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Sample records for rcra unit located

  1. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  2. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980's, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled 'du Pont Freon 11', were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit

  3. RCRA facility investigation report for the 200-PO-1 operable unit. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) report is prepared in support of the RFI/corrective measures study process for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report summarizes existing information on this operable unit presented in the 200 East and PUREX Aggregate Area Management Study Reports, contaminant specific studies, available modeling data, and groundwater monitoring data summary reports. Existing contaminant data are screened against current regulatory limits to determine contaminants of potential concern (COPC). Each identified COPC is evaluated using well-specific and plume trend analyses

  4. First annual report RCRA post-closure monitoring and inspections for the U-3fi waste unit. Final report, July 1995--October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emer, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi RCRA Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada during the July 1995 to October 1996 period. Inspections of the U-3fi RCRA Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 420 ft ER3-3 borehole and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval. This is the first annual report on the U-3fi closure and includes the first year baseline monitoring data as well as one quarter of compliance monitoring data

  5. RCRA closure of eight land-based units at the Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.E.; Welch, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed under an integrated multi-year program. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. These units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. The closure of these sites will be funded by a new Department of Energy budget category, the Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to provide greater flexibility in the response to closure and remedial activities. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA), has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the scope of this program has required the development of risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated schedule

  6. RCRA land unit closures at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.H.; Kelly, B.A.; Delozier, M.F.P.; Manrod, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Y-12 Plant are being closed under an integrated multi-year program. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. These units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. The closure of these sites will be funded by a new Department of Energy budget category, the Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to provide greater flexibility in the response to closure and remedial activities. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA), has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the scope of this program has required the development of a detailed set of assumptions and a confirmation program for each assumption. Other significant activities in the CAPCA program include the development of risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated schedule

  7. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-DR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations. Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-DR-1 source operable unit Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination

  8. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  9. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  10. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations, under the authority of Chapter 173-303 Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-HR-3 operable unit. The 100-HR-3 operable unit underlies the D/DR and H Areas, the 600 Area between them, and the six source operable units these areas contain. The 100-HR-3 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water within its boundary. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination. Separate work plans have been initiated for the 100-DR-1 (DOE-RL 1992a) and 100-HR-1 (DOE-RL 1992b) source operable units

  11. Optimally Locating MARFORRES Units

    OpenAIRE

    Salmeron, Javier; Dell, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Javier Salmeron and Rob Dell The U.S. Marine Forces Reserve (USMCR, MARFORRES) is conducting realignment studies where discretionary changes may benefit from formal mathematical analysis. This study has developed an optimization tool to guide and/or support Commander, MARFORRES (CMFR) decisions. A prototype of the optimization tool has been tested with data from the units and Reserve Training Centers (RTCs) in the San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA areas. Prepared for: MARFORRES, POC:...

  12. RCRA facility stabilization initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program's management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials.

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials

  15. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-3 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, G.A.; Lodman, D.L.; Spry, M.J.; Poor, K.J.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plan for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-3 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. The unit will be closed by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  16. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-HR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-HR-1 source operable unit. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination. The 100-HR-3 operable unit underlies the D/DR and H Areas, the 600 Area between them, and the six source operable units these areas contain. The 100-HR-3 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water within its boundary. Separate work plans have been initiated for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit (DOE-RL 1992a) and the 100-DR-1 (DOE-RL 1992b) source operable units

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) general contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  19. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodman, D.W.; Spry, M.J.; Nolte, E.P.; Barry, G.A.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plans for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. Future plans for the unit include incorporating the earthen-covered portion of the TSA-2 pad into a TSA retrieval enclosure along with the TSA-1 and TSAR pads, and closure of the portion of the TSA-2 pad under the Air Support Weather Shield (ASWS-2). This plan addresses closure of the ASWS-2 by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted the waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all closure activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan

  2. Detailed analysis of a RCRA landfill for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this detailed analysis is to provide a preliminary compilation of data, information, and estimated costs associated with a RCRA landfill alternative for UNC Disposal Site. This is in response to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) comment No. 6 from their review of a open-quotes Feasibility Study for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.close quotes

  3. CERCLA and RCRA requirements affecting cleanup of a hazardous waste management unit at a Superfund site: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) attempted to address both RCRA and CERCLA requirements at the fire training facility (FTF) by integrating a CERCLA removal action work plan with a RCRA closure plan. While the regulatory agencies involved with the FTF cleanup agreed the integrated document was a good idea, implementation proved complicated, owing to disposition of clean debris from a Superfund site, treatment of contaminated media, duration of cleanup activities, and cleanup certification. While all the complications have not been resolved, solutions to all have been proposed to Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA. Both agencies have worked closely with FEMP to find the most effective fulfillment of RCRA and CERCLA requirements

  4. Hazardous Waste/IGD: EF_RCRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EF_RCRA is a subset of facilities from FRS_INTEREST and FRS_FACILITY_SITE which are updated on a monthly basis as part of the Locational Reference Tables (LRT)...

  5. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  6. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  7. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980`s, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  8. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980's, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit

  9. 200-BP-11 operable unit and 216-B-3 main pond work/closure plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Volume 1: Field investigation and sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document coordinates a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) past-practice work plan for the 200-BP-11 Operable Unit and a RCRA closure/postclosure plan for the 216-B-3 Main Pond and 216-B-3-3 Ditch [treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit]. Both RCRA TSD and past-practice waste management units are contained within the 200-BP-11 Operable Unit. The 200-BP-11 Operable Unit is a source operable unit located on the east side of the B Plant Source Aggregate Area in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The operable unit lies just east of the 200 East Area perimeter fence and encompass approximately 476 hectares (1,175 acres). Source operable units include waste management units that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. Source waste management units are categorized in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order as either RCRA TSD, RCRA past-practice, or Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) past-practice. As listed below and in the Tri-Party Agreement, the 200-BP-11 Operable Unit contains five RCRA past-practice and five RCRA TSD waste management units. Additionally, for RCRA TSD permitting purposes, the RCRA TSD waste management units are subdivided into two RCRA TSD units

  10. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  11. When RCRA meets ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to identify an inconsistency between RCRA and AEA and for distinguishing a true inconsistency from a compliance difficulty. The paper also provides examples of each situation, accommodating specific RCRA requirements to maintain adherence to radiation protection requirements. The proposed method is derived from radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure that was issued by EPA, under authority derived from Executive Order 10831, the AEA, and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970. This EPA guidance was approved by President Reagan on January 20, 1987 and closely reflects the guidance of national and international radiation standard-setting groups

  12. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  13. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented

  14. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).

  15. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.J.; Ochoa, R.; Fritz, K.D.; Craig, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning

  16. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  17. Resource conversation and recovery act (RCRA) Contingency Plan for interim status or permitted units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The official mission of the Y-12 Plant is to serve as a manufacturing technology center for key processes such that capabilities are maintained for safe, secure, reliable, and survivable nuclear weapons systems and other applications of national importance. The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be reviewed and revised if necessary if the facility RCRA operating permits are revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the facility's operations change in a manner that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Preparedness Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste interim status or permitted treatment, storage, or disposal facilities. The 90-day storage areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  18. RCRA corrective action and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators' interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE's permitted facilities and interim status facilities

  19. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, 'Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities', would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Program Plan has been developed to provide a framework for the completion of RCRA Facility Investigations (RFI) at identified units on the Savannah Rive Site (SRS) facility. As such, the RFI Program Plan provides: technical guidance for all work to be performed, managerial control, a practical, scientific approach. The purpose of this Overview is to demonstrate how the basic RFI Program Plan elements (technical, management, and approach) are interwoven to provide a practical and workable plan. The goal of the RFI Program Plan is to provide a systematic, uniform approach for performance and reporting. In addition, the RFI Program Plan has been developed to be specific to the SRS facility and to adhere to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) RFI guidance received as part of the SRS. The US EPA publication ''Characterization of Hazardous Waste Sites'' has been liberally adapted for use in this RFI Program Plan

  1. Costs of RCRA corrective action: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, B.; Russell, M.; Hwang Ho-Ling; Goeltz, R.; Warren, J.

    1991-09-01

    This report estimates the cost of the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for all non-federal facilities in the United States. RCRA is the federal law which regulates the treatment, storage, disposal, and recovery of hazardous waste. The 1984 amendment to RCRA, known as the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, stipulates that facilities that treat, store or dispose of hazardous wastes (TSDs) must remediate situations where hazardous wastes have escaped into the environment from their solid waste management units (SWMUs). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA 1990a), among others, believes that the costs of RCRA corrective action could rival the costs of SUPERFUND. Evaluated herein are costs associated with actual remedial actions. The remedial action cost estimating program developed by CH2M Hill is known as the Cost of Remedial Action Model (CORA). It provides cost estimates, in 1987 dollars, by technology used to remediate hazardous waste sites. Rules were developed to categorize each SWMU in the RTI databases by the kinds of technologies that would be used to remediate them. Results were then run through CORA using various assumptions for variable values that could not be drawn from the RTI databases and that did not have CORA supplied default values. Cost estimates were developed under several scenarios. The base case assumes a TSD and SWMU universe equal to that captured in the RTI databases, a point of compliance at the SWMU boundary with no ability to shift wastes from SWMU to SWMU, and a best-as-practical clean-up to health-based standards. 11 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs

  2. ORGDP RCRA/PCB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, T.

    1986-01-01

    A dual purpose solid/liquid incinerator is currently being constructed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant [ORGDP (K-25)] to destroy uranium contaminated, hazardous organic wastes in compliance with the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These wastes are generated by the gaseous diffusion plants in Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; and Portsmouth, OH. In addition, waste will also be received from the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Destruction of PCBs and hazardous liquid organic wastes will be accomplished in a rotary kiln incinerator with an afterburner. This system was selected after a study of various alternatives which are covered in Report No. X-OE-141. Incineration was chosen because it is dependable, permanent, detoxifies organics, and reduces volume. The rotary kiln incinerator was selected because it can thermally destroy organic constituents of liquids, solids, and sludges to produce an organically inert ash. The incineration system, off-gas treatment system, and related instrumentation and controls are being provided by International Waste Energy Systems (IWES) which is responsible for design, construction, startup, and performance testing

  3. Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients’ Perceptions of Unit Dining Locations

    OpenAIRE

    Baptiste, Françoise; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz-Wilner, Claire-Jehanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating together is promoted among hospitalized seniors to improve their nutrition. This study aimed to understand geriatric patients’ perceptions regarding meals in a common dining area versus at the bedside. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. Open-ended questions were asked of eight patients recruited from a geriatric rehabilitation unit where patients had a choice of meal location. Results Eating location was influenced by compliance with the perceived rules ...

  4. RCRA closures at Rocky Flats Plant: A programmatic perspective and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogg, Randy T.; Peterman, Bruce D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interagency Agreement (IAG) integrates a unique mechanism for remediating hazardous waste sites at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), which include utilizing RCRA and CERCLA technical/regulatory processes. Pursuant to the IAG signed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991, sixteen operable units (OUs) were defined for characterization and remediation at RFP. Of the sixteen OUs, six are classified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure units. The six RCRA interim status closure units are: Solar Evaporation Ponds-OU 4, Present LandfUl-OU 7, Original Process Waste Lines-OU 9, Other Outside Closures-OU 10, West Spray Field-OU II, and Inside Building Closures-OU 15. The IAG will function as a technical/regulatory mechanism for managing/complying with all aspects of the RCRA interim status closure units at RFP. (author)

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    Attention is focused on permit applications for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; and Cyanide Treatment Unit. This report addresses the following areas: facility description; waste characteristics; process information; ground water monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plant, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Attention is focused on permit applications for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; and Cyanide Treatment Unit. This report addresses the following areas: facility description; waste characteristics; process information; ground water monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plant, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification.

  7. Impact of Locality on Location Aware Unit Disk Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Kranakis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to their importance for studies oi wireless networks, recent years have seen a surge of activity on the design of local algorithms for the solution of a variety of network tasks. We study the behaviour of algorithms with very low localities. Despite of this restriction we propose local constant ratio approximation algorithms for solving minimum dominating and connected dominating set, maximum independent set and minimum vertex cover in location aware Unit Disk Graphs. We also prove the first ever lower bounds for local algorithms for these problems with a given locality in the location aware setting.

  8. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the

  9. Geriatric rehabilitation patients' perceptions of unit dining locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Françoise; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz-Wilner, Claire-Jehanne

    2014-06-01

    Eating together is promoted among hospitalized seniors to improve their nutrition. This study aimed to understand geriatric patients' perceptions regarding meals in a common dining area versus at the bedside. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. Open-ended questions were asked of eight patients recruited from a geriatric rehabilitation unit where patients had a choice of meal location. Eating location was influenced by compliance with the perceived rules of the unit, physical and emotional well-being, and quarantine orders. Certain participants preferred eating in the common dining room where they had more assistance from hospital staff, a more attractive physical environment, and the opportunity to socialize. However, other participants preferred eating at their bedsides, feeling the quality of social interaction was poor in the dining room. Participants' experiences of, and preferences for, communal dining differed. If the benefits of communal dining are to be maximized, different experiences of this practice must be considered.

  10. Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients’ Perceptions of Unit Dining Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Françoise; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz-Wilner, Claire-Jehanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating together is promoted among hospitalized seniors to improve their nutrition. This study aimed to understand geriatric patients’ perceptions regarding meals in a common dining area versus at the bedside. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. Open-ended questions were asked of eight patients recruited from a geriatric rehabilitation unit where patients had a choice of meal location. Results Eating location was influenced by compliance with the perceived rules of the unit, physical and emotional well-being, and quarantine orders. Certain participants preferred eating in the common dining room where they had more assistance from hospital staff, a more attractive physical environment, and the opportunity to socialize. However, other participants preferred eating at their bedsides, feeling the quality of social interaction was poor in the dining room. Conclusions Participants’ experiences of, and preferences for, communal dining differed. If the benefits of communal dining are to be maximized, different experiences of this practice must be considered. PMID:24883161

  11. Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the Gunsite 113 Access Road (631-24G) Operable Unit: Final Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. The selected action was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy satisfies both CERCLA and RCRA 3004(U) requirements. This decision is based ont he Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA Unit

  12. Ground-water monitoring under RCRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coalgate, J.

    1993-11-01

    In developing a regulatory strategy for the disposal of hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), protection of ground-water resources was the primary goal of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). EPA's ground-water protection strategy seeks to minimize the potential for hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents in waste placed in land disposel units to migrate into the environment. This is achieved through liquids management (limiting the placement of liquid wastes in or on the land, requiring the use of liners beneath waste, installing leachate collection systems and run-on and run-off controls, and covering wastes at closure). Ground-water monitoring serves to detect any failure in EPA's liquids management strategy so that ground-water contamination can be detected and addressed as soon as possible

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification.

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification

  15. Rocky Flats Solar Evaporation Ponds RCRA hybrid-closure case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogg, R.T.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP)/Operable Unit 4 (OU 4), located at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) sixteen miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is currently undergoing remediation/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure in accordance with the Rocky Flats Interagency Agreement (IAG) signed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991. Based on the ''Phase 1'' (source and soils) RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFM data and interpretations), the DOE and EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG and G) have selected a permanent surface engineered/isolation barrier as the technological option for remediation of the SEP. The DOE and EG and G will utilize all natural materials to create an ''impermeable'' barrier/structure to isolate the waste being left in place from impacting human health and the environment for a minimum of 1,000 years. Their rationale for utilizing natural materials is two fold; (1) optimize long term performance of the barrier and; (2) design a structure which will be near maintenance free (passive remediation) for 1,000 years. The DOE and EG and G have taken a proactive approach in providing post closure performance assessment for this RCRA closure action. An integrated monitoring system has been designed which will include monitoring the engineered barrier, vadose zone and ground water systems. Rocky Flats will integrate instrumentation into the permanent engineered barrier which will provide early warning of potential liquid migration through the barrier and into the waste zone

  16. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively

  17. Clues to interpretation of RCRA regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebach, P.R.; Brown, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    Waste waters from industrial facilities are often treated at waste water treatment plants and then discharged to streams or rivers, or may be reused. Discharges of pollutants to waterways are regulated under the Clean Water Act, and require a permit. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulates the management of solid wastes. This paper discusses the status of waste water treatment plant discharges and sludges pursuant to RCRA. It concludes that some exceptions to RCRA allow waste water treatment plants to accept dilute solvent mixtures, treat them, and discharge effluent without needing a RCRA permit. If residual sludges do not exhibit a hazardous characteristic, then they may be managed as nonhazardous solid waste. For DOE and other generators of mixed waste (both radioactive and hazardous), this may allow sludges to be managed as low level radioactive waste. (author)

  18. Interpreting the SARA and RCRA training requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreland, W.M.; Wells, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) promulgated by the EPA (RCRA) and the OSHA (SARA) require hazardous materials training for all individuals working with hazardous materials. Facilities that are involved in the generation, storage, treatment, transportation, or disposal/removal of hazardous materials/waste must comply with all relevant training regulations. Using the guidelines contained in the RCRA and SARA regulations, decisions must be made to determine: the type of regulatory requirement based on facility function (i.e., whether the facility is a RCRA or CERCLA facility). The type of training required for specific categories of workers (e.g. managers, supervisors, or general site workers). The level of training needed for each category of worker. This presentation outlines how the Environmental Compliance and Health Protection Technical Resources and Training Group, working with waste operations personnel, establishes specific training requirements

  19. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention

  20. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  1. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  2. National RCRA Hazardous Waste Biennial Report Data Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in cooperation with the States, biennially collects information regarding the generation, management, and final disposition of hazardous wastes regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), as amended. Collection, validation and verification of the Biennial Report (BR) data is the responsibility of RCRA authorized states and EPA regions. EPA does not modify the data reported by the states or regions. Any questions regarding the information reported for a RCRA handler should be directed to the state agency or region responsible for the BR data collection. BR data are collected every other year (odd-numbered years) and submitted in the following year. The BR data are used to support regulatory activities and provide basic statistics and trend of hazardous waste generation and management. BR data is available to the public through 3 mechanisms. 1. The RCRAInfo website includes data collected from 2001 to present-day (https://rcrainfo.epa.gov/rcrainfoweb/action/main-menu/view). Users of the RCRAInfo website can run queries and output reports for different data collection years at this site. All BR data collected from 2001 to present-day is stored in RCRAInfo, and is accessible through this website. 2. An FTP site allows users to access BR data files collected from 1999 - present day (ftp://ftp.epa.gov/rcrainfodata/). Zip files are available for download directly from this

  3. Successful completion of a RCRA closure for the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippitt, J.M.; Kolthoff, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful completion of a RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) closure of a HF (hydrofluoric acid) tank car at FEMP, which is on the national priorities list of hazardous waste sites and is undergoing CERCLA remediation. The HF tank car closure was conducted by FERMCO. Through a combination of sound planning and team work, the HF tank car was closed safely and ahead of schedule. During > 22,000 hr field work required for construction modifications and neutralization of 9,600 gallons of HF and decontamination rinseates, there were no OSHA recordable incidents. The system design avoided additional costs by maximizing use of existing equipment and facilities. This successful closure of the HF tank car demonstrates FEMP's commitment to reducing risks and cleaning up the facility in a manner consistent with objectives of RCRA regulations and the Ohio EPA hazardous waste rules. This in turn facilitated ongoing negotiations with Ohio EPA to integrate RCRA closure and the ongoing CERCLA remediation activities. This paper addresses why the unit was clean closed under an approved RCRA Closure Plan. Integration of EPA regulations for RCRA and CERCLA programs and the DOE-Orders impacting design, construction and operation of an acid neutralization system is also reviewed. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned in the process in preparing the closure plant and through final project close out

  4. The location choice of graduate entrepreneurs in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polonyová Eva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The graduates’ startup formation process represents a possible future role for universities in the form of active-participation, when speaking of the regional development. Tracking the path of entrepreneurial graduates who are moving between home, university, and employment, allows us to identify the specific motives that determine their migration decisions. The choice of location of graduate entrepreneurs is naturally affected by the context of their home region, as the availability of resources leads to a rising entrepreneurial intention. Similarly, the location of the startups flourish in densely populated urban regions, as well as in wealthier locations. At the same time, the vibrancy of the local entrepreneurial ecosystems is enhanced through mutual exchange and collaboration; and the higher the number of startups already present in a region, the higher the probability becomes for interaction and creativity. A leading tendency, not least to be mentioned, is that the preference to start new businesses is connected to highly-skilled creative sectors of the economy.

  5. A Location-Based Service Using Geometric Location Methods to Unite Mobile Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chen Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of iPhone in 2007, many location-based services (LBSs have been created and new LBSs are found every day. This research proposes yet another LBS, which is practical and was not found before to the best of authors' knowledge. The problem is described as follows. It happens all the times while several groups of people are traveling towards a destination, they lose contact from each other on the way. This research tries to have the groups travel as closely as possible until they reach the destination. It uses a method of minimum covering ellipses to find whether the groups are separated by more than a threshold/distance. If they are, the system will find a convenient rendezvous for all groups by using a method of geometric median. After meeting at the rendezvous, the groups reset the service and continue their journey. By using this LBS, travelers do not need to worry about losing connections with others. This method can also be applied to the problem of finding a convenient meeting place for mobile users.

  6. RCRA Part A permit characterization plan for the U-2bu subsidence crater. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This plan presents the characterization strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 109, U-2bu Subsidence Crater (referred to as U-2bu) in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of the planned activities is to obtain sufficient characterization data for the crater soils and observed wastes under the conditions of the current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A permit. The scope of the characterization plan includes collecting surface and subsurface soil samples with hand augers and for the purpose of site characterization. The sampling strategy is to characterize the study area soils and look for RCRA constituents. Observable waste soils and surrounding crater soils will be analyzed and evaluated according to RCRA closure criteria. Because of the status of the crater a RCRA Part A permit site, acquired radionuclide analyses will only be evaluated in regards to the health and safety of site workers and the disposition of wastes generated during site characterization. The U-2bu Subsidence Crater was created in 1971 by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground nuclear test, event name Miniata, and was used as a land-disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988

  7. The Pinellas Plant RCRA facility investigation - A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbury, Richard; Keshian, Berg; Farley, Dwain; Meyer, David; Ingle, David; Biedermann, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office Environmental Restoration Program, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) was completed at the Pinellas Plant to fulfill requirements of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) permit issued on February 9, 1990 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RFI addressed potential contaminant releases and environmental conditions at 15 solid waste management units (SWMUs). The RFI characterization program began in April 1990 and was completed in May 1991. The scope of RFI data collection activities is presented in the Pinellas Plant RFI Workplan issued in May 1990 and approved by EPA on April 16, 1991. An RFI Report was submitted to EPA on September 1, 1991. This paper presents a summary of RFI results and conclusions. Primary environmental concerns at the Pinellas Plant are emphasized. (author)

  8. A Decision Support System for the Location of Naval Surface Reserve Units

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venable, Laura

    1998-01-01

    .... The research suggests the feasibility of a PC based Decision Support System to assist Commander, Naval Surface Reserve Force improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the unit location decision...

  9. United States paper, paperboard, and market pulp capacity trends by process and location, 1970-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Ince; Xiaolei Li; Mo Zhou; Joseph Buongiorno; Mary Reuter

    This report presents a relational database with estimates of annual production capacity for all mill locations in the United States where paper, paperboard, or market pulp were produced from 1970 to 2000. Data for more than 500 separate mill locations are included in the database, with annual capacity data for each year from 1970 to 2000 (more than 17, 000 individual...

  10. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 2001 - October 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, G.

    2003-01-01

    This annual monitoring and inspection report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2001 to October 2002 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft)

  11. Establishing a regulatory framework for a RCRA corrective action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, the environmental community has become keenly aware of problems associated with integration of the demanding regulations that apply to environmental restoration activities. Once can not attend an EPA-sponsored conference on Superfund without hearing questions concerning the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the applicability of the National Contingency Plan (NCP) to sites that do not qualify for the National Priorities List (NPL). In particular, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been greatly criticized for its inability to define a comprehensive approach for cleaning up its hazardous waste sites. This article presents two decision flowcharts designed to resolve some of this confusion for DOE. The RCRA/CERCLA integration diagram can help the environmental manager determine which law applies and under what conditions, and the RCRA corrective action decision flowchart can guide the manager in determining which specific sections of RCRA apply to a RCRA-lead environmental restoration program

  12. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents

  13. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1301-N, 1324-N/NA, and 1325-N RCRA Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2001-01-01

    The 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, the 1324-N Surface Impoundment, and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100 N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The closure plans for these facilities stipulate that groundwater is monitored according to the 100-N Pilot Project: Proposed Consolidated Groundwater Monitoring Program (BHI-00725). This document supplements the consolidated plan by providing information on sampling and analysis protocols, quality assurance, data management, and a conceptual model for the RCRA sites. Monitoring well networks, constituents, and sampling frequency remain the same as in the consolidated plan or the previous groundwater monitoring plan (Hartman 1996)

  14. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM's after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide's scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary

  15. Impact of trucking network flow on preferred biorefinery locations in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy M. Young; Lee D. Han; James H. Perdue; Stephanie R. Hargrove; Frank M. Guess; Xia Huang; Chung-Hao Chen

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the trucking transportation network flow was modeled for the southern United States. The study addresses a gap in existing research by applying a Bayesian logistic regression and Geographic Information System (GIS) geospatial analysis to predict biorefinery site locations. A one-way trucking cost assuming a 128.8 km (80-mile) haul distance was estimated...

  16. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-July 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 2000--July 2001 monitoring period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 2001. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began eight years ago. Precipitation for the period October 2000 through July 2001 was 9.42 centimeters (cm) (3.71 inches [in]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2001). The prior year annual rainfall (January 2000 through December 2000) was 10.44 cm (4.1 1 in.). The recorded average annual rainfall for this site from 1972 to January 2000 is 14.91 cm (5.87 in.). The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) new-employee training manual for the Operations Division RCRA personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkenbus, B.D.

    1987-03-01

    This manual has been prepared for the training of new employees who will work with RCRA hazardous waste management in the Operations Division. It will be taught by a person who is trained in hazardous waste regulations/procedures. It consists of nine modules. The topics of these modules are: RCRA Training, Hazardous Waste Regulations, Transportation Regulations, Hazardous Waste Management at ORNL, Chemical Hazards and Safety, Hazardous Waste Operations Training, Sampling of Hazardous Waste, Hazardous Waste Identification/Classification, and RCRA Contingency Plans and Emergency Procedures. The on-the-job training areas are identified in the modules. They are an integral part of training.

  18. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and open-quotes Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilitiesclose quotes (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  19. Hanford Site waste management units report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of the 1984. This report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site, including a description of the units and the waste they contain. Waste management units in the report include: (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structures, (5) RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of the units report, the list of units is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of the 1984. In Sections 3.0 through 6.0 of this report, the four aggregate areas are subdivided into their operable units. The operable units are further divided into two parts: (1) those waste management units assigned to the operable unit that will be remediated as part of the Environmental Restoration Remedial Actions (ERRA) Program, and (2) those waste management units located within the operable unit boundaries but not assigned to the ERRA program. Only some operable unit sections contain the second part

  20. NPL deletion policy for RCRA-regulated TSD facilities finalized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Under a new policy published by EPA on March 20, 1995, certain sites may be deleted from the National Priorities List (NPL) and deferred to RCRA corrective action. To be deleted from the NPL, a site must (1) be regulated under RCRA as a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility and (2) meet the four criteria specified by EPA. The new NPL deletion policy, which does not pertain to federal TSD facilities, became effective on April 19, 1995. 1 tab

  1. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L.; Coalgate, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA's corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ''stabilization'' initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ''Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,'' is currently being developed by DOE's Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE's new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning

  2. EPA seeks to make RCRA more effective through legislative changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Since RCRA was enacted in 1976 and amended in 1984, hazardous waste management has been transformed. To protect human health and the environment as mandated by the act, EPA has developed a complex cradle-to-grave system for managing hazardous waste. The agency recognizes that some targeted legislative changes could make RCRA even more useful, particularly by (1) establishing some open-quotes middle groundclose quotes for waste posing low risks, and (2) emphasizing sensible and enforceable hazardous waste management practices

  3. RCRA and CERCLA requirements affecting cleanup activities at a federal facility superfund site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) achieved success on an integrated groundwater monitoring program which addressed both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. The integrated plan resulted in a cost savings of approximately $2.6 million. At present, the FEMP is also working on an integrated closure process to address Hazardous Waste Management Units (HWMUs) at the site. To date, Ohio EPA seems willing to discuss an integrated program with some stipulations. If an integrated program is implemented, a cost savings of several million dollars will be realized since the CERCLA documents can be used in place of a RCRA closure plan. The success of an integrated program at the FEMP is impossible without the support of DOE and the regulators. Since DOE is an owner/operator of the facility and Ohio EPA regulates hazardous waste management activities at the FEMP, both parties must be satisfied with the proposed integration activities. Similarly, US EPA retains CERCLA authority over the site along with a signed consent agreement with DOE, which dictates the schedule of the CERCLA activities. Another federal facility used RCRA closure plans to satisfy CERCLA activities. This federal facility was in a different US EPA Region than the FEMP. While this approach was successful for this site, an integrated approach was required at the FEMP because of the signed Consent Agreement and Consent Decree. For federal facilities which have a large number of HWMUs along with OUs, an integrated approach may result in a timely and cost-effective cleanup

  4. ORGDP RCRA/PCB incinerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, T.

    1987-01-01

    A dual purpose solid/liquid incinerator is currently being constructed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant [ORGDP (K-25)] to destroy uranium contaminated, hazardous organic wastes in compliance with the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These wastes are generated by the gaseous diffusion plants in Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; and Portsmouth, OH. In addition, waste will also be received from the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Destruction of PCBs and hazardous liquid organic wastes will be accomplished in a rotary kiln incinerator with an afterburner. This system was selected faster a study of various alternatives. Incineration was chosen because it is dependable, permanent, detoxifies organics, and reduces volume. The rotary kiln incinerator was selected because it can thermally destroy organic constituents of liquids, solids, and sludges to produce an organically inert ash. In addition to the incineration off-gas treatment system, the facility includes a tank farm, drum storage buildings, a solids preparation area, a control room, and a data management system. The incineration system, off-gas treatment system, and related instrumentation and controls are being provided by International Waste Energy Systems (IWES) which is responsible for design, construction, startup, and performances testing

  5. Timing and locations of reef fish spawning off the southeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Farmer

    Full Text Available Managed reef fish in the Atlantic Ocean of the southeastern United States (SEUS support a multi-billion dollar industry. There is a broad interest in locating and protecting spawning fish from harvest, to enhance productivity and reduce the potential for overfishing. We assessed spatiotemporal cues for spawning for six species from four reef fish families, using data on individual spawning condition collected by over three decades of regional fishery-independent reef fish surveys, combined with a series of predictors derived from bathymetric features. We quantified the size of spawning areas used by reef fish across many years and identified several multispecies spawning locations. We quantitatively identified cues for peak spawning and generated predictive maps for Gray Triggerfish (Balistes capriscus, White Grunt (Haemulon plumierii, Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus, Vermilion Snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens, Black Sea Bass (Centropristis striata, and Scamp (Mycteroperca phenax. For example, Red Snapper peak spawning was predicted in 24.7-29.0°C water prior to the new moon at locations with high curvature in the 24-30 m depth range off northeast Florida during June and July. External validation using scientific and fishery-dependent data collections strongly supported the predictive utility of our models. We identified locations where reconfiguration or expansion of existing marine protected areas would protect spawning reef fish. We recommend increased sampling off southern Florida (south of 27° N, during winter months, and in high-relief, high current habitats to improve our understanding of timing and location of reef fish spawning off the southeastern United States.

  6. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA. TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-01-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004

  7. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator's carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent

  8. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States up to March 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.; Kramer, Louisa; Ancona, Zachary H.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Wind energy is a rapidly growing form of renewable energy in the United States. While summary information on the total amounts of installed capacity are available by state, a free, centralized, national, turbine-level, geospatial dataset useful for scientific research, land and resource management, and other uses did not exist. Available in multiple formats and in a web application, these public domain data provide industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States up to March 2014, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. Wind turbine records have been collected and compiled from various public sources, digitized or position verified from aerial imagery, and quality assured and quality controlled. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in public literature. In some cases, turbines were not seen in imagery or turbine information did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Uncertainty associated with these is recorded in a confidence rating.

  9. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States up to March 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, Jay E; Kramer, Louisa A; Ancona, Zach H; Garrity, Christopher P

    2015-11-24

    Wind energy is a rapidly growing form of renewable energy in the United States. While summary information on the total amounts of installed capacity are available by state, a free, centralized, national, turbine-level, geospatial dataset useful for scientific research, land and resource management, and other uses did not exist. Available in multiple formats and in a web application, these public domain data provide industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States up to March 2014, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. Wind turbine records have been collected and compiled from various public sources, digitized or position verified from aerial imagery, and quality assured and quality controlled. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in public literature. In some cases, turbines were not seen in imagery or turbine information did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Uncertainty associated with these is recorded in a confidence rating.

  10. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period July through September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-02-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period July through September 2006. Eighteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites were sampled during the reporting quarter.

  11. EPA R1 RCRA Corrective Action 2020 Baseline Site Property Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Property boundaries as indicated in figures of all facilities subject to RCRA Corrective Action on the 2020 baseline in Region 1. For more information on the RCRA...

  12. Achieving RCRA compliance in DOE defense waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankhauser, W.A.; Shepard, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) generates significant volumes of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) through its defense-related activities. Defense RMW is co-regulated by DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/State agencies in accordance with requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). This paper highlights some of the problems encountered in co-regulation and discusses achievements of the defense waste management program in integrating RCRA requirements into RMW operations. Defense waste sites are planning facility modifications and major new construction projects to develop treatment, storage and disposal capacity for existing RMW inventories and projected needs

  13. An example of system integration for RCRA policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R.; Schmidt, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of various computer technologies and software systems used on a project to estimate the costs of remediating Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that fall under the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The project used two databases collected by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) that contain information on SWMUs and a PC-based software system called CORA that develops cost estimates for remediating SWMUs. The project team developed rules to categorize every SWMU in the databases by the kinds of technologies required to clean them up. These results were input into CORA, which estimated costs associated with the technologies. Early on, several computing challenges presented themselves. First, the databases have several hundred thousand records each. Second, the categorization rules could not be written to cover all combinations of variables. Third, CORA is run interactively and the analysis plan called for running CORA tens of thousands of times. Fourth, large data transfers needed to take place between RTI and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Solutions to these problems required systems integration. SWMU categorization was streamlined by using INTERNET as was the data transfer. SAS was used to create files used by a program called SuperKey that was used to run CORA. Because the analysis plan required the generation of hundreds of thousands of cost estimates, memory management software was needed to allow the portable IBM P70 to do the job. During the course of the project, several other software packages were used, including: SAS System for Personal Computers (SAS/PC), DBase III, LOTUS 1-2-3, PIZAZZ PLUS, LOTUS Freelance Plus, and Word Perfect. Only the comprehensive use of all available hardware and software resources allowed this project to be completed within the time and budget constraints. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  14. RCRA groundwater data analysis protocol for the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Jackson, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring program currently involves site-specific monitoring of 20 facilities on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The RCRA groundwater monitoring program has collected abundant data on groundwater quality. These data are used to assess the impact of a facility on groundwater quality or whether remediation efforts under RCRA corrective action programs are effective. Both evaluations rely on statistical analysis of groundwater monitoring data. The need for information on groundwater quality by regulators and environmental managers makes statistical analysis of monitoring data an important part of RCRA groundwater monitoring programs. The complexity of groundwater monitoring programs and variabilities (spatial, temporal, and analytical) exhibited in groundwater quality variables indicate the need for a data analysis protocol to guide statistical analysis. A data analysis protocol was developed from the perspective of addressing regulatory requirements, data quality, and management information needs. This data analysis protocol contains four elements: data handling methods; graphical evaluation techniques; statistical tests for trend, central tendency, and excursion analysis; and reporting procedures for presenting results to users

  15. Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaphart, D.M.; Reed, S.R.; Rankin, W.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution disposal methods, and cost

  16. Optimal location of centralized biodigesters for small dairy farms: A case study from the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Mukherjee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion technology is available for converting livestock waste to bio-energy, but its potential is far from fully exploited in the United States because the technology has a scale effect. Utilization of the centralized anaerobic digester (CAD concept could make the technology economically feasible for smaller dairy farms. An interdisciplinary methodology to determine the cost minimizing location, size, and number of CAD facilities in a rural dairy region with mostly small farms is described. This study employs land suitability analysis, operations research model and Geographical Information System (GIS tools to evaluate the environmental, social, and economic constraints in selecting appropriate sites for CADs in Windham County, Connecticut. Results indicate that overall costs are lower if the CADs are of larger size and are smaller in number.

  17. Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

    2003-01-01

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude

  18. Location, location, location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, S.P.; Goeree, J.K.; Ramer, R.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the canonical location-then-price duopoly game with general log- concave consumer densities. A unique pure-strategy equilibrium to the two-stage game exists if the density is not "too asymmetric" and not "too concave." These criteria are satisfied by many commonly used densities.

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste...

  20. A review of state regulations that exceed those of the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.; Heckman, C.L.

    1988-04-01

    This report identifies and provides information on state hazardous waste management programs and regulations in states where the US Department of Energy (DOE) has facilities. The objective is to describe for the DOE defense program and its contractors how state requirements are more stringent than the federal regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). DOE defense programs are located in 13 of the 50 states. Most of these states have regulations that are essentially equivalent to the federal RCRA requirements as they existed prior to the 1984 amendments, but their regulations are, in most instances, more stringment than the federal requirements. Differences are both substantive and procedural, and they are summarized and tabulated herein. All but three of these 13 states have been granted Final Authorization from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to operate their own hazardous waste management program in accord with the federal RCRA program prior to the 1984 amendments; two of the three others have some stage of Interim Authorization. EPA currently administers all of the provisions of the 1984 amendments, including requirements for corrective action under Sect. 3004(u). Two states, Colorado and Tennessee, have been granted revisions to their Final Authorizations delegating responsibility for the hazardous wastes. Responsible state agencies (with appropriate telephone numbers) are indicated, as are the relevant laws and current regulatory statutes

  1. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. F. Emer

    2001-03-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the

  2. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol

  3. Analysis of TRU waste for RCRA-listed elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, C.; Gerth, D.; Yoshida, T.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical methods for RCRA listed elements on Portland cement type waste have been employed using both microwave and open hot plate digestions with subsequent analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) and cold vapor atomic absorption and fluorescence (CVAA/CVAFS). Four different digestion procedures were evaluated including an open hot plate nitric acid digestion, EPA SW-846 Method 3051, and 2 methods using modifications to Method 3051. The open hot plate and the modified Method 3051, which used aqua regia for dissolution, were the only methods which resulted in acceptable data quality for all 14 RCRA-listed elements. Results for the nitric acid open hot plate digestion were used to qualify the analytical methods for TRU waste characterization, and resulted in a 99% passing score. Direct chemical analysis of TRU waste is being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in an attempt to circumvent the problems associated with strong acid digestion methods. Technology development includes laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), dc arc CID atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-AES), and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). Analytical methods using the Portland cement matrix are currently being developed for each of the listed techniques. Upon completion of the development stage, blind samples will be distributed to each of the technology developers for RCRA metals characterization

  4. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993

  5. Hanford Site waste management units report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of the 1984. This report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site, including a description of the units and the waste they contain. Waste management units in the report include: (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structures, (5) RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of the units report, the list of units is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of the 1984. In Sections 3.0 through 6.0 of this report, the four aggregate areas are subdivided into their operable units. The operable units are further divided into two parts: (1) those waste management units assigned to the operable unit that will be remediated as part of the Environmental Restoration Remedial Actions (ERRA) Program, and (2) those waste management units located within the operable unit boundaries but not assigned to the ERRA program. Only some operable unit sections contain the second part.Volume two contains Sections 4.0 through 6.0 and the following appendices: Appendix A -- acronyms and definition of terms; Appendix B -- unplanned releases that are not considered to be units; and Appendix C -- operable unit maps

  6. Construction of mixed waste storage RCRA facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment, DOE/EA-0820, to assess the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating two mixed waste Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) storage facilities. The new facilities would be located inside and immediately west of the security-fenced area of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Area in Melton Valley, Tennessee. Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact

  7. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, container storage accumulation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) remedial action strategy is based on a memorandum from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in which EPA elected to enforce regulatory requirements for ORNL through its amended Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) authority. This report, which completes the requirements of II.A.1 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit, identifies areas near the point of waste generation in which wastes are accumulated before they are transferred into the permitted waste storage facilities. In includes background information on each area and an assessment of the need for further remedial attention. The waste accumulation areas described in this addendum bear identification numbers indicative of the WAGs of which they are a part. Waste accumulation areas that are located inside a building and in which there is no potential for releases to the environment are not included in this report

  8. Quadrant I RCRA Facility Investigation Work Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this Facility Investigation (FRI) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data which will: (1) characterize the environmental setting including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; (2) define and characterize sources of contamination; (3) characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; (4) assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and, (5) support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS) which will follow the RFI. Investigations to characterize the environmental setting, sources of contamination, and vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination will be conducted relative to individual potential sources which have been identified in the Quadrant I Description of Current Conditions. These unit investigations will follow the systematic approach which is outlined below

  9. Forest resources, government policy, and investment location decisions of the forest products industry in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changyou Sun; Daowei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the results of an initial attempt to estimate the effects of state attributes on plant location and investment expenditure were presented for the forest products industry in the southern United States. A conditional logit model was used to analyze new plant births, and a time-series cross-section model to assess the total capital expenditure....

  10. Development of Electrode Units for Electrokinetic Desalination of Masonry and Pilot Scale Test at Three locations for Removal of Chlorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Skibsted, Gry

    2010-01-01

    which allows continuous pressure between clay and masonry so good electrical contact is remained. The electrode units were tested at three different locations, two on baked brick masonry (inside in a heated room and outside on a masonry with severe plaster peeling) and the third pilot scale experiment...

  11. High Frequency Radar Locations in the United States as of February 2016.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset show the point locations of High Frequency (HF) radar systems across the US. HF radars measure the speed and direction of ocean surface currents in near...

  12. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1

  13. RCRA Treatment, Disposal, and Storage Site Boundaries in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2002) [RCRA_TSD_LA_poly_EPA_2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a shapefile of RCRA Treatment, Storage, and Disposal facility boundaries developed by PRC Environmental Management, Inc (PRC) per a Work Assignment from the...

  14. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  15. Revised RCRA closure plan for the Interim Drum Yard (S-030) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Interim Drum Yard (IDY) facility is a containerized waste storage area located in the Y-12 exclusion area. It was used to store waste materials which are regulated by RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act); uranyl nitrate solutions were also stored there. The closure plan outlines the actions required to achieve closure of IDY and is being submitted in accordance with TN Rule 1200-1-11.05(7) and 40 CFR 265.110

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah Sd.

    2001-01-01

    The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from RCRA borehole bore samples and composite samples. Intact cores from two RCRA boreholes (299-W22-48 and 299-W22-50) near the SX Tank Farm and four, large-quantity grab samples from outcrop sediment on and off the Hanford Site were sampled to better understand the fate of contaminants in the vadose zone beneath underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. Borehole and outcrop samples analyzed for this report are located outside the tank farms, and therefore may be considered standard or background samples from which to compare contaminated sediments within the tank farms themselves. This report presents our interpretation of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of the uncontaminated vadose zone sediments, and variations in the vertical distribution of these properties. The information presented in this report is intended to support preparation of the S-SX Field Investigation Report to be prepared by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. as well as future remediation actions at the S-SX Tank Farm

  17. DIVERSITY IN DIAK JÄRVENPÄÄ CAMPUS UNIT : Diversity and Relation among Different Institutions Located Within the Campus Premises

    OpenAIRE

    Shakya, Samasty; Singh, Sadin Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Sadin Kumar Singh & Samasty Shakya. Diversity in Diak Järvenpää Campus Unit: Diversity and Relation among Different Institution Located within the campus premises. Järvenpää, Spring 2012. 48p. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Diak South, Järvenpää Unit, Degree program in Social Services (UAS) Focus on Community Development Work The primary purpose of this research was to find the biggest issue of diversity in the campus area. All three educational institutions operating from t...

  18. 77 FR 58470 - Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern United States; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... jointly by APHIS and the national plant protection organization (NPPO) of India as part of the required... standard \\2\\ of the International Plant Protection Convention, of which the United States is a contracting... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 319 [Docket No...

  19. RCRA, a state perspective: the buck should stop with us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, III, M N

    1977-11-01

    The states must carry the ball of realizing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); state agencies and the EPA can work together, though they don't always agree; adequate funding is absolutely necessary. The states' perspective of their role is threefold-regulation, assistance, and leadership, with maximum input into implementation. A National Governors' Association committee on waste management was established. Neither RCRA itself nor supporting committee reports allow definition of open dumps and sanitary landfills with other than traditional meaning. Conducting the open dump inventory should be the responsibility of the states, with financial support from EPA. The existence of state nonimportation laws should not preclude that state from receiving money for a hazardous waste program. The criteria for defining hazardous wastes must be realistic if an unmanageable list is to be avoided. State solid waste management agencies must provide aid to local government and private industry. The state-not EPA- is the best level of government to carry out an effective solid waste program. The Federal program should concentrate on resource and energy conservation, research and development, demonstration projects, establishing markets for recycled materials, and education and training programs. Planning should be coordinated through state agencies.

  20. Infant Sleep Location and Breastfeeding Practices in the United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren A; Geller, Nicole L; Kellams, Ann L; Colson, Eve R; Rybin, Denis V; Heeren, Timothy; Corwin, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    To describe the prevalence of breastfeeding and sleep location practices among US mothers and the factors associated with these behaviors, including advice received regarding these practices. A nationally representative sample of 3218 mothers who spoke English or Spanish were enrolled at a sample of 32 US birth hospitals between January 2011 and March 2014. Exclusive breastfeeding was reported by 30.5% of mothers, while an additional 29.5% reported partial breastfeeding. The majority of mothers, 65.5%, reported usually room sharing without bed sharing, while 20.7% reported bed sharing. Compared to mothers who room shared without bed sharing, mothers who bed shared were more likely to report exclusive breastfeeding (adjusted odds ratio 2.46, 95% confidence interval 1.76, 3.45) or partial breastfeeding (adjusted odds ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.33, 2.31). The majority of mothers reported usually room sharing without bed sharing regardless of feeding practices, including 58.2% of exclusively breastfeeding mothers and 70.0% of nonbreastfeeding mothers. Receiving advice regarding sleep location or breastfeeding increased adherence to recommendations in a dose response manner (the adjusted odds of room sharing without bed sharing and exclusive breastfeeding increased as the relevant advice score increased); however, receiving advice regarding sleep location did not affect feeding practices. Many mothers have not adopted the recommended infant sleep location or feeding practices. Receiving advice from multiple sources appears to promote adherence in a dose response manner. Many women are able to both breastfeed and room share without bed sharing, and advice to adhere to both of these recommendations did not decrease breastfeeding rates. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 4 (shallow groundwater in Bear Creek Valley) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste fadities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCIA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RIFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Coffective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures Implementation process. Under CERCLA, the actions follow the Pre at sign ary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/Sl) Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study (RI/FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCIA into an RI Work Plan for the lint phase of characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 4

  2. A decision modeling for phasor measurement unit location selection in smart grid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yup

    As a key technology for enhancing the smart grid system, Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) provides synchronized phasor measurements of voltages and currents of wide-area electric power grid. With various benefits from its application, one of the critical issues in utilizing PMUs is the optimal site selection of units. The main aim of this research is to develop a decision support system, which can be used in resource allocation task for smart grid system analysis. As an effort to suggest a robust decision model and standardize the decision modeling process, a harmonized modeling framework, which considers operational circumstances of component, is proposed in connection with a deterministic approach utilizing integer programming. With the results obtained from the optimal PMU placement problem, the advantages and potential that the harmonized modeling process possesses are assessed and discussed.

  3. Military Service Records and Unit Histories: A Guide to Locating Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    records, therefoa- e , written authorization from the veta -an or ne.’Ct of kin is not rEqUired. However, in ordet" to protect the privacy of the...line E -mail: MPR.center@nara.gov Older military personnel records (generally prior to World War I, depending on the service branch) are located at...AFB, DC 20032-5000 E -mail: afhso.research@pentagon.af.mil http://www.afhso.af.mil/ (202) 404-2264 National Museum of the U.S. Air Force 1100

  4. Remote Detection and Location of Illegal Radioactive Materials Units in Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, R. A.; Khaydarov, R. R.

    2007-01-01

    Uzbekistan is a checkpoint for transportation between Russia and some Asian countries, such as Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan that might be attractive destinations for those smuggling nuclear materials or weapons. Currently there are over 200 border crossing points. Most of them have equipped with monitors able to reliably detect nuclear materials. Uzbekistan also has substantial radioactive ore mining, and these monitors also allow the Customs Service to maintain safe conditions for their inspectors as well as for population of Uzbekistan and its neighbors. But it is very important to detect radioactive materials inland, their location and travel. This task cannot be solved by using stationary detectors which are used at border crossing points. New method, electronic scheme and software for remote detection, location and travel of radioactive sources were developed. The operation principle lies in detection of radiation by 6 detectors situated in a leaden cylindrical shield collimating gamma-radiation in 6 directions. Besides the detection system contains 6 amplifiers, 6 counters and JPS-system connected with computer. The detection system is transported by car. Field tests of the detection system have shown that the detection limit is 5. 106 Bq and 4.106 Bq for Co60 and Cs137 respectively when the radioactive sources distance is 400 m. (author)

  5. RCRA corrective action ampersand CERCLA remedial action reference guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This reference guide provides a side-by-side comparison of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA Remedial Action, focusing on the statutory and regulatory requirements under each program, criterial and other factors that govern a site's progress, and the ways in which authorities or requirements under each program overlap and/or differ. Topics include the following: Intent of regulation; administration; types of sites and/or facilities; definition of site and/or facility; constituents of concern; exclusions; provisions for short-term remedies; triggers for initial site investigation; short term response actions; site investigations; remedial investigations; remedial alternatives; clean up criterial; final remedy; implementing remedy; on-site waste management; completion of remedial process

  6. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  7. Remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when the ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures Implementation process. Under CERCLA, the actions follow the preliminary assessment/site investigation/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. This document incorporates requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA in the form of an RI report for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2

  8. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2

  9. Polybrominated diphenyl ether levels in foodstuffs collected from three locations from the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schecter, Arnold; Colacino, Justin; Patel, Keyur; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Yun, Se Hun; Haffner, Darrah; Harris, T. Robert; Birnbaum, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to provide updated measurements of PBDEs in US food, to estimate possible difference in levels from differing geographical regions, and to provide an improved estimate of current dietary intake. Methods: Thirty matched food samples for a total of 90 samples were collected from each of three cities (Los Angeles, California; Dallas, Texas; and Albany, New York) and were analyzed for 13 polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners (BDE 28, 47, 49, 66, 85, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, 183, 203, and 209). Dietary intake of PBDEs was estimated by food type, age, and sex. Results: In this pilot study, we did not note a statistically significant difference in total PBDE levels in food collected from the three locations. The median total PBDE levels (estimating non-detected values as half of the detection limit) in meat, dairy, eggs, and fish were 267 pg/g wet weight (ww) (range 102-3156 pg/g ww), 176 pg/g ww (range 41-954 pg/g ww), 637 pg/g ww (range 193-932 pg/g ww), and 243 pg/g ww (range 36-2161 pg/g ww). PBDE intake from food was estimated to range from 2.7 ng/kg/day for children 2 through 5 years of age to 0.8 ng/kg/day for women aged 60 years and older. This compares closely with our previous study where the intake estimate was 2.7 ng/kg/day for children 2 through 5 years of age and 0.9 ng/kg/day for women aged 60 years and older. Conclusion: We did not find a decrease of PBDEs in food since our previous studies which we expected to find due to the declining use of PBDEs in the USA. These findings could be consistent with food contamination from depot sources of PBDEs. A larger, more representative sampling of the US food supply is indicated based on our findings.

  10. Special Focus Areas for Hazardous Waste Cleanups under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to manage the new and changing needs of the RCRA Corrective Action Program, EPA is constantly exploring program enhancements, alternate exposure pathways, and new technologies available to protect human health and environment.

  11. Low-level mixed waste: An RCRA perspective for NRC licensees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The publication presents an overview of RCRA requirements for commercially-generated low-level mixed waste. It is designed for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees who may not be familiar with EPA regulations that apply to their waste products

  12. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - RCRA and Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Federal Facilities, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) sites as part of the CIMC web service. The...

  13. EPA Linked Open Data: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Handlers (RCRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RCRAInfo is EPA’s comprehensive information system that supports the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste...

  14. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments

  15. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments.

  16. Characterization of sediment in a leaching trench RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, M.G.; Kossik, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    Hazardous materials potentially were disposed of into a pair of leaching trenches from 1975 until Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations were imposed in 1985. These leaching trenches now are used for disposal of nonhazardous process water. The typical effluent (approximately 3 million gal/d) consisted of water with trace quantities of laboratory, maintenance, and fuel fabrication process chemicals. The largest constituent in the waste stream was uranium in low concentrations. This paper describes the project used to analyze and characterize the sediments in and below the leaching trenches. Two phases of sediment sampling were performed. The first phase consisted of taking samples between the bottom of the trenches and groundwater to locate contamination in the deep sediments under the trenches. To accomplish this sampling, a series of wells were drilled, and samples were obtained for every five feet in depth. The second phase consisted of samples taken at three depths in a series of positions along each trench. Sampling was completed to determine contamination levels in the shallow sediments and loose material washed into the trenches from the process sewer system. The project results were that no measurable contamination was found in the deep sediments. Measurable contamination from metals, such as chromium and nickel, was found in the shallow sediments. The primary contaminant in the shallow sediments was uranium. The concentration of contaminants decreased rapidly to near-background levels at shallow depths below the bottoms of the trenches

  17. Temporal trend analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Need, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data at a uranium hexafluoride processing facility showed a statistically significant increase in the concentration of gross beta activity in monitor wells downgradient of surface impounds storing calcium fluoride sludge and high pH water. Because evidence of leakage had not been detected in lysimeters installed beneath the impounds, the operator sought an evaluation of other potential causes of the result, including natural variability. This study determined that all five data sets showed either long-term excursionary (spike-like), or seasonal forms of temporal variation. Gross beta had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that almost appeared to be seasonal. Gross alpha had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Specific conductance had both upward and downward long-term trends but no other variations. pH had a downward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Fluoride had a downward long-term trend without excursions but with clear seasonal variations. The gross beta result that appeared to be a significant change was a spike event on the upward long-term trend

  18. Use of vertebral body units to locate the cavoatrial junction for optimum central venous catheter tip positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y G; Byun, J H; Hwang, S Y; Kim, C W; Shim, S G

    2015-08-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement plays an important role in clinical practice; however, optimal positioning of the CVC tip remains a controversial issue. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of vertebral body unit (VBUs), to locate the cavoatrial junction (CAJ), for optimal CVC tip placement based on chest radiography (CXR) using the carina as a landmark. 524 patients who underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and CXR were included. The position of the CAJ was identified using VBUs, and the efficacy of VBUs for locating the CAJ with the carina as a landmark was analysed using multiple regression analysis. A VBU was defined as the distance between two adjacent vertebral bodies, including the inter-vertebral disk space. The mean (sd) distance from the carina to the superior CAJ was 54.3 (9.7) mm on CTA; the mean distance in VBUs at the level of the carina was 21.4 (1.7) mm on CTA and 22.6 (2.1) mm on CXR. The mean CAJ position was 2.5 VBUs below the carina on CTA and 2.4 VBUs below on CXR with 95% limits of agreement between -0.6 and +0.3. The position of the CVC tip in relation to the carina can be described using the thoracic spine as an internal ruler, and the position of the CAJ in adults was reliably estimated to be 2.4 VBUs below the carina. KCT0001319. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effectiveness evaluation of three RCRA caps at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevenell, L.A. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Goldstrand, P.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1994-01-01

    Because installation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- engineered caps is costly, it is prudent to evaluate the effectiveness of this procedure for hydrologically isolating contaminants. The objective for installation of five-part engineered caps at the Y-12 Plant was to (1) satisfy the regulatory compliance issues, (2) minimize the risk of direct contact with the wastes, and (3) reduce rainfall infiltration. Although the original objectives of installing the caps were not to alter groundwater flow, a potential effect of reducing infiltration is to minimize leaching, thus retarding groundwater contaminant migration from the site. Hence, cap effectiveness with respect to reduced groundwater contaminant migration is evaluated using groundwater data in this report. Based on the available data at the Y-12 capped areas, evaluation of cap effectiveness includes studying water level and chemical variability in nearby monitoring wells. Three caps installed during 1989 are selected for evaluation in this report. These caps are located in three significantly different hydrogeologic settings: overlying a karst aquifer (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits [CRSP]), overlying shales located on a hill slope (Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area [OLWMA]), and overlying shales in a valley floor which is a site of convergent groundwater flow (New Hope Pond [NHP]). Presumably, the caps have been effective in minimizing risk of direct contact with the wastes and halting direct rainfall infiltration into the sites over the extent of the capped areas, but no evidence is presented in this report to directly demonstrate this. The caps installed over the three sites appear to have had a minimal effect on groundwater contaminant migration from the respective sites. Following cap construction, no changes in the configuration of the water table were observed. Migration of contaminant plumes occurred at all three sites, apparently without regard to the timing of cap installation.

  20. Sustainable Urban Development? Exploring the Locational Attributes of LEED-ND Projects in the United States through a GIS Analysis of Light Intensity and Land Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell M. Smith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available LEED®-ND™ is the latest attempt to develop more sustainable urban environs in the United States. The LEED®-ND™ program was created to provide a green rating system that would improve the quality of life for all people through the inclusion of sustainable development practices. To achieve this, a premium is placed on the locational attributes of proposed projects under the “Smart Location and Linkages” credit category. The purpose of this paper is to explore the locational attributes of LEED®-ND™ projects in the United States to determine if projects are being located in areas that will result in achieving the program’s stated objectives. Specifically, this paper will examine two locational variables (i.e., night-time light intensity and land use cover through the use of GIS to determine the effectiveness of these criteria.

  1. Hanford facility RCRA permit condition II.U.1 report: mapping of underground piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, C.B.

    1996-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to fulfill Condition Il.U.1. of the Hanford Facility (HF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit. The HF RCRA Permit, Number WA7890008967, became effective on September 28, 1994 (Ecology 1994). Permit Conditions Il.U. (mapping) and II.V. (marking) of the HF RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste (OW) Portion, require the mapping and marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines subject to the provisions of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-303. Permit Condition Il.U.I. requires the submittal of a report describing the methodology used to generate pipeline maps and to assure their quality. Though not required by the Permit, this report also documents the approach used for the field marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines.

  2. Demonstration of airborne transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 between simulated pig units located at close range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.S.; Angen, Øystein; Andreasen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was studied as the percentage of air needed to establish airborne transmission from an infected pig unit into a neighbouring non-infected pig unit. The experiment was carried out in two containers constructed as pig units, placed 1 m apart...... and connected by pipes. By manipulating the air pressure in the two units, the amount of ventilation air transferred from the infected pigs (unit A) to the non-infected pigs (unit B) was controlled and measured. In three experiments, between 48 and 50 specific pathogen free-pigs were randomly assigned to each...... of the two units. In unit A, five pigs (experiment 1) or eight pigs (experiments 2 and 3) were inoculated with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. In experiments 1 and 3, 10% of the air was transferred from unit A to B; in experiment 2, 70% of the air was transferred. In the non-infected unit (B), 36...

  3. Performance test results of noninvasive characterization of RCRA surrogate waste by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Propp, W.A.

    1997-11-01

    A performance evaluation to determine the feasibility of using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for noninvasive, quantitative assay of mixed waste containers was sponsored by DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD), the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The evaluation was conducted using a surrogate waste, based on Portland cement, that was spiked with three RCRA metals, mercury, cadmium, and lead. The results indicate that PGNAA has potential as a process monitor. However, further development is required to improve its sensitivity to meet regulatory requirements for determination of these RCRA metals

  4. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP.

  5. Exiting RCRA Subtitle C regulation data for supporting a new regulatory path for immobilized mixed debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, C.L. [Jetseal, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carson, S.D.; Cheng, Wu-Ching [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents analytical and empirical data that provide technical support for the position that mixed debris (debris contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) treated by immobilization in accordance with 40 CFR 268.45 can exit RCRA Subtitle C requirements at the time the treatment is complete. Pathways analyses and risk assessments of low-level waste and RCRA mixed waste disposal facilities show that these two types of facilities provide equivalent long-term (> 100 years) performance and protection of human health and the environment. A proposed two-tier approach for waste form performance criteria is discussed.

  6. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    RCRA ampersand Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP

  7. RCRA corrective action for underground storage tanks -- Subtitle C for Subtitle I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to DOE and DOE contractor personnel responsible for planning and implementation of corrective measures addressing cleanup of releases of hazardous materials or regulated substances from underground storage tanks regulated under RCRA Subtitle C or Subtitle I

  8. 76 FR 76158 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; RCRA Expanded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... contents of the docket, and to access those documents in the public docket that are available..., including through the use of appropriate automated electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection... as State, local, or Tribal governments. Title: RCRA Expanded Public Participation. ICR numbers: EPA...

  9. The implications of RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] regulation for the disposal of transuranic and high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmon, C.F.; Sharples, F.E.; Smith, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    In May of 1987 the Department of Energy (DOE) published a rule interpreting the definition of ''byproduct'' under the Atomic Energy Act. This byproduct rule clarified the role of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in the regulation of DOE's radioactive waste management activities. According to the rule, only the radioactive portion of DOE's mixed radioactive and hazardous waste (mixed waste), including mixed transuranic (TRU) and high-level waste (HLW), is exempt from RCRA under the byproduct exemption. The portion of a waste that is hazardous as defined by RCRA is subject to full regulation under RCRA. Because the radioactive and hazardous portions of m any, if not most, DOE wastes are likely to be inseparable, the rule in effect makes most mixed wastes subject to dual regulation. The potential application of RCRA to facilities such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the HLW repository creates unique challenges for both the DOE and regulatory authorities. Strategies must be developed to assure compliance with RCRA without either causing excessive administrative burdens or abandoning the goal of minimizing radiation exposure. This paper will explore some of the potential regulatory options for and recent trends in the regulation of TRU and HLW under RCRA

  10. Interim Measures Report for the Headquarters Building Area Location of Concern (LOC) 2E East SWMU 104 John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment portion of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit issued by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), requires identification and evaluation of all known Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Locations of Concern (LOCs) located on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) property. The KSC Headquarters Building Area (KHQA) has been identified as SWMU 104 under KSC's RCRA Program. This report summarizes the Interim Measure (IM) conducted by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity Contract NNK12CA13B at the KHQA to mitigate potential exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-affected media at the eastern side of LOC 2E. The IM activities were conducted in June and July 2015 to remediate PCBs above the FDEP Residential Direct-Exposure (R-) Soil Cleanup Target Level (SCTL) of 0.5 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg) established by Chapter 62-777, Florida Administrative Code. The IM was performed in accordance with the IM Work Plan (IMWP) approved by the FDEP, dated August 2012. IM activities were conducted in accordance with the KSC Generic PCB Work Plan (NASA 2007).

  11. Location. Unit 9. Level 2. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 302-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on locating a business in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 2 of learning--planning for…

  12. Location. Unit 9. Level 3. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 303-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on location in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 3 of learning--starting and managing…

  13. Location. Unit 9. Level 1. Instructor Guide. PACE: Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Third Edition. Research & Development Series No. 301-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This instructor guide for a unit on locating a business in the PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) curriculum includes the full text of the student module and lesson plans, instructional suggestions, and other teacher resources. The competencies that are incorporated into this module are at Level 1 of…

  14. The role of amenities and other factors in influencing the location of nonmanufacturing industry in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Calzonetti, F.J. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography

    1990-07-01

    Consumer and producer services, the latter in particular, are expected to become an important means of diversification and employment growth to the economy of Nevada. It has been suggested that the siting of the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will lead to a significant reduction in the amenity value of the state and, consequently, the ability of the state to attract these nonmanufacturing industries. This report reviews the literature dealing with factors important to the location of services, with an emphasis on producer services, to determine whether amenities, which have been shown to be an important locational consideration for some manufacturing firms, similarly affect the location of services. The report finds little substantive evidence to link amenities with the location of service firms, although the process by which these firms` locations are chosen is not well understood. Research in this area is comparatively recent, and although a number of theories of service location have been developed, the majority of research is exploratory in scope.

  15. National RCRA Hazardous Waste Biennial Report Data Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in cooperation with the States, biennially collects information regarding the generation, management, and...

  16. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA

  17. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_INACTIVE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste...

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_ACTIVE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of active hazardous...

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_LQG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  20. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_TRANS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_TSD

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of Hazardous Waste...

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Areas 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-08-01

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110 in accordance with the reissued (November 2000) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B operational permit NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 2000) and the Federal Facility and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP et al., 1996). CAU 110 consists of one Corrective Action Site 03-23-04, described as the U-3ax/bl Subsidence Crater. Certifications of closure are located in Appendix A. The U-3ax/bl is a historic disposal unit within the Area 3 RWMS located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit, which was formed by excavating the area between two subsidence craters (U-3ax and U-3bl), was operationally closed in 1987. The U-3ax/bl disposal unit was closed under the RCRA, as a hazardous waste landfill. Existing records indicate that, from July 1968 to December 1987, U-3ax/bl received 2.3 x 10{sup 5} cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (8.12 x 10{sup 6} cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]) of waste. NTS atmospheric nuclear device testing generated approximately 95% of the total waste volume disposed of in U-3ax/bl; 80% of the total volume was generated from the Waste Consolidation Project. Area 3 is located in Yucca Flat, within the northeast quadrant of the NTS. The Yucca Flat watershed is a structurally closed basin encompassing an area of approximately 780 square kilometers (300 square miles). The structural geomorphology of Yucca Flat is typical of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. Yucca Flat lies in one of the most arid regions of the country. Water balance calculations for Area 3 indicate that it is normally in a state of moisture deficit.

  3. Relation between location of a motor unit in the human biceps brachii and its critical firing levels for different tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Haar Romeny, B.M. ter; Gon, J.J.D. van der

    1984-01-01

    Critical firing levels (CFLs) of single motor units (MUs) in the long head of the human biceps brachii muscle were determined in combinations of two isometric tasks: flexion of the elbow, supination of the lower arm, and exorotation of the humerus, as well as the corresponding antagonistic tasks.

  4. A device for locating intercircuit leaks in heat transfer components of WWER steam generators during unit outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J.; Holy, F.; Fabian, S.

    1991-01-01

    The device is based on the following principle. The space between the tubes of the cold steam generator is filled with pressurized gas, the spaces of primary collectors in their bottom neck and in the attached tubing are waterproof-closed, and the inner spaces of the heat transfer tubes are gradually filled with modified water. This water is illuminated and its level is monitored. The formation and magnitude of flow and locality of source of gas bubbles leaking into the primary collector space are optically observed and acoustically measured. The device for this includes a module attached to a support, which is slidably located on a column. The module houses a water level indicator, a camera, a light source, and at least one acoustic sensor located under the water level. On the bottom part of the column, along which a water filling hose and a water tubing are led, is suspended an inflatable bag placed into the bottom neck of the primary collector and into the tubing. The water tubing empties in the lowest space, which is formed by the bottom neck of the primary collector and the surface of the inflated bag. On the inflatable bag is located a flange fitted with a light source oriented into the water-filled space of the primary collector, and with safety and attachment valves. (P.A.). 2 figs

  5. Dewatering and RCRA partial closure action on solar evaporation ponds, Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0487) on its proposal to partially close five solar evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) pursuant to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This proposal would be known as a RCRA partial closure and would be accomplished by dewatering the ponds, where necessary, and converting any remaining sludge or evaporator concentrate to a solid wasteform (pondcrete and saltcrete). The pond sites would be stabilized to prevent erosion or other disturbance to the soil and to prevent infiltration of rain or snowmelt. The solid wasteform would be transported offsite for disposal. The five solar ponds (designated 207-A, 207-B (north, center, and south), and 207-C), are the only solar evaporation ponds that exist at the RFP. A finding of no significant impact is included

  6. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  7. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring

  8. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  9. SACM and the RCRA stabilization initiative: Similarities of principles and applicability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provide standards for the remediation of environmental media contaminated with hazardous substances or hazardous waste, respectively. In both cases, prior to the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) development of the two subject reform initiatives, existing formal processes specified the level of site investigation required, the process for reaching a decision on the method of remediation, public participation in the decision process, and enforcement authorities that include orders and schedules of compliance. Traditionally, implementation of these processes has resulted in a great amount of time, effort, and money being expended before actual remediation began. Following criticism from the public and the regulated community, the EPA has proposed streamlining reforms for hazardous waste site cleanup under both CERCLA and RCRA that will begin remediation sooner with lower costs. The purpose of this Information Brief is to discuss the common goals, processes, and strategies of the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM) and the RCRA Stabilization Initiative.

  10. Obtaining variances from the treatment standards of the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs) [40 CFR 268] impose specific requirements for treatment of RCRA hazardous wastes prior to disposal. Before the LDRs, many hazardous wastes could be land disposed at an appropriately designed and permitted facility without undergoing treatment. Thus, the LDRs constitute a major change in the regulations governing hazardous waste. EPA does not regulate the radioactive component of radioactive mixed waste (RMW). However, the hazardous waste component of an RMW is subject to RCRA LDR regulations. DOE facilities that manage hazardous wastes (including radioactive mixed wastes) may have to alter their waste-management practices to comply with the regulations. The purpose of this document is to aid DOE facilities and operations offices in determining (1) whether a variance from the treatment standard should be sought and (2) which type (treatability or equivalency) of petition is appropriate. The document also guides the user in preparing the petition. It shall be noted that the primary responsibility for the development of the treatability petition lies with the generator of the waste. 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  12. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment at the 216-B-3 Pond Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Teel, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    This document describes a groundwater quality assessment of the 216-B-3 pond system, a Resources Conservation and Recovery act of 1976 (RCRA) waste facility. In 1990, sampling and chemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility indicated that the contamination indicator parameters, total organic halogens (TOX), and total organic carbon (TOC) had exceeded established limits in two wells. This discovery placed the facility into RCRA groundwater assessment status and subsequently led to a more detailed hydrochemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility. Comprehensive chemical analyses of groundwater samples from 1994 through 1996 revealed one compound, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TRIS2CH), that may have contributed to elevated TOX concentrations. No compound was identified as a contributor to TOC. Detailed evaluations of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH and comparison of occurrences of these parameters led to conclusions that (1) with few exceptions, these constituents occur at low concentrations below or near limits of quantitation; (2) it is problematic whether the low concentrations of TRIS2CH represent a contaminant originating from the facility or if it is a product of well construction; and (3) given the low and diminishing concentration of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH, no further investigation into the occurrent of these constituents is justified. Continued groundwater monitoring should include an immediate recalculation of background critical means of upgradient/downgradient comparisons and a return to seminannual groundwater monitoring under a RCRA indicator parameter evaluation program

  13. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed

  14. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration{trademark} technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration{trademark} (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs.

  15. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration trademark technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration trademark (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs

  16. Norovirus GII.17 Outbreak Linked to an Infected Post-Symptomatic Food Worker in a French Military Unit Located in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Marc-Antoine; Corcostégui, Simon-Pierre; De Broucker, Charles-Arnaud; Cabre, Olivier; Watier-Grillot, Stéphanie; Perelle, Sylvie; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Pommier de Santi, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    In February 2016, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in a French military unit located in Poitiers, France. Attack rate was of 34% (103/300). A case-control study identified association between illness and cake consumption. Stool samples were tested positive for Norovirus GII.17 for one patient and one post-symptomatic food worker (FW). The FW presented vomiting one day before cake preparation. The NoV strain was probably spread through food worker hand contact. Prevention of Norovirus foodborne outbreaks implies new guidelines for FWs management in France and Europe.

  17. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300 and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Figure 1-1 shows the location of these areas. Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations, under the authority of Chapter 173-303 Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plant and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-5 operable unit. The 100-B/C Area consists of the 100-BC-5 groundwater operable unit and four source operable units. The 100-BC-5 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-B/C Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination

  18. Occurrence of pesticides in water and sediment collected from amphibian habitats located throughout the United States, 2009-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Orlando, James L.; Calhoun, Daniel; Battaglin, William A.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Water and bed-sediment samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2009 and 2010 from 11 sites within California and 18 sites total in Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, and Oregon, and were analyzed for a suite of pesticides by the USGS. Water samples and bed-sediment samples were collected from perennial or seasonal ponds located in amphibian habitats in conjunction with research conducted by the USGS Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative and the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. Sites selected for this study in three of the states (California, Colorado, and Orgeon) have no direct pesticide application and are considered undeveloped and remote. Sites selected in Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, and Maine were in close proximity to either agricultural or suburban areas. Water and sediment samples were collected once in 2009 during amphibian breeding seasons. In 2010, water samples were collected twice. The first sampling event coincided with the beginning of the frog breeding season for the species of interest, and the second event occurred 10-12 weeks later when pesticides were being applied to the surrounding areas. Additionally, water was collected during each sampling event to measure dissolved organic carbon, nutrients, and the fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which has been linked to amphibian declines worldwide. Bed-sediment samples were collected once during the beginning of the frog breeding season, when the amphibians are thought to be most at risk to pesticides. Results of this study are reported for the following two geographic scales: (1) for a national scale, by using data from the 29 sites that were sampled from seven states, and (2) for California, by using data from the 11 sampled sites in that state. Water samples were analyzed for 96 pesticides by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 24 pesticides were detected in one or more of the 54 water samples, including 7 fungicides, 10

  19. Effect of object location on the density measurement and Hounsfield conversion in a NewTom 3G cone beam computed tomography unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagravère, M O; Carey, J; Ben-Zvi, M; Packota, G V; Major, P W

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an object's location in a cone beam CT imaging chamber (CBCT-NewTom 3G) on its apparent density and to develop a linear conversion coefficient for Hounsfield units (HU) to material density (g cm(-3)) for the NewTom 3G Scanner. Three cylindrical models of materials with different densities were constructed and scanned at five different locations in a NewTom 3G Volume Scanner. The average HU value for each model at each location was obtained using two different types of software. Next, five cylinders of different known densities were scanned at the exact centre of a NewTom 3G Scanner. The collected data were analysed using the same two types of software to determine a standard linear relationship between density and HU for each type of software. There is no statistical significance of location of an object within the CBCT scanner on determination of its density. A linear relationship between the density of an object and the HU of a scan was rho = 0.001(HU)+1.19 with an R2 value of 0.893 (where density, rho, is measured in g cm(-3)). This equation is to be used on a range between 1.42 g cm(-3) and 0.4456 g cm(-3). A linear relationship can be used to determine the density of materials (in the density range of bone) from the HU values of a CBCT scan. This relationship is not affected by the object's location within the scanner itself.

  20. If I were a band-aid, where would I be? Researching the use and location of supplies on two patient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazuin, Doug; Martinez, Jessica; Harper, Kathy; Okland, Kathy; Bergquist, Patricia; Kumar, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the use and storage of supplies in the neonatal intensive care and women's health units of Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas. Construction of a new Parkland Hospital is underway, with completion of the 862-bed, 2.5-million square feet hospital in 2014. Leaders from the hospital and representatives from one of its major vendors collaborated on a research study to evaluate the hospital's current supply management system and develop criteria to create an improved system to be implemented at the new hospital. Approach includes qualitative and quantitative methods, that is, written survey, researcher observations, focus groups, and evaluation of hospital supply reports. Approaching the ideal location of supplies can be best approached by defining a nurse's activity at the point of care. Determining an optimal supply management system must be approached by understanding the "what" of caregivers' activities and then determining the "where" of the supplies that support those activities. An ideal supply management system locates supplies as close as possible to the point of use, is organized by activity, and is standardized within and across units. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The WIPP RCRA Part B permit application for TRU mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    In August 1993, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a draft permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to begin experiments with transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. Subsequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to cancel the on-site test program, opting instead for laboratory testing. The Secretary of the NMED withdrew the draft permit in 1994, ordering the State's Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Bureau to work with the DOE on submittal of a revised permit application. Revision 5 of the WIPP's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application was submitted to the NMED in May 1995, focusing on disposal of 175,600 m 3 of TRU mixed waste over a 25 year span plus ten years for closure. A key portion of the application, the Waste Analysis Plan, shifted from requirements to characterize a relatively small volume of TRU mixed waste for on-site experiments, to describing a complete program that would apply to all DOE TRU waste generating facilities and meet the appropriate RCRA regulations. Waste characterization will be conducted on a waste stream basis, fitting into three broad categories: (1) homogeneous solids, (2) soil/gravel, and (3) debris wastes. Techniques used include radiography, visually examining waste from opened containers, radioassay, headspace gas sampling, physical sampling and analysis of homogeneous wastes, and review of documented acceptable knowledge. Acceptable knowledge of the original organics and metals used, and the operations that generated these waste streams is sufficient in most cases to determine if the waste has toxicity characteristics, hazardous constituents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PBCs), or RCRA regulated metals

  2. Self-assembled monolayers on mosoporous supports (SAMMS) for RCRA metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Fryxell, G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area has declared mercury removal and stabilization as the first and fourth priorities among 30 prioritized deficiencies. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal and mercury removal has also been identified as a high priority at DOE sites such as Albuquerque, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River. Under this task, a proprietary new technology, Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS), for RCRA metal ion removal from aqueous wastewater and mercury removal from organic wastes such as vacuum pump oils is being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The six key features of the SAMMS technology are (1) large surface area (>900 m{sup 2}/g) of the mesoporous oxides (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}) ensures high capacity for metal loading (more than 1 g Hg/g SAMMS); (2) molecular recognition of the interfacial functional groups ensures the high affinity and selectivity for heavy metals without interference from other abundant cations (such as calcium and iron) in wastewater; (3) suitability for removal of mercury from both aqueous wastes and organic wastes; (4) the Hg-laden SAMMS not only pass TCLP tests, but also have good long-term durability as a waste form because the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance to ion exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis; (5) the uniform and small pore size (2 to 40 nm) of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria (>2000 nm) from solubilizing the bound mercury; and (6) SAMMS can also be used for RCRA metal removal from gaseous mercury waste, sludge, sediment, and soil.

  3. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC). The report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site and consists of waste disposal units, including (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structure, (5) RCRA treatment and storage units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. In support of the Hanford RCRA permit, a field was added to designate whether the waste management unit is a solid waste management unit (SWMU). As SWMUs are identified, they will added to the Hanford Waste Information Data System (WIDS), which is the database supporting this report, and added to the report at its next annual update. A quality review of the WIDS was conducted this past year. The review included checking all data against their reference and making appropriate changes, updating the data elements using the most recent references, marking duplicate units for deletion, and addition additional information. 6 refs

  4. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC). The report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site and consists of waste disposal units, including (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structures, (5) RCRA treatment and storage units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. In support of the Hanford RCRA permit, a field was added to designate whether the waste management unit is a solid waste management unit (SWMU). As SWMUs are identified, they will added to the Hanford Waste Information Data System (WIDS), which is the database supporting this report, and added to the report at its next annual update. A quality review of the WIDS was conducted this past year. The review included checking all data against their reference and making appropriate changes, updating the data elements using the most recent references, marking duplicate units for deletion, and adding additional information. 6 refs

  5. Record of Decision for the Ford Building Waste Unit (643-11G) Operable Unit; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraley, S.

    2002-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial for the Ford Building Waste Unit (FBWU), in Aiken, South Carolina, which was chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by SARA, and, to the extent practical, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA site

  6. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  7. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1 through June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and ''Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities,'' as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company manages RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. This quarterly report contains data received between May 20 and August 19, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  8. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONSERVATION and RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper

  9. A Poisson Cluster Stochastic Rainfall Generator That Accounts for the Interannual Variability of Rainfall Statistics: Validation at Various Geographic Locations across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for a Poisson cluster stochastic rainfall generator was validated in its ability to reproduce important rainfall and watershed response characteristics at 104 locations in the United States. The suggested novel approach, The Hybrid Model (THM, as compared to the traditional Poisson cluster rainfall modeling approaches, has an additional capability to account for the interannual variability of rainfall statistics. THM and a traditional approach of Poisson cluster rainfall model (modified Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse model were compared in their ability to reproduce the characteristics of extreme rainfall and watershed response variables such as runoff and peak flow. The results of the comparison indicate that THM generally outperforms the traditional approach in reproducing the distributions of peak rainfall, peak flow, and runoff volume. In addition, THM significantly outperformed the traditional approach in reproducing extreme rainfall by 2.3% to 66% and extreme flow values by 32% to 71%.

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Figure 1-1 shows the location of these areas. Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations, under the authority of Chapter 173-303 Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-1 operable unit. The 100-KR-1 source operable unit is one of three source operable units in the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination

  11. A Spatial Decision Support System Framework for the Evaluation of Biomass Energy Production Locations: Case Study in the Regional Unit of Drama, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Ioannou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Renewable Energy Sources are expected to play a very important role in energy production in the following years. They constitute an energy production methodology which, if properly enabled, can ensure energy sufficiency as well as the protection of the environment. Energy production from biomass in particular is a very common method, which exploits a variety of resources (wood and wood waste, agricultural crops and their by-products after cultivation, animal wastes, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW and food processing wastes for the production of energy. This paper presents a Spatial Decision Support System, which enables managers to locate the most suitable areas for biomass power plant installation. For doing this, fuzzy logic and fuzzy membership functions are used for the creation of criteria layers and suitability maps. In this paper, we use a Multicriteria Decision Analysis methodology (Analytical Hierarchy Process combined with fuzzy system elements for the determination of the weight coefficients of the participating criteria. Then, based on the combination of fuzzy logic and theAnalytic Hierarchy Process (AHP, a final proposal is created thatdivides the area into four categories regarding their suitability forsupporting a biomass energy production power plant. For the two optimal locations, the biomass is also calculated.The framework is applied to theRegional Unit of Drama, which is situated in Northern Greece and is very well known for the area’s forest and agricultural production.

  12. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted

  13. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  14. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  15. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  16. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations

  17. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-01-01

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information

  18. The marriage of RCRA and CERCLA at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, D.C.; Brooks, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    A key goal of the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) signed in July of 1996 was to provide a seamless marriage of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (and other media specific programs) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the implementing agencies of each. This paper examines the two years since the signing of RFCA and identifies the successes, failures, and stresses of the marriage. RFCA has provided an excellent vehicle for regulatory and substantive progress at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats facility. The key for a fully successful marriage is to build on the accomplishments to date and to continually improve the internal and external systems and relationships. To date, the parties can be proud of both the substantial accomplishment of substantive environmental work and the regulatory systems that have enabled the work

  19. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  20. HIV infection and testing among Latino men who have sex with men in the United States: the role of location of birth and other social determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Oster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the United States, Latino men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV. Latino MSM are a diverse group who differ culturally based on their countries or regions of birth and their time in the United States. We assessed differences in HIV prevalence and testing among Latino MSM by location of birth, time since arrival, and other social determinants of health. METHODS: For the 2008 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, a cross-sectional survey conducted in large US cities, MSM were interviewed and tested for HIV infection. We used generalized estimating equations to test associations between various factors and 1 prevalent HIV infection and 2 being tested for HIV infection in the past 12 months. RESULTS: Among 1734 Latino MSM, HIV prevalence was 19%. In multivariable analysis, increasing age, low income, and gay identity were associated with HIV infection. Moreover, men who were U.S.-born or who arrived ≥5 years ago had significantly higher HIV prevalence than recent immigrants. Among men not reporting a previous positive HIV test, 63% had been tested for HIV infection in the past 12 months; recent testing was most strongly associated with having seen a health care provider and disclosing male-male attraction/sexual behavior to a health care provider. CONCLUSIONS: We identified several social determinants of health associated with HIV infection and testing among Latino MSM. Lower HIV prevalence among recent immigrants contrasts with higher prevalence among established immigrants and suggests a critical window of opportunity for HIV prevention, which should prioritize those with low income, who are at particular risk for HIV infection. Expanding health care utilization and encouraging communication with health care providers about sexual orientation may increase testing.

  1. A RCRA clean closure of a unique site - Kerr Hollow quarry at the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.E.; Yemington, C.

    1991-01-01

    An abandoned rock quarry, Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), near the DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was used from 1951-1988 as a site to treat RCRA wastes which were reactive, corrosive, or ignitable and which posed major concerns for personnel safety. The wastes were generated from operations at the Y-12 Plant and Oak Ridge National Laboratory and were previously treated by allowing the wastes to react with the water in KHQ. When closure of the site was required by the RCRA regulations, a closure method was selected to allow for clean closure of the quarry without treatment or removal of the water in KHQ. The method proposed to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) was one of surveying the containers in the quarry by a submersible Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) using sonar and visually inspecting the containers by camera to confirm that all containers are breached and empty. Any container found intact would be breached to allow the contents to react with water and form non-hazardous residue. The progress of this unique type of closure is presented along with a summary of the problems encountered, planning activities, equipment utilized and other information about the closure. All work was done with remotely operated equipment. This work is being performed by Sonsub, Inc. This closure project showed the practicality and cost benefits of telerobotic systems for work on hazardous waste sites. In addition to the intangible benefit of reduced exposure of workers, insurance costs are much lower and efficiency is higher. Daily start-up time is reduced since there is no need to don protective suits or other gear. Productivity is higher since personnel work only in clean areas where they are not hampered by protective gear. Cleanup time at shift end is minimized since the remote equipment does not leave the hazardous area and personnel need not go through decontamination

  2. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single-blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

  3. INEL RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] permit for incineration of hazardous waste: Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFee, J.N.; Dalton, J.D.; Bohrer, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was constructed to reduce the volume of low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). To address the problem of radioactively contaminated ignitable hazardous waste resulting from INEL activities, a development program was carried out to evaluate WERF's ability to meet the regulated criteria for incinerating liquid and solid ignitable waste. Concurrently, INEL submitted its hazardous waste Part B application under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). As required, and as a major step in the permitting process, the WERF incinerator portion of the permit application included a proposed trial burn, which is a demonstration test of the incinerator's ability to destroy hazardous materials. The trial burn plan was designed to demonstrate the system performance for liquid and solid ignitable wastes at three operating conditions, using a prepared mix of materials representative of waste to be processed. EPA Region X reviewed and commented on the plan prior to the trial burn. Results of the liquid feed trial burn showed a greater than 97% probability of meeting the RCRA-dictated DRE value for chlorinated solvents and a greater than 99% probability for nonchlorinated solvents. Nonchlorinated solid waste results were calculated at a 93% probability of meeting the required DRE, with a 75% probability for chlorinated solid wastes. In addition, the incinerator DRE continued to improve long after the assumed pre-test equilibrium period had ended. The trial burn demonstrates that the WERF incinerator can safely and adequately destroy ignitable hazardous and mixed waste and provides a significant enhancement of the INEL's waste management system

  4. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System

  5. OAS :: Our Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    the Human Resources of the OAS, including its organizational structure, each organizational unit's contract and travel control measure reports, the applicable procurement rules and regulations, and the Charter Organizational Charts Organizational List Authorities Our Locations Contact Us Telephone: +1 (202

  6. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  7. The influence of geographical location, host maturity and sex on intestinal helminth communities of the double-crested cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus from the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, K L; Hanson-Dorr, K C; Dorr, B S; Yarrow, G K; Johnson, R J

    2017-09-01

    Here the intestinal helminth infracommunities of 218 double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from 11 locations in Alabama, Minnesota, Mississippi and Vermont are documented. Trematode infections were present in 98% of hosts; 65% of cormorants carried cestode infections, 4% were infected with acanthocephalans and 66% had nematode intestinal parasites. Parasite infracommunities of hosts collected on wintering grounds had higher richness and diversity than did birds collected on breeding grounds. Differences in parasite richness and diversity between male and female P. auritus were also detected, but not between immature and mature bird hosts. Parasite intensity did not differ by sex, maturity, or between breeding and wintering season. The most common parasite was Drepanocephalus auritus (spathans), which is recognized as a disease agent that negatively impacts the catfish aquaculture industry in the US. Echinochasmus sp. in double-crested cormorants is documented for the first time in the United States. We suggest that the differences observed among parasite infracommunities could be associated with the foraging distances travelled by P. auritus during breeding and wintering seasons, which is limited by allocation of parental care during the breeding season.

  8. Locative media

    CERN Document Server

    Wilken, Rowan

    2014-01-01

    Not only is locative media one of the fastest growing areas in digital technology, but questions of location and location-awareness are increasingly central to our contemporary engagements with online and mobile media, and indeed media and culture generally. This volume is a comprehensive account of the various location-based technologies, services, applications, and cultures, as media, with an aim to identify, inventory, explore, and critique their cultural, economic, political, social, and policy dimensions internationally. In particular, the collection is organized around the perception that the growth of locative media gives rise to a number of crucial questions concerning the areas of culture, economy, and policy.

  9. Location, location, location: Extracting location value from house prices

    OpenAIRE

    Kolbe, Jens; Schulz, Rainer; Wersing, Martin; Werwatz, Axel

    2012-01-01

    The price for a single-family house depends both on the characteristics of the building and on its location. We propose a novel semiparametric method to extract location values from house prices. After splitting house prices into building and land components, location values are estimated with adaptive weight smoothing. The adaptive estimator requires neither strong smoothness assumptions nor local symmetry. We apply the method to house transactions from Berlin, Germany. The estimated surface...

  10. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-17

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  12. Preparation of radioactive ''mixed'' waste samples for measurement of RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.A.; Caton, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A radioactive ''mixed'' waste typically contains alpha-, beta-, or gamma-emitting radionuclides and varying quantities of semivolatile or volatile organic species, some or all of which may be named specifically by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because there are no acceptable means available currently for disposing of these mixed wastes, they are presently stored above-ground in sealed drums. For this reason, analytical procedures which can determine RCRA organics in radioactive waste are necessary for deciding the proper approach for disposal. An important goal of this work is the development of methods for preparing mixed waste samples in a manner which allows the RCRA organics to be measured in conventional organic analysis laboratories without special precautions. Analytical procedures developed for handling mixed waste samples must satisfy not only the usual constraints present in any trace-level organic chemical determination, but also those needed to insure the protection of the operator from radioactive contamination. Consequently, procedures should be designed to use the least amount of radioactive sample commensurate with achieving acceptable sensitivity with the RCRA analytical methods. Furthermore, the unusual laboratory glassware which would normally be used should be replaced with disposable materials wherever possible, in order to reduce the ''clean-up'' time required, and thereby reduce the operator's exposure to radioactivity. Actual sample handling should be reduced to the absolute minimum. Finally, the final isolate must exhibit a sufficiently low level of alpha, beta, or gamma activity to permit detailed characterization in a conventional organic analysis laboratory. 4 refs., 5 tabs

  13. Feasibility study of X-ray K-edge analysis of RCRA heavy metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, T.

    1999-01-01

    A study has been completed to assess the capabilities of X-ray K-edge analysis in the measurement of RCRA metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums. Results were obtained for mercury and lead contamination. It was not possible to measure cadmium contamination using this technique. No false positive signals were observed. In cases where uniformity of the sludge can be assumed, this analysis can provide a quick, accurate measurement of heavy-metal contamination

  14. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2000-2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Duane G; Hodges, Floyd N

    2001-01-01

    This document compiles information of the drilling and construction, well development, pump installation, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of five new RCRA wells in calendar year 2000 - 2001. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams); the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs; Appendix B contains physical properties data; and Appendix C contains the borehole geophysical logs

  15. RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual progress report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruland, R.M.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress during 1988 of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 16 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility (the Solid Waste Landfill). Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 21 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Hanford Site Waste Managements Units reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) was originated to provide information responsive to Section 3004(u) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of the 1984 United States Code (USC 1984). This report provides a comprehensive inventory of all types of waste management units at the Hanford Site, including a description of the units and the waste they contain. Waste management units in this report include: (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) disposal units, (2) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) disposal units, (3) unplanned releases, (4) inactive contaminated structures, (5) RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units, and (6) other storage areas. Because of the comprehensive nature of this report, the listing of sites is more extensive than required by Section 3004(u) of HSWA. The information in this report is extracted from the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The WIDS provides additional information concerning the waste management units contained in this report and is maintained current with changes to these units. This report is updated annually if determined necessary per the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1990). This report identifies 1,414 waste management units. Of these, 1,015 units are identified as solid waste management units (SWMU), and 342 are RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal units. The remaining 399 are comprised mainly of one-time spills to the environment, sanitary waste disposal facilities (i.e., septic tanks), and surplus facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure report: Area 2 Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells, Correction Action Unit 90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation of the activities conducted during the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Spring Quadrangle (USGS, 1986), Township 10 South, Range 53 East, Nye County, Nevada. This report discusses the Bitcutter Shop Inside Injection Well (CAU 90-A) closure-in-place and the Bitcutter Shop Outside Injection Well (CAU 90-B) and Postshot Containment Shop Injection Well (CAU 90-C) clean closures. This Closure Report provides background information about the unit, the results of the characterization activities and actions conducted to determine the closure design. It also provides a discussion of the drainage analysis, preliminary closure activities, final closure activities, waste management activities, and the Post-Closure Care requirements

  18. Library Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh locations including address, coordinates, phone number, square footage, and standard operating hours. The map below does not display...

  19. RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) are located on the southwest flank of Pine Ridge ∼1.5 miles west of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley. This facility consists of several contiguous disposal sites identified as Burial Grounds A, B, C, and D. Each burial site consists of a series of trenches used for disposal of solid wastes and, in some cases, liquid wastes. Initially, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure plan for the BCBG was intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the walk-in pits for BCBG. However, a plan was provided to include the B Area in the walk-in pits so that both areas cold be closed under one cap. The closure plan for B Area and the walk-in pits is presented in this document. The actual quantity and identity of materials is uncertain. The largest volume of material disposed in BCBG consists of uranium-contaminated industrial trash (paper, wood, steel, glass, and rubble)

  20. RCRA materials analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Detection limits in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskelo, A.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) that this report supports is research, development, testing and evaluation of a portable analyzer for RCRA and other metals. The instrumentation to be built will be used for field-screening of soils. Data quality is expected to be suitable for this purpose. The data presented in this report were acquired to demonstrate the detection limits for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of soils using instrument parameters suitable for fieldable instrumentation. The data are not expected to be the best achievable with the high pulse energies available in laboratory lasers. The report presents work to date on the detection limits for several elements in soils using LIBS. The elements targeted in the Technical Task Plan are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, selenium, and zirconium. Data for these elements are presented in this report. Also included are other data of interest to potential customers for the portable LIBS apparatus. These data are for barium, mercury, cesium and strontium. Data for uranium and thorium will be acquired during the tasks geared toward mixed waste characterization

  1. Sulfur polymer cement encapsulation of RCRA toxic metals and metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calhoun, C.L. Jr.; Nulf, L.E.; Gorin, A.H.

    1995-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the suitability of Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) encapsulation technology for the stabilization of RCRA toxic metal and metal oxide wastes. In a series of bench-scale experiments, the effects of sodium sulfide additions to the waste mixture, residence time, and temperature profile were evaluated. In addition, an effort was made to ascertain the degree to which SPC affords chemical stabilization as opposed to physical encapsulation. Experimental results have demonstrated that at the 25 wt % loading level, SPC can effectively immobilize Cr, Cr 2 O 3 , Hg, Pb, and Se to levels below regulatory limits. SPC encapsulation also has been shown to significantly reduce the leachability of other toxic compounds including PbO, PbO 2 , As 2 O 3 , BaO, and CdO. In addition, data has confirmed sulfide conversion of Hg, Pb, PbO, PbO 2 , and BaO as the product of their reaction with SPC

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  3. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-01-01

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples

  4. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  5. RCRA permitting strategies for the development of innovative technologies: Lessons from Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, S.W.; Donaghue, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Hanford Site restoration is the largest waste cleanup operation in history. The Hanford plutonium production mission generated two-thirds of all the nuclear waste, by volume, in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Cleanup challenges include not only large stored volumes of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste, but contaminated soil and groundwater and scores of major structures slated for decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition. DOE and its contractors will need to invent the technology required to do the job on a timetable driven by negotiated milestones, public concerns, and budgetary constraints. This paper will discuss the effort at Hanford to develop an integrated, streamlined strategy for compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) in the conduct of research, development, and demonstration (RD ampersand D) of innovative cleanup technologies. The aspects that will be discussed include the following: the genesis of the RD ampersand D permitting challenge at Hanford; permitting options in the existing regulatory framework; regulatory options that offered the best fit for Hanford RD ampersand D activities, and the problems associated with them; and conclusions and recommendations made to regulatory bodies

  6. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part II: Becoming an Entrepreneur. Unit B: Where to Locate the Business. Research and Development Series No. 194 B-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the seven instructional units in Part II is on establishing a business. Unit B focuses on choosing a business…

  7. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...... of flexibility in calculating genetic linkage and displaying linkage group. Among other features, this software enables user to identify linkage groups with output visualized graphically. The program calculates interference and coefficient of coincidence with elevated accuracy in sample datasets. AVAILABILITY...

  8. General minisum circle location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Körner, Mark; Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    In our paper we approximate a set of given points by a general circle. More precisely, we consider the problem of locating and scaling the unit ball of some given norm k1 with respect to xed points on the plane such that the sum of weighted distances between the circle and the xed points is minim......In our paper we approximate a set of given points by a general circle. More precisely, we consider the problem of locating and scaling the unit ball of some given norm k1 with respect to xed points on the plane such that the sum of weighted distances between the circle and the xed points...

  9. RFI/RI Report for the H-Area Tank Farm Groundwater Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-11-01

    The Savannah River site is located in Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties in South Carolina. The SRS manages certain waste materials that are regulated under the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which requires stringent management of hazardous wastes. The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments were passed in 1984 to further augment the 1976 RCRA requirements

  10. The importance of trade in services and environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities in the western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, T.

    1991-12-31

    The use of business services has had an increasingly important effect on economic performance in many industries, with the ability of firms in a given location to respond to changes in external markets, production techniques and material supplies often determined by the local provision of business information. Consequently, an increasing research effort has focused on the characteristics and role of producer services activities at the regional and urban economies. This paper examines the nature and extent of external linkages of a sample of independent producer service firms in the two regional centers of Denver and Salt Lake City. Preliminary results are presented from a larger survey of local and regional factors important to the location of producer service activity using survey data collected from producer service activities in metropolitan and non-metropolitan places in Colorado and Utah. Findings are presented in three main areas of interest: the importance and geographic sources of subcontracting of business services by producer service establishments, particularly those establishments where scientific and technical occupations are an important location factor; the geographic and sectoral distribution of service sales; and the relative importance of various environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities.

  11. The importance of trade in services and environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities in the western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, T.

    1991-01-01

    The use of business services has had an increasingly important effect on economic performance in many industries, with the ability of firms in a given location to respond to changes in external markets, production techniques and material supplies often determined by the local provision of business information. Consequently, an increasing research effort has focused on the characteristics and role of producer services activities at the regional and urban economies. This paper examines the nature and extent of external linkages of a sample of independent producer service firms in the two regional centers of Denver and Salt Lake City. Preliminary results are presented from a larger survey of local and regional factors important to the location of producer service activity using survey data collected from producer service activities in metropolitan and non-metropolitan places in Colorado and Utah. Findings are presented in three main areas of interest: the importance and geographic sources of subcontracting of business services by producer service establishments, particularly those establishments where scientific and technical occupations are an important location factor; the geographic and sectoral distribution of service sales; and the relative importance of various environmental amenities to the location of producer service activities.

  12. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This 'was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE)

  13. Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is participating in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to treatment of mixed (radioactive and RCRA) wastes. The salt residues from the MSO treatment will require further separations or other processing to prepare them for final disposal. A bench-scale MSO apparatus is being installed at ORNL and will be operated on real Oak Ridge wastes. The treatment concepts to be tested and demonstrated on the salt residues from real wastes are described

  14. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document

  15. 1993 RCRA Part B permit renewal application, Savannah River Site: Volume 10, Consolidated Incineration Facility, Section C, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molen, G.

    1993-08-01

    This section describes the chemical and physical nature of the RCRA regulated hazardous wastes to be handled, stored, and incinerated at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site. It is in accordance with requirements of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.13(a) and(b), and 270.14(b)(2). This application is for permit to store and teat these hazardous wastes as required for the operation of CIF. The permit is to cover the storage of hazardous waste in containers and of waste in six hazardous waste storage tanks. Treatment processes include incineration, solidification of ash, and neutralization of scrubber blowdown

  16. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system

  18. Anxious? Depressed? You might be suffering from capitalism: Contradictory class locations and the prevalence of depression and anxiety in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Seth J.; Bates, Lisa M.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Muntaner, Carles

    2015-01-01

    Despite a well-established social gradient for many mental disorders, evidence suggests that individuals near the middle of the social hierarchy suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety than those at the top or bottom. Although prevailing indicators of socioeconomic stratification (e.g., SES) cannot detect or easily explain such patterns, relational theories of social class, which emphasise political-economic processes and dimensions of power, might. We test whether the relational construct of contradictory class location, which embodies aspects of both ownership and labour, can explain this nonlinear pattern. Data on full-time workers from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N=21,859) show that occupants of contradictory class locations have higher prevalence and odds of depression and anxiety than occupants of non-contradictory class locations. These findings suggest that the effects of class relations on depression and anxiety extend beyond those of SES, pointing to under-studied mechanisms in social epidemiology, e.g., domination and exploitation. PMID:26385581

  19. Location-based Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Christensen, Knud

    on the market. However, CPM is primarily an activity based method that takes the activity as the unit of focus and there is criticism raised, specifically in the case of construction projects, on the method for deficient management of construction work and continuous flow of resources. To seek solutions...... to the identified limitations of the CPM method, an alternative planning and scheduling methodology that includes locations is tested. Location-based Scheduling (LBS) implies a shift in focus, from primarily the activities to the flow of work through the various locations of the project, i.e. the building. LBS uses...... the graphical presentation technique of Line-of-balance, which is adapted for planning and management of work-flows that facilitates resources to perform their work without interruptions caused by other resources working with other activities in the same location. As such, LBS and Lean Construction share...

  20. Issues in radioactive mixed waste compliance with RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act]: Some examples from ongoing operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, D.L.; Smith, T.H.; Clements, T.L. Jr.; Hodge, V.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive mixed waste is subject to regulation under both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The regulation of such waste is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and either the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or the Department of Energy (DOE), depending on whether the waste is commercially generated or defense-related. The recent application of the RCRA regulations to ongoing operations at the DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described in greater detail. 8 refs., 2 figs

  1. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material

  2. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring)

  3. Tooele Army Depot - South Area Suspected Release Units. RCRA Facility Investigation - Phase 2, for SWMUs 1, 25, and 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    metabolism before reaching the systemic circulation. Therefore, a toxic effect attributable to an active metabolite might be more pronounced if the compound...no first-pass metabolism might result in a greater dose of the toxic constituent entering the systemic circulation than if the compound were absorbed...great horned owls, red-tailed hawks, loggerhead shrikes, badgers, Ord’s kangaroo rats, horned larks, and sagebrush lizards. The vegetation types

  4. 圖書館事業與交流/Location Choice Patterns of Computer Use in the United States/Zhixian Yi; Philip Q. Yang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixian Yi; Philip Q. Yang Zhixian Yi; Philip Q. Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There is little research on the patterns of computer use outside home or work. This study examines who is more or less likely to use a computer at a location other than work or home by using the 2002–2004 General Social Survey data and logistic regression analysis. Demographic variables (such as age, race, marital status, and region, socioeconomic status (such as education and family income, self employment, and satisfaction with financial situation are significant predictors of computer use at locations other than home or work; but occupation and gender make no difference. The findings will help institutions to provide computer infrastructure support and services for customers in public places, and especially help schools and libraries to improve computer labs and services. 過去在探討非居家或上班電腦使用地點的研究微之又微。本文針對2002-2004 年總體社會調查資料進行對數回歸分析,分析更可能或不可能在家外或工作外使用電腦的族群。研究結果顯示,人口變量如年齡、種族、婚姻狀況、地區,社經地位(教育程度、家庭收入),是否自謀職業,是否對財政狀況滿意等,為解釋是否在家外或工作外使用電腦的有效自變量,然而職業和性別的影響則不顯著。本研究結果對於社會機構在公共場所提供計算機基礎設施和服務,以及對學校和圖書館改善電腦使用室及服務具有參考價值。 頁次:116-130

  5. Molecular approaches for blood meal analysis and species identification of mosquitoes (Insecta: Diptera: Culicidae) in rural locations in southern England, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Triana, Luis Miguel; Brugman, Victor Albert; Prosser, Sean Williams John; Weland, Chris; Nikolova, Nadya; Thorne, Leigh; Marco, Mar Fernández DE; Fooks, Anthony Richard; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-04-03

    Thirty-four species of Culicidae are present in the UK, of which 15 have been implicated as potential vectors of arthropod-borne viruses such as West Nile virus. Identification of mosquito feeding preferences is paramount to the understanding of vector-host-pathogen interactions which, in turn, would assist in the control of disease outbreaks. Results are presented on the application of DNA barcoding for vertebrate species identification in blood-fed female mosquitoes in rural locations. Blood-fed females (n = 134) were collected in southern England from rural sites and identified based on morphological criteria. Blood meals from 59 specimens (44%) were identified as feeding on eight hosts: European rabbit, cow, human, barn swallow, dog, great tit, magpie and blackbird. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I mtDNA barcoding region and the internal transcribed spacer 2 rDNA region of the specimens morphologically identified as Anopheles maculipennis s.l. revealed the presence of An. atroparvus and An. messeae. A similar analysis of specimens morphologically identified as Culex pipiens/Cx. torrentium showed all specimens to be Cx. pipiens (typical form). This study demonstrates the importance of using molecular techniques to support species-level identification in blood-fed mosquitoes to maximize the information obtained in studies investigating host feeding patterns.

  6. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR section 261.4(a)(4), ''Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,'' as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues

  7. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  8. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  9. Microbial rRNA sequencing analysis of evaporative cooler indoor environments located in the Great Basin Desert region of the United States†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Angela R.; Hogan, Mary Beth; Gault, Ruth A.; Holland, Kathleen; Sobek, Edward; Olsen-Wilson, Kimberly A.; Park, Yeonmi; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Gu, Ja Kook; Kashon, Michael L.; Green, Brett J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies conducted in the Great Basin Desert region of the United States have shown that skin test reactivity to fungal and dust mite allergens are increased in children with asthma or allergy living in homes with evaporative coolers (EC). The objective of this study was to determine if the increased humidity previously reported in EC homes leads to varying microbial populations compared to homes with air conditioners (AC). Children with physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis living in EC or AC environments were recruited into the study. Air samples were collected from the child's bedroom for genomic DNA extraction and metagenomic analysis of bacteria and fungi using the Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform. The analysis of bacterial populations revealed no major differences between EC and AC sampling environments. The fungal populations observed in EC homes differed from AC homes. The most prevalent species discovered in AC environments belonged to the genera Cryptococcus (20%) and Aspergillus (20%). In contrast, the most common fungi identified in EC homes belonged to the order Pleosporales and included Alternaria alternata (32%) and Phoma spp. (22%). The variations in fungal populations provide preliminary evidence of the microbial burden children may be exposed to within EC environments in this region. PMID:28091681

  10. Examining the financial performance of micro-generation wind projects and the subsidy effect of feed-in tariffs for urban locations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, Ryan; Walsh, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to evaluate the effect of the upcoming 2010 UK Feed-in Tariff (UK FIT) on decentralised small wind-energy installations at the household and building level in urban locations. It is projected that the UK FIT will stimulate an unprecedented surge in building-mounted turbine installation. The tariff amount must stimulate incentive but mitigate the likelihood of distortions in the competitive electricity market. To analyse these issues, measured energy output from sites in the Warwick Wind Trials Project (WWTP) is converted into revenue in a net-present-value (NPV) framework for assessing commercial purchases of small wind systems. Variances in project variables are examined through NPV simulations using Monte Carlo analysis to capture permutations of small wind-project performance in the UK-with and without the UK FIT. Our research concludes that the proposed tariff amount of 30.5 p/kWh will not significantly boost the economic attractiveness of mildly selective (WWTP-based) sites in the UK. Furthermore, the fixed-tariff rate ( Pounds /kWh generated) could cause inefficiencies applied across uneven wind-resource distribution. The results of this study suggest further examination of policy related to micro-generation, in particular decentralised small wind projects. - Highlights: → Feed-in tariff (FIT) policy for urban UK small wind projects. → Determination of economic attractiveness (NPV) of projects. → Application of performance data from Warwick Wind Trials. → Need for higher tariff rate to provide average project with NPV>0. → Recommend reconsideration of FIT policy for urban small wind projects.

  11. Parental perceptions and predictors of consent for school-located influenza vaccination in urban elementary school children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Susan; Wang, Hai-Lin; Mascola, Laurene; El Amin, Alvin Nelson; Pannaraj, Pia S

    2015-09-01

    School-located influenza vaccination (SLV) programs have the potential to mass-vaccinate all enrolled children, but parental consent is required. To examine parental attitudes and determine predictors of parental consent for vaccination of schoolchildren through SLV programs. Surveys were distributed to parents of 4517 children during 2009-2010 (year 1) and 4414 children during 2010-2011 (year 2) in eight elementary schools in conjunction with a SLV program. Participants included 1259 (27·9%) parents in year 1 and 1496 (33·9%) in year 2. Parental consent for 2009 H1N1, 2009 seasonal, and 2010 seasonal influenza vaccines was obtained from 738 (70·8%), 673 (64·5%), and 1151 (77·2%) respondents, respectively. During the 2009 pandemic, respondents concerned about influenza severity were twice as likely to consent for the 2009 H1N1 vaccination compared to unconcerned respondents (OR 2·04, 95% CI:1·19-3·51). During year 2, factors that predicted parental consent were the perception of high susceptibility to influenza infection (OR 2·19, 95% CI:1·50-3·19) and high benefit of vaccine (OR 2·23, 95% CI:1·47-3·40). In both years, college-educated parents were more likely to perceive vaccine risks (year 1: 83·6 versus 61·5%, P college-educated parents. Parents who appreciate the risks of influenza and benefits of vaccination are more likely to consent for SLV. More research is needed to determine how to address heightened safety concerns among college-educated parents. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Optimization of production in the oil field through the study of the problem of location of wells and production units; Otimizacao da producao em campo de petroleo pelo estudo do problema de localizacao de pocos e unidades de producao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Roberta G.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Rosa, Vinicius R. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This project provides a process for determining the best location of well and production units in an oil field in order to optimize the reservoir performance and the volume of recovered oil, maximizing the profitability. The process uses various statistical analyses presented in the reservoir simulation results, under considerations and parameters. Sensibility analysis and response surface methodology is also applied to a better understanding of how each well influence the total production and the location of the platform and/or manifold can be changed to optimize the production. The method is shown being applied on a field scale with synthetic data. It aims to be a new way of guiding decision-making on a project to develop a field production. (author)

  13. Trends in oral anti-osteoporosis drug prescription in the United Kingdom between 1990 and 2012: Variation by age, sex, geographic location and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, R Y; Wyers, C E; Teesselink, E; Geusens, P P M M; van den Bergh, J P W; de Vries, F; Cooper, C; Harvey, N C; van Staa, T P

    2017-01-01

    Given the expected increase in the number of patients with osteoporosis and fragility fractures it is important to have concise information on trends in prescription rates of anti-osteoporosis drugs (AOD). We undertook a retrospective observational study using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) in the UK between 1990 and 2012 in subjects 50years or older, stratified by age, sex, geographic region and ethnicity. Yearly prescription incidence rates of any AOD and of each specific AOD were calculated as the number of patients first prescribed these AODs per 10,000person-years (py). In women, yearly rates of first prescription of any AOD increased from 1990 to 2006 (from 2.3 to 169.7 per 10,000py), followed by a plateau and a 12% decrease in the last three years. In men, a less steep increase from 1990 to 2007 (from 1.4 to 45.3 per 10,000py) was followed by a plateau from 2008 onwards. Yearly rates of first prescription of any AOD increased up to the age of 85-89years (248.9 per 10,000py in women and 119.3 in men). There were marked differences between ethnic groups and regions. Bisphosphonates were the most frequently prescribed AODs: etidronate till 2000, and then subsequently alendronate. We have demonstrated marked secular changes in rates of anti-osteoporosis drug prescription over the last two decades. The plateau (and decrease amongst women) in rates in recent years, set against an ever ageing population, is worrying, suggesting that the well-documented care gap in osteoporosis treatment persists. The differences in prescription rates by geographic location and ethnicity raise intriguing questions in relation to underlying fracture rates, provision of care and health behaviour. We studied the prescription incidence of anti-osteoporosis drugs (AOD) from 1990 to 2012 in the UK CPRD. Overall AOD prescription incidence showed a strong increase from 1990 to 2006, followed by a plateau in both sexes and a decrease amongst women in the last three years

  14. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly

  15. 75 FR 984 - Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at CERCLA and RCRA Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is announcing a 50-day public comment period for draft recommended interim preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) developed in the Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Sites. EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency and Emergency Response (OSWER) has developed the draft recommended interim PRGs for dioxin in soil. These draft recommended interim PRGs were calculated using existing, peer- reviewed toxicity values and current EPA equations and default exposure assumptions. This Federal Register notice is intended to provide an opportunity for public comment on the draft recommended interim PRGs. EPA will consider any public comments submitted in accordance with this notice and may revise the draft recommended interim PRGs thereafter.

  16. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  17. Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to the treatment of mixed wastes at Oak Ridge and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the atomic energy legislation, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A major part of our ORNL program involves the development of separation technologies that are necessary for the complete treatment of mixed wastes. The residues from the MSO treatment of the mixed wastes must be processed further to separate the radioactive components, to concentrate and recycle residues, or to convert the residues into forms acceptable for final disposal. This paper is a review of the MSO requirements for separation technologies, the information now available, and the concepts for our development studies

  18. Response of Stream Chemistry During Base Flow to Gradients of Urbanization in Selected Locations Across the Conterminous United States, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Lori A.; Harned, Douglas A.; Hall, David W.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Bauch, Nancy J.; Richards, Kevin D.

    2007-01-01

    During 2002-2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program conducted a study to determine the effects of urbanization on stream water quality and aquatic communities in six environmentally heterogeneous areas of the conterminous United States--Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Denver, Colorado; and Portland, Oregon. This report compares and contrasts the response of stream chemistry during base flow to urbanization in different environmental settings and examines the relation between the exceedance of water-quality benchmarks and the level of urbanization in these areas. Chemical characteristics studied included concentrations of nutrients, dissolved pesticides, suspended sediment, sulfate, and chloride in base flow. In three study areas where the background land cover in minimally urbanized basins was predominantly forested (Atlanta, Raleigh-Durham, and Portland), urban development was associated with increased concentrations of nitrogen and total herbicides in streams. In Portland, there was evidence of mixed agricultural and urban influences at sites with 20 to 50 percent urban land cover. In two study areas where agriculture was the predominant background land cover (Milwaukee-Green Bay and Dallas-Fort Worth), concentrations of nitrogen and herbicides were flat or decreasing as urbanization increased. In Denver, which had predominantly shrub/grass as background land cover, nitrogen concentrations were only weakly related to urbanization, and total herbicide concentrations did not show any clear pattern relative to land cover - perhaps because of extensive water management in the study area. In contrast, total insecticide concentrations increased with increasing urbanization in all six study areas, likely due to high use of insecticides in urban applications and, for some study areas, the proximity of urban land cover to the sampling sites. Phosphorus

  19. Identification, classification and management of industrial waste in Kavir steel complex according to the Bazel convention and RCRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Ehrampoush

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Requiring industries for implementing industrial waste management programs and planning for proper waste disposal is essential in order to achieve sustainable development. Therefore, industrial waste management program was done in Kavir Steel Complex, in Aran va Bidgol region to identify and classify industrial waste and also to present solutions for improving waste management. In this complex, production process is hot rolling steel and the product is rebar. Material and Method: The preset study was conducted in Kavir Steel Complex. Following survey of production process and sources of waste, the type and volume of produced waste were identified and measured during 3 months. Then, the classification of wastes was done according to the Bazel Convention and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, and finally new industrial & health solid waste management program was presented. Result: Considering the volume, industrial waste of production process in Kavir Steel Complex was between 130 to 180 grams per each ton of rebar. Main industrial waste included oxide of steel billet, industrial sludge, used oil and lubricant which were classified according to the RCRA: 8 materials with T code, 1 with C code, 5 with I code and 3 materials with C code. Conclusion: The results revealed that the most amount of industrial waste in Kavir Steel Complex is the waste of steel billet and industrial sludge, and more than 90% of Kavir steel industrial waste were reused and recycled inside or outside of this complex. It is recommended that used oil to be transport and maintain in the safe containers.

  20. Aquatic Nuisance Species Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data in this map has been collected by the United States Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program located in Gainesville, Florida (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/default.aspx). This dataset may have some inaccuracies and is only current to June 15, 2012. The species identified in this dataset are not inclusive of all aquatic nuisance species, but rather a subset identified to be at risk for transport by recreational activities such as boating and angling. Additionally, the locations where organisims have been identified are also not inclusive and should be treated as a guide. Organisms are limited to the following: American bullfrog, Asian clam, Asian shore crab, Asian tunicate, Australian spotted jellyfish, Chinese mitten crab, New Zealand mudsnail, Colonial sea squirt, Alewife, Bighead carp, Black carp, Flathead catfish, Grass carp, Green crab, Lionfish, Northern snakehead, Quagga mussel, Round Goby, Ruffe, Rusty crayfish, Sea lamprey, Silver carp, Spiny water flea, Veined rapa whelk, Zebra mussel

  1. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs

  2. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides

  3. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford site facilities for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1993 and September 1994. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides

  4. Apparatus for locating defective nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    An ultrasonic search unit for locating defective fuel elements within a fuel assembly used in a water cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The unit is capable of freely traversing the restricted spaces between the fuel elements

  5. Modelos matemáticos de localização aplicados à organização espacial de unidades de saúde Mathematical location models applied in the spatial organization of health units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Diéguez Galvão

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Modelos matemáticos de localização têm tido aplicação crescente na área de saúde em nível internacional. No Brasil, embora de uso incipiente, existe enorme potencial para a utilização desses modelos na área de saúde pública. Nesse sentido são apresentados diversos modelos de localização com aplicação em saúde pública, analisando a localização de serviços não emergenciais, de serviços de emergência e a localização de serviços hierarquicamente relacionados. Mostrou-se a aplicação de um modelo hierárquico à localização de serviços de assistência materna e perinatal no Município do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brasil. Nesta parte, após a apresentação de alguns dados da assistência materna e perinatal no município, foi proposto um modelo hierárquico de quatro níveis (localização de unidades ambulatoriais, maternidades, centros de neonatologia e hospitais gerais e analisado o impacto que a adoção da metodologia teria em comparação com o sistema atual.Mathematical location models have been increasingly applied in the health services at the international level. In Brazil, although incipient, there exists an enormous potential for the use of such models in the area of public health. In this paper several location models that can be applied to public health are presented initially, and the location of non-emergency services, of emergency services and of services hierarchically related are analysed. A hierarchical model is then applied to the location of maternal and perinatal assistance in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. In this part, after presenting some related data for the municipality, a four-level hierarchical model (location of out-patient units, maternity hospitals, neonatal hospitals and general hospitals is proposed and the impact that the adoption of this methodology would have as compared with that of the present system is analysed.

  6. Alternative Site Technology Deployment-Monitoring System for the U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, J.M.; Levitt, D.G.; Rawlinson, S.E.

    2001-01-01

    In December 2000, a performance monitoring facility was constructed adjacent to the U-3ax/bl mixed waste disposal unit at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Recent studies conducted in the arid southwestern United States suggest that a vegetated monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) closure cover may be more effective at isolating waste than traditional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) multi-layered designs. The monitoring system deployed next to the U-3ax/bl disposal unit consists of eight drainage lysimeters with three surface treatments: two are left bare; two are revegetated with native species; two are being allowed to revegetate with invader species; and two are reserved for future studies. Soil used in each lysimeter is native alluvium taken from the same location as the soil used for the cover material on U-3ax/bl. The lysimeters were constructed so that any drainage to the bottom can be collected and measured. To provide a detailed evaluation of the cover performance, an ar ray of 16 sensors was installed in each lysimeter to measure soil water content, soil water potential, and soil temperature. Revegetation of the U-3ax/bl closure cover establishes a stable plant community that maximizes water loss through transpiration while at the same time, reduces water and wind erosion and ultimately restores the disposal unit to its surrounding Great Basin Desert environment

  7. RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk- In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Subsequently, this plan was modified again and approved as Y/TS-395, Revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (February 29, 1988). Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. The plan was presented to the state of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. This amended closure plan goes further to include inspection and maintenance criteria along with other details

  8. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2002-01-01

    This document provides information on the construction of three new RCRA wells at Waste Management Area U in September 2001. These wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Codes 173-160 and 173-303. Grab samples for geological description and archive were collected every 5 ft throughout the wells. Borehole and drill cuttings were monitored regularly for organic vapors and radionuclide contaminants. At well 299-W18-40, beta-gamma activity was found to be slightly above background at 120 ft below ground surface. All other measurements were below background. Cesium-137 was found at the ground surface and at 3 ft below ground surface (bgs). No other manmade contamination was found. At well 299-W19-44, no radionuclide contamination was found, but several intervals of high carbon monoxide were detected. Cesium-137 was detected at 3 ft bgs at 0.4 pCi/g. At well 299-W19-45, no radionuclide contamination was found, but several intervals of high carbon monoxide were detected. Cesium-137 was detected near the surface at 0.4 pCi/g. No other manmade radionuclide was detected. At well 299-W19-45, samples for geological description and archive were collected every 5 ft throughout the well. No contamination was noted. Cesium-137 was detected near the surface at 0.4 to 1.4 pCi/g. No other manmade radionuclide was detected

  9. The elimination of chlorinated, chlorofluorocarbon, and other RCRA hazardous solvents from the Y-12 Plant's enriched uranium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.H.; Patton, R.L.; Thompson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A major driving force in waste minimization within the plant is the reduction of mixed radioactive wastes associated with operations on highly enriched uranium. High enriched uranium has a high concentration of the uranium-235 isotope (up to 97.5% enrichment) and is radioactive, giving off alpha and low level gamma radiation. The material is fissionable with as little as two pounds dissolved in water being capable of producing a spontaneous chain reaction. For these reasons the material is processed in small batches or small geometries. Additionally, the material is completely recycled because of its strategic and monetary value. Since the early eighties, the plant has had an active waste minimization program which has concentrated on substitution of less hazardous solvents wherever possible. The following paper summarizes efforts in two areas - development of a water-based machining coolant to replace perchloroethylene and substitution of an aliphatic solvent to replace solvents producing hazardous wastes as defined by the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA)

  10. Savannah River Site RCRA/CERCLA/NEPA integrated investigation case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.R.; Thomas, R.; Wilson, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a US Department of Energy facility placed on the Superfund National Priority List in 1989. Numerous past disposal facilities and contaminated areas are undergoing the integrated regulatory remediation process detailed in the draft SRS Federal Facility Agreement. This paper will discuss the integration of these requirements by highlighting the investigation of the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits, a typical waste unit at SRS

  11. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit investigative phase and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA). The 100-HR-2 Operable Unit contains solid waste burial grounds, an ash pit, bum pits, electrical facilities, septic systems, and support facilities. All known and suspected areas of contamination were classified as solid waste burial grounds or low-priority waste sites based on the collective knowledge of the operable unit managers (representatives from the US Department of Energy [DOE], the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], and Washington Department of Ecology [Ecology]) during the preparation of the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit work plan (DOE/RL 1993f). Solid waste burial grounds were judged to pose sufficient risk(s), through one or more pathways, to require evaluation for an interim remedial measure (IRM) as per the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy (HPPS) (DOE/RL 1991) and negotiations with DOE, EPA, and Ecology. An IRM is intended to achieve remedies that are likely to lead to a final record of decision. Low-priority sites are those judged not to pose significant risk to require the streamlined evaluation. There were six low-priority waste sites and seven solid waste burial grounds identified. The investigative phase was conducted in accordance with the RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit (DOE/RL 1993f). The QRA was performed in accordance with the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology (DOE/RL 1993b) and the recommendations incorporate the strategies of the HPPS. The purpose of this report is to: (1) provide a summary of site investigative activities; (2) refine the conceptual exposure model (as needed); (3) identify chemical- and location-specific corrective action requirements; and (4) provide a human health and ecological QRA associated with solid waste burial grounds

  12. 39 CFR 958.7 - Hearing location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing location. 958.7 Section 958.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO CIVIL... location. An oral hearing under this part shall be held: (a) In the judicial district of the United States...

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the end of the Cold War and the Nonproliferation treaty, the United States is left with quantifies of spent nuclear fuel. The final disposition of the spent nuclear fuel is yet to be determined. However, one issue that plagues the holders of this material is 'if this material is no longer required and must be disposed, how will it be classified under current U.S. environmental laws and regulations?' This paper provides one site's position on the characterization of the spent nuclear fuel as a non-hazardous solid waste

  14. Permian Basin location recommendation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    Candidate study areas are screened from the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basin areas using data obtained from studies to date and criteria and specifications that consider: rock geometry; rock characteristics; human intrusion potential; surface characteristics; and environmental and socioeconomic conditions. Two preferred locations are recommended from among these areas for additional characterization to identify potential National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) salt repository sites. One location, in northeastern Deaf Smith County and southeastern Oldham County, is underlain by two salt units that meet the adopted screening specifications. The other location, in northcentral Swisher County, is underlain by one salt unit that meets the adopted screening specifications. Both locations have several favorable features, relative to surrounding areas, and no obviously undesirable characteristics. Both lie wholly on the Southern High Plains surface, are in relatively sparsely populated areas, contain no unique land use conflicts, and comprise large enough geographic areas to provide flexibility in site selection. Data gathered to date indicate that these locations contain salt units sufficient in thickness and in depth for the safe construction and operation of the underground facilities under consideration. 93 references, 34 figures, 6 tables

  15. Statistical methods for determination of background levels for naturally occuring radionuclides in soil at a RCRA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, S.; Taylor, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    It is critical that summary statistics on background data, or background levels, be computed based on standardized and defensible statistical methods because background levels are frequently used in subsequent analyses and comparisons performed by separate analysts over time. The final background for naturally occurring radionuclide concentrations in soil at a RCRA facility, and the associated statistical methods used to estimate these concentrations, are presented. The primary objective is to describe, via a case study, the statistical methods used to estimate 95% upper tolerance limits (UTL) on radionuclide background soil data sets. A 95% UTL on background samples can be used as a screening level concentration in the absence of definitive soil cleanup criteria for naturally occurring radionuclides. The statistical methods are based exclusively on EPA guidance. This paper includes an introduction, a discussion of the analytical results for the radionuclides and a detailed description of the statistical analyses leading to the determination of 95% UTLs. Soil concentrations reported are based on validated data. Data sets are categorized as surficial soil; samples collected at depths from zero to one-half foot; and deep soil, samples collected from 3 to 5 feet. These data sets were tested for statistical outliers and underlying distributions were determined by using the chi-squared test for goodness-of-fit. UTLs for the data sets were then computed based on the percentage of non-detects and the appropriate best-fit distribution (lognormal, normal, or non-parametric). For data sets containing greater than approximately 50% nondetects, nonparametric UTLs were computed

  16. A Location Privacy Aware Friend Locator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Thomsen, Jeppe Rishede; Saltenis, Simonas

    2009-01-01

    to trade their location privacy for quality of service, limiting the attractiveness of the services. The challenge is to develop a communication-efficient solution such that (i) it detects proximity between a user and the user’s friends, (ii) any other party is not allowed to infer the location of the user...

  17. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-01-01

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan

  18. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-07

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan.

  19. Low temperature setting iron phosphate ceramics as a stabilization and solidification agent for incinerator ash contaminated with transuranic and RCRA metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, P.G.; Hansen, M.; Wood, E.L.; Frank, S.M.; Sidwell, R.W.; Giglio, J.J.; Johnson, S.G.; Macheret, J.

    1997-01-01

    Incineration of combustible Mixed Transuranic Waste yields an ash residue that contains oxides of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and transuranic metals. In order to dispose of this ash safely, it has to be solidified and stabilized to satisfy appropriate requirements for repository disposal. This paper describes a new method for solidification of incinerator ash, using room temperature setting iron phosphate ceramics, and includes fabrication procedures for these waste forms as well as results of the MCC-1 static leach test, XRD analysis, scanning electron microscopy studies and density measurements of the solidified waste form produced

  20. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement

  1. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  2. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ''Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.'' The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ''package'' for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package

  3. Onderzoek Location Based Marketing: Mobile = location = effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisbergen, M.S. van; Huhn, A.E.; Khan, V.J.; Ketelaar, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Onderzoekers van de NHTV (Internationaa Hoger Onderwijs Breda, Radboud Universiteit, DVJ Insights en Popai Benelux lieten consumenten in een virtuele supermarkt advertenties via de smartphone ontvangen wanneer men langs het geadverteerde product liep. De uitkomsten laten zien dat 'location based

  4. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traynor, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure

  5. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Traynor

    2001-03-01

    The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

  6. RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. In January 1993, the Closure Plan was revised to include inspection and maintenance criteria and to reflect that future monitoring and remediation would be conducted as part of the ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This Closure Plan revision is intended to reflect the placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the Walk-In Pits, revise the closure dates, and acknowledge that the disposition of a monitoring well within the closure site cannot be verified

  7. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed

  8. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site's 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed

  9. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  10. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA ampersand Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects ampersand Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC's scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule

  11. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced

  12. Location | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  13. Appraising manufacturing location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    International location of manufacturing activities is an issue for managers of manufacturing companies as well as public policy makers. For managers, the issue is relevant because international locations offer opportunities for lowering costs due to productivity improvements. For governments the

  14. Law Enforcement Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Law Enforcement Locations in Kansas Any location where sworn officers of a law enforcement agency are regularly based or stationed. Law enforcement agencies "are...

  15. RCRA Facility Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes hazardous waste information, which is mostly contained in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) System, a national...

  16. Smartphones as locative media

    CERN Document Server

    Frith, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone adoption has surpassed 50% of the population in more than 15 countries, and there are now more than one million mobile applications people can download to their phones. Many of these applications take advantage of smartphones as locative media, which is what allows smartphones to be located in physical space. Applications that take advantage of people's location are called location-based services, and they are the focus of this book. Smartphones as locative media raise important questions about how we understand the complicated relationship between the Internet and physical space

  17. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-01-01

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan

  18. 39 CFR 962.7 - Hearing location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing location. 962.7 Section 962.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 962.7 Hearing location. An oral hearing under this part shall be held (a) In...

  19. An analysis of the CERCLA response program and the RCRA corrective action program in determining cleanup strategies for federal facilities which have been proposed for listing on the National Priorities List

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, P.; Vinson, R.

    1994-01-01

    This document was prepared as an issue paper for the Department of Energy to serve in the decision-making process for environmental restoration activities. The paper compares cleanup requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and those currently proposed under Subpart S of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The history and regulatory framework for both laws is discussed, and the process for environmental restoration actions under both regulatory programs is compared and contrasted. Contaminants regulated under CERCLA and RCRA differ significantly in that radioactive contaminants are subject to Environmental Protection Agency jurisdiction only under CERCLA. The DOE has the jurisdiction to implement radioactive waste management and cleanup levels under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) at nuclear weapons facilities. For sites with significant amounts of contaminants which are radioactive only, cleanup under RCRA can present significant advantages, since the DOE can then manage restoration activities under its own authority. There are, conversely several significant advantages for a remedial action being conducted at a CERCLA site recognized on the National Priorities List (NPL). Other provisions in the CERCLA remediation and the RCRA corrective action process offer both advantages and disadvantages related to DOE environmental restoration programs. This paper presents a discussion of significant issues which should be considered in such negotiations

  20. Lost in Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    traversed. While becoming destination aware, the individual loses her location awareness. The article proposes that the reason people get lost when using sat-nav is due to a wrong location-performative paradigm. As an alternative, the article introduces and analyzes two performance-related examples...... that illustrate an alternative location-performative paradigm: Meredith Warner's Lost/Found knitting series and Etter and Schecht's Melodious Walkabout. In both examples, the artist's hand becomes the intermediary between alien and location. Thus, by exploring how wayfinding can be a poetically situated...... performance, the article examines how the growing locative media industry can learn from the location-aware performative strategies employed by artists who create situated and urban performances for the curious participant. The academic frames employed in the analysis draw on psychogeography, site...

  1. Internet Geo-Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    INTERNET GEO-LOCATION DUKE UNIVERSITY DECEMBER 2017 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR...REPORT TYPE FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) MAY 2014 – MAY 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERNET GEO-LOCATION 5a. CONTRACT...of SpeedTest servers that are used by end users to measure the speed of their Internet connection. The servers log the IP address and the location

  2. Smart Location Database - Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  3. Smart Location Database - Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  4. Location, Location: Jurisdiction & Conflicts in Transborder Contract Litigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph

    In transborder contract litigation place-based factors are often decisive, both as regards jurisdiction to adjudicate as well as the rules which determine the applicable substantive law. Relevant locations include the place where the contract was made, where the parties reside, transact business...... or own property, the place of delivery, payment or other performance etc. Using concrete case-based examples, Professor Lookofsky explains how rules of jurisdiction and contract conflicts in Europe are tied to rigidly defined, single-place-based factors. In the United States, by contrast...

  5. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments

  6. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments.

  7. Green facility location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velázquez Martínez, J.C.; Fransoo, J.C.; Bouchery, Y.; Corbett, C.J.; Fransoo, J.C.; Tan, T.

    2017-01-01

    Transportation is one of the main contributing factors of global carbon emissions, and thus, when dealing with facility location models in a distribution context, transportation emissions may be substantially higher than the emissions due to production or storage. Because facility location models

  8. Industrial location and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brakman (Steven); J.H. Garretsen (Harry); J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe interaction between the extent of location advantages and the intensity of firm competition relative to the size of the market jointly determines the location of industrial activity. Technology, factor endowments, geography, and scale economies are influential for determining

  9. Development of guidance for preparing treatability variance petitions from the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions for DOE [Department of Energy] mixed-waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, T.; Scheuer, N.; Martin, R.; Van Epp, T.; Triplett, M.

    1990-01-01

    In response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) anticipated need for variances from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) treatment requirements, a treatability variance guidance document is being prepared for use by DOE facilities and operations offices. The guidance document, although applicable to non-mixed hazardous waste streams, provides specific guidance regarding radioactive mixed-waste streams. Preparation of the guidance manual has involved developing an overview of the Land Disposal Restrictions, as well as an overview of the petition preparation process. The DOE internal review requirements are specifically addressed in the manual. Specific data requirements and engineering analyses are also described. A discussion of EPA's criteria for granting a treatability variance is also provided. A checklist for completeness of the petition is provided. Model language for use in DOE treatability variance petitions will be provided in a petition for a DOE waste stream as an appendix to the document

  10. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for minimum versus maximum compliance.

  11. Planning for closures of hazardous waste land disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.H.; Kelly, B.A.; DeLozier, M.F.P.; Manrod, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Eight hazardous waste land disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) under an integrated multi-year program. The units, some of which date back to the early 1950s and include five surface impoundments, two landfills and a land treatment unit, have been used for the management of a variety of types of hazardous wastes. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. The units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. Closure of all eight units must be initiated by November 8, 1988. Funding for the eight closures is being provided by a new Department of Energy budget category, the environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to allow for a more rapid response to environmental problems and regulatory requirements. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA) has been identified for ERBC funding to close the land disposal units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the project scope has required the development of a detailed set of assumptions and a confirmation program for each assumption. Other significant activities in the CAPCA project include risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated project schedule

  12. Allegheny County Dam Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the point locations of dams in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  13. Smart Location Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Smart Location Database, Access to Jobs and Workers via Transit, and National Walkability Index tools can help assess indicators related to the built environment, transit accessibility, and walkability.

  14. VT Hospital Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data layer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of...

  15. SGA Project Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The stream geomorphic assessment is a physical assessment competed by geomorphologists to determine the condition and sensitivity of a stream. The SGA locations...

  16. Waste Recovery Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Locations where City residents are encouraged to drop off and dispose or recycle of unwanted materials. Information provided is subject to change. Please call ahead...

  17. Global Volcano Locations Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a database of over 1,500 volcano locations obtained from the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program, Volcanoes of the World publication. The...

  18. USAID Activity Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID Activities dataset is a snapshot of activities supported by USAID including their geographical locations within countries at the time of the snapshot. The...

  19. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This permit application provides facility information on the design, processes, and security features associated with the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit. The unit will receive and dispose of onsite and offsite containerized low-level mixed waste (LLMW) that has an approved U.S. Department of Energy nexus.

  20. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Protection and Technical Services

    2009-09-30

    This permit application provides facility information on the design, processes, and security features associated with the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit. The unit will receive and dispose of onsite and offsite containerized low-level mixed waste (LLMW) that has an approved U.S. Department of Energy nexus.

  1. 12 CFR 905.3 - Location and business hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Location and business hours. (a) Location. All office units of the Finance Board are located at 1777 F... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location and business hours. 905.3 Section 905.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION AND...

  2. AFRICOM: Does Location Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Decision Model,” 242-244. 26 Susan Hesse Owen & Mark S. Daskin , “Strategic Facility Location: A Review,” European Journal of Operational Research...Susan Hesse & Mark S. Daskin . “Strategic Facility Location: A Review,” European Journal of Operational Research 111 (1998), 423-447. Paye-Layeleh...ES) N/ A 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and

  3. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  4. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan

  5. On English Locative Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Brůhová

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses English sentences with thematic locative subjects. These subjects were detected as translation counterparts of Czech sentenceinitial locative adverbials realized by prepositional phrases with the prepositions do (into, na (on, v/ve (in, z/ze (from complemented by a noun. In the corresponding English structure, the initial scene-setting adverbial is reflected in the thematic subject, which results in the locative semantics of the subject. The sentences are analysed from syntactic, semantic and FSP aspects. From the syntactic point of view, we found five syntactic patterns of the English sentences with a locative subject (SV, SVA, SVO, SVpassA and SVCs that correspond to Czech sentences with initial locative adverbials. On the FSP level the paper studies the potential of the sentences to implement the Presentation or Quality Scale. Since it is the “semantic content of the verb that actuates the presentation semantics of the sentence” (Duškova, 2015a: 260, major attention is paid to the syntactic-semantic structure of the verb. The analysis of the semantics of the English sentences results in the identification of two semantic classes of verbs which co-occur with the English locative subject.

  6. Tooele Army Depot - South Area Suspected Releases Units RCRA Facility Investigation - Phase II for SWMUs 1, 25, and 37. Appendices: D-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    behavior which may include running, fighting, and/or singing. If the condition persists, a mask-like face, retropulsion or propulsion and a Parkinson ...Toxicity Acute mercury poisoning is usually caused by the soluble inorganic salts. Early signs and symptoms include pharyngitis, dysphagia , abdominal

  7. Location-based games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    In this dissertation, it is explored which prerequisites are necessary in location-based games (LBGs) to make meaningful the meeting between players and spatiality with an emphasis on physical locations. Throughout the dissertation, it has been shown that LBGs affect players’ perception of and be...... possible. The practical contribution is my creation of the LBG Visions of Sara. People continue to play this game in Odense more than two years after its launch, and DJEEO uses it as a showcase, enabling the company to sell similar LBGs....

  8. The Czech Locative Chameleon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarald Taraldsen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that under certain circumstances, the Czech locative prepositions (LOC show up as directional prepositions (DIR and vice versa, (under different circumstances the Czech DIR PPs show up as LOC. We argue that such a chameleon life of the PPs is structurally dependent.

  9. Immigrants' location preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil

    This paper exploits a spatial dispersal policy for refugee immigrants to estimate the importance of local and regional factors for refugees' location preferences. The main results of a mixed proportional hazard competing risks model are that placed refugees react to high regional unemployment...

  10. Tracking, say, SKYPE Locations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Tracking, say, SKYPE Locations. Real Time Communication: Peer-to-Peer (P2P). Datagram flows between the two conversing partners; Exposes the IP addresses of all the participants to one another. If A knows B's VoIP ID, she can establish a call with Bob & obtain his current ...

  11. RFID Location Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zi Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of social services, people’s living standards improve further requirements, there is an urgent need for a way to adapt to the complex situation of the new positioning technology. In recent years, RFID technology have a wide range of applications in all aspects of life and production, such as logistics tracking, car alarm, security and other items. The use of RFID technology to locate, it is a new direction in the eyes of the various research institutions and scholars. RFID positioning technology system stability, the error is small and low-cost advantages of its location algorithm is the focus of this study.This article analyzes the layers of RFID technology targeting methods and algorithms. First, RFID common several basic methods are introduced; Secondly, higher accuracy to political network location method; Finally, LANDMARC algorithm will be described. Through this it can be seen that advanced and efficient algorithms play an important role in increasing RFID positioning accuracy aspects.Finally, the algorithm of RFID location technology are summarized, pointing out the deficiencies in the algorithm, and put forward a follow-up study of the requirements, the vision of a better future RFID positioning technology.

  12. Spatiotemporal AED Location Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Timothy C.Y.; Sun, Christopher L.F.; Demirtas, Derya; Morrison, Laurie J.; Brooks, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mathematical optimization can be used to plan future AED placement to maximize out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) coverage. Many public access AEDs are placed in locations without 24/7 access. AED coverage can be overestimated unless temporal availability is considered. Objective: To

  13. Location of New Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backman, Mikaela; Karlsson, Charlie

    2017-01-01

    characteristics, such as the commuting experience. Our results show that commuting influences the firm location choice. The probability of establishing a firm in the work municipality increases if the entrepreneur is a commuter, holding constant the type of region and unobservable and observable individual...

  14. Financial responsibilities under RCRA. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H. R. 3692, November 13, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Representatives of environmental organizations, the Hazardous Waste Treatment Council, and regulators were among those testifying at a hearing on H.R. 3692, which amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The bill is in response to concerns that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not compiled with the intent of RCRA in its failure to move beyond interim permits to issue final permits to land disposal facilities accepting hazardous wastes. Reported leakage and environmental risks from sites operating under interim permits raises questions about how disposal companies could deal with liability claims. At issue was whether Congress needs to take new action to develop regulations under which financially responsible companies can operate or whether new EPA rules can solve the problem. A spokesman for EPA reviewed the liability insurance problem and the status of the insurance market in this context. Material submitted for the record follows the text of H.R. 3692 and the testimony of 11 witnesses.

  15. Economic implications of locating a nuclear waste repository in Texas. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 11, 1985, Hereford, TX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Ten witnesses representing Texas industries and agriculture spoke at a field hearing in Hereford, Texas on the selection of Deaf Smith County as one of the three potential repository sites for spent fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Safety and the potential for ground water contamination were major arguments of the opponents to the location. DOE spokesman William Purcell advised that no material will be placed in the repository until the turn of the century and then after a lengthy public licensing procedure. Other concerns were the socio-economic impacts on the surrounding area and the possible damage to agriculture if either soil or water contamination should occur. Additional statements submitted for the record follow the testimony

  16. Locating underground uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Underground uranium deposits are located by placing wires of dosimeters each about 5 to 18 mg/cm 2 thick underground in a grid pattern. Each dosimeter contains a phosphor which is capable of storing the energy of alpha particles. In each pair one dosimeter is shielded from alpha particles with more than 18 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material but not gamma and beta rays and the other dosimeter is shielded with less than 1 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material to exclude dust. After a period underground the dosimeters are heated which releases the stored energy as light. The amount of light produced from the heavily shielded dosimeter is subtracted from the amount of light produced from the thinly shielded dosimeter to give an indication of the location and quantity of uranium underground

  17. Web cache location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boffey Brian

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress placed on network infrastructure by the popularity of the World Wide Web may be partially relieved by keeping multiple copies of Web documents at geographically dispersed locations. In particular, use of proxy caches and replication provide a means of storing information 'nearer to end users'. This paper concentrates on the locational aspects of Web caching giving both an overview, from an operational research point of view, of existing research and putting forward avenues for possible further research. This area of research is in its infancy and the emphasis will be on themes and trends rather than on algorithm construction. Finally, Web caching problems are briefly related to referral systems more generally.

  18. Location based services

    OpenAIRE

    Doan, Cong Nam

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices (tablets, smart phones, laptops) are proving themselves to be the main means of accessing information of the future. The embodiment of Recommender Systems (RSs) into mobile environments, as a matter of fact, has come about to serve as a way to solve the nuisances of data overwhelming. RSs' main advantage is their ability to allow users to find useful information according to the users' preferences and location. Even though they are not free of shortcoming such as the limitation...

  19. Location Intelligence Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, D.

    2015-01-01

    Location Intelligence (LI) means using the spatial dimension of information as a key to support business processes. This spatial dimension has to be defined by geographic coordinates. Storing these spatial objects in a database allows for attaching a 'meaning' to them, like 'current position', 'border', 'building' or 'room'. Now the coordinates represent real-world objects, which can be relevant for the measurement, documentation, control or optimization of (parameters of) business processes aiming at different business objectives. But LI can only be applied, if the locations can be determined with an accuracy (in space and time) appropriate for the business process in consideration. Therefore the first step in any development of a LI solution is the analysis of the business process itself regarding its requirements for spatial and time resolution and accuracy. The next step is the detailed analysis of the surrounding conditions of the process: Does the process happen indoor and/or outdoor? Are there moving objects? If yes, how fast are they? How does the relevant environment look like? Is technical infrastructure available? Is the process restricted by regulations? As a result, a proper Location Detection Technology (LDT) has to be chosen in order to get reliable and accurate positions of the relevant objects. At the highly challenging conditions of the business processes IAEA inspectors are working with, the chosen LDTs have to deliver reliable positioning on ''room-level'' accuracy, even if there is no location enabling infrastructure in place, the objects (people) mostly are indoors and have to work under strong regulations. The presentation will give insights into innovative LI solutions based on technologies of different LDT providers. Pros and cons of combinations of different LDT (like multi- GNSS, IMU, camera, and human interaction based positioning) will be discussed from the

  20. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  1. Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation

  2. Decommissioning of a RCRA Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility: A case study of the 216-A-29 ditch at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Hayward, W.M.

    1991-09-01

    The 216-A-29 ditch is located in the central portion of the Hanford Site with Operable Unit 200-PO-5. The ditch is classified under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 as a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Facility and as such, is to be removed from service in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M-17-10, which states ''cease all liquid discharges to hazardous land disposal units unless such units have been clean closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976''. The 216-A-29 ditch is one stream feeding the 216-B-3 Pond system, and its removal from service was necessary to support the closure strategy for the 216-B-3 Pond system. Interim stabilization of the 216-A-29 ditch is the first step required to comply with the Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology et al. 1989) and the eventual decommissioning of the entire B Pond system. Interim stabilization was required to maintain the 216-A-29 ditch in a stable configuration until closure actions have been determined and initiated. 4 refs., 3 figs

  3. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data

  5. Location Privacy with Randomness Consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Location-Based Social Network (LBSN applications that support geo-location-based posting and queries to provide location-relevant information to mobile users are increasingly popular, but pose a location-privacy risk to posts. We investigated existing LBSNs and location privacy mechanisms, and found a powerful potential attack that can accurately locate users with relatively few queries, even when location data is well secured and location noise is applied. Our technique defeats previously proposed solutions including fake-location detection and query rate limits.

  6. Indoor Location Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on the special challenges posed by accurately pinpointing a location indoors, this volume reflects the distance we have come in the handful of decades since the germination of GPS technology. Not only can we locate a signal to within a meter’s accuracy, but we now have this technology in the most basic mobile phone. Tracing recent practical developments in positioning technology and in the market it supplies, the author examines the contributions of the varied research—in silicon, signal and image processing, radio communications and software—to a fast-evolving field. The book looks forward to a time when, in addition to directing your road journey, positioning systems can peer indoors and guide you to an available photocopier in your office building. Featuring standalone chapters each dealing with a specific aspect of the subject, including treatments of systems such as Zebra, Awarepoint, Aeroscout, IEEE 802.11, etc. This study has all the detail needed to get up to speed on a key modern techn...

  7. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-01

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards

  8. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-5 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The Tri-Party Agreement requires that the cleanup programs at the Hanford Site integrate the requirements of CERCLA, RCRA, and Washington State's dangerous waste (the state's RCRA-equivalent) program. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-5 operable unit. The 100-B/C Area consists of the 100-BC-5 groundwater operable unit and four source operable units. The 100-BC-5 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-B/C Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination

  9. Seismic and Infrasound Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrowsmith, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Begnaud, Michael L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-19

    This presentation includes slides on Signal Propagation Through the Earth/Atmosphere Varies at Different Scales; 3D Seismic Models: RSTT; Ray Coverage (Pn); Source-Specific Station Corrections (SSSCs); RSTT Conclusions; SALSA3D (SAndia LoS Alamos) Global 3D Earth Model for Travel Time; Comparison of IDC SSSCs to RSTT Predictions; SALSA3D; Validation and Model Comparison; DSS Lines in the Siberian Platform; DSS Line CRA-4 Comparison; Travel Time Δak135; Travel Time Prediction Uncertainty; SALSA3D Conclusions; Infrasound Data Processing: An example event; Infrasound Data Processing: An example event; Infrasound Location; How does BISL work?; BISL: Application to the 2013 DPRK Test; and BISL: Ongoing Research.

  10. Demographics and remote locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppus, G. [Dynawise Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Within the next decade, the number of people leaving the workforce will exceed the number of new entrants. The demand for workers is expected to increase in Alberta due to oil sands industry growth. Sixty-four per cent of all responding federal, provincial, and municipal government organizations have reported shortages in their work environments, and almost 8 in 10 organizations predict they will continue to be understaffed in the next 3 to 5 years. Tightness in the general labour market will have an impact on employers in remote locations, and planning is essential to avoid the creation of a mercenary culture and a reliance on compensation. Challenges found in remote locations include high turnover rates among recent hires; critical gaps in service length; aggressive retirement; and the fact that the local population is often seen as unqualified for many industrial jobs. This Power Point presentation suggested that although decisions to join or quit a company are often based on considerations such as the organizational environment and amount of compensation, the relationship between employees and management is the most important attribute in many career decisions. Rigorous quantitative analysis of current demographics combined with forecasting analysis may help to forestall recruitment difficulties for many companies. Productivity analyses, and the effects of work overload on absenteeism, attrition and quality of workmanship must also be examined. Many companies are now focusing on retention and development strategies on mid-career staff to address depletion, as well as redesigning procedures to operate with less skilled staff. It was concluded that extra efforts are now being made to attract non-traditional employees, and non-traditional employment models are being considered by some companies. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Location constrained resource interconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discussed issues related to wind integration from the perspective of the California Independent System Operator (ISO). Issues related to transmission, reliability, and forecasting were reviewed. Renewable energy sources currently used by the ISO were listed, and details of a new transmission financing plan designed to address the location constraints of renewable energy sources and provide for new transmission infrastructure was presented. The financing mechanism will be financed by participating transmission owners through revenue requirements. New transmission interconnections will include network facilities and generator tie-lines. Tariff revisions have also been implemented to recover the costs of new facilities and generators. The new transmission project will permit wholesale transmission access to areas where there are significant energy resources that are not transportable. A rate impact cap of 15 per cent will be imposed on transmission owners to mitigate short-term costs to ratepayers. The presentation also outlined energy resource area designation plans, renewable energy forecasts, and new wind technologies. Ramping issues were also discussed. It was concluded that the ISO expects to ensure that 20 per cent of its energy will be derived from renewable energy sources. tabs., figs

  12. On location at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    CERN continues to be a very popular candidate for film locations at the moment. Not only has it inspired a German author and a film-maker interested in the more exotic interpretations of the science being worked on at the Organization, but even the recent puppet animation film by the legendary Muppets featured some CERN scenes.   Dr Bunsen Honeydew (far left) and his friends at ATLAS. Beaker, Bunsen's assistant, has just been sucked up the vacuum tube top left... Image courtesy Walt Disney Studios. In “The Muppet Movie”, released in November 2011 in North America and world-wide in January and February this year, Kermit is reuniting his friends who have ended up in some far-flung places since they last worked together 10 years ago. CERN caught the imagination of the film-makers as the perfect place for the Muppet scientists, Dr. Honeydew Bunsen and his hapless assistant Beaker. After a brief scene filmed in front of a backdrop of the ATLAS detector, the rest of the ...

  13. Costly location in Hotelling duopoly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, J.; Martin, S.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a cost of location into Hotelling’s (1929) spatial duopoly. We derive the general conditions on the cost-of-location function under which a pure strategy price-location Nash equilibrium exists. With linear transportation cost and a suitably specified cost of location that rises toward

  14. Costly location in Hotelling duopoly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, J.; Martin, S.

    We introduce a cost of location into Hotelling's (1929) spatial duopoly model. We derive the general conditions on the cost-of-location function under which a pure strategy price-location Nash equilibrium exists. With linear transportation cost and a suitably specified cost of location that rises

  15. LOCATION DECISIONS OF MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia P. BLĂJUȚ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the location decisions of foreign direct investments by the most important global multinational companies in Romania. The study covers the top 100 multinational companies, according to Fortune and underline that all of them have the headquarters location in the United States. In particular, this analysis presents the distribution of global companies based on the main industry and major economic sectors. The first company, from the rank 100, that invests in our country is Exxon Mobil (the number two on the list and has numerous projects in petroleum refining industry in many other countries, because energy sector is one of the most important ones in the global economy.

  16. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting

  17. Integration of CERCLA and RCRA requirements at the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, W.D.; Wyatt, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper to is present the comprehensive approach being taken at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to consolidate regulatory documents, characterization and assessment activities for 3 contiguous waste management facilities. These facilities cover 7.12 x 10 5 m 2 (194 acres) and include an Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground, a Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and a closed Mixed Waste Management Facility. Each of these facilities include one or more operable units including solvent tanks, transuranic waste storage pads, research lysimeters and experimental confinement disposal vaults. All of these facilities have differing submittal dates for regulatory documents but similar and continuous environmental problems. The characterization and risk assessment require simultaneous efforts for all facilities to adequately define the nature and extent of past, present and future environmental impact. Current data indicates that contaminant plumes in both soil and water are comingled, interspersed and possibly exist internally within the contiguous facilities, requiring a combined investigative effort. This paper describes the combination of regulatory documents leading to this comprehensive and integrative approach for burial ground characterization at the Savannah River Site

  18. Evaluation of sampling equipment for RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] monitoring in a deep unconfined aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, R.B.; Serkowski, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    Acceptable sampling devices identified include gas-operated bladder pumps and bailers constructed of nonreactive materials. In arid portions of the western United States, depths to ground water, which are often greater than 100 feet, make the use of bailers extremely time consuming. The efficiency of gas-operated bladder pumps decreases with depth, and special design and construction is often needed to accommodate higher gas pressures. Commercially available sampling pumps were evaluated for their suitability as sampling and purging equipment for installation in monitoring wells in a deep, unconfined aquifer. The test was conducted in a well where the depth to ground water was 340 feet. The objective was to identify equipment capable of discharge rates suitable for sampling (∼0.025 gpm) and, if possible, for purging (>1 gpm). The potential for physical or chemical alteration of the water sample was evaluated from literature sources and not specifically tested. Four positive-displacement pumps were tested, consisting of two bladder pumps, a gas-driven piston pump, and a mechanically-driven pump. All pumps could be installed in a 2-inch diameter well, although this was not important for the planned application. 4 refs., 1 tab

  19. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-07

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

  20. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI.

  1. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S ampersand A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI

  2. Duality in constrained location problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik; Love, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    The dual of a facility location problem with general norms, distance constraints, and linear constraints is formulated.......The dual of a facility location problem with general norms, distance constraints, and linear constraints is formulated....

  3. ICE Online Detainee Locator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Online Detainee Locator datasets provide the location of a detainee who is currently in ICE custody, or who was release from ICE custody for any reason with the...

  4. OLBS: Offline location based services

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, P; Ana Aguiar; João Correia Lopes

    2011-01-01

    Most existing location-based services rely on ubiquitous connectivity to deliver location-based contents to the users. However, connectivity is not available anywhere at anytime even in urban centres. Underground, indoors, remote areas, and foreign countries are examples situations where users commonly do not have guaranteed connectivity but could profit from location-based contents. In this work, we propose an open platform for publishing, distributing and maintaining location-based contents...

  5. LOCAT - A Data Retrieval Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    onoitode of scified location - P C RADIUS - maximum distance between specified location and C file locationsC . ’ CONNON /LOCN/ LOCLAT, LOCLNG, RADIUS...rrr’, ,r:.- r -’ - r- rJ Z. . . , . -.-. - - - - - - -- , -• .. . . FILMED 8-85 DTIC .-. ... , ,- . . . . ...: .--. :,.:. ..-..-- ,-, .-..-...

  6. Location theory a unified approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Although modern location theory is now more than 90 years old, the focus of researchers in this area has been mainly problem oriented. However, a common theory, which keeps the essential characteristics of classical location models, is still missing.This monograph addresses this issue. A flexible location problem called the Ordered Median Problem (OMP) is introduced. For all three main subareas of location theory (continuous, network and discrete location) structural properties of the OMP are presented and solution approaches provided. Numerous illustrations and examples help the reader to bec

  7. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve 'clean closure' of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems

  8. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  9. Location of Urban Logistic Terminals as Hub Location Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Pašagić Škrinjar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problems of locating urban logistic terminals are studied as hub location problems that due to a large number of potential nodes in big cities belong to hard non-polynomial problems, the so-called NP-problems. The hub location problems have found wide application in physical planning of transport and telecommunication systems, especially systems of fast delivery, networks of logistic and distribution centres and cargo traffic terminals of the big cities, etc. The paper defines single and multiple allocations and studies the numerical examples. The capacitated single allocation hub location problems have been studied, with the provision of a mathematical model of selecting the location for the hubs on the network. The paper also presents the differences in the possibilities of implementing the exact and heuristic methods to solve the actual location problems of big dimensions i.e. hub problems of the big cities.

  10. Location, Location, Location: Does Place Provide the Opportunity for Differentiation for Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Emma; Thompson-Whiteside, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The fiercely competitive HE market has led HEIs to invest significant resources in building a distinct identity. An HEI's location forms an inherent part of its identity and the uniqueness of location offers an opportunity to differentiate. However there has been limited examination of how location is used by HEIs and little consideration of how…

  11. Location Systems An Introduction to the Technology Behind Location Awareness

    CERN Document Server

    LaMarca, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Advances in electronic location technology and the coming of age of mobile computing have opened the door for location-aware applications to permeate all aspects of everyday life. Location is at the core of a large number of high-value applications ranging from the life-and-death context of emergency response to serendipitous social meet-ups. For example, the market for GPS products and services alone is expected to grow to US200 billion by 2015. Unfortunately, there is no single location technology that is good for every situation and exhibits high accuracy, low cost, and universal coverage.

  12. Minimizing Co-location Potential of Moving Entities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Will; Kirkpatrick, David; Löffler, Maarten; Staals, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining knowledge of the locations of $n$ entities that are moving, each with some, possibly different, upper bound on their speed. We assume a setting where we can query the current location of any one entity, but this query takes a unit of time, during which we cannot

  13. 42 CFR 1007.7 - Organization and location requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organization and location requirements. 1007.7 Section 1007.7 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES STATE MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNITS § 1007.7 Organization and location requirements...

  14. 6 CFR 13.32 - Location of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of hearing. 13.32 Section 13.32 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.32 Location of hearing. (a) The hearing may be held: (1) In any judicial district of the United...

  15. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  16. Location-based prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rear, Andrea E; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2018-02-01

    This study explores location-based prospective memory. People often have to remember to do things when in a particular location, such as buying tissues the next time they are in the supermarket. For event cognition theory, location is important for structuring events. However, because event cognition has not been used to examine prospective memory, the question remains of how multiple events will influence prospective memory performance. In our experiments, people delivered messages from store to store in a virtual shopping mall as an ongoing task. The prospective tasks were to do certain activities in certain stores. For Experiment 1, each trial involved one prospective memory task to be done in a single location at one of three delays. The virtual environment and location cues were effective for prospective memory, and performance was unaffected by delay. For Experiment 2, each trial involved two prospective memory tasks, given in either one or two instruction locations, and to be done in either one or two store locations. There was improved performance when people received instructions from two locations and did both tasks in one location relative to other combinations. This demonstrates that location-based event structure influences how well people perform on prospective memory tasks.

  17. Quarter Dates Location(s) Purpose Transportation and Travel ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Dates. Location(s). Purpose. Transportation and Travel. Accommodation,. Meals and Other. Hospitality. Total. Expenses. Quarter 1. May 15. Ottawa, ON. Meetings. May 20 to 21. Washington DC. Conference. 11,364.93. 3,274.71. 53.50. 14,693.14. May 5 to June 5. Kenya and England. Meetings. June 18 to 21. Winnipeg, MB.

  18. Location Based Services and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Elenis Gorrita Michel; Rónier Sierra Dávila; Samuel Montejo Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Location Based Services (LBS) continue to grow in popularity, effectiveness and reliability, to the extent that applications are designed and implemented taking into account the facilities of the user location information. In this work, some of the main applications are addressed, in order to make an assessment of the current importance of the LBS, as a branch of technology in full swing. In addition, the main techniques for location estimation are studied, essential information to the LBS. B...

  19. RCRA Personnel Training, Course 7488

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Federal and state regulations require hazardous and mixed waste facility workers at treatment and storage facilities (TSFs) and <90-day accumulation areas to be trained in hazardous and mixed waste management. This course will refamiliarize and update <90-day accumulation area workers, TSF workers, and supervisors of TSF workers regarding waste identification, pollution prevention, storage area requirements, emergency response procedures, and record-keeping requirements.

  20. RCRA Sustainable Materials Management Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes a broad variety of documents, descriptive data, technical analyses and guidance materials relative to voluntary improvements in resource...

  1. Termination unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  2. Location i det geopolitiske rum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2017-01-01

    Hovedformålet med artiklen er at undersøge forholdet mellem genrehåndtering og location i The Night Manager. Genren er thrilleren i den spionudgave, der er kendt fra tidligere John Le Carré-filmatiseringer. Location passer perfekt til genren med valget af glamourøse steder, der har kunnet bruges i...

  3. Improved Dynamic Planar Point Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Arge, Lars; Georgiadis, Loukas

    2006-01-01

    We develop the first linear-space data structures for dynamic planar point location in general subdivisions that achieve logarithmic query time and poly-logarithmic update time.......We develop the first linear-space data structures for dynamic planar point location in general subdivisions that achieve logarithmic query time and poly-logarithmic update time....

  4. Evolutionary economics and industry location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, R.A.; Frenken, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims to provide the outlines of an evolutionary economic geography of industry location. We discuss two evolutionary explanations of industry location, that is, one that concentrates on spin-offs, and one that focuses attention on knowledge and agglomeration economies. We claim that both

  5. Locations in television drama series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit

    in the extra bonus material (Gray, 2010; Waade, 2013), and film tours and film apps become part of the television series’ trans-media franchise (Reijnders, 2011; Thompson, 2007). Location has so far been a practical term describing the place where the series is shot. Ellis (1992) used to see location...

  6. Locations in Television Drama Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit

    2017-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the analysis of the increasingly significant role of location as a key element in television drama. In recent years, the popularity of serial television has progressively been tied to the expanded use of location as a central element in productions, both as sett...... mainly been considered as a practical term in film and television productions....

  7. Family ties and residential locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, C.H.; Cooke, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, and in the Special Issue it introduces, the focus is on the role of family ties in residential location choice and, conversely, the role of residential locations in maintaining family ties. Not only do events in the nuclear family trigger residential relocations, but nearby family

  8. Uncapacitated facility location problems: contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Roberto Diéguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to review my personal contributions in the field of uncapacitated facility location problems. These contributions took place throughout my academic career, from the time I was a Ph.D. student at Imperial College to the present day. They cover approximately 30 years, from 1973 to 2003; they address: algorithms developed for the p-median problem and for a general formulation of uncapacitated location problems; the study of dynamic location models; covering and hierarchical location problems; queuing-based probabilistic location models. The contributions encompass theoretical developments, computational algorithms and practical applications. All work took place in an academic environment, with the invaluable collaboration of colleagues (both in Brazil and abroad and research students at COPPE. Each section in the paper is dedicated to a topic that involves a personal contribution. Every one of them is placed within the context of the existing literature.

  9. Modeling discrete competitive facility location

    CERN Document Server

    Karakitsiou, Athanasia

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an up-to-date review of modeling and optimization approaches for location problems along with a new bi-level programming methodology which captures the effect of competition of both producers and customers on facility location decisions. While many optimization approaches simplify location problems by assuming decision making in isolation, this monograph focuses on models which take into account the competitive environment in which such decisions are made. New insights in modeling, algorithmic and theoretical possibilities are opened by this approach and new applications are possible. Competition on equal term plus competition between market leader and followers are considered in this study, consequently bi-level optimization methodology is emphasized and further developed. This book provides insights regarding modeling complexity and algorithmic approaches to discrete competitive location problems. In traditional location modeling, assignment of customer demands to supply sources are made ...

  10. Analyzing and Predicting Micro-Location Patterns of Software Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kinne

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While the effects of non-geographic aggregation on statistical inference are well studied in economics, research on the effects of geographic aggregation on regression analysis is rather scarce. This knowledge gap, together with the use of aggregated spatial units in previous firm location studies, results in a lack of understanding of firm location determinants at the microgeographic level. Suitable data for microgeographic location analysis has become available only recently through the emergence of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI, especially the OpenStreetMap (OSM project, and the increasing availability of official (open geodata. In this paper, we use a comprehensive dataset of three million street-level geocoded firm observations to explore the location pattern of software firms in an Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA. Based on the ESDA results, we develop a software firm location prediction model using Poisson regression and OSM data. Our findings offer novel insights into the mode of operation of the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP in the context of a microgeographic location analysis: We find that non-aggregated data can be used to detect information on location determinants, which are superimposed when aggregated spatial units are analyzed, and that some findings of previous firm location studies are not robust at the microgeographic level. However, we also conclude that the lack of high-resolution geodata on socio-economic population characteristics causes systematic prediction errors, especially in cities with diverse and segregated populations.

  11. VT School Locations - K-12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) FacilitiesSchools_PTSCHOOL is designed to provide point locations of every Vermont School along with the established school ID (PSID) for...

  12. Hull properties in location problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik; Love, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    Some properties of the solution set for single and multifacility continuous location problems with lp distances are given. A set reduction algorithm is developed for problems in k-dimensional space having rectangular distances....

  13. WHERE2 Location Aided Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Armin; Agapiou, George; Brunel, Loïc

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of preliminary results of investigations within the WHERE2 Project on identifying promising avenues for location aided enhancements to wireless communication systems. The wide ranging contributions are organized according to the following targeted systems: cellular...

  14. Water Well Locations - Conservation Wells

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The conservation well layer identifies the permitted surface location of oil and gas conservation wells that have not been plugged. These include active, regulatory...

  15. Allegheny County Blazed Trails Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the location of blazed trails in all Allegheny County parks. This is the same data used in the Allegheny County Parks Trails Mobile App, available for Apple...

  16. CBP List of Preclearance Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — CBP Preclearance provides for the U.S. border inspection and clearance of commercial air passengers and their goods at (15) locations in (6) foreign countries. CBP...

  17. Allegheny County WIC Vendor Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program vendors. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data...

  18. A Calculus of Located Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Compagnoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We define BioScapeL, a stochastic pi-calculus in 3D-space. A novel aspect of BioScapeL is that entities have programmable locations. The programmer can specify a particular location where to place an entity, or a location relative to the current location of the entity. The motivation for the extension comes from the need to describe the evolution of populations of biochemical species in space, while keeping a sufficiently high level description, so that phenomena like diffusion, collision, and confinement can remain part of the semantics of the calculus. Combined with the random diffusion movement inherited from BioScape, programmable locations allow us to capture the assemblies of configurations of polymers, oligomers, and complexes such as microtubules or actin filaments. Further new aspects of BioScapeL include random translation and scaling. Random translation is instrumental in describing the location of new entities relative to the old ones. For example, when a cell secretes a hydronium ion, the ion should be placed at a given distance from the originating cell, but in a random direction. Additionally, scaling allows us to capture at a high level events such as division and growth; for example, daughter cells after mitosis have half the size of the mother cell.

  19. Residential Location, Job Location, and Wages: Theory and Empirics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    -to-job transition without changing workplace location. However, workers making a job-to-job transition which makes the workplace location closer to the residence experiences a wage drop. Furthermore, low wage workers and workers with high transportation costs are more likely to make job-to-job transitions, but also......I develop a stylized partial on-the-job equilibrium search model which incorporate a spatial dimension. Workers reside on a circle and can move at a cost. Each point on the circle has a wage distribution. Implications about wages and job mobility are drawn from the model and tested on Danish...... matched employer-employee data. The model predictions hold true. I find that workers working farther away from their residence earn higher wages. When a worker is making a job-to-job transition where he changes workplace location he experiences a higher wage change than a worker making a job...

  20. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below

  1. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  2. Location and activity specific site-management for military locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, L.; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2009-01-01

    pace is limited in the Netherlands and military activities, that may cause nuisance or environmental hazards, should therefore be considered and evaluated during the use of military locations. The last few years TNO and Deltares have worked on a research program on environmental effects due to

  3. Characterization of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) waste tanks located at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1997-04-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) is located in Melton Valley within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and includes five underground storage tanks (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T9) ranging from 13,000 to 25,000 gal. capacity. During the period of 1996--97 there was a major effort to re-sample and characterize the contents of these inactive waste tanks. The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, examine concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and to provide the data needed to meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data collected on both the supernatant and sludge samples taken from three different locations in each of the OHF tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ( 233 U and 235 U) do not satisfy the denature ratios required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The fissile isotope of plutonium ( 239 Pu and 241 Pu) are diluted with thorium far above the WAC requirements. In general, the OHF sludge was found to be hazardous (RCRA) based on total metal content and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the OHF sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP

  4. Wireless Damage Location Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A wireless damage location sensing system uses a geometric-patterned wireless sensor that resonates in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field to generate a harmonic response that will experience a change when the sensor experiences a change in its geometric pattern. The sensing system also includes a magnetic field response recorder for wirelessly transmitting the time-varying magnetic field and for wirelessly detecting the harmonic response. The sensing system compares the actual harmonic response to a plurality of predetermined harmonic responses. Each predetermined harmonic response is associated with a severing of the sensor at a corresponding known location thereof so that a match between the actual harmonic response and one of the predetermined harmonic responses defines the known location of the severing that is associated therewith.

  5. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  6. New Location Improves Efficiency | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The physical proximity of the SAIC-Frederick Intellectual Property (IP) Office to the NCI Technology Transfer Center (NCI-TTC) is one of the many benefits of being at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), according to Courtney Silverthorn, Ph.D. Being in one location “has increased the effectiveness of both informal communication and

  7. Part Objects and Their Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1992-01-01

    The notion of location of part objects is introduced, yielding a reference to the containing object. Combined with locally defined objects and classes (block structure), singularly defined part objects, and references to part objects, it is a powerful language mechanism for defining objects...

  8. Locating a buried magnetic dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffey, T.W.H.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical basis and required computations for locating a buried magnetic dipole are outlined. The results are compared with measurements made with a tiltable coil lowered to a depth of 20 m in a vertical borehole within a three-layered earth. this work has application to the rescue of trapped miners. 3 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  9. Interaction in activity location scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, V.; Vries, de B.; Dijkstra, J.; Jessurun, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the interaction in activity location scheduling which is the main subject of an ongoing research project called "User Simulation of Space Utilization". The aim of this research project is to develop an overall model for the simulation of human movement and utilization of

  10. WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations in the Western Pacific Region (WHO Standard was released in 2008. Initially, there were 92/361 controversial acupuncture points (acupoints. Through seven informal consultations and four task force team meetings, 86 points were agreed upon among the 92 controversial acupoints, leaving 6 remaining controversial acupoints, demanding active research in the future. This will enhance the reproducibility and validity of acupuncture studies. It will also lead to a better understanding of acupuncture mechanisms in order to optimize its clinical efficacy for a range of diseases and syndromes. This book has two parts: General Guidelines for Acupuncture Point Locations and WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations. First of all, familiarity with the General Guidelines for Acupuncture Point Locations in this book can help the reader to understand and use the contents of this book in depth. I would like to thank all of the participating experts and scholars for this great work, who have overcome the limits of previous acupuncture references. I also appreciate the dedicated effort and harmonious leadership of Dr Choi Seung-hoon, former Regional Adviser in Traditional Medicine of Western Pacific Office, WHO.

  11. The Location of Digital Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Walker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative researchers interested in digitally-located social and cultural practices have struggled with ways in which to design studies that can account for the digital aspect of cultural practices while also taking into account that those digital practices do not exist as separate (or separable in terms of our research from other social and cultural practices. As such, one of the primary and ongoing challenges facing internet-based ethnographic research is the question of how to construct the location of a project when the sites, technologically-mediated practices, and people we study exist and flow through a wider information ecology that is neither fixed nor can easily be located as “online” or “offline.” This is as much a methodological challenge as a theoretical one. If one accepts that a rigid distinction between online and offline makes little theoretical sense, then drawing a methodological line between online and offline only reifies such a dualism. While there is a developing body of internet-related ethnographic literature which is attempting to take into account the fluid nature of our information ecology (e.g. Burrell, 2009, Leander and McKim, 2003, Hine, 2007, we continue to operate on shifting ground. This article uses the case of my own work on city-specific discussion forums in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to highlight the complexities of locating digital ethnographic work and also argue for the necessity of accounting for both movement and placed-ness.

  12. Small Business Location and Layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration, Washington, DC.

    As an approach to teaching small-business location and layout, this publication contains material for teaching one session of a basic course. The sections of the publication are as follows: (1) The Lesson Plan--an outline of the material covered, which may be used as a teaching guide, presented in two columns: an outline of the presentation, and a…

  13. LOCATING LEAKS WITH ACOUSTIC TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water distribution systems in this country are almost 100 years old. About 26 percent of piping in these systems is made of unlined cast iron or steel and is in poor condition. Many methods that locate leaks in these pipes are time-consuming, costly, disruptive to operations...

  14. Competition in spatial location models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webers, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Models of spatial competition are designed and analyzed to describe the fact that space, by its very nature, is a source of market power. This field of research, lying at the interface of game theory and economics, has attracted much interest because location problems are related to many aspects of

  15. Smart location system; Sistema de localizacao inteligente Smart Location System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Augusto Pereira da; Antunes, Rodrigo de Castro; Azevedo, Fabio Augusto Ferreira de [PipeWay Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Afonso, Orlando de Jesus Ribeiro [Instituto de Pesquisas da Marinha, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Matsuura, Minoru; Santa Cruz, Sergio de Freitas [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transportes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Jose Alberto Costa dos; Hashiguchi, Decio Issao [GDK Engenharia (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the technology used in the Intelligent Location System developed by Pipeway and includes some of the results already obtained optimizing repair time and logistic costs during the location of anomalies detected by intelligent pigs, a joint operation within the scope of the contract for Sub sea Pipeline Recovery in the Guanabara Bay with PETROBRAS/TRANSPETRO and GDK Engenharia. The system uses the ELF (Extra Low Frequency) transmission and reception technology at points near a pipe, with or without concrete coating, whose signals are recorded in the inspection tool memory to accurately establish reference points, thus preventing excessive dig work or dredging when human and operational risks tend to be high. (author)

  16. Earthquake location in island arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  17. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  18. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  19. Contemporary United States Foreign Policy Towards Indonesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAslan, Hugh

    2004-01-01

    United States national interests in Indonesia have traditionally being based on strategic security requirements given Indonesia's geographic location between the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and strong...

  20. Location, location, location: Assessing the spatial patterning between marijuana licenses, alcohol outlets and neighborhood characteristics within Washington state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, Loni Philip; Fillmore, Christina; Melly, Steven

    2018-04-01

    The availability of marijuana products is becoming increasingly prevalent across the United States (US), many states are allowing for the production, processing, and retailing of these products for medical and/or recreational use. The purpose of this study is to: (1) examine the spatial patterning of marijuana licenses, and (2) examine the impact of alcohol outlets in addition to other neighborhood characteristics on marijuana licenses within the state of Washington. This cross-sectional observational study examined 1458 census tracts in Washington state from 2017, using marijuana and alcohol data from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board as well as neighborhood characteristics data from the American Community Survey 2011-2015 5-year estimates. We used exploratory and formal spatial regression methods, including integrated nested Laplace approximation within a Bayesian statistical framework, to address the study aims. Our results indicate there is significant spatial patterning of marijuana producers and processors across the state. We also found that all marijuana licenses are located in poorer census tracts, and marijuana retailers are co-located in census tracts with off-premises alcohol outlets. Our study provides empirical evidence of the relationship between marijuana licenses, alcohol outlets, and neighborhood characteristics, and has important implications for policymakers in other states currently considering legalizing marijuana-products for medical and/or recreational use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. It's All about Location, Location, Location: Children's Memory for the "Where'' of Personally Experienced Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Doydum, Ayzit O.; Pathman, Thanujeni; Larkina, Marina; Guler, O. Evren; Burch, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Episodic memory is defined as the ability to recall specific past events located in a particular time and place. Over the preschool and into the school years, there are clear developmental changes in memory for when events took place. In contrast, little is known about developmental changes in memory for where events were experienced. In the…

  2. Location, Location, Location: How Would a High-Performing Charter School Network Fare in Different States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Chris; Rotherham, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the authors do not examine different operating strategies for charter schools or analyze the impact of their often educationally intensive models on finance. Instead, because public charter schools are funded predominantly by public dollars, they simply ask what impact location--and its associated variances in public funding and the…

  3. MICROGRIDS: THE AGRIA TEST LOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krkoleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the pilot Microgrid in Macedonia, developed within the framework of the MOREMICROGRIDS (EU EP6 projecet, contract No. SES6-019864 project. This Microgrid is the first of its kind being developed in the Western Balkan region and serves as pilot site for introduction and examination of the Microgrids concept in non European Union conditions. The test network consists of a part of the low voltage grid, located on a pig farm. The main electricity source for the Microgrid is a small biogas plant, which uses the biogas produced by a waste water treatment process. The paper addresses the Microgrid design, development of test scenarios and test results from the pilot location.

  4. Location Privacy in RFID Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Ahmad-Reza; Visconti, Ivan; Wachsmann, Christian

    RFID-enabled systems allow fully automatic wireless identification of objects and are rapidly becoming a pervasive technology with various applications. However, despite their benefits, RFID-based systems also pose challenging risks, in particular concerning user privacy. Indeed, improvident use of RFID can disclose sensitive information about users and their locations allowing detailed user profiles. Hence, it is crucial to identify and to enforce appropriate security and privacy requirements of RFID applications (that are also compliant to legislation). This chapter first discusses security and privacy requirements for RFID-enabled systems, focusing in particular on location privacy issues. Then it explores the advances in RFID applications, stressing the security and privacy shortcomings of existing proposals. Finally, it presents new promising directions for privacy-preserving RFID systems, where as a case study we focus electronic tickets (e-tickets) for public transportation.

  5. Location Estimation using Delayed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Larsen, Thomas Dall; Nørgård, Peter Magnus

    1998-01-01

    When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new techn...... technique to a sensor fusion system for estimating the location of an autonomous guided vehicle. The system fuses encoder and vision measurements in an extended Kalman filter. Results from experiments in a real environment are reported...

  6. Akzeptanz von Location Based Services

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Hans H.; Haber, Tobias E.; Reichardt, Tina; Bökamp, Marten

    2006-01-01

    Die enormen Investitionen in UMTS-Lizenzen und den Aufbau einer neuen Netzinfrastruktur zwingen die Mobilfunkanbieter zur Erschließung neuer Umsatzpotenziale. Durch Entwicklung neuer mobiler Mehrwertdienste hoffen sie, die „Killerapplikation“ der 3. Mobilfunkgeneration zu finden, die ähnlich wie der Short Message Service (SMS) für GSM, zum Treiber des UMTS-Markterfolges werden kann. Nach Meinung vieler Marktbeobachter könnten Location Based Services, d.h. mobile Dienste, die ...

  7. Location, location, location: does early cancer in Barrett's esophagus have a preference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enestvedt, Brintha K; Lugo, Ricardo; Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Shah, Pari; Falk, Gary W; Furth, Emma; Ginsberg, Gregory G

    2013-09-01

    Early cancer (high-grade dysplasia [HGD] and intramucosal carcinoma [ImCa]) associated with Barrett's esophagus (BE) may have a circumferential spatial predilection. To describe the esophageal circumferential location of early cancer in BE. Retrospective study, single tertiary referral center. One hundred nineteen patients were referred for endoscopic eradication therapy for early cancer associated with BE. Endoscopic images and reports and pathology were reviewed. Circumferential location designation of early cancer in BE by using a clock-face orientation. One hundred nineteen of 131 patients referred for endoscopic eradication therapy had a location designation for their advanced histology (91.9%). There were a total of 57 patients (47.9%) with HGD and 62 patients (52.1%) with ImCa. There was a significantly higher rate of early cancer (HGD or ImCa) in the right hemisphere (12 to 6 o'clock location) compared with the left hemisphere (84.9% vs 15.1%, P cancer was found in the 12 to 3 o'clock quadrant (64.7%); 71.9% of HGD and 58.1% of ImCa lesions were located in the 12 to 3 o'clock quadrant. Retrospective design, single center. Early cancer associated with BE is far more commonly found in the right hemisphere of the esophagus (12 to 6 o'clock) with the highest rate in the 12 to 3 o'clock quadrant. These findings support enhanced scrutiny of the right hemisphere of the esophagus during surveillance and endoscopic treatment of patients with BE. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Puesta en marcha de una Unidad de Valoración Sociosanitaria (UVASS ubicada en un hospital de agudos (Fundación Hospital Son Llatzer: FHSLL Implementation of a socio-medical assessment unit (UVASS located in a hospital for acute patients (Foundation Hospital Son Llatzer: FHSLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª. Inés Cuesta Antelo

    2008-03-01

    Dependencia.Introduction: The social health assessment unit of the Hospital Complex of Majorca (CHM is located at the Hospital for acute patients of Son Llátzer (FHSLL, in Palma de Majorca. For its start-up, the model will be the functional interdisciplinary units (UFISS of Catalonia, which work since the creation in 1986 of the "Vida als anys" program, although other autonomous regions also have these support equipments. Its activity began in June, 2002, when the General Hospital (HG and the Joan March Hospital (HJM reconverted into social health hospitals. We are an interdisciplinary unit in charge of defining and prioritizing every user needs by means of a comprehensive professional evaluation. Objectives: To show the most common typology of patients evaluated by this unit and the main problems found when deriving them to more appropriate centres for their case; and describing the difficulties found from the beginning, just as the consultations made to our team. Material and method: Retrospective study of the patients evaluated between June, 2002, and December, 2005. The parameters used are: Barthel scale, Pheiffer scale, control of symptoms scale, as well as the age and sex of the patients. For the nursing assessment it's been utilized the Virginia Henderson's model with the 14 basic needs. Results: They reflect the different services which the patients have been referred to, just as the lack of resources that we have detected during the study period. We believe that the right selection of patients is the basis for a good performance of the UVASS. We are a young unit, in phase of expansion, with still a long way to go and lots of possibilities, taking into account the projects of new social health resources, both at autonomic and national level (Dependence Law.

  9. Modeling the Variable Heliopause Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    In 2012, Voyager 1 zipped across the heliopause. Five and a half years later, Voyager 2 still hasnt followed its twin into interstellar space. Can models of the heliopause location help determine why?How Far to the Heliopause?Artists conception of the heliosphere with the important structures and boundaries labeled. [NASA/Goddard/Walt Feimer]As our solar system travels through the galaxy, the solar outflow pushes against the surrounding interstellar medium, forming a bubble called the heliosphere. The edge of this bubble, the heliopause, is the outermost boundary of our solar system, where the solar wind and the interstellar medium meet. Since the solar outflow is highly variable, the heliopause is constantly moving with the motion driven by changes inthe Sun.NASAs twin Voyager spacecraft were poisedto cross the heliopause after completingtheir tour of the outer planets in the 1980s. In 2012, Voyager 1 registered a sharp increase in the density of interstellar particles, indicating that the spacecraft had passed out of the heliosphere and into the interstellar medium. The slower-moving Voyager 2 was set to pierce the heliopause along a different trajectory, but so far no measurements have shown that the spacecraft has bid farewell to oursolar system.In a recent study, ateam of scientists led by Haruichi Washimi (Kyushu University, Japan and CSPAR, University of Alabama-Huntsville) argues that models of the heliosphere can help explain this behavior. Because the heliopause location is controlled by factors that vary on many spatial and temporal scales, Washimiand collaborators turn to three-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the heliosphere. In particular, they investigate how the position of the heliopause along the trajectories of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 changes over time.Modeled location of the heliopause along the paths of Voyagers 1 (blue) and 2 (orange). Click for a closer look. The red star indicates the location at which Voyager

  10. 46 CFR 58.60-5 - Industrial systems: Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Industrial systems: Locations. 58.60-5 Section 58.60-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Industrial Systems and Components on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODU...

  11. Perceptual organization at attended and unattended locations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Shihui; Glyn W. Humphreys

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of attention on forming perceptual units by proximity grouping and by uniform connectedness (UC). In Experiment 1 a row of three global letters defined by either proximity or UC was presented at the center of the visual field. Participants were asked to identify the letter in the middle of stimulus arrays while ignoring the flankers. The stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between stimulus arrays and masks varied between 180 and 500 ms. We found that responses to targets defined by proximity grouping were slower than to those defined by UC at median SOAs but there were no differences at short or long SOAs. Incongruent flankers slowed responses to targets and this flanker compatibility effect was larger for UC than for proximity-defined flankers. Experiment 2 examined the effects of spatial precueing on discrimination responses to proximity- and UC-defined targets. The advantage for targets defined by UC over targets defined by proximity grouping was greater at uncued relative to cued locations. The results suggest that the advantage for UC over proximity grouping in forming perceptual units is contingent on the stimuli not being fully attended, and that paying attention to the stimuli differentially benefits proximity grouping.

  12. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 94: Building 650 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The Building 650 Leachfield, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 94, will be clean closed by removal in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recover Act (RCRA) operational permit and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Historically, laboratory effluent was discharged through pipelines leading from the Radiochemistry Laboratory in Building 650 to a distribution box and a series of pipes dispersed across the leachfield. Effluent from the laboratory contained both hazardous and radioactive constituents. Discharge of hazardous and radioactive waste began in 1965. Discharge of radioactive waste ended in 1979 and hazardous waste discharge ended in 1987. From 1987 to 1993 the leachfield was used for the disposal of non-hazardous waste water. The piping leading to the leachfield was sealed in 1993

  13. Global mapping of transposon location.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Gabriel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Transposable genetic elements are ubiquitous, yet their presence or absence at any given position within a genome can vary between individual cells, tissues, or strains. Transposable elements have profound impacts on host genomes by altering gene expression, assisting in genomic rearrangements, causing insertional mutations, and serving as sources of phenotypic variation. Characterizing a genome's full complement of transposons requires whole genome sequencing, precluding simple studies of the impact of transposition on interindividual variation. Here, we describe a global mapping approach for identifying transposon locations in any genome, using a combination of transposon-specific DNA extraction and microarray-based comparative hybridization analysis. We use this approach to map the repertoire of endogenous transposons in different laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrate that transposons are a source of extensive genomic variation. We also apply this method to mapping bacterial transposon insertion sites in a yeast genomic library. This unique whole genome view of transposon location will facilitate our exploration of transposon dynamics, as well as defining bases for individual differences and adaptive potential.

  14. Methodology of failed section location in case of leaks in PGN-200M sectional steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A.A.; Govorov, P.P.; Nosov, Yu.V.; Karavaev, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    The article considers a way of the failed section location when indications of water-sodium reaction emerge in PGN-200M sectional steam generator of the BN-600 power unit. The selection of diagnostic parameters used to locate the failed section is justified. Various alternative locations of leaks have been simulated [ru

  15. Heat exchanger leakage problem location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent compact heat exchangers are very often assembled from numerous parts joined together to separate heat transfer fluids and to form the required heat exchanger arrangement. Therefore, the leak tightness is very important property of the compact heat exchangers. Although, the compact heat exchangers have been produced for many years, there are still technological problems associated with manufacturing of the ideal connection between the individual parts, mainly encountered with special purpose heat exchangers, e.g. gas turbine recuperators. This paper describes a procedure used to identify the leakage location inside the prime surface gas turbine recuperator. For this purpose, an analytical model of the leaky gas turbine recuperator was created to assess its performance. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data which were acquired during the recuperator thermal performance analysis. The differences between these two data sets are used to indicate possible leakage areas.

  16. Estimating location without external cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Cheung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to determine one's location is fundamental to spatial navigation. Here, it is shown that localization is theoretically possible without the use of external cues, and without knowledge of initial position or orientation. With only error-prone self-motion estimates as input, a fully disoriented agent can, in principle, determine its location in familiar spaces with 1-fold rotational symmetry. Surprisingly, localization does not require the sensing of any external cue, including the boundary. The combination of self-motion estimates and an internal map of the arena provide enough information for localization. This stands in conflict with the supposition that 2D arenas are analogous to open fields. Using a rodent error model, it is shown that the localization performance which can be achieved is enough to initiate and maintain stable firing patterns like those of grid cells, starting from full disorientation. Successful localization was achieved when the rotational asymmetry was due to the external boundary, an interior barrier or a void space within an arena. Optimal localization performance was found to depend on arena shape, arena size, local and global rotational asymmetry, and the structure of the path taken during localization. Since allothetic cues including visual and boundary contact cues were not present, localization necessarily relied on the fusion of idiothetic self-motion cues and memory of the boundary. Implications for spatial navigation mechanisms are discussed, including possible relationships with place field overdispersion and hippocampal reverse replay. Based on these results, experiments are suggested to identify if and where information fusion occurs in the mammalian spatial memory system.

  17. The LHCb VERTEX LOCATOR performance and VERTEX LOCATOR upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez Pérez, P

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is an experiment dedicated to the study of new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. The detector operates in a severe and highly non-uniform radiation environment. The small pitch and analogue readout result in a best single hit precision of 4 μm. The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz event rate. The vertex detector will have to cope with radiation levels up to 10 16 1 MeVn eq /cm 2 , more than an order of magnitude higher than those expected at the current experiment. A solution is under development with a pixel detector, based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips with 55 x 55 μm pixels. In addition a micro-strip solution is also under development, with finer pitch, higher granularity and lower mass than the current detector. The current status of the VELO will be described together with recent testbeam results.

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  19. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Sections 4 through 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  20. PAINT SUPPLIES AND LOCATION: EXAMINING ICI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available How important is location to an international retailer? Not just any retailer but the second largest paint retailer in the world. Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI was a British chemical company and was at one stage the largest manufacturer in Britain. Formed from the merger of several leading British chemical companies in 1926, ICI makes paints and speciality products, including food ingredients, speciality polymers, electronic materials, fragrances and flavourings. ICI paints purchased the Cleveland Ohiobased Glidden Coatings & Resins (Glidden Paint Company in 1986 for USD$580 million. The addition of Glidden to ICI's North American operations more than doubled that subsidiary's annual sales to $3 billion and increased ICI's corporate presence in the United States dramatically. A decline in paint and solvent consumption during the 2000 decade slowed the average growth of the paint industry to about 2% annually. Rauch Associates, the leading US paint analyst firm, predicted near-term growth to slow even further to 1.2% per annum. Through the 1990’s and early 2000’s Glidden paint was sold only through Glidden-badged paint stores and smaller retailers under licence, developing a strong identifiable brand and reputation. How were potential Glidden retail paint store locations chosen across America to enable and support this market growth? This paper investigates the real process that was developed and applied to construct a national network of retail outlets across the United States. It also highlights the change in direction that occurred at ICI paints culminating in its eventual acquisition by AkzoNobel in 2008 who immediately sold parts of ICI to Henkel, and integrated ICI's remaining operations within its existing organisation. This sale and the associated corporate restructure caused considerable change in marketing directions allowing for the first time the selling of Glidden paint products to mass market centres

  1. Quasiconvex optimization and location theory

    CERN Document Server

    Santos Gromicho, Jaoquim António

    1998-01-01

    grams of which the objective is given by the ratio of a convex by a positive (over a convex domain) concave function. As observed by Sniedovich (Ref. [102, 103]) most of the properties of fractional pro­ grams could be found in other programs, given that the objective function could be written as a particular composition of functions. He called this new field C­ programming, standing for composite concave programming. In his seminal book on dynamic programming (Ref. [104]), Sniedovich shows how the study of such com­ positions can help tackling non-separable dynamic programs that otherwise would defeat solution. Barros and Frenk (Ref. [9]) developed a cutting plane algorithm capable of optimizing C-programs. More recently, this algorithm has been used by Carrizosa and Plastria to solve a global optimization problem in facility location (Ref. [16]). The distinction between global optimization problems (Ref. [54]) and generalized convex problems can sometimes be hard to establish. That is exactly the reason ...

  2. Uncommon locations of hydatid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, N.; Kocer, Nazim E.; Kayaselcuk, F.; Ezer, A.; Arpaci, R.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to document the hydatid cyst cases in the endemic Cukurova region of Turkey, by their involvement sites in the body, and discuss the clinical and morphological features of the cases with rare localization. Archival materials of 153 hydatid cyst cases that were diagnosed in 2 different medical centers in Adana, Turkey Cukurova region between the years 2000-2006 were included in the study. Cases with rare localizations were re-evaluated in terms of clinical and laboratory findings, and histopathological features. Involvement sites of the cases were documented, cases with rare localizations are discussed. The liver was the most common localization with 63 cases followed by lungs with 54 cases. Uncommon locations were spleen n=4, bone n=3, intra-arterial n=1, ovary n=1, adrenal n=1, heart n=1, mesenteric n=2, retroperitoneal n=2, subcutaneous tissue n=4, breast n=1, intramuscular tissue n=4. The diagnosis of hydatic cyst should be considered in patients with a cystic mass, who live or have lived in a geographic region that has a high risk for Echinococcus granulosus, or visited an endemic area. (author)

  3. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  4. Privacy-Preserving Location-Based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Location-based services (LBS for short) providers require users' current locations to answer their location-based queries, e.g., range and nearest-neighbor queries. Revealing personal location information to potentially untrusted service providers could create privacy risks for users. To this end, our objective is to design a privacy-preserving…

  5. Privacy for location-based services

    CERN Document Server

    Ghinita, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Sharing of location data enables numerous exciting applications, such as location-based queries, location-based social recommendations, monitoring of traffic and air pollution levels, etc. Disclosing exact user locations raises serious privacy concerns, as locations may give away sensitive information about individuals' health status, alternative lifestyles, political and religious affiliations, etc. Preserving location privacy is an essential requirement towards the successful deployment of location-based applications. These lecture notes provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in locatio

  6. Locating a general minisum 'circle' on a plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Körner, Mark-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    We approximate a set of given points in the plane by the boundary of a convex and symmetric set which is the unit circle of some norm. This generalizes previous work on the subject which considers Euclidean circles only. More precisely, we examine the problem of locating and scaling the unit circle...... of some given norm k with respect to given points on the plane such that the sum of weighted distances (as measured by the same norm k) between the circumference of the circle and the points is minimized. We present general results and are able to identify a finite dominating set in the case that k...

  7. A Kinesthetic Demonstration for Locating Earthquake Epicenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyantash, J.; Sperber, S.

    2005-12-01

    During Spring 2005, an inquiry-based curriculum for plate tectonics was developed for implementation in sixth-grade classrooms within the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Two cohorts of LAUSD teachers received training and orientation to the plate tectonics unit during one week workshops in July 2005. However, during the training workshops, it was observed that there was considerable confusion among the teachers as to how the traditional "textbook" explanation of the time lag between P and S waves on a seismogram could possibly be used to determine the epicenter of an earthquake. One of the State of California science content standards for sixth grade students is that they understand how the epicenters of earthquakes are determined, so it was critical that the teachers themselves grasped the concept. In response to the adult learner difficulties, the classroom explanation of earthquake epicenter location was supplemented with an outdoor kinesthetic activity. Based upon the experience of the kinesthetic model, it was found that the hands-on model greatly cemented the teachers' understanding of the underlying theory. This paper details the steps of the kinesthetic demonstration for earthquake epicenter identification, as well as offering extended options for its classroom implementation.

  8. Location based services in smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Ματσιούλας, Κωνσταντίνος

    2015-01-01

    Η κινητή υπολογιστική εξελίσσεται συνεχώς και με ταχύ ρυθμό. Κάθε μέρα εισάγονται νέες κινητές συσκευές, τεχνολογίες, μέθοδοι, και εφαρμογές. Πρόσφατα, μία από τις κινητές εφαρμογές, η υπηρεσία αξιοποίησης της γεωγραφικής θέσης (Location-Based Service – LBS), έχει τραβήξει έντονα την προσοχή. Μία τέτοια υπηρεσία βασίζεται στην γεωγραφική θέση μίας κινητής συσκευής χειρός (π.χ. ένα κινητό τηλέφωνο και συγκεκριμένα ένα έξυπνο τηλέφωνο –smartphone). Αν και οι υπηρεσίες LBS είναι πολύ δημοφιλείς,...

  9. An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

    2002-01-01

    Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing

  10. Mining Significant Semantic Locations from GPS Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing deployment and use of GPS-enabled devices, massive amounts of GPS data are becoming available. We propose a general framework for the mining of semantically meaningful, significant locations, e.g., shopping malls and restaurants, from such data. We present techniques capable...... of extracting semantic locations from GPS data. We capture the relationships between locations and between locations and users with a graph. Significance is then assigned to locations using random walks over the graph that propagates significance among the locations. In doing so, mutual reinforcement between...

  11. Mining significant semantic locations from GPS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xin; Cong, Gao; Jensen, Christian S.

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing deployment and use of GPS-enabled devices, massive amounts of GPS data are becoming available. We propose a general framework for the mining of semantically meaningful, significant locations, e.g., shopping malls and restaurants, from such data. We present techniques capable...... of extracting semantic locations from GPS data. We capture the relationships between locations and between locations and users with a graph. Significance is then assigned to locations using random walks over the graph that propagates significance among the locations. In doing so, mutual reinforcement between...

  12. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-October 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2000 to October 2001 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-ft) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that may be indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself

  13. Unit Manning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGinniss, Mike

    2003-01-01

    .... This decision combines two crucial initiatives: first, transforming the Army from an individual soldier replacement system to a unit manning system that enhances cohesion and keeps trained soldiers, leaders, and commanders together longer, thereby...

  14. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  15. Drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanchik, N P; Demin, A V; Khrustalev, N N; Linnik, G N; Lovchev, S V; Rozin, M M; Sidorov, R V; Sokolov, S I; Tsaregradskiy, Yu P

    1981-01-01

    A drilling unit is proposed which includes a hydraulic lifter, hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump with valve distribution and sectional drilling pump with separators of the working and flushing fluid. In order to reduce metal consumption and the overall dimensions of the drilling unit, the working cavity of each cylinder of the hydraulic multiple-cylinder pump is equipped with suction and injection valves and is hydraulically connected to the working cavity by one of the sections of the drilling pump.

  16. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Locatable Minerals AGENCY: Forest... on the extension of a currently approved information collection, Locatable Minerals-36 CFR part 228...: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to: USDA, Forest Service, Minerals and Geology...

  17. Location | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Search Menu About Leadership Mission Social Media Community History Diversity Social Media Careers View All Jobs Students & Postdocs Benefits & Perks Hiring Technology Deployment Centers New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program Sandia's Economic Impact Sandia

  19. HSIP Law Enforcement Locations in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Law Enforcement Locations Any location where sworn officers of a law enforcement agency are regularly based or stationed. Law Enforcement agencies "are publicly...

  20. National Archives and Records Administration Employee Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The National Archives and Records Administration Employee Locator is an online system that provides the name, office symbol, location, room, telephone number, and...

  1. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  2. CARAVAN: Providing Location Privacy for VANET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sampigethaya, Krishna; Huang, Leping; Li, Mingyan; Poovendran, Radha; Matsuura, Kanta; Sezaki, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    .... This type of tracking leads to threats on the location privacy of the vehicle's user. In this paper, we study the problem of providing location privacy in VANET by allowing vehicles to prevent tracking of their broadcast communications...

  3. Simulation analysis for hyperbola locating accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changli; Liu Daizhi

    2004-01-01

    In the system of the hyperbola location, the geometric shape of the detecting stations has an important influence on the locating accuracy. At first, this paper simulates the process of the hyperbola location by the computer, and then analyzes the influence of the geometric shape on the locating errors and gives the computer simulation results, finally, discusses the problems that require attention in course of selecting the detecting station. The conclusion has practicality. (authors)

  4. Open Location Management in Automated Warehousing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yugang; Koster, René

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA warehouse needs to have sufficient open locations to be able to store incoming shipments of various sizes. In combination with ongoing load retrievals open locations gradually spread over the storage area. Unfavorable positions of open locations negatively impact the average load retrieval times. This paper presents a new method to manage these open locations such that the average system travel time for processing a block of storage and retrieval jobs in an automated warehousing...

  5. A Wireless Location System in LTE Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qi; Hu, Rongyi; Liu, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Personal location technologies are becoming important with the rapid development of Mobile Internet services. In traditional cellular networks, the key problems of user location technologies are high-precision synchronization among different base stations, inflexible processing resources, and low accuracy positioning, especially for indoor environment. In this paper, a new LTE location system in Centralized Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is proposed, which makes channel and location measurement...

  6. Location tracking forensics on mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Stefan; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    The spread of navigation devices has increased significantly over the last 10 years. With the help of the current development of even smaller navigation receiver units it is to navigate with almost any current smart phone. Modern navigation systems are no longer limited to satellite navigation, but use current techniques, e.g. WLAN localization. Due to the increased use of navigation devices their relevance to forensic investigations has risen rapidly. Because navigation, for example with navigation equipment and smartphones, have become common place these days, also the amount of saved navigation data has risen rapidly. All of these developments lead to a necessary forensic analysis of these devices. However, there are very few current procedures for investigating of navigation devices. Navigation data is forensically interesting because by the position of the devices in most cases the location and the traveled path of the owner can be reconstructed. In this work practices for forensic analysis of navigation devices are developed. Different devices will be analyzed and it is attempted, by means of forensic procedures to restore the traveled path of the mobile device. For analysis of the various devices different software and hardware is used. There will be presented common procedures for securing and testing of mobile devices. Further there will be represented the specials in the investigation of each device. The different classes considered are GPS handhelds, mobile navigation devices and smartphones. It will be attempted, wherever possible, to read all data of the device. The aim is to restore complete histories of the navigation data and to forensically study and analyze these data. This is realized by the usage of current forensic software e.g. TomTology or Oxygen Forensic Suite. It is also attempted to use free software whenever possible. Further alternative methods are used (e.g. rooting) to access locked data of the unit. To limit the practical work the

  7. Spatial quality, location theory and spatial planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assink, Mathijs; Groenendijk, Nico

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with spatial quality as a possible factor in location choices made by companies. Actual location decisions as well as location theory have changed over time. In the industrial era primary “hard” cost factors were dominant, to be supplemented by agglomeration factors ever since the

  8. 47 CFR 101.129 - Transmitter location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter location. 101.129 Section 101.129... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.129 Transmitter location. (a) The applicant must determine, prior to... adequate to render the service proposed. In cases of questionable antenna locations, it is desirable to...

  9. 46 CFR 193.50-10 - Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location. 193.50-10 Section 193.50-10 Shipping COAST... Details § 193.50-10 Location. (a) Approved hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems shall be installed in accordance with Table 193.50-10(a). The location of the equipment...

  10. 46 CFR 108.493 - Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location. 108.493 Section 108.493 Shipping COAST GUARD... Extinguishing Systems Hand Portable and Semiportable Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.493 Location. (a) Each... this subpart and installed in the locations prescribed in the table. (b) Each portable and semi...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1120 - Station location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station location. 73.1120 Section 73.1120... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1120 Station location. Each AM, FM, TV and Class A TV... be the geographical station location. [65 FR 30003, May 10, 2000] ...

  12. 46 CFR 95.50-10 - Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location. 95.50-10 Section 95.50-10 Shipping COAST GUARD...-10 Location. (a) Approved hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire extinguishing systems shall be installed in accordance with Table 95.50-10(a). The location of the equipment shall be to...

  13. 46 CFR 76.50-10 - Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location. 76.50-10 Section 76.50-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... Extinguishers and Semiportable Fire Extinguishing Systems, Arrangements and Details § 76.50-10 Location. (a... fire extinguishing systems Classification (see § 76.50-5) Quantity and location Safety area 1...

  14. 49 CFR 195.260 - Valves: Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valves: Location. 195.260 Section 195.260... PIPELINE Construction § 195.260 Valves: Location. A valve must be installed at each of the following locations: (a) On the suction end and the discharge end of a pump station in a manner that permits isolation...

  15. 7 CFR 1924.106 - Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location. 1924.106 Section 1924.106 Agriculture... CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR Planning and Performing Site Development Work § 1924.106 Location. (a) General. It is... will not finance development on locations that adversely affect properties which are listed or are...

  16. Open Location Management in Automated Warehousing Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yugang); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA warehouse needs to have sufficient open locations to be able to store incoming shipments of various sizes. In combination with ongoing load retrievals open locations gradually spread over the storage area. Unfavorable positions of open locations negatively impact the average load

  17. Bounds in the location-allocation problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1981-01-01

    Develops a family of stronger lower bounds on the objective function value of the location-allocation problem. Solution methods proposed to solve problems in location-allocation; Efforts to develop a more efficient bound solution procedure; Determination of the locations of the sources....

  18. LOCATION-BASED SERVICES USING SIP

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Azfar,; Md. Sakhawat Hossen,; María José Peroza Marval; Razib Hayat Khan

    2010-01-01

    Due to the popularity of Location-Based Services and IP telephony, we decided to review a number of different proposals to implement Location-Based Services over a SIP-based mobile network. The result is an interesting overview about the potential functionalities of Location-Based Services and the capabilities of SIP for implementingthese services.

  19. Multi-dimensional indoor location information model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, Q.; Zhu, Q.; Zlatanova, S.; Huang, L.; Zhou, Y.; Du, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at the increasing requirements of seamless indoor and outdoor navigation and location service, a Chinese standard of Multidimensional Indoor Location Information Model is being developed, which defines ontology of indoor location. The model is complementary to 3D concepts like CityGML and

  20. Position locating device and method for interstitial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    A position locating device is described for interstitial radiotherapy of a body portion comprising a flexible sheet member for being received about and conformed with a body portion which is to receive radiotherapy. The sheet member has spaced position locating means and first and second opposite ends, and attachment means for releasably securing the sheet member about the body portion comprising joining means securing bands with the sheet member. The joining means provides first and second clamping units each detachably secured with the sheet member proximate to a respective one of its ends for being replaced and repositioned therewith. The bands comprise first and second sets having first ends pivotably secured with a respective one of the first and second clamping units for allowing their angular adjustment with the second ends of the first set of bands being detachably securable with the second ends of the second set of bands for releasably securing the sheet member about the body portion. Each of the clamping units comprises a flat bar having a slot for receiving therethrough an end of the sheet member and screw elements threadedly engaging a respective one of the bars for clamping and securing the sheet member therewith. The first ends of the bands have an opening for receiving a respective screw element therethrough for securing same with the bar unit and allowing pivotal movement thereabout

  1. An Ecosystem Approach to Recreation Location Quotients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Vogel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread agreement on the importance of preserving ecological integrity in conservation and outdoor recreation decision-making processes, traditional metrics analyzing the supply of and demand for conservation and recreation resources have focused on geographical and population-centric units of measurement rather than ecological ones. One tool past researchers have used to inform recreation resource planning is the recreation location quotient (RLQ. While simple park-to-population ratios or acres-per-capita metrics provide a base measure of carrying capacity and are often useful to set broad recreation supply standards, the RLQ offers a more nuanced snapshot of supply and demand by comparing regional ratios to a standardized reference region. The RLQ is thus able to provide a statistic or quotient that highlights regions where recreation resources are particularly abundant and/or scarce relative to a reference area. This project expands the past RLQ analyses by investigating the distribution of recreation resources across the 10 ecological sections found within the US state of Minnesota. RLQs were calculated using recreation trail mileage, natural resource and recreation area acreage data, and recreation facility data from federal, state, and local agencies. Results found notable differences in supply of recreation resources across ecological sections. Some sections were considerably underrepresented in recreation resources-per area (e.g., Red River Valley and North Central Glaciated Plains while others were underrepresented in recreation resources-per capita (e.g., Minnesota and Northeast Iowa Morainal. The RLQ statistics and resulting maps illustrating relative surplus or deficiencies can inform future land acquisition decisions and highlight the need for cross-jurisdictional planning in order to ensure outdoor recreation systems are ecologically representative. Possible implications and recommendations for future planning

  2. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Perspectival Structure and Agentive Self-location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    -locating, in the sense that an episode of perceptual experience may be sufficient for thoughts about one’s location. In this chapter, I argue that perceptual experience can conceivably be perspectivally structured without locating its subject and that any account of spatial self-consciousness based upon a simple......Perceptual experience is perspectivally structured, in at least two respects. It has characteristic sensory limitations relative to a given location (limitation-structure) and it presents objects as spatially related to a given location (egocentric-structure). Perceptual experience is also self...... inference from the perspectival structure of perceptual experience faces serious difficulties. If this is correct, then we ought to look beyond the perspectival structure of perceptual experience in order to account for its self-locating content. The Agentive Self-Location Thesis, as developed here...

  4. The role of location of food consumption in the prevention of travelers' diarrhea in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, C D; Pickering, L K; Sullivan, P; DuPont, H L

    1980-11-01

    The location of food consumption was recorded daily for 3 wk by 130 United States summer students newly arrived in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, as part of an assessment of bismuth subsalicylate vs. placebo in the irevention of travelers' diarrhea. Eating at locations other than homes and apartments (P travelers' diarrhea, even among persons taking bismuth subsalicylate as a preventive measure.

  5. Use of ecological exposure units in ecological risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenbaugh, R.; Myers, O.; Gallegos, A.; Breshears, D.; Ebinger, M.

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to ecological risk assessment at hazardous waste sites that are being evaluated for cleanup under CERCLA or RCRA requirements is to focus on the immediate impacts at or adjacent to a site. While this may be acceptable in some situations, it is not ecologically defensible in situations where there are numerous contaminated sites in proximity to each other. In the latter case, transport from the sites, potential cumulative effects, and wide-ranging receptors must be considered. The concept of the Ecological Exposure Unit (EEU) has been proposed to address this situation. Ecological Exposure Units are defined on the basis of ecological considerations and each EEU may contain several to many contaminated sites. The initial steps involved in performing ecological risk assessments using the EEU approach include (1) selection of appropriate receptors and assessment endpoints, and (2) geographical definition of EEUs. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, receptors have been identified and EEUs have been defined for these receptors. GIS is being used as a tool to map EEUs. Receptors include representatives from threatened or endangered species, species reflecting status of ecological health, species with social or cultural relevance, and other species of concern. After definition of EEUs, cumulative impacts of all stressors at all sites within each EEU must be evaluated. The two major advantages to performing ecological risk assessments using this approach are that risk assessments are performed in a more scientifically defensible manner because they are performed on ecologically defined units and that resources are used optimally by minimizing redundant remedial activities

  6. A dataset of housing market and self-attitudes towards housing location choices in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed R

    2017-04-01

    A survey, of sample size 224, is designed to include the different related-factors to housing location choice, such as; socioeconomic factors, housing characteristics, travel behavior, current self-selection factors, housing demand and future location preferences. It comprises 16 questions, categorized into three different sections; socioeconomic (5 Questions), current dwelling unit characteristics (7 Questions), and housing demand characteristics (4 Questions). The first part, socioeconomic, covers the basic information about the respondent, such as; age, gender, marital status, employment, and car ownership. While the second part, current dwelling unit characteristics, covers different aspect concerning the residential unit typology, financial aspects, and travel behavior of the respondent. It includes the tenure types of the residential unit, estimation of the unit price (in the case of ownership or renting), housing typologies, the main reason for choosing the unit, in case of working, the modes of travel to work, and time to reach it, residential mobility in the last decade, and the ownership of any other residential units. The last part, housing demand characteristics, covers the size of the demand for a residential unit, preference in living in a certain area and the reason to choose it, and the preference of residential unit׳s tenure. This survey is a representative sample for the population in Alexandria, Egypt. The data in this article is represented in: How do people select their residential locations in Egypt? The case of Alexandria; JCIT1757.

  7. A dataset of housing market and self-attitudes towards housing location choices in Alexandria, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Ibrahim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A survey, of sample size 224, is designed to include the different related-factors to housing location choice, such as; socioeconomic factors, housing characteristics, travel behavior, current self-selection factors, housing demand and future location preferences. It comprises 16 questions, categorized into three different sections; socioeconomic (5 Questions, current dwelling unit characteristics (7 Questions, and housing demand characteristics (4 Questions. The first part, socioeconomic, covers the basic information about the respondent, such as; age, gender, marital status, employment, and car ownership. While the second part, current dwelling unit characteristics, covers different aspect concerning the residential unit typology, financial aspects, and travel behavior of the respondent. It includes the tenure types of the residential unit, estimation of the unit price (in the case of ownership or renting, housing typologies, the main reason for choosing the unit, in case of working, the modes of travel to work, and time to reach it, residential mobility in the last decade, and the ownership of any other residential units. The last part, housing demand characteristics, covers the size of the demand for a residential unit, preference in living in a certain area and the reason to choose it, and the preference of residential unit׳s tenure. This survey is a representative sample for the population in Alexandria, Egypt. The data in this article is represented in: How do people select their residential locations in Egypt? The case of Alexandria; JCIT1757.

  8. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2004-01-01

    contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106

  9. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2004-09-01

    contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106.

  10. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  11. Indoor Positioning with Radio Location Fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    . A promising indoor positioning technique is radio-based location ngerprinting, having the major advantage of exploiting already existing radio infrastructures, like IEEE 802.11 or GSM, which avoids extra deployment costs and eort. The research goal of this thesis is to address the limitations of current...... indoor location ngerprinting systems. In particular the aim is to advance location ngerprinting techniques for the challenges of handling heterogeneous clients, scalability to many clients, and interference between communication and positioning. The wireless clients used for location ngerprinting...... are heterogeneous even when only considering clients for the same technology. The heterogeneity is due to dierent radios, antennas, and rmwares causing measurements for location ngerprinting not to be directly comparable among clients. Heterogeneity is a challenge for location ngerprinting because it severely...

  12. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    for semi-constrained indoor movement, and then uses this to map raw tracking records into mapping records representing object entry and exit times in particular locations. Then, an efficient indexing structure, the Dense Location Time Index (DLT-Index) is proposed for indexing the time intervals...... of the mapping table, along with associated construction, query processing, and pruning techniques. The DLT-Index supports very efficient aggregate point queries, interval queries, and dense location queries. A comprehensive experimental study with real data shows that the proposed techniques can efficiently......Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based model...

  13. Allocation and Location of Transport Logistics Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mocková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The facility allocation problem sets out to determine the optimal number of facilities to be opened. Based on multiple criteria evaluation, the optimal location of the facilities is usually solved subsequently. Several considerations, e.g. technical parameters, costs and finance must be taken into account. Economic analysis is carried out on the basis of the specific instance of the problem.Let us assume that the number of potentially located facilities is known. Then the problem of the optimal location of a given number of facilities in a network is referred to as the facility location problem. The solution to the problem is a set of facilities optimally located in an area such that this area is fully covered by the required services that the facilities provide. An example of a real-life problem of this type is the location of logistics centers. 

  14. Network location theory and contingency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, S L

    1983-08-01

    A brief survey of results in network location theory is first presented. Then, a systems view of contingency planning is described. Finally, some results in location theory are re-examined and it is shown that they are motivated by contingency planning considerations. Some new issues and problems in location theory are described, which, if properly tackled, will have a substantial impact on contingency planning in transportation.

  15. Location class change impact on onshore gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Cassia de Oliveira; Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Seixas de [DNV Energy Solutions, Oslo (Norway); Leal, Cesar Antonio [DNV Energy Solutions, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Faertes, Denise [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gas and Energy

    2009-07-01

    During a pipeline life cycle, some significant changes in the population may happen along its route. Such changes are indirectly evaluated by the increase in the amount of buildings constructed along the route, which determines the so called Location Class. Such changes, after licensing, provoke differences between what is required by the standards and what is actually done. This work has two goals. One is to study the requirements of international standards and legislations as well as some solutions used in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Netherlands. This goal intends to provide some technical bases for a comparative analysis on how the location class changes, during the life cycle of a pipeline, are treated in each country. Another goal is to present a risk-based methodology for the guideline development which can be used in decision-making concerning what to do in case of any location class change. Particularly, it has given special attention to the requirements which are imposed for the pipeline operational license continuation. This work is of supreme importance for the Brazilian pipeline segment, since the existing Brazilian design standard, ABNT NBR12712 for transmission and distribution pipeline design, does not deal with that issue. Moreover, a summary of the main solutions found in those countries together with a guideline, customized for the Brazilian reality, is presented. (author)

  16. Locating techniques for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masao

    1983-01-01

    The basic thought in locating nuclear power stations is to examine carefully the suitability of sites and the safety of plants, and in the end, to perfect the safety of public. In Japan, effort is exerted to obtain the trust of local people by carrying out investigation, research and examination from respective standpoints of the government, institutes and industries. The author has engaged in the standardization of the investigation, test and analysis regarding the aseismatic capability of ground, the verifying project in Tadotsu of the coupled vibration of ground and structures, the evaluation of the performance of large vibration tables, the future concept of new locating procedure and so on in the last more than ten years. The technological classification of ground, the technological meaning of active faults, the procedure of the aseismatic design of plants, the difference of earthquake input force according to various locating methods, 12 rules regarding the attenuation of vibration of ground, and the concept of new locating method in the 21st century are explained. As the new locating techniques applicable to central Japan, diluvial ground location, floating location in tunnels, underground location, offshore location and so on must be promoted. (Kako, I.)

  17. Location-dependent communications using quantum entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaney, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to unconditionally verify the location of a communication receiver would lead to a wide range of new security paradigms. However, it is known that unconditional location verification in classical communication systems is impossible. In this work we show how unconditional location verification can be achieved with the use of quantum communication channels. Our verification remains unconditional irrespective of the number of receivers, computational capacity, or any other physical resource held by an adversary. Quantum location verification represents an application of quantum entanglement that delivers a feat not possible in the classical-only channel. It gives us the ability to deliver real-time communications viable only at specified geographical coordinates.

  18. Semantic Location Extraction from Crowdsourced Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koswatte, S.; Mcdougall, K.; Liu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Crowdsourced Data (CSD) has recently received increased attention in many application areas including disaster management. Convenience of production and use, data currency and abundancy are some of the key reasons for attracting this high interest. Conversely, quality issues like incompleteness, credibility and relevancy prevent the direct use of such data in important applications like disaster management. Moreover, location information availability of CSD is problematic as it remains very low in many crowd sourced platforms such as Twitter. Also, this recorded location is mostly related to the mobile device or user location and often does not represent the event location. In CSD, event location is discussed descriptively in the comments in addition to the recorded location (which is generated by means of mobile device's GPS or mobile communication network). This study attempts to semantically extract the CSD location information with the help of an ontological Gazetteer and other available resources. 2011 Queensland flood tweets and Ushahidi Crowd Map data were semantically analysed to extract the location information with the support of Queensland Gazetteer which is converted to an ontological gazetteer and a global gazetteer. Some preliminary results show that the use of ontologies and semantics can improve the accuracy of place name identification of CSD and the process of location information extraction.

  19. SEMANTIC LOCATION EXTRACTION FROM CROWDSOURCED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Koswatte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Crowdsourced Data (CSD has recently received increased attention in many application areas including disaster management. Convenience of production and use, data currency and abundancy are some of the key reasons for attracting this high interest. Conversely, quality issues like incompleteness, credibility and relevancy prevent the direct use of such data in important applications like disaster management. Moreover, location information availability of CSD is problematic as it remains very low in many crowd sourced platforms such as Twitter. Also, this recorded location is mostly related to the mobile device or user location and often does not represent the event location. In CSD, event location is discussed descriptively in the comments in addition to the recorded location (which is generated by means of mobile device's GPS or mobile communication network. This study attempts to semantically extract the CSD location information with the help of an ontological Gazetteer and other available resources. 2011 Queensland flood tweets and Ushahidi Crowd Map data were semantically analysed to extract the location information with the support of Queensland Gazetteer which is converted to an ontological gazetteer and a global gazetteer. Some preliminary results show that the use of ontologies and semantics can improve the accuracy of place name identification of CSD and the process of location information extraction.

  20. Overdenture locator attachments for atrophic mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-supported overdentures provide a good opportunity for dentists to improve oral health and quality-of-life of patients. Atrophic mandible poses a significant challenge to successful oral rehabilitation with dental implants. In this article, the fabrication of lower overdenture by two narrow platform implants is described with dual retentive, resilient, self-locating locator attachment system. The locator attachment system has the lowest profile in comparison with the ball and bar attachments and is versatile up to 40΀ of divergence between two implants. By using locators as attachments, we can meet functional, economic and social expectation of patients with ease and satisfaction.