the impact of chalcopyrite’s galvanic interaction with pyrite, chalcopyrite dissolution has been examined at 75 °C, pH 1.0, in the presence of quartz (as an inert mineral and pyrite. The presence of pyrite increased the chalcopyrite dissolution rate by more than five times at Eh of 650 mV (SHE (Cu recovery 2.5 cf. 12% over 132 days due to galvanic interaction between chalcopyrite and pyrite. Dissolution of Cu and Fe was stoichiometric and no pyrite dissolved. Although the chalcopyrite dissolution rate at 750 mV (SHE was approximately four-fold greater (Cu recovery of 45% within 132 days as compared to at 650 mV in the presence of pyrite, the galvanic interaction between chalcopyrite and pyrite was negligible. Approximately all of the sulfur from the leached chalcopyrite was converted to S0 at 750 mV, regardless of the presence of pyrite. At this Eh approximately 60% of the sulfur associated with pyrite dissolution was oxidised to S0 and the remaining 40% was released in soluble forms, e.g., SO42−.

  11. Recrystallization Experiments of Pyrite From Circulating Hydrothermal Solution by Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Isobe, H.

    2005-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common accessory minerals in many rocks and generally occurs in hydrothermal deposit. However, pyrite morphology and association with other sulfide minerals is not well known with respect to the solution condition, especially with the hydrothermal solution under circulation. In this study, recrystallization experiments of pyrite from circulating hydrothermal solution by thermal convection were carried out. A rectangular circuit (42.6 cm by 17.3 cm) of SUS316 pressure tubing with 5 mm in inner diameter was used as a reaction vessel. The volume of the circuit is approximately 24 ml. Long sides of the rectangular circuit were held to be 20 degrees inclination. One of the long sides was heated by an electric furnace. Solution in the circuit evaporates in the high temperature tubing and the vapor condenses in room temperature tubing. The solution backs to the bottom of the high temperature tubing. Thus, thermal convection of the solution produces circulation in the circuit. Starting material was filled in the high temperature tubing. The lower half was filled with mixture of 2 g of powdered natural pyrite and 4 g of quartz grains. The upper half was filled with quartz grains only. 9 ml of 5 mol/l NH4Cl solution was sealed in the circuit with the starting material. Temperature gradient of the sample was monitored by 6 thermocouples. Maximum temperature was controlled at 350°C. Experimental durations are 3, 5, 10 and 30 days. After the experiments, the run products are fixed with resin and cut every 2 cm. Thin sections of vertical cross-sections are made and observed by microscope and SEM. Tiny pyrite crystals occurred at the upper outside of the furnace, where temperature should be much lower than 200°C. In the lower half of the starting material, pyrite decomposed and pyrrhotite formed around pyrite grains. At higher temperature area, pyrite decomposition and pyrrhotite formation is remarkable. Circulating sulfur-bearing solution provided by

  12. Pre-cambrian geochronology in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, A.C.

    1981-08-01

    The Precambrian region polyciclic caracter, in the Rio Grande do Norte State has make difficulties to its geochronological and geological studies. Four importants tectonometamorphic occurences identified dissimulate the original isotopic composition of the rocks. Is much defined the presence of three geochronological events wich left vestiges in the differents Serido litological units. The first event is related with Jequie cicle (2,7 b.y) and related with the Caico Group rocks. The second important event define the Transamazonic cicle (2.1 b.y). The third is correlated with Brazilian Cicle, when occurred the granitoids and pegmatites bodies formation. This third event was the last in this region and affect the other units too. (C.D.G.) [pt

  13. Geochronological constraints on the evolution of El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Ubide, Teresa; Sudo, Masafumi; Martí, Joan; Galindo, Inés; Galé, Carlos; Morales, Jose María; Yepes, Jorge; Lago, Marceliano

    2016-01-01

    New age data have been obtained to time constrain the recent Quaternary volcanism of El Hierro (Canary Islands) and to estimate its recurrence rate. We have carried out 40Ar/39Ar geochronology on samples spanning the entire volcanostratigraphic sequence of the island and 14C geochronology on the most recent eruption on the northeast rift of the island: 2280 ± 30 yr BP. We combine the new absolute data with a revision of published ages onshore, some of which were identified through geomorphological criteria (relative data). We present a revised and updated chronology of volcanism for the last 33 ka that we use to estimate the maximum eruptive recurrence of the island. The number of events per year determined is 9.7 × 10-4 for the emerged part of the island, which means that, as a minimum, one eruption has occurred approximately every 1000 years. This highlights the need of more geochronological data to better constrain the eruptive recurrence of El Hierro.

  14. Oxidation state of gold and arsenic in gold-bearing arsenian pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, G.; Huang, H.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Kesler, S.E.; Kao, L.S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1999-07-01

    XANES measurements on gold-bearing arsenian pyrite from the Twin Creeks Carlin-type gold deposits show that gold is present as both Au{sup 0} and Au{sup 1+} and arsenic is present as As{sup 1{minus}}. Au{sup 0} is attributed to sub-micrometer size inclusions of free gold, whereas Au{sup 1+} is attributed to gold in the lattice of the arsenian pyrite. STEM observations suggest that As{sup 1{minus}} is probably concentrated in angstrom-scale, randomly distributed layers with a marcasite or arsenopyrite structure. Ionic gold (Au{sup 1+}) could be concentrated in these layers as well, and is present in both twofold- and fourfold-coordinated forms, with fourfold-coordinated Au{sup 1+} more abundant. Twofold-coordinated Au{sup 1+} is similar to gold in Au{sub 2}S in which it is linearly coordinated to two sulfur atoms. The nature of fourfold-coordinated Au{sup 1+} is not well understood, although it might be present as an Au-As-S compound where gold is bonded in fourfold coordination to sulfur and arsenic atoms, or in vacancy positions on a cation site in the arsenian pyrite. Au{sup 1+} was probably incorporated into arsenian pyrite by adsorption onto pyrite surfaces during crystal growth. The most likely compound in the case of twofold-coordinated Au{sup 1+} was probably a tri-atomic surface complex such as S{sub pyrite}-Au{sup 1+}-S{sub bi-sulfide}H or Au{sup 1+}-S-Au{sup 1+}. The correlation between gold and arsenic might be related to the role of arsenic in enhancing the adsorption of gold complexes of this type on pyrite surfaces, possibly through semiconductor effects.

  15. Action time effect of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tichang Sun

    2004-01-01

    Two sample groups of bulk concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite and chalcopyrite from Daye and Chenghchao Mines in Hubei Province of China were used to investigate the effect of the action time of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite. The experimental results conducted with different samples and collectors showed that the action time between lime and pyrite markedly influences the depressive ability of lime. The depressive ability of lime increased with the action time increasing. It was also proved that the depressive results obtained at a large lime dosage after a shorter action time are similar to those obtained at a small lime dosage after a longer action time. The increase of depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because that there are different mechanisms in different action time. The composition on the surface of pyrite acted for different time with lime was studied by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis). The results showed that iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate formed on the pyrite surface at the presence of lime in the pulp but the amounts of iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate were different at different action time. At the beginning action time the compound formed on the pyrite surface was mainly calcium sulphate and almost no iron hydroxide formed; but with the action time increasing, iron hydroxide formed. The longer the action time, the more iron hydroxide and the less calcium sulphate formed. It was considered that the stronger depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because more iron hydroxide forms on the pyrite surface.

  16. Characteristics and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Erdenet Cu-Mo deposit, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalieris, Imants; Khashgerel, Bat-Erdene; Morgan, Leah; Undrakhtamir, Alexander; Borohul, Adiya

    2017-01-01

    50 to 200 m from the granodiorite porphyry contact, although D veins (and chalcopyrite) extend outward to the propylitic zone.The Erdenet porphyry system, was overprinted by advanced argillic alteration, which outcrops 2 km northwest of the pit, and forms a lithocap that extends over 10 × 2.5 km. It is characterized by residual quartz, andalusite, Na-Ca and K-alunite, diaspore, pyrophyllite, zunyite, topaz, dickite, and kaolinite. The upper part of the porphyry Cu-Mo deposit (removed by mining), comprised a bornite-chalcocite enriched zone up to 300 m thick with an average grade of 0.7 wt % Cu and up to 5 wt % Cu locally. Based on hypogene bornite-chalcocite mineral textures and high-sulfidation state mineralogy, the enriched zone is inferred to be of hypogene origin, but modified by supergene processes. Consequently, it may be related to formation of the lithocap.Previous Re-Os dates of 240.4 and 240.7 ± 0.8 Ma for molybdenite in quartz veins are comparable to new 40Ar/39Ar dates of 239.7 ± 1.6 and 240 ± 2 Ma for muscovite that envelops D veins. One 40Ar/39Ar date on K-alunite from the lithocap of 223.5 ± 1.9 Ma suggests that it may be about 16 m.y. younger than Erdenet, but this result needs to be verified by further dating.

  17. Rb-Sr geochronology of leucocratic granitoid rocks from the Spissko-Gemerske Rudohorie Mts. and Veporicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, B.; Veselsky, J.

    1989-01-01

    Information is given on new Rb-Sr data from leucocratic types of rocks occurring in the Gemericum and Veporicum. Basses on isochron geochronological data, mutual geochronological and geochemical relations are discussed. (author). 3 figs., 47 tabs., 14 refs

  18. Western cratonic domains in Uruguay, geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F; Pell, E; Muzio, R; Ledesma, J.J; Guerequiz, R

    2001-01-01

    of this unit is also illustrated by the existence of extended mylonitic zones, relicts of supracrustal rocks and granitic intrusions with different ages and compositions. Some isochronic ages (Rb/Sr WR) are ca. 650 to 500 Ma, being associated to partial melting processes generated during the Neoproterozoic orogeneses. The most important and the oldest metamorphic event yields transamazonic ages around 2250 ± 60 Ma in granulitic orthogneisses of Rivera using Rb/Sr (WR) (Cordani and Soliani, 1990). These rocks are intercalated with leucocratic and cataclastic gneisses and with diverse types of mafic rocks (amphibolites, piroxenites and peridotites). A rapakivi granite dated in 1.75 Ga is located near the town Minas de Corrales. Another one having a Rb/Sr isochronic age of 1760 ± 32 Ma (Bossi and Campal, 1992) is developed to the south and it is called Illescas Batholith (Campal and Schipilov, 1995). Recent geochronologic ages using Shrimp U/Pb (Hartmann et al., 2000) in samples taken from the Valentines Block produced ages around 2.6 Ga for crystallization and around 2.2 Ga for metamorphism. Pavas Block is composed of an orthogneissic basement and a volcano-sedimentary cover strongly deformed and recristalized, occurring like an allocton tectonic sheet. A K/Ar determination in muscovite gave an age of 584.9 ± 18 Ma and using Rb/Sr (WR) systematics the age obtained was 1252 ± 3 Ma with R0 = 0.72664. Metasedimentary zircons gave ages of 3.4 Ga, which is interpreted as the age of crystallization, and of 2.7 Ga, which is interpreted as the age of metamorphism. Younger ages for this terrane were not observed. In basement rocks of de la China creek Hartmann (2000) obtained an age of 3.41 Ga in addition to events at 3.1 Ga and 2.7 Ga. Pavas Block does not record events later than 2.7 Ga except for values around 586 Ma using K/Ar method in green muscovites taken from corundum micaceous quartzites (au)

  19. Geochemistry of shale and sedimentary pyrite as a proxy for gold fertility in the Selwyn basin area, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Patrick J.; Large, Ross R.; Gregory, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    Selwyn basin area strata contain sedimentary pyrite with Au above background levels when analyzed by laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Hyland Group rocks contain framboidal pyrite contents of 670 ppb Au, 1223 ppm As, and 5.3 ppm Te; the mean of all types of sedimentary pyrite in the Hyland Group is 391 ppb Au, 1489 ppm As, and 3.8 ppm Te. These levels are similar to sedimentary pyrite in host lithologies from major orogenic gold districts in New Zealand and Australia. Comparison of whole rock and pyrite data show that rocks deposited in continental slope settings with significant terrigenous input contain pyrite that is consistently enriched in Au, As, Te, Co, and Cu. Although data are limited, whole rock samples of stratigraphic units containing Au-rich pyrite also contain high Au, indicating that most of the Au is within sedimentary pyrite. Based on geologic characteristics and comparison of pyrite chemistry data with whole rock chemistry, Selwyn basin area strata have the necessary ingredients to form orogenic gold deposits: Au-enriched source rocks, metamorphic conditions permissive of forming a metamorphic ore fluid, and abundant structural preparation for channeling fluids and depositing ore.

  20. Preparation of Authigenic Pyrite from Methane-bearing Sediments for In Situ Sulfur Isotope Analysis Using SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiyong; Sun, Xiaoming; Peckmann, Jörn; Lu, Yang; Strauss, Harald; Xu, Li; Lu, Hongfeng; Teichert, Barbara M A

    2017-08-31

    Different sulfur isotope compositions of authigenic pyrite typically result from the sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (SO4-AOM) and organiclastic sulfate reduction (OSR) in marine sediments. However, unravelling the complex pyritization sequence is a challenge because of the coexistence of different sequentially formed pyrite phases. This manuscript describes a sample preparation procedure that enables the use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to obtain in situ δ 34 S values of various pyrite generations. This allows researchers to constrain how SO4-AOM affects pyritization in methane-bearing sediments. SIMS analysis revealed an extreme range in δ 34 S values, spanning from -41.6 to +114.8‰, which is much wider than the range of δ 34 S values obtained by the traditional bulk sulfur isotope analysis of the same samples. Pyrite in the shallow sediment mainly consists of 34 S-depleted framboids, suggesting early diagenetic formation by OSR. Deeper in the sediment, more pyrite occurs as overgrowths and euhedral crystals, which display much higher SIMS δ 34 S values than the framboids. Such 34 S-enriched pyrite is related to enhanced SO4-AOM at the sulfate-methane transition zone, postdating OSR. High-resolution in situ SIMS sulfur isotope analyses allow for the reconstruction of the pyritization processes, which cannot be resolved by bulk sulfur isotope analysis.

  1. Sulfur amino acids and alanine on pyrite (100) by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy: Surface or molecular role?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Galvez-Martinez, S.; Mateo-Marti, E., E-mail: mateome@cab.inta-csic.es

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Surface annealing pretreatment on pyrite surfaces can select molecular adsorption. • Enriched monosulfide species on pyrite (100) surface favors NH{sub 2} adsorption form. • Enriching disulfide species on pyrite (100) surface promotes NH{sub 3}{sup +} adsorption form. • Unique structure of each aminoacid provides a particular fingerprint in the process. • Spectroscopy evidence, pretreatment surface processes drives molecular adsorption. - Abstract: This paper describes the first successful adsorption of the cysteine, cystine, methionine and alanine amino acids on the pyrite (100) surface under ultra-high vacuum conditions with crucial chemical adsorption parameters driving the process. We have demonstrated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) that the surface pretreatment annealing process on pyrite surfaces is a critical parameter driving surface reactivity. The presence of enriched monosulfide species on the pyrite (100) surface favours the amino acid NH{sub 2} chemical form, whereas a longer annealing surface pretreatment of over 3 h repairs the sulfur vacancies in the pyrite, enriching disulfide species on the pyrite surface, which promotes NH{sub 3}{sup +} adsorption due to the sulfur vacancies in the pyrite being replaced by sulfur atom dimers (S{sub 2}{sup 2−}) on the surface. Furthermore, even if the surface chemistry (monosulfide or disulfide species enrichment) is the main factor promoting a partial conversion from NH{sub 2} to NH{sub 3}{sup +} species, the unique chemical structure of each amino acid provides a particular fingerprint in the process.

  2. Trace element mapping of pyrite from Archean gold deposits – A comparison between PIXE and EPMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agangi, A., E-mail: aagangi@uj.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, Department of Geology, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Przybyłowicz, W., E-mail: przybylowicz@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics & Applied Computer Science, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Hofmann, A., E-mail: ahofmann@uj.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, Department of Geology, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2015-04-01

    Chemical zoning of pyrites can record the evolution of mineralising fluids at widely varying P–T conditions ranging from diagenesis to medium-grade metamorphism. If preserved, zoning can reveal growth textures, brecciation and veining, resorption and recrystallisation events, thus shedding light on the processes that contributed to ore formation. Chemical zoning of sulfides is invisible in optical microscopy, but can be studied by chemical etching, high-contrast back-scattering electron images, and elemental imaging. In this study we compared micro-PIXE and WDS-EPMA elemental maps on the chemically zoned pyrites in mineralised vein-bearing samples from the Sheba and Fairview gold mines in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Elemental images show complex distribution of trace elements, suggesting multiple events of pyrite crystallisation and gold deposition. EPMA maps show fine-scale variations reflecting growth and recrystallisation textures marked, in particular, by variations of As, Ni, and Co. In PIXE maps, gold occurs both as finely-distributed and discrete inclusions, suggesting incorporation in the pyrite structure as solid solution, and deposition as electrum inclusions, respectively. Micro-PIXE and EPMA provide complementary information, forming together a powerful tool to obtain information on chemical zoning of pyrites in ore deposits.

  3. Geochronologic study of sediments deposition of two lakes from the Rio Negro basin, Amazonas State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Ana Carla F.; Mozeto, Antonio A.; Cazotti, Raul I.; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.; Taddei, Maria Helena

    2000-01-01

    Since 1963 the radionuclide 210 Pb became an important tool for dating (geochronology) recent sediments (up to 120 years). In this work the sedimentary geochronology of two lakes from the Negro River Basin was determined, using different radiochemical separation methods for 210 Pb and 226 Ra. (author)

  4. In situ characterization of natural pyrite bioleaching using electrochemical noise technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-bao; Yang, Hong-ying; Li, Hai-jun

    2016-02-01

    An in situ characterization technique called electrochemical noise (ECN) was used to investigate the bioleaching of natural pyrite. ECN experiments were conducted in four active systems (sulfuric acid, ferric-ion, 9k culture medium, and bioleaching solutions). The ECN data were analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. Spectral noise impedance spectra obtained from power spectral density (PSD) plots for different systems were compared. A reaction mechanism was also proposed on the basis of the experimental data analysis. The bioleaching system exhibits the lowest noise resistance of 0.101 MΩ. The bioleaching of natural pyrite is considered to be a bio-battery reaction, which distinguishes it from chemical oxidation reactions in ferric-ion and culture-medium (9k) solutions. The corrosion of pyrite becomes more severe over time after the long-term testing of bioleaching.

  5. Use of the Moessbauer effect for determining pyritic sulfur content in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerw, B; Sikora, T

    1986-10-01

    This paper discusses investigations into resonance absorption of gamma radiation. Standard equipment for measuring the Moessbauer effect in black coal consisting of a measuring head, the SM-4T spectrometer, a multichannel analyzer, the Standard electronic unit and a printer is evaluated. The MSP measuring system developed jointly by the EMAG Mine Automation Company and the Nuclear Research Institute in Swierk is described. The MSP equipment is used for measuring content of pyritic sulfur in coal. Its accuracy is satisfactory. Results of measuring pyritic and total sulfur content by means of quantitative chemical analysis and by the MSP resonance absorption method (Moessbauer effect) are compared. The mean standard deviation for pyritic sulfur is 0.14% and for total sulfur content 0.21%. 11 refs.

  6. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  7. Microbial Oxidation of Pyrite Coupled to Nitrate Reduction in Anoxic Groundwater Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2009-01-01

    denitrification process with pyrite as the primary electron donor. The process demonstrates a temperature dependency (Q10) of 1.8 and could be completely inhibited by addition of a bactericide (NaN3). Experimentally determined denitrification rates show that more than 50% of the observed nitrate reduction can...... be ascribed to pyrite oxidation. The apparent zero-order denitrification rate in anoxic pyrite containing sediment at groundwater temperature has been determined to be 2-3 µmol NO3- kg-1 day-1. The in situ groundwater chemistry at the boundary between the redoxcline and the anoxic zone reveals that between 65......-anoxic boundary in sandy aquifers thus determining the position and downward progression of the redox boundary between nitrate-containing and nitrate-free groundwater....

  8. Isotopic and elemental chemistry of sedimentary pyrite: A combined analytical and statistical approach to a novel planetary biosignature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, M. C.; Gregory, D. D.; Lyons, T. W.; Williford, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    Life processes affect trace element abundances in pyrite such that sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite have significantly different trace element signatures. Thus, we propose that these biogeochemical data could be used to identify pyrite that formed biogenetically either early in our planet's history or on other planets, particularly Mars. The potential for this approach is elevated because pyrite is common in diverse sedimentary settings, and its trace element content can be preserved despite secondary overprints up to greenschist facies, thus minimizing the concerns about remobilization that can plague traditional whole rock studies. We are also including in-situ sulfur isotope analysis to further refine our understanding of the complex signatures of ancient pyrite. Sulfur isotope data can point straightforwardly to the involvement of life, because pyrite in sediments is inextricably linked to bacterial sulfate reduction and its diagnostic isotopic expressions. In addition to analyzing pyrite of known biological origin formed in the modern and ancient oceans under a range of conditions, we are building a data set for pyrite formed by hydrothermal and metamorphic processes to minimize the risk of false positives in life detection. We have used Random Forests (RF), a machine learning statistical technique with proven efficiency for classifying large geological datasets, to classify pyrite into biotic and abiotic end members. Coupling the trace element and sulfur isotope data from our analyses with a large existing dataset from diverse settings has yielded 4500 analyses with 18 different variables. Our initial results reveal the promise of the RF approach, correctly identifying biogenic pyrite 97 percent of the time. We will continue to couple new in-situ S-isotope and trace element analyses of biogenic pyrite grains from modern and ancient environments, using cutting-edge microanalytical techniques, with new data from high temperature settings. Our ultimately goal

  9. Chemistry and phase evolution during roasting of toxic thallium-bearing pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Arce, Paula; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Garrido, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    In the frame of a research project on microscopic distribution and speciation of geogenic thallium (Tl) from contaminated mine soils, Tl-bearing pyrite ore samples from Riotinto mining district (Huelva, SW Spain) were experimentally fired to simulate a roasting process. Concentration and volatility behavior of Tl and other toxic heavy metals was determined by quantitative ICP-MS, whereas semi-quantitative mineral phase transitions were identified by in situ thermo X-Ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analyses after each firing temperature. Sample with initial highest amount of quartz (higher Si content), lowest quantity of pyrite and traces of jarosite (lower S content) developed hematite and concentrated Tl (from 10 up to 72 mg kg -1 ) after roasting at 900 °C in an oxidizing atmosphere. However, samples with lower or absent quartz content and higher pyrite amount mainly developed magnetite, accumulating Tl between 400 and 500 °C and releasing Tl from 700 up to 900 °C (from 10-29 mg kg -1 down to 4-1 mg kg -1 ). These results show the varied accumulative, or volatile, behaviors of one of the most toxic elements for life and environment, in which oxidation of Tl-bearing Fe sulfides produce Fe oxides wastes with or without Tl. The initial chemistry and mineralogy of pyrite ores should be taken into account in coal-fired power stations, cement or sulfuric acid production industry involving pyrite roasting processes, and steel, brick or paint industries, which use iron ore from roasted pyrite ash, where large amounts of Tl entail significant environmental pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetoli, Luis Otavio de Brito, E-mail: luskywalcker@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Geremias, Reginaldo [Departamento de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Goncalvez de Souza, Ivan [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, Nito Angelo, E-mail: debacher@qmc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use O{sub 2} as the feed gas and pyrite was added to the non-thermal plasma reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methylene blue removal by NTP increased in the presence of pyrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total organic carbon content decreased substantially. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acute toxicity test showed that the treated solution is not toxic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dye degradation occurs via electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation. - Abstract: In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N{sub 2}, Ar, and O{sub 2}. The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N{sub 2} < Ar < O{sub 2}). Using O{sub 2} as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O{sub 2} or O{sub 2}-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules.

  11. Bioleaching of low grade uranium ore containing pyrite using A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexey Borisovich Umanskii; Anton Mihaylovich Klyushnikov

    2013-01-01

    A process of uranium extraction from ore containing 3.1 % pyrite by bacterial leaching was investigated in shaken flasks during 90 days. The highest uranium recovery amounting to 85.1 % was obtained using binary mixture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans that was exceeding results obtained by traditional acid leaching technique up to 27 %. High uranium recovery was founded to be due to the high degree of pyrite dissolution that can be readily achieved by bacterial leaching (up to 98.0 %). (author)

  12. DFT study on the galvanic interaction between pyrite (100) and galena (100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Baolin; Li, Yuqiong; Chen, Jianhua; Zhao, Cuihua; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Galvanic interaction is weakened with the increase of contact distance. • Electronic transfer mainly occurs on the contact layers. • Galvanic effect enhances nucleophilicity of galena and electrophilicity of pyrite. • Presence of H_2O increases the galvanic interaction. - Abstract: The galvanic interaction between pyrite and galena surface has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) method. The calculated results show that galvanic interactions between pyrite and galena surface are decreased with the increase of contact distance. The galvanic interactions still occurs even the distance larger than the sum of two atoms radius (≈2.8 Å), and the limit distance of galvanic interaction between galena and pyrite surface is about 10 Å, which is consistent with the quantum tunneling effect. Through Mulliken charge population calculation, it is found that electrons transfer from galena to pyrite. For galena surface, Pb 6s and 6p states lose electrons and S 3p state loses a small amount of electrons, which causes the electron loss of galena. For pyrite surface, Fe 4p state obtains large numbers of electrons, resulting in the decrease of positive charge of Fe atom. However, the 3p state of S atom loses a small numbers of electrons. The reactivity of mineral surface has also been studied by calculating the frontier orbitals of minerals. Results suggest that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) coefficients of galena are increased whereas those of pyrite are decreased with the enhancing galvanic interaction, indicating that the oxidation of galena surface would be enhanced due to the galvanic interaction. The Fukui indices and dual descriptor values of surface atoms suggest that the nucleophilicity of the galena surface increases, meanwhile, the electrophilicity of pyrite surface increases with the decrease of the contact distance. In addition, the density of states (DOS) of atoms results show that the

  13. High spatial resolution U-Pb geochronology and Pb isotope geochemistry of magnetite-apatite ore from the Pea Ridge iron oxide-apatite deposit, St. Francois Mountains, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; Pietruszka, Aaron; Aleinikoff, John N.; Fanning, C. Mark; Pillers, Renee M.; Moscati, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The Pea Ridge iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposit is one of the major rhyolite-hosted magnetite deposits of the St. Francois Mountains terrane, which is located within the Mesoproterozoic (1.5–1.3 Ga) Granite-Rhyolite province in the U.S. Midcontinent. Precise and accurate determination of the timing and duration of oreforming processes in this deposit is crucial for understanding its origin and placing it within a deposit-scale and regional geologic context. Apatite and monazite, well-established U-Pb mineral geochronometers, are abundant in the Pea Ridge orebody. However, the potential presence of multiple generations of dateable minerals, processes of dissolution-reprecipitation, and occurrence of micrometer-sized intergrowths and inclusions complicate measurements and interpretations of the geochronological results. Here, we employ a combination of several techniques, including ID-TIMS and high spatial resolution geochronology of apatite and monazite using LA-SC-ICPMS and SHRIMP, and Pb isotope geochemistry of pyrite and magnetite to obtain the first direct age constraints on the formation and alteration history of the Pea Ridge IOA deposit. The oldest apatite TIMS 207Pb*/206Pb* dates are 1471 ± 1 and 1468 ± 1 Ma, slightly younger than (but within error of) the ~1474 to ~1473 Ma U-Pb zircon ages of the host rhyolites. Dating of apatite and monazite inclusions within apatite provides evidence for at least one younger metasomatic event at ~1.44 Ga, and possibly multiple superimposed metasomatic events between 1.47 and 1.44 Ga. Lead isotop analyses of pyrite show extremely radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb ratios up to ~80 unsupported by in situ U decay. This excess radiogenic Pb in pyrite may have been derived from the spatially associated apatite as apatite recrystallized several tens of million years after its formation. The low initial 206Pb/204Pb ratio of ~16.5 and 207Pb/204Pb ratio of ~15.4 for individual magnetite grains indicate closed U-Pb system behavior in

  14. Geochronological studies in the Chuquicamata district, Chile: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentilli, M; Tassinari, C.C.G; Rojas, J; Reynolds, P.H.; Pemberton, G.B; Munizaga, F; Mathur, R; Maksaev, V; Lindsay, D.D; Heaman, L; Graves, M.C.; Arnott, A.M

    2001-01-01

    The dating and discrimination of significant events in the complex Chuquicamata porphyry copper system have been challenging. The work by others and us indicates that the first mineralizing (Chuqui) porphyries were emplaced at ca.35 Ma, followed by potassic alteration and various hydrothermal pulses to ca. 33 Ma. This system evolved within a dynamic ductile to brittle shear system. After 1- 2 km of exhumation, a discrete mineralizing (quartz-sericitic) event was superimposed at ca. 31 Ma. Relatively slower exhumation followed, allowing for the development and preservation of important supergene blankets (19 to 15 Ma) and exotic copper deposits. The unmineralized Fortuna igneous complex, juxtaposed across the NS (Falla Oeste) fault system, is relatively older than the Chuqui porphyries. Historically, in the 1960s, Pb-alpha on zircon approximately dated the Paleozoic and Mesozoic hosts to the Chuqui porphyries, and the Eocene Fortuna. In the 1970s and 1980s, conventional K/Ar dated the main potassic alteration at 35 to 33 Ma, and the quartz-sericite alteration at 31-28 Ma. In the 1990s, Rb-Sr accurately dated the major homogenization of the Chuqui system at 35 ±2 Ma and confirmed that Fortuna is older. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar defined two thermal pulses and documented thermal overprint by the younger event. U-Pb dating is hindered by the presence of xenocrystic zircon with Paleozoic ages. Recently, ELA-ICP-MS dating of zircon distinguish 3 intrusive phases at 34.8, 33.4 and 33.3 Ma, compatible with a 34.9 Ma age by Re-Os in molybdenite. Re-Os in Cu-Fe sulfides confirms the ca. 31 Ma age of the quartz-sericitic stage. Fission-track data on zircon and apatite, and (U-Th)/He dating, point to extremely fast cooling to o C after the quartz-sericitic event, and improve exhumation histories. Fission-track data on apatite and ESR of quartz in fault gouge suggest that the Falla Oeste was active into the Pliocene and Pleistocene, respectively (au)

  15. Thallium-rich pyrite ores from the Apuan Alps, Tuscany, Italy:constraints for their origin and environmental concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Massimo; Biagioni, Cristian; Dini, Andrea; Vezzoni, Simone

    2017-06-01

    The southern sector of the Apuan Alps (AA) massif, Tuscany, Italy, is characterized by the occurrence of a series of baryte-pyrite-iron oxide orebodies whose Tl-rich nature was recognized only recently. The geochemistry of the pyrite ore was investigated through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In addition, lead isotope data for selected pyrite ores from AA were collected. Pyrite ores are characterized by a complex geochemistry, with high concentrations of Tl (up to 1100 μg/g) coupled with high As and Sb contents; the Co/Ni ratio is always <1. Geochemical data of pyrite and marcasite ore samples from other mining districts of Tuscany have been collected in order to compare them with those from the AA. These samples usually have very low Tl content (less than 2 μg/g) and high to very high Co/Ni and As/Sb ratios. Only some samples from the Sb-Hg ore deposits showed very high Tl concentrations (up to 3900 μg/g). Another difference is related to the lead isotope composition, with pyrite ores from AA markedly less radiogenic than those from the other deposits from Tuscany. Geochemical data of pyrite ores from AA give new insights on the genesis of the baryte-pyrite-iron oxide orebodies, relating their formation to low-temperature hydrothermal systems active during early Paleozoic; in addition, these data play a fundamental role in assessing the environmental impact of these deposits.

  16. On the mechanism of action of combination of thionocarbamates with xanthate during flotation of copper-molybdenum pyrite contained ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedosekina, T.V.; Glembotskij, A.V.; Bekhtle, G.A.; Novgorodova, Eh.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation results of action mechanism of thionocarbamates combination with xanthate are described. It is established that these collectors are capable of co-adsorbing on pyrite surface, that is the reason for sharp increase of the floatability and disturbs the selectivity of copper-molybdenum pyrite-containing ore flotation

  17. Element migration of pyrites during ductile deformation of the Yuleken porphyry Cu deposit (NW-China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao; Xu, Xing-Wang; Gao, Jun; Peters, Stephen; Li, Jilei; Cao, Mingjian; Xiang, Peng; Wu, Chu; You, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The strongly deformed Yuleken porphyry Cu deposit (YPCD) occurs in the Kalaxiangar porphyry Cu belt (KPCB), which occupies the central area of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) between the Sawu’er island arc and the Altay Terrane in northern Xinjiang. The YPCD is one of several typical subduction-related deposits in the KPCB, which has undergone syn-collisional and post-collisional metallogenic overprinting. The YPCD is characterized by three pyrite-forming stages, namely a hydrothermal stage A (Py I), a syn-ductile deformation stage B (Py II) characterized by Cu-Au enrichment, and a fracture-filling stage C (Py III). In this study, we conducted systematic petrographic and geochemical studies of pyrites and coexist biotite, which formed during different stages, in order to constrain the physicochemical conditions of the ore formation. Euhedral, fragmented Py I has low Pb and high Te and Se concentration and Ni contents are low with Co/Ni ratios mostly between 1 and 10 (average 9.00). Py I is further characterized by enrichments of Bi, As, Ni, Cu, Te and Se in the core relative to the rim domains. Anhedral round Py II has moderate Co and Ni contents with high Co/Ni ratios >10 (average 95.2), and average contents of 46.5 ppm Pb and 5.80 ppm Te. Py II is further characterized by decreasing Bi, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ag, Te, Mo, Sb and Au contents from the rim to the core domains. Annealed Py III has the lowest Co content of all pyrite types with Co/Ni ratios mostly <0.1 (average 1.33). Furthermore, Py III has average contents of 3.31 ppm Pb, 1.33 ppm Te and 94.6 ppm Se. In addition, Fe does not correlate with Cu and S in the Py I and Py III, while Py II displays a negative correlation between Fe and Cu as well as a positive correlation between Fe and S. Therefore, pyrites which formed during different tectonic regimes also have different chemical compositions. Biotite geothermometer and oxygen fugacity estimates display increasing temperatures and oxygen

  18. A combined chemical, isotopic and microstructural study of pyrite from roll-front uranium deposits, Lake Eyre Basin, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Edwina S.; Cook, Nigel J.; Cliff, John; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Huddleston, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The common sulfide mineral pyrite is abundant throughout sedimentary uranium systems at Pepegoona, Pepegoona West and Pannikan, Lake Eyre Basin, South Australia. Combined chemical, isotopic and microstructural analysis of pyrite indicates variation in fluid composition, sulfur source and precipitation conditions during a protracted mineralization event. The results show the significant role played by pyrite as a metal scavenger and monitor of fluid changes in low-temperature hydrothermal systems. In-situ micrometer-scale sulfur isotope analyses of pyrite demonstrated broad-scale isotopic heterogeneity (δ34S = -43.9 to +32.4‰VCDT), indicative of complex, multi-faceted pyrite evolution, and sulfur derived from more than a single source. Preserved textures support this assertion and indicate a genetic model involving more than one phase of pyrite formation. Authigenic pyrite underwent prolonged evolution and recrystallization, evidenced by a genetic relationship between archetypal framboidal aggregates and pyrite euhedra. Secondary hydrothermal pyrite commonly displays hyper-enrichment of several trace elements (Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, Mo, Sb, W and Tl) in ore-bearing horizons. Hydrothermal fluids of magmatic and meteoric origins supplied metals to the system but the geochemical signature of pyrite suggests a dominantly granitic source and also the influence of mafic rock types. Irregular variation in δ34S, coupled with oscillatory trace element zonation in secondary pyrite, is interpreted in terms of continuous variations in fluid composition and cycles of diagenetic recrystallization. A late-stage oxidizing fluid may have mobilized selenium from pre-existing pyrite. Subsequent restoration of reduced conditions within the aquifer caused ongoing pyrite re-crystallization and precipitation of selenium as native selenium. These results provide the first qualitative constraints on the formation mechanisms of the uranium deposits at Beverley North. Insights into

  19. Pyritization processes and greigite formation in the advancing sulfidization front in the Upper Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neretin, LN; Bottcher, ME; Jørgensen, BB

    2004-01-01

    Pyritization in late Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea is driven by sulfide formed during anaerobic methane oxidation. A sulfidization front is formed by the opposing gradients of sulfide and dissolved iron. The sulfidization processes are controlled by the diffusion flux of sulfide from above...... and by the solid reactive iron content. Two processes of diffusion-limited pyrite formation were identified. The first process includes pyrite precipitation with the accumulation of iron sulfide precursors with the average chemical composition of FeSn (n = 1.10-1.29), including greigite. Elemental sulfur...... and polysulfides, formed from H,S by a reductive dissolution of Fe(Ill)-containing minerals, serve as intermediates to convert iron sulfides into pyrite. In the second process, a "direct" pyrite precipitation occurs through prolonged exposure of iron-containing minerals to dissolved sulfide. Methane-driven sulfate...

  20. Petrogenesis, detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology, and tectonic implications of the Upper Paleoproterozoic Seosan iron formation, western Gyeonggi Massif, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Seong; Jang, Yirang; Samuel, Vinod O.; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Jung-Woo; Yi, Keewook; Choi, Seon-Gyu

    2018-05-01

    This study involves investigations on the Upper Paleoproterozoic iron formation (viz., Seosan iron formation) from the Seosan Group, Gyeonggi Massif of the southwestern Korean Peninsula. It occurs as thin banded layers within meta-arkosic sandstone, formed by alternating processes of chemical (hydrothermal) and detrital depositions under a shallow marine environment. It mainly consists of alternating layers of iron oxides, mostly hematite, and quartz. Minor amounts of magnetite surrounded by muscovite, clinopyroxene and amphibole indicate hydrothermal alteration since its formation. Meta-arkosic sandstone is composed of recrystallized or porphyroclastic quartz and microcline, with small amounts of hematite and pyrite clusters. The Seosan iron formation has high contents of total Fe2O3 and SiO2 with positive Eu anomalies similar to those of other Precambrian banded iron formations, and its formation is clearly related to hydrothermal alteration since its deposition. Detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology data from a meta-arkosic sandstone (SN-1) and an iron formation (SN-2) show mainly two age groups of ca. 2.5 Ga and ca. 1.9-1.75 Ga. This together with intrusion age of the granite gneiss (ca. 1.70-1.65 Ga) clearly indicate that the iron formations were deposited during the Upper Paleoproterozoic. The dominant Paleoproterozoic detrital zircon bimodal age peaks preserved in the Seosan iron formation compare well with those from the South China Craton sedimentary basins, reflecting global tectonic events related to the Columbia supercontinent in East Asia.

  1. Distribution of sulfur and pyrite in coal seams from Kutai Basin (East Kalimantan, Indonesia): Implications for paleoenvironmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widodo, Sri [Department of Mining Engineering, Moslem University of Indonesia, Jln. Urip Sumoharjo, Makassar (Indonesia); Oschmann, Wolfgang [Institute of Geosciece, J.W. Goethe-University, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany); Bechtel, Achim; Sachsenhofer, Reinhard F. [Department of Applied Geoscience and Geophysics, University of Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Str.5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Anggayana, Komang [Department of Mining Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jln. Ganesa 10, I-40132 Bandung (Indonesia); Puettmann, Wilhelm [Institute of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Dapartment of Analytical Enviromental Chemistry, J.W. Goethe-University, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)

    2010-03-01

    Thirteen Miocene coal samples from three active open pit and underground coal mines in the Kutai Basin (East Kalimantan, Indonesia) were collected. According to our microscopical and geochemical investigations, coal samples from Sebulu and Centra Busang coal mines yield high sulfur and pyrite contents as compared to the Embalut coal mine. The latter being characterized by very low sulfur (< 1%) and pyrite contents. The ash, mineral, total sulfur, iron (Fe) and pyrite contents of most of the coal samples from the Sebulu and Centra Busang coal mines are high and positively related in these samples. Low contents of ash, mineral, total sulfur, iron (Fe) and pyrite have been found only in sample TNT-32 from Centra Busang coal mine. Pyrite was the only sulfur form that we could recognize under reflected light microscope (oil immersion). Pyrite occurred in the coal as framboidal, euhedral, massive, anhedral and epigenetic pyrite in cleats/fractures. High concentration of pyrite argues for the availability of iron (Fe) in the coal samples. Most coal samples from the Embalut coal mine show lower sulfur (< 1 wt.%) and pyrite contents as found within Centra Busang and Sebulu coals. One exception is the coal sample KTD-38 from Embalut mine with total sulfur content of 1.41 wt.%. The rich ash, mineral, sulfur and pyrite contents of coals in the Kutai Basin (especially Centra Busang and Sebulu coals) can be related to the volcanic activity (Nyaan volcanic) during Tertiary whereby aeolian material was transported to the mire during or after the peatification process. Moreover, the adjacent early Tertiary deep marine sediment, mafic igneous rocks and melange in the center of Kalimantan Island might have provided mineral to the coal by uplift and erosion. The inorganic matter in the mire might also originate from the ground and surface water from the highland of central Kalimantan. (author)

  2. Surface structure-dependent pyrite oxidation in relatively dry and moist air: Implications for the reaction mechanism and sulfur evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Xian, Haiyang; Lin, Xiaoju; Tang, Hongmei; Du, Runxiang; Yang, Yiping; Zhu, Runliang; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Jingming; Teng, H. Henry; He, Hongping

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite oxidation not only is environmentally significant in the formation of acid mine (or acid rock) drainage and oxidative acidification of lacustrine sediment but also is a critical stage in geochemical sulfur evolution. The oxidation process is always controlled by the reactivity of pyrite, which in turn is controlled by its surface structure. In this study, the oxidation behavior of naturally existing {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, and {2 1 0} facets of pyrite was investigated using a comprehensive approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry with periodic density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that (i) the initial oxidation rates of both pyrite {1 1 1} and {2 1 0} are much greater than that of pyrite {1 0 0}; (ii) the initial oxidation rate of pyrite {2 1 0} is greater than that of pyrite {1 1 1} in low relative humidity, which is reversed in high relative humidity; and (iii) inner sphere oxygen-bearing sulfur species are originally generated from surface reactions and then converted to outer sphere species. The facet dependent rate law can be expressed as: r{hkl} =k{hkl}haP0.5(t + 1) - 0.5 , where r{hkl} is the orientation dependent reaction rate, k{hkl} is the orientation dependent rate constant, h is the relative humidity, P is the oxygen partial pressure, and t is the oxidation time in seconds. {1 1 1} is the most sensitive facet for pyrite oxidation. Combined with DFT theoretical investigations, water catalyzed electron transfer is speculated as the rate-limiting step. These findings disclose the structure-reactivity dependence of pyrite, which not only presents new insight into the mechanism of pyrite oxidation but also provides fundamental data to evaluate sulfur speciation evolution, suggesting that the surface structure sensitivity should be considered to estimate the reactivity at the mineral

  3. Preparation of natural pyrite nanoparticles by high energy planetary ball milling as a nanocatalyst for heterogeneous Fenton process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathinia, Siavash [Department of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathinia, Mehrangiz [Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmani, Ali Akbar [Department of Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khataee, Alireza, E-mail: a_khataee@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrite nanoparticles were successfully produced by planetary ball milling process. • The physical and chemical properties of pyrite nanoparticles were fully examined. • The degradation of AO7 was notably enhanced by pyrite nanoparticles Fenton system. • The influences of basic operational parameters were investigated using CCD. - Abstract: In the present study pyrite nanoparticles were prepared by high energy mechanical ball milling utilizing a planetary ball mill. Various pyrite samples were produced by changing the milling time from 2 h to 6 h, in the constant milling speed of 320 rpm. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) linked with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) were performed to explain the characteristics of primary (unmilled) and milled pyrite samples. The average particle size distribution of the produced pyrite during 6 h milling was found to be between 20 nm and 100 nm. The catalytic performance of the different pyrite samples was examined in the heterogeneous Fenton process for degradation of C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) solution. Results showed that the decolorization efficiency of AO7 in the presence of 6 h-milled pyrite sample was the highest. The impact of key parameters on the degradation efficiency of AO7 by pyrite nanoparticles catalyzed Fenton process was modeled using central composite design (CCD). Accordingly, the maximum removal efficiency of 96.30% was achieved at initial AO7 concentration of 16 mg/L, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 5 mmol/L, catalyst amount of 0.5 g/L and reaction time of 25 min.

  4. Pyrite nanoparticles as a Fenton-like reagent for in situ remediation of organic pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gil-Lozano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton reaction is the most widely used advanced oxidation process (AOP for wastewater treatment. This study reports on the use of pyrite nanoparticles and microparticles as Fenton reagents for the oxidative degradation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc as a representative contaminant. Upon oxidative dissolution in water, pyrite (FeS2 particles can generate H2O2 at their surface while simultaneously promoting recycling of Fe3+ into Fe2+ and vice versa. Pyrite nanoparticles were synthesized by the hot injection method. The use of a high concentration of precursors gave individual nanoparticles (diameter: 20 nm with broader crystallinity at the outer interfaces, providing a greater number of surface defects, which is advantageous for generating H2O2. Batch reactions were run to monitor the kinetics of CuPc degradation in real time and the amount of H2O2. A markedly greater degradation of CuPc was achieved with nanoparticles as compared to microparticles: at low loadings (0.08 mg/L and 20 h reaction time, the former enabled 60% CuPc removal, whereas the latter enabled only 7% removal. These results confirm that the use of low concentrations of synthetic nanoparticles can be a cost effective alternative to conventional Fenton procedures for use in wastewater treatment, avoiding the potential risks caused by the release of heavy metals upon dissolution of natural pyrites.

  5. Degradation of Anthraquinone Dye Reactive Blue 4 in Pyrite Ash Catalyzed Fenton Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Becelic-Tomin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrite ash (PA is created by burning pyrite in the chemical production of sulphuric acid. The high concentration of iron oxide, mostly hematite, present in pyrite ash, gives the basis for its application as a source of catalytic iron in a modified Fenton process for anthraquinone dye reactive blue 4 (RB4 degradation. The effect of various operating variables such as catalyst and oxidant concentration, initial pH and RB4 concentration on the abatement of total organic carbon, and dye has been assessed in this study. Here we show that degradation of RB4 in the modified Fenton reaction was efficient under the following conditions: pH=2.5; [PA]0=0.2 g L−1; [H2O2]0=5 mM and initial RB4 concentration up to 100 mg L−1. The pyrite ash Fenton reaction can overcome limitations observed from the classic Fenton reaction, such as the early termination of the Fenton reaction. Metal (Pb, Zn, and Cu content of the solution after the process suggests that an additional treatment step is necessary to remove the remaining metals from the water. These results provide basic knowledge to better understand the modified, heterogeneous Fenton process and apply the PA Fenton reaction for the treatment of wastewaters which contains anthraquinone dyes.

  6. Investigating the formation of acid mine drainage of Toledo pyrite concentrate using column cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Diosa Marie

    2018-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is an inevitable problem in mining and has adverse effects in water quality. Studying AMD formation will be valuable in controlling the composition of mine waters and in planning the rehabilitation method for a mine. In this research, kinetics of AMD formation of Toledo pyrite was studied using two column experiments. The mechanisms of AMD formation and the effects of various factors on pH drop were first studied. Another column test was done for validation and to study the role of Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the change of leachate pH. The first experiment revealed that time and particle size are the most significant factors. It was also observed that the sudden pH drop during the starting hours was due to cracks formed from beneficiation, and the formation of Fe(OH)3. The laddered behavior of pH thereafter was due to decrease in formation of Fe(OH)3, and the precipitates in pyrite surface that lowered the surface area available for pyrite oxidation. The results of the second experiment validated the laddered behavior of pH. It was also observed that particle size distribution and pyrite surface were affected by the change in pH. Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio of leachate generally decreased as pH dropped.

  7. Pyrite-pyrrhotite intergrowths in calcite marble from Bistriški Vintgar, Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavašnik, J

    2016-01-01

    Roman marble quarry in Bistrica gorge in southern Pohorje Mt. (north-eastern Slovenia) is situated in a 20 m thick lens of layered marble, at the contact zone between granodiorite and metamorphites. Grey and yellowish non-homogenous calcite marble is heavily included by mica, quartz, feldspars, zoisite, pyrite and amphiboles. In the present research, we have studied numerous pyrite (FeS 2 ) crystals associated with yellowish-bronze non-stoichiometric pyrrhotite (Fe 1−x S), not previously reported from this locality. SEM investigation revealed unusual sequence of crystallisation: primary skeletal pyrrhotite matrix is sparsely overgrown by well-crystalline pyrite, both being overgrown by smaller, well-developed hexagonal pyrrhotite crystals of the second generation. With TEM we identify the pyrrhotite as 5T-Fe 1-x S phase, where x is about 0.1 and is equivalent to Fe 9 S 10 . The pyrite-pyrrhotite coexistence allows us a construction of fO 2 -pH diagram of stability fields, which reflects geochemical conditions at the time of marble re-crystallisation. (paper)

  8. Advective and diffusive contributions to reactive gas transport during pyrite oxidation in the unsaturated zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binning, P. J.; POSTMA, D; Russell, T. F.; Wesselingh, J. A.; Boulin, P. F.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated mine waste rock dumps and soils is limited by the supply of oxygen from the atmosphere. In models, oxygen transport through the subsurface is often assumed to be driven by diffusion. However, oxygen comprises 23.2% by mass of dry air, and when oxygen is consumed

  9. Enhanced photoresponse of FeS2 films: the role of Marcasite-Pyrite phase junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L.; Dzade, N.Y.; Gao, L.; Scanlon, D.O.; Öztürk, Z.; Hollingsworth, N.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Hensen, E.J.M.; De Leeuw, N.H.; Hofmann, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial role of marcasite in iron-sulfide-based photo-electrochemical applications is reported for the first time. A spectacular improvement of the photoresponse observed experimentally for mixed pyrite/marcasite-FeS2 films can be ascribed to the presence of p/m phase junctions at the

  10. Enhanced Photoresponse of FeS2 Films : The Role of Marcasite–Pyrite Phase Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Longfei; Dzade, N.Y.; Gao, L.; Scanlon, D. O.; Özturk, Zafer; Hollingsworth, N.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Hensen, E. J. M.; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Hofmann, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial role of marcasite in iron sulfide-based photo-electrochemical applications is reported for the first time. A spectacular improvement of the photoresponse observed experimentally for mixed pyrite/marcasite-FeS2 films can be ascribed to the presence of p/m phase junctions at the

  11. The Influence of Pyrite on the Solubility of Minjingu and Panda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    28.5 million tons of sulphur. This study was ... bining PRs with elemental S, FYM ot 'and pyrite rock rere used.in this compost (Chien et al., ... Some of the possibility of using locally available the chemical properties of the rocks materials in ...

  12. Geochronology of the Rio Formoso estuarine by {sup 210}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Gilberto N.; Lyra, Denilson T.; Melo, Julyanne T.B.; Farias, Emerson E.G.; Franca, Elvis J.; Santos, Thiago O., E-mail: gnarruda@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: denilsonengseg@gmail.com, E-mail: julyanne.melo@ufpe.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Souza Neto, Joao A., E-mail: adauto@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Uranium series disequilibrium is useful for dating methods, in which profile sediments can be considered as historical records of anthropogenic events regarding the distribution and impacts of chemical substances on the environment. In this study, 2 deep sediment profiles (about 1 m) were collected, layered at each 3 cm, oven-dried and homogenized. The radiochemical separation of {sup 210}Pb consisted of using hydrobromic acid and an ion exchange resin (DOWEX) for precipitating {sup 210}Pb in the form of lead chromate. After 10 days, the radioactivity was therefore measured by means of the low level gas flow proportional counter, model S5-XLB, from Canberra. Sedimentation rate were obtained by CIC (Constant Initial Concentration) model assumes a constant sedimentation rate throughout the period over which unsupported {sup 210}Pb is measurable. Some sediment profiles were not dated since the percentage of sand was quite high in top layers or a high percentage of organic matter and water in excess were observed in the all sediment samples. {sup 210}Pb geochronology was successfully applied to age nine sediment profiles, in which higher sedimentation rates were observed in the middle portion of the estuarine probably related to shrimp farming impacts. By using geochronology, the detection of human impacts on chemical element distribution could be enhanced in the case of environmental monitoring studies in the Rio Formoso estuarine. (author)

  13. Geochronology of the Rio Formoso estuarine by 210Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda, Gilberto N.; Lyra, Denilson T.; Melo, Julyanne T.B.; Farias, Emerson E.G.; Franca, Elvis J.; Santos, Thiago O.; Souza Neto, Joao A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium series disequilibrium is useful for dating methods, in which profile sediments can be considered as historical records of anthropogenic events regarding the distribution and impacts of chemical substances on the environment. In this study, 2 deep sediment profiles (about 1 m) were collected, layered at each 3 cm, oven-dried and homogenized. The radiochemical separation of 210 Pb consisted of using hydrobromic acid and an ion exchange resin (DOWEX) for precipitating 210 Pb in the form of lead chromate. After 10 days, the radioactivity was therefore measured by means of the low level gas flow proportional counter, model S5-XLB, from Canberra. Sedimentation rate were obtained by CIC (Constant Initial Concentration) model assumes a constant sedimentation rate throughout the period over which unsupported 210 Pb is measurable. Some sediment profiles were not dated since the percentage of sand was quite high in top layers or a high percentage of organic matter and water in excess were observed in the all sediment samples. 210 Pb geochronology was successfully applied to age nine sediment profiles, in which higher sedimentation rates were observed in the middle portion of the estuarine probably related to shrimp farming impacts. By using geochronology, the detection of human impacts on chemical element distribution could be enhanced in the case of environmental monitoring studies in the Rio Formoso estuarine. (author)

  14. A dynamic mathematical model for microbial removal of pyritic sulfur from coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargi, F; Weissman, J G

    1984-06-01

    A dynamic mathematical model has been developed to describe microbial desulfurization of coal by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The model considers adsorption and desorption of cells on coal particles and microbial oxidation of pyritic sulfur on particle surfaces. The influence of certain parameters, such as microbial growth rate constants, adsorption-description constants, pulp density, coal particle size, initial cell and solid phase substrate concentration on the maximum rate of pyritic sulfur removal, have been elucidated. The maximum rate of pyritic sulfur removal was strongly dependent upon the number of attached cells per coal particle. At sufficiently high initial cell concentrations, the surfaces of coal particles are nearly saturated by the cells and the maximum leaching rate is limited either by total external surface area of coal particles or by the concentration of pyritic sulfur in the coal phase. The maximum volumetric rate of pyritic sulfur removal (mg S/h cm(3) mixture) increases with the pulp density of coal and reaches a saturation level at high pulp densities (e.g. 45%). The maximum rate also increases with decreasing particle diameter in a hyperbolic form. Increases in adsorption coefficient or decreases in the desorption coefficient also result in considerable improvements in this rate. The model can be applied to other systems consisting of suspended solid substrate particles in liquid medium with microbial oxidation occurring on the particle surfaces (e.g., bacterial ore leaching). The results obtained from this model are in good agreement with published experimental data on microbial desulfurization of coal and bacterial ore leaching.

  15. Assessing the impact of preload on pyrite-rich sediment and groundwater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari-Yeboah, Ohene; Addai-Mensah, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    Pyrite-rich sediments would, invariably, undergo redox reactions which would lead to acidic aqueous environment containing solubilized toxic metal species. When such sediments are subjected to preload, a technique employed by geotechnical engineers to improve the load-bearing capacity of highly compressible formation, transient flow of pore water, accompanied by acidity transfer, would occur as a response. Despite the concomitant environmental and socio-economic significance, to date, there has been limited interdisciplinary research on the underpinning geotechnical engineering and geo-environmental science issues for pyrite-rich sediments under preload. In this study, we investigate the effect of pyrite-rich sediment pore water transfer under preload surcharge on the receiving environment and the impact on the groundwater speciation and quality. Sediment samples were obtained at close depth intervals from boreholes established within pristine areas and those subjected to the preload application. Soil and pore water samples were subjected to solid/solution speciation, moisture contents, soil pH and the Atterberg Limits' analyses using standard analytical techniques and methods. Standpipes were also installed in the boreholes for groundwater sampling and in situ monitoring of water quality parameters. It is shown that the imposition of preload surcharge over pyritic sediment created a reducing environment rich in SO 4 2- , iron oxide minerals and organic matter. This reducing environment fostered organic carbon catabolism to generate excess pyrite and bicarbonate alkalinity, which would invariably impact adversely on soil quality and plant growth. These were accompanied by increase in pH, dissolved Al, Ca, Mg and K species beneath the surcharge.

  16. Pyrite deformation and connections to gold mobility: Insight from micro-structural analysis and trace element mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosq, R.; Lawley, C. J. M.; Rogowitz, A.; Schneider, D. A.; Jackson, S.

    2018-06-01

    The metamorphic transition of pyrite to pyrrhotite results in the liberation of lattice-bound and nano-particulate metals initially hosted within early sulphide minerals. This process forms the basis for the metamorphic-driven Au-upgrading model applied to many orogenic Au deposits, however the role of syn-metamorphic pyrite deformation in controlling the retention and release of Au and related pathfinder elements is poorly understood. The lower amphibolite facies metamorphic mineral assemblage (Act-Bt-Pl-Ep-Alm ± Cal ± Qz ± Ilm; 550 °C) of Canada's giant Detour Lake deposit falls within the range of pressure-temperature conditions (450 °C) for crystal plastic deformation of pyrite. We have applied a complementary approach of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) 2D element mapping on pyrite from the Detour Lake deposit. Chemical element maps document an early generation of Au-rich sieve textured pyrite domains and a later stage of syn-metamorphic oscillatory-zoned Au-poor pyrite. Both pyrite types are cut by Au-rich fractures as a consequence of remobilization of Au with trace element enrichment of first-row transition elements, post-transition metals, chalcogens and metalloids during a late brittle deformation stage. However, similar enrichment in trace elements and Au can be observed along low-angle grain boundaries within otherwise Au-poor pyrite, indicating that heterogeneous microstructural misorientation patterns and higher strain domains are also relatively Au-rich. We therefore propose that the close spatial relationship between pyrite and Au at the microscale, features typical of orogenic Au deposits, reflects the entrapment of Au within deformation-induced microstructures in pyrite rather than the release of Au during the metamorphic transition from pyrite to pyrrhotite. Moreover, mass balance calculations at the deposit scale suggest that only a small percentage

  17. Attenuation of pyrite oxidation with a fly ash pre-barrier: Reactive transport modelling of column experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R.; Cama, J.; Nieto, J.M.; Ayora, C.; Saaltink, M.W. [University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain). Dept. of Geology

    2009-09-15

    Conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for passive treatment of groundwater contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD) use limestone as reactive material that neutralizes water acidity. However, the limestone-alkalinity potential ceases as inevitable precipitation of secondary metal-phases on grain surfaces occurs, limiting its efficiency. In the present study, fly ash derived from coal combustion is investigated as an alternative alkalinity generating material for the passive treatment of AMD using solution-saturated column experiments. Unlike conventional systems, the utilization of fly ash in a pre-barrier to intercept the non-polluted recharge water before this water reacts with pyrite-rich wastes is proposed. Chemical variation in the columns was interpreted with the reactive transport code RETRASO. In parallel, kinetics of fly ash dissolution at alkaline pH were studied using flow-through experiments and incorporated into the model. In a saturated column filled solely with pyritic sludge-quartz sand (1: 10), oxidation took place at acidic conditions (pH 3.7). According to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} release and pH, pyrite dissolution occurred favourably in the solution-saturated porous medium until dissolved O{sub 2} was totally consumed. In a second saturated column, pyrite oxidation took place at alkaline conditions (pH 10.45) as acidity was neutralized by fly ash dissolution in a previous level. At this pH Fe release from pyrite dissolution was immediately depleted as Fe-oxy(hydroxide) phases that precipitated on the pyrite grains, forming Fe-coatings (microencapsulation). With time, pyrite microencapsulation inhibited oxidation in practically 97% of the pyritic sludge. Rapid pyrite-surface passivation decreased its reactivity, preventing AMD production in the relatively short term.

  18. Preliminary results of U/Pb geochronology in Meridional Espinhaco Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, N.; Schrank, A.; Abreu, F.R. de; Knauer, L.G.; Abreu, P.A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Some samples of the constituent unities from Meridional Espinhaco Mountain for geochronology determining by U/Pb method are presented. The analytical techniques described by Krogh and the Davis linear regression program are used for treating these samples. (author)

  19. Chemostratigraphy and trace element pattern of authigenic pyrite in a Frasnian-Fammenian transition section (Büdesheimer bach, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, F.; Berner, Z.; Neumann, T.; Stüben, D.

    2003-04-01

    Trace element contents in authigenic pyrite were investigated in relationship to the geochemistry of host rocks in a 160 m deep drilling at Büdesheimer Bach (Prümer Mulde, Germany), in order to put constrains on possible changes in depositional conditions and seawater composition related to the Kellwasser events (Frasnian/Fammenian transition). The approach is based on the observation that the trace element pattern of authigenic pyrite is controlled by genetic conditions (Stüben et al., 2002) and that the content of elements with generally high degree of pyritization (DTMP, degree of trace metal pyritization, like As, Mo, Co, Ni, etc.) depends on their availability at the site of pyrite formation (e.g. Huerta-Diaz and Morse, 1992). The distribution of trace elements in the bulk rock essentially reflects mineralogical composition and redox conditions which are mainly controlled by the flux of organic matter entering the sediment. The lower and upper Kellwasser horizons are marked by an increase in carbonate and organic carbon content (up to 2%), coupled with an increase in the degree of pyritization of Fe (DOP: 0.4-0.8), indicating a change from normal marine to suboxic/anoxic conditions. A simultaneous drop in the Ba content of the host lithology, which usually is used as a proxy for paleoproductivity, can be explained by the removal of Ba dissolved in pore water under anoxic conditions (McManus et al., 1998). While low in the host rock, the Ba content of authigenic pyrite is high in these horizons, suggesting that pyrite may preserve the initial composition of pore water even for some elements with generally low DTMP, like Ba. Consequently, Ba content in pyrite may serve as indicator for productivity even when the Ba content of sediment can not be used due to its poor preservation. During these anoxic episodes also a significant increase in the content of As, U, V was registered in pyrite. Opposite to these, others like Ni, Co, Ag show a decrease in their

  20. The origin of copiapite from chlorite pyritic schist (Wiesciszowice, Lower Silesia, Poland) in the light of Moessbauer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, Z., E-mail: zdzislaw.adamczyk@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Applied Geology (Poland); Komraus, J. L., E-mail: komraus@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics (Poland)

    2008-01-15

    This work presents the results of the analysis of copiapite, formed from weathering and oxidation of pyrite in pyritic schist from Wiesciszowice, Lower Silesia (Poland). The pure phase of copiapite was found in secondary minerals after pyrite and identified by optical microscopy, XRD and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the analyzed copiapite major cations appear to be Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. Some Fe{sup 3+} is substituted by other cations, mainly Al{sup 3+}. Al{sup 3+} probably comes from leaching of chlorite from which hydrated sulphates of iron, mainly szomolnokite, form followed by hydrated sulphates fibroferrite, which is replaced by copiapite.

  1. Geochronology and geochemistry by nuclear tracks method: some utilization examples in geologic applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Soliani Junior, E.

    1988-01-01

    This article discuss some applications of the 'nuclear tracks method' in geochronology, geochemistry and geophysic. In geochronology, after rapid presentation of the dating principles by 'Fission Track' and the kinds of geological events mensurable by this method, is showed some application in metallogeny and in petroleum geolocy. In geochemistry the 'fission tracks' method utilizations are related with mining prospecting and uranium prospecting. In geophysics an important application is the earthquake prevision, through the Ra 222 emanations continous control. (author) [pt

  2. Geochemical Astro- and Geochronological Constraints on the Early Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, M.; Condon, D. J.; Ruhl, M.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Hesselbo, S. P.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Percival, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Early Jurassic Hettangian and Sinemurian time scales are poorly defined due to the lack of continuous geochemical records, and the temporal constrain of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and associated global carbon cycle perturbation is afflicted by geochemical and biostratigraphical uncertainties of the existing radiometric dates from various volcanic ash bearing sections. Here we present a continuous, orbitally paced Hettangian to Pliensbachian carbon-isotope record of the Mochras drill-core (Cardigan bay Basin, UK). The record generates new insights into the evolution and driving mechanisms of the Early Jurassic carbon cycle, and is contributing to improve the Hettangian and Sinemurian time scale. Furthermore, we introduce a new high-resolution carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy, integrated with ammonite biostratigraphy and new U/Pb single zircon geochronology of the Las Overas section (Neuquén Basin, Argentina). The studied section comprises sediments from the tenuicostatum to Dumortiera Andean Ammonite zone (tenuicostatum to levesqui European standard zones). A stratigraphically expanded negative shift in d13Corg values, from -24‰ down to -32­‰, appears in the tenuicostatum and hoelderi ammonite zone, coeval to the negative excursion in European realm which is associated with the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. The negative isotope excursion appears concomitant with an increase in sedimentary mercury levels, indicating enhanced volcanic activity. TOC values and elemental data suggest a high sedimentation dilution in the tenuicostatum to pacificum zone. The new geochronological data from several volcanic ash beds throughout the section are further improving the temporal correlation between the Early Toarcian isotope event and causal mechanisms

  3. The Effect of Water Vapor on the Thermal Decomposition of Pyrite in N2 Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin BOYABAT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of water vapor on the thermal decomposition of pyrite mineral in nitrogen atmosphere has been investigated in a horizontal tube furnace. Temperature, time and water vapor concentration were used as experimental parameters. According to the data obtained at nitrogen/ water vapor environment, it was observed that the water vapor on the decomposition of pyrite increased the decomposition rate. The decomposition reaction is well represented by the "shrinking core" model and can be divided into two regions with different rate controlling step. The rate controlling steps were determined from the heat transfer through the gas film for the low conversions, while it was determined from the mass transfer through product ash layer for the high conversions. The activation energies of this gas and ash film mechanisms were found to be 77 and 81 kJ/mol-1, respectively.

  4. Chemical vapour transport of pyrite (FeS 2) with halogen (Cl, Br, I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, S.; Mai, J.; Ennaoui, A.; Szacki, W.

    1986-12-01

    A systematic study of chemical vapour transport (CVT) of pyrite with halogen, hydrogen halides and ammonium halides as transporting agents has shown that the transport with chlorine and bromine in a temperature gradient Δ T = 920-820 K yields the highest transport rates (˜6 mg/h) with crystals up to 5 mm edge length. Computing thermochemical equilibria and flux functions in the system Fe-S-Hal (Hal = Cl, Br, I) it has been confirmed that the transport velocity of pyrite is limited by the concentration of FeHal 2 in the vapour phase, the equilibrium position between FeHal 2(g) and FeHal 3(g) and the flux directions of the iron gas species.

  5. Preparation of Metallic Iron Powder from Pyrite Cinder by Carbothermic Reduction and Magnetic Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Long

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction and magnetic separation procedure of pyrite cinder in the presence of a borax additive was performed for the preparation of reduced powder. The effects of borax dosage, reduction temperature, reduction time and grinding fineness were investigated. The results show that when pyrite cinder briquettes with 5% borax were pre-oxidized at 1050 °C for 10 min, and reduced at 1050 °C for 80 min, with the grinding fineness (<0.44 mm passing 81%, the iron recovery was 91.71% and the iron grade of the magnetic concentrate was 92.98%. In addition, the microstructures of the products were analyzed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and mineralography, and the products were also studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique (XRD to investigate the mechanism; the results show that the borax additive was approved as a good additive to improve the separation of iron and gangue.

  6. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  7. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  8. Arsenopyrite and pyrite bioleaching: evidence from XPS, XRD and ICP techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantauzzi, Marzia; Licheri, Cristina; Atzei, Davide; Loi, Giovanni; Elsener, Bernhard; Rossi, Giovanni; Rossi, Antonella

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a multi-technical bulk and surface analytical approach was used to investigate the bioleaching of a pyrite and arsenopyrite flotation concentrate with a mixed microflora mainly consisting of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray-induced Auger electron spectroscopy mineral surfaces investigations, along with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur determination (CHNS) analyses, were carried out prior and after bioleaching. The flotation concentrate was a mixture of pyrite (FeS(2)) and arsenopyrite (FeAsS); after bioleaching, 95% of the initial content of pyrite and 85% of arsenopyrite were dissolved. The chemical state of the main elements (Fe, As and S) at the surface of the bioreactor feed particles and of the residue after bioleaching was investigated by X-ray photoelectron and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. After bioleaching, no signals of iron, arsenic and sulphur originating from pyrite and arsenopyrite were detected, confirming a strong oxidation and the dissolution of the particles. On the surfaces of the mineral residue particles, elemental sulphur as reaction intermediate of the leaching process and precipitated secondary phases (Fe-OOH and jarosite), together with adsorbed arsenates, was detected. Evidence of microbial cells adhesion at mineral surfaces was also produced: carbon and nitrogen were revealed by CHNS, and nitrogen was also detected on the bioleached surfaces by XPS. This was attributed to the deposition, on the mineral surfaces, of the remnants of a bio-film consisting of an extra-cellular polymer layer that had favoured the bacterial action. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  9. Adaptation of chemical methods of analysis to the matrix of pyrite-acidified mining lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzsprung, P.; Friese, K.

    2000-01-01

    Owing to the unusual matrix of pyrite-acidified mining lakes, the analysis of chemical parameters may be difficult. A number of methodological improvements have been developed so far, and a comprehensive validation of methods is envisaged. The adaptation of the available methods to small-volume samples of sediment pore waters and the adaptation of sensitivity to the expected concentration ranges is an important element of the methods applied in analyses of biogeochemical processes in mining lakes [de

  10. Pyrite as a proxy for the identification of former coastal lagoons in semiarid NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago O.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Albuquerque, Antonia G. B. M.; Sartor, Lucas R.; Gomes, Irlene S.; Artur, Adriana G.; Otero, Xosé L.

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to test the suitability of pyrite (FeS2) as a proxy for reconstructing past marine environmental conditions along the semiarid coast of Brazil. Morphological description combined with physicochemical analyses including Fe partitioning were conducted for soil depth profiles (30 and 60 cm depths) at three sites in two contrasting lagoons of the state of Ceará: a suspected former lagoon that would have been transformed into a freshwater "lake" at a site vegetated by Juncus effusus (site P1), and another lagoon with connection to the sea at sites vegetated by J. effusus (site P2) or Portulaca oleracea (site P3). Soil samples were collected in September 2010. Site P3 had more reducing conditions, reaching Eh values of -132 mV in the surface layer (0-10 cm), whereas minimum values for the P1 and P2 sites were +219 and +85 mV, respectively. Lower pyritic Fe values were found at site P1, with a degree of pyritization (DOP) ranging from 10 to 13%. At sites P2 and P3, DOP ranged from 9 to 67% and from 55 to 72%, respectively. These results are consistent with an interruption of tidal channels by eolian dune migration inducing strong changes in the hydrodynamics and physicochemical characteristics (lower salinity, oxidizing conditions) of these sites, causing the dieback of suspected former mangroves and a succession to freshwater marshes with an intermediate salt marsh stage. Together with other physicochemical signatures, pyrite can evidently serve as a useful proxy in tracking environmental changes in such ecotones, with implications for coastal management.

  11. Simulated aerobic pedogenesis in pyritic overburden with a positive acid-base account

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, J.J.; Hossner, L.R.; Wilding, L.P. (South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD (United States). Dept. of Plant Science)

    Reclamation of surface-mined land is often hindered by the excess salts and acidity produced by the weathering of pyritic overburden. This study was conducted to document the initial transformations that occur when pyritic overburden containing excess acid neutralizing potential is used as parent material in minesoil construction. An overburden containing 0.8% FeS[sub 2] (pyrite) and 1.6% inorganic carbonate (predominantly dolomite) was collected from the highwall of an active lignite surface mine in Panola County, Texas. The overburden was lightly crushed through a 13-mm sieve and packed into three replicate lysimeters (0.75 by 0.75 by 1.2 m). The lysimeters were leached monthly with 63.5 mm of deionized water for 24 mo. The initial material had a pH of 8.3 and an excess acid neutralizing potential. Progressive FeS[sub 2] oxidation released H[sub 2]SO[sub 4], and the pH decreased to 6.8. The dolomite dissolved, neutralizing the acidity, with subsequent release of Ca and Mg ions into solution. Leachate Ca[sup 2+] and SO[sub 4][sup 2-] concentrations exceeded the ion activity product of gypsum in the lower 60 cm of the lysimeters. Thin-section analysis revealed that gypsum crystals precipitated along margins of residual pyrite particles and in conductive vughs and channels. The continued accumulation of gypsum in minesoil development could eventually lead to the formation of a gypsic or a petrogypsic horizon. A restrictive layer such as this would decrease vertical movement of water and O[sub 2] which would reduce vegetative growth, increase runoff and erosion, and thus increase the probability of reclamation failure.

  12. Late Strunian age : a key time frame for VMS deposit exploration in the Iberian Pyrite Belt

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, João Xavier; Pereira, Zélia; Rosa, Carlos J. P.; Rosa, Diogo R. N.; Oliveira, José Tomás; Relvas, Jorge M. R. S.

    2011-01-01

    Estimate of geological environments favorable for the formation of massive sulphide deposits is an important goal to the exploration companies working in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), the main European VMS base metals province, with giant deposits such as Neves Corvo, Aljustrel (Portugal), Rio Tinto and Tharsis (Spain). Palynostratigraphic research programs using more than 40 exploration boreholes (>30 km length) allowed the dating of the sediments of the Volcano-Sedimentary Comp...

  13. Matrix composition and community structure analysis of a novel bacterial pyrite leaching community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle; Ackermann, Sonia; Majzlan, Juraj; Gescher, Johannes

    2009-09-01

    Here we describe a novel bacterial community that is embedded in a matrix of carbohydrates and bio/geochemical products of pyrite (FeS(2)) oxidation. This community grows in stalactite-like structures--snottites--on the ceiling of an abandoned pyrite mine at pH values of 2.2-2.6. The aqueous phase in the matrix contains 200 mM of sulfate and total iron concentrations of 60 mM. Micro-X-ray diffraction analysis showed that jarosite [(K,Na,H(3)O)Fe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)] is the major mineral embedded in the snottites. X-ray absorption near-edge structure experiments revealed three different sulfur species. The major signal can be ascribed to sulfate, and the other two features may correspond to thiols and sulfoxides. Arabinose was detected as the major sugar component in the extracellular polymeric substance. Via restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, a community was found that mainly consists of iron oxidizing Leptospirillum and Ferrovum species but also of bacteria that could be involved in dissimilatory sulfate and dissimilatory iron reduction. Each snottite can be regarded as a complex, self-contained consortium of bacterial species fuelled by the decomposition of pyrite.

  14. An Insight into Flotation Chemistry of Pyrite with Isomeric Xanthates: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Han

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The flotation chemistry between pyrite and isomeric xanthates (butyl xanthate and isobutyl xanthate was investigated by means of adsorption experiments, surface tension tests, and molecular dynamic simulations in this work. The flotation chemical results were confirmed and further interpreted by quantum chemical calculations. The experiment results demonstrated that the isobutyl xanthate exhibited superior adsorption capacity and surface activity than those of butyl xanthate in flotation chemistry. In addition, molecular dynamic simulations were simultaneously performed in constant number, constant volume and temperature (NVT, and constant number, constant volume, and pressure (NPT ensemble, indicating that the NPT ensemble was more suitable to the flotation system and the isobutyl xanthate was easier to be adsorbed on pyrite surface compared with butyl xanthate during an appropriate range of concentrations. Furthermore, the quantum chemical calculations elucidated that the isobutyl xanthate presented higher reactivity than that of the corresponding butyl xanthate based on the frontier molecular orbital theory of chemical reactivity, which was consistent with experimental and simulation results obtained. This work can provide theoretical guidance for an in-depth study of the flotation chemistry of pyrite with isomeric xanthates.

  15. Surface Chemical Characterisation of Pyrite Exposed to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Associated Extracellular Polymeric Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian M. La Vars

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A. ferrooxidans and their metabolic products have previously been explored as a viable alternative depressant of pyrite for froth flotation; however, the mechanism by which separation is achieved is not completely understood. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS and captive bubble contact angle measurements have been used to examine the surface physicochemical properties of pyrite upon exposure to A. ferrooxidans grown in HH medium at pH 1.8. C K-edge near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectra collected from PEEM images indicate hydrophilic lipids, fatty acids and biopolymers are formed at the mineral surface during early exposure. After 168 h, the spectra indicate a shift towards protein and DNA, corresponding to an increase in cell population and biofilm formation on the surface, as observed by SEM. The Fe L-edge NEXAFS show gradual oxidation of the mineral surface from Fe(II sulfide to Fe(III oxyhydroxides. The oxidation of the iron species at the pyrite surface is accelerated in the presence of A. ferrooxidans and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS as compared to HH medium controls. The surface chemical changes induced by the interaction with A. ferrooxidans show a significant decrease in surface hydrophobicity within the first 2 h of exposure. The implications of these findings are the potential use of EPS produced during early attachment of A. ferrooxidans, as a depressant for bioflotation.

  16. Acid-base properties of a limed pyritic overburden during simulated weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, J.J.; Hossner, L.R. [South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD (United States). Plant Science Dept.

    1997-11-01

    Surface-mine reclamation is often hindered by the formation of acid mine soil and acid mine drainage from FeS{sub 2} oxidation. Surface soils containing FeS{sub 2} are often treated with crushed limestone (predominately CaCO{sub 3}) to prevent aid minesoil formation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of liming pyritic minesoil to prevent the formation of acid minesoil and acid mine drainage. Pyritic minesoils that did not receive lime became acidic very rapidly and produced acidic leachate. Almost all of the FeS{sub 2} in this treatment oxidized during the first 200 d. The addition of lime at a rate of 25% of the theoretical acid-base account (ABA) significantly slowed FeS{sub 2} oxidation, but rapid oxidation ensued after the added lime was neutralized. Treatments receiving a liming rate of 50% ABA or greater remained neutral to alkaline throughout the study. Acid-base values and residual FeS{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} data, however, indicate that the lime was dissolving from the system faster than the FeS{sub 2} was oxidizing, and all the treatments would eventually become acidic. The results indicate that the liming of a pyritic overburden to an ABA of 125% is not a sustainable solution to preventing acid minesoil and acid mine drainage. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. In situ remediation of hexavalent chromium with pyrite fines : bench scale demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathum, S.; Wong, W.P.; Brown, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    An in situ remediation technique for chromium contaminated soil with pyrite fines was presented. Past industrial activities and lack of disposal facilities have contributed to a serious problem dealing with chromium, which cannot be eliminated from the environment because it is an element. Both bench-scale and laboratory testing was conducted to confirm the efficiency of the proposed process which successfully converted Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in soil and water. Cr(III) is less toxic and immobile in the environment compared to Cr(VI) which moves freely in the soil matrix, posing a risk to the groundwater quality. pH in the range of 2.0 to 7.6 has no effect on the reactivity of pyrite towards Cr(VI). The optimization of the bench-scale treatment resulted in a large volume of chromium waste, mostly from the control experiments and column hydrology testing. These waste streams were treated according to municipal guidelines before disposal to the environment. Samples of chromium waste before and after treatment were analyzed. Cr (VI) was completely mineralized to below guideline levels. It was determined that several conditions, including contact time between pyrite and Cr(VI), are crucial for complete mineralization of Cr(VI). 13 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs

  18. Correlation of Surface Adsorption and Oxidation with a Floatability Difference of Galena and Pyrite in High-Alkaline Lime Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaopeng; Ruan, Renman; Xia, Liuyin; Li, Li; Sun, Heyun; Jia, Yan; Tan, Qiaoyi

    2018-02-27

    When it comes to Pb-Zn ores with high amounts of pyrite, the major problem encountered is the low separation efficiency between galena and pyrite. By virtue of high dosage of lime and collector sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate (DDTC), pyrite and zinc minerals are depressed, allowing the galena to be floated. However, there have been significant conflicting reports on the flotation behavior of galena at high pH. In this context, correlation of the surface adsorption and oxidation with the floatability difference of galena and pyrite in high-alkaline lime systems would be a key issue for process optimization. Captive bubble contact angle measurements were performed on freshly polished mineral surfaces in situ exposed to lime solutions of varying pH as a function of immersion time. Furthermore, single mineral microflotation tests were conducted. Both tests indicated that the degree of hydrophobicity on the surfaces of galena and pyrite increased in the presence of DDTC at natural or mild pulp pH. While in a saturated lime solution, at pH 12.5, DDTC only worked for galena, but not for pyrite. Surface chemistry analysis by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) confirmed the preference of DDTC on the galena surface at pH 12.5, which contributed to a merit recovery. Further important evidence through measurements of Tof-SIMS, ion chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that in high-alkaline lime systems, the merit floatability of galena could exclude the insignificant contribution of elemental sulfur (S 8 ) and was dominantly attributed by the strong adsorption of DDTC. In contrast, the poor flotation response of pyrite at high pH was due to the prevailing adsorption of CaOH + species. This study provides an important surface chemistry evidence for a better understanding of the mechanism on the better selectivity in the galena-pyrite separation adopting high-alkaline lime systems.

  19. Pyrite oxidation in the presence of hematite and alumina: I. Batch leaching experiments and kinetic modeling calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Veerawattananun, Suchol; Ito, Mayumi; Hiroyoshi, Naoki; Igarashi, Toshifumi

    2017-02-15

    Pyrite is one of the most common and geochemically important sulfide minerals in nature because of its role in the redox recycling of iron (Fe). It is also the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD) that is considered as a serious and widespread problem facing the mining and mineral processing industries. In the environment, pyrite oxidation occurs in the presence of ubiquitous metal oxides, but the roles that they play in this process remain largely unknown. This study evaluates the effects of hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) and alumina (α-Al 2 O 3 ) on pyrite oxidation by batch-reactor type experiments, surface-sensitive characterization of the oxidation layer and thermodynamic/kinetic modeling calculations. In the presence of hematite, dissolved sulfur (S) concentration dramatically decreased independent of the pH, and the formation of intermediate sulfoxy anionic species on the surface of pyrite was retarded. These results indicate that hematite minimized the overall extent of pyrite oxidation, but the kinetic model could not explain how this suppression occurred. In contrast, pyrite oxidation was enhanced in the alumina suspension as suggested by the higher dissolved S concentration and stronger infrared (IR) absorption bands of surface-bound oxidation products. Based on the kinetic model, alumina enhanced the oxidative dissolution of pyrite because of its strong acid buffering capacity, which increased the suspension pH. The higher pH values increased the oxidation of Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ by dissolved O 2 (DO) that enhanced the overall oxidative dissolution kinetics of pyrite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Short communication: Adverse effect of surface-active reagents on the bioleaching of pyrite and chalcopyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, G; Escobar, B; Rubio, J; Badilla-Ohlbaum, R

    1995-09-01

    Oxidation of Fe(II) iron and bioleaching of pyrite and chalcopyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was adversely affected by isopropylxanthate, a flotation agent, and by LIX 984, a solvent-extraction agent, each at ≤ 1 g/l. The reagents/l were adsorbed on the bacterial surface, decreasing the bacteria's development and preventing biooxidation. Both reagents inhibited the bioleaching of pyrite and LIX 984 also inhibited the bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

  1. Isolation and characterization of bacteria on the drainage water from Ratones mine and its behaviour on pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, J. L.; Saez, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes some of the studies made about iron and sulfur oxidizing bacteria on the drainage water from Ratones mine. Different liquid and solid media were utilized as well as some energy sources, ferrous sulphate, thiosulfate and sulfur. Some experiment were al so realized on museum grade pyrite aimed at determining the possibilities of applying the mentioned bacteria on the leaching of pyrite and subsequently on the leaching of uranium ores. (Author) 27 refs

  2. Sulfur amino acids and alanine on pyrite (100) by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy: Surface or molecular role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Galvez-Martinez, S.; Mateo-Marti, E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the first successful adsorption of the cysteine, cystine, methionine and alanine amino acids on the pyrite (100) surface under ultra-high vacuum conditions with crucial chemical adsorption parameters driving the process. We have demonstrated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) that the surface pretreatment annealing process on pyrite surfaces is a critical parameter driving surface reactivity. The presence of enriched monosulfide species on the pyrite (100) surface favours the amino acid NH2 chemical form, whereas a longer annealing surface pretreatment of over 3 h repairs the sulfur vacancies in the pyrite, enriching disulfide species on the pyrite surface, which promotes NH3+ adsorption due to the sulfur vacancies in the pyrite being replaced by sulfur atom dimers (S22-) on the surface. Furthermore, even if the surface chemistry (monosulfide or disulfide species enrichment) is the main factor promoting a partial conversion from NH2 to NH3+ species, the unique chemical structure of each amino acid provides a particular fingerprint in the process.

  3. Geochemistry of Early Frasnian (Late Devonian) pyrite-ammonoid level in the Kostomłoty Basin, Poland, and a new proxy parameter for assessing the relative amount of syngenetic and diagenetic pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarzowska, Agnieszka; Berner, Zsolt A.; Racki, Grzegorz

    2014-07-01

    Pyrite geochemistry (isotope and trace element composition, degree of pyritization, S/Corg ratio) was used in context of selected lithogeochemical parameters (major and trace elements, including sulphur, organic carbon, and δ13C of carbonate carbon) to constrain fluctuations in depositional conditions during the Early to Middle Frasnian carbon isotopic perturbation (punctata Event) in the Kostomłoty Basin, Poland. Based on the ratio between the sum of oxyanionic elements and transition metals in pyrite, a new proxy parameter (index of syngenetic pyrite, ISYP) is proposed for assessing the relative amount of syngenetic pyrite in a sample. The distribution of the ISYP along the Kostomłoty - Małe Górki section (upper Szydłówek to the basal Kostomłoty beds) is in concert with conclusions inferred from paleoecologic data and other geochemical parameters (degree of pyritization, S/Corg, δ34Spyrite). According to these, the lower segment of the Szydłówek Beds was deposited in a normally oxygenated environment, but undergoing increasing primary productivity in surface water, as indicated by an increase in δ13Ccarb and in Cu/Zr ratio in bulk rock, which triggered the periodic deposition of sediments slightly enriched in organic matter, notably within the pyrite-ammonoid level (= Goniatite Level). Fluctuating, but in general high S/Corg ratios, DOPR values and ISYP values suggest that during this time - against the background of a generally dysoxic environment - shorter or longer lasting episodes of more restricted (anoxic and possibly even euxinic) bottom water conditions developed. Low sedimentation rates enabled a continuous and practically unlimited supply of sulphate during bacterial sulphate reduction (BSR), which in turn led to a strong depletion of pyrite sulphur in 34S in this interval (constantly around -29‰). In contrast, below and above the Goniatite Level, higher δ34S values (up to + 3‰), are compatible with closed system conditions and higher

  4. Oxygen isotope evidence for sorption of molecular oxygen to pyrite surface sites and incorporation into sulfate in oxidation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichomirowa, Marion; Junghans, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate (i) the rate of O-isotope exchange between SO 4 and water molecules at low pH and surface temperatures typical for conditions of acid mine drainage (AMD) and (ii) the O- and S-isotope composition of sulfates produced by pyrite oxidation under closed and open conditions (limited and free access of atmospheric O 2 ) to identify the O source/s in sulfide oxidation (water or atmospheric molecular O 2 ) and to better understand the pyrite oxidation pathway. An O-isotope exchange between SO 4 and water was observed over a pH range of 0-2 only at 50 deg. C, whereas no exchange occurred at lower temperatures over a period of 8 a. The calculated half-time of the exchange rate for 50 deg. C (pH = 0 and 1) is in good agreement with former experimental data for higher and lower temperatures and excludes the possibility of isotope exchange for typical AMD conditions (T ≤ 25 deg. C, pH ≥ 3) for decades. Pyrite oxidation experiments revealed two dependencies of the O-isotope composition of dissolved sulfates: O-isotope values decreased with longer duration of experiments and increasing grain size of pyrite. Both changes are interpreted as evidence for chemisorption of molecular O 2 to pyrite surface sites. The sorption of molecular O 2 is important at initial oxidation stages and more abundant in finer grained pyrite fractions and leads to its incorporation in the produced SO 4 . The calculated bulk contribution of atmospheric O 2 in the dissolved SO 4 reached up to 50% during initial oxidation stages (first 5 days, pH 2, fine-grained pyrite fraction) and decreased to less than 20% after about 100 days. Based on the direct incorporation of molecular O 2 in the early-formed sulfates, chemisorption and electron transfer of molecular O 2 on S sites of the pyrite surface are proposed, in addition to chemisorption on Fe sites. After about 10 days, the O of all newly-formed sulfates originates only from water, indicating direct interaction

  5. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of terrestrial pyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Bryant; Jourdan, Fred

    2018-06-01

    Geochronological techniques such as U/Pb in zircon and baddeleyite and 40Ar/39Ar on a vast range of minerals, including sanidine, plagioclase, and biotite, provide means to date an array of different geologic processes. Many of these minerals, however, are not always present in a given rock, or can be altered by secondary processes (e.g. plagioclase in mafic rocks) limiting our ability to derive an isotopic age. Pyroxene is a primary rock forming mineral for both mafic and ultramafic rocks and is resistant to alteration process but attempts to date this phase with 40Ar/39Ar has been met with little success so far. In this study, we analyzed pyroxene crystals from two different Large Igneous Provinces using a multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometer (ARGUS VI) since those machines have been shown to significantly improve analytical precision compared to the previous single-collector instruments. We obtain geologically meaningful and relatively precise 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging from 184.6 ± 3.9 to 182.4 ± 0.8 Ma (2σ uncertainties of ±1.8-0.4%) and 506.3 ± 3.4 Ma for Tasmanian and Kalkarindji dolerites, respectively. Those data are indistinguishable from new and/or published U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar plagioclase ages showing that 40Ar/39Ar dating of pyroxene is a suitable geochronological tool. Scrutinizing the analytical results of the pyroxene analyses as well as comparing them to the analytical result from plagioclase of the same samples indicate pure pyroxene was dated. Numerical models of argon diffusion in plagioclase and pyroxene support these observations. However, we found that the viability of 40Ar/39Ar dating approach of pyroxene can be affected by irradiation-induced recoil redistribution between thin pyroxene exsolution lamellae and the main pyroxene crystal, hence requiring careful petrographic observations before analysis. Finally, diffusion modeling show that 40Ar/39Ar of pyroxene can be used as a powerful tool to date the formation age of mafic

  6. Geochronology and characteristics of Ni-Cu-(PGE) mineralization at Rožany, Lusatian Granitoid Complex, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haluzová, Eva; Ackerman, Lukáš; Pašava, J.; Jonášová, Šárka; Svojtka, Martin; Hrstka, Tomáš; Veselovský, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2015), s. 219-236 ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Ni-Cu-(PGE) * Lusatia * Re-Os * Bohemian Massif * sulphur Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2015

  7. Geochronological determination of the pegmatites from Rio de Janeiro State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Menezes, S. de; Cordani, U.G.; Teixeira, W.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of muscovite and plagioclase were collected from the pegmatites located in the counties of Niteroi and Sao Goncalo, State of Rio de Janeiro. Geochronological Research Center of the University of Sao Paulo has selected some samples for pottasium-argon and rubidium-strontium analysis. Three samples of muscovite analysed by K-Ar dating method lave ages between 437+-13 and 447+-16 m.y and two others, by Rb-Sr dating method, gave 495+-15 and 500+-13 m.y.. One sample of plagioclase analysed by K-Ar method gave age of 337+-16 m.y.. In this paper, the locations of the analysed samples are described and the samples of vicinity are listed in the Appendix. Interpretation of the radiometrio ages and discussion of results are made. Taking into account the results of Table l and the geologic setting of the pegmatities sample in Niteroi and Sao Goncalo, we way conclude that all cooling ages (440-550 m.y.) are related to the Brasiliano Orogeny. These pegmatites are regard as having same geological history and their ages are supposed 500 m.y.. (author) [pt

  8. Geochronology of La Tinta Upper Proterozoic sedimentary rocks, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cingolani, C.A.; Bonhomme, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Olavarria-Sierras Bayas, Barker-San Manuel and Balcarce-Mar del Plata fine-grained sedimentary rocks from La Tinta Formation, the pre-Cenozoic cover of the Tandilia region, were studied using the Rb-Sr and K-Ar geochronology. The mineralogical study of the fine fraction has shown that only the Olavarria-Sierras Bayas area presents suitable material comprising typical sedimentary clays, affected only by diagenetic processes. Two Rb-Sr isochrons were obtained from Olavarria-Sierras Bayas rocks. They show: (1) an age of 769 +- 12 Ma with ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) 0 = 0.7121 +- 0.0005, for Aust Quarry rocks; and (2) an age of 723 +- 21 Ma with ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) 0 = 0.7171 +- 0.0012 for Cerro Negro and Losa Quarries rocks. Considering the above-mentioned isochron data and the mineralogy of the clays studied, the conclusion is drawn that the ages obtained reflect the isotopic setting of a late diagenetic process, dated back to nearly 720 Ma. K-Ar data also support the Rb-Sr isochrons and the late diagenetic clay origin. The lower section of La Tinta sequence in the Sierras Bayas area must then be considered as Upper Proterozoic in age. These new data support the recently reported stratigraphical divisions and ages. (Auth.)

  9. Geochronological determination of pegmatites from Rio de Janeiro state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Menezes, S. de; Cordani, U.G.; Teixeira, W.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of muscovite and plagioclase were collected from the pegmatites located in the counties of Niteroi and Sao Goncalo, State of Rio de Janeiro. Geochronological Research Center of the University of Sao Paulo has selected some samples for potassium-argon and rubidium-strontion analysis. Three samples of muscovite analysed by K-Ar dating method gave ages between 437±13 and 447±16 m.y and two others, by Rb-Sr dating method, gave 495±15 and 500±13 m.y.. One sample of plagioclase analysed by K-Ar method gave age of 337±16 m.y.. In this paper, the locations of the analysed samples are described and the samples of vicinity are listed in the Appendix. interpretation of the radiometric ages and discussion of results are made. Taking into account the results of Table 1 and the geologic setting of the pegmatites sampled in Niteroi and Sao Goncalo, we way conclude that all cooling ages (440-550 m.y.) are related to the Brasiliano Orogeny. These pegmatites are regard as having same geological history and their ages are supposed 500 m.y [pt

  10. Geochronology and geochemistry of upper proterozoic granites from Southern Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordani, U.G.; Kawashita, K.; Vancini, K.R.B.; Cadoppi, P.; Sacchi, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Upper Proterozoic basement of Benin, like that of nearby Nigeria and like the polycyclic basement of Central Hoggar, belongs to the hinterland of the Pharusian Chain (Pan-African Trans-Saharan Belt) generated by the collision between the (passive) margin of the West African craton and the (reactivated) margin of the Tuareg Shield and its southern extension. Rb-Sr dating of sub alkaline, meta-aluminums, syn-Kinematic granite forming tabular bodies near Dassa-Zoume and near Save yielded two WR isochron ages of 650 ± 35 Ma (I.R. = 0.7043) and 705 ± 70 Ma (I.R. = 0.7045). Emplacement of these bodies was clearly controlled by trans current movements along the Kandi Fault System. The analyzed granites are comparable with those of Central Hoggar and North-Central Nigeria on the ground of field, geochronological and geochemical data; they also display some affinities with the late-tectonic granites of the Adrar des Iforas. They are expected to find their Brazilian continuation in the Chaval Granitoids west of Fortaleza, but data for comparison are inadequate. (author)

  11. Iberian Pyrite Belt Subsurface Life (IPBSL), a drilling project in a geochemical Mars terrestrial analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amils, R.; Fernández-Remolar, D. C.; Parro, V.; Manfredi, J. A.; Timmis, K.; Oggerin, M.; Sánchez-Román, M.; López, F. J.; Fernández, J. P.; Omoregie, E.; Gómez-Ortiz, D.; Briones, C.; Gómez, F.; García, M.; Rodríguez, N.; Sanz, J. L.

    2012-09-01

    Iberian Pyrite Belt Subsurface Life (IPBSL) is a drilling project specifically designed to characterize the subsurface ecosystems operating in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), in the area of Peña de Hierro, and responsible of the extreme acidic conditions existing in the Rio Tinto basin [1]. Rio Tinto is considered a good geochemical terrestrial analogue of Mars [2, 3]. A dedicated geophysical characterization of the area selected two drilling sites (4) due to the possible existence of water with high ionic content (low resistivity). Two wells have been drilled in the selected area, BH11 and BH10, of depths of 340 and 620 meters respectively, with recovery of cores and generation of samples in anaerobic and sterile conditions. Preliminary results showed an important alteration of mineral structures associated with the presence of water, with production of expected products from the bacterial oxidation of pyrite (sulfates and ferric iron). Ion chromatography of water soluble compounds from uncontaminated samples showed the existence of putative electron donors (ferrous iron, nitrite in addition of the metal sulfides), electron acceptors (sulfate, nitrate, ferric iron) as well as variable concentration of metabolic organic acids (mainly acetate, formate, propionate and oxalate), which are strong signals of the presence of active subsurface ecosystem associated to the high sulfidic mineral content of the IPB. The system is driven by oxidants that appear to be provided by the rock matrix, only groundwater is needed to launch microbial metabolism. The geological, geomicrobiological and molecular biology analysis which are under way, should allow the characterization of this ecosystem of paramount interest in the design of an astrobiological underground Mars exploration mission in the near future.

  12. Strategies for Reduced Acid and Metalliferous Drainage by Pyrite Surface Passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujie Qian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD is broadly accepted to be a major global environmental problem facing the mining industry, requiring expensive management and mitigation. A series of laboratory-scale kinetic leach column (KLC experiments, using both synthetic and natural mine wastes, were carried out to test the efficacy of our pyrite passivation strategy (developed from previous research for robust and sustainable AMD management. For the synthetic waste KLC tests, initial treatment with lime-saturated water was found to be of paramount importance for maintaining long-term circum-neutral pH, favourable for the formation and preservation of the pyrite surface passivating layer and reduced acid generation rate. Following the initial lime-saturated water treatment, minimal additional alkalinity (calcite-saturated water was required to maintain circum-neutral pH for the maintenance of pyrite surface passivation. KLC tests examining natural potentially acid forming (PAF waste, with much greater peak acidity than that of the synthetic waste, blended with lime (≈2 wt % with and without natural non-acid-forming (NAF waste covers, were carried out. The addition of lime and use of NAF covers maintained circum-neutral leachate pH up to 24 weeks. During this time, the net acidity generated was found to be significantly reduced by the overlying NAF cover. If the reduced rate of acidity production from the natural PAF waste is sustained, the addition of smaller (more economically-feasible amounts of lime, together with application of NAF wastes as covers, could be trialled as a potential cost-effective AMD mitigation strategy.

  13. The recovery of gold and pyrite from a residue dump at Crown Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keleghan, W.

    1976-01-01

    The application of ore-dressing methods to a residue dump at Crown Mines has been examined. The use of either single-stage or double-stage gravity concentration is advocated for the recovery of the gold. Flotation and wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS) are not recommended. The two-stage gravity process facilitates the recovery of most of the pyrite in the residue (over 70 per cent) at commercial grade (40 per cent sulphur), but sacrifices some of the gold obtainable by a single-stage operation. There is little prospect of the commercial recovery of uranium from the dump at Crown Mines

  14. Determination of the Content of Heavy Metals in Pyrite Contaminated Soil and Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Marić

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of a pyrite contaminated soil texture, content of heavy metals in the soil and soil pH, was the aim in the investigation. Acidification of damaged soil was corrected by calcium carbonate. Mineral nutrients and organic matter (NPK, dung, earthworm cast, straw and coal dust were added to damaged soil. Afterwards, the soil was used for oat production. Determination of total heavy metal contents (Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe in soil was performed by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. Plant material (stems, seeds was analysed, too. Total concentration of the heavy metals in the plant material were greater than in crop obtained in unaffected soil.

  15. Abiotic pyrite reactivity versus nitrate, selenate and selenite using chemical and electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiadis, I.; Betelu, S.; Gaucher, E.; Tournassat, C.; Chainet, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This work is part of ReCosy European project (www.recosy.eu), whose main objectives are the sound understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release/retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal and providing tools to apply the results to performance assessment/safety case. Redox is one of the main factor affecting speciation and mobility of redox-sensitive radionuclides. Thus, it is of a great importance to investigate the redox reactivity of the host radioactive waste formations, particularly when exposed to redox perturbations. Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx), a clay rock known as an anoxic and reducing system, was selected in France as the most suitable location to store nuclear waste. Iron (II) sulfide, mostly constituted of pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron (II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter are considered to account almost entirely for the total reducing capacity of the rock. We report here the redox reactivity of pyrite upon exposure to nitrate (N(V)), selenate (Se(VI)) and selenite (Se(IV)) that possibly occur in the nuclear storage. Both, chemical and electrochemical kinetic approaches were simultaneously conducted such as to (i) determine the kinetics parameters of the reactions and (ii) understand the kinetic mechanisms. In order to reach similar conditions that are encountered in the storage system, all experiments were realised in NaCl 0.1 M, near neutral pH solutions, and an abiotic glove box (O 2 less than 10 -8 M). Chemical approach has consisted to set in contact pyrite in grains with solutions containing respectively nitrate, selenate and selenite. Reactants and products chemical analyses, conducted at different contact times, allowed us to assess the kinetics of oxidant reduction. Electrochemical approach has consisted in the continuous or semi-continuous analysis of large surface pyrite electrodes immersed in solutions with or without oxidant (nitrate

  16. Production of pyrite nanoparticles using high energy planetary ball milling for sonocatalytic degradation of sulfasalazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataee, Alireza; Fathinia, Siavash; Fathinia, Mehrangiz

    2017-01-01

    Sonocatalytic performance of pyrite nanoparticles was evaluated by the degradation of sulfasalazine (SSZ). Pyrite nanoparticles were produced via a high energy mechanical ball milling (MBM) in different processing time from 2h to 6h, in the constant milling speed of 320rpm. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) confirmed the production of pyrite nanoparticles during 6h of ball milling with the average size distribution of 20-80nm. The effects of various operational parameters including pH value, catalyst amount (mg/L), SSZ concentration (mg/L), ultrasonic frequency (kHz) and reaction time on the SSZ removal efficiency were examined. The obtained results showed that the maximum removal efficiency of 97.00% was obtained at pH value of 4, catalyst dosage of 0.5g/L, SSZ concentration of 10mg/L and reaction time of 30min. Experimental results demonstrated that the kinetic of the degradation process can be demonstrated using Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetic model. The effect of different inorganic ions such as Cl - , CO 3 2- and SO 4 2- was investigated on the L-H reaction rate (k r ) and adsorption (K s ) constants. Results showed that the presence of the mentioned ions significantly influenced the L-H constants. The impact of ethanol as a OH radical scavenger and some enhancers including H 2 O 2 and K 2 S 2 O 8 was investigated on the SSZ removal efficiency. Accordingly, the presence of ethanol suppressed SSZ degradation due to the quenching of OH radicals and the addition of K 2 S 2 O 8 and H 2 O 2 increased the SSZ removal efficiency, due to the formation of SO 4 - and additional OH radicals, respectively. Under the identical conditions of operating parameters, pyrite nanoparticles maintained their catalytic activity during four consecutive runs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gold and trace element zonation in pyrite using a laser imaging technique: Implications for the timing of gold in orogenic and carlin-style sediment-hosted deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, R.R.; Danyushevsky, L.; Hollit, C.; Maslennikov, V.; Meffre, S.; Gilbert, S.; Bull, S.; Scott, R.; Emsbo, P.; Thomas, H.; Singh, B.; Foster, J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS imaging of gold and other trace elements in pyrite from four different sediment- hosted gold-arsenic deposits has revealed two distinct episodes of gold enrichment in each deposit: an early synsedimentary stage where invisible gold is concentrated in arsenian diagenetic pyrite along with other trace elements, in particular, As, Ni, Pb, Zn, Ag, Mo, Te, V, and Se; and a later hydrothermal stage where gold forms as either free gold grains in cracks in overgrowth metamorphic and/or hydrothermal pyrite or as narrow gold- arsenic rims on the outermost parts of the overgrowth hydrothermal pyrite. Compared to the diagenetic pyrites, the hydrothermal pyrites are commonly depleted in Ni, V, Zn, Pb, and Ag with cyclic zones of Co, Ni, and As concentration. The outermost hydrothermal pyrite rims are either As-Au rich, as in moderate- to high- grade deposits such as Carlin and Bendigo, or Co-Ni rich and As-Au poor as in moderate- to low-grade deposits such as Sukhoi Log and Spanish Mountain. The early enrichment of gold in arsenic-bearing syngenetic to diagenetic pyrite, within black shale facies of sedimentary basins, is proposed as a critical requirement for the later development of Carlin-style and orogenic gold deposits in sedimentary environments. The best grade sediment-hosted deposits appear to have the gold climax event, toward the final stages of deformation-related hydrothermal pyrite growth and fluid flow. ?? 2009 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.

  18. The geotectonic evolution of southern part of Sao Francisco Craton, based in geochronologic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, W.

    1985-01-01

    Interpretation of available radiometric data from poly metamorphic terranes of southern part of the Sao Francisco Craton demonstrates the importance of geochronology as a tool in the study of ancient crustal evolution. In addition, radiometric study of basic intrusive magmatism helps define the most important epochs of crustal rifting during the Proterozoic. The definition of the southern border of the cratonic area based on distinctive age patterns of the geochronological provinces is also discussed. Finally, the geochronologic evolution of the Bambui platform cover is presented. Approximately 250 radiometric age determinations (Rb-Sr, K-Ar and Pb-Pb methods) were interpreted principally through the use of iso chronic diagrams. The geologic history tectonomagnetic events identified in this study is compared to the crustal evolution of similar segments of the Sao Francisco Craton and elsewhere. (author)

  19. Influence of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans on Initial Attachment and Pyrite Leaching by Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Acidianus sp. DSM 29099

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available At the industrial scale, bioleaching of metal sulfides includes two main technologies, tank leaching and heap leaching. Fluctuations in temperature caused by the exothermic reactions in a heap have a pronounced effect on the growth of microbes and composition of mixed microbial populations. Currently, little is known on the influence of pre-colonized mesophiles or moderate thermophiles on the attachment and bioleaching efficiency by thermophiles. The objective of this study was to investigate the interspecies interactions of the moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T and the thermophile Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 during initial attachment to and dissolution of pyrite. Our results showed that: (1 Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 interacted with S. thermosulfidooxidansT during initial attachment in mixed cultures. In particular, cell attachment was improved in mixed cultures compared to pure cultures alone; however, no improvement of pyrite leaching in mixed cultures compared with pure cultures was observed; (2 active or inactivated cells of S. thermosulfidooxidansT on pyrite inhibited or showed no influence on the initial attachment of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099, respectively, but both promoted its leaching efficiency; (3 S. thermosulfidooxidansT exudates did not enhance the initial attachment of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 to pyrite, but greatly facilitated its pyrite dissolution efficiency. Our study provides insights into cell-cell interactions between moderate thermophiles and thermophiles and is helpful for understanding of the microbial interactions in a heap leaching environment.

  20. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria dominate the microbial diversity shift during the pyrite and low-grade pyrolusite bioleaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yifan; Ma, Xiaomei; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Yunkang; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Xingbiao; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Zhiyong

    2013-10-01

    The microbial ecology of the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching system and its interaction with ore has not been well-described. A 16S rRNA gene clone library was created to evaluate changes in the microbial community at different stages of the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching process in a shaken flask. The results revealed that the bacterial community was disturbed after 5 days of the reaction. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated that the predominant microorganisms were members of a genus of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, Thiomonas sp., that subsequently remained dominant during the bioleaching process. Compared with iron-oxidizing bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were more favorable to the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching system. Decreased pH due to microbial acid production was an important condition for bioleaching efficiency. Iron-oxidizing bacteria competed for pyrite reduction power with Mn(IV) in pyrolusite under specific conditions. These results extend our knowledge of microbial dynamics during pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching, which is a key issue to improve commercial applications. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Soil pollution by a pyrite mine spill in Spain: evolution in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, J.; Dorronsoro, C.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez, J.; Garcia, I.; Martin, F.; Simon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Soil pollution was studied after the spill of the Aznalcollar pyrite mine between 1998 and 2001, analyzing As, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb both in total concentrations as well as in soluble and bioavailable forms. The main remediation measures were: clean-up of the tailings and polluted soils, plus application of amendment materials (liming). The results indicate that, after three years, 50-70% of the acidic soils and 25-30% of the basic soils are still highly polluted in total arsenic. The limit of 0.04 mg kg -1 for water-soluble arsenic is exceeded in 15-20% of all soils. The EDTA-extractable arsenic (bioavailable) exceeds the limit of 2 mg kg -1 only in the acidic sectors. After clean-up, the homogenization of the upper 20-25 cm of the soils appears to be the most recommended measure in the reduction of pollution. - Capsule: Remediation measures carried out after the Aznalcollar pyrite mine spill were effective in the reduction of the pollution, although three years after the accident many areas are still polluted by As

  2. Microbial leaching of iron from pyrite by moderate thermophile chemolithotropic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Niazi, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of iron from pyrite by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (chemolithotroph) and an un-identified strain of acidophilic heterotroph (code 6A1TSB) isolated from local environments. As compared to inoculated flasks, dissolution of metal (due to acid leaching) was significantly low in the un-inoculated control flasks in all the experiments in ore. A decrease in the bioleaching activity was observed at the later stages of bioleaching of metal from ore. Among the strategies adopted to enhance the metal leaching rates, a mixed consortium of the metal adapted cultures of the above-mentioned bacteria was found to exhibit the maximum metal leaching efficiency. In all the flasks where high metal leaching rates were observed, concomitantly biomass production rates were also high indicating high growth rates. It showed that the metal bioleaching capability of the bacteria was associated with their growth. Pyrite contained 42% iron. (author)

  3. Soil infiltration bioreactor incorporated with pyrite-based (mixotrophic) denitrification for domestic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhe; Li, Lu; Feng, Chuanping; Chen, Nan; Dong, Shanshan; Hu, Weiwu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an integrated two-stage soil infiltration bioreactor incorporated with pyrite-based (mixotrophic) denitrification (SIBPD) was designed for domestic wastewater treatment. Benefited from excellent adsorption ability and water-permeability, soil infiltration could avoid clogging, shorten operating time and lower maintenance cost. Respiration and nitrification were mostly engaged in aerobic stage (AES), while nitrate was majorly removed by pyrite-based mixotrophic denitrification mainly occurred in anaerobic stage (ANS). Fed with synthetic and real wastewater for 120days at 1.5h HRT, SIBPD demonstrated good removal performance showing 87.14% for COD, 92.84% for NH4(+)-N and 82.58% for TP along with 80.72% of nitrate removed by ANS. TN removal efficiency was 83.74% when conducting real wastewater. Compared with sulfur-based process, the effluent pH of SIBPD was maintained at 6.99-7.34 and the highest SO4(2-) concentration was only 64.63mgL(-1). This study revealed a promising and feasible application prospect for on-site domestic wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Phospholipid on Pyrite Oxidation and Microbial Communities under Simulated Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Louis, Andro-Marc; Yu, Hui; Shumlas, Samantha L; Van Aken, Benoit; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

    2015-07-07

    The effect of phospholipid on the biogeochemistry of pyrite oxidation, which leads to acid mine drainage (AMD) chemistry in the environment, was investigated. Metagenomic analyses were carried out to understand how the microbial community structure, which developed during the oxidation of pyrite-containing coal mining overburden/waste rock (OWR), was affected by the presence of adsorbed phospholipid. Using columns packed with OWR (with and without lipid adsorption), the release of sulfate (SO4(2-)) and soluble iron (FeTot) was investigated. Exposure of lipid-free OWR to flowing pH-neutral water resulted in an acidic effluent with a pH range of 2-4.5 over a 3-year period. The average concentration of FeTot and SO4(2-) in the effluent was ≥20 and ≥30 mg/L, respectively. In contrast, in packed-column experiments where OWR was first treated with phospholipid, the effluent pH remained at ∼6.5 and the average concentrations of FeTot and SO4(2-) were ≤2 and l.6 mg/L, respectively. 16S rDNA metagenomic pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial communities associated with OWR samples revealed the development of AMD-like communities dominated by acidophilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria on untreated OWR samples, but not on refuse pretreated with phospholipid.

  5. Photoactive thin film semiconducting iron pyrite prepared by sulfurization of iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smestad, G.; Ennaoui, A.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H.; Hofmann, W.K.; Birkholz, M. (Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Solare Energetik Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Materialforschung); Kautek, W. (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-03-01

    Photoactive iron pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) thin film layers have been synthesized by a simple method involving the reaction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with elemental sulfur. The films were formed on a variety of different substrate materials by converting or sulfurizing iron oxide layers. The subsequent sulfur treatment of the oxide layers consisted of exposure of the films to gaseous sulfur in open or closed ampules at 350degC for 0.5-2 h. The morphology, composition and photoactivity of the films produced were checked using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), optical absorption, steady state and transient photoconductivity. The best films showed good crystallinity and purity with concurrent photoconductivity and photoelectrochemical response. The ability of this technique to produce photoactive material can be explained by interpretation of the Gibbs ternary phase diagram for the Fe-O-S system, and may be related to the production of photoactive pyrite in nature. A discussion is made as to the future improvement of the solar cell response by proper optimization of geometric and configurational properties. (orig.).

  6. Study of the pyritized surfaces of the carbon steel components in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, Maria; Parvan, Ioana; Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Dinu, Alice; Blanatui, A.

    1998-01-01

    The components used in the Girldler Sulfide (GS) process of heavy water production are made of carbon steel covered by iron sulfide layers of different compositions (mackinawite, troilite, pyrrhotite or pyrite) of variable thicknesses. The most protective layers which provide an acceptable corrosion resistance of the subjacent metal are the mixtures of pyrrhotite and pyrite. In the present work, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel samples covered by different types of sulfides was investigated by the following methods: X ray diffraction, metallography and electrochemical methods (potential-dynamical and electrochemical impedance). In order to carry out the electrochemical measurements in the same conditions as those of the operation of carbon steel components in D 2 O production facilities, the experiments were performed with Na 2 S solutions, at pH=4 - 13 and S 2- concentration value between 1 and 1000 mg/l. The dependence of corrosion rate kinetics on pH and S 2- concentration of the testing solution was investigated for sulfide covered samples comparatively with the uncovered ones. Corrosion rates determined gravimetrically were compared with those determined by electrochemical measurements. The uniformity and thickness of the sulfide layers were checked by metallographic methods. The composition of the sulfides formed in various environment conditions was established by X-ray diffraction. Reaction mechanisms specific for sulfide formation environments have been proposed. (authors)

  7. Efficient hydrogen evolution catalysis using ternary pyrite-type cobalt phosphosulphide

    KAUST Repository

    Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel

    2015-09-14

    The scalable and sustainable production of hydrogen fuel through water splitting demands efficient and robust Earth-abundant catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Building on promising metal compounds with high HER catalytic activity, such as pyrite structure cobalt disulphide (CoS 2), and substituting non-metal elements to tune the hydrogen adsorption free energy could lead to further improvements in catalytic activity. Here we present a combined theoretical and experimental study to establish ternary pyrite-type cobalt phosphosulphide (CoPS) as a high-performance Earth-abundant catalyst for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Nanostructured CoPS electrodes achieved a geometrical catalytic current density of 10 mA cm at overpotentials as low as 48mV, with outstanding long-term operational stability. Integrated photocathodes of CoPS on n -p-p silicon micropyramids achieved photocurrents up to 35 mA cm at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), onset photovoltages as high as 450 mV versus RHE, and the most efficient solar-driven hydrogen generation from Earth-abundant systems.

  8. Thermodynamic Cconstraints on Coupled Carbonate-Pyrite Weathering Dynamics and Carbon Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnick, M.; Maher, K.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical weathering within the critical zone regulates global biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric composition, and the supply of key nutrients to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Recent studies suggest that thermodynamic limits on solute production act as a first-order control on global chemical weathering rates; however, few studies have addressed the factors that set these thermodynamic limits in natural systems. In this presentation, we investigate the effects of soil CO2 concentrations and pyrite oxidation rates on carbonate dissolution and associated carbon fluxes in the East River watershed in Colorado, using concentration-discharge relationships and thermodynamic constraints. Within the shallow subsurface, soil respiration rates and moisture content determine the extent of carbonic acid-promoted carbonate dissolution through their modulation of soil pCO2 and the balance of open- v. closed-system weathering processes. At greater depths, pyrite oxidation generates sulfuric acid, which alters the approach to equilibrium of infiltrating waters. Through comparisons of concentration-discharge data and reactive transport model simulations, we explore the conditions that determine whether sulfuric acid reacts to dissolve additional carbonate mineral or instead reacts with alkalinity already in solution - the balance of which determines watershed carbon flux budgets. Our study highlights the importance of interactions between the chemical structure of the critical zone and the hydrologic regulation of flowpaths in determining concentration-discharge relationships and overall carbon fluxes.

  9. A geochemical and geochronological section through the Eastern Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katharina; Kuiper, Klaudia; Vroon, Pieter; Wijbrans, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The convergence of Africa and Eurasia and the subduction of a oceanic lithosphere of narrow basins between Gondwana terranes has controlled the geological evolution of the Eastern Mediterranean region since the Cretaceous. This resulted in back-arc extension and lithospheric thinning caused by slab roll-back together with the westward extrusion of Anatolia, in the southwards retreat and stepwise development of the subduction system and also in a low velocity seismic anomaly gap between the Cyprus and Hellenic slab and other slab segments. However, the exact timing of all these events in the Eastern Mediterranean region is still a matter of debate, and the purpose of this study is therefore to disentangle when terrains collided and slab detached in the last 30Ma. In a N-S transect magmatic rocks of the Aegean plate are studied, including volcanics from the islands Nisyros, Kos, Patmos, Chios, Lesbos and Samothraki. Major- and trace elements as well as Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-O isotopes are used to interpret the different features of the Aegean subduction zone. With this geochemical approach the extend of upwelling hot asthenospheric material from the slab tear can be traced in the recent to Eocene volcanic rocks. The volcanic rocks give a wide scatter in classification diagrams and pose for example the question how the sodium rich volcanic products of Patmos can be explained. On the other hand Chios seems to play a key role around 15 Ma years in a phase of relatively low volcanic activity. To get a reliable timeline of the subduction in the Aegean since the Eocene we are aiming to tie our chemical and isotopic data to parallel obtained geochronological ages. New 40Ar/39Ar data will allow us to get the needed resolution for this time span and material.

  10. Presentation on mechanisms and applications of chalcopyrite and pyrite bioleaching in biohydrometallurgy - a presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Huang; Dongwei, Li

    2014-12-01

    This review outlines classic and current research, scientific documents and research achievements in bioleaching, particularly in respect of the bioleaching of chalcopyrite and pyrite. The diversity and commonality of the microbial leaching process can be easily studied through comparing the bioleaching mechanism and the application of these two metal sulfides. The crystal, electronic and surface structures of chalcopyrite and pyrite are summarized in detail in this paper. It determines the specific and complicated interaction pathways, kinetics of the atmospheric/aqueous oxidation, and the control process of bioleaching of the minerals as the precondition. Bioleaching of metal sulfides is performed by a diverse group of microorganisms and microbial communities. The species of the bacteria which have a significant effect on leaching ores are miraculously diverse. The newly identified acidophilic microorganisms with unique characteristics for efficient bioleaching of sulfidic minerals are increasing sharply. The cell-to-cell communication mechanisms, which are still implicit, elusive and intangible at present day, have gradually become a research hotspot. The different mineralogy characteristics and the acid solubility of the metal sulfides (e.g., chalcopyrite and pyrite) cause two different dissolution pathways, the thiosulfate and the polysulfide pathways. The bioleaching mechanisms are categorized by contact (an electrostatic attachment) and noncontact (planktonic) process, with emphasis on the produce of extracellular polymeric substances and formation of biofilm on the surface of the metal sulfides in this paper. The division of the direct and indirect effect are not adopted due to the redox chain, the reduction of the ferric iron and oxidation of the ferrous iron. The molecular oxygen is reduced by the electrons extracted from the specific metal sulfide, via a redox chain forming a supercomplex spanning the periplasmic space and connecting both outer and inner

  11. Archaeal diversity and the extent of iron and manganese pyritization in sediments from a tropical mangrove creek (Cardoso Island, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, X. L.; Lucheta, A. R.; Ferreira, T. O.; Huerta-Díaz, M. A.; Lambais, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    Even though several studies on the geochemical processes occurring in mangrove soils and sediments have been performed, information on the diversity of Archaea and their functional roles in these ecosystems, especially in subsurface environments, is scarce. In this study, we have analyzed the depth distribution of Archaea and their possible relationships with the geochemical transformations of Fe and Mn in a sediment core from a tropical mangrove creek, using 16S rRNA gene profiling and sequential extraction of different forms of Fe and Mn. A significant shift in the archaeal community structure was observed in the lower layers (90-100 cm), coinciding with a clear decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) content and an increase in the percentage of sand. The comparison of the archaeal communities showed a dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layers (0-20 cm), whereas Crenarchaeota was the most abundant taxon in the lower layers. The dominance of methanogenic Euryarchaeota in the upper layer of the sediment suggests the occurrence of methanogenesis in anoxic microenvironments. The concentrations of Fe-oxyhydroxides in the profile were very low, and showed positive correlation with the concentrations of pyrite and degrees of Fe and Mn pyritization. Additionally, a partial decoupling of pyrite formation from organic matter concentration was observed, suggesting excessive Fe pyritization. This overpyritization of Fe can be explained either by the anoxic oxidation of methane by sulfate and/or by detrital pyrite tidal transportation from the surrounding mangrove soils. The higher pyritization levels observed in deeper layers of the creek sediment were also in agreement with its Pleistocenic origin.

  12. U-Pb isotope and trace element compositions of pyrites in the Black Reef: implications on their age and origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    In the Black Reef Quartzite Formation of the Transvaal Supergroup two gold-bearing conglomerate facies have been recognized. The source of gold in these reefs has long been a matter of speculation. Although some ascribe the gold and pyrite to a hydrothermal origin, the prevailing opinion favours a detrital origin. As a possible source, the reworked underlying sub-outcrops of the Kimberly Reef horizons in the Central Rand group have been proposed. An investigation was undertaken with the aim of defining the Pb-isotopic and trace element signatures of morphologically different pyrite populations within the two Black Reef facies as well as for the underlying Kimberly Reef. 2 tabs

  13. S/Se ratio of pyrite from eastern Australian VHMS deposits: implication of magmatic input into volcanogenic hydrothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huston, D L [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sie, S H; Suter, G F [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Cooke, D R [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    The proton microprobe was used to determine the concentrations of over twenty trace elements in pyrite grains from four volcanic-hosted massive sulphide (VHMS) deposits in eastern Australia. Of the elements determined, Se has the most potential in resolving important problems in the genesis of this class of ore deposits. This paper summarises analytical conditions, describes the distribution of Se in pyrite in VHMS deposits as determined in this and other studies, discusses the speciation of Se in hydrothermal fluids, and presents a genetic model on the relative contribution of magmatic versus sea water Se (and S) in VHMS systems. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  14. S/Se ratio of pyrite from eastern Australian VHMS deposits: implication of magmatic input into volcanogenic hydrothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huston, D.L. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Cooke, D.R. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The proton microprobe was used to determine the concentrations of over twenty trace elements in pyrite grains from four volcanic-hosted massive sulphide (VHMS) deposits in eastern Australia. Of the elements determined, Se has the most potential in resolving important problems in the genesis of this class of ore deposits. This paper summarises analytical conditions, describes the distribution of Se in pyrite in VHMS deposits as determined in this and other studies, discusses the speciation of Se in hydrothermal fluids, and presents a genetic model on the relative contribution of magmatic versus sea water Se (and S) in VHMS systems. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Unpacking paleoenvironmental change across OAE2 using paired d34S records of pyrite and organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, M. R.; Gomes, M.; Fike, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Pyrite sulfur isotopes have proven to be a powerful tool for reconstructing major changes in global redox state and the emergence of microbial metabolisms. Still, pyrite can be a challenging archive, as its formation depends on the availability of reactive iron species and can occur over multiple generations of sedimentary processes. Accordingly, pyrite δ34S records commonly have large point-to-point variability reflecting local processes. By pairing pyrite δ34S records with those of coexisting organic matter (OM), including both kerogens and extractable bitumens, we can begin to parse the various potential causes of this variability and gain greater insights into changes in the sedimentary paleoenvironment. Here, we present the first collection of records of OM δ34S for the Cretaceous, focusing on sections spanning Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2, 94 Mya), a period of globally widespread marine anoxia and carbon cycle disruption. In carbonates and shales from OAE2 in Pont d'Issole, France, pyrite and OM δ34S values vary in parallel throughout most of the section, consistent with their shared sulfide source. There are also distinct exceptions: In one interval, an excursion in pyrite δ34S is entirely absent from the organic sulfur record but associated with unusual organic sulfur redox speciation (by XAS), potentially reflecting later exposure to oxic porewaters. Across the core interval of shale deposition during OAE2, the offset between pyrite and OM δ34S values declines smoothly from +17.4 to -7.9‰, which we interpret in terms of changes in the speciation of detrital iron minerals that may have regional implications. We then compare these results with data for other well-characterized OAE2 sections, including Cismon (Italy), Tarfaya (Morocco), and the Demerara Rise (offshore Brazil), which represent environments with a variety of apparent redox states. These paired pyrite - OM δ34S profiles yield new information about how the local and global forcings

  16. Application of quadrupole mass spectrometer to the 40Ar-39Ar geochronological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Yutaka; Nishijima, Tadashi; Koike, Toshio; Okuma, Kouichi.

    1984-01-01

    A Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) has commonly been used for qualitative analyses of gases in organic chemistry or for monitoring the vacuum conditions in industrial machines. No attempt has been made, however, to apply it to geochronological studies because of its disadvantages such as the difficulty in obtaining precise isotope ratios due to triangular peak shapes and poor reproducibility. On the other hand, there are advantages that a QMS is relatively inexpensive and gives a shorter scanning time for analysis compared with a sector type mass spectrometer. The latter characteristics is useful for 40 Ar/ 39 Ar geochronological studies, since it gives a lower background in the QMS and the possibility to obtain many more data from one sample in a limited time. In this study, we have tried to improve a commercial QMS at many parts, such as rf-generator, quadrupole, ionization chamber, source magnet, and so on, in order to meet the requirements to use it for geochronological studies. With the use of the improved QMS equipped with an on-line microcomputer, we could obtain Ar isotope data which are sufficiently precise for the 40 Ar/ 39 Ar geochronological studies. (author)

  17. Re–Os geochemistry and geochronology of the Ransko gabbro–peridotite massif, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Pašava, J.; Erban, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 7 (2013), s. 799-804 ISSN 0026-4598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Re–Os * geochronology * gabbro * Bohemian Massif * Ni–Cu mineralization Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.667, year: 2013

  18. Reactivity of Dazomet, a Hydraulic Fracturing Additive: Hydrolysis and Interaction with Pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolazio, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Karamalidis, A.; Hakala, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale is currently the largest shale gas formation in play across the world. The low-permeability formation requires hydraulic fracturing to be produced. In this process, millions of gallons of water are blended with chemical additives and pumped into each well to fracture the reservoir rock. Although additives account for less than 2% of the fracking fluid mixture, they amount to hundreds of tons per frack job. The environmental properties of some of these additives have been studied, but their behavior under downhole conditions is not widely reported in the peer-reviewed literature. These compounds and their reaction products may return to the surface as produced or waste water. In the event of a spill or release, this water has the potential to contaminate surface soil and water. Of these additives, biocides may present a formidable challenge to water quality. Biocides are toxic compounds (by design), typically added to the Marcellus Shale to control bacteria in the well. An assessment of the most frequently used biocides indicated a need to study the chemical dazomet under reservoir conditions. The Marcellus Shale contains significant deposits of pyrite. This is a ubiquitous mineral within black shales that is known to react with organic compounds in both oxic and anoxic settings. Thus, the objective of our study was to determine the effect of pyrite on the hydrolysis of dazomet. Liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ) was used to calculate the loss rate of aqueous dazomet. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the reaction products. Our experiments show that in water, dazomet rapidly hydrolyses in water to form organic and inorganic transformation products. This reaction rate was unaffected when performed under anoxic conditions. However, with pyrite we found an appreciable increase in the removal rate of dazomet. This was accompanied by a corresponding change in the distribution of observed

  19. Geochronology of Quaternary glaciations from the tropical Cordillera Huayhuash, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah R.; Farber, Daniel L.; Ramage, Joan M.; Rodbell, Donald T.; Finkel, Robert C.; Smith, Jacqueline A.; Mark, Bryan G.; Kassel, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    The Cordillera Huayhuash in the central Peruvian Andes (10.3°S, 76.9°W) is an ideal mountain range in which to study regional climate through variations in paleoglacier extents. The range trends nearly north-south with modern glaciers confined to peaks >4800 m a.s.l. Geomorphology and geochronology in the nearby Cordillera Blanca and Junin Plain reveal that the Peruvian Andes preserve a detailed record of tropical glaciation. Here, we use ASTER imagery, aerial photographs, and GPS to map and date glacial features in both the western and eastern drainages of the Cordillera Huayhuash. We have used in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in quartz bearing erratics on moraine crests and ice-polished bedrock surfaces to develop an exposure age chronology for Pleistocene glaciation within the range. We have also collected sediment cores from moraine-dammed lakes and bogs to provide limiting 14C ages for glacial deposits. In contrast to the ranges to the north and south, most glacial features within the Cordillera Huayhuash are Lateglacial in age, however we have identified features with ages that span ˜0.2 to ˜38 ka with moraine sets marking the onset of glacier retreat at ˜0.3 ka, ˜9-10 ka, ˜13-14 ka, ˜20-22 ka, and >26 ka. The range displays a pronounced east-west variation in maximum down-valley distance from the headwall of moraine crests with considerably longer paleoglaciers in the eastern drainages. Importantly, Lateglacial paleoglaciers reached a terminal elevation of ˜4000 m a.s.l. on both sides of the Cordillera Huayhuash; suggesting that temperature may have been a dominant factor in controlling the maximum glacier extent. We suggest that valley morphology, specifically valley slope, strongly influences down-valley distance to the maximum glacier extent and potential for moraine preservation. While regionally there is an extensive record of older (>50 ka) advances to the north (Cordillera Blanca) and to the south (Junin region), the apparent

  20. Effects of various tailings covers on radon gas emanation from pyritic uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, N.K.; Lim, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Radon emanation studies were carried out at an inactive pyritic uranium tailings site in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada, to evaluate the effects of various existing dry and wet covers on radon flux rates. Measurements were taken using activated charcoal cartridges for various surface covers consisting of bare, vegetated, acidophilic moss with high degree of water saturation, compacted crushed rock and gravel, and winter snow. The results showed that at a given site, there was no significant difference in radon emanation rates between various tailings covers and bare tailings. In particular, no increase In radon emanation rates from vegetated areas compared to bare tailings was observed. Radon emanation rates varied spatially depending on tailings grain size, porosity, moisture content and on pressure and water table variations. The emanation rates were higher for tailings with low water contents compared to those for wet and moss covered tailings

  1. The volcanic-sedimentary sequence of the Lousal deposit, Iberian Pyrite Belt (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carlos; Rosa, Diogo; Matos, Joao; Relvas, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) is a massive sulfide province that is located in the south of Portugal and Spain, and hosts more than 90 massive sulfide deposits that amount to more than 1850 million metric tonnes of sulfide ore (Tornos, 2006). The ore deposits size, vary from ~1Mt to >100Mt (e.g. Neves Corvo and Aljustrel in Portugal, and Rio Tinto and Tharsis in Spain). The ore deposits are hosted by a submarine sedimentary and volcanic, felsic dominated, succession that constitutes the Upper Devonian to Lower Carboniferous Volcanic and Sedimentary Complex (VSC). The VSC ranges in thickness from approximately 600 to 1300 m (Tornos 2006). The VSC overlies the Phyllite-Quartzite Group (PQ) (Upper Devonian, base unknown) and is overlain by the Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (Lower to Upper Carboniferous). The Lousal massive sulfide deposit is located in the western part of the IPB and occurs mostly interbedded with black mudstone. The VSC sequence at Lousal mine consists of a mudstone and quartzite sequence (PQ Group) in the lower part of the succession, over which a thick sequence of rhyolitic lavas (>300 m) occurs. Above the rhyolitic lavas there is a thick sequence of black and grey mudstone that hosts the massive sulfide ore bodies, and a rhyolitic sill. The upper part of the VSC sequence consists of a thick mudstone interval that hosts two thick basaltic units, locally with pillows. The rhyolites have small coherent cores, locally with flow bands, that grade to surrounding massive clastic intervals, with large lateral extent. The clasts show jigsaw-fit arrangement in many places and have planar or curviplanar margins and locally are perlitic at the margin. The top contact of these units is in most locations not exposed, which makes difficult to interpret the mode of emplacement. However, the thick clastic intervals, above described, are in accordance with quenching of volcanic glass with abundant water and therefore indicate that quenching of the rhyolites was the

  2. Advective and diffusive contributions to reactive gas transport during pyrite oxidation in the unsaturated zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binning, Philip John; Postma, Diederik Jan; Russel, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated mine waste rock dumps and soils is limited by the supply of oxygen from the atmosphere. In models, oxygen transport through the subsurface is often assumed to be driven by diffusion. However, oxygen comprises 23.2% by mass of dry air, and when oxygen is consumed at...... parameters; for example, the time to approach steady state depends exponentially on the distance between the soil surface and the subsurface reactive zone. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union....... at depth in the unsaturated zone, a pressure gradient is created between the reactive zone and the ground surface, causing a substantial advective air flow into the subsurface. To determine the balance between advective and diffusive transport, a one-dimensional multicomponent unsaturated zone gas...

  3. The quality and quantity of runoff and groundwater in two overburden dumps undergoing pyritic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.A.; Harries, J.R.; Ritchie, A.I.M.

    1983-01-01

    The quality and quantity of runoff and seepage water from two waste rock dumps at the abandoned uranium mine at Rum Jungle, N.T., have been monitored over various time intervals since 1975. Both dumps contain pyrite which is oxidising and solubilising trace metals within the dumps. Results are presented for the quality and quantity of runoff from both dumps measured in the 1980-81 wet season. The rainfall/runoff characteristics of the two dumps measured during this wet season are similar and in good agreement with measurements made in previous wet seasons. Pollution loads in runoff were only a few per cent of pollution loads in water percolating through to the base of the dumps. The rainfall/runoff characteristics and the dominance of pollution loads in water percolating through the dumps are likely to apply to other similar waste rock dumps

  4. Energetic characterization of the photoactive FeS/sub 2/ (pyrite) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaoui, A.; Tributsch, H.

    1986-12-01

    The electronic properties of synthetic single crystalline pyrite (100) orientation are investigated. The spectral response of the photoconductivity was determined by the four point probe technique. The carrier concentration and the flat band potential are calculated from capacitance measurements, the minority carrier diffusion length is determined by photocurrent and capacitance vs voltage measurements. The results allow the construction of an energy band diagram for the FeS/sub 2//electrolyte contact. The parameters determined explain the high quantum efficiency (approx. 90%) obtained with FeS/sub 2//I/sup -/, I/sub 3//sup -/, photoelectrochemical cells (PECs). The reasons for the main deficiency (photopotentials not exceeding 200 mV at AM0) are elaborated: photogenerated charges in the interface shift the flatband potential and trap-assisted electron transfer through the barrier short-circuits it. 32 refs.

  5. The role of isomorphous substitutions in natural selenides belonging to the pyrite group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindi, Luca; Cipriani, Curzio; Pratesi, Giovanni; Trosti-Ferroni, Renza

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reports chemical and structural data of selenide minerals belonging to the pyrite group. Eighteen samples of minerals in this group with variable chemical composition (7 samples of penroseite, NiSe 2 ; 10 samples of krutaite, CuSe 2 ; 1 sample of trogtalite, CoSe 2 ) were studied by means of X-ray single-crystal diffraction and electron microprobe. On the basis of information gained from the chemical characterization, we can conclude that a complete solid solution between NiSe 2 and CuSe 2 exists in nature with the absence of pure end-members. Although verified only for the Ni-rich members, we also infer a solid solution between NiSe 2 and CoSe 2 . The unit-cell parameters were modeled using a multiple regression method as a function of the Co, Ni, and Cu contents

  6. The role of isomorphous substitutions in natural selenides belonging to the pyrite group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindi, Luca [Museo di Storia Naturale, sez. di Mineralogia e Litologia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: luca.bindi@unifi.it; Cipriani, Curzio [Museo di Storia Naturale, sez. di Mineralogia e Litologia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Pratesi, Giovanni [Museo di Storia Naturale, sez. di Mineralogia e Litologia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Trosti-Ferroni, Renza [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, I-50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2008-07-14

    The present paper reports chemical and structural data of selenide minerals belonging to the pyrite group. Eighteen samples of minerals in this group with variable chemical composition (7 samples of penroseite, NiSe{sub 2}; 10 samples of krutaite, CuSe{sub 2}; 1 sample of trogtalite, CoSe{sub 2}) were studied by means of X-ray single-crystal diffraction and electron microprobe. On the basis of information gained from the chemical characterization, we can conclude that a complete solid solution between NiSe{sub 2} and CuSe{sub 2} exists in nature with the absence of pure end-members. Although verified only for the Ni-rich members, we also infer a solid solution between NiSe{sub 2} and CoSe{sub 2}. The unit-cell parameters were modeled using a multiple regression method as a function of the Co, Ni, and Cu contents.

  7. Effects of pyrite and sphalerite on population compositions, dynamics and copper extraction efficiency in chalcopyrite bioleaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yunhua; Liu, Xueduan; Dong, Weiling; Liang, Yili; Niu, Jiaojiao; Gu, Yabing; Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhen; Yin, Huaqun

    2017-07-01

    This study used an artificial microbial community with four known moderately thermophilic acidophiles (three bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus S1, Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans ST and Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK, and one archaea, Ferroplasma thermophilum L1) to explore the variation of microbial community structure, composition, dynamics and function (e.g., copper extraction efficiency) in chalcopyrite bioleaching (C) systems with additions of pyrite (CP) or sphalerite (CS). The community compositions and dynamics in the solution and on the ore surface were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed that the addition of pyrite or sphalerite changed the microbial community composition and dynamics dramatically during the chalcopyrite bioleaching process. For example, A. caldus (above 60%) was the dominant species at the initial stage in three groups, and at the middle stage, still dominated C group (above 70%), but it was replaced by L. ferriphilum (above 60%) in CP and CS groups; at the final stage, L. ferriphilum dominated C group, while F. thermophilum dominated CP group on the ore surface. Furthermore, the additions of pyrite or sphalerite both made the increase of redox potential (ORP) and the concentrations of Fe 3+ and H + , which would affect the microbial community compositions and copper extraction efficiency. Additionally, pyrite could enhance copper extraction efficiency (e.g., improving around 13.2% on day 6) during chalcopyrite bioleaching; on the contrary, sphalerite restrained it.

  8. Model-Based Integration and Analysis of Biogeochemical and Isotopic Dynamics in a Nitrate-Polluted Pyritic Aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.C.; Prommer, H.; Slomp, C.P.; Broers, H.P.; van der Grift, B.; Passier, H.F.; Greskowiak, J.; Boettcher, M.E.; van Capellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  9. Model-based integration and analysis of biogeochemical and isotopic dynamics in a nitrate-polluted pyritic aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Prommer, H.; Broers, H.P.; Slomp, C.P.; Greskowiak, J.; Van Der Grift, B.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  10. Gelatin/DMSO. A new approach to enhancing the performance of a pyrite electrode in a lithium battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, L.A.; Rosolen, J.M. [Department of Chemistry, FFCLRP-University of Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-04-01

    We have studied the electrochemical behavior of natural pyrite (FeS{sub 1.9}, n-type semiconductor) treated nonaqueously with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solvent and also with a gelatin/DMSO solution. Composite electrodes (comprised of pyrite, polyvinilidene fluoride, polyethylene oxide and carbon) were characterized in a lithium cell at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic measurements; the electrolyte used was LiPF{sub 6} in a solution of ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate (1 mol l{sup -1}). The gelatin/DMSO treatment greatly improved the reversible specific capacity of a pyrite electrode. For galvanostatic discharge/charge at a current density of 0.4 mA cm{sup -2} and between voltage limits of 3.2 and 1.1 V, its reversible specific capacity at the 15th cycle equaled 275 mA h g{sup -1}, an impressive value compared to less than 25 mA h g{sup -1} for a pristine pyrite electrode.

  11. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Manjon, G.; Hurtado, S.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 232 Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  12. The uraninite-pyrite association, a sensitive indicator of changes in fluid chemistry: element gains and losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zachariáš, J.; Adamovič, Jiří; Konečný, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 5 (2008), s. 1159-1172 ISSN 0008-4476 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : uraninite * chemical age, * arsenian pyrite * silicification * fluid chemistry Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.136, year: 2008

  13. Field tracer test for denitrification in a pyrite-bearing schist aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, H.; Kloppmann, W.; Foucher, J.-C.; Martelat, A.; Fritsche, V.

    1998-01-01

    A small-scale artificial tracer test performed on a schist aquifer in Brittany has helped clarify mechanisms and kinetics of in situ autotrophic denitrification. NO 3 was injected as a pulse simultaneously with a conservative tracer - Br - . During the test, which lasted 210 h, 73% of the injected Br - was recovered, as against only 47% of the NO 3 . The 26% difference in the recovery of the two injected species is interpreted as being the result of denitrification, in part due to the direct oxidation of pyrite present in the solid aquifer according to the reaction: 5FeS 2 +14NO 3 - +4H + approaches7N 2 +10SO 4 2- +5Fe 2+ +2H 2 O, and in part due to subsequent iron oxidation according to the reaction: NO 3 - +5Fe 2+ +6H + approaches1/2N 2 +5Fe 3+ +3H 2 O. Despite the potential increase in SO 4 and Fe resulting from denitrification through pyrite oxidation, the concentrations of these elements in the groundwater remain moderate due to the precipitation of minerals such as jarosite and/or natroalunite. Tracer transfer takes place in a heterogeneous medium which, according to the breakthrough curves, can be simplified to a dual-porosity aquifer comprising a high-permeability (fractures or large fissures) medium of low porosity from which only minor denitrification of circulating NO 3 -bearing water was observed and a low-permeability (small fissures) medium of high porosity which induces a higher denitrification rate in the circulating NO 3 -bearing water. The kinetics of the denitrification reaction are high compared with results obtained for other environments and can be described by a first-order model with a half life of 7.9 days for the low-porosity medium and only 2.1 days for the high-porosity medium. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. Thirty-five years of geochronology in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, J.; Campal, N; Hartmann, L.A; Schipilov, A.; Pineyro, D

    2001-01-01

    The radiometric ages obtained abroad have been systematically integrated with the field geology over the last thirty five years. The difference between the radiometric ages and their geochronology interpretation was realized rather early in the investigations. The few opportunities for radiometric determinations of rocks and minerals required careful regional geological mapping, based on models which were predominant at the time. Untial 1965, the pre-Devonian rocks in Uruguay were divided into Archean and Algonkian. The Archean units included medium metamorphic grade rocks and all the plutonic rocks. The Algonkian units were the low metamorphic grade supracrustal belts. The tectono-stratigraphic proposal presented at the International Geological Congress in India (1960) induced the division into two orogenic cycles and the radiometric dating with the techniques available at the time: K-Ar already in use and Rb-Sr isochrons, which were considered accurate and precise. The work of Hart (1966) resulted in ten ages, grouped in two geographically separated age sets: 600-500 Ma in the southeast and ca. 2000 Ma in the south and southwest. Bossi et al. (1967) identified two orogenic cycles based on geological mapping at the 1:250,000 scale, no intermediate ages. These cycles were recognized until 1991, although some improvements occurred in limits of units and cartography and some changes in nomenclature and integration of the Rb-Sr isotopic data by Umpierre and Halpern (1971), Soliani Jr. (1986), Renne (1991, pers. comm.). The proposal of a Trans-Amazonian craton in the west (Ciclo Orogenico Antiguo) and a mobile belt in the east (Ciclo Orogenico Moderno) was accepted for 25 years. Many Brazilian (e.g., Fragoso Cesar, 1980) and some Uruguayan authors included the 'Ciclo Orogenico Moderno in the Brasiliano Cycle of Almeida (1976). The consistency of this proposal has been accepted up to today, because 800-550 Ma granitic rocks are intruded in low metamorphic grade

  15. Model-based analysis of δ34S signatures to trace sedimentary pyrite oxidation during managed aquifer recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Simone; Descourvieres, Carlos; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Deng, Hailin; Prommer, Henning

    2017-05-01

    The oxidation of pyrite is often one of the main drivers affecting groundwater quality during managed aquifer recharge in deep aquifers. Data and techniques that allow detailed identification and quantification of pyrite oxidation are therefore crucial for assessing and predicting the adverse water quality changes that may be associated with this process. In this study, we explore the benefits of combining stable sulphur isotope analysis with reactive transport modelling to improve the identification and characterisation of pyrite oxidation during an aquifer storage and recovery experiment in a chemically and physically heterogeneous aquifer. We characterise the stable sulphur isotope signal (δ34S) in both the ambient groundwater and the injectant as well as its spatial distribution within the sedimentary sulphur species. The identified stable sulphur isotope signal for pyrite was found to vary between -32 and +34‰, while the signal of the injectant ranged between +9.06 and +14.45‰ during the injection phase of the experiment. Both isotope and hydrochemical data together suggest a substantial contribution of pyrite oxidation to the observed, temporally variable δ34S signals. The variability of the δ34S signal in pyrite and the injectant were both found to complicate the analysis of the stable isotope data. However, the incorporation of the data into a numerical modelling approach allowed to successfully employ the δ34S signatures as a valuable additional constraint for identifying and quantifying the contribution of pyrite oxidation to the redox transformations that occur in response to the injection of oxygenated water.

  16. Terrestrial sedimentary pyrites as a potential source of trace metal release to groundwater – A case study from the Emsland, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houben, Georg J.; Sitnikova, Maria A.; Post, Vincent E.A.

    2017-01-01

    Pyrite is a common minor constituent of terrestrial freshwater sediments and a sink for trace elements. Different amounts and morphological types (framboids and euhedral crystals) of sedimentary pyrites were found in the heavy mineral fraction of cores obtained from several drillholes located in the Emsland region, NW Germany. Their trace element contents were investigated to assess their potential for groundwater contamination after oxidation, e.g. induced by dewatering or autotrophic denitrification. Nickel, arsenic and cadmium were found in significant concentrations in pyrite. Geochemical modeling showed that elevated trace metal concentrations in groundwater, potentially exceeding drinking water standards, should preferentially occur in a less than 1 m thick zone situated around the depth of the redoxcline, where nitrate is reduced by pyrite. This was confirmed by depth-specific groundwater sampling in the Emsland and by previously published studies. The absolute concentration of released trace metals depends on their content in the pyrite but also strongly on the nitrate load of groundwater. - Highlights: • Pyrite from heavy mineral fraction of aquifer sediment analyzed for trace metal content. • Pyrites contain significant concentration of trace metals, such as nickel, arsenic, cadmium. • Trace elements are released by autotrophic denitrification. • Reactive transport model predicts small zone of trace element accumulation. • Release of trace elements strongly dependent on nitrate content of groundwater.

  17. Geochronology and petrogenesis of the Early Cretaceous A-type granite from the Feie'shan W-Sn deposit in the eastern Guangdong Province, SE China: Implications for W-Sn mineralization and geodynamic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Mao, Jingwen; Santosh, M.; Bao, Zhian; Zeng, Xiaojian; Jia, Lihui

    2018-02-01

    The Feie'shan greisen-type W-Sn deposit in the eastern Guangdong Province forms part of the Southeastern Coastal Metallogenic Belt (SCMB) in South China. Here we present zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology of the biotite granite which shows a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 134.7 ± 2.0 Ma, consistent with the zircon U-Pb, biotite 40Ar-39Ar and molybdenite Re-Os ages in the previous study. The biotite granite is peraluminous and belongs to high-K calc-alkaline type. It is characterized by high SiO2, K2O, F, K2O + Na2O and FeOt/(FeOt + MgO), and low CaO, MgO, TiO2 and P2O5 contents, enrichment in Rb, Cs, Th and U, and depletion in Ba, Sr, Zr, Ti and P, with flat REE patterns and distinctly negative Eu anomalies, showing an A2-type affinity. The rocks also display extremely low Ba, Sr and Ti concentrations and high Rb/Sr, Rb/Ba and low CaO/(Na2O + K2O) ratios, indicating high degree of fractionation. Zircon grains from the granite have low Eu/Eu* and Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios, suggesting low oxygen fugacity. The highly fractionated and reduced features imply that the Feie'shan mineralization is genetically related to the biotite granite. The εNd(t) values and zircon εHf(t) values of the biotite granite range from - 2.96 to - 1.95 and - 5.69 to 0.62, with two-stage Nd and Hf model ages (TDM2) of 1083 to 1164 Ma and 1150 to 1552 Ma, indicating that they were derived from magma hybridization between anatectic granitic and mantle-derived mafic magmas. In combination with previous studies, we propose a geodynamic model for the 145―135 Ma W-Sn mineral system and related magmatism in the southwestern domain of the SCMB. After ca. 145 Ma, the subduction orientation of the Izanagi plate changed from oblique to parallel with respect to the continental margin resulting in large-scale lithosphere extension and thinning, which led to the upwelling of asthenosphere. The ascending mantle-derived mafic magmas provided not only supplied the heat for crustal remelting but also added

  18. Archean evolution of Enderby Land (Antarctica) and isotope-geochronological evidences for its ancient history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, D.P.; Belyatskij, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    Revew of published isotope-geochronological data on Ender by Land (Antarctica), which is the region of highly metamorphic formations predominant development which includes ancient rock relicts, is presented. Three tectonic-thermal events present the Archeau evolution in the region. Correlation of isotope-geochronological (U-Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd) data with micro textural processing allows to estimate tectonic-thermal events age: 3000-3100 about 2900 and about 2500 million years. Metamorphism of 3000-3100 million years age has essentially modified all the isotope systems, while model calculations for evolution of U-Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd systems have shown that rocks primary formation accurred 3500-3900 million years ago

  19. The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE): In Situ Geochronology for Planetary Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Potassium (K) - Argon (Ar) Laser Experiment (KArLE) will make in situ noble-gas geochronology measurements aboard planetary robotic landers and roverss. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to measure the K abun-dance in a sample and to release its noble gases; the evolved Ar is measured by mass spectrometry (MS); and rela-tive K content is related to absolute Ar abundance by sample mass, determined by optical measurement of the ablated volume. KArLE measures a whole-rock K-Ar age to 10% or better for rocks 2 Ga or older, sufficient to resolve the absolute age of many planetary samples. The LIBS-MS approach is attractive because the analytical components have been flight proven, do not require further technical development, and provide complementary measurements as well as in situ geochronology.

  20. Geochronology of Cenozoic rocks in the Bodie Hills, California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Robert J.; du Bray, Edward A.; John, David A.; Vikre, Peter G.; Cosca, Michael A.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Box, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present geochronologic data for unaltered volcanic rocks, hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, and mineral deposits of the Miocene Bodie Hills and Pliocene to Pleistocene Aurora volcanic fields of east-central California and west-central Nevada. Most of the data presented here were derived from samples collected between 2000–13, but some of the geochronologic data, compiled from a variety of sources, pertain to samples collected during prior investigations. New data presented here (tables 1 and 2; Appendixes 1–3) were acquired in three U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 40Ar/39Ar labs by three different geochronologists: Robert J. Fleck (Menlo Park, CA), Lawrence W. Snee (Denver, CO), and Michael A. Cosca (Denver, CO). Analytical methods and data derived from each of these labs are presented separately.

  1. Contribution to the geochronological pile of the setentrional portion of Ribeira folded belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, J.J.; Kawashita, K.

    1985-01-01

    Six new Rb-Sr isochrons on samples of rocks of the setentrional portion of the Ribeira folded belt are presented and discussed with others geochronological and geological data. The main object of this study is the search of the understanding of the geodynamic evolution of this Region using the Rb-Sr method. The results obtained for the K-Ar and U-Pb, in other papers, are also commented. The integrated analysis of the date deals with the charnocketic, gneissic - migmatitic and magmatic rocks. All the data are refered to the Brasiliano cicle (Upper Precambrian), and thus, the geochronological pattern points out to an important event in the generation of the geologic processes for the brasilian geotectonic unit. (Author) [pt

  2. The geotectonic evolution of the Northeastern Minas Gerais, based in geochronological interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siga Junior, O.

    1986-01-01

    This work tries to show the potential of the Rb-Sr, K-Ar, Pb-Pb and U-Pb methods applied to basic geological maping. The different interpretative values of these methodologies contribute to the understanding of the tectonic processes developed in the southeastern border of the Sao Francisco Craton (northeastern Minas Gerais and southern Bahia). The geochronological data for this region represents sampling of the several lithological units characterized and corresponds to about 230 determinations. The radiometric age distribution pattern together with other geological information suggest the subdivision into two main geochronological domains: the external Brazilian domain (at the western portion) and the internal Brazilian domain (at the center-eastern part). (author) [pt

  3. High-energy particle emission from galena and pyrite bombarded with Cs and O ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpuzov, D.S.; McIntyre, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    The ejection of energetic particles during steady-state ion surface bombardment has been investigated by means of a dynamic computer simulation as well as in a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)/low-energy ion scattering from surfaces (LEIS) experiment. The emphasis of this comparative study is on the mass dependence of high-energy tails in sputtering and backscattering for the bombardment of galena (PbS) and pyrite (FeS 2 ) with keV energy ion beam of cesium and oxygen. In the experiment, kinetic energy distributions of sputtered secondary ions (S + , Fe + , Pb + , S - ), as well as backscattered or re-sputtered primary ions (Cs + , O + , O - ), have been measured on a modified Cameca IMS-3f magnetic sector mass spectrometer for keV cesium (Cs + ) and oxygen (O 2 + , O - ) bombardment of galena and pyrite. Ejection of high-energy particles, with emission energies of up to ∼40% or up to ∼60% of the bombarding energy for sputtering of the lighter component (S ± ) with cesium or oxygen, respectively, and of up to ∼40% (Cs + ) and ∼80% (O ± ) for backscattering, has been observed for PbS. The computer simulations were based on the well-known MARLOWE code. In order to model the change of the stoichiometry of the binary compounds, dynamic modification of the target composition in the near-surface region was introduced. Cs incorporation was included, and a relative enrichment of the metallic component (Pb, Fe) in the top few layers due to preferential sputtering of sulfur was allowed. The computer simulations provide information on the formation of altered layer under sputter equilibrium as well as on the energy and angular emission distributions of sputtered and backscattered particles in steady-state conditions. Multiple scattering of Cs projectiles and dynamic re-sputtering of cesium that was previously incorporated in the altered near-surface region can be distinguished in the simulation, and matched with the experimental observations. In addition

  4. Biomarkers in sediments. The racemization/epiremitation of amino acids like tool in geochronology and paleothermometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, T.; Llamas, F. J.; Canoira, L.; Garcia-Alonso, P.; Ortiz, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The study of amino acids as biomarkers in sediments has become a necessary methodology and tool for the analysis of palaeoenvironmental conditions and, therefore, of climatic evolution in the past. Research based on the selection and analysis of geological biomarkers, and more specifically activities relating to the racemization/epimerization of amino acids, makes it possible to obtain the geochronological and photoelectrochemical data required to establish different hypotheses for Long-Term Performance Assessment of a repository for high level radioactive wastes

  5. Breaking through the uncertainty ceiling in LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstwood, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sources of systematic uncertainty associated with session-to-session bias are the dominant contributor to the 2% (2s) uncertainty ceiling that currently limits the accuracy of LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology. Sources include differential downhole fractionation (LIEF), `matrix effects' and ablation volume differences, which result in irreproducibility of the same reference material across sessions. Current mitigation methods include correcting for LIEF mathematically, using matrix-matched reference materials, annealing material to reduce or eliminate radiation damage effects and tuning for robust plasma conditions. Reducing the depth and volume of ablation can also mitigate these problems and should contribute to the reduction of the uncertainty ceiling. Reducing analysed volume leads to increased detection efficiency, reduced matrix-effects, eliminates LIEF, obviates ablation rate differences and reduces the likelihood of intercepting complex growth zones with depth, thereby apparently improving material homogeneity. High detection efficiencies (% level) and low sampling volumes (20um box, 1-2um deep) can now be achieved using MC-ICP-MS such that low volume ablations should be considered part of the toolbox of methods targeted at improving the reproducibility of LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology. In combination with other strategies these improvements should be feasible on any ICP platform. However, reducing the volume of analysis reduces detected counts and requires a change of analytical approach in order to mitigate this. Appropriate strategies may include the use of high efficiency cell and torch technologies and the optimisation of acquisition protocols and data handling techniques such as condensing signal peaks, using log ratios and total signal integration. The tools required to break the 2% (2s) uncertainty ceiling in LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology are likely now known but require a coherent strategy and change of approach to combine their implementation and realise

  6. Geochronology database for New Zealand rocks (2nd edition) : 1961-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, S.; Thurlow, C.; Warnes, P.N.; Zucchetto, R.

    2000-01-01

    A bibliography and database of radiometric ages on rocks in the New Zealand region, published between 1961-1999 has been prepared as a joint project between the Geochemical, Isotopic and Geochronology Database of the Geological Society of New Zealand and the Geologic Mapping Programme of the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Over 3800 entries are included. Separate tables also document over 200 K-Ar ages that have not been previously published. (author). 237 refs

  7. Geochemical geochronology and genesis of granite from Coronel Murta, Northeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A.C.P.; Siga Junior, O.

    1987-01-01

    Geological, petrographic, geochemical (including rare-earth elements) and geochronological data of the Coronel Murta (Northeast Minas Gerais State) post-tectonic intrusive alkalic granites were summarized in order to discuss their genesis. This paper shows that Coronel Murta granites were generated by anatexis of dominantly metasedimentary rocks, in an ensialic environment, as the late results of an intraplate A-type subduction during the Brazilian Cycle. (author) [pt

  8. Development of the Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE) Instrument for In Situ Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Li, Z.-H.; Miller, J. S.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Clegg, S. M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Swindle, T. D.; Wiens, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute dating of planetary samples is an essential tool to establish the chronology of geological events, including crystallization history, magmatic evolution, and alteration. Traditionally, geochronology has only been accomplishable on samples from dedicated sample return missions or meteorites. The capability for in situ geochronology is highly desired, because it will allow one-way planetary missions to perform dating of large numbers of samples. The success of an in situ geochronology package will not only yield data on absolute ages, but can also complement sample return missions by identifying the most interesting rocks to cache and/or return to Earth. In situ dating instruments have been proposed, but none have yet reached TRL 6 because the required high-resolution isotopic measurements are very challenging. Our team is now addressing this challenge by developing the Potassium (K) - Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE) under the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP), building on previous work to develop a K-Ar in situ instrument [1]. KArLE uses a combination of several flight-proven components that enable accurate K-Ar isochron dating of planetary rocks. KArLE will ablate a rock sample, determine the K in the plasma state using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), measure the liberated Ar using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS), and relate the two by the volume of the ablated pit using an optical method such as a vertical scanning interferometer (VSI). Our preliminary work indicates that the KArLE instrument will be capable of determining the age of several kinds of planetary samples to +/-100 Myr, sufficient to address a wide range of geochronology problems in planetary science.

  9. First-principles studies of electronic, transport and bulk properties of pyrite FeS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipendra Banjara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present results from first principle, local density approximation (LDA calculations of electronic, transport, and bulk properties of iron pyrite (FeS2. Our non-relativistic computations employed the Ceperley and Alder LDA potential and the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO formalism. The implementation of the LCAO formalism followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams (BZW method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF. We discuss the electronic energy bands, total and partial densities of states, electron effective masses, and the bulk modulus. Our calculated indirect band gap of 0.959 eV (0.96, using an experimental lattice constant of 5.4166 Å, at room temperature, is in agreement with the measured indirect values, for bulk samples, ranging from 0.84 eV to 1.03 ± 0.05 eV. Our calculated bulk modulus of 147 GPa is practically in agreement with the experimental value of 145 GPa. The calculated, partial densities of states reproduced the splitting of the Fe d bands to constitute the dominant upper most valence and lower most conduction bands, separated by the generally accepted, indirect, experimental band gap of 0.95 eV.

  10. The leaching of base minerals from the calcines produced by the roasting of pyrite concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, M.J.; Filmer, A.O.

    1985-01-01

    A number of gold and uranium plants in South Africa concentrate the pyrite in the ore residue by flotation and roast the concentrate for the production of sulphuric acid. The calcine produced, which is predominantly hematite, is generally subjected to cyanidation for the recovery of gold and silver. The calcines often contain economically significant quantities of copper, nickel , cobalt and uranium. Prior treatment of the calcine for the recovery of these metals would be desirable in terms of the value of the products. Several processes for the leaching of the base metals from plant calcines have been investigated, and an important general conclusion is that an adequate recovery of the base metals requires that a large proportion of the iron should also be extracted. This observation led to a more extensive investigation of the kinetics of leaching of various iron oxides. The application of electrochemical theory and techniques resulted in a fuller understanding of the various factors that govern the rate of leaching of iron oxides. As a result of this fundamental work, alternative treatment schemes that should yield more efficient extraction from calcines were suggested. Several of these possibilities were investigated, and the most promising were found to require reducing conditions during the leach, or prior partial reduction of the calcine to magnetite or wustite

  11. Quantifying Fenton reaction pathways driven by self-generated H2O2 on pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lozano, C.; Davila, A. F.; Losa-Adams, E.; Fairén, A. G.; Gago-Duport, L.

    2017-03-01

    Oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) plays a significant role in the redox cycling of iron and sulfur on Earth and is the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD). It has been established that this process involves multi-step electron-transfer reactions between surface defects and adsorbed O2 and H2O, releasing sulfoxy species (e.g., S2O32-, SO42-) and ferrous iron (Fe2+) to the solution and also producing intermediate by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, our understanding of the kinetics of these transient species is still limited. We investigated the kinetics of H2O2 formation in aqueous suspensions of FeS2 microparticles by monitoring, in real time, the H2O2 and dissolved O2 concentration under oxic and anoxic conditions using amperometric microsensors. Additional spectroscopic and structural analyses were done to track the dependencies between the process of FeS2 dissolution and the degradation of H2O2 through the Fenton reaction. Based on our experimental results, we built a kinetic model which explains the observed trend of H2O2, showing that FeS2 dissolution can act as a natural Fenton reagent, influencing the oxidation of third-party species during the long term evolution of geochemical systems, even in oxygen-limited environments.

  12. Environmental regulatory failure and metal contamination at the Giap Lai pyrite mine, Northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkan Tarras-Wahlberg, N; Nguyen, Lan T

    2008-03-01

    The causes for the failure in enforcement of environmental regulations at the Giap Lai pyrite mine in northern Vietnam are considered and the environmental impacts that are associated with this mine are evaluated. It is shown that sulphide-rich tailings and waste rock in the mining area represent significant sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). The ARD is causing elevated metal levels in downstream water bodies, which in turn, represent a threat to both human health and to aquatic ecosystems. Metal concentrations in impacted surface waters have increased after mine closure, suggesting that impacts are becoming progressively more serious. No post-closure, remediation measures have been applied at the mine, in spite of the existence of environmental legislation and both central and regional institutions charged with environmental supervision and control. The research presented here provides further emphasis for the recommendation that, while government institutions may need to be strengthened, and environmental regulations need to be in place, true on the ground improvement in environmental quality in Vietnam and in many other developing countries require an increased focus on promoting public awareness of industrial environmental issues.

  13. Resilient carbon encapsulation of iron pyrite (FeS2) cathodes in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tara S.; Tussing, Matthew; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan

    2015-01-01

    Converting iron pyrite (FeS2) from a non-cyclable to a cyclable cathode material for lithium ion batteries has been an ongoing challenge in recent years. Herein we report a promising mitigation strategy: wet-chemistry based conformal encapsulation of synthetic FeS2 nanocrystals in a resilient carbon (RC) matrix (FeS2@RC). The FeS2@RC composite was fabricated by dispersing autoclave-synthesized FeS2 nanocrystals in an aqueous glucose solution, polymerizing the glucose in a hydrothermal reactor, and finally heating the polymer/FeS2 composite in a tube furnace to partially carbonize the polymer. The FeS2@RC electrodes showed superior cyclability compared with the FeS2 electrodes, that is, 25% versus 1% of retention at the 20th cycle. Based on electrochemical analysis, XRD study, and SEM characterization, the performance enhancement was attributed to RC's ability to accommodate volume fluctuation, enhance charge transfer, alleviate detrimental side reactions, and suppress loss of the active material. Furthermore, the remaining issues associated with the current system were identified and future research directions were proposed.

  14. Restoration of pyritic colliery waste with sewage sludge in the Midlands coalfield, England, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, R.N.; McQuire, G.E.; Sly, M.

    1994-01-01

    A trial was set up in 1990 in the Midlands coalfield in the United Kingdom (UK) to evaluate the use of sewage sludge to revegetate colliery waste tips containing 1--2% sulfur as iron pyrites. The rate of sewage sludge application is currently restricted by legislation and codes of practice to maximum concentrations of potentially toxic elements (copper, nickel, zinc, etc.) in the soil or waste after application. Following this guidance, an application rate of 250 mt/ha dry solids was applied at the trial site. At this rate, the colliery waste became extremely acidic pH <4.0. From experience elsewhere, much higher levels have been found to be necessary to control acidification in the absence of other measures or treatments. In view of the restriction on the amount of sewage sludge that can be applied, it is recommended that the current practice of covering fresh colliery wastes with soil or low sulfur spoil to a minimum depth of 0.45m is continued in the UK. Where this is not possible, the sludge must always be applied with sufficient neutralizing agent to control the potential acidity. If the acidity cannot be maintained above pH 5.0, the guidelines do not permit the application of sewage sludge

  15. Theoretical growth of framboidal and sunflower pyrite using the R-package frambgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merinero, Raul; Cárdenes, Víctor

    2017-12-01

    Framboids and sunflowers are the most ubiquitous shapes of sedimentary pyrite. Framboids are spherical aggregates of nanocrystals, while sunflowers are formed by overgrowth of framboids and represent intermediate stages in the transformation of framboids into euhedrae. The characterization of the size populations of these shapes provides critical information about the paleoredox conditions at time of formation and the subsequent changes in these conditions. This paper describes in detail an algorithm designed to model the growth and generate significant populations of both framboids and sunflowers, using functions of the statistical software R. The source code is provided as supplementary material to this paper. The algorithm uses several growth mechanisms based on dependence on or independence of the number of nanocrystals for framboids and the external diameter for sunflowers. Variability in the generated size populations depends on several parameters of the algorithm, such as the diameter of the nanocrystals, the initial diameter of the framboids and the maximum value of the random numbers. The resulting populations of framboids and sunflowers can be compared with data obtained from analysis of real samples in order to understand and model the genetic paleo-processes.

  16. Ore prospecting in the Iberian Pyrite Belt using seismic and potential-field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, João; Pinto, Carlos; Sousa, Pedro; Matos, João Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Ore prospecting using gravimetric and magnetic data has become one of the traditional approaches used in past decades, often complemented with electric and electromagnetic methods. However, due to the problem of non-uniqueness inherent to potential-field modelling, constraints provided by structural methods such as seismic reflection are often used. During the exploration of polymetallic massive sulfide minerals in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, Figueira de Cavaleiros sector, located in the Sado Tertiary Basin, several gravimetric and magnetic anomalies were considered to be interesting targets. In order to reduce any ambiguity in the gravimetric modelling and to confirm the geological model of the area, two seismic reflection profiles were acquired. The interpretation of these profiles was assisted by three mechanical boreholes, two of which were located in the research area to make a seismostratigraphic interpretation. Unfortunately, the gravimetric modelling suggests that the anomaly has a lithological and structural origin and is not related to massive sulfides. Nevertheless, a good agreement between the seismic and potential-field data was achieved and new insights into the geological model for the region were obtained from this work, with accurate data about the Tertiary cover and Palaeozoic basement

  17. Leachability and physical stability of solidified and stabilized pyrite cinder sludge from dye effluent treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerkez Đurđa V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with exploring the possibilities of using solidification/stabilization (S/S treatment for toxic sludge generated in dye effluent treatment, when pyrite cinder is used as catalytic iron source in the modified heterogeneous Fenton process. S/S treatment was performed by using different clay materials (kaolin, bentonite and native clay from the territory of Vojvodina and fly ash in order to immobilize toxic metals and arsenic presented in sludge. For the evaluation of the extraction potential of toxic metals and the effectiveness of the S/S treatment applied, four single-step leaching tests were performed. Leaching test results indicated that all applied S/S treatments were effective in immobilizing toxic metals and arsenic presented in sludge. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of pozzolanic products, and compressive strength measurement proved the treatment efficacy. It can be concluded that the S/S technique has significant potential for solving the problem of hazardous industrial waste and its safe disposal. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43005 i br. TR37004

  18. Mycorrhizal Fungal Community of Poplars Growing on Pyrite Tailings Contaminated Site near the River Timok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Katanić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Mycorrhizal fungi are of high importance for functioning of forest ecosystems and they could be used as indicators of environmental stress. The aim of this research was to analyze ectomycorrhizal community structure and to determine root colonization rate with ectomycorrhizal, arbuscular mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi of poplars growing on pyrite tailings contaminated site near the river Timok (Eastern Serbia. Materials and Methods: Identification of ectomycorrhizal types was performed by combining morphological and anatomical characterization of ectomycorrhizae with molecular identification approach, based on sequencing of the nuclear ITS rRNA region. Also, colonization of poplar roots with ectomycorrhizal, arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septated endophytic fungi were analysed with intersection method. Results and Conclusions: Physico-chemical analyses of soil from studied site showed unfavourable water properties of soil, relatively low pH and high content of heavy metals (copper and zinc. In investigated samples only four different ectomycorrhizal fungi were found. To the species level were identified Thelephora terrestris and Tomentella ellisi, while two types remained unidentified. Type Thelephora terrestris made up 89% of all ectomycorrhizal roots on studied site. Consequently total values of Species richness index and Shannon-Weaver diversity index were 0.80 and 0.43, respectively. No structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were recorded. Unfavourable environmental conditions prevailing on investigated site caused decrease of ectomycorrhizal types diversity. Our findings point out that mycorrhyzal fungal community could be used as an appropriate indicator of environmental changes.

  19. Phytoremediation trials on metal- and arsenic-contaminated pyrite wastes (Torviscosa, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vamerali, Teofilo [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Parma, Viale G.P. Usberti 11/A, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: teofilo.vamerali@unipd.it; Bandiera, Marianna; Coletto, Lucia; Zanetti, Federica [Department of Environmental Agronomy and Crop Sciences, University of Padova, Viale dell' Universita 16, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Dickinson, Nicholas M. [Faculty of Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool, L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Mosca, Giuliano [Department of Environmental Agronomy and Crop Sciences, University of Padova, Viale dell' Universita 16, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    At a site in Udine, Italy, a 0.7 m layer of As, Co, Cu, Pb and Zn contaminated wastes derived from mineral roasting for sulphur extraction had been covered with an unpolluted 0.15 m layer of gravelly soil. This study investigates whether woody biomass phytoremediation is a realistic management option. Comparing ploughing and subsoiling (0.35 m depth), the growth of Populus and Salix and trace element uptake were investigated in both pot and field trials. Species differences were marginal and species selection was not critical. Impaired above-ground productivity and low translocation of trace elements showed that bioavailable contaminant stripping was not feasible. The most significant finding was of coarse and fine roots proliferation in surface layers that provided a significant sink for trace elements. We conclude that phytostabilisation and effective immobilisation of metals and As could be achieved at the site by soil amelioration combined with woody species establishment. Confidence to achieve a long-term and sustainable remediation requires a more complete quantification of root dynamics and a better understanding of rhizosphere processes. - In As- and metal-contaminated pyrite wastes, contaminant stripping is not feasible, and root foraging and quantification of root dynamics holds the key to stabilisation in woody species.

  20. Phytoremediation trials on metal- and arsenic-contaminated pyrite wastes (Torviscosa, Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vamerali, Teofilo; Bandiera, Marianna; Coletto, Lucia; Zanetti, Federica; Dickinson, Nicholas M.; Mosca, Giuliano

    2009-01-01

    At a site in Udine, Italy, a 0.7 m layer of As, Co, Cu, Pb and Zn contaminated wastes derived from mineral roasting for sulphur extraction had been covered with an unpolluted 0.15 m layer of gravelly soil. This study investigates whether woody biomass phytoremediation is a realistic management option. Comparing ploughing and subsoiling (0.35 m depth), the growth of Populus and Salix and trace element uptake were investigated in both pot and field trials. Species differences were marginal and species selection was not critical. Impaired above-ground productivity and low translocation of trace elements showed that bioavailable contaminant stripping was not feasible. The most significant finding was of coarse and fine roots proliferation in surface layers that provided a significant sink for trace elements. We conclude that phytostabilisation and effective immobilisation of metals and As could be achieved at the site by soil amelioration combined with woody species establishment. Confidence to achieve a long-term and sustainable remediation requires a more complete quantification of root dynamics and a better understanding of rhizosphere processes. - In As- and metal-contaminated pyrite wastes, contaminant stripping is not feasible, and root foraging and quantification of root dynamics holds the key to stabilisation in woody species

  1. Mössbauer study of the effect of gamma irradiation on the removal of pyrite from Colombian coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejía, J A; Palacio, C A; Caballero, F Reyes; Dávila, H Olaya; Ovalle, S A Martínez; De Grave, E

    2014-01-01

    The removal of sulfur from the coals is necessary before using it. It is due to the environmental and technological problems that it causes. In this work, the results of the study by Mössbauer spectroscopy of the gamma-irradiation effect on the pyrite in three Colombian coals are analyzed. They were exposed to different gamma-irradiation doses using a 60 Co source

  2. Surface chemistry of pyrite during the pre-processing for the flotation in alkaline sodium carbonate medium during uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudert, A.; Sommer, H.; Schubert, H.

    1991-01-01

    It is often necessary during processing of uranium ore to flotate pyrite at sodium carbonate alkaline pH value caused by the subsequent hydrometallurgical process stages. It was found out by ESCA analyses that the pyrite surface changes chemically prior to the addition of flotation agents. FeS 2 becomes FeO within a few hours in the case of storage in process water; limonite and/or geothite result from pyrite. The copper ions of the activator CuSO 4 are exclusively monovalent on the pyrite surface. The resulting heavy metal xanthogenate is Cu(I) xanthogenate. Conclusions are derived for the flotation practice for the intensification of the reagent regime. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Origin of the subduction-related Carboniferous intrusions associated with the Yandong porphyry Cu deposit in eastern Tianshan, NW China: constraints from geology, geochronology, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-O isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Hong; Xue, Chun-Ji; Liu, Jia-Jun; Zhang, Fang-Fang

    2018-06-01

    The Yandong porphyry Cu deposit is located at the south margin of the Dananhu-Tousuquan arc belt in eastern Tianshan, northwest China. The Cu ores comprise mainly disseminations and vein zones in the potassic and phyllic alteration zones, and are predominantly hosted in diorite porphyry, tonalite, and quartz porphyry, which intruded into Carboniferous Qi'eshan Group volcanic rocks. The U-Pb ages indicate that four intrusions were emplaced between 338.6 ± 2.9 and 326.1 ± 2.6 Ma. Five molybdenite samples yield Re-Os model ages of 333.8-329.5 Ma with a weighted average age of 331.8 ± 2.1 Ma. Fourteen pyrite samples have 206Pb/204Pb of 17.776-18.959, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.410-15.534, and 208Pb/204Pb of 37.323-38.127, similar to the age-corrected data of the Yandong tonalite. The tonalite shows adakite-like characteristics (e.g., high Sr/Y ratios and low Y contents), and has positive ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t) values, and low zircon O isotopes (3.7-4.6 ‰), suggesting that the melt was derived from partial melting of a subducted oceanic slab followed by mantle peridotite interaction. The diorite porphyry exhibits high Mg# and low Sr/Y values, slightly negative Eu anomalies, and positive ɛHf(t) values, indicating a lithospheric mantle source. The quartz porphyry, with stronger negative Eu anomalies, less evolved ɛHf(t) values, and low δ18O values (4.7-5.5 ‰), was probably derived from mantle melts that experienced mixing with lower crustal materials (melts or assimilation). The new data suggest that the Yandong intrusions formed in an arc setting. As the tonalite is genetically linked to the Cu mineralization, subduction-related slab melts must have played a key role in the formation of the Yandong deposit.

  4. Origin of the subduction-related Carboniferous intrusions associated with the Yandong porphyry Cu deposit in eastern Tianshan, NW China: constraints from geology, geochronology, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-O isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Hong; Xue, Chun-Ji; Liu, Jia-Jun; Zhang, Fang-Fang

    2017-10-01

    The Yandong porphyry Cu deposit is located at the south margin of the Dananhu-Tousuquan arc belt in eastern Tianshan, northwest China. The Cu ores comprise mainly disseminations and vein zones in the potassic and phyllic alteration zones, and are predominantly hosted in diorite porphyry, tonalite, and quartz porphyry, which intruded into Carboniferous Qi'eshan Group volcanic rocks. The U-Pb ages indicate that four intrusions were emplaced between 338.6 ± 2.9 and 326.1 ± 2.6 Ma. Five molybdenite samples yield Re-Os model ages of 333.8-329.5 Ma with a weighted average age of 331.8 ± 2.1 Ma. Fourteen pyrite samples have 206Pb/204Pb of 17.776-18.959, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.410-15.534, and 208Pb/204Pb of 37.323-38.127, similar to the age-corrected data of the Yandong tonalite. The tonalite shows adakite-like characteristics (e.g., high Sr/Y ratios and low Y contents), and has positive ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t) values, and low zircon O isotopes (3.7-4.6 ‰), suggesting that the melt was derived from partial melting of a subducted oceanic slab followed by mantle peridotite interaction. The diorite porphyry exhibits high Mg# and low Sr/Y values, slightly negative Eu anomalies, and positive ɛHf(t) values, indicating a lithospheric mantle source. The quartz porphyry, with stronger negative Eu anomalies, less evolved ɛHf(t) values, and low δ18O values (4.7-5.5 ‰), was probably derived from mantle melts that experienced mixing with lower crustal materials (melts or assimilation). The new data suggest that the Yandong intrusions formed in an arc setting. As the tonalite is genetically linked to the Cu mineralization, subduction-related slab melts must have played a key role in the formation of the Yandong deposit.

  5. Whole rock and discrete pyrite geochemistry as complementary tracers of ancient ocean chemistry: An example from the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Daniel D.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Large, Ross R.; Jiang, Ganqing; Stepanov, Aleksandr S.; Diamond, Charles W.; Figueroa, Maria C.; Olin, Paul

    2017-11-01

    The trace element content of pyrite is a recently developed proxy for metal abundance in paleo-oceans. Previous studies have shown that the results broadly match those of whole rock studies through geologic time. However, no detailed study has evaluated the more traditional proxies for ocean chemistry for comparison to pyrite trace element data from the same samples. In this study we compare pyrite trace element data from 14 samples from the Wuhe section of the Ediacaran-age Doushantuo Formation, south China, measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with new and existing whole rock trace element concentrations; total organic carbon; Fe mineral speciation; S isotope ratios; and pyrite textural relationships. This approach allows for comparison of data for individual trace elements within the broader environmental context defined by the other chemical parameters. The results for discrete pyrite analyses show that several chalcophile and siderophile elements (Ag, Sb, Se, Pb, Cd, Te, Bi, Mo, Ni, and Au) vary among the samples with patterns that mirror those of the independent whole rock data. A comparison with existing databases for sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite allows us to discriminate between signatures of changing ocean conditions and those of known hydrothermal sources. In the case of the Wuhe samples, the observed patterns for trace element variation point to primary marine controls rather than higher temperature processes. Specifically, our new data are consistent with previous arguments for pulses of redox sensitive trace elements interpreted to be due to marine oxygenation against a backdrop of mostly O2-poor conditions in the Ediacaran ocean-with important implications for the availability of bioessential elements. The agreement between the pyrite and whole rock data supports the use of trace element content of pyrite as a tracer of ocean chemistry in ways that complement existing approaches, while also opening additional

  6. Invisible and microscopic gold in pyrite: Methods and new data for massive sulfide ores of the Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikentyev, I. V.

    2015-07-01

    Au speciation in sulfides (including "invisible" Au), which mostly controls the loss of Au during ore dressing, is discussed. Modern methods of analysis of Au speciation, with discussion of limitations by locality and sensitivity, are reviewed. The results of sulfide investigation by the methods of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, mass spectrometric analysis with laser ablation (LA-ICP-MS), the thermochemical method (study of ionic Au speciation), and automated "quantitative mineralogy," are demonstrated for weakly metamorphosed VHMS deposits of the Urals (Galkinsk and Uchaly). Significant content of Au is scattered in sulfides, such as pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite, with quantitative predomination of pyrite. The portion of such "invisible" gold ranges from flakes) with a monocrystal diffraction pattern of some particles and a ring diffraction pattern of other particles was registered in the ores of these deposits by the methods of transmission electron microscopy. The low degree (or absence) of metamorphic recrystallization results in (1) predomination of thin intergrowths of sulfides, which is the main reason for the bad concentration of ores (especially for the Galkinsk deposit) and (2) the high portion of "invisible" gold in the massive sulfide ores, which explains the low yield of Au in copper and zinc concentrates, since it is lost in tailings with predominating pyrite.

  7. A combined kinetic and diffusion model for pyrite oxidation in tailings - a change in controls with time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elberling, B.; Nicholson, R.V.; Scharer, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Acidic drainage from the oxidation of mine tailing wastes is an important environmental problem. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model (1) to simulate the rate of oxidation of pyrite over time, (2) to verify the importance of chemical kinetic control and diffusion control on the oxidation rate with time and, (3) to evaluate the sensitivity of the model to critical parameters of the tailings, such as grain size, pyrite content and the effective diffusion coefficient. The source code comprises four main modules including parameter allocation (kinetics, transport), sulphide oxidation (shrinking particle), oxygen transport and pyrite mass balance. The results show that high oxidation rates are observed in the initial time after tailings deposition. During this initial period of high rates, an apparent shift occurs from kinetic to diffusional control over a period of time that depends on the composition and properties of the tailings. Based on the simulation results, it is evident that the overall rate of oxidation after a few years will be controlled dominantly by the diffusion of oxygen rather than by biological or non-biological kinetics in the tailings

  8. Assessing Pyrite-Derived Sulfate in the Mississippi River with Four Years of Sulfur and Triple-Oxygen Isotope Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Bryan A; Bao, Huiming; Kohl, Issaku E

    2018-05-17

    Riverine dissolved sulfate (SO 4 2- ) sulfur and oxygen isotope variations reflect their controls such as SO 4 2- reduction and reoxidation, and source mixing. However, unconstrained temporal variability of riverine SO 4 2- isotope compositions due to short sampling durations may lead to mischaracterization of SO 4 2- sources, particularly for the pyrite-derived sulfate load. We measured the sulfur and triple-oxygen isotopes (δ 34 S, δ 18 O, and Δ' 17 O) of Mississippi River SO 4 2- with biweekly sampling between 2009 and 2013 to test isotopic variability and constrain sources. Sulfate δ 34 S and δ 18 O ranged from -6.3‰ to -0.2‰ and -3.6‰ to +8.8‰, respectively. Our sampling period captured the most severe flooding and drought in the Mississippi River basin since 1927 and 1956, respectively, and a first year of sampling that was unrepresentative of long-term average SO 4 2- . The δ 34 S SO4 data indicate pyrite-derived SO 4 2- sources are 74 ± 10% of the Mississippi River sulfate budget. Furthermore, pyrite oxidation is implicated as the dominant process supplying SO 4 2- to the Mississippi River, whereas the Δ' 17 O SO4 data shows 18 ± 9% of oxygen in this sulfate is sourced from air O 2 .

  9. Acid mine drainage in the Iberian Pyrite Belt: 1. Hydrochemical characteristics and pollutant load of the Tinto and Odiel rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Jose M; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Canovas, Carlos R; Olias, Manuel; Ayora, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Acid mine drainage in the Iberian Pyrite Belt is probably the worst case in the world of surface water pollution associated with mining of sulphide mineral deposits. The Iberian Pyrite Belt is located in SW Iberian Peninsula, and it has been mined during the last 4,500 years. The central and eastern part of the Iberian Pyrite Belt is drained by the Tinto and Odiel rivers, which receive most of the acidic leachates from the mining areas. As a result, the main channels of the Tinto and Odiel rivers are very rich in metals and highly acidic until reaching the Atlantic Ocean. A significant amount of the pollutant load transported by these two rivers is delivered during the rainy season, as is usual in rivers of Mediterranean climate regions. Therefore, in order to have an accurate estimation of the pollutant loads transported by the Tinto and Odiel rivers, a systematic sampling on a weekly basis and a high temporal resolution sampling of floods events were both performed. Results obtained show that metal fluxes are strongly dependent on the study period, highlighting the importance of inter-annual studies involving dry and wet years.

  10. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of hypabyssal igneous rocks in the Maranon Basin of Peru - A record of thermal history, structure, and alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueher, L.M.; Erlich, R.; Snee, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Hypabyssal andesites and dacites from the Balsapuerto Dome in the Mara?on Basin of Peru record the thermal, tectonic, and alteration history of the area. The Mara?on Basin is one of 19 sub-Andean foreland basins. The hypabyssal rocks in the Balsapuerto Dome are one of four known occurrences of subvolcanic rocks along the deformation front in Peru. This dome is a potential petroleum structural trap. Petroleum seeps near the dome indicate that a source for the petroleum is present, but the extent and amount of petroleum development is unknown. The Balsapuerto hypabyssal rocks are plagioclase-, hornblende-, pyroxene-phyric andesites to dacites. Some parts of the dome are pervasively altered to a hydrothermal assemblage of quartz-sericite-pyrite. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology shows that thermal activity related to emplacement of these subvolcanic rocks took place between 12-10 Ma, subsequent to the major periods of Andean folding and faulting, previously assumed to have occurred about 9 Ma. Eleven argon mineral age-spectrum analyses were completed. Argon apparent ages on amphibole range from 12.7 to 11.6 Ma, and the age spectra are simple, which indicates that the ages are very close to emplacement ages. Potassium feldspar yields an argon age spectrum ranging in age from 12.5 to 11.4 Ma, reflecting the period during which the potassium feldspar closed to argon diffusion between the temperature range of 350?C to about 150?C; thus the potassium feldspar age spectrum reflects a cooling profile throughout this temperature range. This age range is consistent with ages of emplacement for the entire igneous complex indicating that an increased thermal state existed in the area for at least 1.0 m.y. Combined with the coexisting hornblende age, this rock cooled from ~580?C to ~150?C in ~1.2 m.y. resulting in an average cooling rate of 358?C /m.y. White mica, or sericite, formed as a later alteration phase associated with quartz- sericite- pyrite and propylitic alteration in some

  11. Mineralization and trace element distribution in pyrite using EMPA in exploration drill holes from Cheshmeh Zard gold district, Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alaminia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pyrite is the most abundant sulfide mineral in low sulfidation ore deposits. Experimental studies have shown that low-temperature ( 200°C from hydrothermal or metamorphic fluids (Butler and Rickard, 2000. Framboidal pyrite mostly occurs in sedimentary environments, though it could also form during metamorphism and hydrothermal alteration (Scott et al., 2009. The pyrite formed tends to be enriched in various trace elements such as Au and As. For this study we have combined the geology, alteration, mineralization with recent studies of the description of the deposit from core logging and underground mapping and geochemistry in the CheshmehZard gold district and also investigated the compositional variation and textural differences between pyrite types. This study is based on the results of our alteration and mineralization mapping and detailed logging of 1937.8 m of drill core. Materials and Methods Geology, hydrothermal alteration and mineralization were examined in drill holes along several cross sections. Host-rock alteration minerals and veins were determined for 11 samples using standard X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF techniques. Polished sections were studied by reflected light microscopy and backscattered electron images (BSE. In this study, the trace-element composition of pyrite samples from the Au-III vein system was obtained using electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA data. All analyseswere carried out at the department of Materials Engineering and Physics of the University of Salzburg in Austria. The EMPA measurements and BSE imaging were made using a JXA-8600 electron microprobe. Spot analyses of 30 pyrite grains from CheshmehZard are given in Table 1. Results The study area is located in the north of Khorasan Razavi Province 45 km to the south of Neyshabour. The area near CheshmehZard could become important as a site of economically significant gold mineralization. Six gold-bearing vein

  12. Use of lead isotopic composition in sulfides for the mineral-formation geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordynets, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the isotopic composition of lead in pyrites and galenites of a hydrothermal uranium deposit makes it possible to determine the time of ore formation. A few types of lead ores are distinguished. Each type corresponds to a definite period of mineralization and is characterized by a specific isotopic composition. The Cimmerian age of carbonate-sulphide veins has been established, the deposit being formed over a period of 150-200 million years

  13. Geology and geochronology of Cardoso Island, in the southeastern coast of Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Werner

    1998-01-01

    This aim of work is the geological and geochronological study of rocks cropping out on Cardoso Island, on the southeastern coast of Sao Paulo States, close to be boundary with Parana State. The Island with an area of about 151 km 2 is a protected area administered by the Forest Institute of Environment Secretariat of the State of Sao Paulo. It is mountanious, with a peak at 814 m, and is covered by dense Mata Atlantica vegetation. The terrains which compose the island are mainly an igneous complex with light grey leucocratic, inequigranular, medium - to coarse-grained syenites. The predominant Tres Irmaos Syenite (STI), composed of pyroxene, hornblende, and perthitic to mesoperthitic microcline, has a magmatic flow structures, and is cut by the Cambriu alkali-feldspar Granites (GC), which is pinkish grey, leucocratic and medium-grained. Geochemical analysis of STI and GC demonstrate their meta luminous alkaline nature and late-orogenic to an orogenic character. The geochronological results suggest that the bodies were formed between 620 and 570 My according to the U-Pb method in zircons, with cooling between 597 and 531 My (K-Ar in amphiboles). Whole rock Sm-Nd analysis yield T DM ages in the Meso and Paleoproterozoic (1.200 - 2.200 My). belt of low grade meta sedimentary rocks occurs in the northern part of the island. Quartz schist, quartz-mica schist and mica-quartz schist, often containing andaluzite and cordierite, predominate. The geochemical and geochronological data suggest that the sources of the metasediments were andesites of continental arc whose protolities separated from the mantle during the Paleoproterozoic, between 1.800 and 2.200 My. These metasediments probably continue on the continent in the Taquari region and extend southwards in narrow strips between the granitoids of the Paranagua Domain. Although quaternary deposits are expressive, they were not studied in details since they were not the objectives of this study. (author)

  14. Geochronology of sedimentary and metasedimentary Precambrian rocks of the West African craton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.; Jeannette, D.; Trompette, R.

    1982-01-01

    This contribution summarizes current knowledge of the geochronology of the Upper Proterozoic sedimentary rocks covering the West African craton. This was done by using direct dating methods. Correlations between the northern edge of the Tindouf basin and the northern and southern part of the Taoudeni basin, as well as the Volta basin, are proposed. Tectonic, volcanic and thermal activities in connection with the Pan-African orogeny are recorded only around the craton. They induced either sedimentation lacks in Morocco or sedimentation excesses in Hoggar. Unsolved problems such as the precise stratigraphic position of the uppermost Proterozoic tillitic episode and the correlation within the Moroccan Anti-Atlas are also raised. (Auth.)

  15. Goethite (U–Th)/He geochronology and precipitation mechanisms during weathering of basalts

    OpenAIRE

    Riffel, Silvana B.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Carmo, Isabela O.; Farley, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    (U–Th)/He geochronology of 33 goethite grains from in situ ferruginous duricrusts overlying the Paraná flood basalt in the Guarapuava region, Paraná, Brazil, reveals ages ranging from 3.6 ± 0.4 to 0.4 ± 0.1 Ma. Thirty-one grains from detrital fragments of ferruginous duricrust yield ages in the 6.2 ± 0.6 to 0.7 ± 0.1 Ma range. The results show that goethites from detrital blocks are generally older than those from the in situ ferruginous layers and that all the goethites from the Guarapuava s...

  16. Geology, petrography and geochronology of meridional and oriental regions from Morungaba complex, SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlach, S.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Morungaba Granitoid Complex, covering about 330 km 2 , crops out as an elongate irregular Massif trending SW-NE, in the southeast part of the State of Sao Paulo, southeast Brazil. Major constituents are biotite granitoids with subordinate diorites. Over thirty facies types, each with distinctive structural-petrographic features, were recognized during detailed mapping of part of the Massif (about 200 km 2 ), and mapped as groups of facies. Geochronological Rb/Sr data for several groups of associated facies are also presented. (author)

  17. Half-lives of radionuclides used in nuclear geochronology and cosmochronology (evaluated data)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechev, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated half-life values are given for the radionuclides 26 Al, 40 K, 53 Mn, 60 Fe, 87 Rb, 93 Zr, 98 Tc, 107 Pd, 129 I, 135 Cs, 146 Sm, 176 Lu, 182 Hf, 187 Re, 205 Pb, 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U, 244 Pu and 247 Cm. These were obtained from an analysis of published information up to 2001. These half-lives are used in geochronology and cosmochronology to determine different radiometric ages in the history of the earth, solar system and galaxy. (author)

  18. Geochronology and structuring of the Ceara State: Borborema Province northwestern part, NE Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetter, A.; Van Schmus, W.R.; Santos, Ticiano J. Saraiva dos; Arthaud, M.; Nogueira Neto, J.

    1997-01-01

    The work confirms that the geochronological new data U/Pb in zircon and Samarium/Neodymium from the Ceara State furnished a refined chronology of the geological activity in the NW part of the Borborema Province, indicating an evolutive history since 2,78 Ga and 532 Ma. Furthermore, these data facilitated the different crust domain outlines in the region, putting age maximum limits in the pre-brasilianas supracrusts rocks deposition, and evidencing the epoch and duration of the Brasiliano magmatism and metamorphism in the northwest part of the State

  19. Geochronological correlation of the late Precambrian sequences on and around the stable zones of Equatorial Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Very few radiometric age determinations have a bearing on the late Precambrian sequences of the stable zones of Equatorial Africa. A geochronological correlation of these sequences must therefore rest upon a compilation of ages from these stable zones and the corresponding mobile zones. About 15 ages of varying precision more or less well tied up with the stratigraphical sequences, together with results of the study of stromatolite assemblages allow a provisional correlation to be made. One conclusion of this correlation is that most mixtites surrounding the Congo basin are in a 950 +- 50 Ma age bracket and are presumably to be correlated. (Auth.)

  20. Paleoclimates and geomorphological evolution of the Carajas region: geochemical and geochronological evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the geochronological results, on the petrographical and geochemical observations and considering the experimental evidences that suggests a great influence of the organic processes in the Manganese geochemistry it's possible to conclude that the dissolution and reprecipitation events of the Manganese oxides in the Carajas region, Para State, Brazil, represents humid and hot periods in the geological history of the region. The weathering dating furnishes information about the continental evolution in the Mesozoic/Cenozoic, difficult or impossible to determine by another methods

  1. A remediation strategy based on active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation in a soil contaminated by pyrite waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Rafael; Almela, Concepcion; Bernal, M. Pilar

    2006-01-01

    Phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils can be promoted by the proper use of soil amendments and agricultural practices. A 4-year phytoremediation programme was applied to a site affected by the toxic spill of pyrite residue at Aznalcollar (Spain) in 1998, contaminated with heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) and arsenic. This consisted of active phytoremediation, using organic amendments (cow manure and compost) and lime and growing two successive crops of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., followed by natural attenuation without further intervention. Changes in soil pH, extractable metal and As concentrations, organic carbon content and microbial biomass was evaluated. The initial oxidation of metal sulphides from pyrite residues released soluble metals and reduced soil pH to extremely acidic values (mean 4.1, range 2.0-7.0). The addition of lime (up to 64 t ha -1 ) increased soil pH to adequate values for plant growth, resulting in a significant decrease in DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in all plots. Natural attenuation phase showed also a decrease in extractable metals. Organic treatments increased the soil total organic carbon, which led to higher values of microbial biomass (11.6, 15.2 and 14.9 g kg -1 TOC and 123, 170 and 275 μg g -1 biomass-C in control, compost and manure plots, respectively). Active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation, was effective for remediation of this pyrite-polluted soil. - The addition of lime and organic amendments decreased heavy metal solubility and promoted Natural attenuation of a recently-contaminated soil

  2. A remediation strategy based on active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation in a soil contaminated by pyrite waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Rafael [Department of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, Centro de Edafologia y Biologia Aplicada del Segura, CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Apartado 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: rclemente@cebas.csic.es; Almela, Concepcion [Instituto de Agroquimica y Tecnologia de Alimentos, CSIC, Apartado 73, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Bernal, M. Pilar [Department of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, Centro de Edafologia y Biologia Aplicada del Segura, CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Apartado 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    Phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils can be promoted by the proper use of soil amendments and agricultural practices. A 4-year phytoremediation programme was applied to a site affected by the toxic spill of pyrite residue at Aznalcollar (Spain) in 1998, contaminated with heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) and arsenic. This consisted of active phytoremediation, using organic amendments (cow manure and compost) and lime and growing two successive crops of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., followed by natural attenuation without further intervention. Changes in soil pH, extractable metal and As concentrations, organic carbon content and microbial biomass was evaluated. The initial oxidation of metal sulphides from pyrite residues released soluble metals and reduced soil pH to extremely acidic values (mean 4.1, range 2.0-7.0). The addition of lime (up to 64 t ha{sup -1}) increased soil pH to adequate values for plant growth, resulting in a significant decrease in DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in all plots. Natural attenuation phase showed also a decrease in extractable metals. Organic treatments increased the soil total organic carbon, which led to higher values of microbial biomass (11.6, 15.2 and 14.9 g kg{sup -1} TOC and 123, 170 and 275 {mu}g g{sup -1} biomass-C in control, compost and manure plots, respectively). Active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation, was effective for remediation of this pyrite-polluted soil. - The addition of lime and organic amendments decreased heavy metal solubility and promoted Natural attenuation of a recently-contaminated soil.

  3. Potential use of pyrite cinders as raw material in cement production: results of industrial scale trial operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Yazici, E Y; Türk, T; Süngün, Y H

    2009-07-15

    Pyrite cinders, which are the waste products of sulphuric acid manufacturing plants, contain hazardous heavy metals with potential environmental risks for disposal. In this study, the potential use of pyrite cinders (PyCs) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker was demonstrated at the industrial scale. The chemical and mineralogical analyses of the PyC sample used in this study have revealed that it is essentially a suitable raw material for use as iron source since it contains >87% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The samples of the clinkers produced from PyC in the industrial scale trial operation of 6 months were tested for the conformity of their chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products. The data were compared with the clinker products of the iron ore, which is used as the raw material for the production Portland cement clinker in the plant. The chemical compositions of all the clinker products of PyC appeared to conform to those of the iron ore clinker, and hence, a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the mortars prepared from the PyC clinker was found to be consistent with those of the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. It can be inferred from the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) that PyC could be a potential source of heavy metal pollution while the mortar samples obtained from the PyC clinkers present no environmental problems. These findings suggest that the waste pyrite cinders can be readily used as iron source for the production of Portland cement. The availability of PyC in large quantities at low cost provides further significant benefits for the management/environmental practices of these wastes and for the reduction of mining and processing costs of cement raw materials.

  4. Soil pollution by oxidation of tailings from toxic spill of a pyrite mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, M.; Martin, F.; Ortiz, I.; Garcia, I.; Fernandez, J.; Fernandez, E.; Dorronsoro, C.; Aguilar, J.

    2001-01-01

    On the 25th April 1998, toxic water and tailings from a pyrite mine of Aznalcollar (southern Spain) spilled into the Agrio and Guadiamar River Basin affecting some 40 km 2 . In five sectors throughout the basin, we monitored the physical and chemical properties of the tailings as well as the degree of pollution in the soils on four different sampling dates: 5 May, 20 May, 4 June and 22 July 1998. The characteristics of the tailings deposited on the soils are shown to be related to distance from the spill. The oxidation rate of the tailings and the solubilization of the pollutant elements were more pronounced in the middle and lower sectors of the basin, where the particle size was finer, the sulfur content higher and the bulk density less. The increases in water-soluble sulfates, Zn, Cd and Cu were very rapid (the highest values being reached 25 days after the spill) and intense (reaching 45% of the total Cu, 65% of the total Zn and Cd). Meanwhile, the increases in water-soluble As, Bi, Sb, Pb and Tl were far lower (ranging between 0.002% of the total Tl and 2.5% of the total As) and less rapid in the case of As, Bi and Pb (the highest values for these elements being reached 40 days after the spill). These soluble elements infiltrated the soils with the rainwater, swiftly augmenting the soil pollution. Twenty-five days after the spill, when the rainfall ranged between 45 and 63 mm, the first 10-cm of the soils in the middle and lower sectors of the basin exceeded the maximum concentration permitted for agricultural soils in Zn, Cu and Tl. At 40 days after the spill, when the rainfall ranged between 60 and 89 mm, all the soils reached or exceeded the maximum permitted concentrations for As and Tl. Nevertheless, the pollutants tended to concentrate in the first 10 cm of the soils without seriously contaminating either the subsoil or the groundwaters. Consequently, a rapid removal of the tailings and the ploughing of the first 25-30 cm of the soils would be urgent

  5. First-principles investigation of the electronic states at perovskite and pyrite hetero-interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-09-01

    Oxide heterostructures are attracting huge interest in recent years due to the special functionalities of quasi two-dimensional quantum gases. In this thesis, the electronic states at the interface between perovskite oxides and pyrite compounds have been studied by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Optimization of the atomic positions are taken into account, which is considered very important at interfaces, as observed in the case of LaAlO3/SrTiO3. The creation of metallic states at the interfaces thus is explained in terms of charge transfer between the transition metal and oxygen atoms near the interface. It is observed that with typical thicknesses of at least 10-12 °A the gases still extend considerably in the third dimension, which essentially determines the magnitude of quantum mechanical effects. To overcome this problem, we propose incorporation of highly electronegative cations (such as Ag) in the oxides. A fundamental interest is also the thermodynamic stability of the interfaces due to the possibility of atomic intermixing in the interface region. Therefore, different cation intermixed configurations are taken into account for the interfaces aiming at the energetically stable state. The effect of O vacancies is also discussed for both polar and non-polar heterostructures. The interface metallicity is enhanced for the polar system with the creation of O vacancies, while the clean interface at the non-polar heterostructure exhibits an insulating state and becomes metallic in presence of O vacancy. The O vacancy formation energies are calculated and explained in terms of the increasing electronegativity and effective volume of A the side cation. Along with these, the electronic and magnetic properties of an interface between the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the non-magnetic semiconductor FeS2 is investigated. We find that this contact shows a metallic character. The CoS2 stays quasi half metallic at the interface, while the

  6. Complete removal of AHPS synthetic dye from water using new electro-fenton oxidation catalyzed by natural pyrite as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiadh, Lazhar; Oturan, Mehmet A; Panizza, Marco; Hamadi, Nawfel Ben; Ammar, Salah

    2015-10-30

    The mineralization of a new azo dye - the (4-amino-3-hydroxy-2-p-tolylazo-naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) (AHPS) - has been studied by a novel electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP), consisting in electro-Fenton (EF) oxidation, catalyzed by pyrite as the heterogeneous catalyst - the so-called 'pyrite-EF'. This solid pyrite used as heterogeneous catalyst instead of a soluble iron salt, is the catalyst the system needs for production of hydroxyl radicals. Experiments were performed in an undivided cell equipped with a BDD anode and a commercial carbon felt cathode to electrogenerate in situ H2O2 and regenerate ferrous ions as catalyst. The effects on operating parameters, such as applied current, pyrite concentration and initial dye content, were investigated. AHPS decay and mineralization efficiencies were monitored by HPLC analyses and TOC measurements, respectively. Experimental results showed that AHPS was quickly oxidized by hydroxyl radicals (OH) produced simultaneously both on BDD surface by water discharge and in solution bulk from electrochemically assisted Fenton's reaction with a pseudo-first-order reaction. AHPS solutions with 175 mg L(-1) (100 mg L(-1) initial TOC) content were then almost completely mineralized in 8h. Moreover, the results demonstrated that, under the same conditions, AHPS degradation by pyrite electro-Fenton process was more powerful than the conventional electro-Fenton process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Size-Dependent Affinity of Glycine and Its Short Oligomers to Pyrite Surface: A Model for Prebiotic Accumulation of Amino Acid Oligomers on a Mineral Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rehana; Ganbaatar, Narangerel; Aono, Masashi; Cleaves, H. James; Yano, Taka-aki; Hara, Masahiko

    2018-01-01

    The interaction strength of progressively longer oligomers of glycine, (Gly), di-Gly, tri-Gly, and penta-Gly, with a natural pyrite surface was directly measured using the force mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). In recent years, selective activation of abiotically formed amino acids on mineral surfaces, especially that of pyrite, has been proposed as an important step in many origins of life scenarios. To investigate such notions, we used AFM-based force measurements to probe possible non-covalent interactions between pyrite and amino acids, starting from the simplest amino acid, Gly. Although Gly itself interacted with the pyrite surface only weakly, progressively larger unbinding forces and binding frequencies were obtained using oligomers from di-Gly to penta-Gly. In addition to an expected increase of the configurational entropy and size-dependent van der Waals force, the increasing number of polar peptide bonds, among others, may be responsible for this observation. The effect of chain length was also investigated by performing similar experiments using l-lysine vs. poly-l-lysine (PLL), and l-glutamic acid vs. poly-l-glutamic acid. The results suggest that longer oligomers/polymers of amino acids can be preferentially adsorbed on pyrite surfaces. PMID:29370126

  8. Applications of dendrochronology and sediment geochronology to establish reference episodes for evaluations of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Carroll, J.; Abraham, J.D.; Landeen, D.S. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Dendrochronology and sediment geochronology have been used to demonstrate retrospective monitoring of environmental radioactivity at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. {sup 14}C in annual growth rings of sagebrush preserved the temporal and spatial patterns of {sup 14}C resulting from dispersion downwind of a nuclear fuel processing facility at the Hanford Site in Washington State. As far as 10 km downwind of the facility, {sup 14}C concentrations were significantly higher in growth rings formed during a fuel processing episode than in rings produced during preoperational or postoperational episodes. An episode of uranium mill tailings deposition in pond sediments at the Grand Junction Office in Colorado was reconstructed using {sup 210}Pb geochronology constrained by a marker of peak {sup 137}Cs fallout. Uranium concentrations in ponds sediments deposited after the processing episode provide a reasonable cleanup standard. These reference episodes of environmental radioactivity reconstructed from measurements taken within contaminated environments can improve or replace reference area data as baseline information for dose reconstructions, risk assessments, and the establishment of cleanup standards. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Applications of dendrochronology and sediment geochronology to establish reference episodes for evaluations of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, W.J.; Carroll, J.; Abraham, J.D.; Landeen, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Dendrochronology and sediment geochronology have been used to demonstrate retrospective monitoring of environmental radioactivity at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 14 C in annual growth rings of sagebrush preserved the temporal and spatial patterns of 14 C resulting from dispersion downwind of a nuclear fuel processing facility at the Hanford Site in Washington State. As far as 10 km downwind of the facility, 14 C concentrations were significantly higher in growth rings formed during a fuel processing episode than in rings produced during preoperational or postoperational episodes. An episode of uranium mill tailings deposition in pond sediments at the Grand Junction Office in Colorado was reconstructed using 210 Pb geochronology constrained by a marker of peak 137 Cs fallout. Uranium concentrations in ponds sediments deposited after the processing episode provide a reasonable cleanup standard. These reference episodes of environmental radioactivity reconstructed from measurements taken within contaminated environments can improve or replace reference area data as baseline information for dose reconstructions, risk assessments, and the establishment of cleanup standards. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Geology, alteration, mineralization, petrogenesis, geochronology, geochemistry and airborne geophysics of Kuh Shah prospecting area, SW Birjand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Abdi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Kuh Shah prospecting area is located in Tertiary volcano-plutonic belt of the Lut Block. More than seventeen subvolcanic intermediate to acidic intrusive rocks, diorite to syenite in composition, were identified in the study area. The intrusions are related to hydrothermal alteration zones and contain argillic, propylitic, advanced argillic, silicified, quartz-sericite-pyrite, gossan and hydrothermal breccia which overprinted to each other and are accompanied by weathering which made it complicated to distinguish zoning. Mineralization is observed as sulfide (pyrite and rare chalcopyrite, disseminated Fe-oxides and quartz-Fe-oxide stockwork veinlets. Intrusive rocks are metaluminous, calc-alkaline with shoshonitic affinity with high values of magnetic susceptibility. The Kuh Shah intrusive rocks are classified as magnetite-series of oxidant I-type granitoids. Based on zircon U–Pb age dating, the age of these granitoid rocks is 39.7± 0.7 Ma (Middle Eocene. The radioisotope data (initial 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios as well as εNd and geochemical data suggest that the Kuh Shah granitoid rocks formed from depleted mantle in a subduction-related magmatic arc setting. Geochemical anomalies of elements such as Cu, Au, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Sb, Mo, Bi, Hg and also Mn, Ba, Te and Se, correlated with quartz-sericite-pyrite, gossan-stockwork-hydrothermal breccias, irregular silicified bodies and advanced argillic hydrothermal alteration zones. Geophysical anomalies correlated with hydrothermal alteration and mineralization zones. The interpretation of the results represents complex patterns of sub-circular to ellipsoid shape with north-east to south-west direction. These evidences are similar to the other for known Cu-Au porphyry and Au-epithermal systems in Iran and worldwide.

  11. K-Ar geology, geochemistry and geochronology from the Maria River region dikes, Parana State southeastern part, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, Renato Oliveira da; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Oliveira, Elson Paiva de

    1996-01-01

    The paper synthesizes the geological, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data from the Maria River region dikes, situated at the southeastern part of the Para State, Brazil. It identifies five groups of dikes and determines the age of these dikes, through the Potassium-Argon (K-Ar) methodology

  12. Geochronologic study of polycyclic rocks from Sao Vicente complex in anticlinorium of Caico and Florania - RN, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, D.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    The characterization of geochronologic standard in a polycyclic area, verifying the interpretative potentials of Rubidium-Strontium and Potassium-Argon methods is the main objective of this paper. The determinations of K/Ar were made in amphiboles, moscovites and biotites. Petrology studies were also made for verifying the composition of several lithological types. (author)

  13. New improvements in the characterization of refractory gold in pyrites: an electron microprobe, Moessbauer spectrometry and ion microprobe study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, P.; Holliger, P.; Boiron, M.C.; Cathelineau, M.; Wagner, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of pyrites by Moessbauer spectroscopy have shown the presence of gold in a combined state probably inserted within the lattice. In order to enhance detection limits for in-situ quantitative gold analyses, new SIMS investigations have been made thanks to a Resistive Anode Encorder record of the ion emissions, which provides digital images or scans of any part of the analyzed volume. Quantitative analysis of gold have been carried out thanks to 2 MeV ion implantation of gold in reference sulfide crystals, and the bulk composition of a pyrite grain has been determined. Some strong enrichments in gold and arsenic at the crystal margin attest fluctuations in the fluid chemistry and may be interpreted as a final growth zone, which is similar to that observed on arsenopyrite crystals. This multidisciplinary approach constitutes a powerful tool for the investigation of the insertion and distribution of trace elements within crystals, especially gold in sulfides at low contents down to a few ppm. (author)

  14. Sequential extraction of heavy metals in river sediments of an abandoned pyrite mining area: pollution detection and affinity series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnanelli, F.; Moscardini, E.; Giuliano, V.; Toro, L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper heavy metal pollution at an abandoned Italian pyrite mine has been investigated by comparing total concentrations and speciation of heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb and As) in a red mud sample and a river sediment. Acid digestions show that all the investigated heavy metals present larger concentrations in the sediment than in the tailing. A modified Tessier's procedure has been used to discriminate heavy metal bound to organic fraction from those originally present in the mineral sulphide matrix and to detect a possible trend of metal mobilisation from red mud to river sediment. Sequential extractions on bulk and size fractionated samples denote that sediment samples present larger percent concentrations of the investigated heavy metals in the first extractive steps (I-IV) especially in lower dimension size fractionated samples suggesting that heavy metals in the sediment are significantly bound by superficial adsorption mechanisms. - Capsule: A modified Tessier's procedure, discriminating organic and sulphide bound metals, was used to detect pollutant mobilisation from red mud to river sediment in an abandoned pyrite mine

  15. Explanation for many of the unusual features of the massive sulfide deposits of the Iberian pyrite belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, M.; Tornos, F.; Gaspar, O. C.

    2002-01-01

    Newly published fluid-inclusion data from quartz in stockwork veins beneath seven massive sulfide lenses in the Iberian pyrite belt suggest that the lenses were formed from fluids that on reaching the sea reversed buoyancy and ponded in basins. Sulfides quenched in the resulting brine pool would have settled to form a sulfide mud. This process provides a relatively efficient trapping mechanism for metal in the fluids and effectively excludes ambient seawater, accounting for the deposits tending to have the characteristics of large size, sheet-like form, absence of relict chimney structures, and a mineral content characterized by pyrite-arsenopyrite, and absence or scarcity of barite, marcasite, and Fe oxides. If total S was less than total metals in the stockwork fluids, some or all of the more soluble Zn and Pb could have been swept from the basin at the overflow, accounting for the variable but generally low Zn and Pb contents of the ores. The lack of sedimentary source for the high salinities implicates magmatic intrusions, possibly similar to those related to Sn-W mineralization.

  16. In situ phytoremediation of arsenic- and metal-polluted pyrite waste with field crops: effects of soil management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamerali, Teofilo; Bandiera, Marianna; Mosca, Giuliano

    2011-05-01

    Sunflower, alfalfa, fodder radish and Italian ryegrass were cultivated in severely As-Cd-Co-Cu-Pb-Zn-contaminated pyrite waste discharged in the past and capped with 0.15m of unpolluted soil at Torviscosa (Italy). Plant growth and trace element uptake were compared under ploughing and subsoiling tillages (0.3m depth), the former yielding higher contamination (∼30%) in top soil. Tillage choice was not critical for phytoextraction, but subsoiling enhanced above-ground productivity, whereas ploughing increased trace element concentrations in plants. Fodder radish and sunflower had the greatest aerial biomass, and fodder radish the best trace element uptake, perhaps due to its lower root sensitivity to pollution. Above-ground removals were generally poor (maximum of 33mgm(-2) of various trace elements), with Zn (62%) and Cu (18%) as main harvested contaminants. The most significant finding was of fine roots proliferation in shallow layers that represented a huge sink for trace element phytostabilisation. It is concluded that phytoextraction is generally far from being an efficient management option in pyrite waste. Sustainable remediation requires significant improvements of the vegetation cover to stabilise the site mechanically and chemically, and provide precise quantification of root turnover. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Geochronology Intermediary Laboratory implantation at the Rio Grande do Norte Federal University: the dating of the Serrinha Granitoid (RN) and the correlate Brasiliana extensional deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Maria Helena F.; Sa, Emanuel F. Jardim de; Souza, Zorano S.; Mendes, Franklin S.; Ramalho, Karlos A.C.

    1997-01-01

    The article describes the activities developed by the Geochronology Intermediary Laboratory at the Federal University of the Rio Grande do Norte, a Brazilian university, where there were the preoccupation of establishing strategies for a geochronological development. It relates the Rubidium-Strontium (Rb/Sr) and Samarium-Neodymium (Sm/Nd) methods, describing the analysis realized in these methodologies. Afterward, it presents the geological and petrographic situation of the Granitoide de Serrinha, located at Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil and its geochronological data

  18. An experimental study on the geochemical behavior of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and metalloids (As, Se, Sb, Te, Bi) in a mss-iss-pyrite system at 650 °C: A possible magmatic origin for Co-HSE-bearing pyrite and the role of metalloid-rich phases in the fractionation of HSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafagna, Fabio; Jugo, Pedro J.

    2016-04-01

    Pyrite, the most abundant sulfide in the Earth's crust, is an accessory mineral in several magmatic sulfide deposits. Although most pyrite is hydrothermal, previous experimental studies have shown that pyrite can also have a primary magmatic origin, by exsolving from monosulfide solid solution (mss) during cooling of a sulfide melt, if sulfur fugacity is sufficiently high. Pyrite from some localities has significant amounts of Co, and complex zonation in some low-melting-point chalcophile elements (LMCE), such as As, Se, Sb, Te, Bi (henceforth referred to as metalloids) and some platinum-group elements (PGE: Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt). However, the origin of such pyrite and the causes of zonation are not clear. Because the distribution of some of these elements is heterogeneous and seems to be developed in concentric zones, the zonation has been interpreted to represent growth stages, some of them secondary and caused partly by hydrothermal fluids. Better constraints on the origin of Co-PGE-bearing pyrite could help unravel the geochemical processes affecting the sulfide assemblages in which it is found; thus, an experimental study was undertaken to characterize pyrite formation in magmatic sulfide environments and its relationship with metalloids and highly siderophile elements (HSE: PGE, Re, Au). Natural pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite and elemental S were mixed and doped with approximately 50 ppm of each HSE. A mixture of metalloids was added at 0.2 wt.% or 3 wt.% to aliquots of sulfide mixtures. Starting materials were sealed in evacuated silica tubes and fused at 1200 °C. The temperature was subsequently reduced to 750 °C (at 60 °C/h), then to 650 °C (at 0.5 °C/h) to produce relatively large euhedral pyrite crystals, then quenched. The experiments were analyzed using reflected light, SEM, EPMA and LA-ICP-MS. Experimental products contained euhedral pyrite, mss, intermediate solid solution (iss) and metalloid-rich phases, interpreted as quench product

  19. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Guangmei, E-mail: zhaiguangmei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Solar Cell Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Xu, Bingshe [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  20. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS2 nanocrystals and solid thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Guangmei; Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS 2 nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS 2 nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS 2 nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS 2 nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS 2 nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  1. Physiological response of Cistus monspeliensis L. growing in two mine areas of the Iberian Pyrite Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Lago, Daniel; Carvalho, Luisa C.; Santos, Erika S.; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Andrade, María Luisa

    2015-04-01

    São Domingos and Lousal mines, nowadays in abandoned state, are located in Portugal, in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, a world-class volcanic-hosted massive sulfide. As a result of the intense mining activity large volumes of wastes containing metal(loid)s were partly exposed to weathering realising potential hazardous elements contaminating waters, soils and sediments. In both mines, a great part of the contaminated areas is relatively covered by several wild species. These species have developed mechanisms of response to oxidative stress originated by high concentration of metal(loid)s in plant tissues, whose presence leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species, thus causing oxidative damage. The main objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the ecophysiological behaviour of Cistus monspeliensis L., which grows spontaneously in both mine areas, in soils containing high concentrations of metal(loid)s. With this purpose, the variation of some physiological parameters was analysed in order to identify which parameters can be indicators of the plant'sresponse to oxidative stress. Representative soils from rhizosphere and plants were sampled, in the same locations, in different areas of São Domingos and Lousal mines and in an uncontaminated area nearby São Domingos. Soils were characterized for the classic properties. Multielemental total concentration was analysed in soils and plants (shoots and roots), and multielemental concentration in the available fraction of soils. Pigments (chlorophylls, anthocyanins and carotenoids), glutathione, ascorbate, H2O2 and antioxidative enzyme activities were measured in plant shoots. In general, total and available concentrations (mg/kg) of Zn (total 149-463; available 2-16), As (total 62-3030; available 0.03-1.9), Cd (total 0.3-1.2; available 0.01-0.05), Cu (total 79-375; available 0.8-10) and Pb (total 95-9210; available 0.2-40) are significantly higher in mine soils than in uncontaminated soils Zn (total 92

  2. Sources and Contributions of Oxygen During Microbial Pyrite Oxidation: the Triple Oxygen Isotopes of Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, K.; Coleman, M. L.; Mielke, R. E.; Young, E. D.

    2008-12-01

    The triple isotopes of oxygen (Δ17O' = δ17O'-0.528 × δ18O' using logarithmic deltas) can trace the oxygen sources of sulfate produced during sulfide oxidation, an important biogeochemical process on Earth's surface and possibly also on Mars [1]. δ18OSO4 compositions are determined by the isotopic selectivity of the mechanism(s) responsible for their changes, and the δ18O value of the reactants (O2 vs. H2O). The relative proportional importance and contribution of each of those sources and mechanisms, as well as their associated isotopic fractionations, are not well understood. We are investigating the use of Δ 17O as a quantitative and qualitative tracer for the different processes and oxygen sources involved in sulfate production. Δ17O signatures are distinct fingerprints of these reservoirs, independent of fractionation factors that can be ambiguous. We conducted controlled abiotic and biotic (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, A.f.) laboratory experiments in which water was spiked with 18O, allowing us to quantify the sources of sulfate oxygen and therefore the processes attending sulfate formation. Results of this Δ17O tracer study show that A.f. microbes initiate pyrite S-oxidation within hours of exposure, and that sulfate is produced from ~90% atmospheric oxygen. This initial lag-phase (behavior in the initial lag-phase will aid in the understanding of the ecological conditions required for microbial populations to establish and survive. An exponential phase of growth, facilitated by microbial Fe2+-oxidation, follows. The source of sulfate rapidly switches to abiotic sulfide oxidation during exponential growth and the source of oxygen switches from atmospheric O2 to nearly ~100% water. Pending acquisition of complimentary chemistry data (in progress), we interpret our isotope data to indicate that the biotic fractionation factor ɛ18OSO4-O2 of at least ~ -25 to - 35‰ is augmented by microbially induced kinetic fractionation; it is larger than

  3. Microbiological oxidative dissolution of a complex mineral sample containing pyrite (FeS2), pyrrotite (Fe1-xS) and molybdenite (MoS2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco Junior, Wilmo E.; Bevilaqua, Denise; Garcia Junior, Oswaldo

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to study the oxidation of a complex molybdenite mineral which contains pyrite and pyrrotite, by Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans. This study was performed by respirometric essays and bioleaching in shake flasks. Respirometric essays yielded the kinetics of mineral oxidation. The findings showed that sulfide oxidation followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Bioleaching in shake flasks allowed evaluation of chemical and mineralogical changes resulting from sulfide oxidation. The results demonstrated that pyrrotite and pyrite were completely oxidized in A. ferrooxidans cultures whereas molybdenite was not consumed. These data indicated that molybdenite was the most recalcitrant sulfide in the sample. (author)

  4. A review of the fundamental studies of the copper activation mechanisms for selective flotation of the sulfide minerals, sphalerite and pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, A P; Gerson, A R

    2009-01-30

    A review of the considerable, but often contradictory, literature examining the specific surface reactions associated with copper adsorption onto the common metal sulfide minerals sphalerite, (Zn,Fe)S, and pyrite (FeS(2)), and the effect of the co-location of the two minerals is presented. Copper "activation", involving the surface adsorption of copper species from solution onto mineral surfaces to activate the surface for hydrophobic collector attachment, is an important step in the flotation and separation of minerals in an ore. Due to the complexity of metal sulfide mineral containing systems this activation process and the emergence of activation products on the mineral surfaces are not fully understood for most sulfide minerals even after decades of research. Factors such as copper concentration, activation time, pH, surface charge, extent of pre-oxidation, water and surface contaminants, pulp potential and galvanic interactions are important factors affecting copper activation of sphalerite and pyrite. A high pH, the correct reagent concentration and activation time and a short time delay between reagent additions is favourable for separation of sphalerite from pyrite. Sufficient oxidation potential is also needed (through O(2) conditioning) to maintain effective galvanic interactions between sphalerite and pyrite. This ensures pyrite is sufficiently depressed while sphalerite floats. Good water quality with low concentrations of contaminant ions, such as Pb(2+)and Fe(2+), is also needed to limit inadvertent activation and flotation of pyrite into zinc concentrates. Selectivity can further be increased and reagent use minimised by opting for inert grinding and by carefully choosing selective pyrite depressants such as sulfoxy or cyanide reagents. Studies that approximate plant conditions are essential for the development of better separation techniques and methodologies. Improved experimental approaches and surface sensitive techniques with high spatial

  5. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  6. Mixed Messages from Garnet Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, J. D.; Wang, D.; Johnson, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Garnet geochronology provides important information on the timing and conditions of metamorphism. As a major indicator mineral formed during metamorphism, its direct dating can not only help establish the timing of metamorphism, provide the "t" for P-T-t paths, but also, if the dated garnet can be placed in a textural context, can provide information on the timing of deformational features. With advances in chemistry and mass spectrometry, garnet Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd geochronology has become an important geochronological tool and we can now reliably (if not routinely) date a wide variety of garnet compositions formed under diverse conditions. In the course of dating a variety of lithologies using both Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systems, however, some intriguing results have emerged. Although there are many examples where the Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd systems give the same date within uncertainty, there are also many cases where these systems yield significantly different dates, and the differences between these dates can be considerable—many 10's of Ma of and even 100's of Ma. For example, in garnet-bearing Mesoproterozoic gneisses from across the Blue Ridge Province in Virginia, both Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd analyses (determined on the same solutions) define narrow time spans, but with the Sm-Nd dates systematically younger (for orthogneisses Lu-Hf dates are 1032 to 1019 Ma whereas Sm-Nd dates are 965 to 949 Ma—a difference of 67 to 80 Ma). There are many other examples of systematically younger Sm-Nd garnet dates in both the literature and with our ongoing research. Potential explanations for these differences include: 1) strong partitioning of Lu into garnet during growth yielding ages weighted toward the beginning of growth; 2) faster Lu diffusion from high Lu regions after garnet formation, potentially leading to isochron rotation and anomalously old Lu-Hf dates; and 3) differences in closure temperatures of the two isotope systems. We will review several examples of divergent Lu

  7. Effects of irradiation on minerals and their consequences in geo-chronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali

    2011-01-01

    In this HDR (accreditation to supervise research studies) report, the author first gives a brief overview of her scientific approach. Then, addressing the irradiation of minerals by a radioactive source, she discusses the effects of irradiation, notably in the case of monazite, reports an experimental approach of external irradiation by ion beams, and comments some side effects like irradiation of host minerals. She also comments how irradiation-induced damages interfere with some processes like diffusion kinetics and dissolution. She addresses the case of mineral irradiation by means of a femto-second laser source: scientific approach, effects on mineral microstructure, notably in the case of monazite and quartz. The last part discusses issues in abeyance and perspectives in the field of irradiation textures, consequences on the geo-chronological response, alteration mechanisms, role of defects, and contribution of experimental irradiation

  8. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results

  9. PALEOARCHEAN MAFIC ROCKS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN SIBERIAN CRATON: PRELIMINARY GEOCHRONOLOGY AND GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Siberian craton consists of Archean blocks, which were welded up into the same large unit by ca 1.9 Ga [Gladkochub et al., 2006; Rojas-Agramonte et al., 2011]. The history of the constituent Archean blocks is mosaic because of limited number of outcrops, insufficient sampling coverage because of their location in remote regions and deep forest and difficulties with analytical studies of ancient rocks, which commonly underwent metamorphic modifications and secondary alterations. In this short note, we report data on discovery of unusual for Archean mafic rocks of ultimate fresh appearance. These rocks were discovered within southwestern Siberian craton in a region near a boundary between Kitoy granulites of the Sharyzhalgai highgrade metamorphic complex and Onot green-schist belt (Fig. 1. Here we present preliminary data on geochronology of these rocks and provide their geochemical characterization.

  10. Understanding sudden environmental and societal change through coupled geochronological and artefact shape analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoggard, Christian Steven; Sauer, Florian Rudolf; Zernack, Anke Verena

    Over the last twenty years, advances in geometric morphometric methodologies have revolutionised how archaeologists understand changes in artefact shape and form (size plus shape) throughout the Quaternary period. Such methodologies provide a high resolution of artefact coverage, and allow...... a critical analysis of previous taxonomic classificatory schemas and human tool-use in the past. Despite this, methodologies into artefact shape through geometric morphometrics have not been integrated within extensive geochronological data to better understand periods of high environmental stress and......, with respect to archaeology, how past societies reacted to such stress. The Laacher See volcanic eruption (c. 13,000 BP) in western Germany is believed, given its hypothesised characteristics, to have had profound impact on the lifeways of hunter-gatherers towards the end of the Final Palaeolithic (Riede, 2017...

  11. Temporal dynamics of airborne lead-210 in Missouri (USA): implications for geochronological methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheets, R.W.; Lawrence, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    Lead-210 ( 210 Pb) deposited from the atmosphere is used in the dating of certain geological materials such as glacial ice and lacustrine sediments, but its long-term atmospheric behavior has been little studied. The present investigation reports measurements of airborne 210 Pb at 21 monitoring stations in Springfield, Missouri, during 1975-1995. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of atmospheric concentrations are established, and the mean annual concentrations of 210 Pb in ground level air during the 20-year period are examined. Although airborne 210 Pb concentrations are found to vary diurnally and seasonally, mean annual concentrations in southwest Missouri have remained relatively constant during this time period. This finding is important for geochronological methods that assume a constant 210 Pb flux from the atmosphere. (orig.)

  12. In Situ Potassium-Argon Geochronology Using Fluxed Fusion and a Double Spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurowitz, Joel A.; Hecht, Michael H.; Zimmerman, Wayne F.; Neidholdt, Evan L.; Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Coleman, Max; McCleese, Daniel J.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Eiler, John M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    A document highlights an Li-based fluxing agent that enables sample fusion and quantitative Ar-release at relatively low temperatures (900-1,000 C), readily achievable with current flight resistance furnace designs. A solid, double spike containing known quantities of Ar-39 and K-41 was developed that, when added in known amounts to a sample, enables the extraction of a Ar-40/K-40 ratio for age estimation without a sample mass measurement. The use of a combination of a flux and a double spike as a means of solving the mechanical hurdles to an in situ K-Ar geochronology measurement has never been proposed before. This methodology and instrument design would provide a capability for assessing the ages of rocks and minerals on the surfaces of planets and other rocky terrestrial bodies in the solar system.

  13. Experimental studies on the electronic structure of pyrite FeS2 films prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Wang Baoyi; Zhang Rengang; Zhang Zhe; Wei Long; Qian Haijie; Su Run; Kui Rexi

    2006-01-01

    Pyrite FeS 2 films have been prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films deposited by magnetron sputtering. The electronic structures were studies by X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray photoemission spectrum. The results show that an S 3p valence band with relatively higher intensity compared to the calculation exists in 2-10 eV range and a high density below the Fermi level of Fe 3d states were detected. A second gap of 2.8 eV in the unoccupied density of states was found above the conduction band which was 2.4 eV by experimentally calculation. The difference between t 2g and e g which were formed in an octahedral crystal field was computed to be 2.1 eV. (authors)

  14. Defect formation energies and homogeneity ranges of rock salt-, pyrite-, chalcopyrite- and molybdenite-type compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechter, S. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, Berlin D-14109 (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Employing the generalisation of Van Vechten's cavity model, formation energies of neutral point defects in pyrites (FeS{sub 2}, RuS{sub 2}), chalcopyrites (II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-III-VI{sub 2}) as well as molybdenites (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) have been estimated. As input parameters the fundamental band gaps, work functions, electron affinities, surface energies, coordination numbers, covalent or ionic radii and unit cell parameters were used. The values calculated for tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated compounds agreed well with measured values. The data obtained can be used to calculate point defect concentrations and homogeneity ranges as a function of partial pressure and temperature. Introducing charged vacancies, the conductivity type can be predicted.

  15. (U-Th)/He geochronology of goethite and the origin and evolution of cangas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Hevelyn S.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Spier, Carlos A.; Mello, Claudio L.

    2014-04-01

    (U-Th)/He geochronology of 147 grains of goethite cements extracted from ferruginous duricrusts (cangas) developed on banded iron-formations from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero region, Minas Gerais, Brazil, records a history of protracted mineral dissolution-reprecipitation that started at ca. 48.1 ± 4.8 Ma and continues intermittently until the Present. A large majority of the samples (more than 30%) are younger than 2 Ma, revealing active mineral dissolution-reprecipitation in the recent past. Within cangas, goethite cements are younger near the surface and become progressively older towards the bottom of the weathering profile, indicating that iron is more effectively cycled in the parts of the weathering profile more strongly affected by biogenic activity. (U-Th)/He geochronology of 14 goethite grains from saprolites in the same profiles yield results ranging from 55.3 ± 5.5 to 25.7 ± 2.6 Ma. For a single weathering profile, goethite cements from cangas are invariably younger than goethite grains from the underlying saprolite, indicating that the duricrust and the saprolite behave as independent and separate systems responding to different environmental controls. Thorium shows conservative behaviour during goethite dissolution-reprecipitation, and it is enriched towards the surface of the weathering profile. Uranium, on the other hand, is preferentially leached from the surface into the saprolite or out of the weathering profile. Recurrent goethite dissolution-reprecipitation lends great textural complexities to cangas, but it is also responsible for its capacity to reheal when physically disrupted. This self-healing property accounts for canga’s role in armoring banded iron-formation landscapes.

  16. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of potassium for in-situ geochronology on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipe, Christopher B., E-mail: stipec@seattleu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Guevara, Edward; Brown, Jonathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Rossman, George R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is explored for the development of an in-situ K-Ar geochronology instrument for Mars. Potassium concentrations in standard basaltic glasses and equivalent rock samples in their natural form are quantified using the potassium doublet at 766.49 and 769.90 nm. Measurement precision varies from 0.5 to 5.5 (% RSD) over the 3.63% to 0.025% potassium by weight for the standard samples, and little additional precision is achieved above 20 laser shots at 5 locations. For the glass standards, the quantification limits are 920 and 66 ppm for non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. For the basaltic rocks, the quantification limits are 2650 and 328 ppm for the non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. The heterogeneity of the rock samples leads to larger variations in potassium signal; however, normalizing the potassium peak by base area at 25 locations on the rock improved calibration accuracy. Including only errors in LIBS measurements, estimated age errors for the glasses range from approximately {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma samples to {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma samples. For the basaltic rocks, the age errors are approximately {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma samples and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of basaltic glasses and rocks by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of potassium for K-Ar dating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an instrument for in-situ geochronology on Mars. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limit is 35 ppm, relative standard deviations range from 0.5% to 5.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated errors for the glass standards range from {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma; estimated errors for the basaltic rocks range from {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma.

  17. Trace element chemistry and textures of low-temperature pyrites associated with shallow fossil subsurface geothermal discharge in the Eger Graben, northwestern Bohemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zachariáš, J.; Adamovič, Jiří; Langrová, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, 29 (2006), s. 237-239 ISSN 0032-6267 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : pyrite * geothermal fluids * Eger Graben Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. Photoelectrochemistry: Enhanced Photoresponse of FeS2 Films: The Role of Marcasite–Pyrite Phase Junctions  (Adv. Mater. 43/2016, Back Cover)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Longfei; Dzade, N.Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41249311X; Gao, L.; Scanlon, D. O.; Öztürk, Z.; Hollingsworth, N.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Hensen, E. J. M.; de Leeuw, Nora H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/376421061; Hofmann, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial role of marcasite in pyrite thin films for photoelectrochemical applications is reported by J. P. Hofmann and co-workers on page 9602. A bulk heterojunction with staggered band alignment at the pyrite–marcasite interface enhances charge-carrier separation and leads to a dramatic

  19. Synergistic effect of biogenic Fe3+ coupled to S° oxidation on simultaneous bioleaching of Cu, Co, Zn and As from hazardous Pyrite Ash Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sandeep; Akcil, Ata; Mishra, Srabani; Erust, Ceren

    2017-03-05

    Pyrite ash, a waste by-product formed during roasting of pyrite ores, is a good source of valuable metals. The waste is associated with several environmental issues due to its dumping in sea and/or land filling. Although several other management practices are available for its utilization, the waste still awaits and calls for an eco-friendly biotechnological application for metal recovery. In the present study, chemolithotrophic meso-acidophilic iron and sulphur oxidisers were evaluated for the first time towards simultaneous mutli-metal recovery from pyrite ash. XRD and XRF analysis indicated higher amount of Hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) in the sample. ICP-OES analysis indicated concentrations of Cu>Zn>Co>As that were considered for bioleaching. Optimization studies indicated Cu - 95%, Co - 97%, Zn - 78% and As - 60% recovery within 8days at 10% pulp density, pH - 1.75, 10% (v/v) inoculum and 9g/L Fe 2+ . The productivity of the bioleaching system was found to be Cu - 1696ppm/d (12% dissolution/d), Co - 338ppm/d (12.2% dissolution/d), Zn k 576ppm/d (9.8% dissolution/d) and As - 75ppm/d (7.5% dissolution/d). Synergistic actions for Fe 2+ - S° oxidation by iron and sulphur oxidisers were identified as the key drivers for enhanced metal dissolution from pyrite ash sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tridimensional modelling and resource estimation of the mining waste piles of São Domingos mine, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre; Matos, João; Lopes, Luis; Martins, Ruben

    2016-04-01

    Located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) northern sector, near the Portuguese/Spanish border, the outcropping São Domingos deposit was mined since Roman time. Between 1854 and 1966 the Mason & Barry Company developed open pit excavation until 120 m depth and underground mining until 420 m depth. The São Domingos subvertical deposit is associated with felsic volcanics and black shales of the IPB Volcano-Sedimentary Complex and is represented by massive sulphide and stockwork ore (py, cpy, sph, ga, tt, aspy) and related supergene enrichment ore (hematite gossan and covellite/chalcocite). Different mine waste classes were mapped around the old open pit: gossan (W1), felsic volcanic and shales (W2), shales (W3) and mining waste landfill (W4). Using the LNEG (Portuguese Geological Survey) CONASA database (company historical mining waste characterization based on 162 shafts and 160 reverse circulation boreholes), a methodology for tridimensional modelling mining waste pile was followed, and a new mining waste resource is presented. Considering some constraints to waste removal, such as the Mina de São Domingos village proximity of the wastes, the industrial and archaeological patrimony (e.g., mining infrastructures, roman galleries), different resource scenarios were considered: unconditioned resources (total estimates) and conditioned resources (only the volumes without removal constraints considered). Using block modelling (SURPAC software) a mineral inferred resource of 2.38 Mt @ 0.77 g/t Au and 8.26 g/t Ag is estimated in unconditioned volumes of waste. Considering all evaluated wastes, including village areas, an inferred resource of 4.0 Mt @ 0.64 g/t Au and 7.30 g/t Ag is presented, corresponding to a total metal content of 82,878 oz t Au and 955,753 oz t Ag. Keywords. São Domingos mine, mining waste resources, mining waste pile modelling, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Portugal

  1. Monitoring the Extent of Contamination from Acid Mine Drainage in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain Using Hyperspectral Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuncion Riaza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring mine waste from sulfide deposits by hyperspectral remote sensing can be used to predict surface water quality by quantitatively estimating acid drainage and metal contamination on a yearly basis. In addition, analysis of the mineralogy of surface crusts rich in soluble salts can provide a record of annual humidity and temperature. In fact, temporal monitoring of salt efflorescence from mine wastes at a mine site in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Huelva, Spain has been achieved using hyperspectral airborne Hymap data. Furthermore, climate variability estimates are possible based on oxidation stages derived from well-known sequences of minerals, by tracing sulfide oxidation intensity using archive spectral libraries. Thus, airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used to provide a short-term record of climate change, and represent a useful set of tools for assessing environmental geoindicators in semi-arid areas. Spectral and geomorphological indicators can be monitored on a regular basis through image processing, supported by field and laboratory spectral data. In fact, hyperspectral image analysis is one of the methods selected by the Joint Research Centre of the European Community (Ispra, Italy to study abandoned mine sites, in order to assess the enforcement of the European Mine Waste Directive (2006/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council 15 March 2006 on the management of waste from extractive industries (Official Journal of the European Union, 11 April 2006. The pyrite belt in Andalucia has been selected as one of the core mission test sites for the PECOMINES II program (Cracow, November 2005, using imaging spectroscopy; and this technique is expected to be implemented as a monitoring tool by the Environmental Net of Andalucía (REDIAM, Junta de Andalucía, Spain.

  2. A sustainable process to utilize ferrous sulfate waste from titanium oxide industry by reductive decomposition reaction with pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Penghui; Deng, Shaogang; Zhang, Zhiye; Wang, Xinlong; Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Xiushan; Yang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A newly developed treating process of ferrous sulfate was proposed. • The reaction process was discussed by thermodynamic analysis. • Thermodynamic analysis was compared with experiments results. • The kinetic model of the decomposition reaction was determined. • The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions was explored. - Abstract: Ferrous sulfate waste has become a bottleneck in the sustainable development of the titanium dioxide industry in China. In this study, we propose a new method for the reductive decomposition of ferrous sulfate waste using pyrite. Thermodynamics analysis, tubular reactor experiments, and kinetics analysis were performed to analyze the reaction process. The results of the thermodynamic simulation showed that the reaction process and products were different when molar ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was changed. The suitable molar ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was 8–12. The reaction temperature of ferrous sulfate with pyrite was 580–770 K and the main products were Fe_3O_4 and SO_2. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results. The desulphurization rate reached 98.55% and main solid products were Fe_3O_4 at 823.15 K when mole ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was 8. Nano-sized magnetite was obtained at this condition. The kinetic model was investigated by isoconversional methods. The average E value was 244.34 kJ mol"−"1. The ferrous sulfate decomposition process can be treated as autocatalytic reaction mechanism, which corresponded to the expanded Prout–Tompson (Bna) model. The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions during the process of ferrous sulfate decomposition were explored, the products of Fe oxide substances are the catalyst components.

  3. Production of hydroxyl radicals from abiotic oxidation of pyrite by oxygen under circumneutral conditions in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu

    2017-12-01

    Besides acidic environments, pyrite oxidation also occurs in circumneutral environments, such as well-buffered marine and estuarine sediments and salt marshes where low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (e.g., citrate and oxalate) prevail. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals (radOH) from pyrite oxidation by oxygen (O2) in these circumneutral environments is poorly understood. In this study, radOH production was measured during the abiotic oxidation of pyrite by O2 under circumneutral conditions. A pyrite suspension (50 g/L pyrite) that was buffered at pH 6-8 was exposed to air for oxygenation in the dark. Benzoate (20 mM) was added into the suspension to trap radOH. At pH 7, the cumulative radOH reached 7.5 μM within 420 min in the absence of LMWOAs, whereas it increased to 14.8, 12 and 11.2 μM in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminotetraacetate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. When the citrate concentration, which serves as a LMWOAs model, was increased from 0.5 to 5 mM, the cumulative radOH increased from 10.3 to 27.3 μM within 420 min at pH 7. With the decrease in pH from 8 to 6, the cumulative radOH increased from 2.1 to 23.3 μM in the absence of LMWOAs, but it increased from 8.8 to 134.9 μM in the presence of 3 mM citrate. The presence of LMWOAs enhanced the radOH production from pyrite oxidation under circumneutral conditions. In the absence of LMOWAs, radOH is produced mostly from the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) by O2. In the presence of citrate, radOH production is attributed mainly to the oxidation of Fe(II)-citrate- by O2 and secondarily to the oxidation of H2O on surface-sulfur defects. The acceleration of pyrite oxidation by Fe(III)-citrate increases radOH production. Fe(II)-citrate- is generated mainly from the complexation of adsorbed Fe(II) by citrate and the reduction of Fe(III)-citrate, and the generation is suppressed by the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II). Fe(III)-citrate is generated predominantly from Fe

  4. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic constraints on the timing and origin of Mesozoic granitoids hosting the Mo deposits in northern Xilamulun district, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Qihai; Lai, Yong; Zhou, Yitao; Xu, Jiajia; Wu, Huaying

    2015-12-01

    Located in the east section of the Central Asian orogen in northeastern China, the Xilamulun district comprises several newly discovered molybdenum deposits, primarily of porphyry type and Mesozoic ages. This district is divided by the Xilamulun fault into the southern and the northern parts. In this paper, we present new zircon U-Pb dating, trace elements and Hf isotope, and/or whole rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic results for the host granitoids from three Mo deposits (Yangchang, Haisugou and Shabutai) in northern Xilamulun. Our aim is to constrain the age and petrogenesis of these intrusions and their implications for Mo mineralization. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating shows that the monzogranites from the Shabutai and Yangchang deposits formed at 138.4 ± 1.5 and 137.4 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively, which is identical to the molybdenite Re-Os ages and coeval well with the other Mo deposits in this region, thereby indicating an Early Cretaceous magmatism and Mo mineralization event. Zircon Ce/Nd ratios from the mineralized intrusions are significantly higher than the barren granites, implying that the mineralization-related magmas are characterized by higher oxygen fugacity. These mineralized intrusions share similar zircon in-situ Hf and whole rock Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, with slightly negative to positive εHf(t) ranging from - 0.8 to + 10.0, restricted εNd(t) values from - 3.7 to + 1.6 but a little variable (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios between 0.7021 and 0.7074, indicative of formation from primary magmas generated from a dominantly juvenile lower crust source derived from depleted mantle, despite diverse consequent processes (e.g., magma mixing, fractional crystallization and crustal contamination) during their evolution. The Pb isotopes (whole rock) also show a narrow range of initial compositions, with (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.03-18.88, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.48-15.58 and (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.72-38.28, in agreement with Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes reflecting the dominance of a mantle component

  5. G R Tripathy | Speakers | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Earth & Climate Sci., Indian Institute of Science ... Re-Os geochronology: Clues for past marine and atmospheric conditions. Changes in the seawater chemistry have influenced the biosphere greatly in the past. These important ...

  6. The laser microprobe dating drives K-Ar geochronology into a new milestone at the end of 20th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Zhiguo; Gao Yongjun

    2001-01-01

    K-Ar age dating method is facing a serious challenge to its application due to that both Ar loss and Ar excess are widespread found even though it has been undergoing 50 years. In the latest few years of the 20th century, studies on K-Ar geochronology have been pushing on a new step as a sign of method perfected and precision enhanced. High precision and high resolution 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating, can use in both micro-area and a single grain, extends dating limit into the historical realm. Applied range of K-Ar geochronology is getting bigger and bigger due to fine analytical techniques while solved geological problems are getting wider and wider

  7. Paleomagnetism and geochronological studies on a 450 km long 2216 Ma dyke from the Dharwar craton, southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, E.; Parashuramulu, V.; Kumar, Anil; Srinivas Sarma, D.

    2018-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geochronological studies were carried out on a ∼ 450 km long (from 17 sites) N-S striking Paleoproterozoic dyke swarm exposed along a natural crustal cross section of about 10 km (increasing from North to South) in the Dharwar Craton, to study the characteristics of paleomagnetism and geochronology in vertical dimension. U-Pb/Pb-Pb dating on baddeleyite gives a crystallisation age of 2216.0 ± 0.9 Ma for long dyke AKLD. Paleomagnetic data from this well dated ∼ 2216 Ma dyke swarm in Dharwar Craton are of excellent quality. High coercivity and high blocking temperature components are carried by single domain magnetite and show dual polarity remanence directions. Combined normal and reverse polarity remanences on AKLD and other N-S dykes define the most reliable paleomagnetic pole for ∼ 2216 Ma at latitude 36°S and longitude 312°E (A95 = 7°). Though paleomagnetic data is unavailable on other N-S dykes below the Cuddapah basin, high precision geochronology suggest that they are of similar age within errors. Though there is a variation in the crustal depth of Dharwar craton from north to south, consistent Pb-Pb/U-Pb baddeleyite geochronology and paleomagnetic studies along the AKLD established its continuity and preservation along its entire strike length. The virtual geomagnetic poles of these sites confirm a stable remanence and are almost identical to the previously reported paleomagnetic pole and also supported by positive reversal test. Positive paleomagnetic reversal test on these dykes signify that the remanent magnetization is primary and formed during initial cooling of the intrusions. Updated apparent polar wander path of Dharwar craton indicates relatively low drift rate during 2.21-2.08 Ga interval. Magnetogranulometry and SEM studies show that remanent magnetization in this dyke was carried by single domain magnetite residing within silicate minerals.

  8. Geochronology and magnetic fabrics of the Altenberg-Teplice granite porphyry: implications for emplacement style of a caldera ring dike

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, J.; Svojtka, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 46 (2016), s. 39-40 E-ISSN 1434-7512. [Late Paleozoic magmatism in the Erzgebirge / Krušné hory: Magma genesis, tectonics, geophysics, and mineral deposits : abstracts. 11.11.2016-12.11.2016, Freiberg] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : porphyry * magnetic fabrics * geochronology * Altenberg-Teplice Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://tu-freiberg.de/sites/default/files/media/institut-fuer-geologie-718/pdf/fog_volume_46.pdf

  9. Facile synthesis of pyrite-type binary nickel iron diselenides as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Jing-Qi; Shang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liang, Fei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Dong, Bin, E-mail: dongbin@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Li, Xiao; Liu, Yan-Ru; Yan, Kai-Li [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Gao, Wen-Kun [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Chai, Yong-Ming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liu, Chen-Guang, E-mail: cgliu@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Binary pyrite-type Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC was prepared by a facile two-step process. • The effect of Ni/Fe (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}Se{sub 2} x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) on OER was investigated. • Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC (x = 0.5) possesses the better electrocatalytic activity for OER. • The enhanced activity may be attributed to binary Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} and CFC support. - Abstract: Pyrite-type binary nickel iron diselenides (Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}) supported on carbon fiber cloth (CFC) as electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been prepared by a facile two-step process. Firstly, binary Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5} hydroxide nanosheets have been electrodeposited on CFC. Secondly, a solvothermal selenization process has been used to convert Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}/CFC into Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC. XRD shows that Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} on CFC has the typically octahedral crystalline. XPS proves the existence and valence of Ni, Fe and Se. SEM images show that Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} has novel pyrite-type octahedral morphology with uniform size and good dispersion on the surface of CFC. SEM elemental mapping images confirm the good distribution of Ni, Fe, Se element on CFC. TEM and SAED provide the clear diffraction rings of octahedral Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}, which is consistent with the results of XRD. Furtherly, the effect of different ratio of Ni/Fe (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}Se{sub 2} x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) on OER performances has been systematically investigated. The electrochemical measurements results show that Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC (x = 0.5) possesses the better electrocatalytic activity with the lower overpotential, Tafel slope and long-term stability than other samples. The enhanced activity of Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC may be attributed to the intrinsic activity of binary Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} and faster electron

  10. Assessing Soil Quality in Areas Affected by Sulfide Mining. Application to Soils in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel González

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The characterization, evaluation and remediation of polluted soils is one of the present environmental challenges to be addressed in the coming years. The origin of trace elements in soils can be either geogenic or anthropogenic, but only the latter is interesting from a legal point of view. The hazard of the pollutants in the soils not only depends on their total concentration, but particularly on their availability. The mobility of the trace elements depends on their speciation, and it is also affected by several soil parameters. Mining activity is one of the most important anthropogenic causes of soil pollution. As a case study, this work is focused in the Riotinto mining area (Iberian Pyrite Belt, IPB, SW Spain. The IPB is one of the most important metallogenic provinces in the world and it has been exploited for thousands of years. The disposal of mining residues has produced important sources of contamination by trace elements and acidic waters affecting soils and rivers. In addition to these problems, the closure of mines in the Pyrite Belt at the end of the 20th Century has led to a great loss of employment, which has caused the development of an intensive agriculture of citrus fruits as a new source of income. The intensive growing of citrus fruits and the traditional subsistence agriculture have been developed surrounding the mining areas and on floodplains near to mining sites. The level of soil pollution has not been taken into account in these cases, nor has its impact on the health of the inhabitants of these areas. Therefore, it is of great interest to study the current state of the cultivated soils and the sources and types of contaminants derived from mining activity in order to program its decontamination, where appropriate, according to legislation. In order to know the present and future hazard posed by the soils chemical and mineralogical speciation has been carried out, given that the availability of a metal depends on the

  11. High-precision ID-TIMS zircon U-Pb geochronology using new 1013 Ohm resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Quadt, A.; Buret, Y.; Large, S.; Peytcheva, I.; Trinquier, A.; Wotzlaw, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Faraday cups equipped with high gain amplifiers provide a means to measure small ion beams in static mode without the limited linear range of ion counting systems. We tested the application of newly available 1013 Ohm resistors to ID-TIMS zircon U-Pb geochronology using a range of natural and synthetic reference materials. The TritonPlus-RPQ at the Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, is equipped with five new 1013 Ohm resistors and one MasCom secondary electron multiplier, allowing to measure the 202-204-205-206-207-208Pb masses in static mode. U is measured subsequently as U-oxide (265-267-270UO2) during a second step, also in static Faraday mode. The gain calibration of the 1013 Ohm resistors was performed using the procedure of Trinquier (2014), with 144Nd-146Nd being measured using 1011 Ohm resistor and 142-143-145-148-150Nd being measured using 1013 Ohm resitors (Trinquier, 2014; Koornneef et al., 2014). Standard deviations of the noise in all five new 1013 Ohm resistors are lower than 5.0 x 10-6 over a 6 month period, with no shift occurring over this time interval. This new detector set-up was tested by analyzing natural zircon standard materials and synthetic U/Pb solutions (www.earthime.org), ranging in age from ~2 Ma to ~600 Ma. All natural zircon standards were chemically abraded (Mattinson, 2005) and all samples were spiked with the ET2535 tracer solution. U-Pb dates obtained using the static measurement routine are compared to measurements employing dynamic peak jumping routines on the MasCom multiplier. This study illustrates the benefits and current limitations of using high gain amplifiers to measure small ion beams for zircon U-Pb geochronology compared to conventional dynamic ion counting techniques. Mattinson, J.M. (2005) Chemical Geology 220:47-66; Trinquier, A. (2014) Application Note 30281; Koornneef, J. et al (2014) Analytica Chimica Acta 819:49-55.

  12. Photoelectrochemical energy conversion obtained with ultrathin organo-metallic-chemical-vapor-deposition layer of FeS2 (pyrite) on TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennaoui, A.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H.; Giersig, M.; Vogel, R.; Weller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrathin (10 to 20 nm thick), polycrystalline films of FeS 2 (pyrite) were grown on TiO 2 (anatase) by chemical vapor deposition. The FeS 2 films were characterized using optical absorption and high-resolution electron microscopy. Photoelectrochemical solar cells, using TiO 2 (anatase) coated with FeS 2 ultrathin films, generated high open-circuit photo-voltages, of up to 600 mV, compared with a single crystal of pyrite electrode (200 mV). The photoelectrochemical behavior shows a strong dependence of photovoltage and photocurrent on the pH of the solution. This paper reports that it is explained by electron injection from the conduction band of FeS 2 to the conduction band of TiO 2 . Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from the redox system in the electrolyte

  13. Photoelectrochemical energy conversion obtained with ultrathin organo-metallic-chemical-vapor-deposition layer of FeS[sub 2] (pyrite) on TiO[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaoui, A.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst., D-1000 Berlin 39 (Germany)); Giersig, M.; Vogel, R.; Weller, H. (Abt. Photochemie, Hahn-Meitner-Inst., D-1000 Berlin 39 (Germany))

    1992-09-01

    Ultrathin (10 to 20 nm thick), polycrystalline films of FeS[sub 2] (pyrite) were grown on TiO[sub 2] (anatase) by chemical vapor deposition. The FeS[sub 2] films were characterized using optical absorption and high-resolution electron microscopy. Photoelectrochemical solar cells, using TiO[sub 2] (anatase) coated with FeS[sub 2] ultrathin films, generated high open-circuit photo-voltages, of up to 600 mV, compared with a single crystal of pyrite electrode (200 mV). The photoelectrochemical behavior shows a strong dependence of photovoltage and photocurrent on the pH of the solution. This paper reports that it is explained by electron injection from the conduction band of FeS[sub 2] to the conduction band of TiO[sub 2]. Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from the redox system in the electrolyte.

  14. Super gene alternation of magnetite and pyrite and the role of their alternation products in the fixation of uranium from the circulating media. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gemmizi, M A [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    In most of the Egyptian altered radioactive granites, highly magnetic heavy particles were found to be radioactive. They are a mixture of several iron oxide minerals which are products of super gene alternation of the preexisting hypo gene iron-bearing minerals especially magnetite and pyrite. The end products of this super gene alternation are mainly hydrated iron oxide minerals limonite and/or goethite. During the alternation, deformation and defects in the mineral structure took place, thereby promoting diffusion of the substitutional and interstitial ions (uranium) towards these sites. The mechanism of the alternation of the hypo gene iron-bearing minerals, magnetite and pyrite to form the secondary mineral hematite, limonite and goethite; and the role of these secondary minerals in fixing uranium from the circulating media, and as indicators to the radioactivity of the host rocks are discussed. 2 figs.

  15. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of ultra-thin photovoltaic devices using a pyrite based p-i-n structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, A.J., E-mail: andy.clayton@optictechnium.com [CSER, Glyndwr University, OpTIC Technium, St Asaph, LL17 0JD (United Kingdom); Irvine, S.J.C.; Barrioz, V.; Brooks, W.S.M. [CSER, Glyndwr University, OpTIC Technium, St Asaph, LL17 0JD (United Kingdom); Zoppi, G.; Forbes, I. [NPAC, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Rogers, K.D.; Lane, D.W.; Hutchings, K.; Roncallo, S. [Centre for Material Science and Engineering, Cranfield University, Swindon, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-31

    Ultra-thin photovoltaic (PV) devices were produced by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapour deposition (AP-MOCVD) incorporating a highly absorbing intermediate sulphurised FeS{sub x} layer into a CdS/CdTe structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed a transitional phase change to pyrite FeS{sub 2} after post growth sulphur (S) annealing of the FeS{sub x} layer between 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C. Devices using a superstrate configuration incorporating a sulphurised or non-sulphurised FeS{sub x} layer were compared to p-n devices with only a CdS/CdTe structure. Devices with sulphurised FeS{sub x} layers performed least efficiently, even though pyrite fractions were present. Rutherford back scattering (RBS) confirmed deterioration of the CdS/FeS{sub x} interface due to S inter-diffusion during the annealing process.

  16. Super gene alternation of magnetite and pyrite and the role of their alternation products in the fixation of uranium from the circulating media. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gemmizi, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    In most of the Egyptian altered radioactive granites, highly magnetic heavy particles were found to be radioactive. They are a mixture of several iron oxide minerals which are products of super gene alternation of the preexisting hypo gene iron-bearing minerals especially magnetite and pyrite. The end products of this super gene alternation are mainly hydrated iron oxide minerals limonite and/or goethite. During the alternation, deformation and defects in the mineral structure took place, thereby promoting diffusion of the substitutional and interstitial ions (uranium) towards these sites. The mechanism of the alternation of the hypo gene iron-bearing minerals, magnetite and pyrite to form the secondary mineral hematite, limonite and goethite; and the role of these secondary minerals in fixing uranium from the circulating media, and as indicators to the radioactivity of the host rocks are discussed. 2 figs

  17. The potential use of storm water and effluent from a constructed wetland for re-vegetating a degraded pyrite trail in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaliya, R.; Kansiime, F.; Oryem-Origa, H.; Kateyo, E.

    During the operation of the Kilembe Mines (copper mining) a cobaltiferous stockpile was constructed, which began to erode after the closure of the mines in the early 1970s. The erosion of the pyrite stockpile resulted in a large acid trail all the way to Lake George (a Ramsar site). The acid trail contaminated a large area of Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) resulting in the death of most of the shallow-rooted vegetation. Processes and conditions created by storm water and effluent from a constructed wetland were assessed for vegetation regeneration in the degraded QENP pyrite trail. Cynodon dactylon, Imperata cylindrica and Hyparrhenia filipendula dominated the regeneration zone (RZ) where storm water and effluent from a constructed wetland was flowing; and the adjacent unpolluted area (UP) with importance value indices of 186.4 and 83.3 respectively. Typha latifolia and C. dactylon formed two distinct vegetation sub-zones within the RZ with the former inhabiting areas with a higher water table. Soil pH was significantly higher in the RZ, followed by UP and bare pyrite trail (BPT) at both 0-15 cm and 16-30 cm depths. Soil electrical conductivity was not significantly different in the RZ and BPT but significantly higher than that in UP for both depths. For 0-15 cm depth, RZ had significantly higher concentrations of copper than BPT and UP which had similar concentrations. Still at this depth (0-15 cm), the unpolluted area had significantly higher concentrations of total phosphorus and total nitrogen than the regeneration zone and the bare pyrite trail which had similar concentrations. The RZ dominated by Typha had significantly higher concentrations of TP and TN compared to the RZ dominated by Cynodon. The concentrations of NH 4-N were significantly lower in Typha regeneration zone than in CRZ at 0-15 cm depth but similar at 16-30 cm depth. At 16-30 cm depth, concentrations of copper were significantly higher in the regeneration zone followed by the bare pyrite

  18. Technological procedure for chemical cleaning prior to re-pyritization of H2O-H2S isotopic exchange installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, I.; Smaranda, D.; Titescu, Gh.

    1996-01-01

    In normal operation the anti-corrosive shielding of the GS installations undergo a slow, irreversible degradation in time so that after 6 - 8 years their protection characteristics break down. In order to put them back in operation the regeneration of anti-corrosive is required. The procedure achieved at ICIS - Rm.Valcea consists in chemical cleaning of the impaired layers and re-pyritization of the interior surface of installations. Chemical cleaning include the following operations: - mechanical cleaning; - water washing; - alkaline washing with sodium hydroxide, tri-sodium phosphate and sodium tri-polyphosphate; - final mechanical cleaning; - neutralizing washing; - chemical cleaning with phosphoric acid solution; - neutralizing washing. After applying this procedure, the surface is prepared for the pyritization regeneration of the anti-corrosive shielding which ensures the prolongation of the equipment service lifetime with another six year period

  19. A novel bioreactor system for simultaneous mutli-metal leaching from industrial pyrite ash: Effect of agitation and sulphur dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sandeep; Akcil, Ata; Mishra, Srabani; Erust, Ceren

    2018-01-15

    Simultaneous multi-metal leaching from industrial pyrite ash is reported for the first time using a novel bioreactor system that allows natural diffusion of atmospheric O 2 and CO 2 along with the required temperature maintenance. The waste containing economically important metals (Cu, Co, Zn & As) was leached using an adapted consortium of meso-acidophilic Fe 2+ and S oxidising bacteria. The unique property of the sample supported adequate growth and activity of the acidophiles, thereby, driving the (bio) chemical reactions. Oxido-reductive potentials were seen to improve with time and the system's pH lowered as a result of active S oxidation. Increase in sulphur dosage (>1g/L) and agitation speed (>150rpm) did not bear any significant effect on metal dissolution. The consortium was able to leach 94.01% Cu (11.75% dissolution/d), 98.54% Co (12.3% dissolution/d), 75.95% Zn (9.49% dissolution/d) and 60.80% As (7.6% dissolution/d) at 150rpm, 1g/L sulphur, 30°C in 8days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New markers to identify the provenance of lapis lazuli: trace elements in pyrite by means of micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Re, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Angelici, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Torino (Italy); Lo Giudice, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Maupas, E. [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Giuntini, L.; Calusi, S.; Massi, M.; Mando, P.A. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Gelli, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Borghi, A. [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Torino (Italy); Gallo, L.M. [Museo Regionale di Scienze Naturali, Torino (Italy); Pratesi, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Firenze (Italy); Museo di Storia Naturale, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    Lapis lazuli has been used for glyptics and carving since the fifth millennium BC to produce jewels, amulets, seals, inlays, etc; the identification of the origin of the stone used for carving artworks may be valuable for reconstructing old trade routes. Since ancient lapis lazuli art objects are precious, only non-destructive techniques can be used to identify their provenance, and ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques allow us to characterise this stone in a fully non-invasive way. In addition, by using an ion microprobe, we have been able to focus the analysis on single crystals, as their typical dimensions may range from a few microns to hundreds of microns. Provenance markers, identified in previous IBA studies and already presented elsewhere, were based on the presence/absence of mineral phases, on the presence/quantity of trace elements inside a phase and on characteristic features of the luminescence spectra. In this work, a systematic study on pyrite crystals, a common accessory mineral in lapis lazuli, was carried out, following a multi-technique approach: optical microscopy and SEM-EDX to select crystals for successive trace element micro-PIXE measurements at two Italian facilities, the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and the INFN LABEC laboratory in Firenze. The results of this work allowed us to obtain new markers for lapis lazuli provenance identification. (orig.)

  1. Stoichiometry-, phase- and orientation-controlled growth of polycrystalline pyrite (FeS 2) thin films by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpfner, C.; Ellmer, K.; Ennaoui, A.; Pettenkofer, C.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H.

    1995-06-01

    The growth process of polycrystalline pyrite thin films employing low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD) in a vertical cold wall reactor has been investigated. Iron pentacarbonyl (IPC) and t-butyldisulfide (TBDS) were utilized as precursors. Study of the growth rate as a function of temperature reveals a kinetically controlled growth process with an activation energy of 73 kJ / mol over the temperature range from 250 to 400°C. From 500 to 630°C, the growth rate is mainly mass transport limited. Decomposition of the films into pyrrhotite (Fe 1 - xS) occurs at higher growth temperatures. The {S}/{Fe} ratio in the films has been controlled from 1.23 up to 2.03 by changing the TBDS partial pressure. With increasing deposition temperature, the crystallites in the films show the tendency to grow [100]-oriented on amorphous substrates at a growth rate of 2.5 Å / s. The grains show a preferential orientation in the [111] direction upon lowering the growth rate down to 0.3 Å / s. Temperatures above 550°C are beneficial in enhancing the grain size in the columnar structured films up to 1.0 μm.

  2. Stoichiometry-, phase- and orientation-controlled growth of polycrystalline pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) thin films by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoepfner, C.; Ellmer, K.; Ennaoui, A.; Pettenkofer, C.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung Solare Energetik, Berlin (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    The growth process of polycrystalline pyrite thin films employing low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD) in a vertical cold wall reactor has been investigated. Iron pentacarbonyl (IPC) and t-butyldisulfide (TBDS) were utilized as precursors. Study of the growth rate as a function of temperature reveals a kinetically controlled growth process with an activation energy of 73 kJ/mol over the temperature range from 250 to 400C. From 500 to 630C, the growth rate is mainly mass transport limited. Decomposition of the films into pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) occurs at higher growth temperatures. The S/Fe ratio in the films has been controlled from 1.23 up to 2.03 by changing the TBDS partial pressure. With increasing deposition temperature, the crystallites in the films show the tendency to grow [100]-oriented on amorphous substrates at a growth rate of 2.5 A/s. The grains show a preferential orientation in the [111] direction upon lowering the growth rate down to 0.3 A/s. Temperatures above 550C are beneficial in enhancing the grain size in the columnar structured films up to 1.0 {mu}m

  3. Inorganic arsenic speciation at river basin scales: The Tinto and Odiel Rivers in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento, A.M. [Department of Geology, Faculty of Experimental Sciences, University of Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain)], E-mail: aguasanta.miguel@dgeo.uhu.es; Nieto, J.M. [Department of Geology, Faculty of Experimental Sciences, University of Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Casiot, C.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F.; Egal, M. [Laboratoire Hydrosciences, UMR 5569, Universite Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier cedex 05 (France)

    2009-04-15

    The Tinto and Odiel rivers are heavily affected by acid mine drainage from mining areas in the Iberian Pyrite Belt. In this work we have conducted a study along these rivers where surface water samples have been collected. Field measurements, total dissolved metals and Fe and inorganic As speciation analysis were performed. The average total concentration of As in the Tinto river (1975 {mu}g L{sup -1}) is larger than in the Odiel river (441 {mu}g L{sup -1}); however, the mean concentration of As(III) is almost four times higher in the Odiel. In wet seasons the mean pH levels of both rivers (2.4 and 3.2 for the Tinto and Odiel, respectively) increase slightly and the amount of dissolved total arsenic tend to decrease, while the As(III)/(V) ratio strongly increase. Besides, the concentration of the reduced As species increase along the water course. As a result, As(III)/(V) ratio can be up to 100 times higher in the lower part of the basins. An estimation of the As(III) load transported by both rivers into the Atlantic Ocean has been performed, resulting in about 60 kg yr{sup -1} and 2.7 t yr{sup -1} by the Tinto and Odiel rivers, respectively. - Total arsenic concentration decreases along the water basins, however the As(III)/(V) ratio increases.

  4. Assessment of the flotability of chalcopyrite, molybdenite and pyrite using biosolids and their main components as collectors for greening the froth flotation of copper sulphide ores.

    OpenAIRE

    Sobarzo, Francisco; Herrera Urbina, Ronaldo; Higueras Higueras, Pablo Leon; Sáez Navarrete, César; Godoy Faúndez, Alex; Reyes Bozo, Lorenzo; Vásquez Bestagno, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Biosolids and representative compounds of their main components ? humic acids, sugars, and proteins ? have been tested as possible environment-friendly collectors and frothers for the flotation of copper sulphide ores. The floatability of chalcopyrite and molybdenite ? both valuable sulphide minerals present in these ores ? as well as non-valuable pyrite was assessed through Hallimond tube flotation tests. Humic acids exhibit similar collector ability for chalcopyrite and molybdenite as that ...

  5. Phase stabilities of pyrite-related MTCh compounds (M=Ni, Pd, Pt; T=Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; Ch=S, Se, Te): A systematic DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachhuber, Frederik; Krach, Alexander; Furtner, Andrea; Söhnel, Tilo; Peter, Philipp; Rothballer, Jan; Weihrich, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite-type and related systems appear for a wide range of binary and ternary combinations of transition metals and main group elements that form Zintl type dumbbell anion units. Those representatives with 20 valence electrons exhibit an extraordinary structural flexibility and interesting properties as low-gap semiconductors or thermoelectric and electrode materials. This work is devoted to the systematic exploration of novel compounds within the class of MTCh compounds (M=Ni, Pd, Pt; T=Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; Ch=S, Se, Te) by means of density functional calculations. Their preferred structures are predicted from an extended scheme of colored pyrites and marcasites. To determine their stabilities, competing binary MT 2 and MCh 2 boundary phases are taken into account as well as ternary M 3 T 2 Ch 2 and M 2 T 3 Ch 3 systems. Recently established stability diagrams are presented to account for MTCh ordering phenomena with a focus on a not-yet-reported ordering variant of the NiAs 2 type. Due to the good agreement with experimental data available for several PtTCh systems, the predictions for the residual systems are considered sufficiently accurate. - Graphical abstract: Compositional and structural stability of MTCh compounds is investigated from first principle calculations. A conceptional approach is presented to study and predict novel stable and metastable compounds and structures of low gap semiconductors with TCh dumbbell units that are isoelectronic and structurally related to pyrite (FeS 2 ). - Highlights: • Study of compositional stability of MTCh vs. M 3 T 2 Ch 2 and M 2 T 3 Ch 3 compounds. • Study of structural stability of known and novel MTCh compounds. • Prediction of novel stable and metastable structures and compounds isoelectronic to pyrite, FeS 2

  6. Geochemical and geochronological constrains on the Chiang Khong volcanic rocks (northwestern Thailand) and its tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Feng, Qinglai; Chonglakmani, Chongpan; Monjai, Denchok

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic rocks in northwestern Thailand exposed dominantly in the Chiang Khong area, are commonly considered to be genetically linked to the tectonic evolution of the Paleo-Tethyan Ocean. The volcanic rocks consist mainly of andesitic to rhyolitic rocks and are traditionally mapped as Permian-Triassic sequences. Our zircon U-Pb geochronological results show that two andesitic samples (TL-1-B and TL-31-B), are representative of the Doi Yao volcanic zone, and give a mean weighted age of 241.2±4.6 Ma and 241.7±2.9 Ma, respectively. The rhyolitic sample (TL-32-B1) from the Doi Khun Ta Khuan volcanic zone erupted at 238.3±3.8 Ma. Such ages indicate that Chiang Khong volcanic rocks erputed during the early Middle Triassic period. Seven samples from the Doi Yao and Doi Khun Ta Khuan zones exhibit an affinity to arc volcanics. Three rhyolitic samples from the Chiang Khong area have a geochemical affinity to both arc and syn-collisional volcanic rocks. The Chiang Khong arc volcanic rocks can be geochemically compared with those in the Lampang area in northern Thailand, also consistent with those in Jinghong area of southwestern Yunnan. This indicates that the Chiang Rai arc-volcanic zone might northwardly link to the Lancangjiang volcanic zone in southwestern China.

  7. U-Pb zircon geochronology in the western part of the Rayner Complex, East Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu; Motoyoshi, Yoichi; Shiraishi, Kazuyuki; Takehara, Mami; Hiroi, Yoshikuni

    2016-01-01

    U-Pb zircon geochronology was applied to nine metasedimentary samples collected from Mt. Yuzhnaya, Condon Hills, and Mt. Lira in the inland region of the Rayner Complex of western Enderby Land, East Antarctica, in order to define the eastern limits of the western Rayner Complex that underwent the Pan-African metamorphism and to evaluate potential source areas of metasedimentary rocks. Condon Hills and Mt. Lira revealed metamorphic ages of ∼ 894 and ∼ 934 Ma, respectively, which are consistent with previously reported metamorphism in association with Rayner Structural Episode (RSE). Mt. Yuzhnaya samples affected by the RSE contain zircon grains rejuvenated during 590-570 Ma, which indicates that the Pan-African reworking can be extended up to Mt. Yuzhnaya. On the other hand, the Condon Hills samples include Archean detritus, and the age peaks from 3850 to 2491 Ma are the oldest components in the Rayner Complex of western Enderby Land. There is no evidence of reworked Napier Complex rocks in the studied Rayner samples. (author)

  8. Geochronological study of the metaconglomerates of the Sao Roque Group, Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassinari, C.C.G.; Kawashita, K.; Kikuchi, R.K.P. de

    1985-01-01

    This work deals with the geochronological study of the metaconglomerates of the Sao Roque Group by Rb-Sr whole rock measurements and K-Ar method in minerals concentrate. The granite-gneissic pebbles from the metaconglomerates have been analysed by Rb-Sr isochronic method and yelded an age of 1200+100 Ma. with a 87 Sr/ 86 Sr intercept of 0.737 +- 0.003. In our view this age might be associated to the metamorphic episode affecting the pre-existent granitic rocks before the epoch of the Sao Roque group sedimentation, or to the original age of the pebbles. The analytical points from the conglomerate matrix seem to define a linear array with 800Ma. This age, probably, represents the epoch of the main metamorphic event on the Sao Roque Group. The K-Ar micas determinations on rocks of the unit in study are concordant in ages, with values around 620.. These ages represent the tectonic estabilization epoch of the Pico de Jaragua region. (Author) [pt

  9. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed

  10. A flavor of 40Ar-39Ar geochronology research at lIT Bombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Kanchan

    2017-01-01

    Geochronology based on radiogenic isotopes has become an invaluable tool in earth sciences. Several radioactive parent-daughter systems of varying half-lives such as Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, K-Ar have been traditionally used by researchers for determining the timing of geological and planetary processes. 40 Ar- 39 Ar dating, a variant of the K-Ar system, is a well-established and versatile method of determining the eruptive ages of volcanic rocks and the ∼150-500° C thermal histories of a variety of more slowly cooled igneous and metamorphic rocks. In the 40 Ar- 39 Ar method the sample is irradiated by fast neutrons in a nuclear reactor to convert some of 39 K into 39 Ar. The fixed natural ratio 39 K/ 40 K provides estimate for the parent 40 K by measuring 39 Ar. In order to know the conversion factor of 39 K to 39 Ar and to take care of other nuclear interfering reactions a sample of known K-Ar age is irradiated along with the unknown. The age of the unknown is then derived by comparison with the monitor sample of known age

  11. Study on geochronology and uranium source of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Dongsheng area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haibin; Xia Yuliang; Tian Shifeng

    2007-01-01

    This paper studied the geochronology of sandstone-type uranium deposit in the Dongsheng area of Ordos Basin. In eastern segment, ages of mineralization at the wing of the ore-roll are found to be 120 ± 5 Ma and 80 ± 5 Ma, and at the front of the ore-roll are 20 ± 2 Ma and 8 ± 1 Ma; While in middle segment, ages of mineralization are 124 ± 6 Ma and 80 ± 5 Ma. This means that the main mineralization in Dongsheng area were formed at early Jurassic and late Cretaceous, and correspondent to the time of structure uplift. Mineralization of roll-front (rich ore) which formed in Miocene and Pliocene may related to tectonic-thermal event taken place at that time and reformed the early mineralization in this area. The isochron line age of sample with uranium grade 0 ) in the sandbody is 24.64 x 10 -6 also shows the uranium pre-concentration in the strata. The even value of ΔU of rocks in Zhiluo formation is -70.2%, this shows that non-mineralized rocks have migrated uranium and acted as important metallogenic uranium sources. (authors)

  12. Contribution for geochronological evolution study of the Pianco-Alto Brigida fold belt system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito Neves, B.B. de; Basei, M.A.S.; Van Schmus, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Proterozoic Painco-Alto Fold Belt is situated in the central portion of the Borborema Province and it probably is just a segment of a longer structural development encompassed between the Patos (N) and Pernambuco (S) lineaments. The geochronological study was carried out along a cross section in the central part of the belt (Paraiba State) where biotite-muscovite quartz schists are the predominating rock types, including intercalations of bi-modal volcanics, marbles and quartzites. These rocks were metamorphosed in the amphibolite facies, and they display a complex history of folding. Zircons of the acid volcanics (meta-rhyolytes where analysed through U/Pb method and they plot in a discordia diagram with superior intercept indicating ages around 1100 Ma. Whole rocks Rb/Sr analyses on the same meta-volcanics are indicating isochrons of 950Ma. These data are being respectively interpreted as ages of sedimentation (and volcanism) and regional metamorphism associated to the main (D sub(2)) phase of folding. One of the main purpose of this paper is to stress the importance of the ages around 950Ma, in the central domain of the Borborema Province, as result of regional folding and metamorphism. Some other occurence of ages in the 1000-900Ma range will be discussed as support for this interpretation from now on adopted. (author)

  13. U-Pb zircon geochronology and evolution of some Adirondack meta-igneous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclelland, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    An update was presented of the recent U-Pb isotope geochronology and models for evolution of some of the meta-igneous rocks of the Adirondacks, New York. Uranium-lead zircon data from charnockites and mangerites and on baddeleyite from anorthosite suggest that the emplacement of these rocks into a stable crust took place in the range 1160 to 1130 Ma. Granulite facies metamorphism was approximately 1050 Ma as indicated by metamorphic zircon and sphene ages of the anorthosite and by development of magmatitic alaskitic gneiss. The concentric isotherms that are observed in this area are due to later doming. However, an older contact metamorphic aureole associated with anorthosite intrusion is observed where wollastonite develops in metacarbonates. Zenoliths found in the anorthosite indicate a metamorphic event prior to anorthosite emplacement. The most probable mechanism for anorthosite genesis is thought to be ponding of gabbroic magmas at the Moho. The emplacement of the anorogenic anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite suite was apparently bracketed by compressional orogenies.

  14. Magmatic tempo of Earth's youngest exposed plutons as revealed by detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Spencer, Christopher J; Danišík, Martin; Hoiland, Carl W

    2017-09-29

    Plutons are formed by protracted crystallization of magma bodies several kilometers deep within the crust. The temporal frequency (i.e. episodicity or 'tempo') of pluton formation is often poorly constrained as timescales of pluton formation are largely variable and may be difficult to resolve by traditional dating methods. The Hida Mountain Range of central Japan hosts the youngest exposed plutons on Earth and provides a unique opportunity to assess the temporal and spatial characteristics of pluton emplacement at high temporal resolution. Here we apply U-Pb geochronology to zircon from the Quaternary Kurobegawa Granite and Takidani Granodiorite in the Hida Mountain Range, and from modern river sediments whose fluvial catchments include these plutons in order to reconstruct their formation. The U-Pb data demonstrate that the Kurobegawa pluton experienced two magmatic pulses at ~2.3 Ma and ~0.9 Ma; whereas, to the south, the Takidani pluton experienced only one magmatic pulse at ~1.6 Ma. These data imply that each of these magmatic systems were both spatially and temporally distinct. The apparent ~0.7 Myr age gap between each of the three magmatic pulses potentially constrains the recharge duration of a single pluton within a larger arc plutonic complex.

  15. Extension of 239+240Pu sediment geochronology to coarse-grained marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Steven A.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Miselis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Sediment geochronology of coastal sedimentary environments dominated by sand has been extremely limited because concentrations of natural and bomb-fallout radionuclides are often below the limit of measurement using standard techniques. ICP-MS analyses of 239+240Pu from two sites representative of traditionally challenging (i.e., low concentration) environments provide a "proof of concept" and demonstrate a new application for bomb-fallout radiotracers in the study of sandy shelf-seabed dynamics. A kasten core from the New Zealand shelf in the Southern Hemisphere (low fallout), and a vibracore from the sandy nearshore of North Carolina (low particle surface area) both reveal measurable 239+240Pu activities at depth. In the case of the New Zealand site, independently verified steady-state sedimentation results in a 239+240Pu profile that mimics the expected atmospheric fallout. The depth profile of 239+240Pu in the North Carolina core is more uniform, indicating significant sediment resuspension, which would be expected in this energetic nearshore environment. This study, for the first time, demonstrates the utility of 239+240Pu in the study of sandy environments, significantly extending the application of bomb-fallout isotopes to coarse-grained sediments, which compose the majority of nearshore regions.

  16. Rb-Sr geochronology from Sao Felix to Xingu: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, J.M.; Pereira, E.D.; Silva Barradas, J.A. da

    1991-01-01

    Rb-Sr systematics have been applied on rocks from the Sao Felix do Xingu region, in the southeastern part of the State of Para. An age of 2716 ± 34 Ma with IR of 0.70292 ± 0.00030 (MSWD = 1.54) and an age of 2677 ± 50 Ma with IR of 0.70161 ± 0.00022 (MSWD = 5.21) had been obtained for a granitic body and a tonalitic body respectively, both of them associated to the green stones belts that occur in this area. Gneisses from the Xingu complex gave an age of 2574 ± 57 Ma with an IR of 0.70416 ± 0.00054 (MSWD = 5.06). An age of 1653 ± 14 Ma with IR of 0.70823 ± 0.02361 (MSWD = 1.71) had been obtained for the Velho Guilherme granite that crosscut the granite-green stones terrains. Such geochronological data show the existence of a magmatic event between 2.72 Ga and 2.68 Ga and permit us to conclude on the archaean age of the green stones terrains. (author)

  17. Sedimentation rates and depositional processes in Lake Superior from 210Pb geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Alexander, E.C. Jr.; Lively, R.S.; Eisenreich, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Sedimentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.32 cm/yr in 17 sediment box cores from Lake Superior, as determined by 210 Pb geochronology. Shoreline erosion and resuspension of nearshore sediments causes moderate to high (0.05-0.11 cm/yr) sedimentation rates in the western arm of Lake Superior. Sedimentation rates are very high (> 0.15 cm/yr) in marginal bays adjoining Lake Superior; and moderate to very high (0.07-0.19 cm/yr) in open lake regions adjacent to marginal bays. Resuspension of nearshore and shoal top sediments in southern and southeastern Lake Superior by storms is responsible for depositional anomalies in 210 Pb profiles corresponding to 1905, 1916-1918, and 1940 storms. Sedimentation rates are very low (0.01-0.03 cm/yr) in the central basins due to isolation from sediment sources. These data indicate that sedimentation rates and processes vary significantly in different regions of Lake Superior. The sedimentation rates provided by this study, in conjunction with previously-reported sedimentation rates, yield a better understanding of the Lake Superior depositional environment

  18. The precambrian of the Anti-Atlas (Morocco): a geochronological synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlot, Rene

    1976-01-01

    Twenty total-rock Rb/Sr isochrons (lambda 87 Rb=1.47x10 -11 yr 1 ) and many individual data, mainly obtained by the K/Ar and Rb/Sr methods, on total rocks and minerals show that the orogenic story of the Precambrian of the Anti-Atlas, which was studied in its western and central parts, began with the Eburnean orogeny (1900-1650 m.y.). Up to now there is no good evidence of an older basement, even if the rather high initial ratio (0.707-0.709) of some Eburnean granites might suggest that such a basement exists at depth. There is also no geochronological evidence of plutonism until in early Panafrican time (680 m.y.) there started a period of intense magmatic and thermal activity which was ended by the emplacement of late post-tectonic granites at 530-520 m.y. The late Panafrican acid volcanism does not generally give suitable material for Rb/Sr dating, because of the great mobility of the radiogenic strontium in such a material even under very weak thermal conditions

  19. Geochemistry and zircon U-Pb geochronology of the Pulang complex, Yunnan province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Zhenshan; Du, Yangsong; Cao, Yi; Gao, Fuping; Wang, Gongwen; Dong, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The Pulang complex is located tectonically at the southern margin of the Yidun-Zhongdian island arc belt in Yunnan province, China, and is closely related to formation of the Pulang copper deposit, which is the largest copper deposit in Asia. The Pulang complex can be divided into three intrusion stages based on contact relationships and petrological characteristics: (1) a first stage of quartz dioritic porphyry; (2) a second stage of quartz monzonitic porphyry; and (3) a third stage of granodioritic porphyry. The crystallization ages of these intrusion stages were determined by single-zircon U-Pb dating, yielding ages of 221.0 ± 1.0, 211.8 ± 0.5, and 206.3 ± 0.7 Ma for the first, second, and third stages, respectively. These dates, integrated with previous geochronological data and field investigations, indicate that the second-stage quartz monzonitic porphyry has a close spatial and temporal relationship with the large Pulang porphyry copper deposit. These age data, geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic results suggest that the Pulang complex formed in the Indo-Chinese epoch (257∼ 205 Ma) by multiphase intrusion of a mixture of mantle- and crust-derived magmas. (author)

  20. The metamorphic basement of the Cordillera Frontal of Mendoza: New geochronologic and isotopic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basei, Miguel; Ramos, Victor A.; Vujovich, Graciela I.; Poma, Stella

    1998-01-01

    The metamorphic rocks of the Cordillera Frontal exposed in the Cordon del Portillo, Mendoza were examined by Rb/Sr geochronology and Nd/Sm isotopic analysis. The Rb/Sr data defined a Devonian age for the last metamorphic episode, similar to the previous K/Ar and Ar/Ar ages obtained in this region and western Precordillera. The isotopic analysis identified three sets of model ages: 1.- The oldest corresponds to a set of meta sedimentary rocks with a model age of 1,400 to 1,700 Ma; 2.- A monzogranodiorite with a model age of 1,000 Ma; and 3.- Metabasites with model ages between 577 and 330 Ma. These rocks are interpreted as 1.- A typical Grenvillian derived basement; 2.- Late Paleozoic granitoids derived from a different Proterozoic basement; and 3.- Some Eopaleozoic metabasites tectonically inter fingered with the Grenvillian basement. These new data are coherent with the existence of a Laurentia derived terrane, Chilenia, that was separated by oceanic rocks from the basement of Pre cordillera during Eopaleozoic times. This last basement known as the Cuyania terrane, was also derived from Laurentia. (author)

  1. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, Joshua L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  2. Sediment accumulation rates and geochronologies measured in the Saguenay Fjord using the Pb-210 dating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J N; Walton, A [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Dartmouth, N.S. (Canada). Atlantic Oceanographic Lab., Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    1980-02-01

    Sediment accumulation rates were estimated from the vertical distribution of excess Pb-210 measured in sediment cores collected at seven stations in the Saguenay Fjord, Quebec. These rates decrease with increasing water depth and distance from the mouth of the Saguenay River, ranging from 4.0 g cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ (approximately = 7 cm yr/sup -1/) near the head of the fjord to 0.07 g cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ (approximately 0.1 cm yr/sup -1/) in the deep inner basin of the fjord. In one core from the head of the fjord, layered sediment structures, having different physical characteristics and composition, appear related to recent pulsed inputs of older raised marine deposits displaced by a landslide in 1971. Synchronous depositional anomalies in several cores provide evidence of other large scale sediment redistribution processes in the fjord. Pb-210 geochronologies are generally in good agreement with time-stratigraphic horizons inferred both from Cs-137 activity profiles and from the analysis of pollen assemblages in one core. (author).

  3. The influence of pH and reaction time on the formation of FeSe{sub 2} upon selenite reduction by nano-sized pyrite-greigite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Mingliang [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Zhuhai (China). Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Ma, Bin; Charlet, Laurent [Grenoble Univ. (France). Environmental Geochemistry Group; Chen, Fanrong; Yang, Yongqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pH and reaction time on the formation of FeSe{sub 2} by reductive precipitation of Se(IV) with nano-sized pyrite-greigite was investigated. Reductive precipitation is an effective method of attenuating the mobility of {sup 79}Se, which is foreseen to be a dangerous radioisotope for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The results indicated that Se(0)was formed at pH <4.05, whereas, at pH > 6.07, considerable amount of FeSe{sub 2} was formed along with Se(0). These observations are in agreement with the thermodynamic predictions reported in this work. Furthermore, the formation of FeSe{sub 2} was found to continue by increasing the reaction time, indicating that the Se(0) formed in the early reaction stage is gradually transformed to FeSe{sub 2} upon the depletion of aqueous Se(IV). Since FeSe{sub 2} has a stronger reactivity than pyrite, it was proposed that greigite, rather than pyrite, was responsible for the formation of FeSe{sub 2}. The findings in this study are of interest for key geochemical processes governing the mobility of toxic {sup 79}Se in the environment in presence of iron sulfides.

  4. Investigation of pyrite as a contributor to slagging in eastern bituminous coals. Quarterly progress report 9, October 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryers, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    The objective of this program is to examine slags formed as a result of firing coals with varying concentration levels, size distribution, and orientation of pyrite with regard to mineral matter in the coal in a laboratory furnace. The program tasks are: (1) selection of eight candidate coals; (2) chemical characterization of the coal samples and identification of the pyrite size, distribution, and orientation with respect to other mineral matter and concentration levels; (3) testing of the candidate coals in a laboratory furnace; (4) chemical and physical characterization of the slag and fly ash samples created by the impurities in the coal sample; (5) influence of coal beneficiation on furnace slagging; and (6) analysis of data and identification of parameters influencing the contribution of pyrite to slagging problems. Washing of the Upper Freeport coal from Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was completed by the last quarter of 1983. The washed product was characterized for mineral content, and a combustion test was performed. Kentucky No. 9 from Henderson County, Kentucky, selected as the sixth coal to be investigated, was characterized using size and gravity fractionation techniques and was combusted in the laboratory furnace to evaluate its slagging and fouling potential. The remaining two coals to be characterized and combusted were identified as Illinois No. 5 and Lower Kittanning from Clarion County, Pennsylvania. 80 figures, 27 tables.

  5. Isolation and characterization of bacteria on the drainage water from Ratones mine and its behaviour on pyrite; Aislamiento y caracterizacion de bacterias en aguas de la mina de ratones y su comportamiento con pirita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino, J L; Saez, R M

    1974-07-01

    This paper describes some of the studies made about iron and sulfur oxidizing bacteria on the drainage water from Ratones mine. Different liquid and solid media were utilized as well as some energy sources, ferrous sulphate, thiosulfate and sulfur. Some experiment were al so realized on museum grade pyrite aimed at determining the possibilities of applying the mentioned bacteria on the leaching of pyrite and subsequently on the leaching of uranium ores. (Author) 27 refs.

  6. Archean and proterozoic in the West-European Hercynian chain: isotopic geochemistry (Sr-Nd-Pb) and U-Pb geochronology on zircons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrot, C.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis reports the study of isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry and U-Pb geochronology on zircons in the immersed granulites of the Bay of Biscay: U-Pb geochronology on zircons, Nd isotopic geochemistry, Sr isotopic geochemistry, common Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and rare earth data on minerals, comparison with other European granulites, comparison with West-Africa, study of Archean and proterozoic in the Hercynian chain. The second part reports the study of the U-Pb geochronology on zircon in the Cadomian, and the third part addresses the Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry of some Cadomian granitoid, and the crust contamination in different regions [fr

  7. Decoding a protracted zircon geochronological record in ultrahigh temperature granulite, and persistence of partial melting in the crust, Rogaland, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Antonin T.; Bingen, Bernard; Duchene, Stephanie; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-magali; Bosse, Valerie

    2018-04-01

    This contribution evaluates the relation between protracted zircon geochronological signal and protracted crustal melting in the course of polyphase high to ultrahigh temperature (UHT; T > 900 °C) granulite facies metamorphism. New U-Pb, oxygen isotope, trace element, ion imaging and cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging data in zircon are reported from five samples from Rogaland, South Norway. The data reveal that the spread of apparent age captured by zircon, between 1040 and 930 Ma, results both from open-system growth and closed-system post-crystallization disturbance. Post-crystallization disturbance is evidenced by inverse age zoning induced by solid-state recrystallization of metamict cores that received an alpha dose above 35 × 1017 α g-1. Zircon neocrystallization is documented by CL-dark domains displaying O isotope open-system behaviour. In UHT samples, O isotopic ratios are homogenous (δ18O = 8.91 ± 0.08‰), pointing to high-temperature diffusion. Scanning ion imaging of these CL-dark domains did not reveal unsupported radiogenic Pb. The continuous geochronological signal retrieved from the CL-dark zircon in UHT samples is similar to that of monazite for the two recognized metamorphic phases (M1: 1040-990 Ma; M2: 940-930 Ma). A specific zircon-forming event is identified in the orthopyroxene and UHT zone with a probability peak at ca. 975 Ma, lasting until ca. 955 Ma. Coupling U-Pb geochronology and Ti-in-zircon thermometry provides firm evidence of protracted melting lasting up to 110 My (1040-930 Ma) in the UHT zone, 85 My (ca. 1040-955 Ma) in the orthopyroxene zone and some 40 My (ca. 1040-1000 Ma) in the regional basement. These results demonstrate the persistence of melt over long timescales in the crust, punctuated by two UHT incursions.

  8. Geochronology of the Jequie-Itabuna granulitic belt and of the Contendas-Mirante volcano-sedimentary belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, Moacyr M.; Barbosa, Johildo S.F.; Sabate, Pierre

    1995-01-01

    The Jequie-Itabuna Granulitic Belt is divided here into the Jequie-Mutuipe-Maracas Domain and the Atlantic Coast Domain. The paper analyzes the geochronological data from the Jequie-Mutuipe-Maracas Domain in two parts: plutonic rocks equilibrated in granulite facies, including the charno-enderbitic rocks from the Laje-Mutuipe region and the charnockitic rocks from the Maracas region; and ortho- and paraderived rocks metamorphosed in granulite facies, with the data obtained from rocks collected at the Jequie quarry and from homogeneous rocks collected at the western outskirts of the Jequirica town. The available geochronological data for the Atlantic Coast Domain is discussed, and due to the lack of petrologic control of the analyzed rocks, the geological significance of the ages between 2.0 and 2.3 is obtained in several line regressions. The paper identifies the following domains within the Contendas-Mirante volcano-sedimentary belt: the the basement dones, the volcano-sedimentary sequence and the intrusive rocks. The basement domes is the domain of the ancient gray gneisses (ca 3.4 Ga), to TTG (tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) terrains and among the different massifs that crop out in the SE sector of the volcano-sedimentary belt, those of Sete Voltas and Boa Vista/Mata Verde have geochronological data available. The volcano-sedimentary sequence is divided into a lower, a middle and an upper unit and its available isotopic data are analyzed. The item referent to the intrusive rocks deals with the following plutons: The Lagoa Morro da Velha granitoid, the Pe da Serra granite, the Rio Jacare sill and the Transamazonian granites. 31 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Geochemistry and geochronology of the Archean and palaeo-Proterozoic formations of southern Cameroon (Ntem group, Congo craton)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rchameni, R.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the crustal evolution of the NW margin of the Congo craton using structural, petrography, isotopic, geochemical and geochronological studies of the Archean and palaeo-Proterozoic formations of the Ntem group of southern Cameroon. The synthesis of these studies allows to propose a diapir-type gravity model linked with the genesis of granitoids to explain the geodynamical evolution of this part of the craton during the Archean. A convergence model with the collision of the Congo and Sao-Francisco cratons and with crust thickening followed by a relaxation phase is proposed for the palaeo-Proterozoic. (J.S.)

  10. The lower Mesozoic record of detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Sonora, Mexico, and its paleogeographic implications

    OpenAIRE

    González-León, Carlos M.; Valencia, Víctor A.; Lawton, Timothy F.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Gehrels, George E.; Leggett, William J.; Montijo-Contreras, Óscar; Fernández, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology from each of the formations of the Triassic-Lower Jurassic Barranca and El Antimonio groups of central and northwestern Sonora and from the Lower Jurassic Basomari and Middle Jurassic Lily formations of northern Sonora indicate they contain distinctive zircon populations. A Proterozoic population has peak ages near 1.8, 1.7, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.1 Ga. A population of Permo-Triassic grains with important peak ages near 269, 254, 245, 234 and 227 Ma. A third popula...

  11. Geochronological framework of the early Paleozoic Bainaimiao Cu-Mo-Au deposit, NE China, and its tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Hua; Mao, Jing-Wen; Ma, Xing-Hua; Che, He-Wei; Ou'yang, He-Gen; Gao, Xu

    2017-08-01

    The Bainaimiao Cu-Mo-Au deposit of NE China is an important ore deposit in the middle section of the northern margin of the North China Craton. The early Paleozoic Bainaimiao Group is the main ore-hosting rock. The mineralization at the deposit shows features of porphyry alteration and late-stage orogenesis and transformation. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age data indicate that the ages of the Third and Fifth formations of the Bainaimiao Group are 492.7 ± 2.9 Ma (MSWD = 0.53) and 488.9 ± 3.1 Ma (MSWD = 0.92), respectively. The age of quartz diorite that intrudes the Bainaimiao Group is 459.3 ± 6.4 Ma (MSWD = 2.20). Molybdenite samples from massive Cu-Mo-bearing ores and quartz veins in the southern ore belt yield a Re-Os isochron age of 438.2 ± 2.7 Ma (MSWD = 0.16), which is consistent with the Re-Os isochron age of molybdenite in the northern ore belt, implying that the two ore belts belong to the same mineralization system. Muscovite from a post-magmatic Cu-Mo-bearing quartz-calcite vein yields an Ar-Ar isochron age of 422.5 ± 3.9 Ma (MSWD = 0.64) with an initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 286 ± 21. The well-defined plateau age of the muscovite is 422.4 ± 2.6 Ma (MSWD = 0.05), which represents the time of the post-magmatic orogenic transformation event. Based on our new age data and previous findings, we propose that the Bainaimiao Cu-Mo-Au deposit formed in an active continental margin setting and experienced four stages of ore mineralization: (1) a Late Cambrian-Middle Ordovician volcanic-sedimentary stage; (2) a Late Ordovician porphyry mineralization stage; (3) a Late Silurian regional metamorphism stage; and (4) an orogenic transformation stage. Subhedral and euhedral Paleoproterozoic (2402-1810 Ma) inherited zircons indicate that the Bainaimiao Group has a tectonic affinity with the North China Craton. The Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which is closely related to the complex closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean, is favorable for prospecting for Paleozoic porphyry Cu

  12. Acid drainages of the pyritic sterile from the Pocos de Caldas uranium mine: environmental interpretation and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Vicente Paulo de

    1995-12-01

    Considering the planned closure of the first uranium mine and milling plant operating in Brazil, located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, in the State of Minas Gerais, in the next two years, there is the need to obtain basic information for its decommissioning. Special attention has been directed to the following critical areas: open pit, tailing, dam and waste rock piles, because these are the main sources of acid drainage generation. These waters cannot be allowed to flow in the external environment because in addition to sulphuric acid, there is a number of elements in concentration above those allowed by regulations. Among the waste piles (bota-foras BF) two of them BF-4 and BF-8, are in a process of acid generation, thus requiring more attention. The objective of this work was to simulate at the laboratory scale the oxidation and the reduction zones of BF-4. The experiments were conducted in acrylic columns, where the waste sample was kept under aerated and saturated conditions, in different columns. The control of the chemical (solubilized chemical species), physico-chemical (redox potential, pH, conductivity) and biological (bacterial activity) parameters has been carried out on the acid solutions generated by the chemical and biological reactions that occur at the waste. Although the results refer to a four month period, some relevant points can be highlighted, which will serve as a basis for further research. The mineralogical characterization identified the existence of other sulphides associated to pyrite with lower oxidation potential than the latter. The results obtained with the biological characterization for the two conditions studied revealed that the bacterial activity is more intense in the region in contact with air, than in saturated region. (author)

  13. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  14. Geochronology and Fluid-Rock Interaction Associated with the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayek, M.; Goodell, P.; Ren, M.; Simmons, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca District, Mexico, largely consists of secondary U 6+ minerals, which occur within a breccia pipe mainly hosted by the 44 Ma Nopal and Colorados volcanic formations. These two units overly the Pozos conglomerate formation and Cretaceous limestone. Three new vertical diamond drill holes (DDHs) were recently drilled at Nopal I. DDH-PB1 with continuous core was drilled through the Nopal I deposit and two additional DDHs were drilled ∼50 m on either side of the cored hole. These DDHs terminate 20 m below the current water table, thus allowing the detection of possible gradients in radionuclide contents resulting from transport from the overlying uranium deposit. Primary uraninite within the main ore body is rare and fine-grained (∼50 micrometers), thus making geochronology of the Nopal I deposit very difficult. Uranium, lead and oxygen isotopes can be used to study fluid-uraninite interaction, provided that the analyses are obtained on the micro-scale. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) permits in situ measurement of isotopic ratios with a spatial resolution on the scale of a few (micro)m. Preliminary U-Pb results show that uraninite from the main ore body gives an age of 32 ± 8 Ma, whereas uraninite from the uraniferous Pozos conglomerate that lies nearly 100 m below the main ore body and 25 meters above the water table, gives a U-Pb age that is 18 O = -10.8(per t housand), whereas the uraninite within the Pozos conglomerate has a (delta) 18 O = +1.5(per t housand). If it is assumed that both uraninites precipitated from meteoric water ((delta) 18 O = -7(per t housand)), then calculated precipitation temperatures are 55 C for the uraninite from the ore body and 20 C for uraninite hosted by the Pozos conglomerate. These temperatures are consistent with previous studies that calculated precipitation temperatures for clay minerals associated with uraninite

  15. The Middlesex Fells Volcanic Complex: A Revised Tectonic Model based on Geochronology, Geochemistry, and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Boston Bay area is composed of several terranes originating on the paleocontinent of Avalonia, an arc terrane that accreted onto the continent of Laurentia during the Devonian. Included in these terranes is the Middlesex Fells Volcanic Complex, a bimodal complex composed of both intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks. Initial studies suggested that this volcanic complex formed during a rift event as the Avalonian continent separated from its parent continent 700-900 Ma. New geochemical and geochronological data and field relationships observed in this study establishes a new tectonic model. U-Pb laser ablation zircon data on four samples from different units within the complex reveal that the complex erupted 600 Ma. ICP-MS geochemical analysis of the metabasalt member of the complex yield a trace element signature enriched in Rb, Pb, and Sr and depleted in Th, indicating a subduction component to the melt and interpreted as an eruption into a back-arc basin. The felsic units similarly have an arc related signature when plotted on trace element spider diagrams and tectonic discrimination diagrams. Combined with the field relationships, including an erosional unconformity, stratigraphic and intrusional relationships and large faults from episodic extension events, this data suggests that the Middlesex Fells Volcanic Complex was erupted as part of the arc-sequence of Avalonia and as part of the formation of a back-arc basin well after Avalonia separated from its parent continent. This model presents a significantly younger eruption scenario for the Middlesex Fells Volcanics than previously hypothesized and may be used to study and compare to other volcanics from Avalon terranes in localities such as Newfoundland and the greater Boston area.

  16. Quaternary Geochronology, Paleontology, and Archaeology of the Upper San Pedro River Valley, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, E. P.

    2013-12-01

    This poster presents the results of multi-disciplinary investigations of the preservation and extent of Quaternary fossil-bearing strata in the San Pedro River Valley in Sonora, Mexico. Geologic deposits in the portions of the San Pedro Valley in southern Arizona contain one of the best late Cenozoic fossil records known in North America and the best record of early humans and extinct mammals on the continent. The basin in the U.S. is one of the type locations for the Blancan Land Mammal Age. Hemiphilian and Irvingtonian fossils are common. Rancholabrean remains are widespread. Strata in the valley adjacent to the international border with Mexico have yielded the densest concentration of archaeological mammoth-kill sites known in the western hemisphere. Despite more than 60 years of research in the U.S., however, and the fact that over one third of the San Pedro River lies south of the international boundary, little has been known about the late Cenozoic geology of the valley in Mexico. The study reported here utilized extensive field survey, archaeological documentation, paleontological excavations, stratigraphic mapping and alluvial geochronology to determine the nature and extent of Quaternary fossil-bearing deposits in the portions of the San Pedro Valley in Sonora, Mexico. The results demonstrate that the Plio-Pleistocene fossil -bearing formations known from the valley in Arizona extend into the uppermost reaches of the valley in Mexico. Several new fossil sites were discovered that yielded the remains of Camelids, Equus, Mammuthus, and other Proboscidean species. Late Pleistocene archaeological remains were found on the surface of the surrounding uplands. AMS radiocarbon dating demonstrates the widespread preservation of middle- to late- Holocene deposits. However, the late Pleistocene deposits that contain the archaeological mammoth-kill sites in Arizona are absent in the valley in Mexico, and are now known to be restricted to relatively small portions of

  17. Stratigraphical sequence and geochronology of the volcanic rock series in caifang basin, south jiangxi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xunsheng; Wu Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    The late Mesozoic volcanic rocks in Jiangxi constitute two volcanic belts: the northern is Xiajiang-Guangfeng volcanic belt, the volcanic rocks series belong to one volcano cycle and named Wuyi group which is subdivided into three formations (Shuangfengling formation, Ehuling formation and Shixi formation); the southern is Sannan-Xunwu volcanic belt, the volcanic rocks series in Caifang basin which locates on Sannan-Xunwu volcanic belt also belong to only one volcano cycle. It can be subdivided into two lithology and lithofacies units (upper and lower): the lower unit consists of sedimentary rocks and associated with a subordinate amount of volcanic rocks, it belongs to erupt-deposit facies which is the product of early volcanic stage; the upper unit is mostly composed of volcanic rocks, it belongs to erupt facies that is the volcanic eruption product. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age of rhyolite? which locates at the top of the upper unit is 130.79 ± 0.73) Ma. According to the new International Stratigraphic Chart, the boundary of Jurassic and Cretaceous is (145.4 ± 4.0) Ma, so the age shows that the geologic period of Caifang volcanic rocks series is early Early Cretaceous epoch. On the basis of lithological correlation, lithofacies and stratigraphic horizon analysis, the volcanic rock series in Caifang basin fall under Wuyi group, and the lower unit could be incorporated into Shuangfengling formation, the upper unit could be incorporated into Ehuling formation. The subdivision of sequence and the determination of geochronology of the volcanic rock series in Caifang basin provide some references for the study of the late Mesozoic volcanic rocks series of the Sannan-Xunwu volcanic belt. (authors)

  18. Pangea: Geochronological correlation of successive environmental and strati-tectonic phases in Europe and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veevers, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    A robust geochronology based on U-Pb zircon ages in Australia (n = 158) and Europe (n = 376) provides a rigorous test of (1) the model of a climatic-tectonic cycle of a single continent (Pangea) and ocean (Panthalassa) with an icehouse climate alternating with many continents and oceans with a greenhouse climate, and (2) the idea of coeval (320 to 300 Ma) right-lateral shear events in Eastern Australia and Europe followed by earliest Permian (~ 300 Ma) extension. During Pangean assembly, stress from the oblique collision of Laurussia and Gondwanaland bent the oroclines in Iberia, drove the intense shortening in Central Australia and terminal megakinking in the Lachlan orogen, and possibly drove the bending of oroclines in Eastern Australia. Extension I (~ 300 Ma, Carboniferous/Permian) followed the first outburst of self-induced (monsoonal) heat from the newly assembled Pangea, and generated fresh accommodation space for globally synchronous sedimentary successions, including the glacial base and succeeding coals of the Gondwana facies. Extension was relieved by sags on (isotropic) cratons and rifts on (anisotropic) fold belts with voluminous volcanics. In Europe, the Variscan orogen was cut into right-lateral magmatic rifts and the craton sagged to accumulate magmatic basins; likewise, the convergent margin of Eastern Australia was cut into a long magmatic rift and the cratonic foreland covered by the Gondwana facies. The end-Permian (251 Ma) sea-level drawdown, climate warming, and severe biotic extinction, with no obvious tectonic cause, were responsible for the Early-Middle Triassic coal gap. A second outburst of heat drove Extension II (235 Ma, Carnian, Late Triassic), expressed as rifts and sags that accumulated a second set of coal-bearing strata. At this time of its largest extent, Pangea underwent incipient breakup by rifting of the Atlantic Margins of North America, Morocco, and Western Europe that developed into 190 Ma drifting.

  19. U–Pb geochronology and geochemistry of late Palaeozoic volcanism in Sardinia (southern Variscides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gaggero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The latest Carboniferous to lower Permian volcanism of the southern Variscides in Sardinia developed in a regional continental transpressive and subsequent transtensile tectonic regime. Volcanism produced a wide range of intermediate–silicic magmas including medium- to high-K calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, and rhyolites. A thick late Palaeozoic succession is well exposed in the four most representative Sardinian continental basins (Nurra, Perdasdefogu, Escalaplano, and Seui–Seulo, and contains substantial stratigraphic, geochemical, and geochronological evidence of the area's complex geological evolution from the latest Carboniferous to the beginning of the Triassic. Based on major and trace element data and LA-ICP-MS U–Pb zircon dating, it is possible to reconstruct the timing of post-Variscan volcanism. This volcanism records active tectonism between the latest Carboniferous and Permian, and post-dates the unroofing and erosion of nappes in this segment of the southern Variscides. In particular, igneous zircon grains from calc-alkaline silicic volcanic rocks yielded ages between 299 ± 1 and 288 ± 3 Ma, thereby constraining the development of continental strike-slip faulting from south (Escalaplano Basin to north (Nurra Basin. Notably, andesites emplaced in medium-grade metamorphic basement (Mt. Cobingius, Ogliastra show a cluster of older ages at 332 ± 12 Ma. Despite the large uncertainty, this age constrains the onset of igneous activity in the mid-crust. These new radiometric ages constitute: (1 a consistent dataset for different volcanic events; (2 a precise chronostratigraphic constraint which fits well with the biostratigraphic data and (3 insights into the plate reorganization between Laurussia and Gondwana during the late Palaeozoic evolution of the Variscan chain.

  20. The Padre Miguel Ignimbrite Suite, central Honduras: Paleomagnetism, geochronology, and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Roberto S. Molina; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Rogers, Robert D.; Ganerød, Morgan; Dekkers, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    The Padre Miguel Group in western Honduras is a silicic volcanic sequence that forms part of the Central American Miocene volcanic arc built on the Chortis continental fragment. We report new 40Ar/39Ar data of 16.1 ± 0.2 Ma and 14.42 ± 0.08 Ma for the Padre Miguel Group, and present paleomagnetic data for 36 cooling units (mainly ignimbrites) from localities north and northeast of the capital city of Tegucigalpa. These rocks are characterized by univectorial characteristic magnetization carried mainly by low-Ti titanomagnetites, or two component magnetizations with a minor secondary overprint. Dual polarity magnetizations suggest that it is a primary thermo-remanence and the obtained data scatter can be straightforwardly explained by paleosecular variation. The overall mean of 33 selected sites (14.39°N, 87.14°W) defines a paleomagnetic pole at lat = 80.0°N, lon = 142.9°E (K = 24.5, A95 = 5.2°). The overall mean compared with the North America expected direction indicates statistically insignificant rotation and inclination anomaly (R = - 4.1° ± 6.1° and an F = - 8.6° ± 11.3°). Restoring 255 km of sinistral slip in the Polochic-Motagua fault system, as suggested by Cayman Trough reconstructions since 15 Ma, brings the mid-Miocene arcs of southern Mexico (Oaxaca) and the Central America ignimbrite province into alignment; this is consistent with a derivation of the Chortis Block from southern Mexico. Our paleomagnetic and geochronological studies hence support models that explain the offset of the Miocene ignimbrite belt of Central America by post-Middle Miocene displacement of the Chortis Block relative to North America.

  1. Geochronologic constraints of the uplift and metamorphism along the Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, C.P.; Zeitler, P.K.; Cooper, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    Geochronological studies of pegmatites and Alpine Schist exposed east of the Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, reveal a complex history beginning with magmatism and metamorphism at c. 68 m.y. ago and ending with rapid uplift and exhumation in the last 5 m.y. Pegmatites exposed in the Mataketake Range give conventional U-Pb monazite and SHRIMP ion-probe zircon ages of 68 ± 2.6 Ma and 67.9 ± 2.5 Ma, respectively. Inasmuch as petrologic and isotopic data indicate that the Alpine pegmatites are melts derived from the Alpine Schist, the age of the pegmatites suggests that, at least locally, the high-grade metamorphism is considerably younger than previously assumed. We tentatively suggest that metamorphism, in at least some areas of the Alpine Schist, may be associated with Late Cretaceous transtension rather than resulting from the consequences of collision during the Rangitata Orogeny. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar studies of hornblendes from the Alpine Schist, collected from the Haast River to the Franz Josef Glacier area, reveal highly disturbed spectra. Despite this complexity, these analyses define a systematic decrease in ages both across-strike toward the Alpine Fault (Haast River traverse) and northwards along-strike towards Mt Cook. This pattern of decreasing 40 Ar/ 39 Ar hornblende ages is also observed in lower closure temperature systems such as zircon and apatite fission-track ages. We interpret the decrease in ages toward the fault to be the result of deeper exhumation in the immediate vicinity of the Alpine Fault, whereas we interpret the northward younging of fault-proximal samples to be a result of both more recent and possibly more extensive exhumation than occurred in areas to the south. (author). 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. The geochronological data of South-Riograndense shield and its implications on geotectonic order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliani Junior, E.

    1986-01-01

    Based on 250 new radiometric analyses using K-Ar, Rb-Sr, Pb-Pb and Fission Tracks methods, all of them interpreted with the existing geochronological data, this paper divides the Rio Grande do Sul Shield (Southern Brazil) into geotectonic provinces, as well as presents the ages that seem to be of the major rock generator events. It is suggested that the Brasiliano Cycle (Upper Precambrian) was active during a time interval greater than has been thought and its chronological limits could be extended from 850 to 550 Ma with late and local magmatic episodes reaching the 450 Ma ago. Outcrops of Early Proterozoic or older terranes are rare, being the most areas related to the Late Proterozoic. These areas can be divided into two tectonic entities: (1) the Pelotas Batholit, a multi-intrusive and polyphase granitoid body, in the eastern shield, pointing out ages that range from 850 to 550 Ma and (2) its Marginal Basin in the west represented by supracrustal rocks such as gneisses, mafic-ultramafic and volcano-sedimentary sequences showing a complex structural pattern and green schists to amphibolite metamorphic facies. Their K-Ar and Rb-Sr ages are concentrated between 760 and 640 Ma, though values of 800 may be found. Polyphase granitic suites and their volcanic correspondents, sometimes interbabded with molassoid sediments, are being attributes to the 650 - 450 Ma time interval. Finally, it tries to enclose the Rio Grande do Sul Shield in the regional geologic context (Southern Brazil and Uruguay), which to supposed to have developed in agreement with the Plate Tectonic. (Author) [pt

  3. Indirect dating of deformation: a geochronological study from the Pan African Ajaj shear zone, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt; Klötzli, Urs

    2013-04-01

    The metamorphic complexes of the Arabian-Nubian Shield were exhumed by different exhumation mechanisms (i.e. in extension or oblique transpression regime) during the Pan African activity of Najd Fault System - the largest pre-Mesozoic shear zone on Earth. The different exhumation mechanisms could be the consequence of (i) orientation of the complexes at slightly different angles with respect to the overall orientation of the principal stresses of the Najd Fault System, (ii) exhumation from different depths, or (iii) change of the stress regime through time. In order to test the third hypothesis, geochronological work will be applied on a representative suite of complexes across the Najd Fault System. In particular we focus on three complexes in the Arabian part of the shield named Qazaz, Hamadat and Wajh. In general, the metamorphic complexes of the Arabian part of the shield exhibit left-lateral transcurrent tectonism along the NW-SE Najd faults and right-lateral movement along conjugate NE-SW striking structures. The whole unit forms an anastomosing network of planar structures that demarcate large fish-shaped bodies of high grade metamorphics. The Hamadat complex is surrounded by a left-lateral greenshist facies WNW-ESE Ajaj shear zone. The complex consists of folds that are strongly pinched to the north and more open to the south marked by a well-developed parallel stretching sub-horizontal lineation. Granite intrusions along and across the Ajaj shear zone may allow testing the timing of the deformation. Deformed and non-deformed samples of these granites will be examined by age dating to determine the absolute timing of the metamorphism and the deformation for the complex. Some 20 samples are currently being prepared for zircon dating. Whilst no results are available at the time of writing of this abstract, they will be presented at EGU 2013.

  4. Sediments of the Lagoa Olho D'Agua: geochronology and accumulation of trace metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorato, Eliane Valentim

    2002-01-01

    An assessment of the environmental impact of anthropic activities in the Lagoa Olho D'Agua, located in Jaboatao dos Guararapes County, Brazil, was carried out by assessing the vertical distribution of some trace metals (Cd, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, U, Zn and Zr) in dated sediment samples. Sediment cores were collected from thirteen locations at the northern, central and southern sections of the lagoon. The metal content in the samples was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Its organic carbon content was also determined and used to characterize the environment as, either oxic or anoxic environments can bias the trace element content of sediment samples. The influence of the hydrodynamic characteristics in the sedimentation process was also studied. The results obtained for the geochronology of sediments showed a pronounced increase in sedimentation rates in the period of 1970 - 1980 and 1980 - 1990 in the sampling stations ST-09, ST-10, ST-11, ST-12 e ST-13 (ca.480% in the 80's to 90's ) compared to ca. 90% increase observed in other sampling stations. This increase can be associated to the demographic growth of ca. 500% that occurred in Jaboatao dos Guararapes County in the 80's to 90's predominantly along the shoreline. The geochemistry analyses of sediment samples, on the other hand, showed that the severe degradation process the occurred in the lagoon in the last 30 years was caused by the release of pollutants from industrial facilities as well as by the discharge of untreated domestic sewage. These domestic sewage favorable the increase of the concentration of organic material in the lagoon, accentuating the adsorption process of the metals on the sediments, mainly Fe and Zr in the suspense particles. The accentuated increase observed in both Fe and Zr concentrations is compatible with period of built industries basic steel works foundries and painting, indicating the anthropogenic origin these metals. (author)

  5. Photo-nuclear reactions on nuclei in the W-Re-Os region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takehito; Goko, Shinji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Mohr, Peter; Lui, Yiu-Wing; Goriely, Stephane

    2005-01-01

    Photo-disintegration cross sections for 186 W, 187 Re, 188 Os have been measured at energies close to the neutron thresholds using quasi monochromatic γ-ray beams from laser Compton scattering (LCS). The data are used to evaluate the cross sections for the inverse neutron capture reactions within the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. The influence of the radiative neutron capture on the 9.75 keV first excited state of 187 Os which is substantially populated in stellar plasmas at typical s-process temperatures is examined in connection to the 187 Re- 187 Os cosmochronology. (author)

  6. Highly precise Re-Os dating for molybdenite using alkaline fusion and NTIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, R; Stein, H; Morgan, J

    1998-03-01

    The technique described in this paper represents the modification and combination of two previously existing methods, alkaline fusion and negative thermal ion mass spectrometry (NTIMS). We have used this technique to analyze repeatedly a homogeneous molybdenite powder used as a reference standard in our laboratory. Analyses were made over a period of 18 months, using four different calibrations of two different spike solutions. The age of this standard reproduces at a level of +/-0.13%. Each individual age analysis carries an uncertainty of about 0.4% that includes the uncertainty in the decay constant for (187)Re. This new level of resolution has allowed us to recognize real differences in ages for two grain-size populations of molybdenite from some Archean samples.

  7. Geology, geochemistry, and geochronology of the East Bay gold trend, Red Lake, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shaun; Camacho, Alfredo; Fayek, Mostafa; Epp, Mark; Spell, Terry L.; Armstrong, Richard

    2018-01-01

    The Red Lake greenstone belt is situated in northwestern Ontario within the Uchi Subprovince, Superior Province. Most gold deposits therein are associated with major deformation corridors; the east-west oriented "Mine trend" hosts most of the large deposits and the northeast-southwest "East Bay trend" hosts several small deposits and showings. Gold along the East Bay trend typically occurs in quartz replacement veins that were emplaced into pre-existing quartz-carbonate veins. Gold can occur as free gold or along vein margins associated with pyrite and pyrrhotite. Most primary fluid inclusions, preserved in relatively undeformed portions of veins, are carbonaceous with lesser quantities of aqueous inclusions. The average homogenization temperature of aqueous fluids is 250 °C; however, the abundance of three-phase inclusions, variation in liquid-vapor ratios, and a wide range in homogenization temperatures indicate that immiscibility, effervescence, and fluid mixing are mechanisms associated with gold deposition. The age ( 2550 Ma) of alteration minerals in the Abino area is considerably younger (by 100 Myr) than alteration minerals in other deposits in the Red Lake district, indicating that the mineralizing fluid history was more protracted than previously thought. Along the East Bay trend, barren veins generally have lower δ18OVSMOW values (0.0 to 8.5‰) relative to auriferous veins (9.6 and 13.1‰). Consequently, the oxygen isotopic composition of quartz could be used as a vector for gold mineralization. The genetic model for the East Bay trend involves several stages of vein formation. Auriferous veins formed near the upper boundary of the mesozonal regime (depth of 5-6 km).

  8. Depositional history of a condensed shallow marine reservoir succession: stratigraphy and detrital zircon geochronology of the Jurassic Sto Formation, Barents Sea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klausen, T. G.; Müller, R.; Sláma, Jiří; Olaussen, S.; Rismyhr, B.; Helland-Hansen, W.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 1 (2018), s. 130-145 ISSN 0016-7649 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : binary alloys * deposition * erosion * geochronology * lead * lead alloys * sea level * silicate minerals * uranium alloys * zircon Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 3.037, year: 2016

  9. Oxidation of dibenzothiophene as a model substrate for the removal of organic sulphur from fossil fuels by iron(III ions generated from pyrite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR P. BESKOSKI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Within this paper a new idea for the removal of organically bonded sulphur from fossil fuels is discussed. Dibenzothiophene (DBT was used as a model compound of organicmolecules containing sulphur. This form of (biodesulphurization was performed by an indirect mechanism in which iron(III ions generated from pyrite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans performed the abiotic oxidation. The obtained reaction products, dibenzothiopene sulfoxide and dibenzothiophene sulfone, are more soluble in water than the basic substrate and the obtained results confirmed the basic hypothesis and give the posibility of continuing the experiments related to application of this (biodesulphurization process.

  10. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/TiO2 Mesoporous Hybrid Photoanode with Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Thin Films Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bayram Kilic; Sunay Turkdogan; Aykut Astam; Oguz Can Ozer; Mansur Asgin; Hulya Cebeci; Deniz Urk; Selin Pravadili Mucur

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TiO2 mesoporous networks can be employed as a new alternative photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By using the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous as photoanodes in DSSC, we demonstrate that the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous photoanode is promising alternative to standard FTO/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSC due to larger specific surface area and high electrochemical activity. We also show that iron pyrite (FeS2) thin films can be used as an efficient counter electrode...

  11. Abiotic oxidation of pyrite by Fe(III) in acidic media and its implications for sulfur isotope measurements of lattice-bound sulfate in sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Goldberg, T.; Strauss, H.

    (OH) 3 (Perez-Lopez et al., 2007) and hydrated iron sulfate (Lefticariu et al., 2006) havealsobeen reported. Someflaky material deposited in some of the reaction pits (Fig. 5C) in our experiment probably resembles ferric oxide/hydroxide (Perez-Lopez et al...–160. Perez-Lopez, R., Cama, J., Nieto, J.M., Ayora, C., 2007. The iron-coating role on the oxidation kinetics of a pyritic sludge doped with flyash. Geochim Cosmochim Acta. 71, 1921–1934. Piper, D.Z., Kolodny, Y.,1987. The stable isotopic composition of a...

  12. Geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic evolution of the Western and Central cordilleras of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez, Diego; Spikings, Richard; Magna, Tomas; Kammer, Andreas; Winkler, Wilfried; Beltrán, Alejandro

    2011-08-01

    Autochthonous rocks of the pre-Cretaceous continental margin of NW South America (the Tahami Terrane) are juxtaposed against a series of para-autochthonous rock units that assembled during the Early Cretaceous. Allochthonous, oceanic crust of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province collided with and accreted onto the margin during the Late Cretaceous. We present the first regional-scale dataset of zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS ages for intrusive and metamorphic rocks of the autochthonous Tahami Terrane, Early Cretaceous igneous para-autochthonous rocks and accreted oceanic crust. The U-Pb zircon data are complemented by multiphase 40Ar/ 39Ar crystallization and cooling ages. The geochronological data are combined with whole rock major oxide, trace element and REE data acquired from the same units to constrain the tectonic origin of the rock units and terranes exposed in the Western Cordillera, Cauca-Patía Valley and the Central Cordillera of Colombia. The Tahami Terrane includes lower Paleozoic orthogneisses (~ 440 Ma) that may have erupted during the active margin stage of the Rheic Ocean. Basement gneisses were intruded by Permian, continental arc granites during the final assembly of Pangea. Triassic sedimentary rocks were subsequently deposited in rift basins and partially melted during high-T metamorphism associated with rifting of western Pangea during 240-220 Ma. Continental arc magmatism during 180-145 Ma is preserved along the whole length of the Central Cordillera and was followed by an Early Cretaceous out-board step of the arc axis and the inception of the Quebradagrande Arc that fringed the continental margin. Back-stepping of the arc axis may have been caused by the collision of buoyant seamounts, which were coeval with plateau rocks exposed in the Nicoya Peninsular of Costa Rica. Rapid westward drift of South America closed the Quebradagrande basin in the late Aptian and caused medium-high P-T metamorphic rocks of the Arquía Complex to exhume and obduct onto

  13. Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Pavich, M.J.; Schultz, A.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ≤43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be

  14. Geochronology and Fluid-Rock Interaction Associated with the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Fayek; P. Goodell; M. Ren; A. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca District, Mexico, largely consists of secondary U{sup 6+} minerals, which occur within a breccia pipe mainly hosted by the 44 Ma Nopal and Colorados volcanic formations. These two units overly the Pozos conglomerate formation and Cretaceous limestone. Three new vertical diamond drill holes (DDHs) were recently drilled at Nopal I. DDH-PB1 with continuous core was drilled through the Nopal I deposit and two additional DDHs were drilled {approx}50 m on either side of the cored hole. These DDHs terminate 20 m below the current water table, thus allowing the detection of possible gradients in radionuclide contents resulting from transport from the overlying uranium deposit. Primary uraninite within the main ore body is rare and fine-grained ({approx}50 micrometers), thus making geochronology of the Nopal I deposit very difficult. Uranium, lead and oxygen isotopes can be used to study fluid-uraninite interaction, provided that the analyses are obtained on the micro-scale. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) permits in situ measurement of isotopic ratios with a spatial resolution on the scale of a few {micro}m. Preliminary U-Pb results show that uraninite from the main ore body gives an age of 32 {+-} 8 Ma, whereas uraninite from the uraniferous Pozos conglomerate that lies nearly 100 m below the main ore body and 25 meters above the water table, gives a U-Pb age that is <1 Ma. Oxygen isotopic analyses show that uraninite from the ore body has a {delta}{sup 18}O = -10.8{per_thousand}, whereas the uraninite within the Pozos conglomerate has a {delta}{sup 18}O = +1.5{per_thousand}. If it is assumed that both uraninites precipitated from meteoric water ({delta}{sup 18}O = -7{per_thousand}), then calculated precipitation temperatures are 55 C for the uraninite from the ore body and 20 C for uraninite hosted by the Pozos conglomerate. These temperatures are consistent with previous studies that calculated precipitation

  15. The Aegean/Cycladic and the Basin and Range Extensional Provinces - A Tectonic and Geochronologic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockli, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    petrochronology, detrital geochronology, and high- and low-T thermochronometry allow us to elucidate pre-extensional crustal geometries, differentiate contractional from extensional fabrics, and understand the thermal and rheological evolution of these extensional provinces in a more holistic fashion.

  16. Petrogenesis of Malaysian tin granites: geochemistry, fractional crystallization, U-Pb zircon geochronology and tectonic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai-Pan Ng, Samuel; Searle, Mike; Whitehouse, Martin; Chung, Sun-Lin; Ghani, Azman; Robb, Laurence; Sone, Masatoshi; Oliver, Grahame; Gardiner, Nick; Roselee, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    The Malaysian tin granites forming the backbone of the Thai-Malay Peninsula has been long recognized with two distinct granitic provinces:- 1. Early Permian to Late Triassic Eastern Province with mainly "I-type" (Hbl)-Bt granites with associated Cu-Au deposits, with subordinate Bt granites hosting limited Sn-W deposits, and 2. Late Triassic Main Range Province with mainly "S-type" Bt granites with associated Sn-W deposits, and subordinate (Hbl)-Bt granites. New geochemical data show that Chappell and White's (1974) I-S granite classification adopted in the existing model does not adequately distinguish the granites from one another as previously implied. Trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions show that the Malaysian tin granites in both provinces have transitional I-S characteristics. In addition, they inherited within-plate signature from Cambro-Ordovician Gondwana-related source rocks. Previous ages were obtained by whole rock Rb-Sr and biotite K-Ar geochronology in the 70s and 80s, dating methods that may not accurately represent the crystallization age of granites. We re-sampled the entire Malaysian Peninsula and 40 samples were collected for high-precision U-Pb SIMS dating on extracted zircon grains in order to better constrain the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The crystallization ages of the Eastern Province granitoids have been constrained ranging from 220 to 290 Ma, while the Main Range (Western) Province granitoids have ages ranging from 200 to 230 Ma. A progressive westward younging trend is apparent across the Eastern Province, but becomes less obvious in the Main Range Province. Our model suggests two east dipping subduction zones. We suggest that subduction roll-back along the Bentong-Raub suture might account for the westward younging trend, in the Eastern province. A second Late Triassic east-dipping subduction zone beneath western Malaysia is proposed in order to explain the "I-type" components to the Main

  17. Piedra lata terrane of Uruguay: Rb-Sr geochronological data of two new paleoproterozoic (transamazonian) granitoids