WorldWideScience

Sample records for rcra facilities congress

  1. RCRA facility stabilization initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program's management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies

  2. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  3. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively

  4. NPL deletion policy for RCRA-regulated TSD facilities finalized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Under a new policy published by EPA on March 20, 1995, certain sites may be deleted from the National Priorities List (NPL) and deferred to RCRA corrective action. To be deleted from the NPL, a site must (1) be regulated under RCRA as a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility and (2) meet the four criteria specified by EPA. The new NPL deletion policy, which does not pertain to federal TSD facilities, became effective on April 19, 1995. 1 tab

  5. ORGDP RCRA/PCB incinerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, T.

    1987-01-01

    A dual purpose solid/liquid incinerator is currently being constructed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant [ORGDP (K-25)] to destroy uranium contaminated, hazardous organic wastes in compliance with the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These wastes are generated by the gaseous diffusion plants in Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; and Portsmouth, OH. In addition, waste will also be received from the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Destruction of PCBs and hazardous liquid organic wastes will be accomplished in a rotary kiln incinerator with an afterburner. This system was selected faster a study of various alternatives. Incineration was chosen because it is dependable, permanent, detoxifies organics, and reduces volume. The rotary kiln incinerator was selected because it can thermally destroy organic constituents of liquids, solids, and sludges to produce an organically inert ash. In addition to the incineration off-gas treatment system, the facility includes a tank farm, drum storage buildings, a solids preparation area, a control room, and a data management system. The incineration system, off-gas treatment system, and related instrumentation and controls are being provided by International Waste Energy Systems (IWES) which is responsible for design, construction, startup, and performances testing

  6. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste...

  7. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention

  8. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  9. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  10. Quadrant I RCRA Facility Investigation Work Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this Facility Investigation (FRI) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is to acquire, analyze and interpret data which will: (1) characterize the environmental setting including ground water, surface water and sediment, soil and air; (2) define and characterize sources of contamination; (3) characterize the vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination of the environment; (4) assess the risk to human health and the environment resulting from possible exposure to contaminants; and, (5) support the Corrective Measures Study (CMS) which will follow the RFI. Investigations to characterize the environmental setting, sources of contamination, and vertical and horizontal extent and degree of contamination will be conducted relative to individual potential sources which have been identified in the Quadrant I Description of Current Conditions. These unit investigations will follow the systematic approach which is outlined below

  11. The Pinellas Plant RCRA facility investigation - A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbury, Richard; Keshian, Berg; Farley, Dwain; Meyer, David; Ingle, David; Biedermann, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office Environmental Restoration Program, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) was completed at the Pinellas Plant to fulfill requirements of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) permit issued on February 9, 1990 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RFI addressed potential contaminant releases and environmental conditions at 15 solid waste management units (SWMUs). The RFI characterization program began in April 1990 and was completed in May 1991. The scope of RFI data collection activities is presented in the Pinellas Plant RFI Workplan issued in May 1990 and approved by EPA on April 16, 1991. An RFI Report was submitted to EPA on September 1, 1991. This paper presents a summary of RFI results and conclusions. Primary environmental concerns at the Pinellas Plant are emphasized. (author)

  12. Hanford facility RCRA permit condition II.U.1 report: mapping of underground piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, C.B.

    1996-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to fulfill Condition Il.U.1. of the Hanford Facility (HF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit. The HF RCRA Permit, Number WA7890008967, became effective on September 28, 1994 (Ecology 1994). Permit Conditions Il.U. (mapping) and II.V. (marking) of the HF RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste (OW) Portion, require the mapping and marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines subject to the provisions of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-303. Permit Condition Il.U.I. requires the submittal of a report describing the methodology used to generate pipeline maps and to assure their quality. Though not required by the Permit, this report also documents the approach used for the field marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines.

  13. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_LQG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  14. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_TRANS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  15. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring

  16. Financial responsibilities under RCRA. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H. R. 3692, November 13, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Representatives of environmental organizations, the Hazardous Waste Treatment Council, and regulators were among those testifying at a hearing on H.R. 3692, which amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The bill is in response to concerns that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not compiled with the intent of RCRA in its failure to move beyond interim permits to issue final permits to land disposal facilities accepting hazardous wastes. Reported leakage and environmental risks from sites operating under interim permits raises questions about how disposal companies could deal with liability claims. At issue was whether Congress needs to take new action to develop regulations under which financially responsible companies can operate or whether new EPA rules can solve the problem. A spokesman for EPA reviewed the liability insurance problem and the status of the insurance market in this context. Material submitted for the record follows the text of H.R. 3692 and the testimony of 11 witnesses.

  17. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment at the 216-B-3 Pond Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Teel, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    This document describes a groundwater quality assessment of the 216-B-3 pond system, a Resources Conservation and Recovery act of 1976 (RCRA) waste facility. In 1990, sampling and chemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility indicated that the contamination indicator parameters, total organic halogens (TOX), and total organic carbon (TOC) had exceeded established limits in two wells. This discovery placed the facility into RCRA groundwater assessment status and subsequently led to a more detailed hydrochemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility. Comprehensive chemical analyses of groundwater samples from 1994 through 1996 revealed one compound, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TRIS2CH), that may have contributed to elevated TOX concentrations. No compound was identified as a contributor to TOC. Detailed evaluations of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH and comparison of occurrences of these parameters led to conclusions that (1) with few exceptions, these constituents occur at low concentrations below or near limits of quantitation; (2) it is problematic whether the low concentrations of TRIS2CH represent a contaminant originating from the facility or if it is a product of well construction; and (3) given the low and diminishing concentration of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH, no further investigation into the occurrent of these constituents is justified. Continued groundwater monitoring should include an immediate recalculation of background critical means of upgradient/downgradient comparisons and a return to seminannual groundwater monitoring under a RCRA indicator parameter evaluation program

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_INACTIVE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste...

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_ACTIVE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of active hazardous...

  20. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_TSD

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of Hazardous Waste...

  1. RCRA and CERCLA requirements affecting cleanup activities at a federal facility superfund site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) achieved success on an integrated groundwater monitoring program which addressed both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. The integrated plan resulted in a cost savings of approximately $2.6 million. At present, the FEMP is also working on an integrated closure process to address Hazardous Waste Management Units (HWMUs) at the site. To date, Ohio EPA seems willing to discuss an integrated program with some stipulations. If an integrated program is implemented, a cost savings of several million dollars will be realized since the CERCLA documents can be used in place of a RCRA closure plan. The success of an integrated program at the FEMP is impossible without the support of DOE and the regulators. Since DOE is an owner/operator of the facility and Ohio EPA regulates hazardous waste management activities at the FEMP, both parties must be satisfied with the proposed integration activities. Similarly, US EPA retains CERCLA authority over the site along with a signed consent agreement with DOE, which dictates the schedule of the CERCLA activities. Another federal facility used RCRA closure plans to satisfy CERCLA activities. This federal facility was in a different US EPA Region than the FEMP. While this approach was successful for this site, an integrated approach was required at the FEMP because of the signed Consent Agreement and Consent Decree. For federal facilities which have a large number of HWMUs along with OUs, an integrated approach may result in a timely and cost-effective cleanup

  2. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1301-N, 1324-N/NA, and 1325-N RCRA Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2001-01-01

    The 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, the 1324-N Surface Impoundment, and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100 N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The closure plans for these facilities stipulate that groundwater is monitored according to the 100-N Pilot Project: Proposed Consolidated Groundwater Monitoring Program (BHI-00725). This document supplements the consolidated plan by providing information on sampling and analysis protocols, quality assurance, data management, and a conceptual model for the RCRA sites. Monitoring well networks, constituents, and sampling frequency remain the same as in the consolidated plan or the previous groundwater monitoring plan (Hartman 1996)

  3. Source term analysis for a RCRA mixed waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, D.L.; Blandford, T.N.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    A Monte Carlo transport scheme was used to estimate the source strength resulting from potential releases from a mixed waste disposal facility. Infiltration rates were estimated using the HELP code, and transport through the facility was modeled using the DUST code, linked to a Monte Carlo driver

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  5. RCRA facility investigation report for the 200-PO-1 operable unit. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) report is prepared in support of the RFI/corrective measures study process for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report summarizes existing information on this operable unit presented in the 200 East and PUREX Aggregate Area Management Study Reports, contaminant specific studies, available modeling data, and groundwater monitoring data summary reports. Existing contaminant data are screened against current regulatory limits to determine contaminants of potential concern (COPC). Each identified COPC is evaluated using well-specific and plume trend analyses

  6. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-01-01

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information

  7. Construction of mixed waste storage RCRA facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment, DOE/EA-0820, to assess the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating two mixed waste Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) storage facilities. The new facilities would be located inside and immediately west of the security-fenced area of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Area in Melton Valley, Tennessee. Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact

  8. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations

  9. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, container storage accumulation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) remedial action strategy is based on a memorandum from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in which EPA elected to enforce regulatory requirements for ORNL through its amended Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) authority. This report, which completes the requirements of II.A.1 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit, identifies areas near the point of waste generation in which wastes are accumulated before they are transferred into the permitted waste storage facilities. In includes background information on each area and an assessment of the need for further remedial attention. The waste accumulation areas described in this addendum bear identification numbers indicative of the WAGs of which they are a part. Waste accumulation areas that are located inside a building and in which there is no potential for releases to the environment are not included in this report

  10. RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual progress report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruland, R.M.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress during 1988 of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 16 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility (the Solid Waste Landfill). Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 21 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs

  11. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-DR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al. 1990a), signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations. Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-DR-1 source operable unit Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination

  12. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - RCRA and Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Federal Facilities, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) sites as part of the CIMC web service. The...

  13. RCRA corrective action and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators' interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE's permitted facilities and interim status facilities

  14. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations, under the authority of Chapter 173-303 Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-HR-3 operable unit. The 100-HR-3 operable unit underlies the D/DR and H Areas, the 600 Area between them, and the six source operable units these areas contain. The 100-HR-3 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water within its boundary. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination. Separate work plans have been initiated for the 100-DR-1 (DOE-RL 1992a) and 100-HR-1 (DOE-RL 1992b) source operable units

  15. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document

  16. 1993 RCRA Part B permit renewal application, Savannah River Site: Volume 10, Consolidated Incineration Facility, Section C, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molen, G.

    1993-08-01

    This section describes the chemical and physical nature of the RCRA regulated hazardous wastes to be handled, stored, and incinerated at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site. It is in accordance with requirements of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.13(a) and(b), and 270.14(b)(2). This application is for permit to store and teat these hazardous wastes as required for the operation of CIF. The permit is to cover the storage of hazardous waste in containers and of waste in six hazardous waste storage tanks. Treatment processes include incineration, solidification of ash, and neutralization of scrubber blowdown

  17. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring)

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  19. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980's, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled 'du Pont Freon 11', were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit

  20. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-HR-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1,000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-HR-1 source operable unit. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination. The 100-HR-3 operable unit underlies the D/DR and H Areas, the 600 Area between them, and the six source operable units these areas contain. The 100-HR-3 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water within its boundary. Separate work plans have been initiated for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit (DOE-RL 1992a) and the 100-DR-1 (DOE-RL 1992b) source operable units

  1. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents

  2. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Federal Facility RCRA Sites, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Federal facilities are properties owned by the federal government. This data layer provides access to Federal facilities that are Resource Conservation and Recovery...

  3. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E.

    1998-10-02

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

  5. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina

  6. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides

  7. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford site facilities for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1993 and September 1994. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides

  8. Results of the groundwater quality assessment program at the 216-A-29 ditch RCRA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votava, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the findings of the groundwater quality assessment program for the 216-A-29 Ditch. The information presented in this report Ditch have affected the quality of the groundwater in the unconfined aquifer beneath the facility. The results indicate that the 216-A-29 Ditch is the source of elevated specific conductance in well 299-E25-35 and that the source is nonhazardous. This report describes the current monitoring status of the 216-A-29 Ditch, groundwater chemical data interpretation, and recommends the reinstatement of an indicator-evaluation monitoring program in accordance with 40 CFR 265.93(d)(6)

  9. Statistical methods for determination of background levels for naturally occuring radionuclides in soil at a RCRA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, S.; Taylor, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    It is critical that summary statistics on background data, or background levels, be computed based on standardized and defensible statistical methods because background levels are frequently used in subsequent analyses and comparisons performed by separate analysts over time. The final background for naturally occurring radionuclide concentrations in soil at a RCRA facility, and the associated statistical methods used to estimate these concentrations, are presented. The primary objective is to describe, via a case study, the statistical methods used to estimate 95% upper tolerance limits (UTL) on radionuclide background soil data sets. A 95% UTL on background samples can be used as a screening level concentration in the absence of definitive soil cleanup criteria for naturally occurring radionuclides. The statistical methods are based exclusively on EPA guidance. This paper includes an introduction, a discussion of the analytical results for the radionuclides and a detailed description of the statistical analyses leading to the determination of 95% UTLs. Soil concentrations reported are based on validated data. Data sets are categorized as surficial soil; samples collected at depths from zero to one-half foot; and deep soil, samples collected from 3 to 5 feet. These data sets were tested for statistical outliers and underlying distributions were determined by using the chi-squared test for goodness-of-fit. UTLs for the data sets were then computed based on the percentage of non-detects and the appropriate best-fit distribution (lognormal, normal, or non-parametric). For data sets containing greater than approximately 50% nondetects, nonparametric UTLs were computed

  10. Hazardous Waste/IGD: EF_RCRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EF_RCRA is a subset of facilities from FRS_INTEREST and FRS_FACILITY_SITE which are updated on a monthly basis as part of the Locational Reference Tables (LRT)...

  11. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.J.; Ochoa, R.; Fritz, K.D.; Craig, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning

  12. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  13. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted

  14. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  15. RCRA Facility Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes hazardous waste information, which is mostly contained in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) System, a national...

  16. Interpreting the SARA and RCRA training requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreland, W.M.; Wells, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) promulgated by the EPA (RCRA) and the OSHA (SARA) require hazardous materials training for all individuals working with hazardous materials. Facilities that are involved in the generation, storage, treatment, transportation, or disposal/removal of hazardous materials/waste must comply with all relevant training regulations. Using the guidelines contained in the RCRA and SARA regulations, decisions must be made to determine: the type of regulatory requirement based on facility function (i.e., whether the facility is a RCRA or CERCLA facility). The type of training required for specific categories of workers (e.g. managers, supervisors, or general site workers). The level of training needed for each category of worker. This presentation outlines how the Environmental Compliance and Health Protection Technical Resources and Training Group, working with waste operations personnel, establishes specific training requirements

  17. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly

  18. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  19. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  20. Clues to interpretation of RCRA regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebach, P.R.; Brown, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    Waste waters from industrial facilities are often treated at waste water treatment plants and then discharged to streams or rivers, or may be reused. Discharges of pollutants to waterways are regulated under the Clean Water Act, and require a permit. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulates the management of solid wastes. This paper discusses the status of waste water treatment plant discharges and sludges pursuant to RCRA. It concludes that some exceptions to RCRA allow waste water treatment plants to accept dilute solvent mixtures, treat them, and discharge effluent without needing a RCRA permit. If residual sludges do not exhibit a hazardous characteristic, then they may be managed as nonhazardous solid waste. For DOE and other generators of mixed waste (both radioactive and hazardous), this may allow sludges to be managed as low level radioactive waste. (author)

  1. EPA R1 RCRA Corrective Action 2020 Baseline Site Property Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Property boundaries as indicated in figures of all facilities subject to RCRA Corrective Action on the 2020 baseline in Region 1. For more information on the RCRA...

  2. An analysis of the CERCLA response program and the RCRA corrective action program in determining cleanup strategies for federal facilities which have been proposed for listing on the National Priorities List

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, P.; Vinson, R.

    1994-01-01

    This document was prepared as an issue paper for the Department of Energy to serve in the decision-making process for environmental restoration activities. The paper compares cleanup requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and those currently proposed under Subpart S of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The history and regulatory framework for both laws is discussed, and the process for environmental restoration actions under both regulatory programs is compared and contrasted. Contaminants regulated under CERCLA and RCRA differ significantly in that radioactive contaminants are subject to Environmental Protection Agency jurisdiction only under CERCLA. The DOE has the jurisdiction to implement radioactive waste management and cleanup levels under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) at nuclear weapons facilities. For sites with significant amounts of contaminants which are radioactive only, cleanup under RCRA can present significant advantages, since the DOE can then manage restoration activities under its own authority. There are, conversely several significant advantages for a remedial action being conducted at a CERCLA site recognized on the National Priorities List (NPL). Other provisions in the CERCLA remediation and the RCRA corrective action process offer both advantages and disadvantages related to DOE environmental restoration programs. This paper presents a discussion of significant issues which should be considered in such negotiations

  3. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation

  5. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data

  6. Chemical Facility Security: Regulation and Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shea, Dana A; Tatelman, Todd B

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has proposed security regulations for chemical facilities, implementing the statutory authority granted in the Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2007 (P.L...

  7. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-01

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards

  8. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the borehole geophysical logging performed at selected monitoring wells at waste area grouping (WAG) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI). It identifies the locations and describes the methods, equipment used in the effort, and the results of the activity. The actual logs for each well logged are presented in Attachment 1 through 4 of the TM. Attachment 5 provide logging contractor service literature and Attachment 6 is the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Procedure for Control of a Nuclear Source Utilized in Geophysical logging. The primary objectives of the borehole geophysical logging program were to (1) identify water-bearing fractured bedrock zones to determine the placement of the screen and sealed intervals for subsequent installation, and (2) further characterize local bedrock geology and hydrogeology and gain insight about the deeper component of the shallow bedrock aquifer flow system. A secondary objective was to provide stratigraphic and structural correlations with existing logs for Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) wells, which display evidence of faulting

  9. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI.

  10. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Etnier, E.L.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Greeley, M.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Harris, R.A.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Howell, P.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.

    1992-12-01

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S ampersand A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI

  11. When RCRA meets ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to identify an inconsistency between RCRA and AEA and for distinguishing a true inconsistency from a compliance difficulty. The paper also provides examples of each situation, accommodating specific RCRA requirements to maintain adherence to radiation protection requirements. The proposed method is derived from radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure that was issued by EPA, under authority derived from Executive Order 10831, the AEA, and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970. This EPA guidance was approved by President Reagan on January 20, 1987 and closely reflects the guidance of national and international radiation standard-setting groups

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Program Plan has been developed to provide a framework for the completion of RCRA Facility Investigations (RFI) at identified units on the Savannah Rive Site (SRS) facility. As such, the RFI Program Plan provides: technical guidance for all work to be performed, managerial control, a practical, scientific approach. The purpose of this Overview is to demonstrate how the basic RFI Program Plan elements (technical, management, and approach) are interwoven to provide a practical and workable plan. The goal of the RFI Program Plan is to provide a systematic, uniform approach for performance and reporting. In addition, the RFI Program Plan has been developed to be specific to the SRS facility and to adhere to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) RFI guidance received as part of the SRS. The US EPA publication ''Characterization of Hazardous Waste Sites'' has been liberally adapted for use in this RFI Program Plan

  13. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, 'Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities', would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action

  14. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L.; Coalgate, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA's corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ''stabilization'' initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ''Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,'' is currently being developed by DOE's Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE's new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning

  15. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 2, Environmental assessment for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) supports the DOE proposal to Congress to construct and operate a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portion of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first part of this document is an assessment of the value of, need for, and feasibility of an MRS facility as an integral component of the waste management system. The second part is an assessment and comparison of the potential environmental impacts projected for each of six site-design combinations. The MRS facility would be centrally located with respect to existing reactors, and would receive and canister spent fuel in preparation for shipment to and disposal in a geologic repository. 207 refs., 57 figs., 132 tabs

  16. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  17. Costs of RCRA corrective action: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, B.; Russell, M.; Hwang Ho-Ling; Goeltz, R.; Warren, J.

    1991-09-01

    This report estimates the cost of the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for all non-federal facilities in the United States. RCRA is the federal law which regulates the treatment, storage, disposal, and recovery of hazardous waste. The 1984 amendment to RCRA, known as the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, stipulates that facilities that treat, store or dispose of hazardous wastes (TSDs) must remediate situations where hazardous wastes have escaped into the environment from their solid waste management units (SWMUs). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA 1990a), among others, believes that the costs of RCRA corrective action could rival the costs of SUPERFUND. Evaluated herein are costs associated with actual remedial actions. The remedial action cost estimating program developed by CH2M Hill is known as the Cost of Remedial Action Model (CORA). It provides cost estimates, in 1987 dollars, by technology used to remediate hazardous waste sites. Rules were developed to categorize each SWMU in the RTI databases by the kinds of technologies that would be used to remediate them. Results were then run through CORA using various assumptions for variable values that could not be drawn from the RTI databases and that did not have CORA supplied default values. Cost estimates were developed under several scenarios. The base case assumes a TSD and SWMU universe equal to that captured in the RTI databases, a point of compliance at the SWMU boundary with no ability to shift wastes from SWMU to SWMU, and a best-as-practical clean-up to health-based standards. 11 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs

  18. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for minimum versus maximum compliance.

  19. RCRA Treatment, Disposal, and Storage Site Boundaries in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2002) [RCRA_TSD_LA_poly_EPA_2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a shapefile of RCRA Treatment, Storage, and Disposal facility boundaries developed by PRC Environmental Management, Inc (PRC) per a Work Assignment from the...

  20. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  1. ORGDP RCRA/PCB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, T.

    1986-01-01

    A dual purpose solid/liquid incinerator is currently being constructed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant [ORGDP (K-25)] to destroy uranium contaminated, hazardous organic wastes in compliance with the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These wastes are generated by the gaseous diffusion plants in Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; and Portsmouth, OH. In addition, waste will also be received from the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Destruction of PCBs and hazardous liquid organic wastes will be accomplished in a rotary kiln incinerator with an afterburner. This system was selected after a study of various alternatives which are covered in Report No. X-OE-141. Incineration was chosen because it is dependable, permanent, detoxifies organics, and reduces volume. The rotary kiln incinerator was selected because it can thermally destroy organic constituents of liquids, solids, and sludges to produce an organically inert ash. The incineration system, off-gas treatment system, and related instrumentation and controls are being provided by International Waste Energy Systems (IWES) which is responsible for design, construction, startup, and performance testing

  2. Achieving RCRA compliance in DOE defense waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankhauser, W.A.; Shepard, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) generates significant volumes of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) through its defense-related activities. Defense RMW is co-regulated by DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/State agencies in accordance with requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). This paper highlights some of the problems encountered in co-regulation and discusses achievements of the defense waste management program in integrating RCRA requirements into RMW operations. Defense waste sites are planning facility modifications and major new construction projects to develop treatment, storage and disposal capacity for existing RMW inventories and projected needs

  3. RCRA groundwater data analysis protocol for the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Jackson, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring program currently involves site-specific monitoring of 20 facilities on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The RCRA groundwater monitoring program has collected abundant data on groundwater quality. These data are used to assess the impact of a facility on groundwater quality or whether remediation efforts under RCRA corrective action programs are effective. Both evaluations rely on statistical analysis of groundwater monitoring data. The need for information on groundwater quality by regulators and environmental managers makes statistical analysis of monitoring data an important part of RCRA groundwater monitoring programs. The complexity of groundwater monitoring programs and variabilities (spatial, temporal, and analytical) exhibited in groundwater quality variables indicate the need for a data analysis protocol to guide statistical analysis. A data analysis protocol was developed from the perspective of addressing regulatory requirements, data quality, and management information needs. This data analysis protocol contains four elements: data handling methods; graphical evaluation techniques; statistical tests for trend, central tendency, and excursion analysis; and reporting procedures for presenting results to users

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  5. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Sections 4 through 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  6. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P. M.

    2013-02-21

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

  7. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-16

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  8. Decommissioning of a RCRA Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility: A case study of the 216-A-29 ditch at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Hayward, W.M.

    1991-09-01

    The 216-A-29 ditch is located in the central portion of the Hanford Site with Operable Unit 200-PO-5. The ditch is classified under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 as a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Facility and as such, is to be removed from service in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M-17-10, which states ''cease all liquid discharges to hazardous land disposal units unless such units have been clean closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976''. The 216-A-29 ditch is one stream feeding the 216-B-3 Pond system, and its removal from service was necessary to support the closure strategy for the 216-B-3 Pond system. Interim stabilization of the 216-A-29 ditch is the first step required to comply with the Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology et al. 1989) and the eventual decommissioning of the entire B Pond system. Interim stabilization was required to maintain the 216-A-29 ditch in a stable configuration until closure actions have been determined and initiated. 4 refs., 3 figs

  9. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 2, Environmental assessment for a monitored retrievable storage facility. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) supports the DOE proposal to Congress to construct and operate a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portion of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first part of this document is an assessment of the value of, need for, and feasibility of an MRS facility as an integral component of the waste management system. The second part is an assessment and comparison of the potential environmental impacts projected for each of six site-design combinations. The MRS facility would be centrally located with respect to existing reactors, and would receive and canister spent fuel in preparation for shipment to and disposal in a geologic repository. 207 refs., 57 figs., 132 tabs.

  10. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve 'clean closure' of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems

  11. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  12. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction

  13. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-03-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  14. Report to Congress on innovative safety and security technology solutions for alternative transportation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This research collected information on the frequency and impact of safety and security incidents (threats) at selected facilities and identified priority incidents at each facility. A customized all hazards approach was used to determine the ha...

  15. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-02-01

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  16. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction

  17. Exiting RCRA Subtitle C regulation data for supporting a new regulatory path for immobilized mixed debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, C.L. [Jetseal, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carson, S.D.; Cheng, Wu-Ching [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents analytical and empirical data that provide technical support for the position that mixed debris (debris contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) treated by immobilization in accordance with 40 CFR 268.45 can exit RCRA Subtitle C requirements at the time the treatment is complete. Pathways analyses and risk assessments of low-level waste and RCRA mixed waste disposal facilities show that these two types of facilities provide equivalent long-term (> 100 years) performance and protection of human health and the environment. A proposed two-tier approach for waste form performance criteria is discussed.

  18. Successful completion of a RCRA closure for the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippitt, J.M.; Kolthoff, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful completion of a RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) closure of a HF (hydrofluoric acid) tank car at FEMP, which is on the national priorities list of hazardous waste sites and is undergoing CERCLA remediation. The HF tank car closure was conducted by FERMCO. Through a combination of sound planning and team work, the HF tank car was closed safely and ahead of schedule. During > 22,000 hr field work required for construction modifications and neutralization of 9,600 gallons of HF and decontamination rinseates, there were no OSHA recordable incidents. The system design avoided additional costs by maximizing use of existing equipment and facilities. This successful closure of the HF tank car demonstrates FEMP's commitment to reducing risks and cleaning up the facility in a manner consistent with objectives of RCRA regulations and the Ohio EPA hazardous waste rules. This in turn facilitated ongoing negotiations with Ohio EPA to integrate RCRA closure and the ongoing CERCLA remediation activities. This paper addresses why the unit was clean closed under an approved RCRA Closure Plan. Integration of EPA regulations for RCRA and CERCLA programs and the DOE-Orders impacting design, construction and operation of an acid neutralization system is also reviewed. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned in the process in preparing the closure plant and through final project close out

  19. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1

  20. The implications of RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] regulation for the disposal of transuranic and high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmon, C.F.; Sharples, F.E.; Smith, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    In May of 1987 the Department of Energy (DOE) published a rule interpreting the definition of ''byproduct'' under the Atomic Energy Act. This byproduct rule clarified the role of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in the regulation of DOE's radioactive waste management activities. According to the rule, only the radioactive portion of DOE's mixed radioactive and hazardous waste (mixed waste), including mixed transuranic (TRU) and high-level waste (HLW), is exempt from RCRA under the byproduct exemption. The portion of a waste that is hazardous as defined by RCRA is subject to full regulation under RCRA. Because the radioactive and hazardous portions of m any, if not most, DOE wastes are likely to be inseparable, the rule in effect makes most mixed wastes subject to dual regulation. The potential application of RCRA to facilities such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the HLW repository creates unique challenges for both the DOE and regulatory authorities. Strategies must be developed to assure compliance with RCRA without either causing excessive administrative burdens or abandoning the goal of minimizing radiation exposure. This paper will explore some of the potential regulatory options for and recent trends in the regulation of TRU and HLW under RCRA

  1. Chemical Facility Security: Issues and Options for the 112th Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    between two approved disinfectants —chlorine and chloramine —as correlated with an unexpected increase in levels of lead in drinking water due to...treatment facilities possess large amounts of potentially hazardous chemicals, such as chlorine, for purposes such as disinfection .50 Advocates for their...Works, June 21, 2006, S.Hrg. 109-1044. 89 The DHS Science and Technology (S& T ) Directorate is engaged in a Chemical Infrastructure Risk Assessment

  2. H.R. 3521: Nuclear Facilities Occupational Safety Improvement Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, October 25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Bill H.R.3521 was introduced in the House of Representatives of the United States on October 25, 1989. The purpose of this Act and the amendments made by this Act are to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities. Congress finds that worker health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities could be made substantially safer by applying standards developed by experts in the field of occupational health and safety. A section-by-section analysis makes up most of the report with emphasis on the following: application of OSHA to DOE nuclear facilities; cooperation with inspections and investigations; transfer and allocation of appropriations and personnel; worker training requirements; performance of NIOSH functions at DOE nuclear facilities; medical examinations of employees; and labor-management health and safety committees at DOE nuclear facilities

  3. RCRA corrective action ampersand CERCLA remedial action reference guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This reference guide provides a side-by-side comparison of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA Remedial Action, focusing on the statutory and regulatory requirements under each program, criterial and other factors that govern a site's progress, and the ways in which authorities or requirements under each program overlap and/or differ. Topics include the following: Intent of regulation; administration; types of sites and/or facilities; definition of site and/or facility; constituents of concern; exclusions; provisions for short-term remedies; triggers for initial site investigation; short term response actions; site investigations; remedial investigations; remedial alternatives; clean up criterial; final remedy; implementing remedy; on-site waste management; completion of remedial process

  4. RCRA Personnel Training, Course 7488

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Federal and state regulations require hazardous and mixed waste facility workers at treatment and storage facilities (TSFs) and <90-day accumulation areas to be trained in hazardous and mixed waste management. This course will refamiliarize and update <90-day accumulation area workers, TSF workers, and supervisors of TSF workers regarding waste identification, pollution prevention, storage area requirements, emergency response procedures, and record-keeping requirements.

  5. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration{trademark} technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration{trademark} (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs.

  6. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration trademark technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration trademark (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs

  7. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  8. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-05-31

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  9. Obtaining variances from the treatment standards of the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs) [40 CFR 268] impose specific requirements for treatment of RCRA hazardous wastes prior to disposal. Before the LDRs, many hazardous wastes could be land disposed at an appropriately designed and permitted facility without undergoing treatment. Thus, the LDRs constitute a major change in the regulations governing hazardous waste. EPA does not regulate the radioactive component of radioactive mixed waste (RMW). However, the hazardous waste component of an RMW is subject to RCRA LDR regulations. DOE facilities that manage hazardous wastes (including radioactive mixed wastes) may have to alter their waste-management practices to comply with the regulations. The purpose of this document is to aid DOE facilities and operations offices in determining (1) whether a variance from the treatment standard should be sought and (2) which type (treatability or equivalency) of petition is appropriate. The document also guides the user in preparing the petition. It shall be noted that the primary responsibility for the development of the treatability petition lies with the generator of the waste. 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. CERCLA and RCRA requirements affecting cleanup of a hazardous waste management unit at a Superfund site: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) attempted to address both RCRA and CERCLA requirements at the fire training facility (FTF) by integrating a CERCLA removal action work plan with a RCRA closure plan. While the regulatory agencies involved with the FTF cleanup agreed the integrated document was a good idea, implementation proved complicated, owing to disposition of clean debris from a Superfund site, treatment of contaminated media, duration of cleanup activities, and cleanup certification. While all the complications have not been resolved, solutions to all have been proposed to Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA. Both agencies have worked closely with FEMP to find the most effective fulfillment of RCRA and CERCLA requirements

  11. Workplan/RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground 643-E, S01-S22 - Volume I - Text and Volume II - Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, K.R.

    2000-12-12

    This document presents the assessment of environmental impacts resulting from releases of hazardous substances from the facilities in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground 643-E, including Solvent Tanks 650-01E to 650-22E, also referred to as Solvent Tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina.

  12. 7. international congress on sports facilities and bath installation with international trade exhibition. 7. Internationaler Kongress Sportstaettenbau und Baederanlagen mit internationaler Ausstellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This congress report is divided into 4 allied topics: the first one mainly deals with practicable provision of facilities for handicapped people in Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Great Britain. The second and third topic deals with practicable design of public buildings like sports areas and sports halls in 7 countries including one example of solar assisted heating in a sports hall in Japan. The last topic treats design and restoration of outdoor and indoor swimming pools under the aspect of energy conservation (mainly achieved by solar systems for water heating and heat recovery) and used comfort in the Federal Republic of Germany, in Austria and France. Furthermore attention is given to biological and hygienical aspects of natural swimming pools and to E.E.C. regulations.

  13. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and open-quotes Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilitiesclose quotes (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  14. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM's after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide's scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary

  15. Establishing a regulatory framework for a RCRA corrective action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, the environmental community has become keenly aware of problems associated with integration of the demanding regulations that apply to environmental restoration activities. Once can not attend an EPA-sponsored conference on Superfund without hearing questions concerning the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the applicability of the National Contingency Plan (NCP) to sites that do not qualify for the National Priorities List (NPL). In particular, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been greatly criticized for its inability to define a comprehensive approach for cleaning up its hazardous waste sites. This article presents two decision flowcharts designed to resolve some of this confusion for DOE. The RCRA/CERCLA integration diagram can help the environmental manager determine which law applies and under what conditions, and the RCRA corrective action decision flowchart can guide the manager in determining which specific sections of RCRA apply to a RCRA-lead environmental restoration program

  16. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  17. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  18. Ground-water monitoring under RCRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coalgate, J.

    1993-11-01

    In developing a regulatory strategy for the disposal of hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), protection of ground-water resources was the primary goal of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). EPA's ground-water protection strategy seeks to minimize the potential for hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents in waste placed in land disposel units to migrate into the environment. This is achieved through liquids management (limiting the placement of liquid wastes in or on the land, requiring the use of liners beneath waste, installing leachate collection systems and run-on and run-off controls, and covering wastes at closure). Ground-water monitoring serves to detect any failure in EPA's liquids management strategy so that ground-water contamination can be detected and addressed as soon as possible

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) new-employee training manual for the Operations Division RCRA personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkenbus, B.D.

    1987-03-01

    This manual has been prepared for the training of new employees who will work with RCRA hazardous waste management in the Operations Division. It will be taught by a person who is trained in hazardous waste regulations/procedures. It consists of nine modules. The topics of these modules are: RCRA Training, Hazardous Waste Regulations, Transportation Regulations, Hazardous Waste Management at ORNL, Chemical Hazards and Safety, Hazardous Waste Operations Training, Sampling of Hazardous Waste, Hazardous Waste Identification/Classification, and RCRA Contingency Plans and Emergency Procedures. The on-the-job training areas are identified in the modules. They are an integral part of training.

  20. Temporal trend analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Need, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data at a uranium hexafluoride processing facility showed a statistically significant increase in the concentration of gross beta activity in monitor wells downgradient of surface impounds storing calcium fluoride sludge and high pH water. Because evidence of leakage had not been detected in lysimeters installed beneath the impounds, the operator sought an evaluation of other potential causes of the result, including natural variability. This study determined that all five data sets showed either long-term excursionary (spike-like), or seasonal forms of temporal variation. Gross beta had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that almost appeared to be seasonal. Gross alpha had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Specific conductance had both upward and downward long-term trends but no other variations. pH had a downward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Fluoride had a downward long-term trend without excursions but with clear seasonal variations. The gross beta result that appeared to be a significant change was a spike event on the upward long-term trend

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) general contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  3. EPA seeks to make RCRA more effective through legislative changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Since RCRA was enacted in 1976 and amended in 1984, hazardous waste management has been transformed. To protect human health and the environment as mandated by the act, EPA has developed a complex cradle-to-grave system for managing hazardous waste. The agency recognizes that some targeted legislative changes could make RCRA even more useful, particularly by (1) establishing some open-quotes middle groundclose quotes for waste posing low risks, and (2) emphasizing sensible and enforceable hazardous waste management practices

  4. Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

    2003-01-01

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude

  5. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period July through September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-02-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period July through September 2006. Eighteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites were sampled during the reporting quarter.

  6. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1 through June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and ''Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities,'' as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company manages RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. This quarterly report contains data received between May 20 and August 19, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  7. Resource conversation and recovery act (RCRA) Contingency Plan for interim status or permitted units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The official mission of the Y-12 Plant is to serve as a manufacturing technology center for key processes such that capabilities are maintained for safe, secure, reliable, and survivable nuclear weapons systems and other applications of national importance. The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be reviewed and revised if necessary if the facility RCRA operating permits are revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the facility's operations change in a manner that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent's Office and the Emergency Preparedness Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste interim status or permitted treatment, storage, or disposal facilities. The 90-day storage areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement

  8. The WIPP RCRA Part B permit application for TRU mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    In August 1993, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a draft permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to begin experiments with transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. Subsequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to cancel the on-site test program, opting instead for laboratory testing. The Secretary of the NMED withdrew the draft permit in 1994, ordering the State's Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Bureau to work with the DOE on submittal of a revised permit application. Revision 5 of the WIPP's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application was submitted to the NMED in May 1995, focusing on disposal of 175,600 m 3 of TRU mixed waste over a 25 year span plus ten years for closure. A key portion of the application, the Waste Analysis Plan, shifted from requirements to characterize a relatively small volume of TRU mixed waste for on-site experiments, to describing a complete program that would apply to all DOE TRU waste generating facilities and meet the appropriate RCRA regulations. Waste characterization will be conducted on a waste stream basis, fitting into three broad categories: (1) homogeneous solids, (2) soil/gravel, and (3) debris wastes. Techniques used include radiography, visually examining waste from opened containers, radioassay, headspace gas sampling, physical sampling and analysis of homogeneous wastes, and review of documented acceptable knowledge. Acceptable knowledge of the original organics and metals used, and the operations that generated these waste streams is sufficient in most cases to determine if the waste has toxicity characteristics, hazardous constituents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PBCs), or RCRA regulated metals

  9. Rocky Flats Solar Evaporation Ponds RCRA hybrid-closure case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogg, R.T.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP)/Operable Unit 4 (OU 4), located at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) sixteen miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is currently undergoing remediation/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure in accordance with the Rocky Flats Interagency Agreement (IAG) signed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991. Based on the ''Phase 1'' (source and soils) RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFM data and interpretations), the DOE and EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG and G) have selected a permanent surface engineered/isolation barrier as the technological option for remediation of the SEP. The DOE and EG and G will utilize all natural materials to create an ''impermeable'' barrier/structure to isolate the waste being left in place from impacting human health and the environment for a minimum of 1,000 years. Their rationale for utilizing natural materials is two fold; (1) optimize long term performance of the barrier and; (2) design a structure which will be near maintenance free (passive remediation) for 1,000 years. The DOE and EG and G have taken a proactive approach in providing post closure performance assessment for this RCRA closure action. An integrated monitoring system has been designed which will include monitoring the engineered barrier, vadose zone and ground water systems. Rocky Flats will integrate instrumentation into the permanent engineered barrier which will provide early warning of potential liquid migration through the barrier and into the waste zone

  10. Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaphart, D.M.; Reed, S.R.; Rankin, W.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution disposal methods, and cost

  11. RCRA Refresher Self-Study, Course 28582

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Federal and state regulations require hazardous and mixed waste facility workers at treatment and storage facilities (TSFs) and <90-day accumulation areas to be trained in hazardous and mixed waste management. This course will refamiliarize and update <90-day accumulation area workers, TSF workers, and supervisors of TSF workers regarding waste identification, pollution prevention, storage area requirements, emergency response procedures, and record-keeping requirements.

  12. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONSERVATION and RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper

  13. A review of state regulations that exceed those of the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.; Heckman, C.L.

    1988-04-01

    This report identifies and provides information on state hazardous waste management programs and regulations in states where the US Department of Energy (DOE) has facilities. The objective is to describe for the DOE defense program and its contractors how state requirements are more stringent than the federal regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). DOE defense programs are located in 13 of the 50 states. Most of these states have regulations that are essentially equivalent to the federal RCRA requirements as they existed prior to the 1984 amendments, but their regulations are, in most instances, more stringment than the federal requirements. Differences are both substantive and procedural, and they are summarized and tabulated herein. All but three of these 13 states have been granted Final Authorization from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to operate their own hazardous waste management program in accord with the federal RCRA program prior to the 1984 amendments; two of the three others have some stage of Interim Authorization. EPA currently administers all of the provisions of the 1984 amendments, including requirements for corrective action under Sect. 3004(u). Two states, Colorado and Tennessee, have been granted revisions to their Final Authorizations delegating responsibility for the hazardous wastes. Responsible state agencies (with appropriate telephone numbers) are indicated, as are the relevant laws and current regulatory statutes

  14. Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) Corrective Action Facility Polygons, Region 9, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RCRA Treatment, Storage and Disposal facilities (TSDs) are facilities that have treated, stored or disposed of hazardous wastes. They are required to clean up...

  15. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol

  16. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  17. The marriage of RCRA and CERCLA at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, D.C.; Brooks, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    A key goal of the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) signed in July of 1996 was to provide a seamless marriage of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (and other media specific programs) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the implementing agencies of each. This paper examines the two years since the signing of RFCA and identifies the successes, failures, and stresses of the marriage. RFCA has provided an excellent vehicle for regulatory and substantive progress at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats facility. The key for a fully successful marriage is to build on the accomplishments to date and to continually improve the internal and external systems and relationships. To date, the parties can be proud of both the substantial accomplishment of substantive environmental work and the regulatory systems that have enabled the work

  18. Analysis of TRU waste for RCRA-listed elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, C.; Gerth, D.; Yoshida, T.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical methods for RCRA listed elements on Portland cement type waste have been employed using both microwave and open hot plate digestions with subsequent analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) and cold vapor atomic absorption and fluorescence (CVAA/CVAFS). Four different digestion procedures were evaluated including an open hot plate nitric acid digestion, EPA SW-846 Method 3051, and 2 methods using modifications to Method 3051. The open hot plate and the modified Method 3051, which used aqua regia for dissolution, were the only methods which resulted in acceptable data quality for all 14 RCRA-listed elements. Results for the nitric acid open hot plate digestion were used to qualify the analytical methods for TRU waste characterization, and resulted in a 99% passing score. Direct chemical analysis of TRU waste is being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in an attempt to circumvent the problems associated with strong acid digestion methods. Technology development includes laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), dc arc CID atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-AES), and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). Analytical methods using the Portland cement matrix are currently being developed for each of the listed techniques. Upon completion of the development stage, blind samples will be distributed to each of the technology developers for RCRA metals characterization

  19. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993

  20. National RCRA Hazardous Waste Biennial Report Data Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in cooperation with the States, biennially collects information regarding the generation, management, and final disposition of hazardous wastes regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), as amended. Collection, validation and verification of the Biennial Report (BR) data is the responsibility of RCRA authorized states and EPA regions. EPA does not modify the data reported by the states or regions. Any questions regarding the information reported for a RCRA handler should be directed to the state agency or region responsible for the BR data collection. BR data are collected every other year (odd-numbered years) and submitted in the following year. The BR data are used to support regulatory activities and provide basic statistics and trend of hazardous waste generation and management. BR data is available to the public through 3 mechanisms. 1. The RCRAInfo website includes data collected from 2001 to present-day (https://rcrainfo.epa.gov/rcrainfoweb/action/main-menu/view). Users of the RCRAInfo website can run queries and output reports for different data collection years at this site. All BR data collected from 2001 to present-day is stored in RCRAInfo, and is accessible through this website. 2. An FTP site allows users to access BR data files collected from 1999 - present day (ftp://ftp.epa.gov/rcrainfodata/). Zip files are available for download directly from this

  1. Revised RCRA closure plan for the Interim Drum Yard (S-030) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Interim Drum Yard (IDY) facility is a containerized waste storage area located in the Y-12 exclusion area. It was used to store waste materials which are regulated by RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act); uranyl nitrate solutions were also stored there. The closure plan outlines the actions required to achieve closure of IDY and is being submitted in accordance with TN Rule 1200-1-11.05(7) and 40 CFR 265.110

  2. IRPA Regional Congress on Radiation Protection in Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Congress proceedings included 93 papers. The IRPA Congress materials deals with progress the various IRPA initiatives to implement new radiation protection concepts. In accordance to this actual trends the main topics of the congress are 'Clearance levels and material release' and 'Environmental impact assessment of workplaces resp. facilities with radiation sources'. Papers and posters in all traditional radiation protection subjects (general aspects, biological effects of radiation, radiation protection in medicine, dosimetry, instrumentation, quality assurance)

  3. IRPA Regional Congress on Radiation Protection in Central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The Congress proceedings included 93 papers. The IRPA Congress materials deals with progress the various IRPA initiatives to implement new radiation protection concepts. In accordance to this actual trends the main topics of the congress are 'Clearance levels and material release' and 'Environmental impact assessment of workplaces resp. facilities with radiation sources'. Papers and posters in all traditional radiation protection subjects (general aspects, biological effects of radiation, radiation protection in medicine, dosimetry, instrumentation, quality assurance)

  4. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single-blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

  5. INEL RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] permit for incineration of hazardous waste: Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFee, J.N.; Dalton, J.D.; Bohrer, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was constructed to reduce the volume of low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). To address the problem of radioactively contaminated ignitable hazardous waste resulting from INEL activities, a development program was carried out to evaluate WERF's ability to meet the regulated criteria for incinerating liquid and solid ignitable waste. Concurrently, INEL submitted its hazardous waste Part B application under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). As required, and as a major step in the permitting process, the WERF incinerator portion of the permit application included a proposed trial burn, which is a demonstration test of the incinerator's ability to destroy hazardous materials. The trial burn plan was designed to demonstrate the system performance for liquid and solid ignitable wastes at three operating conditions, using a prepared mix of materials representative of waste to be processed. EPA Region X reviewed and commented on the plan prior to the trial burn. Results of the liquid feed trial burn showed a greater than 97% probability of meeting the RCRA-dictated DRE value for chlorinated solvents and a greater than 99% probability for nonchlorinated solvents. Nonchlorinated solid waste results were calculated at a 93% probability of meeting the required DRE, with a 75% probability for chlorinated solid wastes. In addition, the incinerator DRE continued to improve long after the assumed pre-test equilibrium period had ended. The trial burn demonstrates that the WERF incinerator can safely and adequately destroy ignitable hazardous and mixed waste and provides a significant enhancement of the INEL's waste management system

  6. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  7. First annual report RCRA post-closure monitoring and inspections for the U-3fi waste unit. Final report, July 1995--October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emer, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi RCRA Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada during the July 1995 to October 1996 period. Inspections of the U-3fi RCRA Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 420 ft ER3-3 borehole and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval. This is the first annual report on the U-3fi closure and includes the first year baseline monitoring data as well as one quarter of compliance monitoring data

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc

  9. RCRA, a state perspective: the buck should stop with us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, III, M N

    1977-11-01

    The states must carry the ball of realizing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); state agencies and the EPA can work together, though they don't always agree; adequate funding is absolutely necessary. The states' perspective of their role is threefold-regulation, assistance, and leadership, with maximum input into implementation. A National Governors' Association committee on waste management was established. Neither RCRA itself nor supporting committee reports allow definition of open dumps and sanitary landfills with other than traditional meaning. Conducting the open dump inventory should be the responsibility of the states, with financial support from EPA. The existence of state nonimportation laws should not preclude that state from receiving money for a hazardous waste program. The criteria for defining hazardous wastes must be realistic if an unmanageable list is to be avoided. State solid waste management agencies must provide aid to local government and private industry. The state-not EPA- is the best level of government to carry out an effective solid waste program. The Federal program should concentrate on resource and energy conservation, research and development, demonstration projects, establishing markets for recycled materials, and education and training programs. Planning should be coordinated through state agencies.

  10. Ground Water Monitoring Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The groundwater monitoring requirements for hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are just one aspect of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management strategy for protecting human health and the

  11. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material

  12. Impact of the resource conservation and recovery act on energy facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevepaugh, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 is a multifaceted approach to the management of both solid and hazardous waste. The focus of this research is on the RCRA mandated proposed regulations for the siting of hazardous waste disposal facilities. This research is an analysis of the interactions among hazardous waste disposal facilities, energy supply technologies and land use issues. This study addresses the impact of RCRA hazardous waste regulations in a descriptive and exploratory manner. A literature and legislative review, interviews and letters of inquiry were synthesized to identify the relationship between RCRA hazardous waste regulations and the siting of selected energy supply technologies. The results of this synthesis were used to determine if and how RCRA influences national land use issues. It was found that the interaction between RCRA and the siting of hazardous waste disposal facilities required by energy supply technologies will impact national land use issues. All energy supply technologies reviewed generate hazardous waste. The siting of industrial functions such as energy supply facilities and hazardous waste disposal facilities will influence future development patterns. The micro-level impacts from the siting of hazardous waste disposal facilities will produce a ripple effect on land use with successive buffer zones developing around the facilities due to the interactive growth of the land use sectors

  13. Annual report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Department from the publication of the 1985 Annual Report to Congress through 1986. Activities of all elements of the Department except the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission are included herein. During this period, activities for the Environmental Survey of facilities were finalized, the onsite studies by DOE Survey teams were inaugurated, and Technical Safety Appraisals of our nuclear facilities were performed. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve surpassed the 500-million-barrel milestone, and a successful market test of the Reserve's drawdown and distribution capability and sale of one million barrels of oil were completed. Particular attention was directed toward coal research and acid rain-related technologies. Work continued in petroleum and unconventional natural gas recovery. The focus in conservation research and development, as well as renewable activities, was to assist the private sector by expanding the technology base. DOE-supported research in high energy and nuclear physics continued. The Department supported basis scientific research in the fields of materials, nuclear and applied mathematical science, engineering and geosciences, biological science, advanced energy projects and magnetic fusion energy; and research on the effects of energy systems on biological and environmental processes and on the use of nuclear materials in medical diagnosis and treatment continued. Internationally, we continued efforts in the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Department's responsibilities for national security included weapons research, development, and testing, as well as the improvement of safeguards and security at production facilities. The Department also continued to pursue a variety of activities to dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel

  14. Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit General Inspection Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagles, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    This inspection plan describes the activities that shall be conducted for a general inspection of the Hanford Facility. RCRA includes a requirement that general facility inspections be conducted of the 100, 200 East, 200 West, 300, 400, and 1100 areas and the banks of the Columbia River. This plan meets the RCRA requirements and also provides for scheduling of inspections and defines general and specific items to be noted during the inspections

  15. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments

  16. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments.

  17. Lesotho Medical Congress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    12 Okt 1974 ... The Medical Association of Lesotho held its first congress from 6 to 8 September 1974, in Maseru. In every respect it was a remarkable success, to the extent that the organising committee will be hard put to emulate it for the next congress. We cer- tainly speak for every delegate when we say that this was ...

  18. Special Focus Areas for Hazardous Waste Cleanups under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to manage the new and changing needs of the RCRA Corrective Action Program, EPA is constantly exploring program enhancements, alternate exposure pathways, and new technologies available to protect human health and environment.

  19. Low-level mixed waste: An RCRA perspective for NRC licensees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The publication presents an overview of RCRA requirements for commercially-generated low-level mixed waste. It is designed for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees who may not be familiar with EPA regulations that apply to their waste products

  20. RCRA closures at Rocky Flats Plant: A programmatic perspective and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogg, Randy T.; Peterman, Bruce D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interagency Agreement (IAG) integrates a unique mechanism for remediating hazardous waste sites at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), which include utilizing RCRA and CERCLA technical/regulatory processes. Pursuant to the IAG signed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991, sixteen operable units (OUs) were defined for characterization and remediation at RFP. Of the sixteen OUs, six are classified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure units. The six RCRA interim status closure units are: Solar Evaporation Ponds-OU 4, Present LandfUl-OU 7, Original Process Waste Lines-OU 9, Other Outside Closures-OU 10, West Spray Field-OU II, and Inside Building Closures-OU 15. The IAG will function as a technical/regulatory mechanism for managing/complying with all aspects of the RCRA interim status closure units at RFP. (author)

  1. EPA Linked Open Data: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Handlers (RCRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — RCRAInfo is EPA’s comprehensive information system that supports the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste...

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  3. ICIASF '85 - International Congress on Instrumentation in Aerospace Simulation Facilities, 11th, Stanford University, CA, August 26-28, 1985, Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Developments related to laser Doppler velocimetry are discussed, taking into account a three-component dual beam laser-Doppler-anemometer to be operated in large wind tunnels, a new optical system for three-dimensional laser-Doppler-anemometry using an argon-ion and a dye laser, and a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter by switching fringe orientation. Other topics studied are concerned with facilities, instrumentation, control, hot wire/thin film measurements, optical diagnostic techniques, signal and data processing, facilities and adaptive wall test sections, data acquisition and processing, ballistic instrument systems, dynamic testing and material deformation measurements, optical flow measurements, test techniques, force measurement systems, and holography. Attention is given to nonlinear calibration of integral wind tunnel balances, a microcomputer system for real time digitized image compression, and two phase flow diagnostics in propulsion systems.

  4. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-01-01

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan

  5. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-07

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan.

  6. World geothermal congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarov, O.A.; Tomarov, G.V.

    2001-01-01

    The World geothermal congress took place in the period from 28 May up to 10 June 2000 in Japan. About 2000 men from 43 countries, including specialists in the area of developing geothermal fields, creating and operating geothermal electrical and thermal plants and various systems for the earth heat application, participated in the work of the Congress. It was noted at the Congress, that development of the geothermal power engineering in the world is characterized by the large-scale application of geothermal resources for the electrical energy generation [ru

  7. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site's 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed

  8. 2018 Congress Podium Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Each abstract has been indexed according to first author. Abstracts appear as they were submitted and have not undergone editing or the Oncology Nursing Forum’s review process. Only abstracts that will be presented appear here. For Congress scheduling information, visit congress.ons.org or check the Congress guide. Data published in abstracts presented at the ONS 43rd Annual Congress are embargoed until the conclusion of the presentation. Coverage and/or distribution of an abstract, poster, or any of its supplemental material to or by the news media, any commercial entity, or individuals, including the authors of said abstract, is strictly prohibited until the embargo is lifted. Promotion of general topics and speakers is encouraged within these guidelines.

  9. National Women's Science Congress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TSC

    This National Women's Science Congress is planned essentially to bring women to the forefront ... The following areas are indicative of this wide coverage, in each of which ... C. V. Raman, two great scientists of the world; Marie Curie Mahila.

  10. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments

  11. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments.

  12. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  13. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA

  14. First Mayan Women's Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teissedre, S

    1997-01-01

    In October 1997, over 200 participants attended the First Mayan Women's Congress in Mexico and called for financial assistance, capacity building, and training to help Mayan women escape poverty. The Congress was initiated by the UN Development Fund for Women in collaboration with the Small Grants Program of the UN Development Program. Traditionally, Mayan women and men have played distinct roles in society, and efforts are underway to increase gender sensitivity and achieve a new balance of power. Mayan women attending the Congress reported that they face daily challenges in gaining their husbands' approval for participation in income-generating activities outside of the home. Eventually, however, some husbands also start working in these enterprises and are learning to assume their share of domestic responsibilities. Mayan women have been forced to reevaluation their role in society by a prevailing agricultural and environmental crisis as well as a high unemployment rate. Crafts that were once produced only for household consumption are now considered for export. Because the women need funds to initiate income-generating activities, the Conference linked women's groups with development practitioners, policy-makers, and donors. The women requested financial aid for more than 30 specific projects, and Congress participants agreed to pursue innovate strategies to support the enterprises with funds, training, and technical assistance. The Congress also encouraged environmental nongovernmental organizations to include Mayan women in mainstream development activities. This successful Congress will be duplicated in other Mexican states.

  15. 23. ATSR congress - Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the 23. congress of the French association for radiation protection techniques and sciences (ATSR): 1 - J-F. Lecomte (CIPR): International commission of radiological protection (ICRP)'s recommendations; 2 - T. Lahaye (DGT): presentation of the 'worker's decree'; 3 - C. Marchal (DGSNR): Nuclear safety authority (ASN) viewpoint: first controllers' experience feedback; 4 - F. Rollinger (IRSN): missions of the IRSN's public expert for workers radiation protection; 5 - J-C. Varin (Areva NC): technical, organisational and managerial aspects of the implementation of new regulatory dispositions about radiation protection technical controls at La Hague facility; 6 - J-J. Radecki (Areva NC): enforcement of the radiological zoning by-law at Areva facilities; 7 - D. Miniere (EDF): implementation of the ALARA approach at EDF's nuclear power plants; 8 - D. Lefer (EAMEA): situation in the army and issues generated by the new decree; 9 - L. Ridel (DGA SPN): waste management aspect in the framework of submarines dismantling; 10 - D. Giordan (CMIR 78): the workers' decree: from practice to intervention; 11 - N. Barrey (CHU Bordeaux): enforcement of the May 2004 by-law and experience feedback; 12 - J-C. Mozziconacci (CH Bourges): zoning, reclassification and implementation of the medical imaging operational dosimetry in a medium size hospital; 13 - J. Bino (AMEST Lille): recommendations and technical instructions for labour doctors; 14 - K. Zarraa (CERAP): decree impact on approved organisations; 15 - D. Morio (COFREND): difficulties encountered with the implementation of radiographical devices; 16 - B. Carrez (Ponts et Chaussees): workplace studies and operational dosimetries: essential tools at public work sites; 17 - G. Imbard (CEA): evolution of workers regulation, adaptation of practices at Marcoule site; 18 - M. Ammerich (CEA): ambiguities and enforcement difficulties of the workers' decree; 19 - H. Mansoux

  16. An example of system integration for RCRA policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R.; Schmidt, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of various computer technologies and software systems used on a project to estimate the costs of remediating Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that fall under the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The project used two databases collected by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) that contain information on SWMUs and a PC-based software system called CORA that develops cost estimates for remediating SWMUs. The project team developed rules to categorize every SWMU in the databases by the kinds of technologies required to clean them up. These results were input into CORA, which estimated costs associated with the technologies. Early on, several computing challenges presented themselves. First, the databases have several hundred thousand records each. Second, the categorization rules could not be written to cover all combinations of variables. Third, CORA is run interactively and the analysis plan called for running CORA tens of thousands of times. Fourth, large data transfers needed to take place between RTI and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Solutions to these problems required systems integration. SWMU categorization was streamlined by using INTERNET as was the data transfer. SAS was used to create files used by a program called SuperKey that was used to run CORA. Because the analysis plan required the generation of hundreds of thousands of cost estimates, memory management software was needed to allow the portable IBM P70 to do the job. During the course of the project, several other software packages were used, including: SAS System for Personal Computers (SAS/PC), DBase III, LOTUS 1-2-3, PIZAZZ PLUS, LOTUS Freelance Plus, and Word Perfect. Only the comprehensive use of all available hardware and software resources allowed this project to be completed within the time and budget constraints. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Notification: EPA Progress on Meeting Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Statutory Mandate for Minimum Frequency of Inspections at Hazardous Waste Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY15-0018, January 20, 2015. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on EPA’s progress in meeting minimum inspection requirements under the RCRA at treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs).

  18. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  19. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  20. Performance test results of noninvasive characterization of RCRA surrogate waste by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Propp, W.A.

    1997-11-01

    A performance evaluation to determine the feasibility of using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for noninvasive, quantitative assay of mixed waste containers was sponsored by DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD), the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The evaluation was conducted using a surrogate waste, based on Portland cement, that was spiked with three RCRA metals, mercury, cadmium, and lead. The results indicate that PGNAA has potential as a process monitor. However, further development is required to improve its sensitivity to meet regulatory requirements for determination of these RCRA metals

  1. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP.

  2. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    RCRA ampersand Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP

  3. 2018 Congress Poster Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Each abstract has been indexed according to the first author. Abstracts appear as they were submitted and have not undergone editing or the Oncology Nursing Forum’s review process. Only abstracts that will be presented appear here. Poster numbers are subject to change. For updated poster numbers, visit congress.ons.org or check the Congress guide. Data published in abstracts presented at the ONS 43rd Annual Congress are embargoed until the conclusion of the presentation. Coverage and/or distribution of an abstract, poster, or any of its supplemental material to or by the news media, any commercial entity, or individuals, including the authors of said abstract, is strictly prohibited until the embargo is lifted. Promotion of general topics and speakers is encouraged within these guidelines.

  4. International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Ahmet; Ozer, Mehmet; InterM; INTERM2013

    2014-01-01

    The International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress (INTERM2013) was organized on October 10-13, 2013. The aim of the congress was to bring together scientists from various branches to discuss the latest advances in the field of microscopy. The contents of the congress have been broadened to a more "interdisciplinary" scope, so as to allow all scientists working on related subjects to participate and present their work. These proceedings include 39 peer-reviewed technical papers, submitted by leading academic and research institutions from over 12 countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available. The 39 papers are grouped into the following sections: - Applications of Microscopy in the Physical Sciences - Applications of Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

  5. Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower. Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    This is a formal Department of Energy report to Congress. It outlines the findings of an assessment directed by Congress in Section 9505 of the SECURE Water Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11), the US Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and other federal agencies, including federal dam owners, has prepared a comprehensive assessment examining the effects of climate change on water available for hydropower at federal facilities and on the marketing of power from these federal facilities.

  6. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996

  7. 9th ISAAC Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzhansky, Michael; Analytic Methods in Interdisciplinary Applications

    2015-01-01

    The book includes lectures given by the plenary and key speakers at the 9th International ISAAC Congress held 2013 in Krakow, Poland. The contributions treat recent developments in analysis and surrounding areas, concerning topics from the theory of partial differential equations, function spaces, scattering, probability theory, and others, as well as applications to biomathematics, queueing models, fractured porous media and geomechanics.

  8. International Youth Nuclear Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.

    2017-01-01

    International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC) was Initiated by an international YG group of enthusiasts in 1997. Mission statement developed at ENC1998 in Nice, France Growth in enthusiasm and support: IAEA, Nuclear Societies, companies. IYNC run by the Young Generation with full support of experienced advisors, nuclear societies and companies. First came to African continent when IYNC 2010 was hosted by South Africa

  9. Colombia: Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    30, 2010, at http://www.lasillavacia.com/ historia /14953. 22 Camila Osorio, “Esta Es la Cara de la Legislatura que Se Posesiona Hoy,” La Silla Vacía...website, July 19, 2010, at http://www.lasillavacia.com/ historia /16740; “New Congress Grants Santos Huge Majority,” Latin American Weekly Report

  10. Intelligence Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    open source information— osint (newspapers...by user agencies. Section 1052 of the Intelligence Reform Act expressed the sense of Congress that there should be an open source intelligence ...center to coordinate the collection, analysis, production, and dissemination of open source intelligence to other intelligence agencies. An Open Source

  11. Annual report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This is the ninth Annual Report to Congress of the United States Department of Energy. It covers the activities of all elements of the Department except the independent Federal Regulatory Commission, which issues its own annual report. 88 refs., 43 tabs

  12. RCRA corrective action for underground storage tanks -- Subtitle C for Subtitle I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to DOE and DOE contractor personnel responsible for planning and implementation of corrective measures addressing cleanup of releases of hazardous materials or regulated substances from underground storage tanks regulated under RCRA Subtitle C or Subtitle I

  13. 76 FR 76158 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; RCRA Expanded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... contents of the docket, and to access those documents in the public docket that are available..., including through the use of appropriate automated electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection... as State, local, or Tribal governments. Title: RCRA Expanded Public Participation. ICR numbers: EPA...

  14. RCRA Part A permit characterization plan for the U-2bu subsidence crater. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This plan presents the characterization strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 109, U-2bu Subsidence Crater (referred to as U-2bu) in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of the planned activities is to obtain sufficient characterization data for the crater soils and observed wastes under the conditions of the current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A permit. The scope of the characterization plan includes collecting surface and subsurface soil samples with hand augers and for the purpose of site characterization. The sampling strategy is to characterize the study area soils and look for RCRA constituents. Observable waste soils and surrounding crater soils will be analyzed and evaluated according to RCRA closure criteria. Because of the status of the crater a RCRA Part A permit site, acquired radionuclide analyses will only be evaluated in regards to the health and safety of site workers and the disposition of wastes generated during site characterization. The U-2bu Subsidence Crater was created in 1971 by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground nuclear test, event name Miniata, and was used as a land-disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988

  15. Annual report to Congress, FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for disposing of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel from civilian nuclear power reactors and high-level radioactive waste from its defense activities in a cost-effective manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers and the quality of the environment. To accomplish this mission OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository, a facility for monitored retrievable storage, and a system for transporting the waste. This is the ninth annual report submitted by the OCRWM to Congress. The OCRWM submits this report to inform Congress of its activities and expenditures during fiscal year 1992 (October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992)

  16. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed

  17. Congress ISAAC '97

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Robert; Wen, Guo-Chun

    1999-01-01

    This volume of the Proceedings of the congress ISAAC '97 collects the contributions of the four sections 1. Function theoretic and functional analytic methods for pde, 2. Applications of function theory of several complex variables to pde, 3. Integral equations and boundary value problems, 4. Partial differential equations. Most but not all of the authors have participated in the congress. Unfortunately some from Eastern Europe and Asia have not managed to come because of lack of financial support. Nevertheless their manuscripts of the proposed talks are included in this volume. The majority of the papers deal with complex methods. Among them boundary value problems in particular the Riemann-Hilbert, the Riemann (Hilbert) and related problems are treated. Boundary behaviour of vector-valued functions are studied too. The Riemann-Hilbert problem is solved for elliptic complex equations, for mixed complex equations, and for several complex variables. It is considered in a general topological setting for mapping...

  18. Congress of the Polish Chamber of Tourism - Egypt 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Napierała

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to assess the effectiveness of the Congress of the Polish Chamber of Tourism 2017 in the elaboration of joint applications regarding the provision of substantive and logistical support to entrepreneurs as well as the pursuit of comprehensive regulation of tourism law; adaptation of Polish law to European standards. Research problems: What is the legal status in the field of tourism law regarding outgoing tourism, incoming tourism and MICE, children and youth tourism, domestic tourism and accommodation facilities, travel agents and air transport? What are the main problems of the industries and what are their solutions proposed? What is the position and conclusions of the Congress? Research methods: study of documents, source materials, study of Congress materials, interviews with participants of the Congress, personal participation in the Congress. The PIT Congress took place on 25.11. - 2.12.2017 in Egypt (Marsa Alam: "Groundbreaking changes in tourism law: challenges and problems". The aim of the Congress was to develop a common position in the field of tourism law on outgoing tourism, incoming tourism and MICE, children and youth tourism, domestic tourism and accommodation facilities, travel agents and air transport. PIT is the largest nationwide organization of the economic self-government of the tourism industry. Polish Chamber of Tourism, which is a full member of the European Union of Travel Agencies of the European Union (ECTAA. From the beginning of its existence (25 years of activity, it has been successfully applying for a new shape of tourist business in Poland. Conclusions: - trainings should be carried out using the latest laws, - substantive and logistical support should be provided to entrepreneurs, - strive for comprehensive regulation of tourism law, - tourism needs a host so that it can be prioritized as an important branch of the economy.

  19. Quadrant I RCRA Facility investigation work plan: Health and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report describes occupational health and safety issues at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Health effects from exposure to chemicals, vapors, drilling and sampling activities, as well as from ionizing radiations and protective measures are discussed

  20. European Automotive Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Clenci, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The volume includes selected and reviewed papers from the European Automotive Congress held in Bucharest, Romania, in November 2015. Authors are experts from research, industry and universities coming from 14 countries worldwide. The papers are covering the latest developments in fuel economy and environment, automotive safety and comfort, automotive reliability and maintenance, new materials and technologies, traffic and road transport systems, advanced engineering methods and tools, as well as advanced powertrains and hybrid and electric drives.

  1. ICPES World Congress 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Pak Lau

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The XII World Congress on Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology is co-organised by the International Cardiac Pacing & Electrophysiology Society (ICPES and the Hong Kong College of Cardiology (HKCC. It will take place at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre on February 19-22, 2003. The World Congress has been organized in various countries, including USA, France, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Austria, Israel, Argentina and Germany. The coming Congress is going to be held in the centre of Asia where East meets West – Hong Kong, which is now a Special Administrative Region of China since 1997. Hong Kong continues to enjoy a high degree of autonomy, and has remained an important center of finance, information technology, tourism, trade and exchange in Asia. In addition, it enjoys increasing interaction with the rapidly developing Mainland China. Developed with the assistance of a broadly represented International Scientific Advisory Committee, the scientific programme will feature 11 major topics - “Electrophysiology”, “Catheter Ablation”, “Pacing”, “Defibrillation”, “Pharmacology”, “Hybrid Therapy”, “Pediatric Arrhythmias”, “Arrhythmias for Allied Professionals”, “Genetics & Gene Therapy”, “ECG, Noninvasive Evaluation & Risk Stratification” and “Implantable Monitoring Devices”. It includes Plenary Sessions, Core Sessions, Expert Sessions, Featured Symposia, Live Demonstration, Teaching Courses, Abstract Presentations and Poster Sessions.

  2. 2nd ISAAC Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Robert; Kajiwara, Joji

    2000-01-01

    This book is the Proceedings of the Second ISAAC Congress. ISAAC is the acronym of the International Society for Analysis, its Applications and Computation. The president of ISAAC is Professor Robert P. Gilbert, the second named editor of this book, e-mail: gilbert@math.udel.edu. The Congress is world-wide valued so highly that an application for a grant has been selected and this project has been executed with Grant No. 11-56 from *the Commemorative Association for the Japan World Exposition (1970). The finance of the publication of this book is exclusively the said Grant No. 11-56 from *. Thus, a pair of each one copy of two volumes of this book will be sent to all contributors, who registered at the Second ISAAC Congress in Fukuoka, free of charge by the Kluwer Academic Publishers. Analysis is understood here in the broad sense of the word, includ­ ing differential equations, integral equations, functional analysis, and function theory. It is the purpose of ISAAC to promote analysis, its applications, and...

  3. Dewatering and RCRA partial closure action on solar evaporation ponds, Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0487) on its proposal to partially close five solar evaporation ponds at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) pursuant to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This proposal would be known as a RCRA partial closure and would be accomplished by dewatering the ponds, where necessary, and converting any remaining sludge or evaporator concentrate to a solid wasteform (pondcrete and saltcrete). The pond sites would be stabilized to prevent erosion or other disturbance to the soil and to prevent infiltration of rain or snowmelt. The solid wasteform would be transported offsite for disposal. The five solar ponds (designated 207-A, 207-B (north, center, and south), and 207-C), are the only solar evaporation ponds that exist at the RFP. A finding of no significant impact is included

  4. Development of guidance for preparing treatability variance petitions from the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions for DOE [Department of Energy] mixed-waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, T.; Scheuer, N.; Martin, R.; Van Epp, T.; Triplett, M.

    1990-01-01

    In response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) anticipated need for variances from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) treatment requirements, a treatability variance guidance document is being prepared for use by DOE facilities and operations offices. The guidance document, although applicable to non-mixed hazardous waste streams, provides specific guidance regarding radioactive mixed-waste streams. Preparation of the guidance manual has involved developing an overview of the Land Disposal Restrictions, as well as an overview of the petition preparation process. The DOE internal review requirements are specifically addressed in the manual. Specific data requirements and engineering analyses are also described. A discussion of EPA's criteria for granting a treatability variance is also provided. A checklist for completeness of the petition is provided. Model language for use in DOE treatability variance petitions will be provided in a petition for a DOE waste stream as an appendix to the document

  5. National congress of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  6. Small Big Data Congress 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.

    2017-01-01

    TNO, in collaboration with the Big Data Value Center, presents the fourth Small Big Data Congress! Our congress aims at providing an overview of practical and innovative applications based on big data. Do you want to know what is happening in applied research with big data? And what can already be

  7. SAAPMB summer school and congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Medical and health physics are covered by the papers and posters presented at this congress. A third group within the Association, the group of Radiobiological Scientists, was expected to be formed during this congress. 67 articles have been indexed (44 papers and 23 poster presentations), and 8 articles have been considered to be out of scope for INIS

  8. SACM and the RCRA stabilization initiative: Similarities of principles and applicability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provide standards for the remediation of environmental media contaminated with hazardous substances or hazardous waste, respectively. In both cases, prior to the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) development of the two subject reform initiatives, existing formal processes specified the level of site investigation required, the process for reaching a decision on the method of remediation, public participation in the decision process, and enforcement authorities that include orders and schedules of compliance. Traditionally, implementation of these processes has resulted in a great amount of time, effort, and money being expended before actual remediation began. Following criticism from the public and the regulated community, the EPA has proposed streamlining reforms for hazardous waste site cleanup under both CERCLA and RCRA that will begin remediation sooner with lower costs. The purpose of this Information Brief is to discuss the common goals, processes, and strategies of the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM) and the RCRA Stabilization Initiative.

  9. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  10. The Gas Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document is published before a congress which will address the struggle against climate change, the security of the gas supply chain, the responses of energy groups to environmental and economic challenges, the opening of the gas market, the European energy policy, the future role of gas in the third industrial revolution, and the security of gas supplies. After an introduction briefly discussing these issues and the impacts of the French 'Grenelle de l'Environnement' and the struggle against climate change for gas production and consumption, several interviews are proposed with actors belonging to the AFG (Association Francaise du Gaz), ADEME, European Commission, Total, GDF Suez, other professional bodies, or local communities

  11. H.R. 3173: A Bill to apply the provisions of OSHA to certain Department of Energy nuclear facilities. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 4, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 3173: A Bill to apply the provisions of OSHA to certain Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. The purpose is to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at DOE nuclear facilities

  12. 2017 Gas Congress special

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbin, Patrick; Ferrier, Jerome; Holleaux, Didier; Vivier, Laurent; Gattaz, Pierre; Delga, Carole; Carenco, Jean-Francois; Sadamori, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    This special issue of 'Gaz d'Aujourd'hui' journal is entirely devoted to the 2017 Gas Congress proceedings. The congress was organized in 5 round tables and 12 workshops: Round table 1 - COP 21 2 years after, workshops 1-6: 1 - digital transformation: what are the challenges for the gas sector? 2 - Which actors and what policies to fight against energy insecurity? 3 - Natural gas development: what fiscal signs? 4 - Terrestrial transportation: current situation and prospects; 5 - Consumers' perception of gas; 6 - industrial uses; Round table 2 - Maritime and fluvial LNG perspectives; Round table 3 - Territories, the new decision-makers, workshops 7-12: 7 - What energy regulation for tomorrow? 8 - How to succeed in injecting more and more green gas? 9 - Digital, data and emerging technologies (drones, blockchain..): challenges and applications for gas networks? 10 - Underground storage: a promising infrastructure? 11 - Security of supply: what new cooperation? 12 - Power-to-gas: a new way of energy valorization; Round table 4 - Gas and electricity, winning synergies; Round table 5 - The Europe of gas

  13. A Model Proposal on the Use of Creative Tourism Experiences in Congress Tourism and the Congress Marketing Mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özen Kırant Yozcu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Congress tourism has a great importance for the extension of the tourism season, enhancement of employment opportunities and tourism revenues, promotion and efficient use of the facilities in the area. Creative Tourism provides an authentic feel for a local culture through informal, hands-on workshops and creative experiences. Ensuring that the attendants of congress tourism take part in creative tourism activities may be an example of the synergy to be achieved by including creative tourism in thecongress marketing mix. In this study the tourism marketing mix, programming, packaging, partnership, people, product, price, promotion, place, are adapted for congress tourism and a model which illustrates how to use the creative tourism experiences and activities within the marketing mix is proposed.

  14. Report on Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    Section 208 of the energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1991. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Five of the events occurred at NRC-licensed facilities: one involved a significant degradation of plant safety at a nuclear fuel cycle facility, one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration, and three involved medical therapy misadministrations. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported one abnormal occurrence that involved medical therapy misadministrations

  15. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January through March 1993. There is one abnormal occurrence at a nuclear power plant disposed in this report that involved a steam generator tube rupture at Palo Verde Unit 2, and none for fuel cycle facilities. Three abnormal occurrences involving medical misadminstrations (two therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities are also discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  16. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  17. H.R. 2098: This Act may be cited as the Nuclear Facilities Occupational Safety Improvement Act of 1991, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, April 25, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Worker health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities could be made substantially safer by applying standards developed by experts in the field of occupational health and safety. This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on April 25, 1991 to amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities. Individual sections address the following: application of OSHA to DOE nuclear facilities; cooperation with inspections and investigations; transfer and allocation of appropriations and personnel; worker training requirements; performance of NIOSH functions at DOE nuclear facilities; medical examinations of employees at DOE nuclear facilities; and labor-management health and safety committees at Doe nuclear facilities

  18. S. 1802: This Act may be referred to as the Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities of Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, October 26, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This bill would enhance nuclear safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities, apply the provisions of the Occupational, Health, and Safety Act to certain Department of Energy nuclear facilities, encourage independent research on the effects of radiation on human beings, establish a comprehensive program within the Department of Energy of research, development, and demonstration of methods for waste cleanup and remediation, and establish a process for ensuring cleanup of Department of Energy nuclear facilities

  19. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-July 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 2000--July 2001 monitoring period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 2001. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began eight years ago. Precipitation for the period October 2000 through July 2001 was 9.42 centimeters (cm) (3.71 inches [in]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2001). The prior year annual rainfall (January 2000 through December 2000) was 10.44 cm (4.1 1 in.). The recorded average annual rainfall for this site from 1972 to January 2000 is 14.91 cm (5.87 in.). The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches

  20. International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, D.

    2017-01-01

    International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC) is the global network of a new generation of nuclear professionals to: Communicate the benefits of nuclear energy; Promote the peaceful use of nuclear science and technology; Facilitate knowledge transfer between generations; Provide a platform for networking. The benefits of IYNC's biannual congress maintain IYNC. Innovation for Nuclear: To propose and reward innovative ideas focused on nuclear technologies for a sustainable development; To support young energy in thinking innovative solutions. The congress is funded from sponsorship (between 1000 and 45,000 euros) and individual participant's registration fees (400 euros including meals, technical visit and networking events). Knowledge Transfer at IYNC congress involves Speakers: top managers and nuclear experts, Publication of technical papers, Face-to-face with keynote speakers and organising Workshops

  1. Congress smiles on research budgets

    CERN Multimedia

    Reichhardt, T

    1998-01-01

    Congress has agreed to match or exceed most of the funding requests for the major science agencies requested by President Clinton in February. Many of them will receive their largest budget increases for years (11 paragraphs).

  2. Mercury Study Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Report to Congress on Mercury provides an assessment of the magnitude of U.S. mercury emissions by source, the health and environmental implications of those emissions, and the availability and cost of control technologies.

  3. Congress's Contempt Power: A Sketch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenberg, Morton; Tatelman, Todd B

    2007-01-01

    ...), and/or to remove the obstruction (civil contempt). Although arguably any action that directly obstructs the effort of Congress to exercise its constitutional powers may constitute a contempt, in the last seventy years the contempt power...

  4. 10th International Geostatistics Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigo-Ilarri, Javier; Rodrigo-Clavero, María; Cassiraga, Eduardo; Vargas-Guzmán, José

    2017-01-01

    This book contains selected contributions presented at the 10th International Geostatistics Congress held in Valencia from 5 to 9 September, 2016. This is a quadrennial congress that serves as the meeting point for any engineer, professional, practitioner or scientist working in geostatistics. The book contains carefully reviewed papers on geostatistical theory and applications in fields such as mining engineering, petroleum engineering, environmental science, hydrology, ecology, and other fields.

  5. SAAPMB summer school and congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the 31st annual congress of the South African Association of Physicists in Medicine and Biology are presented. Topics covered at the congress include: radiation physics; radiotherapy and computer applications in radiotherapy; isotope production; dosimetry; nuclear medicine; radiobiology, and radiation protection. 11 articles have been indexed (11 papers and 11 poster presentations). 11 articles were considered to be outside the subject scope of INIS

  6. Self-assembled monolayers on mosoporous supports (SAMMS) for RCRA metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Fryxell, G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area has declared mercury removal and stabilization as the first and fourth priorities among 30 prioritized deficiencies. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal and mercury removal has also been identified as a high priority at DOE sites such as Albuquerque, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River. Under this task, a proprietary new technology, Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS), for RCRA metal ion removal from aqueous wastewater and mercury removal from organic wastes such as vacuum pump oils is being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The six key features of the SAMMS technology are (1) large surface area (>900 m{sup 2}/g) of the mesoporous oxides (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}) ensures high capacity for metal loading (more than 1 g Hg/g SAMMS); (2) molecular recognition of the interfacial functional groups ensures the high affinity and selectivity for heavy metals without interference from other abundant cations (such as calcium and iron) in wastewater; (3) suitability for removal of mercury from both aqueous wastes and organic wastes; (4) the Hg-laden SAMMS not only pass TCLP tests, but also have good long-term durability as a waste form because the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance to ion exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis; (5) the uniform and small pore size (2 to 40 nm) of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria (>2000 nm) from solubilizing the bound mercury; and (6) SAMMS can also be used for RCRA metal removal from gaseous mercury waste, sludge, sediment, and soil.

  7. Report explores Congress' science policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard

    Scientists interested in understanding how Congress develops science policy would find it useful to read a recent report by the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government. “Science, Technology and Congress: Analysis and Advice from the Congressional Support Agencies” contains revealing insights about the often hard-pressed system that Congress uses to analyze science and technology issues.“Congress is on the front line of many battles over the directions of science and technology,” says the 70-page report. “The quality of congressional decisions on these issues often depends on the quality and usefulness of information and analysis made available to Congress.” The report describes the overwhelming amount of information received by members of Congress, few of whom have “substantial training or experience” in science and technology. Making this information understandable and useful is the role of the Office of Technology Assessment, the Congressional Research Service, the General Accounting Office, and the Congressional Budget Office.

  8. Safety at DOE Nuclear Weapons Facilities. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, October 22, 1987 and May 11, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The hearings address the adequacy of health and safety programs at the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons facilities. All the facilities are owned by the government and operated by contractors. Statements and documents are provided by officials from the DOE and its operating contractors

  9. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations

  10. S. 1462: This Act may be cited as the Federal Nuclear Facilities Environmental Response Act. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 1, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    S. 1462 is a bill to create a Federal nuclear facility environmental response fund, to create and Office of Environmental Management and Remedial Action, to require the Secretary of Energy and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency to cooperate with affected States and Indian tribes, to provide for research and development to address environmental problems at Federal nuclear facilities, and for other purposes. The basic purpose of the act is to provide and adequate, long-term source of funding for environmental restoration, decontamination, decommissioning, and management of Federal nuclear facilities and sites

  11. S. 1958: This Act may be cited as the Nuclear Facilities Occupational Safety Improvement Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, November 21, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    S. 1958 is a bill to amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to improve and enforce standards for employee health and safety at Department of Energy nuclear facilities, and for other purposes

  12. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  13. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator's carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent

  14. Potential of Congress Tourism in the Republic of Croatia in Comparison to Neighboring Destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorić Marina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of globalization has led to the development of various selective forms of tourism. One of them is MICE tourism known in Croatia as a business form of tourism. Business tourism is still a relatively new concept and covers all aspects of business travel. The development of business travel has led to the development of congress tourism as a separate form of business tourism which is the focus of this paper. Congress tourism is a lucrative segment of the tourist offer that often takes place out of the tourist season. It requires quality congress facilities which can meet the needs of the participants and organizers of the congress. The main role of congress tourism is to gather participants from different countries and promote different products, services, training, education and many other fields of business while at the same time it promotes the hosting destination and its tourism attractions. The aim of this paper is to research and determine the current situation, supply and demand of the Croatian meetings and congress industry in comparison with the neighbouring destinations, the Republic of Slovenia and the Republic of Serbia. The study and comparison between three destinations imply changes that need to take place to improve the congress offer, to detect what the competitive position of the Republic of Croatia is, which marketing activities to improve so that the Republic of Croatia can become a competitive destination in the region and Europe. Congress tourism as a form of business tourism in Croatia is growing. The most prominent cities in this form of tourism are Zagreb, Dubrovnik and Opatija. The objectives pursued in Croatian congress offer are: the number of participants in congresses, strengthening the quality of congress offer and infrastructure, ensuring coordinated actions of stakeholders and increasing the recognition and awareness of Croatia as a congress destination. Since joining the EU, Slovenia has become an

  15. Complying with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavetto, C.S.; Watmore, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), signed into law on October 6, 1992, amended the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to place significant additional environmental compliance responsibilities on federal facilities. The federal government has expressly waived sovereign immunity regarding hazardous waste enforcement action taken against these facilities by the states and the EPA. An exception exists for mixed waste violations. The FFCA defines mixed waste as hazardous waste, as defined by RCRA, combined with source, special nuclear or by-product material that is subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. As the majority owner of mixed waste in the United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) must satisfy several new requirements under the FFCA for their facilities. This paper reviews the FFCA's requirements and how they apply to and may affect the DOE and other federal facilities. Included in the review are responsibilities of federal agencies involved and the role of the EPA and the states. In addition, this paper discusses the intent of the FFCA to encourage development of federal facility agreements (FFA) between federal agencies, the EPA and state environmental regulatory agencies

  16. Overview of hazardous-waste regulation at federal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzman, E.; LaBrie, B.; Lerner, K.

    1982-05-01

    This report is organized in a fashion that is intended to explain the legal duties imposed on officials responsible for hazardous waste at each stage of its existence. Section 2 describes federal hazardous waste laws, explaining the legal meaning of hazardous waste and the protective measures that are required to be taken by its generators, transporters, and storers. In addition, penalties for violation of the standards are summarized, and a special discussion is presented of so-called imminent hazard provisions for handling hazardous waste that immediately threatens public health and safety. Although the focus of Sec. 2 is on RCRA, which is the principal federal law regulating hazardous waste, other federal statutes are discussed as appropriate. Section 3 covers state regulation of hazardous waste. First, Sec. 3 explains the system of state enforcement of the federal RCRA requirements on hazardous waste within their borders. Second, Sec. 3 discusses two peculiar provisions of RCRA that appear to permit states to regulate federal facilities more strictly than RCRA otherwise would require

  17. Overview of hazardous-waste regulation at federal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzman, E.; LaBrie, B.; Lerner, K.

    1982-05-01

    This report is organized in a fashion that is intended to explain the legal duties imposed on officials responsible for hazardous waste at each stage of its existence. Section 2 describes federal hazardous waste laws, explaining the legal meaning of hazardous waste and the protective measures that are required to be taken by its generators, transporters, and storers. In addition, penalties for violation of the standards are summarized, and a special discussion is presented of so-called imminent hazard provisions for handling hazardous waste that immediately threatens public health and safety. Although the focus of Sec. 2 is on RCRA, which is the principal federal law regulating hazardous waste, other federal statutes are discussed as appropriate. Section 3 covers state regulation of hazardous waste. First, Sec. 3 explains the system of state enforcement of the federal RCRA requirements on hazardous waste within their borders. Second, Sec. 3 discusses two peculiar provisions of RCRA that appear to permit states to regulate federal facilities more strictly than RCRA otherwise would require.

  18. XVIIth Interntional Congress on Mathematical Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the XVIIth International Congress on Mathematical Physics. It is the main scientific event of the International Association of Mathematical Physics (IAMP). The Congress was held in Aalborg, Denmark, August 6-11, 2012.......This volume contains the proceedings of the XVIIth International Congress on Mathematical Physics. It is the main scientific event of the International Association of Mathematical Physics (IAMP). The Congress was held in Aalborg, Denmark, August 6-11, 2012....

  19. 20 CFR 401.170 - Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Congress. 401.170 Section 401.170 Employees... Disclosure of Official Records and Information § 401.170 Congress. (a) We disclose information to either House of Congress. We also disclose information to any committee or subcommittee of either House, or to...

  20. Ecological Congress and the safety problems of the Rostov region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madoyan, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    A brief description of activities of the 3 research and technical conference Ecological Congress (April 16-17, 2001), dealing with problems of reliability and safety of the Rostov NPP operation, is provided. More than 25 reports on problems pertaining to radiation safety and ecology, development and introduction for new research and technical approaches, reliability of building structures, account of human factor during operation of industrial facilities, etc. were submitted. By and large, participants to the conference supported construction for facilities necessary for regional economy upsurge like the Rostov NPP, on condition of high-quality construction and safe operation [ru

  1. H.R. 4121: A Bill to establish an independent safety board to oversee Department of Energy nuclear facilities. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, March 9, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The bill H.R. 4121 if enacted would establish an independent safety board to oversee the Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This board would be a part of the executive branch and would be known as the Federal Facilities Nuclear Safety Board. The structure, functions, and powers of the Board as well as the responsibilities of the Secretary of Energy in full cooperation with the board, the format of board recommendations, the method of board reporting, and authorization for funding for the board are presented in detail. The bill was referred to the Committees on Energy and Commerce and Armed Services

  2. Facility status and progress of the INEL's WERF MLLW and LLW incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, D.; Corrigan, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator began processing beta/gamma- emitting low-level waste (LLW) in September 1984. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) trial burn for the WERF incinerator was conducted in 1986, and in 1989 WERF began processing (hazardous and low-level radioactive) waste known as mixed low-level waste (MLLW). On February 14, 1991 WERF operations were suspended to improve operating procedures and configuration management. On July 12, 1995, WERF initiated incineration of LLW; and on September 20, 1995 WERF resumed its primary mission of incinerating MLLW. MLLW incineration is proceeding under RCRA interim status. State of Idaho issuance of the Part B permit is one of the State's highest permitting priorities. The State of Idaho's Division of Environmental Quality is reviewing the permit application along with a revised trial burn plan that was also submitted with the application. The trial burn has been proposed to be performed in 1996 to demonstrate compliance with the current incinerator guidance. This paper describes the experiences and problems associated with WERF's operations, incineration of MLLW, and the RCRA Part B Permit Application. Some of the challenges that have been overcome include waste characterization, waste repackaging, repackaged waste storage, and implementation of RCRA interim status requirements. A number of challenges remain. They include revision of the RCRA Part B Permit Application and the Trial Burn Plan in response to comments from the state permit application reviewers as well as facility and equipment upgrades required to meet RCRA Permitted Status

  3. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    2000-01-01

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events

  4. VGB congress 'Power Plants 2009'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The VGB Congress 'Power Plants 2009' took place in Lyon/France from 23rd to 25th September 2009 and was themed 'Addressing Climate Change - Winning Public Acceptance through Advanced Technologies'. Nearly 1,300 participants attended the plenary and technical lectures and had the opportunity to discus the current topics of electricity and heat generation. The study carried out by VGB according to which EU-27 requires about 475.000 MW of new power plant capacity was also presented. Specific papers were addressing further topics. The Congress was rounded off by a side-programme and technical visits. (orig.)

  5. VGB Congress 'Power Plants 2006'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The VGB Congress 'Power Plants' took place in Dresden, 27 th to 29 th September 2006 under the auspices of the Federal Minister for Economics and Technology, Michael Glos. The motto of this year's Congress was 'Future becomes Reality - Investments in New Power Plants'. More than 1,200 participants from Germany and abroad attended the plenary and technical lectures on the topics 'Market and Competition' as well as 'Technology, Operation and Environment' for information and discussion. Special papers were dealing with further issues like 'Generation Market in Europe', 'Clean Power Technology Platform', French policy for new power plants as well as potentials and technology of renewables. (orig.)

  6. 304 Concretion facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets in the 304 Concretion Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility). Clean closure of the 304 Facility is the proposed method for closure of the facility. Justification for this proposal is presented. 15 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Environmental crimes at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Documented here are the executive session: September 10, 11, 17, 18, 23 [11:00 a.m.], 24, 25, 30, 1992 and the public session: September 23 [2:15 p.m.]; October 2, 5, 1992 of the hearings on the Environmental Crimes at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility. This document is Volume I of the hearings

  8. 24. ATSR congress - Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This document brings together the available abstracts and presentations given at the 24. congress of the French association for radiation protection techniques and sciences (ATSR) on the topic of the radiation protection actors, and the change in activity and practices: 1 - the new CIPR general recommendations (J-F. Lecomte); 2 - November 2007 legal changes in the public health law (M. Ammerich); 3 - November 2007 legal changes in the labour law (T. Lahaye, M. Ammerich); 4 - events and culture in radiation protection: 2008 situation at EDF (Y. Garcier, H. Delabre); 5 - TSN (nuclear transparency and safety) law and the new nuclear safety authority (M. Bourguignon); 6 - industrial radiography charter in Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur region (PACA): presentation, participants, works in progress, stakes (S. Mocaer, N. Grolleau); 7 - Dosimetric study of an industrial gamma-graphy workplace (D. Paul, M. Pizzorno); 8 - experience feedback of controls and inspections at a gamma-graphy workplace in PACA region (G. Veyret et N. Grolleau); 9 - experience feedback from the industrialist's viewpoint, respect of the charter, evaluation questionnaire (S. Mocaer, D. Guillet); 10 - new regulation, CAMARI by-law, national monitoring committee (T. Lahaye); 11 - patient's radiation protection in medical imaging service: actions and regulations (G. Dandis, S. Simon); 12 - patients radiation protection principles in medical imaging (H. Leclet, M. Madoux); 13 - the exposure sheet, its implementation challenges in an operating room with image intensifiers (A. Bourdeloie); 14 - building up of a radiation protection control approach for patients in radiotherapy (L. Kueny); 15 - impact of recent advances in scintiscanning on patients and personnel exposure (S. Balduyck); 16 - Dose rates evaluation during scintiscanning for dependent patients (G. Fagot); 17 - dealing with patients dosimetry: from the regulatory obligation to the daily practice of a medical imaging service (J-G. Mozziconacci); 18

  9. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety, and a quarterly report on such events is to be made to Congress. The second such report to Congress on abnormal occurrences is presented. The first report identified abnormal occurrences at licensed nuclear power plants during the first six months of 1975. The current report includes the results of a review of events at nuclear power plants for the third quarter of 1975 and the results of a review for overexposure to radiation at all licensed facilities for a nine-month period. The NRC has determined that there were no abnormal occurrences at licensed nuclear power plants during the period and there were no abnormal occurrences involving overexposure to radiation at NRC-licensed facilities from January 1 to September 30, 1975. Therefore, the current report comprises an updating of information concerning events reported to the Congress in the first report dated October 1975. Status is reported as of November 25, 1975

  10. RCRA closure of eight land-based units at the Y-12 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.E.; Welch, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed under an integrated multi-year program. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. These units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. The closure of these sites will be funded by a new Department of Energy budget category, the Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to provide greater flexibility in the response to closure and remedial activities. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA), has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the scope of this program has required the development of risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated schedule

  11. 12th International Congress of Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenti, Walter

    1969-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Twelfth International Congress of Applied Mechanics, held at Stanford University on August 26 to 31, 1968. The Congress was organized by the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; members of the IUTAM Congress Committee and Bureau are listed under Congress Organization. The members of the Stanford Organizing Committee, which was responsible for the detailed organization of the Congress, are also given, as are the names of the sponsors and the industrial and educational organizations that contributed so generously to the financial support of the meeting. Those attending the Congress came from 32 countries and totaled 1337 persons, plus wives and children. A list of the registered participants is included in the volume. The technical sessions of the Congress comprised four General Lectures and 281 contributed papers, the latter being presented in groups of five simultaneous sessions. The final choice of the contributed papers was made on the basis o...

  12. A RCRA clean closure of a unique site - Kerr Hollow quarry at the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.E.; Yemington, C.

    1991-01-01

    An abandoned rock quarry, Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), near the DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was used from 1951-1988 as a site to treat RCRA wastes which were reactive, corrosive, or ignitable and which posed major concerns for personnel safety. The wastes were generated from operations at the Y-12 Plant and Oak Ridge National Laboratory and were previously treated by allowing the wastes to react with the water in KHQ. When closure of the site was required by the RCRA regulations, a closure method was selected to allow for clean closure of the quarry without treatment or removal of the water in KHQ. The method proposed to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) was one of surveying the containers in the quarry by a submersible Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) using sonar and visually inspecting the containers by camera to confirm that all containers are breached and empty. Any container found intact would be breached to allow the contents to react with water and form non-hazardous residue. The progress of this unique type of closure is presented along with a summary of the problems encountered, planning activities, equipment utilized and other information about the closure. All work was done with remotely operated equipment. This work is being performed by Sonsub, Inc. This closure project showed the practicality and cost benefits of telerobotic systems for work on hazardous waste sites. In addition to the intangible benefit of reduced exposure of workers, insurance costs are much lower and efficiency is higher. Daily start-up time is reduced since there is no need to don protective suits or other gear. Productivity is higher since personnel work only in clean areas where they are not hampered by protective gear. Cleanup time at shift end is minimized since the remote equipment does not leave the hazardous area and personnel need not go through decontamination

  13. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah Sd.

    2001-01-01

    The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from RCRA borehole bore samples and composite samples. Intact cores from two RCRA boreholes (299-W22-48 and 299-W22-50) near the SX Tank Farm and four, large-quantity grab samples from outcrop sediment on and off the Hanford Site were sampled to better understand the fate of contaminants in the vadose zone beneath underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. Borehole and outcrop samples analyzed for this report are located outside the tank farms, and therefore may be considered standard or background samples from which to compare contaminated sediments within the tank farms themselves. This report presents our interpretation of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of the uncontaminated vadose zone sediments, and variations in the vertical distribution of these properties. The information presented in this report is intended to support preparation of the S-SX Field Investigation Report to be prepared by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. as well as future remediation actions at the S-SX Tank Farm

  14. XXII EAACI congress, Paris (France)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    2017-04-13

    Apr 13, 2017 ... Please visit our website for details of ESPAI 2017 Congress and the WATS! I also encourage you all to hurry and register to participate in the World Allergy Organization Symposium. (Hot Topics in Allergy: Pediatric and Regulatory Aspects) that will be held in Rome/Vatican City, on April 27-29,. 2017. There.

  15. V Congress of Spanish Geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings book present the lectures of V Spanish geochemistry Congress. The sessions were: 1.- Materials geochemistry and geologic process. 2.- Geochemistry prospection 3.- Environmental geochemistry 4.- Isotopic geochemistry 5.- Organic geochemistry 6.- Natural materials geochemistry for industry 7.- Hydrogeochemistry 8.- Mathematical models in geochemistry 9.- Analysis methods in geochemistry 10.-Training of geochemistry 11.-Cosmochemistry

  16. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System

  17. 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with Zircaloy-2 and copper silicon allo , uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy, and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gal containers) in the 304 Concretion Facility (304 Facility), located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/Zircaloy-2 alloy and Zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLRMW) with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Concretion Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040 (Ecology 1991). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of materials and wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The strategy for closure of the 304 Facility is presented in Section 6.0

  18. Proceedings of the 5. Regional congress on radiation protection and safety; 2. Iberian and Latin American Congress on Radiological Protection Societies; Regional IRPA Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Fifth Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety has been held in Recife (Brazil), from 29th April to 4th May 2001. The congress was hosted by the Brazilian Radiation Protection Society, under the joint sponsorship of FRALC and UFPE-DEN Department of Nuclear Energy. Its designation as a Regional IRPA Congress has been requested. The main purpose of the meeting was to bring together professionals from the industry, universities and research laboratories to present and discuss the latest research results, and to review the state of the art on applied and fundamental aspects of the radiation protection. These specialists have talked about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. In their discussions, also were included subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation

  19. Congress in Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Over 1200 accelerator physicists and engineers gathered in Washington mid-May for the 15th in the series of biennial Particle Accelerator Conferences (PAC) - the major US forum for accelerator physics and technology. For the first time since their inception, actual attendance declined, however the number of contributed papers stayed around 1500. CERN Director General designate Chris Llewellyn Smith spelled out the challenges with an opening talk underlining the deficiencies in today's Standard Model. From many directions comes the message that collision in the 1 TeV range must tell us something new - wherefore art thou SSC and LHC? The secondary shock waves of last year's (fortunately overturned) bid to cancel the SSC Superconducting Supercollider project still ripple around the USA, while progress towards authorization of CERN's LHC Large Hadron Collider has been slower than initially hoped. The new US administration has indicated a constant rate of SSC funding over the next four years; the figure is higher than the present budget but considerably below the originally proposed budget profile, implying that completion will be retarded by some three years beyond the end of the decade. The SSC Laboratory will clearly have problems to fight increased overall cost and sustain enthusiasm. CERN hopes for LHC blessing in time to allow machine completion by the year 2000. Pride of place at Washington went to DESY's HERA electron-proton collider - the major new facility since the previous PAC. Commissioning has been impressive and physics is well underway, with luminosity climbing towards the design figure. The varied user community of the ubiquitous synchrotron radiation facilities is now considerably larger than that of particle physics and has extensive industrial involvement. Three such machines have come into operation since the previous PAC - the 6 GeV European Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Grenoble, the 1.5 GeV Advanced Light Source

  20. Nuclear weapons facilities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 6, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A hearing to review evidence that security at DOE weapons facilities is not adequate to protect against a potential terrorist attack focused on incidents in which security personnel performances reveal weaknesses in the Inspection and Evaluation (I and E) program. Criticism of the program cited DOE credibility, personnel training and possible drug use by plant personnel, poor coordination, and inadequate protection for physical plants and classified information. Reduced budgeting for security contributed to the problem. The hearing record includes an exchange of correspondence between the Oversight Committee and government officials, the testimony of DOE officials responsible for defense programs, and other material submitted for the record

  1. 21 CFR 14.10 - Applicability to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability to Congress. 14.10 Section 14.10... HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE General Provisions § 14.10 Applicability to Congress. This part applies to Congress, individual Members of Congress, and other employees or representatives of Congress in...

  2. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA. TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-01-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004

  3. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-17

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  4. S. 1563: A Bill granting the consent of the Congress to amendments to the Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 4, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    S. 1563: A Bill granting the consent of the Congress to amendments to the Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact. The disposal facility located in Barnwell County, South Carolina shall be the considered the first host State disposal facility

  5. RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) are located on the southwest flank of Pine Ridge ∼1.5 miles west of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley. This facility consists of several contiguous disposal sites identified as Burial Grounds A, B, C, and D. Each burial site consists of a series of trenches used for disposal of solid wastes and, in some cases, liquid wastes. Initially, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure plan for the BCBG was intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the walk-in pits for BCBG. However, a plan was provided to include the B Area in the walk-in pits so that both areas cold be closed under one cap. The closure plan for B Area and the walk-in pits is presented in this document. The actual quantity and identity of materials is uncertain. The largest volume of material disposed in BCBG consists of uranium-contaminated industrial trash (paper, wood, steel, glass, and rubble)

  6. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).

  7. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. F. Emer

    2001-03-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the

  8. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit

  9. Review of hazardous chemical regulation at nuclear facilities by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 14, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Seven witnesses from agencies and the nuclear industry testified on the status of chemical regulation at nuclear facilities, the potential for accidents, and the quality of emergency plans in the event of a release of chemical substances. Impetus for the review came from incidents at Kerr-McGhee's Sequoyah plant in Oklahoma and the release of uranium hexafluoride, as well as a pattern of accidents which occur after the potential hazard has already been identified. The witnesses included Richard Krimm of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, James Makris of the Environmental Protection Agency, John Miles of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Nunxio Palladino of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and representatives of DOE and Kerr-McGee. Additional materials submitted for the record follows the testimony

  10. Annual report to Congress, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-31

    Created by Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. With the mandate to ``collect, assemble, evaluate, analyze, and disseminate data and information,`` EIA`s mission has been defined to: maintain a comprehensive data and information program relevant to energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. Develop and maintain analytical tool and collection and processing systems; provide analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and provide information dissemination services. This annual report summarizes EIA`s activities and accomplishments in 1993.

  11. 1st National Mechanics Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Nieuwstadt, F

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Applied Mechanics of the Royal Institution of Engineers in the Netherlands (Koninklijk Instituut van Ingenieurs) organised on April 2-4, 1990 the first National Applied Mechanics Congress about the theme: "Integration of Theory and Applications in Applied Mechanics" The idea behind this initiative was to bring together the Applied Mechanics communities in The Netherlands and Belgium and to create an environment in which new developments in the field could be discussed and in which connections to other disciplines could be established. Among an extensive list of possible subjects the following were selected as congress topics: - non-linear material behaviour, - chaos, - mechatronics, - liquid-solid interactions, - mathematics and applied mechanics, - integration of Applied Mechanics and other disciplines. Applied Mechanics comprises both solid mechanics and fluid mechanics. These can be subdivided further into: rheology, plasticity, theory of plates and shells, theory of elasticity, multibody...

  12. FISITA 2012 World Automotive Congress

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Proceedings of the FISITA 2012 World Automotive Congress are selected from nearly 2,000 papers submitted to the 34th FISITA World Automotive Congress, which is held by Society of Automotive Engineers of China (SAE-China ) and the International Federation of Automotive Engineering Societies (FISITA). This proceedings focus on solutions for sustainable mobility in all areas of passenger car, truck and bus transportation. Volume 8: Vehicle Design and Testing (II) focuses on: •Automotive Reliability Technology •Lightweight Design Technology •Design for Recycling •Dynamic Modeling •Simulation and Experimental Validation •Virtual Design, Testing and Validation •Testing of Components, Systems and Full Vehicle Above all researchers, professional engineers and graduates in fields of automotive engineering, mechanical engineering and electronic engineering will benefit from this book.   SAE-China is a national academic organization composed of enterprises and professionals who focus on research, design a...

  13. Annual report to Congress, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1998 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1998 and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  14. Annual report to Congress 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1997 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1997, and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  15. 2012 geothermal energy congress. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Within the Geothermal Energy Congress 2012 from 13th to 16th November 2012, in Karlsruhe (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Comparison of different methods for the design of geothermal probes on the example of the thermal utilization of smouldering fires at heaps (Sylvia Kuerten); (2) Determination of the thermo-physical features of loose rocks (Johannes Stegner); (3) Tools for the planning and operation of district heating grids (Werner Seichter); (4) geo:build - System optimisation of the cooling mode of the ground-source heat and cooling supply (Franziska Bockelmann); (5) Successful and economic conception, planning and optimization of district heating grids (Werner Seichter); (6) Treacer / Heat transfer decoupling in a heterogeneous hydrothermal reservoir characterized by geological faults in the Upper Rhine Graben (I. Ghergut); (7) Determination of the porosity, thermal conductivity and particle size distribution in selected sections of the Meisenheim-1 drilling core (Saar-Nahe basin, Rheinland-Palatinate) under consideration of geothermally relevant formulation of questions (Gillian Inderwies); (8) Innovative technologies of exploration in the Jemez Geothermal project, New Mexico, USA (Michael Albrecht); (9) Geothermal energy, heat pump and TABS - optimization of planning, operational control and control (Franziska Bockelmann); (10) The impact of large-scale geothermal probes (storage probes) on the heat transfer and heat loss (Christopher Steins); (11) Numeric modelling of the permocarbon in the northern Upper Rhine Graben (L. Dohrer); (12) Engineering measurement solutions on quality assurance in the exploitation of geothermal fields (C. Lehr); (13) Evaluation and optimization of official buildings with the near-surface geothermal energy for heating and cooling (Franziska Bockelmann); (14) On-site filtration for a rapid and cost-effective quantification of the particle loading in the thermal water stream (Johannes Birner

  16. Satisfaction and behavioural intentions of congress attendees: Evidence from an international congress in Novi Sad Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragićević Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The congress industry, as a part of business tourism sector, is globally recognized for its valuable economic contribution to tourism destinations. Regardless economic benefits, there are as well as numerous social, cultural and environmental benefits that congress industry brings to destinations. This is the reason why the congress industry is becoming one of the fastest growing sectors of tourism industry. At the same time, the congress destinations worldwide are competing in bidding international congresses. According to the Strategy of Tourism Development of the Republic of Serbia (2005, congress tourism is recognized as a quick win product that could contribute in a short period of 3 to 5 years to tourism development and image of Serbia. The cities of Belgrade, Novi Sad and Niš are identified as the congress destinations capable for hosting international congresses. Novi Sad, as administrative, economic, cultural, scientific and educational centre of the region of Vojvodina (northern part of Serbia and known as 'town of fairs'(it has long tradition in organizing fairs - since 1923 has strong potential for smaller international congresses. In order to improve quality of 'congress' tourist product, provide stability of congress destination and congress centers, it is necessary to understand meeting planners' and congress attendees' levels of satisfaction and reaction to their experience in destination. In Serbia there is no research regarding mentioned items. The aim of this paper is to examine and analyze the perspective of the congress attendees, as they are final consumers of congress tourist product and their experience and behavioural intentions regarding Novi Sad is thus essential to destination marketing and management organizations, congress centre, hotel managers and meeting planners. .

  17. SAE-China Congress 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings gather outstanding papers submitted to the 2015 SAE-China Congress, the majority of which are from China, the biggest car maker as well as most dynamic car market in the world. The book covers a wide range of automotive topics, presenting the latest technical achievements in the industry. Many of the approaches presented can help technicians to solve the practical problems that most affect their daily work.

  18. SAE-China Congress 2014

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These Proceedings gather outstanding papers submitted to the 2014 SAE-China Congress, the majority of which are from China, the most dynamic car market in the world. The book covers a wide range of automotive topics, presenting the latest technical achievements in the industry. Many of the approaches it presents can help technicians to solve the practical problems that most affect their daily work.

  19. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below

  20. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  1. 18 CFR 16.15 - Commission recommendation to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... recommendation to Congress. 16.15 Section 16.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... 15 of the Federal Power Act § 16.15 Commission recommendation to Congress. Upon receipt of a... Congress. ...

  2. 202-S Hexone Facility supplemental information to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingle, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This document is a unit-specific contingency plan for the 202-S Hexone Facility and is intended to be used as a supplement to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan. This unit-specific plan is to be used to demonstrate compliance with the contingency plan requirements of WAC 173-303 for certain Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units. The 202-S Hexone Facility is not used to process radioactive or nonradioactive hazardous material. Radioactive, dangerous waste material is contained in two underground storage tanks, 276-S-141 and 276-S-142. These tanks do not present a significant hazard to adjacent facilities, personnel, or the environment. Currently, dangerous waste management activities are not being applied at the tanks. It is unlikely that any incidents presenting hazards to public health or the environment would occur at the 202-S Hexone Facility

  3. Annual report to Congress 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-25

    By Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. During 1992, EIA provided information and analysis in response to many energy-related issues and events, including Hurricane Andrew. In addition, EIA made substantial strides in a number of critical special projects, most notably development of the National Energy Modeling System, preparation of National Petroleum Council studies on petroleum refining and natural gas, and establishment of oxygenate data program mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. EIA also took advantage of new opportunities for international consultations and energy information exchanges. This report to Congress contains energy-related information on the following: petroleum; natural gas; integrated analysis and forecasting; electricity; coal; energy markets and end use, nuclear, statistical standards, and information services. The appendices include: data collection surveys of the Energy Information Administration; Analytic models of the Energy Information Administration; EIA publication -- EIA products available on diskette; and Major laws affecting EIA, 1974-1992.

  4. Preparation of radioactive ''mixed'' waste samples for measurement of RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.A.; Caton, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A radioactive ''mixed'' waste typically contains alpha-, beta-, or gamma-emitting radionuclides and varying quantities of semivolatile or volatile organic species, some or all of which may be named specifically by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Because there are no acceptable means available currently for disposing of these mixed wastes, they are presently stored above-ground in sealed drums. For this reason, analytical procedures which can determine RCRA organics in radioactive waste are necessary for deciding the proper approach for disposal. An important goal of this work is the development of methods for preparing mixed waste samples in a manner which allows the RCRA organics to be measured in conventional organic analysis laboratories without special precautions. Analytical procedures developed for handling mixed waste samples must satisfy not only the usual constraints present in any trace-level organic chemical determination, but also those needed to insure the protection of the operator from radioactive contamination. Consequently, procedures should be designed to use the least amount of radioactive sample commensurate with achieving acceptable sensitivity with the RCRA analytical methods. Furthermore, the unusual laboratory glassware which would normally be used should be replaced with disposable materials wherever possible, in order to reduce the ''clean-up'' time required, and thereby reduce the operator's exposure to radioactivity. Actual sample handling should be reduced to the absolute minimum. Finally, the final isolate must exhibit a sufficiently low level of alpha, beta, or gamma activity to permit detailed characterization in a conventional organic analysis laboratory. 4 refs., 5 tabs

  5. Feasibility study of X-ray K-edge analysis of RCRA heavy metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, T.

    1999-01-01

    A study has been completed to assess the capabilities of X-ray K-edge analysis in the measurement of RCRA metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums. Results were obtained for mercury and lead contamination. It was not possible to measure cadmium contamination using this technique. No false positive signals were observed. In cases where uniformity of the sludge can be assumed, this analysis can provide a quick, accurate measurement of heavy-metal contamination

  6. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2000-2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Duane G; Hodges, Floyd N

    2001-01-01

    This document compiles information of the drilling and construction, well development, pump installation, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of five new RCRA wells in calendar year 2000 - 2001. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams); the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs; Appendix B contains physical properties data; and Appendix C contains the borehole geophysical logs

  7. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a open-quotes Settlement Agreementclose quotes (or open-quotes Batt Agreementclose quotes) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed

  8. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  9. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1992. There are two abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants and six abnormal occurrences involving medical misadministration (all therapeutic) at NRC-licensed facilities discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating three previously reported abnormal occurrences

  10. Report to congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1992. The abnormal occurrences involving medical therapy misadministrations at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant, and none were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  11. The role of economic incentives in nuclear waste facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    There is a need to provide some public benefit and/or reward for accepting a ''locally unwanted land use'' (LULU) facility such as a nuclear waste storage or disposal facility. This paper concludes that DOE, Congress and the states should immediately quantify an economic incentive for consideration ''up front'' by society on siting decisions for nuclear waste storage and disposal facilities

  12. Characterization of sediment in a leaching trench RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, M.G.; Kossik, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    Hazardous materials potentially were disposed of into a pair of leaching trenches from 1975 until Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations were imposed in 1985. These leaching trenches now are used for disposal of nonhazardous process water. The typical effluent (approximately 3 million gal/d) consisted of water with trace quantities of laboratory, maintenance, and fuel fabrication process chemicals. The largest constituent in the waste stream was uranium in low concentrations. This paper describes the project used to analyze and characterize the sediments in and below the leaching trenches. Two phases of sediment sampling were performed. The first phase consisted of taking samples between the bottom of the trenches and groundwater to locate contamination in the deep sediments under the trenches. To accomplish this sampling, a series of wells were drilled, and samples were obtained for every five feet in depth. The second phase consisted of samples taken at three depths in a series of positions along each trench. Sampling was completed to determine contamination levels in the shallow sediments and loose material washed into the trenches from the process sewer system. The project results were that no measurable contamination was found in the deep sediments. Measurable contamination from metals, such as chromium and nickel, was found in the shallow sediments. The primary contaminant in the shallow sediments was uranium. The concentration of contaminants decreased rapidly to near-background levels at shallow depths below the bottoms of the trenches

  13. RCRA materials analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Detection limits in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskelo, A.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) that this report supports is research, development, testing and evaluation of a portable analyzer for RCRA and other metals. The instrumentation to be built will be used for field-screening of soils. Data quality is expected to be suitable for this purpose. The data presented in this report were acquired to demonstrate the detection limits for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of soils using instrument parameters suitable for fieldable instrumentation. The data are not expected to be the best achievable with the high pulse energies available in laboratory lasers. The report presents work to date on the detection limits for several elements in soils using LIBS. The elements targeted in the Technical Task Plan are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, selenium, and zirconium. Data for these elements are presented in this report. Also included are other data of interest to potential customers for the portable LIBS apparatus. These data are for barium, mercury, cesium and strontium. Data for uranium and thorium will be acquired during the tasks geared toward mixed waste characterization

  14. Sulfur polymer cement encapsulation of RCRA toxic metals and metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calhoun, C.L. Jr.; Nulf, L.E.; Gorin, A.H.

    1995-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the suitability of Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) encapsulation technology for the stabilization of RCRA toxic metal and metal oxide wastes. In a series of bench-scale experiments, the effects of sodium sulfide additions to the waste mixture, residence time, and temperature profile were evaluated. In addition, an effort was made to ascertain the degree to which SPC affords chemical stabilization as opposed to physical encapsulation. Experimental results have demonstrated that at the 25 wt % loading level, SPC can effectively immobilize Cr, Cr 2 O 3 , Hg, Pb, and Se to levels below regulatory limits. SPC encapsulation also has been shown to significantly reduce the leachability of other toxic compounds including PbO, PbO 2 , As 2 O 3 , BaO, and CdO. In addition, data has confirmed sulfide conversion of Hg, Pb, PbO, PbO 2 , and BaO as the product of their reaction with SPC

  15. RCRA land unit closures at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.H.; Kelly, B.A.; Delozier, M.F.P.; Manrod, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Y-12 Plant are being closed under an integrated multi-year program. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and are in various stages of revision and regulatory review. These units will be closed by various combinations of methods, including liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. The closure of these sites will be funded by a new Department of Energy budget category, the Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC), which is intended to provide greater flexibility in the response to closure and remedial activities. A major project, Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA), has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with RCRA requirements. Establishing the scope of this program has required the development of a detailed set of assumptions and a confirmation program for each assumption. Other significant activities in the CAPCA program include the development of risk assessments and the preparation of an integrated schedule

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-01-01

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples

  17. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  18. RCRA permitting strategies for the development of innovative technologies: Lessons from Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, S.W.; Donaghue, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Hanford Site restoration is the largest waste cleanup operation in history. The Hanford plutonium production mission generated two-thirds of all the nuclear waste, by volume, in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Cleanup challenges include not only large stored volumes of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste, but contaminated soil and groundwater and scores of major structures slated for decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition. DOE and its contractors will need to invent the technology required to do the job on a timetable driven by negotiated milestones, public concerns, and budgetary constraints. This paper will discuss the effort at Hanford to develop an integrated, streamlined strategy for compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) in the conduct of research, development, and demonstration (RD ampersand D) of innovative cleanup technologies. The aspects that will be discussed include the following: the genesis of the RD ampersand D permitting challenge at Hanford; permitting options in the existing regulatory framework; regulatory options that offered the best fit for Hanford RD ampersand D activities, and the problems associated with them; and conclusions and recommendations made to regulatory bodies

  19. Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements

  20. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented

  1. Tooele Army Depot - South Area Suspected Release Units. RCRA Facility Investigation - Phase 2, for SWMUs 1, 25, and 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    metabolism before reaching the systemic circulation. Therefore, a toxic effect attributable to an active metabolite might be more pronounced if the compound...no first-pass metabolism might result in a greater dose of the toxic constituent entering the systemic circulation than if the compound were absorbed...great horned owls, red-tailed hawks, loggerhead shrikes, badgers, Ord’s kangaroo rats, horned larks, and sagebrush lizards. The vegetation types

  2. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents data and information related to remedial investigation studies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information is included on a soil gas survey, surface radiological investigations of waste areas, and well installation for ground water monitoring

  3. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980`s, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980's, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit

  5. Final Site Safety and Health Plan for Phase II RCRA Facility Investigation Fort Benjamin Harrison Marion County, Indiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ..., representativeness, completeness, and comparability of its data are known and documented. To essure that responsibility is met uniformly, each party must prepare a written QA Project Plan (QAPjP...

  6. Pilot Project to Optimize Ground Water Remediation Systems at RCRA Corrective Action Facilities: Summary Report and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on previous success with conducting independent optimization evaluations at Fund-lead pump and treat sites (i.e., those sites with pump and treat systems funded and managed by Superfund and the States), the EPA Office of Superfund .....

  7. Phase II RCRA Facility Investigation Report, Tooele Army Depot-North Area, Group A, Suspected Releases SWMUs; Volume 1 - Text

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shank, David

    1997-01-01

    .... The generated data were used to perform risk assessments for each of the investigated SWMUs. A total of 299 soil samples, two sediment samples, seven water samples, and two total suspended particulate (air filter...

  8. World Energy Council 15th Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consejo Mundial de la Energia.

    1992-01-01

    All energetic aspects collected within the main topic 'Energy and life' are gathered in 14 volumes. Environmental questions were devoted special attention because of public concern. The congress resolved to promote clean technologies and renewable energies with less environmental impact but without forgetting profitability. Experts in energetic topics attended the Congress

  9. 15th Congress of European Hematology Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chomienne, Christine; Guenova, Margarita; Hagenbeek, Antony; Lacombe, Catherine; McCann, Shaun; Foa, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Each year the annual congress of the European Hematology Association gathers clinicians, biologists and scientists dedicated to all fields of hematology. This year's Congress was held in Barcelona, Spain, and presented an appealing program with experts presenting state-of-the-art sessions to more

  10. World Congress on Engineering 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Ao, Sio-Iong; Gelman, Len

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains fifty-one revised and extended research articles written by prominent researchers participating in the international conference on Advances in Engineering Technologies and Physical Science (London, UK, 2-4 July, 2014), under the World Congress on Engineering 2014 (WCE 2014). Topics covered include mechanical engineering, bioengineering, internet engineering, wireless networks, image engineering, manufacturing engineering, and industrial applications. The book offers an overview of the tremendous advances made recently in engineering technologies and the physical sciences and their applications, and also serves as an excellent reference for researchers and graduate students working in these fields.

  11. 2016 SAE-China Congress

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This proceedings volume gathers outstanding papers submitted to the 2016 SAE-China Congress, the majority of which are from China, the biggest car maker as well as most dynamic car market in the world. The book includes insights into the current challenges that the whole industry is currently facing, and it offers possible solutions to problems such as emission controls, environmental pollution, the energy shortage, traffic congestion and sustainable development. It also presents the latest technical achievements in the automotive industry. Many of the approaches it presents can help technicians to solve the practical problems that most affect their daily work.

  12. 10th International ISAAC Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Rodino, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    This book collects lectures given by the plenary speakers at the 10th International ISAAC Congress, held in Macau, China in 2015. The contributions, authored by eminent specialists, present some of the most exciting recent developments in mathematical analysis, probability theory, and related applications. Topics include: partial differential equations in mathematical physics, Fourier analysis, probability and Brownian motion, numerical analysis, and reproducing kernels. The volume also presents a lecture on the visual exploration of complex functions using the domain coloring technique. Thanks to the accessible style used, readers only need a basic command of calculus.

  13. 63rd German radiological congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The book of abstracts contains abstracts of 171 papers read at the German Radiological Congress in Berlin as well as abstracts of two papers not read for lack of time. Further, there are 31 brief descriptions of the scientific exhibition. Subjects: Diagnosis of gall bladder diseases and inflammatory diseases of the large intestine; hyperthermia and irradiation in tumour therapy; nuclear methods in the diagnosis of growing and displacing processes, skeletal diseases, thromboses, embolisms, gastrointestinal and liver affections; new techniques and methods, diagnostics of the spinal tract; radiooncology; carcinoma of the ovaries; diagnostics and therapy of tumours of the lungs; computerized tomography; angiography; ultrasonic diagnosis. (MG) [de

  14. SAAPMB summer school and congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Medical and health physics are greatly stimulated by the exchange of personal experiences and research results among scientists working in their particular fields of interests. Individual contact is of exceptional importance in those rapidly developing areas of high technology which we find in hospitals and industry and therefor the social exchange of ideas at the Summer School and Congress is very important. Research in the fields of medical and health physics is covered by the papers and posters presented. 53 articles have been indexed (27 papers and 26 poster presentations), and 14 articles have been considered to be out of scope for INIS

  15. CIF---Design basis for an integrated incineration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of chosen technologies that occurred during the design process of the US Department of Energy (DOE) incineration system designated the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) as the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. The Plant is operated for DOE by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. The purpose of the incineration system is to treat low level radioactive and/or hazardous liquid and solid wastes by combustion. The objective for the facility is to thermally destroy toxic constituents and volume reduce waste material. Design criteria requires operation be controlled within the limits of RCRA's permit envelope

  16. 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad supplemental information to the Hanford facility contingency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, N.C.

    1996-12-01

    The 190-C Facility <90 Day Storage Pad stores waste oils primarily contaminated with lead generated while draining equipment within the building of residual lubricating oils. Waste oils are packaged and stored in fifty-five gallon drums, or other containers permitted by the Site Specific Waste Management Instruction. Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) manual BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements Procedures, references this document. This document is to be used to demonstrate compliance with the contingency plan requirements in Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations, for certain Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units (units). Refer to BHI-EE-02, for additional information

  17. Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FR-EEMAN, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency

  18. The sequential decontamination of an abandoned uranium fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, R.R.; Allen, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    In 1984, Congress authorized the Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a decontamination research and development project at four sites, including a property in Colonie, New York, that was formerly owned by National Lead Industries (NLI) and is now referred to as the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS). The site covers 4,5 ha (11.2 acres) and includes the plant building [1,023 m 2 (11,000 ft 2 )] and two smaller storage buildings. As a result of NLI operations, the plant buildings, grounds, and vicinity properties became contaminated. The contaminants can be divided into four categories: asbestos, hazardous wastes, low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), and mixed LLRW. The decontamination of the site will be implemented in seven sequential phases and will be carried out under various authorities and with differing categories of response activity. The governing authorities for CISS include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper discusses the relationship between each phase of the proposed restoration activity and the collective requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. (author)

  19. Effectiveness evaluation of three RCRA caps at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevenell, L.A. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Goldstrand, P.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1994-01-01

    Because installation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- engineered caps is costly, it is prudent to evaluate the effectiveness of this procedure for hydrologically isolating contaminants. The objective for installation of five-part engineered caps at the Y-12 Plant was to (1) satisfy the regulatory compliance issues, (2) minimize the risk of direct contact with the wastes, and (3) reduce rainfall infiltration. Although the original objectives of installing the caps were not to alter groundwater flow, a potential effect of reducing infiltration is to minimize leaching, thus retarding groundwater contaminant migration from the site. Hence, cap effectiveness with respect to reduced groundwater contaminant migration is evaluated using groundwater data in this report. Based on the available data at the Y-12 capped areas, evaluation of cap effectiveness includes studying water level and chemical variability in nearby monitoring wells. Three caps installed during 1989 are selected for evaluation in this report. These caps are located in three significantly different hydrogeologic settings: overlying a karst aquifer (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits [CRSP]), overlying shales located on a hill slope (Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area [OLWMA]), and overlying shales in a valley floor which is a site of convergent groundwater flow (New Hope Pond [NHP]). Presumably, the caps have been effective in minimizing risk of direct contact with the wastes and halting direct rainfall infiltration into the sites over the extent of the capped areas, but no evidence is presented in this report to directly demonstrate this. The caps installed over the three sites appear to have had a minimal effect on groundwater contaminant migration from the respective sites. Following cap construction, no changes in the configuration of the water table were observed. Migration of contaminant plumes occurred at all three sites, apparently without regard to the timing of cap installation.

  20. 38 CFR 1.507 - Disclosures to members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Congress. 1.507 Section 1.507 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Disclosures to members of Congress. Members of Congress shall be furnished in their official capacity in any... which may not be furnished a claimant, the member of Congress shall be advised that the information is...

  1. 32 CFR 270.19 - Reports to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports to Congress. 270.19 Section 270.19... Reports to Congress § 270.19 Reports to Congress. Not later than September 23, 1998, the Commission will prepare and the Secretary will submit to Congress a report on the payment of claims under this part...

  2. 16 CFR 1015.12 - Disclosure to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disclosure to Congress. 1015.12 Section 1015...) § 1015.12 Disclosure to Congress. (a) All records of the Commission shall be disclosed to Congress upon a request made by the chairman or ranking minority member of a committee or subcommittee of Congress acting...

  3. National congress of radiation protection - Book of presentations (slides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the 9. French national congress of radiation protection. The congress comprised 9 tutorial sessions and 13 ordinary sessions. The tutorial sessions covered the following topics: T1 - Fukushima accident's consequences on terrestrial environment; T2 - The efficient dose: use and limitations in the industrial and medical domains; T3 - Revision of the NFC 15-160 standard relative to radiological facilities; T4 - Medical implants and low frequency electromagnetic fields; T5 - Report from the working group on radiological zoning; T6 - Incidents in medical environment; T7 - ADR: European agreement about the international road transport of dangerous goods; T8 - Cigeo project: industrial geologic disposal facility; T9 - Dose control in medical imaging: what progress since 2010? The ordinary sessions gathered fifty-nine presentations dealing with the following subjects: 1 - effects of ionising radiations on man and ecosystems; 2 - radiation protection regulation and standards; 3 - radiation protection in incident, accident and post-accident situation; 4 - radiation protection of populations and ecosystems; 5 - Radiation protection and society; 6/11 - Radiation protection of patients; 7/8 - Eye lens irradiation and dosimetry; 9 - Non-ionising radiations; 10/12 - Radiation protection in professional environments; 13 - advances in dosimetry and metrology

  4. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the ninth in the series, covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1977. The NRC has determined that during this period: there were two abnormal occurrences at the 64 nuclear power plants licensed to operate, one involved a breach of a plant's physical security system and the other involved degraded fuel rods; there were no abnormal occurrences at fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants); and there were two abnormal occurrences at other licensee facilities, one involved improper radioactive source handling procedures and the other involved overexposure of two radiographers. Information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences is also included

  5. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the eighth in the series, covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1977. The NRC has determined that during this period: there were no abnormal occurrences at the 63 nuclear power plants licensed to operate; there were no abnormal occurrences at fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants); and there was one abnormal occurrence at other licensee facilities. The event involved an inadvertent radiation exposure to two painters while working in an area where industrial radiography was being performed. This report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  6. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period April through June 1993, and discusses four abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities, three involving medical brachytherapy misadministrations and one involving a research reactor that operated without a safety system. One pool irradiation facility contamination event, two medical misadministrations (one ''sodium iodide'' and one brachytherapy), and one industrial radiographer overexposure event that were reported by NRC Agreement States are also discussed. The report also contains information updating one previously reported abnormal occurrence and information on three other events of interest

  7. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft 2 waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft 2 waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft 2 mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required

  8. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This 'was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE)

  9. Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is participating in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to treatment of mixed (radioactive and RCRA) wastes. The salt residues from the MSO treatment will require further separations or other processing to prepare them for final disposal. A bench-scale MSO apparatus is being installed at ORNL and will be operated on real Oak Ridge wastes. The treatment concepts to be tested and demonstrated on the salt residues from real wastes are described

  10. 7. international congress of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.

    1984-01-01

    The congress was held in Amsterdam on July 3 to 8, 1983, with the participation of 1305 specialists from 44 countries. The number of papers came close to one thousand, most of them being posters. The congress met in 44 sessions grouped by problem areas of which there were five: A. Chemistry and Physics; B. Biology; C. Somatic and genetic effects; D. Biology and therapy of tumours; E. Dosimetry, radionuclides and technology. The congress brought out the immense quantitative growth of knowledge in the field of radiation biology and biochemistry. A general idea of the effects of radiation on organisms is yet to be attained. (Ha)

  11. First International One Health congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn H. Jeggo

    2012-06-01

    The Organising Committee recognised from the outset, the need to provide a forum not just for scientific presentation, but for open discussion and dialogue around the policy and political issues, as well as the science that drives the One Health agenda. The Committee was also cognizant of the need to embrace a definition of One Health that includes food security and food safety and included the social and economic pressures that shapes this area. The meeting was therefore organised under four themes with plenary sessions followed by breakout parallel sessions for each of these. The themes covered Disease Emergence, Environmental Drivers, Trade, Food Security and Food Safety, and Science Policy and Political Action. The plenary session commenced with one or two keynote presentations by world leaders on the topic being covered, followed by panel discussions involving six to eight experts and involving all participants at the congress. Each of the panel members spoke briefly on the topic covered by the keynote speaker and were asked to be as provocative as possible. The discussions that followed allowed debate and discussion on the keynote presentations and the panel members comments. This was followed by six to eight parallel breakout sessions involving in depth papers on the session’s topic. Throughout the conference at various times, sponsored sessions dealt with particular areas of science or policy providing a further framework not only to learn current science but for debate and discussion. A full copy of all abstracts is available on the web at http://www.springerlink.com. In concluding the Congress recognised the interdependence of, and seeks to improve human, animal and environmental health; recognised that communication, collaboration and trust between human and animal health practitioners is at the heart of the One Health concept; agreed that a broad vision that includes other disciplines such as economics and social behaviour is essential to success. The

  12. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system

  13. Chemical Facility Security: Reauthorization, Policy Issues, and Options for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    gaseous chlorine disinfection to chloramine disinfection —a change identified by some advocacy groups as being an inherently safer substitution—as being...chemicals, such as chlorine, for purposes such as disinfection .29 Advocates for their inclusion in security regulations cite the presence of such...Science and Technology (S& T ) Directorate is engaged in a Chemical Infrastructure Risk Assessment Project that, among other goals, will assess the

  14. 4th International Geostatistics Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The contributions in this book were presented at the Fourth International Geostatistics Congress held in Tróia, Portugal, in September 1992. They provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of geostatistics, including recent theoretical developments and new applications. In particular, readers will find descriptions and applications of the more recent methods of stochastic simulation together with data integration techniques applied to the modelling of hydrocabon reservoirs. In other fields there are stationary and non-stationary geostatistical applications to geology, climatology, pollution control, soil science, hydrology and human sciences. The papers also provide an insight into new trends in geostatistics particularly the increasing interaction with many other scientific disciplines. This book is a significant reference work for practitioners of geostatistics both in academia and industry.

  15. World Congress on Engineering 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Gi-Chul; Gelman, Len

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents selected peer-reviewed, revised and extended research articles written by prominent researchers who participated in the World Congress on Engineering 2015, held in London, UK, 1-3 July, 2015. This large international conference covered advances in engineering technologies and the physical sciences, with contributions on subjects including mechanical engineering, bioengineering, internet engineering, image engineering, wireless networks, knowledge engineering, manufacturing engineering, and industrial applications. This book offers a snapshot of the state-of-the-art, highlighting tremendous advances in engineering technologies and physical sciences and their applications, and will serve as an excellent reference for researchers and graduate students working in many different disciplines of physical sciences and engineering.

  16. Congress turns cold on fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, E.

    1984-01-01

    A 5% cut in fusion research budgets will force some programs to be dropped in order to keep the large machinery running unless US and European scientists collaborate instead of competing. Legislators became uneasy about the escalating costs of the new devices. The 1984 budget of $470 million for magnetic fusion research is only half the projected cost of the Tokomak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) planned to ignite, for the first time, a self-sustaining burn. Planning for the TCFX continued despite the message from Congress. Work at the large institutions at Princeton, MIT, etc. may survive at the expense of other programs, some of which will lose academic programs as well. Scientists point to the loss of new ideas and approaches when projects are cancelled. Enthusiasm is growing for international collaboration

  17. 7th International Geostatistics Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsch, Clayton

    2005-01-01

    The conference proceedings consist of approximately 120 technical papers presented at the Seventh International Geostatistics Congress held in Banff, Alberta, Canada in 2004. All the papers were reviewed by an international panel of leading geostatisticians. The five major sections are: theory, mining, petroleum, environmental and other applications. The first section showcases new and innovative ideas in the theoretical development of geostatistics as a whole; these ideas will have large impact on (1) the directions of future geostatistical research, and (2) the conventional approaches to heterogeneity modelling in a wide range of natural resource industries. The next four sections are focused on applications and innovations relating to the use of geostatistics in specific industries. Historically, mining, petroleum and environmental industries have embraced the use of geostatistics for uncertainty characterization, so these three industries are identified as major application areas. The last section is open...

  18. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  19. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ''Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.'' The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ''package'' for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package

  20. 105-DR large sodium fire facility closure Plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruck, F.A. III.

    1995-03-01

    The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was operated 1972-1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the SW side of the 105-DR Reactor Facility. (The 105-DR defense reactor was shut down in 1964.) LSFF was used to investigate fire and safety aspects of large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the LMFBR facilities; it was also used to store and treat alkali metal waste. This closure plan presents a description of the unit, the history of the waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of LSFF is expected. It is located within the 100-DR-2 (source) and 100-HR-3 (groundwater) operable units, which will be addressed through the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study process

  1. Issues in radioactive mixed waste compliance with RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act]: Some examples from ongoing operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, D.L.; Smith, T.H.; Clements, T.L. Jr.; Hodge, V.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive mixed waste is subject to regulation under both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The regulation of such waste is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and either the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or the Department of Energy (DOE), depending on whether the waste is commercially generated or defense-related. The recent application of the RCRA regulations to ongoing operations at the DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described in greater detail. 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Savannah River Site RCRA/CERCLA/NEPA integrated investigation case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.R.; Thomas, R.; Wilson, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a US Department of Energy facility placed on the Superfund National Priority List in 1989. Numerous past disposal facilities and contaminated areas are undergoing the integrated regulatory remediation process detailed in the draft SRS Federal Facility Agreement. This paper will discuss the integration of these requirements by highlighting the investigation of the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits, a typical waste unit at SRS

  3. Hostile reception greets Bottomley Congress speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-04

    Health Minister Virginia Bottomley's attempts to persuade delegates that there are 'exciting' opportunities for nurses in the Government's plans for the health service failed, as she faced growing hostility from the audience at RCN Congress last week.

  4. United Nations Peacekeeping: Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browne, Marjorie A

    2008-01-01

    A major issue facing the United Nations, the United States, and the 110th Congress is the extent to which the United Nations has the capacity to restore or keep the peace in the changing world environment...

  5. United Nations Peacekeeping: Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browne, Marjorie A

    2007-01-01

    A major issue facing the United Nations, the United States, and the 110th Congress is the extent to which the United Nations has the capacity to restore or keep the peace in the changing world environment...

  6. 2002 NPDES CSO Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report, delivered to Congress on January 29, 2002, identifies progress made in implementing and enforcing combined sewer overflow (CSO) controls prior to, and because of, the 1994 CSO control policy.

  7. 2004 NPDES CSO Report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report, delivered to Congress on Thursday, August 26, 2004, presents a comprehensive characterization of CSOs and SSOs, including the extent of environmental and human health impacts caused by CSOs and SSOs.

  8. EPA Reports to Congress on Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agencies are required to report to the Congress annually on their technology transfer activities. These reports summarize technology transfer activities of the EPA’s federal laboratories, by fiscal year.

  9. International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000. Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OST Film Production Studio; YDRNS Information Technology Services, Ltd.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 28 minutes 30 seconds of video-film about programme of International Youth Nuclear Congress 2000 (IYNC 2000). There is documentary video-film about IYNC 2000, also presented are: the Opening panel of the IYNC 2000, every day work of IYNC 2000, Congress people; the fun run; Entertainment excursion in Bratislava, about excursion in Mochovce NPP as well as in IAEA

  10. 7th International Crop Science Congress Announcement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    August 14–19,2016 Beijing,China Crop Science—Innovation and SustainabilityInternational Crop Science Congress(ICSC)is a regular forum for crop scientists from around the world to integrate current knowledge into a global context and international applications.The Congress is organized about every four years beginning in July,1992.The International Crop Science Society has primary oversight for general

  11. Permitting mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities: A mixed bag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranek, N.L.; Coalgate, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992 (FFCAct) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to make a comprehensive national inventory of its mixed wastes (i.e., wastes that contain both a hazardous component that meets the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste and a radioactive component consisting of source, special nuclear, or byproduct material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA)), and of its mixed waste treatment technologies and facilities. It also requires each DOE facility that stores or generates mixed waste to develop a treatment plan that includes, in part, a schedule for constructing units to treat those wastes that can be treated using existing technologies. Inherent in constructing treatment units for mixed wastes is, of course, permitting. This paper identifies Federal regulatory program requirements that are likely to apply to new DOE mixed waste treatment units. The paper concentrates on showing how RCRA permitting requirements interrelate with the permitting or licensing requirements of such other laws as the Atomic Energy Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act. Documentation needed to support permit applications under these laws are compared with RCRA permit application documentation. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation requirements are also addressed, and throughout the paper, suggestions are made for managing the permitting process

  12. Proceedings of the second Asian regional congress on radiation protection, Manila, Philippines, 5-9 November 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Operational experiences of nuclear facilities, radiation protection in medicine, tritium, radiation dosimetry, environmental radiation monitoring, and country experiences in radiation protection are the topics discussed in forty-two (42) papers contained in this compilation of abstracts presented in the Second Asian Regional Congress on Radiation Protection held in Manila. (ELC)

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Moeller, M.P.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum three years. A variety of liquid wastes are generated in processing treatment, and disposal operations throughout the Hanford Site. The Tank Farms Project serves a major role in Hanford Site waste management activities as the temporary repository for these wastes. Stored wastes include hazardous components regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and as by-product material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. A total of 177 single- and double-shell tanks (SST and DST) have been constructed in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site. These facilities were constructed to various designs from 1943 to 1986. The Tank Farms Project is comprised of these tanks along with various transfer, receiving, and treatment facilities

  14. Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Trainee A landfill containing furniture and other materials from the facilities at Camp Leatherneck, Helmand Province, that are not being returned to... rehabilitation of roads, road maintenance, contracting for road construction with private sector/road companies, monitoring and planning of railways...structures” in order to partner with the 135 GOVERNANCE REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS I JULY 30, 2014 Afghan Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation

  15. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR section 261.4(a)(4), ''Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,'' as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues

  16. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  17. Annual report to Congress 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    Since its creation in 1977, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has provided high-quality energy information products and services to a broad spectrum of customers across the Nation and around the world, including Congress, representatives of the print and broadcast news media, businesses, officials of Federal, State, and local agencies, foreign governments and international organizations, students, librarians, researchers, lawyers and private citizens. Our motto: {open_quotes}On-line or off the shelf, EIA is the first place to go for the last word in energy information.{close_quotes} Established as an independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), EIA was charged by its enabling legislation with: (1) Maintaining a comprehensive data and information program on energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. (2) Developing and maintaining analytical tools and collection and processing systems; providing analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and providing information dissemination services. This report summarizes the reports and contact information issued by the EIA.

  18. Annual report to Congress 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    Since its creation in 1977, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has provided high-quality energy information products and services to a broad spectrum of customers across the Nation and around the world, including Congress, representatives of the print and broadcast news media, businesses, officials of Federal, State, and local agencies, foreign governments and international organizations, students, librarians, researchers, lawyers and private citizens. Our motto: open-quotes On-line or off the shelf, EIA is the first place to go for the last word in energy information.close quotes Established as an independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), EIA was charged by its enabling legislation with: (1) Maintaining a comprehensive data and information program on energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation's demands in the near and longer term future. (2) Developing and maintaining analytical tools and collection and processing systems; providing analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and providing information dissemination services. This report summarizes the reports and contact information issued by the EIA

  19. Practically perfect: learning by doing at AVS congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-18

    It has been some time since Cambridge vet school last hosted the annual AVS congress, which meant that this year's congress committee faced a steep learning curve. However, as Gill Harris reports, it rose to the occasion. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Data Summary Report for 116-N-1 and 116-N-3 Facility Soil Sampling to Support Remedial Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludowise, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The 116-N-1 (1301-N) and 116-N-3 (1325-N) liquid waste disposal facilities (LWDFs) are to be remediated beginning in July 2000. Each LWDF consists of a crib and a trench. Under the proposed remedial action (DOE-RL 1998b), pipelines and above ground structures would be removed. Clean overburden material would be excavated and stockpiled. Contaminated soils would be excavated, treated (if required to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 [RCRA] land disposal restrictions), and finally disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The sites would then be backfilled, graded, and revegetated. The purpose of this report is to summarize results of the sampling effort and discuss how they apply to the conceptual model of the sites and the planned remedial action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 and closure action under RCRA

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 through September 30, 1992. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant. Two abnormal occurrences involving medical misadministrations (both therapeutic) and one involving overexposure of a radiographer at NRC-licensed facilities were discussed in this report. In addition, another abnormal occurrence was reported by an NRC Agreement State. The report also contains information updating a previously reported abnormal occurrence

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1992. Five abnormal occurrences are discussed in this report. One involved an extended loss of high-head safety injection capability at the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant. The other four involved medical misadministrations (three therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating a previously reported abnormal occurrence

  3. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence of an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period October through December 1991. Five abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. None of these occurrences involved a nuclear power plant. Four involved medical therapy misadministrations and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. The NRC's Agreement States reported three abnormal occurrences. Two involved exposures of non-radiation workers and one involved a medical therapy misadministration. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  4. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1988. For this reporting period, there were no abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate. There were two abnormal occurrences at other NRC licensees: a significant breakdown in management and procedural controls at a medical facility and a medical diagnostic misadministration. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State (Texas) involving radioactive material released during a transportation accident. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  5. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    Section 108 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period July through September 1991. The report discusses two abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities, neither involving a nuclear power plant. One involved radiation exposures to members of the public from a lost radioactive source and the other involved a medical diagnostic midadministration. The Agreement States reported no abnormal occurrences. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  6. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1983. The report states that for this report period, there were three abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed by the NRC to operate. The first involved a main feedwater line break due to water hammer. The second involved management and procedural control deficiencies. The third involved failure of the automatic reactor trip system. There were no abnormal occurrences for the other NRC licensees. There were six abnormal occurrences at Agreement State licensees. One involved an individual who ingested and was contaminated by radioactive material. Four involved lost or stolen radioactive sources. One involved radioactive contamination of a metals production facility

  7. The Savannah River Plant Consolidated Incineration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    A full scale incinerator is proposed for construction at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) beginning in August 1989 for detoxifiction and volume reduction of liquid and solid low-level radioactive, mixed and RCRA hazardous waste. Wastes to be burned include drummed liquids, sludges and solids, liquid process wastes, and low-level boxed job control waste. The facility will consist of a rotary kiln primary combustion chamber followed by a tangentially fired cylindrical secondary combustion chamber (SCC) and be designed to process up to 12 tons per day of solid and liquid waste. Solid waste packaged in combustible containers will be fed to the rotary kiln incinerator using a ram feed system and liquid wastes will be introduced to the rotary kiln through a burner nozzle. Liquid waste will also be fed through a high intensity vortex burner in the SCC. Combustion gases will exit the SCC and be cooled to saturation in a spray quench. Particulate and acid gas are removed in a free jet scrubber. The off-gas will then pass through a cyclone separator, mist eliminator, reheater high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration and induced draft blowers before release to the atmosphere. Incinerator ash and scrubber blowdown will be immobilized in a cement matrix and disposed of in an onsite RCRA permitted facility. The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) will provide detoxification and volume reduction for up to 560,000 CUFT/yr of solid waste and up to 35,700 CUFT/yr of liquid waste. Up to 50,500 CUFT/yr of cement stabilized ash and blowdown will beproduced for an average overall volume reduction fator of 22:1. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. 75 FR 984 - Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at CERCLA and RCRA Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is announcing a 50-day public comment period for draft recommended interim preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) developed in the Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Sites. EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency and Emergency Response (OSWER) has developed the draft recommended interim PRGs for dioxin in soil. These draft recommended interim PRGs were calculated using existing, peer- reviewed toxicity values and current EPA equations and default exposure assumptions. This Federal Register notice is intended to provide an opportunity for public comment on the draft recommended interim PRGs. EPA will consider any public comments submitted in accordance with this notice and may revise the draft recommended interim PRGs thereafter.

  9. Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to the treatment of mixed wastes at Oak Ridge and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the atomic energy legislation, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A major part of our ORNL program involves the development of separation technologies that are necessary for the complete treatment of mixed wastes. The residues from the MSO treatment of the mixed wastes must be processed further to separate the radioactive components, to concentrate and recycle residues, or to convert the residues into forms acceptable for final disposal. This paper is a review of the MSO requirements for separation technologies, the information now available, and the concepts for our development studies

  10. Proposed plan for the Tank 105-C Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, W.C. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This Proposed Plan was developed to describe the remedial action selected at the Tank 105-C Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) source-specific unit within the C-Area Fundamental Study Area (FSA) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and to fulfill Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements. This 8,400 gallon capacity tank was certified and accepted closed according to a closure plan approved by the state of South Carolina under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) authority in January 1991. As a result of the closure, previously performed under RCRA, the unit poses no current or potential threat to human health or the environment. Accordingly, no further remedial action is necessary under CERCLA

  11. Identification, classification and management of industrial waste in Kavir steel complex according to the Bazel convention and RCRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Ehrampoush

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Requiring industries for implementing industrial waste management programs and planning for proper waste disposal is essential in order to achieve sustainable development. Therefore, industrial waste management program was done in Kavir Steel Complex, in Aran va Bidgol region to identify and classify industrial waste and also to present solutions for improving waste management. In this complex, production process is hot rolling steel and the product is rebar. Material and Method: The preset study was conducted in Kavir Steel Complex. Following survey of production process and sources of waste, the type and volume of produced waste were identified and measured during 3 months. Then, the classification of wastes was done according to the Bazel Convention and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, and finally new industrial & health solid waste management program was presented. Result: Considering the volume, industrial waste of production process in Kavir Steel Complex was between 130 to 180 grams per each ton of rebar. Main industrial waste included oxide of steel billet, industrial sludge, used oil and lubricant which were classified according to the RCRA: 8 materials with T code, 1 with C code, 5 with I code and 3 materials with C code. Conclusion: The results revealed that the most amount of industrial waste in Kavir Steel Complex is the waste of steel billet and industrial sludge, and more than 90% of Kavir steel industrial waste were reused and recycled inside or outside of this complex. It is recommended that used oil to be transport and maintain in the safe containers.

  12. XXVI UIA Congress and General Assembly in Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the UIA World Congress and several fragments of the manifesto. It also touches on the participation of the Russian delegation in the previous Congresses. The important role of the Congresses in the dynamics of the current urbanization processes is pointed out.

  13. 40 CFR 1603.13 - Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Report to Congress. 1603.13 Section... GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1603.13 Report to Congress. The CSB General Counsel shall annually report to the Congress regarding the Board's compliance with the Government in the Sunshine Act, including a...

  14. 31 CFR 0.212 - Influencing legislation or petitioning Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... petitioning Congress. 0.212 Section 0.212 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... petitioning Congress. (a) Employees shall not use Government time, money, or property to petition a Member of Congress to favor or oppose any legislation. This prohibition does not apply to the official handling...

  15. 31 CFR 50.91 - Notice to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice to Congress. 50.91 Section 50... PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.91 Notice to Congress. Pursuant to section 103(e)(3) of the Act, the Secretary shall provide an initial notice to Congress within 15 days of the certification of an act of...

  16. 18 CFR 401.119 - Disclosure to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure to Congress. 401.119 Section 401.119 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Disclosure to Congress. All records of the Commission shall be disclosed to Congress upon an authorized...

  17. 29 CFR 1400.735-19 - Influencing Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Influencing Members of Congress. 1400.735-19 Section 1400... Responsibilities § 1400.735-19 Influencing Members of Congress. No money appropriated to the Service shall be used... devices intended to influence any Member of Congress regarding any legislation or appropriation before the...

  18. 10 CFR 9.109 - Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report to Congress. 9.109 Section 9.109 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.109 Report to Congress. The Secretary shall annually report to the Congress regarding the Commission's compliance with the...

  19. 49 CFR 801.41 - Reports to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports to Congress. 801.41 Section 801.41... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Other Board Documents § 801.41 Reports to Congress. The NTSB submits its annual report to Congress each year, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1117. The report will be...

  20. 48 CFR 1305.403 - Requests from Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests from Members of Congress. 1305.403 Section 1305.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... from Members of Congress. Requests from Members of Congress shall be handled in accordance with the...

  1. 12 CFR 650.25 - Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report to Congress. 650.25 Section 650.25 Banks... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 650.25 Report to Congress. On a determination by the receiver that there are... submit to the Secretary of the Treasury and Congress a report on the financial condition of the...

  2. 45 CFR 1622.10 - Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Report to Congress. 1622.10 Section 1622.10 Public... MEETINGS UNDER THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1622.10 Report to Congress. The Corporation shall report to the Congress annually regarding its compliance with the requirements of the Government in the...

  3. 7 CFR 1409.9 - Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report to Congress. 1409.9 Section 1409.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF... CORPORATION § 1409.9 Report to Congress. The Secretary of Agriculture will annually report to the Congress...

  4. 15 CFR 12.4 - Report to the Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report to the Congress. 12.4 Section....4 Report to the Congress. Whenever the Secretary publishes a final determination under § 12.3(b)(4) or § 12.3(c)(5), he shall promptly report such determination to the Congress with a statement of the...

  5. 22 CFR 181.7 - Transmittal to the Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transmittal to the Congress. 181.7 Section 181... PUBLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS § 181.7 Transmittal to the Congress. (a) International agreements.... Background statements, while not expressly required by the act, have been requested by the Congress and have...

  6. 32 CFR 537.20 - Certification to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Certification to Congress. 537.20 Section 537.20... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.20 Certification to Congress. Admiralty claims, including claims for... of the Army for approval and if in excess of $500,000 for certification to Congress for final...

  7. 21 CFR 20.87 - Disclosure to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure to Congress. 20.87 Section 20.87 Food... INFORMATION Limitations on Exemptions § 20.87 Disclosure to Congress. (a) All records of the Food and Drug Administration shall be disclosed to Congress upon an authorized request. (b) An authorized request for Food and...

  8. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recommendations to Congress. 700.304 Section 700... The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy may make such recommendations to Congress relating to the...

  9. National Congress of Food Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    ATAM is the principal promoter of the diffusion of food science and technology in Mexico with the organization of the XXVI National Congress of Food Science and Technology. Pre-Congress activities were as follow: two first on 'Food legislation in the United States of America' and the second on 'Characterization of food quality', a magisterial desk on the theme 'The challenge of food industry in front of the present Mexico', two round tables: a) Quality assurance systems and risk analysis 'Iso 9000' and b) 'Biotechnological products' and c) 'H Program'. With the ambitious program, the Congress included 234 papers divided in oral presentations and posters on subjects as: nutrition, education, toxicology, additives, gums, fruits, cereals, new products, dairy products, rheology, oleaginous, risk analysis, critical points, statistics and analysis. The foreign participant countries were Venezuela, Spain, Cuba and United States of America. Short communication. (Author)

  10. XI AUTISM-EUROPE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina TROSHANSKA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the period from 16th to 18th September 2016 in the historic city of Edinburgh the 11th International Congress of Autism Europe organized by the National Organization for Autism from the UK will be held. Theme of the Congress in 2016 will be "happy, healthy and empowered". The Congress will focus on the most recent developments in the field of autism, including causes, genetics, diagnosis, early intervention, treatments, education, support, employment, rights and policies, and many more. The improvement of the science, the rights and services for autistic people will be presented, and an insight into future developments of the events, knowledge and technologies for autistic people that may soon become a part of everyday life will be provided.

  11. Library of Congress Model, Anaglyph

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets. Anaglyph glasses are required to see this view in three-dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest. The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the mountains, leaving

  12. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    2000-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application

  13. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Supplemental Information to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan (DOE/RL-93-75)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edens, V.G.

    1998-05-01

    This document is a unit-specific contingency plan for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility and is intended to be used as a supplement to DOE/RL-93-75, Hanford Facility Contingency Plan (DOE-RL 1993). This unit-specific plan is to be used to demonstrate compliance with the contingency plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303 for certain Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units.The LSFF occupied the former ventilation supply fan room and was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires. The unit was used to conduct experiments for studying the behavior of molten alkali metals and alkali metal fires. This unit had also been used for the storage and treatment of alkali metal dangerous waste. Additionally, the Fusion Safety Support Studies programs sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium-lead compounds. The LSFF, which is a RCRA site, was partially clean closed in 1995 and is documented in 'Transfer of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility to Bechtel Hanford, Inc.' (BHI 1998). In summary, the 105-DR supply fan room (1720-DR) has been demolished, and a majority of the surrounding soils were clean-closed. The 117-DR Filter Building, 116-DR Exhaust Stack, 119- DR Sampling Building, and associated ducting/tunnels were not covered under this closure

  14. Proceedings of the eighth Kerala Science Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Eighth Kerala Science Congress organised by the State Committee on Science, Technology and Environment, Government of Kerala was held at Kochi from 27-29 January 1996. The aim of this Science Congress is to support and catalyse scientific activity in different centres in the Kerala State. The topics covered in the proceedings are natural resources utilisation, ecology and environment, agriculture and allied areas, health care, technology, physical sciences, life sciences, engineering and biotechnology for development. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  15. Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection

  16. The 104th congress: challenges for mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeyer, T.

    1995-03-01

    The election of a Republican majority to the US Congress in autumn 1994 will inaugurate a period of change. The period ahead will see a Democrat president against a Republic Congress, both with a manifesto for change. The possible results of such changes on the mining industry are examined. They include: mining law; Clean Water Act; Superfund; Safe Drinking Water Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; Endangered Species Act; wetlands; recognition of property rights; judicial reform; Occupational Safety and Health Act; health care reform; labor law reform; Water Resources Development Act; fast track trade agreements; issue linkage in track agreements; and the US-Chile free trade agreement.

  17. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection

  18. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 101st Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 101st Congress, 2nd Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended: Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended; Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statues and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection

  19. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  20. 7th WACBE World Congress on Bioengineering 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Chwee

    2015-01-01

    This volume publishes the proceedings of the WACBE World Congress on Bioengineering 2015 (WACBE 2015), which was be held in Singapore, from 6 to 8 July 2015. The World Association for Chinese Biomedical Engineers (WACBE) organizes this World Congress biannually. Our past congresses have brought together many biomedical engineers from over the world to share their experiences and views on the future development of biomedical engineering. The 7th WACBE World Congress on Bioengineering 2015 in Singapore continued to offer such a networking platform for all biomedical engineers. Hosted by the Biomedical Engineering Society (Singapore) and the Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, the congress covered all related areas in bioengineering.

  1. Papers presented at congresses and conferences - 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    Empresarios Agrupados (EA) is a leading engineering organization in Spain with significant international experience. EA provides consulting, engineering, procurement, construction management and operation support services for the power industry, power generation and transmission and other engineering areas. These paper are a collection of presentations made on conferences and congresses in 1992

  2. 9th Ambient Assisted Living Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Mand, Beate

    2017-01-01

    In this book, leading authors in the field discuss the habitats of tomorrow. These habitats will be connected through autonomous and assistive systems, turning habitats into health resorts. This book discusses how assistance technologies enable a smooth transition from comfortable health support to medical or nursing care. The contributions have been chosen and invited at the 9th AAL congress, Frankfurt. .

  3. 4. Congress of the Hungarian Radiotherapy Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Clinical experiences with radiotherapeutic treatment of patients with malignant tumors at several Hungarian hospitals and technical aspects of irradiation devices and irradiation procedures has been reported in the 50 lectures given at the congress. Abstracts of the lectures are published in Hungarian or English or German. (N.T.)

  4. The new (XVIIIth) International Congress of Zoology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1998-01-01

    The date of the new Congress has been set for 4-9 September 2000 and the venue will be the Faculty of Philosophy, at the University of Athens, Greece, under the auspices of the Hellenic Zoological Society. In order to reverse the present trend of fragmentation of Zoology and the crisis in the

  5. The Secretary's annual report to Congress, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This is the 12th Secretary's Annual Report to Congress of the United States Department of Energy, and it covers the year 1991. Activities of all elements of the Department are described herein except those of the independent Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which issues its own report

  6. 4. National Congress on Genetics. Memoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to INIS coverage were analyzed four free works on Life and Environmental Sciences presented during the Congress which are treating over the effects of external irradiation on animals. Between the main aspects are the sister chromatid exchange, spermatogonia, somatic cells, genotoxicity, DNA, chlorophyll, gamma radiation, bone marrow cells and radiation injuries

  7. 11. National congress on ionizing radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theme of the Congress was centred on 'the development of radioprotection confronted with the progress of techniques using ionising radiations' in industry, energy, medicine and reseach. The 32 communications were distributed over the following 6 sessions: radioprotection and preventive medicine, radioprotection in a medical environment, radioprotection and energy, practical aspects of radioprotection, training and legislation in radioprotection [fr

  8. Czechoslovak congress of radiology with international participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The booklet contains 125 abstracts of papers presented at the congress, dealing with diagnostic and therapeutic applications of X-rays, 60 Co, 137 Cs, betatron radiation, with scintigraphy, angiography, lymphography, with radiosensitizers, contrast media and with a host of activities performed and results achieved at radiological departments. (A.K.)

  9. Nineteenth Latin-American congress on chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This publication deals with different in-scope papers presented at the 19. Latin-American congress on chemistry, held in Buenos Aires (Argentine Republic) from November 5-9, 1990. The original document where these papers are contained, consists of 567 pages

  10. American Sculpture and the Library of Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress is one of the more significant public structures in American architecture, due for the most part to its wealth and quality of decoration, including an extensive sculptural program executed in 1894-97. The architects entrusted the program to a committee of three prominent sculptors, J. Q. A.…

  11. International Energy and Environmental Congress: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information presented at the International Energy and Environmental Congress `93 proceedings. Symposiums included demand-side management strategic directions; federal energy management; corporate energy management; and pollution control technologies. Individual reports from the symposiums are processed separately for the data bases.

  12. IT Strategy for the Library of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Presents an abstract for a planned technical session to discuss the report of the Committee on the Information Technology Strategy of the Library of Congress, developed by the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Highlights include digital information, Web links, preservation, and the management of libraries.…

  13. 22. ATSR congress - Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This document brings together the abstracts of all presentations given at the 22. congress of the French association for radiation protection techniques and sciences (ATSR) on the topic of the Management of a radiological emergency situation (Organisation and means): First plenary session - alert and first aid: 1 - Radiological and nuclear emergencies: a new doctrine, a new organisation (M. Bourguignon - DGSNR); 2 - Role and organisation of the Nuclear safety authority (M. Stoltz - DGSNR); 3 - The recasting of the nuclear specific intervention plans - PPI (P. Audebert - Ministry of Interior); 4 - Missions and organisation of the DSND - the Delegate for nuclear safety of defense, the safety authority of national defense (R. Isnard - Ministry of Defense); 5 - Management of radiological emergency situations by the IRSN (V. Chambrette - IRSN); Second plenary session - emergency medical measures: 6 - The Mobile radiological intervention units (CMIR) of fire brigades coping with nuclear accidents (D. Giordan - CMIR Yvelines); 7 - The medical organisation in front of radio-nuclear terrorism - SAMU Presentation (C. Telion - SAMU Paris); 8 - Presentation of the national guide of medical intervention in the case of nuclear or radiological event (J. Balosso, F. Loizzo - Grenoble teaching hospital); 9 - Nuclear accident: advantage and importance of stable iodine in accidental situation (P.Y. Hemidy - EDF); 10 - Place of biological dosimetry in accident crisis management (L. Roy - IRSN); 11 - Management of medical emergencies in nuclear environment - Cogema La Hague and Cherbourg hospital collaboration (P. Pradeau - Cogema la Hague); Third plenary session - Evaluation of consequences: 12 - Crisis tools developed at Meteo-France from the local to the international scale - Meteorological data transmission (F. Bonnardot - Meteo France); 13 - IRSN's radiological consequences unit (A. Thomassin - IRSN); 14 - National crisis organisation at CEA at last exercises experience feedback

  14. 21. ATSR congress - Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    This document brings together the abstracts of all presentations given at the 21. congress of the French association for radiation protection techniques and sciences (ATSR) on the topic of Radiation protection and communication (sociology and communication impact in radiation protection): 1 - radiation protection: a permanent conciliation (G. Berne, SPR Cadarache); 2 - the nuclear argument group (M. Chevalier, R. Rzekiecki, GASN); 3 - role of the technical accreditation centre for radiation protection instrumentation (CTHIR) in radiation protection (G. Bicheron, P. Franco, IPSN); 4 - genotoxicity evaluation of ionizing radiations in a population of industrial radiologists using the lymphocyte micro-nuclei test (Sari-Minodier, T. Orsiere, D. Charrier, A. Botta, Laboratory of Bio-geno-toxicology, Medicine School, Marseille - AIMT 13, Martigues); 5 - impact of iodine 131 effluents from a cancer center on the radioactivity levels of the waste water industry ( E. Desjardins, S. Laugle, J-C. Houy, Centre Eugene Marquis, Rennes); 6 - exposed areas and personnel reclassification in medical establishments (S. Laugle, J-C. Houy, Centre Eugene Marquis, Rennes); 7 - 2SNM - a tool used by the navy for the real-time monitoring of its nuclear facilities (Y. Baron, Navy Military Staff); 8 - Intervention of the Army health service in case of radio-biological-type accident during peacetime (P.M. Curet, M. Croq, Armies Radiobiological Protection Service); 9 - the first aid chain in case of nuclear accident (L. Jorda, fire and safety Services of Bouches-du-Rhone; P. Rigaud, Central group, technological risks unit); 10 - Initiation to radioactivity in seventh grade classes of schools (G. Goulin (physics teacher, college Mignet Aix-en-Provence; J-C. Blanc, G. Juste, ATSR); 11 - communication for young people (H. Bernard, M. Gerster-Martinez, CEA-Cadarache); 12 - major risks, preventive information at Aix-en-Provence (P. Lespinat (Aix-en-Provence city security unit); 13 - scientific

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials.

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials

  17. Detailed analysis of a RCRA landfill for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this detailed analysis is to provide a preliminary compilation of data, information, and estimated costs associated with a RCRA landfill alternative for UNC Disposal Site. This is in response to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) comment No. 6 from their review of a open-quotes Feasibility Study for the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.close quotes

  18. Compendium of ORD and OSWER documents relevant to RCRA corrective action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Throughout the past decade, several offices within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been involved in hazardous waste management technologies research, remedial action at chemically contaminated sites, and regulatory development for permitting hazardous waste management facilities. The primary offices involved in these activities include the Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER). During this period, substantial knowledge and experience have been gained relevant to the a placability of remedial action technologies in various environmental setting

  19. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. The report, the twelfth in the series, covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1978. The following incidents or events in that time period were determined by the Commission to be significant and reportable: (1) There was one abnormal occurrence at the 68 nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The event involved insulation failures in containment electrical penetrations. (2) There were no abnormal occurrences at fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants). (3) There were no abnormal occurrences at other license facilities. (4) There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State Licensee. The event involved an overexposure of a radiographer. The report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  20. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 to September 30, 1989. For this reporting period, there were five abnormal occurrences. One abnormal occurrence took place at a licensed nuclear power plant and involved significant deficiencies associated with the containment recirculation sump at the Trojan facility. The other four abnormal occurrences took place under other NRC-issued licenses: the first involved a medical diagnostic misadministration; the second involved a medical therapy misadministration; the third involved a radiation overexposure of a radiographer; and the fourth involved a significant breakdown and careless disregard of the radiation safety program at three of a licensee's manufacturing facilities. The Agreement States reported no abnormal occurrences during the reporting period. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences. 17 refs

  1. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This seventh Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal years (FY) 1989 and 1990. In November 1989, OCRWM is responsible for disposing of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. To direct the implementation of its mission, OCRWM has established the following objectives: (1) Safe and timely disposal: to establish as soon as practicable the ability to dispose of radioactive waste in a geologic repository licensed by the NRC. (2) Timely and adequate waste acceptance: to begin the operation of the waste management system as soon as practicable in order to obtain the system development and operational benefits that have been identified for the MRS facility. (3) Schedule confidence: to establish confidence in the schedule for waste acceptance and disposal such that the management of radioactive waste is not an obstacle to the nuclear energy option. (4) System flexibility: to ensure that the program has the flexibility necessary for adapting to future circumstances while fulfilling established commitments. To achieve these objectives, OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposed deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for MRS, and a system for transporting the waste

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the thirteenth in the series, covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1978. The following incidents or events in that period were determined by the Commission to be significant and reportable: (1) There were two abnormal occurrences at the 69 nuclear power plants licensed to operate. One involved a generic concern pertaining to fuel assembly control rod guide tube integrity. The second involved an overexposure of two radiation protection technicians. (2) There were no abnormal occurrences at fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants). (3) There were no abnormal occurrences at other licensee facilities. (4) There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an agreement state. The event involved willful violations of regulations and subsequent termination of a license. This report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  3. The 18. World energy congress in Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, M.; Bellec, G.

    2001-01-01

    The World Energy Council held its 18. congress in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from 21 to 25 October 2001 on the theme: 'Energy markets: challenges of the new millennium'. Despite recent events, 3 sitting Heads of State, 25 ministers, around 3,000 delegates from 99 countries and numerous company managers took part in the congress. During the congress closing ceremony on 25 October, the World Energy Prize was awarded to Mr Marcel Boiteux, honorary president of WEC and EDF. In this paper, we publish the speech Mr. Boiteux pronounced during the congress as well as the tribute paid by French Energy Council President Mr. Ailleret. Our readers will also find the congress conclusions and recommendations as well as Gilles Bellec's impressions after the congress. On 13 December, the French Energy Council organised a conference in Paris to discuss the results of the Buenos Aires congress. We publish the conclusions hereafter, which have taken the form of a round table called 'What have we remembered about the Buenos Aires congress ?'. The half-day presentation of the congress works will be published in the French Energy Congress' next letter, due in February 2002. (authors)

  4. RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk- In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Subsequently, this plan was modified again and approved as Y/TS-395, Revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (February 29, 1988). Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. The plan was presented to the state of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. This amended closure plan goes further to include inspection and maintenance criteria along with other details

  5. VII International Congress of Engineering Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana and the Physics Engineering career, the Division of Basic Science and Engineering and its Departments organized the "VII International Congress of Physics Engineering". The Congress was held from 24 to 28 November 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. This congress is the first of its type in Latin America, and because of its international character, it gathers experts on physics engineering from Mexico and all over the globe. Since 1999, this event has shown research, articles, projects, technological developments and vanguard scientists. These activities aim to spread, promote, and share the knowledge of Physics Engineering. The topics of the Congress were: • Renewable energies engineering • Materials technology • Nanotechnology • Medical physics • Educational physics engineering • Nuclear engineering • High precision instrumentation • Atmospheric physics • Optical engineering • Physics history • Acoustics This event integrates lectures on top trending topics with pre-congress workshops, which are given by recognized scientists with an outstanding academic record. The lectures and workshops allow the exchange of experiences, and create and strengthen research networks. The Congress also encourages professional mobility among all universities and research centres from all countries. CIIF2014 Organizing and Editorial Committee Dr. Ernesto Rodrigo Vázquez Cerón Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco ervc@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Luis Enrique Noreña Franco Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco lnf@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Alberto Rubio Ponce Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco arp@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Óscar Olvera Neria Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco oon@correo.azc.uam.mx Professor Jaime Granados Samaniego Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco jgs@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Roberto Tito Hern

  6. 241-CX-70, 241-CX-71, and 241-CX-72 underground storage tanks at the strontium semiworks facility supplemental information to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingle, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This document is a unit-specific contingency plan for the underground storage tanks at the Strontium Semiworks Facility and is intended to be used as a supplement to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan. This unit-specific plan is to be used to demonstrate compliance with the contingency plan requirements of WAC 173-303 for certain Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units. Radioactive material is contained in three underground storage tanks: 241-CX-70, 241-CX-71, and 241-CX-72. Tank 241-CX-70 has been emptied, except for residual quantities of waste, and has been classified as an elementary neutralization tank under the RCRA. Tanks 241-CX-71 and 241-CX-72 contain radioactive and Washington State-only dangerous waste material, but do not present a significant hazard to adjacent facilities, personnel, or the environment. Currently, dangerous waste management activities are not being applied at the tanks. It is unlikely that any incidents presenting hazards to public health or the environment would occur at the Strontium Semiworks Facility

  7. Waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) complex consists of the main structure (WSCF) and four support structures located in the 600 Area of the Hanford site east of the 200 West area and south of the Hanford Meterology Station. WSCF is to be used for low level sample analysis, less than 2 mRem. The Laboratory features state-of-the-art analytical and low level radiological counting equipment for gaseous, soil, and liquid sample analysis. In particular, this facility is to be used to perform Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 sample analysis in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Protocols, room air and stack monitoring sample analysis, waste water treatment process support, and contractor laboratory quality assurance checks. The samples to be analyzed contain very low concentrations of radioisotopes. The main reason that WSCF is considered a Nuclear Facility is due to the storage of samples at the facility. This maintenance Implementation Plan has been developed for maintenace functions associate with the WSCF

  8. Secretary's annual report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    This second annual report of the DOE covers activities of all elements of the department except the independent FERC, which issues its own annual report. Individual chapters concern a posture statement, conservation, solar and other renewable energy, fossil energy, electric energy, nuclear energy, the environment, defense programs, international programs, general science programs, energy information, economic regulation, energy production, and support operations. The following appendixes are also included: foreign direct investments in US energy sources and supplies, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, financial assistance programs for alternative fuel demonstration facilities, and 1978 budget summary. 16 figures, 56 tables. (RWR)

  9. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2002-01-01

    This document provides information on the construction of three new RCRA wells at Waste Management Area U in September 2001. These wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Codes 173-160 and 173-303. Grab samples for geological description and archive were collected every 5 ft throughout the wells. Borehole and drill cuttings were monitored regularly for organic vapors and radionuclide contaminants. At well 299-W18-40, beta-gamma activity was found to be slightly above background at 120 ft below ground surface. All other measurements were below background. Cesium-137 was found at the ground surface and at 3 ft below ground surface (bgs). No other manmade contamination was found. At well 299-W19-44, no radionuclide contamination was found, but several intervals of high carbon monoxide were detected. Cesium-137 was detected at 3 ft bgs at 0.4 pCi/g. At well 299-W19-45, no radionuclide contamination was found, but several intervals of high carbon monoxide were detected. Cesium-137 was detected near the surface at 0.4 pCi/g. No other manmade radionuclide was detected. At well 299-W19-45, samples for geological description and archive were collected every 5 ft throughout the well. No contamination was noted. Cesium-137 was detected near the surface at 0.4 to 1.4 pCi/g. No other manmade radionuclide was detected

  10. The elimination of chlorinated, chlorofluorocarbon, and other RCRA hazardous solvents from the Y-12 Plant's enriched uranium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.H.; Patton, R.L.; Thompson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A major driving force in waste minimization within the plant is the reduction of mixed radioactive wastes associated with operations on highly enriched uranium. High enriched uranium has a high concentration of the uranium-235 isotope (up to 97.5% enrichment) and is radioactive, giving off alpha and low level gamma radiation. The material is fissionable with as little as two pounds dissolved in water being capable of producing a spontaneous chain reaction. For these reasons the material is processed in small batches or small geometries. Additionally, the material is completely recycled because of its strategic and monetary value. Since the early eighties, the plant has had an active waste minimization program which has concentrated on substitution of less hazardous solvents wherever possible. The following paper summarizes efforts in two areas - development of a water-based machining coolant to replace perchloroethylene and substitution of an aliphatic solvent to replace solvents producing hazardous wastes as defined by the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA)

  11. 2014 World Congress on Engineering Asset Management

    CERN Document Server

    Hoohlo, Changela; Mathew, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Engineering asset management encompasses all types of engineered assets including built environment, infrastructure, plant, equipment, hardware systems and components. Following the release of ISO 5500x set of standards, the 9th WCEAM addresses the hugely important issue of what constitutes the body of knowledge in Engineering Asset Management. Topics discussed by Congress delegates are grouped into a number of tracks including strategies for investment and divestment of assets, operations and maintenance of assets, assessments of assets condition, risk and vulnerability, technologies and systems for management of asset, standards, education, training and certification. These proceedings include a sample of the wide range of topics presented during the 9th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management in Pretoria South Africa 28 – 31 October, 2014 and complements other emerging publications and standards that embrace the wide ranging issues concerning the management of engineered physical assets.

  12. Proceedings of World Renewable Energy Congress '99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Mohd Yusof Othman; Baharuddin Yatim

    2000-01-01

    The congress discussed the following subjects, 1. The role of renewable energy in the next millenium; 2. Challenges in the commercialization of renewable energy; 3. The role and agenda for renewable energy towards sustainable development. Topics covered in the technical session were biomass conversion; solar thermal technologies and systems; solar photovoltaic s; renewable energy economics, financing and policy; renewable energy education; climate and the environment; energy and architecture; energy management; wind and hydro technologies and systems; hydrogen and fuel cell

  13. Proliferation of Precision Strike: Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    industrial base. Finally, should Congress legislate requirements for DOD to develop precision strike countermeasures and then provide funding for that...Defense, Part 187 – Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Department of Defense Actions, Section 187.3: Definitions. 32 Bryan Clark and Dan Whiteneck...so many missiles ... referring to reports of Venezuelan arms flowing to Colombian guerrillas.... The Chavez regime also has close ties with

  14. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  15. The Third International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect: Conference Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharov, Douglas J.

    1981-01-01

    Presents highlights from the Third International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect. The topic of child sexual abuse dominated the Congress; other topics included malnutrition, research problems, and concerns of Third World countries. Recommendations of the Congress are summarized.

  16. 13th International Congress on Polymers in Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de, ed. lit.; Jalali, Said, ed. lit.; Camões, Aires, ed. lit; Ferreira, Rui Miguel, ed. lit.; International Congress on Polymers in Concrete, 13, Madeira, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The 13th International Congress on Polymers in Concrete 2010 (13th ICPIC 2010) follows a series of 12 earlier successful congresses, which has been started in London in 1975. These congresses, being held every three years, played a key role in disseminating R&D findings between researchers, academics, industrials and students. The 13th ICPIC was again a forum to exchange knowledge and most recent research findings among participants. It represented a contribution to the development of this im...

  17. 22nd International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The 22nd International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ICTAM) of the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics was hosted by the Australasian mechanics community in the city of Adelaide during the last week of August 2008. Over 1200 delegates met to discuss the latest development in the fields of theoretical and applied mechanics. This volume records the events of the congress and contains selected papers from the sectional lectures and invited lectures presented at the congresses six mini-symposia.

  18. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases. PMID:27621942

  19. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  20. IAEA participation in the International Congress of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The congress is organized every three years, and the latest was held at Montreal, Canada, from 25 August to 1 September, and was attended by about 4000 persons, including approximately 2000 full members. Four scientists from the Agency's staff took part in the congress as full members, and out of a total of 517 scientific papers presented at the congress, three were by the Agency participants. The Agency also participated in a scientific exhibition, which was held along with the congress, with a display entitled 'The Contribution of IAEA to Radiology'

  1. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  2. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references

  3. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  4. Performance demonstration program plan for RCRA constituent analysis of solidified wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Performance Demonstration Programs (PDPS) are designed to help ensure compliance with the Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The PDPs are intended for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to assess and approve the laboratories and other measurement facilities supplying services for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste. The PDPs may also be used by CAO in qualifying laboratories proposing to supply additional analytical services that are required for other than waste characterization, such as WIPP site operations. The purpose of this PDP is to test laboratory performance for the analysis of solidified waste samples for TRU waste characterization. This performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated, solidified TRU waste according to the criteria established in this plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will address levels of regulatory concern and will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization samples. Analyses that are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples for the balance of this document

  5. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5

  6. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Brown, Richard E; Brown, Richard; Masanet, Eric; Nordman, Bruce; Tschudi, Bill; Shehabi, Arman; Stanley, John; Koomey, Jonathan; Sartor, Dale; Chan, Peter; Loper, Joe; Capana, Steve; Hedman, Bruce; Duff, Rebecca; Haines, Evan; Sass, Danielle; Fanara, Andrew

    2007-08-02

    This report is the appendices to a companion report, prepared in response to the request from Congress stated in Public Law 109-431 (H.R. 5646),"An Act to Study and Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Computer Servers in the United States." This report assesses current trends in energy use and energy costs of data centers and servers in the U.S. (especially Federal government facilities) and outlines existing and emerging opportunities for improved energy efficiency. It also makes recommendations for pursuing these energy-efficiency opportunities broadly across the country through the use of information and incentive-based programs.

  7. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Brown, Richard E; Brown, Richard; Masanet, Eric; Nordman, Bruce; Tschudi, Bill; Shehabi, Arman; Stanley, John; Koomey, Jonathan; Sartor, Dale; Chan, Peter; Loper, Joe; Capana, Steve; Hedman, Bruce; Duff, Rebecca; Haines, Evan; Sass, Danielle; Fanara, Andrew

    2007-08-02

    This report was prepared in response to the request from Congress stated in Public Law 109-431 (H.R. 5646),"An Act to Study and Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Computer Servers in the United States." This report assesses current trends in energy use and energy costs of data centers and servers in the U.S. (especially Federal government facilities) and outlines existing and emerging opportunities for improved energy efficiency. It also makes recommendations for pursuing these energy-efficiency opportunities broadly across the country through the use of information and incentive-based programs.

  8. Opportunities for artificial intelligence application in computer- aided management of mixed waste incinerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A.L.; Ferrada, J.J.; Singh, S.P.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) operates a mixed waste incinerator facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. It is designed for the thermal treatment of incinerable liquid, sludge, and solid waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This facility, known as the TSCA Incinerator, services seven DOE/OR installations. This incinerator was recently authorized for production operation in the United States for the processing of mixed (radioactively contaminated-chemically hazardous) wastes as regulated under TSCA and RCRA. Operation of the TSCA Incinerator is highly constrained as a result of the regulatory, institutional, technical, and resource availability requirements. These requirements impact the characteristics and disposition of incinerator residues, limits the quality of liquid and gaseous effluents, limit the characteristics and rates of waste feeds and operating conditions, and restrict the handling of the waste feed inventories. This incinerator facility presents an opportunity for applying computer technology as a technical resource for mixed waste incinerator operation to facilitate promoting and sustaining a continuous performance improvement process while demonstrating compliance. Demonstrated computer-aided management systems could be transferred to future mixed waste incinerator facilities

  9. Low-level radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility -- Permanent disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erpenbeck, E.G.; Jasen, W.G.

    1993-03-01

    Radioactive mixed waste (RMW) disposal at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). Westinghouse Hanford Company, in Richland, Washington, has completed the design of a radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility, which is based on the best available technology compliant with RCRA. When completed, this facility will provide permanent disposal of solid RMW, after treatment, in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions. The facility includes a double clay and geosynthetic liner with a leachate collection system to minimize potential leakage of radioactive or hazardous constituents from the landfill. The two clay liners will be capable of achieving a permeability of less than 1 x 10 -7 cm/s. The two clay liners, along with the two high density polyethylene (HDPE) liners and the leachate collection and removal system, provide a more than conservative, physical containment of any potential radioactive and/or hazardous contamination

  10. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual basis for design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of the Conceptual Basis for Design is to provide a control document that establishes the basis for executing the conceptual design of the Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility. This conceptual design shall provide the basis for preparation of a proposal to Congress by the Department of Energy (DOE) for construction of one or more MRS Facilities for storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and transuranic (TRU) waste. 4 figs., 25 tabs

  11. Development of TRU waste mobile analysis methods for RCRA-regulated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, C.A.; Villarreal, R.; Drake, L.; Figg, D.; Wayne, D.; Goldstein, S.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), dc-arc atomic-emission spectroscopy (DC-ARC-AES), laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) were identified as potential solid-sample analytical techniques for mobile characterization of TRU waste. Each technology developers was provided with surrogate TRU waste samples in order to develop an analytical method. Following successful development of the analytical method, five performance evaluation samples were distributed to each of the researchers in a blind round-robin format. Results of the round robin were compared to known values and Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP) data quality objectives. Only two techniques, DC-ARC-AES and EDXRF, were able to complete the entire project. Methods development for GD-MS and LA-ICP-MS was halted due to the stand-down at the CMR facility. Results of the round-robin analysis are given for the EDXRF and DCARC-AES techniques. While DC-ARC-AES met several of the data quality objectives, the performance of the EDXRF technique by far surpassed the DC-ARC-AES technique. EDXRF is a simple, rugged, field portable instrument that appears to hold great promise for mobile characterization of TRU waste. The performance of this technique needs to be tested on real TRU samples in order to assess interferences from actinide constituents. In addition, mercury and beryllium analysis will require another analytical technique because the EDXRF method failed to meet the TWCP data quality objectives. Mercury analysis is easily accomplished on solid samples by cold vapor atomic fluorescence (CVAFS). Beryllium can be analyzed by any of a variety of emission techniques

  12. House Calls: Physicians in the US Congress, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Matthew N

    2015-11-01

    Physicians occupy a prominent position in the US healthcare system, and physicians who serve in Congress may bring a particular perspective, expertise, and influence to health-related legislation. The purpose of this study was to describe physician membership in the US Congress between 2005 and 2015. Congressional biographical records were searched to identify physicians who served in the US Congress from 2005 to 2015. Political and demographic characteristics of physician-members were compared with those of nonphysician-members of Congress and of all US physicians. The numbers of physicians in recent Congresses also were compared with those in each Congress since 1945. A total of 27 physicians representing 17 states have served in Congress since 2005. There has been a significant increase in physician representation since 1987, reaching a high of 20 members (3.7%) in the Congresses immediately following passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Physician-members were mostly men (93%) and more likely than their Congressional colleagues to be Republican (78% vs 53% of all members, P = 0.007) and from the South (63% vs 35% of all members, P = 0.003). Compared with physicians in general, physicians in Congress were more likely to be men (93% vs 70%, P = 0.009) and surgeons (26% vs 11%, P = 0.01). Physician representation in Congress has increased substantially since 2000, potentially reflecting the greater political prominence of healthcare issues, as well as increased interest by and recruitment of physician-candidates. Physicians in Congress differ from their colleagues and from physicians in general in various demographic and political characteristics.

  13. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  14. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the open-quotes Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967close quotes, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure

  15. H.R. 5477: A Bill to provide the States that are not members of interstate compacts for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste may not site low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities within 60 miles of an international border, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, August 3, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Also applicable to all states, whether interstate compact members or not, are the following restrictions on the siting of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Such facilities may not be sited: within 25 miles of the critical habitat of a species listed as endangered or threatened; within 10 miles of an area determined to be a wetland; or within 10 miles of an area of archaeological importance. The act exempts the three facilities in current operation, namely, those located at Barnwell, North Carolina; Richland, Washington; and Beatty, Nevada

  16. 1991 SOLAR WORLD CONGRESS - VOLUME 1, PART I

    Science.gov (United States)

    The four-volume proceedings document the 1991 Solar World Congress (the biennial congress of the International Solar Energy Society) in Denver, CO, August 19-23, 1991. Volume 1 is dedicated to solar electricity, biofuels, and renewable resources. Volume 2 contains papers on activ...

  17. Annual congress of the South African Society of Pathologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The joint annual congress of the South African Society of Pathologists, International Academy of Pathology, South African Association of Clinical Biochemists and the Southern African Microbiology Society, was held from 13 to 15 July 1981 in Bloemfontein. This congress covered facets of clinical biochemistry, anatomical pathology, virology, microbiology, immunology and molecular biology

  18. 45 CFR 12.15 - Reports to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports to Congress. 12.15 Section 12.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION DISPOSAL AND UTILIZATION OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PURPOSES § 12.15 Reports to Congress. The Secretary will make such...

  19. 21st European Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The 21st European Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology took place in Antwerp 5-8 May 2010. The congress provided the participants with an overview of recent scientific and clinical developments throughout the field of obstetrics and gynaecology, and these are summarized in this article....

  20. 48 CFR 605.403 - Requests from members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests from members of Congress. 605.403 Section 605.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION... members of Congress. The Procurement Executive is the agency head for the purposes of FAR 5.403. [59 FR...

  1. 20 CFR 1001.131 - Secretary's annual report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Secretary's annual report to Congress. 1001.131 Section 1001.131 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT... Compliance § 1001.131 Secretary's annual report to Congress. The Secretary shall report, after the end of...

  2. 5 CFR 842.209 - Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Members of Congress. 842.209 Section 842.209 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Eligibility § 842.209 Members of Congress. (a...

  3. 48 CFR 405.403 - Requests from Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests from Members of Congress. 405.403 Section 405.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Members of Congress. The head of the contracting activity (HCA) is the agency head designee pursuant to...

  4. 75 FR 70031 - Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress. The committee advises NARA on the full range...

  5. 48 CFR 1405.403 - Requests from Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests from Members of Congress. 1405.403 Section 1405.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... from Members of Congress. For purposes of this subpart, the agency head is the HCA with the power of...

  6. 14th South African Psychology Congress | Laher | African Safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In response to the xenophobic violence that erupted in South Africa in May 2008, 'Respecting diversity' was an aptly chosen theme for the 14th South African Psychology Congress, held at Emperors Palace in Johannesburg, South Africa from 26 to 29 August 2008. The congress was hosted by the Psychological Society of ...

  7. 48 CFR 2905.403 - Requests from Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests from Members of Congress. 2905.403 Section 2905.403 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Release Of Information 2905.403 Requests from Members of Congress...

  8. Ninth Biennial Congress of the Association of Physicians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4 Mei 1974 ... The 9th Biennial Congress of the Association of. Physicians of South Africa takes place on the campus of the University of Pretoria during the first week in July. There is every reason to expect that this will be a particularly interesting and im- portant congress and every effort is being made to ensure its ...

  9. 76 FR 31367 - Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress. The committee advises NARA on the full range...

  10. 75 FR 32229 - Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress. The committee advises NARA on the full range...

  11. Abstracts of 3. congress of global anti-nuclear alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The 3 congress of global anti-nuclear alliance was held on 18-20 May, 2000 in Astana. There were 55 reports on different aspects of nuclear disarmament; nuclear safeguards; safe operation of nuclear power plants; rehabilitation of population and lands, damaged from many-years tests in Semipalatinsk site; radiobiological monitoring of ecosystems and others presented at the congress

  12. National congress of radiation protection; Congres national de radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  13. Safety of DOE nuclear facilities. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, H.R. 783, H.R. 2047 and H.R. 3123, November 5 and 19, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    H.R. 783 is a bill to require the Secretary of Energy to ensure the compliance of certain operations of the Department of Energy (DOE) with Federal environmental standards and for other purposes. H.R. 2047 is a bill to establish a Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Agency in order to provide for increased standards of safety with respect to radioactive emissions resulting from activities carried out at nuclear facilities of DOE. H.R. 3123 is a bill to create an independent oversight board to ensure the safety of United States Government nuclear facilities, to apply the provisions of OSHA to certain DOE nuclear facilities, to clarify the jurisdiction and powers of Government agencies dealing with nuclear wastes, to ensure independent research on the effects of radiation on human beings, and for other purposes

  14. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the seventh in the series, covers the period from October 1 to December 31, 1976. The NRC has determined that during this period: (1) There were two abnormal occurrences at the 63 nuclear power plants licensed to operate. One event involved improper control rod withdrawals resulting in an unplanned reactor criticality. The second is a generic event pertaining to feedwater nozzle cracking in Boiling Water Reactors. The incidents had no actual impact on public health or safety. (2) There were five abnormal occurrences at other licensee facilities. The occurrences involved overexposures to radiography personnel; one event also involved high radiation levels in unrestricted areas. This report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences. This report does not contain information on activities in those states which have entered into agreements with the NRC for the assumption of certain regulatory authority pursuant to Section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act, as amended. Future reports will include Agreement State licensee activities as soon as procedures can be implemented

  15. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1988. For this reporting period, there were three abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate: a potential for common mode failure of safety-related components due to a degraded instrument air system at Fort Calhoun; common mode failures of main steam isolation valves at Perry Unit 1; and a cracked pipe weld in a safety injection system at Farley Unit 2. There were six abnormal occurrences at other NRC licensees: a diagnostic medical misadministration; a breakdown in management controls at the Georgia Institute of Technology reactor facility; release of polonium-210 from static elimination devices manufactured by the 3M Company; two therapeutic medical misadministrationS; and a significant widespread breakdown in the radiation safety program at Case Western Reserve University research laboratories. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State (Texas) involving radiation injury to two radiographers. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences. 43 refs

  16. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July-September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 to September 30, 1986. The report states that for this reporting period, there were four abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The events were (1) a differential pressure switch problem in safety systems at LaSalle facility, (2) abnormal cooldown and depressurization transient at Catawba Unit 2, (3) significant safeguards deficiencies at Wolf Creek and Fort St. Vrain, and (4) significant deficiencies in access controls at River Bend Station. There was one abnormal occurrence at the other NRC licensees; it involved a therapeutic medical misadministration. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State; it involved a therapeutic medical misadministration. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  17. 1. National Congress of Environmental Science: Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The First National Congress of Environmental Sciences had a plural participation in the environmental thematic. The public universities and the research institutes of the different states of Mexico submitted papers containing proposals of scientific and technological solutions to the problems of management of hazardous wastes: water and land pollution; new methods of evaluation to pollutants of air and water; protection and conservation of relevant species of the ecology; control of genetic alterations; development and conservation of natural resources, and environmental education. Another part of the abstracts is dedicated to the posters session (Author)

  18. International Congress of Automotive and Transport Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ispas, Nicolae

    2017-01-01

    The volume will include selected and reviewed papers from CONAT - International Congress of Automotive and Transport Engineering to be held in Brasov, Romania, in October 2016. Authors are experts from research, industry and universities coming from 14 countries worldwide. The papers are covering the latest developments in automotive vehicles and environment, advanced transport systems and road traffic, heavy and special vehicles, new materials, manufacturing technologies and logistics, accident research and analysis and innovative solutions for automotive vehicles. The conference will be organized by SIAR (Society of Automotive Engineers from Romania) in cooperation with FISITA. .

  19. International Congress on Information and Communication Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Yogesh; Joshi, Amit; Mishra, Durgesh

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains 69 papers presented at ICICT 2015: International Congress on Information and Communication Technology. The conference was held during 9th and 10th October, 2015, Udaipur, India and organized by CSI Udaipur Chapter, Division IV, SIG-WNS, SIG-e-Agriculture in association with ACM Udaipur Professional Chapter, The Institution of Engineers (India), Udaipur Local Centre and Mining Engineers Association of India, Rajasthan Udaipur Chapter. This volume contains papers mainly focused on ICT for Managerial Applications, E-governance, IOT and e-Mining.

  20. 7th Ambient Assisted Living Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Klausing, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In this book, leading authors in the field discuss developments of Ambient Assisted Living. The contributions have been chosen and invited at the 7th AAL congress, Berlin. It presents new technological developments which support the autonomy and independence of individuals with special needs. As the technological innovation raises also social issues, the book addresses micro and macro economical aspects of assistive systems and puts an additional emphasis on the ethical and legal discussion. The presentation is supported by real world examples and applications.

  1. Low temperature setting iron phosphate ceramics as a stabilization and solidification agent for incinerator ash contaminated with transuranic and RCRA metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, P.G.; Hansen, M.; Wood, E.L.; Frank, S.M.; Sidwell, R.W.; Giglio, J.J.; Johnson, S.G.; Macheret, J.

    1997-01-01

    Incineration of combustible Mixed Transuranic Waste yields an ash residue that contains oxides of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and transuranic metals. In order to dispose of this ash safely, it has to be solidified and stabilized to satisfy appropriate requirements for repository disposal. This paper describes a new method for solidification of incinerator ash, using room temperature setting iron phosphate ceramics, and includes fabrication procedures for these waste forms as well as results of the MCC-1 static leach test, XRD analysis, scanning electron microscopy studies and density measurements of the solidified waste form produced

  2. 2nd European Congress of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Katona, G; Recski, A; Sza’sz, D

    1998-01-01

    This is the second volume of the procedings of the second European Congress of Mathematics. Volume I presents the speeches delivered at the Congress, the list of lectures, and short summaries of the achievements of the prize winners. Together with volume II it contains a collection of contributions by the invited lecturers. Finally, volume II also presents reports on some of the Round Table discussions. This two-volume set thus gives an overview of the state of the art in many fields of mathematics and is therefore of interest to every professional mathematician. Contributors: Vol. I: N. Alon, L. Ambrosio, K. Astala, R. Benedetti, Ch. Bessenrodt, F. Bethuel, P. Bjørstad, E. Bolthausen, J. Bricmont, A. Kupiainen, D. Burago, L. Caporaso, U. Dierkes, I. Dynnikov, L.H. Eliasson, W.T. Gowers, H. Hedenmalm, A. Huber, J. Kaczorowski, J. Kollár, D.O. Kramkov, A.N. Shiryaev, C. Lescop, R. März. Vol. II: J. Matousek, D. McDuff, A.S. Merkurjev, V. Milman, St. Müller, T. Nowicki, E. Olivieri, E. Scoppola, V.P. Platon...

  3. 26 CFR 5e.274-8 - Travel expenses of Members of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel expenses of Members of Congress. 5e.274...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS, TRAVEL EXPENSES OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS § 5e.274-8 Travel expenses of Members of Congress. (a) In general. Members of Congress (including any...

  4. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  5. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  6. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  7. H.R. 1083: a bill to amend the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act to improve procedures for the implementation of compacts providing for the establishment and operation of regional disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste, and for other purposes. Introduced in the US House of Representatives, Ninety-Nineth Congress, First Session, February 7, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The main purpose of H.R. 1083 is to amend the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Act to improve the procedures for establishing regional disposal facilities. The bill defines several terms affecting compacts between states and the federal government. It also outlines state and federal responsibilities for disposing of low-level radioactive wastes, establishes procedures for Congressional review of each compact every five years, and designates the limitations of regional facilities for accepting wastes. The bill concludes with requirements for adequate financing of waste disposal facilities and both technical and financial assistance to states. Implementation of this Act will be the cooperative responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Secretary of Energy, and Secretary of Transportation

  8. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the

  9. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  10. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1977. Quarterly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the tenth in the series, covers the period July 1 to September 30, 1977. The NRC has determined that during this period there were no abnormal occurrences at the 65 nuclear power plants licensed to operate nor at fuel cycle facilities. There was one abnormal occurrence at other licensee facilities, which involved the loss and recovery of a radioactive source and probable overexposure. This report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  11. Annual Report to Congress of the Atomic Energy Commission for 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1967-01-31

    The document represents the 1966 Annual Report of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to Congress. The report opens with a Summary of Atomic Energy Programs in 1966 and includes 18 Chapters, 11 appendices and an index. Chapters are as follows: (1) Licensing and Regulating the Atom; (2) Reactor and Other Nuclear Facility Licensing; (3) The Regulation of Radioactive Materials; (4) Source and Special Nuclear Materials; (5) The Nuclear Defense Effort; (6) Naval Propulsion Reactors; (7) Reactor Development and Technology; (8) Space Nuclear Systems; (9) Isotopic Heat and Power Applications; (10) Isotopic Radiation Applications; (11) The Plowshare Program; (12) International Cooperation Activities; (13) Research Facilities and Projects; (14) Nuclear Education and Training; (15) Informational Activities; (16) Operational Safety; (17) Industrial Participation Aspects; and, (18) Administrative and Management Matters.

  12. Proceedings of the Third World Petroleum Congress. General Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1951-01-01

    The following four papers which were presented at the Third World Petroleum Congress are included in this proceedings: (1) Some Recent Progress in Petroleum Chemistry; (2) Oilfields of the Middle East; (3) Heat and Power from Petroleum; (4) Benefits from Research to the Petroleum Industry. The first paper is in French. Besides these four papers, this proceedings includes the following: composition of councils and committees; national committees and their delegates; general report on preparation and results of the Third World Petroleum Congress; text of resolutions approved by the Congress at the final plenary session; table of sectional meetings; plenary opening session; reception by the Municipal Council of the Hague; official banquet; final plenary session; history of petroleum congress; list of members of the Congress; contents of the Volumes I-X of the Third World Petroleum Congress; index of names occurring in Volumes I-XI of the Proceedings of the Third World Petroleum Congress; list of errata and addenda for Volumes I-XI.

  13. Environmental restoration disposal facility applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements study report. Revision 00

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, F.V.; Vedder, B.L.; Rugg, J.E.

    1995-10-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) will be a landfill authorized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and will comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) substantive requirements. The facility will also comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR), including portions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC), and to-be-considered (TBC) elements such as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. In considering the requirements of CERCLA, a detailed analysis of various alternatives for ERDF was completed using the nine CERCLA criteria, National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), and public comments. The ERDF record of decision (ROD) selected an alternative that includes a RCRA-compliant double-lined trench for the disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes resulting from the remediation of operable units (OU) within the National Priorities List (NPL) sites in the 100, 200, and 300 Areas. Only wastes resulting from the remediation of Hanford NPL sites will be allowed in the ERDF. Of the various siting and design alternatives proposed for ERDF, the selected alternative provides the best combination of features by balancing the nine CERCLA criteria, ARAR compliance, environmentally protective site, and various stakeholder and public recommendations. The ERDF trench design, compliant with RCRA Subtitle C minimum technical requirements (MTR), will be double lined and equipped with a leachate collection system. This design provides a more reliable system to protect groundwater than other proposed alternatives. The ERDF is located on the Hanford Site Central Plateau, southeast of the 200 West Area

  14. RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. In January 1993, the Closure Plan was revised to include inspection and maintenance criteria and to reflect that future monitoring and remediation would be conducted as part of the ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This Closure Plan revision is intended to reflect the placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the Walk-In Pits, revise the closure dates, and acknowledge that the disposition of a monitoring well within the closure site cannot be verified

  15. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  16. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA ampersand Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects ampersand Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC's scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule

  17. Operational experience at the Sludge Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Sludge Treatment Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been in operation since April 1987. The facility was designed to encapsulate hazardous sludge wastes in a cement matrix. Fixation will allow the waste to meet or exceed applicable compressive strength and leachability requirements. Thus, the grout mixture complies with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) guidelines as a nonhazardous waste. The grout mixture is based upon a recipe formulation developed after several years of waste stream characterization and formulation studies. The wastes to be treated at the STF are wastes impounded in two ponds. The ponds have a combined capacity of 4.5 million gallons of sludge. The sludge is transferred from the ponds to a 15,000-gallon capacity storage tank by the use of a dredge. The grout mixture recipe dictates the amount of sludge, cement, fly ash, and admixture required for weighing per batch. All ingredients are weighed and then transferred to a tilt or high energy mixer for mixing. The grout mixture is then transferred to 89- or 96-gallon steel drums. The drums are placed in a storage yard designed for a point source discharge from the yard

  18. S. 705: A Bill to assure fair consideration of the interests of states likely to be affected by the establishment of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, April 5, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    S. 705 is a bill to assure fair consideration of the interests of states likely to be affected by the establishment of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Notification of adjacent states is proposed when waste disposal operations are contemplated at border sites

  19. Tooele Army Depot - South Area Suspected Releases Units RCRA Facility Investigation - Phase II for SWMUs 1, 25, and 37. Appendices: D-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    behavior which may include running, fighting, and/or singing. If the condition persists, a mask-like face, retropulsion or propulsion and a Parkinson ...Toxicity Acute mercury poisoning is usually caused by the soluble inorganic salts. Early signs and symptoms include pharyngitis, dysphagia , abdominal

  20. Proceedings of the world heavy oil congress 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The World Heavy Oil Congress 2011 took place March 2011 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. This congress is an international gathering of heavy oil experts and professionals which takes place every 18 months to discuss issues and opportunities facing the heavy oil industry in terms of commercial, technical, regulatory and geo-political areas. Innovative solutions for improving performance, reducing costs and mitigating environmental impacts are presented. Hundreds of presentations were made, courses were delivered, and over 100 companies from 30 countries exhibited. The congress had support from various companies and government entities.This conference featured 133 papers, all of have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.