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Sample records for rcc pathogenesis mutations

  1. Tumor mutational load and immune parameters across metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC) risk groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Hsieh, James J.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared to patients with favorable or intermediate-risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole exome transcriptome data in RCC patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas that ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes –granzyme A and perforin – or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis found that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. PMID:27538576

  2. A novel mutation causing nephronophthisis in the Lewis polycystic kidney rat localises to a conserved RCC1 domain in Nek8

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    McCooke John K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nephronophthisis (NPHP as a cause of cystic kidney disease is the most common genetic cause of progressive renal failure in children and young adults. NPHP is characterized by abnormal and/or loss of function of proteins associated with primary cilia. Previously, we characterized an autosomal recessive phenotype of cystic kidney disease in the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK rat. Results In this study, quantitative trait locus analysis was used to define a ~1.6Mbp region on rat chromosome 10q25 harbouring the lpk mutation. Targeted genome capture and next-generation sequencing of this region identified a non-synonymous mutation R650C in the NIMA (never in mitosis gene a- related kinase 8 ( Nek8 gene. This is a novel Nek8 mutation that occurs within the regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1-like region of the protein. Specifically, the R650C substitution is located within a G[QRC]LG repeat motif of the predicted seven bladed beta-propeller structure of the RCC1 domain. The rat Nek8 gene is located in a region syntenic to portions of human chromosome 17 and mouse 11. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed abnormally long cilia on LPK kidney epithelial cells, and fluorescence immunohistochemistry for Nek8 protein revealed altered cilia localisation. Conclusions When assessed relative to other Nek8 NPHP mutations, our results indicate the whole propeller structure of the RCC1 domain is important, as the different mutations cause comparable phenotypes. This study establishes the LPK rat as a novel model system for NPHP and further consolidates the link between cystic kidney disease and cilia proteins.

  3. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

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    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  4. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. → Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. → The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP C to PrP Sc . -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP C ) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP Sc ). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP C conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  5. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Liang [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Ji, Hong-Fang, E-mail: jhf@sdut.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  6. Review papers The role of KIT gene mutations in pathogenesis of pediatric mastocytosis

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    Joanna Dawicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mastocytosis is characterized by excessive proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in skin and/or other organs. Two forms of the disease, cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis, differ significantly in symptomatology and clinical course. KIT mutations play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. The presence of p.D816V KIT mutation was detected in the vast majority of adults with systemic mastocytosis. The role of KIT mutations in childhood-onset mastocytosis remains a matter of discussion. More recent studies have shown that cutaneous mastocytosis, which is the most common clinical manifestation of the disease in children, has a genetic background. In contrast to adults, different types of KIT mutations have been described in pediatric and familial mastocytosis. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms in mastocytosis enables targeted therapy using tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  7. Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, Beth N.; Millet, Jean K.; Regan, Andrew D.; Hamilton, Brian S.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Duhamel, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses. PMID:23763835

  8. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesen, H-J; Steinbeck, F; Maruschke, M; Koczan, D; Ziems, B; Hakenberg, O W

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs) presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25) and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58). Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes) has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949) leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and predictive value.

  9. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis: a focus on the EIF2AK4 mutation in onset and pathogenesis

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    Ma L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lijiang Ma,1,* Ruijun Bao2,*1Department of Pediatrics and Medicine, Division of Molecular Genetics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, 2The Children's IBD Center, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH is a pulmonary vascular disease that mainly affects small capillaries in the lung, and is often misdiagnosed as pulmonary arterial hypertension or pulmonary veno-occlusive disease due to similarities in their clinical presentations, prognosis, and management. In patients who are symptomatic, there is a high mortality rate with median survival of 3 years after diagnosis. Both idiopathic and familial PCH cases are being reported, indicating there is genetic component in disease etiology. Mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α kinase 4 (EIF2AK4 gene were identified in familial and idiopathic PCH cases, suggesting EIF2AK4 is a genetic risk factor for PCH. EIF2AK4 mutations were identified in 100% (6/6 of autosomal recessively inherited familial PCH and 20% (2/10 of sporadic PCH cases. EIF2AK4 is a member of serine/threonine kinases. It downregulates protein synthesis in response to a variety of cellular stress such as hypoxia, viral infection, and amino acid deprivation. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2 is a major genetic risk factor in pulmonary arterial hypertension and EIF2AK4 potentially connects with BMPR2 to cause PCH. L-Arginine is substrate of nitric oxide synthase, and L-arginine is depleted during the production of nitric oxide, which may activate EIF2AK4 to inhibit protein synthesis and negatively regulate vasculogenesis. Mammalian target of rapamycin and EIF2α kinase are two major pathways for translational regulation. Mutant EIF2AK4 could promote proliferation of small pulmonary arteries by crosstalk with mammalian targets of the rapamycin signaling pathway. EIF2AK4 may regulate

  10. RUNX1/AML1 point mutations take part in the pathogenesis of radiation-and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yuka; Kimura, Akiro; Harada, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    High frequency of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) has been reported in Hiroshima A-bomb exposed survivors, in resident around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Laboratory and in exposed people by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station Accident. MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is thought to be caused by mutation of runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) gene after a long time post exposure to relatively low dose radiation. In this study, participation of RUNX1/AML1 point mutations was examined in pathogenesis of the title neoplasms experienced in authors' facility. Subjects were 18/417 cases in whom myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) had switched to MDS or AML in the follow-up period of 1-25 years, and 11/124 cases in whom t-MN (therapy-related myeloid neoplasms) had developed during the remission of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in the 1-9.7 years follow up. Point mutations were analyzed by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) followed by base sequencing. In the former cases above, RUNX1 point mutation was found in 5/18 cases and in the latter, 4/11. When patients with persistent decrease of blood cells post therapy of APL were followed up for mutation, their RUNX1 point mutation was detected before they were diagnosed to be morbid of MDS/AML. The point mutation was thus a biomarker of myelo-hematogenic cancer, and was thought useful for early diagnosis of MDS and AML. (T.T.)

  11. RCC-MX (2008 edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, X.; Drubay, B.

    2008-10-01

    The RCC-MX books is a compilation of design and construction rules for the mechanical materials of experimental reactors, for their auxiliaries and irradiation devices. This second edition includes the updates of references to NF, EN and ISO standards, the compliance with the regulations for nuclear pressure equipments, and the feedback since the 2005 edition. It comprises 9 books and a CD-Rom and includes a presentation document. The RCC-MX has been developed for the Jules Horowitz reactor but can be used for the design and construction of new projects of new experimental reactors or new equipments and devices for existing facilities. Content: - Book 1: general dispositions, materials for experimental reactors and their auxiliaries, for irradiation devices and for control or handling mechanisms, complementary requirements and particular dispositions; - Book 2: materials for the reactor and for its level 1 auxiliaries; - Book 3: materials for the reactor and for its level 2 and level 3 auxiliaries, control and handling mechanisms, materials for irradiation devices; - Book 4: technical appendixes - materials characteristics (steels and alloys); - Book 5: technical appendixes (design rules); - Book 6: technical specifications of materials; - Book 7: tests and control methods; - Book 8: welding; - Book 9: fabrication. (J.S.)

  12. Comparisons of ratchetting analysis methods using RCC-M, RCC-MR and ASME codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yu; Cabrillat, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper compares the simplified ratcheting analysis methods used in RCC-M, RCC-MR and ASME with some examples. Firstly, comparisons of the methods in RCC-M and efficiency diagram in RCC-MR are investigated. A special method is used to describe these two methods with curves in one coordinate, and the different conservation is demonstrated. RCC-M method is also be interpreted by SR (second ratio) and v (efficiency index) which is used in RCC-MR. Hence, we can easily compare the previous two methods by defining SR as abscissa and v as ordinate and plotting two curves of them. Secondly, comparisons of the efficiency curve in RCC-MR and methods in ASME-NH APPENDIX T are investigated, with significant creep. At last, two practical evaluations are performed to show the comparisons of aforementioned methods. (authors)

  13. Effect of Presenilin Mutations on APP Cleavage; Insights into the Pathogenesis of FAD

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Nuomin; Liu, Kefu; Qiu, Yunjie; Ren, Zehui; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by progressive memory loss, reduction in cognitive functions, and damage to the brain. The β-amyloid precursor protein can be sequentially cleaved by β- secretase and γ-secretase. Mutations in the presenilin1(PS1) are the most common cause of Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD). PS1 mutations can alter the activity of γ-secretase on the cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein, causing increased Aβ production. Previous studies show that the βAPP-C-ter...

  14. Molecular pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts: mutations in MLC1 cause folding defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarri, A.; Teijido, O.; Lopez-Hernandez, T.; Scheper, G.C.; Barriere, H.; Boor, P.K.I.; Aguado, F.; Zorzano, A.; Palacin, M.; Martinez, A; Lukacs, G.L.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Nunes, V.; Estevez, R.

    2008-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) is a rare type of leukodystrophy, most often caused by mutations in the MLC1 gene. MLC1 is an oligomeric plasma membrane (PM) protein of unknown function expressed mainly in glial cells and neurons. Most disease-causing missense

  15. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis.

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    Leslie Goo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural flexibility or 'breathing' of the envelope (E protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F of the West Nile virus (WNV E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV, but not Zika virus (ZIKV, E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing.

  16. The Role of U2AF1 Mutations in the Pathogenesis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    splicing contribute to disease patho mutation in the spliceosome gene U2AF1 and observed hemat also occur in patients with MDS or acute myeloid...Method for Combining Non-Independent, One-Sided Tests of Significance. Biometrics 31, 987–992. Buschbeck, M., Uribesalgo, I., Wibowo, I., Rué, P

  17. The role of PHD2 mutations in the pathogenesis of erythrocytosis

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    Gardie B

    2014-07-01

    of EPO transcription. The α subunits of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor are hydroxylated by three prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD enzymes, which belong to the iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase superfamily. Sequence analysis of the genes encoding the PHDs in patients with erythrocytosis has revealed heterozygous germline mutations only occurring in Egl nine homolog 1 (EGLN1, also known as PHD2, the gene that encodes PHD2. To date, 24 different EGLN1 mutations comprising missense, frameshift, and nonsense mutations have been described. The phenotypes associated with the patients carrying these mutations are fairly homogeneous and typically limited to erythrocytosis with normal to elevated EPO. However, exceptions exist; for example, there is one case with development of concurrent paraganglioma (PHD2-H374R. Analysis of the erythrocytosis-associated PHD2 missense mutations has shown heterogeneous results. Structural studies reveal that mutations can affect different domains of PHD2. Some are close to the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor α/2-oxoglutarate or the iron binding sites for PHD2. In silico studies demonstrate that the mutations do not always affect fully conserved residues. In vitro and in cellulo studies showed varying effects of the mutations, ranging from mild effects to severe loss of function. The exact mechanism of a potential tumor-suppressor role for PHD2 still needs to be elucidated. A knockin mouse model expressing the first reported PHD2-P317R mutation recapitulates the phenotype observed in humans (erythrocytosis with inappropriately normal serum EPO levels and demonstrates that haploinsufficiency and partial deregulation of PHD2 is sufficient to cause erythrocytosis. Keywords: PHD2, EGLN1, HIF, hypoxia, erythropoietin, erythrocytosis

  18. A tale of two maladies? Pathogenesis of depression with and without the Huntington’s disease gene mutation

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    Xin eDu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a tandem repeat expansion encoding an expanded tract of glutamines in the huntingtin protein. HD is progressive and manifests as psychiatric symptoms (including depression, cognitive deficits (culminating in dementia and motor abnormalities (including chorea. Having reached the 20th anniversary of the discovery of the ‘genetic stutter’ which causes HD, we still lack sophisticated insight into why so many HD patients exhibit affective disorders such as depression at very early stages, prior to overt appearance of motor deficits. In this review, we will focus on depression as the major psychiatric manifestation of HD, discuss potential mechanisms of pathogenesis identified from animal models, and compare depression in HD patients with that of the wider gene-negative population. The discovery of depressive-like behaviours as well as cellular and molecular correlates of depression in transgenic HD mice has added strong support to the hypothesis that the HD mutation adds significantly to the genetic load for depression. A key question is whether HD-associated depression differs from that in the general population. Whilst preclinical studies, clinical data and treatment responses suggest striking similarities, there are also some apparent differences. We discuss various molecular and cellular mechanisms which may contribute to depression in HD, and whether they may generalise to other depressive disorders. The autosomal dominant nature of HD and the existence of models with excellent construct validity provide a unique opportunity to understand the pathogenesis of depression and associated gene-environment interactions. Thus, understanding the pathogenesis of depression in HD may not only facilitate tailored therapeutic approaches for HD sufferers, but may also translate to the clinical depression which devastates the lives of so many people.

  19. Affect of Presenilin Mutations on APP Cleavage; Insights into the Pathogenesis of FAD

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    Nuomin eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is characterized by progressive memory loss, reduction in cognitive functions, and damage to the brain. The β-amyloid precursor protein can be sequentially cleaved by β- secretase and γ-secretase. Mutations in the presenilin1(PS1) are the most common cause of Familial Alzheimer’s disease ( FAD. PS1 mutations can alter the activity of γ-secretase on the cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein, causing increased Aβ production. Previous studies show that the βAPP-C-terminal fragment is first cleaved by β-scretase, primarily generating long fragments of Aβ48 and Aβ49, followed by the stepwise cleavage of every three amino acid residues at the C terminus, resulting in Aβ48-, 45-, 42 line and Aβ49-, 46-, 43-, 40 line. Here, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze unique peptides IAT, VVIA, ITL,TVI,IVI through sequential cleavage, combined with ELISA to test the level of Aβ42 and Aβ40 for validation. The results show that most FAD mutant PS1 can alter the level of Aβ42 and Aβ40 monitored by the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio. Among them, 6 mutants (I143T, H163P, S170F, Q223R, M233V and G384A affect the Aβ42/40 ratio through both Aβ49-40 and Aβ48-38 lines; L166P through decreasing the Aβ49-40 line, 6 mutants (I143V, M146V, G217A, E280A, L381V and L392V through increasing the Aβ48-42 line. More importantly, we found some mutations can affect the γ-secretase cleavage preference of α-CTF and β-CTF. In conclusion, we found that the FAD PS1 mutations mainly increase the generation of Aβ42 by decreasing the cleavage of Aβ42-Aβ38 and Aβ43-Aβ40.

  20. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  1. Plutonium recycle concept for RCC - type PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet, H.; Charlier, A.; Deramaix, P.; Vanderberg, C.

    1975-01-01

    Self-generated Pu recycling schemes in RCC-type PWRs have been defined. The main results of survey studies performed to compare the relative merits of various Pu recycle strategies and the merits of alternative solutions of the assembly design such as the Pu-island assembly or the all-Pu assembly are presented [fr

  2. Four novel FBN1 mutations: Significance for mutant transcript level and EGF-like domain calcium binding in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, H.C.; McIntosh, I.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Francomano, C.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Sakai, L.Y.; Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Defects of fibrillin (FBN1), a glycoprotein component of the extracellular microfibril, cause Marfan syndrome. This disorder is characterized by marked inter- and intrafamilial variation in phenotypic severity. To understand the molecular basis for this clinical observation, the authors have screened the fibrillin gene (FBN1) on chromosome 15, including the newly cloned 5[prime] coding sequence, for disease-producing alterations in a panel of patients with a wide range of manifestations and clinical severity. All the missense mutations identified to date, including two novel mutations discussed here, are associated with classic and moderate to severe disease and occur at residues with putative significance for calcium binding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. In contrast, two new mutations that create premature signals for termination of translation of mRNA and are associated with reduction in the amount of mutant allele transcript produce a range of phenotypic severity. The patient with the lowest amount of mutant transcript has the mildest disease. These data support a role for altered calcium binding to EGF-like domains in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome and suggest a dominant negative mechanism for the pathogenesis of this disorder. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Non-hyperfunctioning nodules from multinodular goiters: a minor role in pathogenesis for somatic activating mutations in the TSH-receptor and Gsalpha subunit genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, C; Sonnet, E; Gicquel, I; Le Gall, J Y; Poirier, J Y; David, V; Maugendre, D

    2001-05-01

    Constitutive activation of the cAMP pathway stimulates thyrocyte proliferation. Gain-of-function mutations in Gsalpha protein have already been identified in thyroid nodules which have lost the ability to trap iodine. In contrast, most of the studies failed to detect somatic activating mutations in the thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R) in non-hyperfunctioning thyroid tumors. The aim of this study was to screen for mutations TSH-R exon 10, encoding the whole intracytoplasmic area involved in signal transduction, and Gsalpha exons 8 and 9, containing the two hot-spot codons 201 and 227, in a subset of non-hyperfunctioning nodules from multinodular goiter. Identified by matching ultrasonography and scintiscan, 22 eufunctioning (normal 99Tc uptake) and 15 nonfunctioning (decreased 99Tc uptake) nodules from 27 non-toxic multinodular goiters were isolated. After DNA extraction, TSH-R exon 10 was analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR products and Gsalpha exons 8 and 9 by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. No mutation of TSH-R or Gsalpha was detected in the 37 nodules analyzed. This absence of mutation, despite the use of two sensitive screening methods associated with the analysis of the TSH-R whole intracytoplasmic area and Gsalpha two hot-spot codons, suggests that TSH-R and Gsalpha play a minor role in the pathogenesis of non-toxic nodules from multinodular goiters.

  4. Screening of the USH1G gene among Spanish patients with Usher syndrome. Lack of mutations and evidence of a minor role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Beneyto, Magdalena; Nájera, Carmen; Morera, Constantino; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Ayuso, Carmen; Millán, Jose

    2007-09-01

    The Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The USH1G gene, encoding SANS, has been found to cause both Usher syndrome type I and atypical Usher syndrome. 109 Spanish unrelated patients suffering from Usher syndrome type I, type II, type III and unclassified Usher syndrome were screened for mutations in this gene, but only eight different changes without a clear pathogenic effect have been detected. Based on these results as well as previous studies in other populations where mutational analysis of this gene has been carried out, one can conclude that USH1G has a minor involvement in Usher syndrome pathogenesis.

  5. Noncoding RNA Expression and Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Distinguish Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (TC-RCC) from Other Renal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Charles H; Armesto, María; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Arestín, María; Manterola, Lorea; Goicoechea, Ibai; Larrea, Erika; Caffarel, María M; Araujo, Angela M; Sole, Carla; Sperga, Maris; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej; López, José I

    2018-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) is a rare recently described renal neoplasm characterized by gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical differences from other renal tumor types and was recently classified as a distinct entity. However, this distinction remains controversial particularly because some genetic studies suggest a close relationship with papillary RCC (PRCC). The molecular basis of this disease remains largely unexplored. We therefore performed noncoding (nc) RNA/miRNA expression analysis and targeted next-generation sequencing mutational profiling on 13 TC-RCC cases (11 pure, two mixed TC-RCC/PRCC) and compared with other renal neoplasms. The expression profile of miRNAs and other ncRNAs in TC-RCC was distinct and validated 10 differentially expressed miRNAs by quantitative RT-PCR, including miR-155 and miR-34a, that were significantly down-regulated compared with PRCC cases (n = 22). With the use of targeted next-generation sequencing we identified mutations in 14 different genes, most frequently (>60% of TC-RCC cases) in ABL1 and PDFGRA genes. These mutations were present in  600) of The Cancer Genome Atlas database. In summary, this study is by far the largest molecular study of TC-RCC cases and the first to investigate either ncRNA expression or their genomic profile. These results add molecular evidence that TC-RCC is indeed a distinct entity from PRCC and other renal neoplasms. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Defining the pathogenesis of the human Atp12p W94R mutation using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulemans, Ann; Seneca, Sara; Pribyl, Thomas; Smet, Joel; Alderweirldt, Valerie; Waeytens, Anouk; Lissens, Willy; Van Coster, Rudy; De Meirleir, Linda; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Gatti, Domenico L; Ackerman, Sharon H

    2010-02-05

    Studies in yeast have shown that a deficiency in Atp12p prevents assembly of the extrinsic domain (F(1)) of complex V and renders cells unable to make ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. De Meirleir et al. (De Meirleir, L., Seneca, S., Lissens, W., De Clercq, I., Eyskens, F., Gerlo, E., Smet, J., and Van Coster, R. (2004) J. Med. Genet. 41, 120-124) have reported that a homozygous missense mutation in the gene for human Atp12p (HuAtp12p), which replaces Trp-94 with Arg, was linked to the death of a 14-month-old patient. We have investigated the impact of the pathogenic W94R mutation on Atp12p structure/function. Plasmid-borne wild type human Atp12p rescues the respiratory defect of a yeast ATP12 deletion mutant (Deltaatp12). The W94R mutation alters the protein at the most highly conserved position in the Pfam sequence and renders HuAtp12p insoluble in the background of Deltaatp12. In contrast, the yeast protein harboring the corresponding mutation, ScAtp12p(W103R), is soluble in the background of Deltaatp12 but not in the background of Deltaatp12Deltafmc1, a strain that also lacks Fmc1p. Fmc1p is a yeast mitochondrial protein not found in higher eukaryotes. Tryptophan 94 (human) or 103 (yeast) is located in a positively charged region of Atp12p, and hence its mutation to arginine does not alter significantly the electrostatic properties of the protein. Instead, we provide evidence that the primary effect of the substitution is on the dynamic properties of Atp12p.

  7. NF-κB2 mutation targets survival, proliferation and differentiation pathways in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Brian A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal NF-κB2 activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. However, a causal role for aberrant NF-κB2 signaling in the development of plasma cell tumors has not been established. Also unclear is the molecular mechanism that drives the tumorigenic process. We investigated these questions by using a transgenic mouse model with lymphocyte-targeted expression of p80HT, a lymphoma-associated NF-κB2 mutant, and human multiple myeloma cell lines. Methods We conducted a detailed histopathological characterization of lymphomas developed in p80HT transgenic mice and microarray gene expression profiling of p80HT B cells with the goal of identifying genes that drive plasma cell tumor development. We further verified the significance of our findings in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Results Approximately 40% of p80HT mice showed elevated levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein in the serum and developed plasma cell tumors. Some of these mice displayed key features of human multiple myeloma with accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, osteolytic bone lesions and/or diffuse osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling of B cells from M-protein-positive p80HT mice revealed aberrant expression of genes known to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Blimp1, survivin, IL-10 and IL-15. In vitro assays demonstrated a critical role of Stat3, a key downstream component of IL-10 signaling, in the survival of human multiple myeloma cells. Conclusions These findings provide a mouse model for human multiple myeloma with aberrant NF-κB2 activation and suggest a molecular mechanism for NF-κB2 signaling in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors by coordinated regulation of plasma cell generation, proliferation and survival.

  8. Coronin-1C and RCC2 guide mesenchymal migration by trafficking Rac1 and controlling GEF exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rosalind C.; Cowell, Christopher A. M.; Hammond, Christina L.; Bergen, Dylan J. M.; Roper, James A.; Feng, Yi; Rendall, Thomas C. S.; Race, Paul R.; Bass, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sustained forward migration through a fibrillar extracellular matrix requires localization of protrusive signals. Contact with fibronectin at the tip of a cell protrusion activates Rac1, and for linear migration it is necessary to dampen Rac1 activity in off-axial positions and redistribute Rac1 from non-protrusive membrane to the leading edge. Here, we identify interactions between coronin-1C (Coro1C), RCC2 and Rac1 that focus active Rac1 to a single protrusion. Coro1C mediates release of inactive Rac1 from non-protrusive membrane and is necessary for Rac1 redistribution to a protrusive tip and fibronectin-dependent Rac1 activation. The second component, RCC2, attenuates Rac1 activation outside the protrusive tip by binding to the Rac1 switch regions and competitively inhibiting GEF action, thus preventing off-axial protrusion. Depletion of Coro1C or RCC2 by RNA interference causes loss of cell polarity that results in shunting migration in 1D or 3D culture systems. Furthermore, morpholinos against Coro1C or RCC2, or mutation of any of the binding sites in the Rac1–RCC2–Coro1C complex delays the arrival of neural crest derivatives at the correct location in developing zebrafish, demonstrating the crucial role in migration guidance in vivo. PMID:25074804

  9. Mutations in the VLGR1 Gene Implicate G-Protein Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Michael D.; Luijendijk, Mirjam W. J.; Humphrey, Kurt D.; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C locus was considered a likely candidate on the basis of its protein motif structure and expressed-sequence-tag representation from both cochlear and retinal subtracted libraries. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing of polymerase-chain-reaction products amplified from 10 genetically independent patients with USH2C and 156 other patients with USH2 identified four isoform-specific VLGR1 mutations (Q2301X, I2906FS, M2931FS, and T6244X) from three families with USH2C, as well as two sporadic cases. All patients with VLGR1 mutations are female, a significant deviation from random expectations. The ligand(s) for the VLGR1 protein is unknown, but on the basis of its potential extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interaction domains and its wide mRNA expression profile, it is probable that VLGR1 serves diverse cellular and signaling processes. VLGR1 mutations have been previously identified in both humans and mice and are associated with a reflex-seizure phenotype in both species. The identification of additional VLGR1 mutations to test whether a phenotype/genotype correlation exists, akin to that shown for other Usher syndrome disease genes, is warranted. PMID:14740321

  10. Accelerated pavement testing of thin RCC over soil cement pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three full-scale roller compacted concrete (RCC pavement sections built over a soil cement base were tested under accelerated pavement testing (APT. The RCC thicknesses varied from 102 mm (4 in. to 152 mm (6 in. and to 203 mm (8 in., respectively. A bi-directional loading device with a dual-tire load assembly was used for this experiment. Each test section was instrumented with multiple pressure cells and strain gages. The objective was to evaluate the structural performance and load carrying capacity of thin RCC-surfaced pavements under accelerated loading. The APT results generally indicated that all three RCC pavement sections tested in this study possessed very high load carrying capacity; an estimated pavement life in terms of equivalent single axle load (ESAL for the thinnest RCC section (i.e., RCC thickness of 102 mm evaluated was approximately 19.2 million. It was observed that a fatigue failure would be the primary pavement distress type for a thin RCC pavement under trafficking. Specifically, the development of fatigue cracking was found to originate from a longitudinal crack at the edge or in the center of a tire print, then extended and propagated, and eventually merged with cracks of other directions. Instrumentation results were used to characterize the fatigue damage under different load magnitudes. Finally, based on the APT performance of this experiment, two fatigue models for predicting the fatigue life of thin RCC pavements were developed. Keywords: Roller compacted concrete, APT, Pavement performance, Non-destructive testing, Fatigue analysis

  11. Mutations in zebrafish lrp2 result in adult-onset ocular pathogenesis that models myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry N Veth

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2 underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals--but not all--develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease.

  12. Creep design rules in french ''RCC-MR'' code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, H.

    1986-04-01

    In this paper, four points enlightening the originality of the ''RCC-MR'' analysis rules in the creep range will be discussed. The three first points will concern elastic analysis, the fourth one materials data. The rules given in this paper are applicable for class 1 components and level A conditions. They are given by way of illustration in a simplified form

  13. Sequential Ground Motion Effects on the Behavior of a Base-Isolated RCC Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sequential ground motion effects on the dynamic responses of reinforced concrete containment (RCC buildings with typical isolators are studied in this paper. Although the base isolation technique is developed to guarantee the security and integrity of RCC buildings under single earthquakes, seismic behavior of base-isolated RCC buildings under sequential ground motions is deficient. Hence, an ensemble of as-recorded sequential ground motions is employed to study the effect of including aftershocks on the seismic evaluation of base-isolated RCC buildings. The results indicate that base isolation can significantly attenuate the earthquake shaking of the RCC building under not only single earthquakes but also seismic sequences. It is also found that the adverse aftershock effect on the RCC can be reduced due to the base isolation applied to the RCC. More importantly, the study indicates that disregarding aftershocks can induce significant underestimation of the isolator displacement for base-isolated RCC buildings.

  14. Creep-fatigue rules in the RCC-MR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drubay, B.

    1988-01-01

    In 1978, CEA, Electricite de France (EDF) and NOVATOME decided to draw up a complete set of design and construction rules for LMFBR components. This RCC-MR code issued in June 1985 and completed in November 1987 was chosen as a sound basis for the next European Fast Reactor (EFR). The purpose of this paper is to describe the present RCC-MR creep-fatigue design rules to be applied with elastic analysis including the modifications adopted in the first addenda. This method is based on a separate evaluation of a fatigue usage fraction V and creep rupture usage fraction W with the common linear summation rule. The fatigue usage fraction is obtained from continuous fatigue curves (without hold times) and from total strain ranges (elastic + plastic + creep). The creep rupture usage fraction W is obtained from stress to rupture curves and a stress σk evaluating the stress generated during the cycle. (author)

  15. RCC1 regulates inner centromeric composition in a Ran-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael Shaofei; Furuta, Maiko; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Dasso, Mary

    2018-01-01

    RCC1 associates to chromatin dynamically within mitosis and catalyzes Ran-GTP production. Exogenous RCC1 disrupts kinetochore structure in Xenopus egg extracts (XEEs), but the molecular basis of this disruption remains unknown. We have investigated this question, utilizing replicated chromosomes that possess paired sister kinetochores. We find that exogenous RCC1 evicts a specific subset of inner KT proteins including Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1) and the chromosome passenger complex (CPC). We generated RCC1 mutants that separate its enzymatic activity and chromatin binding. Strikingly, Sgo1 and CPC eviction depended only on RCC1's chromatin affinity but not its capacity to produce Ran-GTP. RCC1 similarly released Sgo1 and CPC from synthetic kinetochores assembled on CENP-A nucleosome arrays. Together, our findings indicate RCC1 regulates kinetochores at the metaphase-anaphase transition through Ran-GTP-independent displacement of Sgo1 and CPC.

  16. Astrovirus Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cydney Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astroviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young, elderly, and the immunocompromised. Since the discovery of human astrovirus type 1 (HAstV-1 in 1975, the family Astroviridae has expanded to include two more human clades and numerous mammalian and avian-specific genotypes. Despite this, there is still little known about pathogenesis. The following review highlights the current knowledge of astrovirus pathogenesis, and outlines the critical steps needed to further astrovirus research, including the development of animal models of cell culture systems.

  17.  Mutations of noncollagen genes in osteogenesis imperfecta – implications of the gene products in collagen biosynthesis and pathogenesis of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Galicka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Recent investigations revealed that the “brittle bone” phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is caused not only by dominant mutations in collagen type I genes, but also by recessively inherited mutations in genes responsible for the post-translational processing of type I procollagen as well as for bone formation. The phenotype of patients with mutations in noncollagen genes overlaps with very severe type III and lethal type II OI caused by mutations in collagen genes. Mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation (P3H1/CRTAP/CyPB eliminated Pro986 hydroxylation and caused an increase in modification of collagen helix by prolyl 4-hydroxylase and lysyl hydroxylase. However, the importance of these disturbances in the disease pathomechanism is not known. Loss of complex proteins’ function as collagen chaperones may dominate the disease mechanism. The latest findings added to the spectrum of OI-causing and collagen-influencing factors other chaperones (HSP47 and FKBP65 and protein BMP-1, which emphasizes the complexity of collagen folding and secretion as well as their importance in bone formation. Furthermore, mutations in genes encoding transcription factor SP7/Osterix and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF constitute a novel mechanism for OI, which is independent of changes in biosynthesis and processing of collagen.

  18. Analysis of Pumphouse RCC Frame Structure for Soil Structure Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mr A.S. Thombare; Prof. V.P. Kumbhar; Prof. A.H. Kumbhar

    2016-01-01

    When structure is built on ground some elements of structure are direct contact with soil. When loads are applied on structure internal forces are developed in both the structure as well as in soil. It results in deformation of both the components which are independent to each other. This are called soil structure interaction. The analysis is done by using (Bentley STAAD.Pro V8i Version 2007) software. The analysis carried out been pump house structure R.C.C. frame structure find ...

  19. RCC Plug Repair Thermal Tools for Shuttle Mission Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alvaro C.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    A thermal math model for the Space Shuttle Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) Plug Repair was developed to increase the confidence in the repair entry performance and provide a real-time mission support tool. The thermal response of the plug cover plate, local RCC, and metallic attach hardware can be assessed with this model for any location on the wing leading edge. The geometry and spatial location of the thermal mesh also matches the structural mesh which allows for the direct mapping of temperature loads and computation of the thermoelastic stresses. The thermal model was correlated to a full scale plug repair radiant test. To utilize the thermal model for flight analyses, accurate predictions of protuberance heating were required. Wind tunnel testing was performed at CUBRC to characterize the heat flux in both the radial and angular directions. Due to the complexity of the implementation of the protuberance heating, an intermediate program was developed to output the heating per nodal location for all OML surfaces in SINDA format. Three Design Reference Cases (DRC) were evaluated with the correlated plug thermal math model to bound the environments which the plug repair would potentially be used.

  20. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual: Windows Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilcox, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating broadband atmospheric longwave and solar shortwave radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer's response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument's responsivity. This is a user's manual and guide to the RCC software.

  1. The Roles of Environmental Pollutants in the Pathogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Toxic chemicals in pollutants may destroy or cause mutation ... Keywords: Diabetes, Pathogenesis, Pancreas, Mutation, Insulin, Blood vessel. INTRODUCTION. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when .... alter insulin metabolism.

  2. Trichloroethylene exposure and somatic mutations of the VHL gene in patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fevotte Joelle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the association between exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE and mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene and the subsequent risk for renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Methods Cases were recruited from a case-control study previously carried out in France that suggested an association between exposures to high levels of TCE and increased risk of RCC. From 87 cases of RCC recruited for the epidemiological study, 69 were included in the present study. All samples were evaluated by a pathologist in order to identify the histological subtype and then be able to focus on clear cell RCC. The majority of the tumour samples were fixed either in formalin or Bouin's solutions. The majority of the tumours were of the clear cell RCC subtype (48 including 2 cystic RCC. Mutation screening of the 3 VHL coding exons was carried out. A descriptive analysis was performed to compare exposed and non exposed cases of clear cell RCC in terms of prevalence of mutations in both groups. Results In the 48 cases of RCC, four VHL mutations were detected: within exon 1 (c.332G>A, p.Ser111Asn, at the exon 2 splice site (c.463+1G>C and c.463+2T>C and within exon 3 (c.506T>C, p.Leu169Pro. No difference was observed regarding the frequency of mutations in exposed versus unexposed groups: among the clear cell RCC, 25 had been exposed to TCE and 23 had no history of occupational exposure to TCE. Two patients with a mutation were identified in each group. Conclusion This study does not confirm the association between the number and type of VHL gene mutations and exposure to TCE previously described.

  3. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ananda Kumar; Dr. C. Selvamony; A. Seeni; Dr. T. R. Sethuraman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral lo...

  4. t(6;11) renal cell carcinoma (RCC): expanded immunohistochemical profile emphasizing novel RCC markers and report of 10 new genetically confirmed cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathaniel E; Illei, Peter B; Allaf, Mohamed; Gonzalez, Nilda; Morris, Kerry; Hicks, Jessica; Demarzo, Angelo; Reuter, Victor E; Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J; Argani, Pedram

    2014-05-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) harboring the t(6;11)(p21;q12) translocation were first described in 2001 and recently recognized by the 2013 International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. Although these RCCs are known to label for melanocytic markers HMB45 and Melan A and the cysteine protease cathepsin K by immunohistochemistry (IHC), a comprehensive IHC profile has not been reported. We report 10 new t(6;11) RCCs, all confirmed by break-apart TFEB fluorescence in situ hybridization. A tissue microarray containing 6 of these cases and 7 other previously reported t(6;11) RCCs was constructed and immunolabeled for 21 different antigens. Additional whole sections of t(6;11) RCC were labeled with selected IHC markers. t(6;11) RCC labeled diffusely and consistently for cathepsin K and Melan A (13 of 13 cases) and almost always at least focally for HMB45 (12 of 13 cases). They labeled frequently for PAX8 (14 of 23 cases), CD117 (10 of 14 cases), and vimentin (9 of 13 cases). A majority of cases labeled at least focally for cytokeratin Cam5.2 (8 of 13 cases) and CD10 and RCC marker antigen (10 of 14 cases each). In contrast to a prior study's findings, only a minority of cases labeled for Ksp-cadherin (3 of 19 cases). The median H score (product of intensity score and percentage labeling) for phosphorylated S6, a marker of mTOR pathway activation, was 101, which is high relative to most other RCC subtypes. In summary, IHC labeling for PAX8, Cam5.2, CD10, and RCC marker antigen supports classification of the t(6;11) RCC as carcinomas despite frequent negativity for broad-spectrum cytokeratins and EMA. Labeling for PAX8 distinguishes the t(6;11) RCC from epithelioid angiomyolipoma, which otherwise shares a similar immunoprofile. CD117 labeling is more frequent in the t(6;11) RCC compared with the related Xp11 translocation RCC. Increased pS6 expression suggests a possible molecular target for the uncommon t(6;11) RCCs that

  5. t(6;11) Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) Expanded Immunohistochemical Profile Emphasizing Novel RCC Markers and Report of 10 New Genetically Confirmed Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathaniel E.; Illei, Peter B.; Allaf, Mohamed; Gonzalez, Nilda; Morris, Kerry; Hicks, Jessica; DeMarzo, Angelo; Reuter, Victor E.; Amin, Mahul B.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Netto, George J.; Argani, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) harboring the t(6;11)(p21;q12) translocation were first described in 2001 and recently recognized by the 2013 International Society of Uro-logical Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. Although these RCCs are known to label for melanocytic markers HMB45 and Melan A and the cysteine protease cath-epsin K by immunohistochemistry (IHC), a comprehensive IHC profile has not been reported. We report 10 new t(6;11) RCCs, all confirmed by break-apart TFEB fluorescence in situ hybridization. A tissue microarray containing 6 of these cases and 7 other previously reported t(6;11) RCCs was constructed and immunolabeled for 21 different antigens. Additional whole sections of t(6;11) RCC were labeled with selected IHC markers. t(6;11) RCC labeled diffusely and consistently for cathepsin K and Melan A (13 of 13 cases) and almost always at least focally for HMB45 (12 of 13 cases). They labeled frequently for PAX8 (14 of 23 cases), CD117 (10 of 14 cases), and vimentin (9 of 13 cases). A majority of cases labeled at least focally for cytokeratin Cam5.2 (8 of 13 cases) and CD10 and RCC marker antigen (10 of 14 cases each). In contrast to a prior study's findings, only a minority of cases labeled for Ksp-cadherin (3 of 19 cases). The median H score (product of intensity score and percentage labeling) for phosphorylated S6, a marker of mTOR pathway activation, was 101, which is high relative to most other RCC subtypes. In summary, IHC labeling for PAX8, Cam5.2, CD10, and RCC marker antigen supports classification of the t(6;11) RCC as carcinomas despite frequent negativity for broad-spectrum cytokeratins and EMA. Labeling for PAX8 distinguishes the t(6;11) RCC from epithelioid angiomyolipoma, which otherwise shares a similar immunoprofile. CD117 labeling is more frequent in the t(6;11) RCC compared with the related Xp11 translocation RCC. Increased pS6 expression suggests a possible molecular target for the uncommon t(6;11) RCCs that

  6. Simulation analysis of temperature control on RCC arch dam of hydropower station

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIA, Shi-fa

    2017-12-01

    The temperature analysis of roller compacted concrete (RCC) dam plays an important role in their design and construction. Based on three-dimensional finite element method, in the computation of temperature field, many cases are included, such as air temperature, elevated temperature by cement hydration heat, concrete temperature during placing, the influence of water in the reservoir, and boundary temperature. According to the corresponding parameters of RCC arch dam, the analysis of temperature field and stress field during the period of construction and operation is performed. The study demonstrates that detailed thermal stress analysis should be performed for RCC dams to provide a basis to minimize and control the occurrence of thermal cracking.

  7. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ananda Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral load reviews are also presented. This review paper is prepared to find out the performance of basalt fibre reinforced polymer BFRP composite retrofitted reinforced cement concrete single end bearing piles.

  8. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MRi is proposing, with its partner, Exotherm Corp (Camden, NJ) to demonstrate the feasibility of using exothermic brazing to join RCC (or C:SiC) composites to itself...

  9. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  10. Test and Analysis Correlation of Form Impact onto Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge RCC Panel 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan; Melis, Matthew; Carney, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) began their study of the space shuttle Columbia accident, "physics-based" analyses using LS-DYNA were applied to characterize the expected damage to the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge from high-speed foam impacts. Forensic evidence quickly led CAIB investigators to concentrate on the left wing leading edge RCC panels. This paper will concentrate on the test of the left-wing RCC panel 8 conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the correlation with an LS-DYNA analysis. The successful correlation of the LS-DYNA model has resulted in the use of LS-DYNA as a predictive tool for characterizing the threshold of damage for impacts of various debris such as foam, ice, and ablators onto the RCC leading edge for shuttle return-to-flight.

  11. Application of a polycarboxylate ether admixture in RCC dam construction[ACI SP-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmus, S.M.F.; Christensen, B.J.; Varley, N.J. [BASF Construction Chemicals Asia Pacific, Shanghai (China)

    2006-07-01

    Chemical admixtures are used in dam construction to improve plasticity of the dry materials mixture over time. Roller compacted concrete (RCC) has been used on many dam projects in China. However, the use of RCC has frequently resulted in water reduction problems. This paper provided details of an admixture based on polycarboxylate ether (PCE) which was developed to improve the quality of RCC constructions at the JinHong dam in China. Use of the polymer at the JinHong dam resulted in a vibration sensitive concrete that was sustained over time. Under identical mix-design and compaction conditions in the laboratory, specific gravity of the RCC was increased from 2417 kg/m{sup 3} to 2463 kg/m{sup 3}. The high specific gravity of the material resulted in satisfactory strength data from the dam project. The key-ratio of the splitting tensile strength versus compressive strength was higher than 8 per cent in all cases. A key advantage of the tailored PCE-RCC was the short Vebe times sustained over elapsed time in the RCC. Without additional compaction or vibration efforts, the specific density of RCC was better than conventional admixture technologies. The reduced viscosity provided cement paste films which formed on the surface of each layer of the RCC, which resulted in better bonding between the layers. It was concluded that the new PCE polymer is compatible with alternative retarder systems, which contributes to more extensive setting times under strict hydration regimes. 7 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  12. High volume fly ash RCC for dams - I : mixture optimization and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, S. [PEAB Construction Co., Oslo (Norway); Lahus, O. [Norwegian Building Research Inst., Oslo (Norway)

    2001-07-01

    Roller compacted concretes (RCC) were developed for the Norwegian Skjerka hydropower project. RCCs were developed to have a high-volume fly ash content to address environmental issues, including the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions associated with dam construction. They also makes good use of waste product and conserve natural resources. This study examined a series of mixtures to determine the appropriateness of using RCC as a competing alternative to the traditional rock fill dam proposed for the Skjerka hydropower project. The main advantage of RCC is speed, allowing a relatively large dam to be constructed in just one summer season, saving financial costs and providing early return on the investment. In addition, fly ash can be used in the structure, using clean and renewable energy. Several procedures to proportion RCC mixtures were proposed, including the optimal paste volume method which is based on the assumption that an optimal RCC should have just enough paste to fill the space between particles when the granular skeleton has reached its maximum density under compaction. With this assumption, RCC tests began in 1998 in the laboratories of the Norwegian Building Research Institute. An ordinary portland cement was used and combined with ordinary low lime fly ash. Both coarse and fine aggregate were used. The tests determined the optimum paste-mortar ratio, the content of coarse aggregates and the production of specimens for test on hardened and fresh concrete. The study showed that the compressive strength of RCC increased with increasing cement/(cement + fly ash) ratio. The permeability coefficient decreased with increasing cement-content and increasing cement/(cement + fly ash) ratio due to the slow pozzolanic reaction of fly ash making a more open pore structure. It was concluded that an optimized mixture can result in a high performance RCC in terms of fresh and hardened concrete properties. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs.

  13. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  14. Epigenetics and colorectal cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  15. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy

  16. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebin Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  17. RCC2 over-expression in tumor cells alters apoptosis and drug sensitivity by regulating Rac1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Ren, Dong; Li, Su; Ma, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Yan; Xiao, Sheng

    2018-01-10

    Small GTP binding protein Rac1 is a component of NADPH oxidases and is essential for superoxide-induced cell death. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), and this activation can be blocked by regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2), which binds the switch regions of Rac1 to prevent access from GEFs. Three cancer cell lines with up- or down-regulation of RCC2 were used to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis, Rac1 signaling and sensitivity to a group of nine chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 expression in lung cancer and ovarian cancer were studied using immunochemistry stain of tumor tissue arrays. Forced RCC2 expression in tumor cells blocked spontaneous- or Staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. In contrast, RCC2 knock down in these cells resulted in increased apoptosis to STS treatment. The protective activity of RCC2 on apoptosis was revoked by a constitutively activated Rac1, confirming a role of RCC2 in apoptosis by regulating Rac1. In an immunohistochemistry evaluation of tissue microarray, RCC2 was over-expressed in 88.3% of primary lung cancer and 65.2% of ovarian cancer as compared to non-neoplastic lung and ovarian tissues, respectively. Because chemotherapeutic drugs can kill tumor cells by activating Rac1/JNK pathway, we suspect that tumors with RCC2 overexpression would be more resistant to these drugs. Tumor cells with forced RCC2 expression indeed had significant difference in drug sensitivity compared to parental cells using a panel of common chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 regulates apoptosis by blocking Rac1 signaling. RCC2 expression in tumor can be a useful marker for predicting chemotherapeutic response.

  18. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome 1, Volume A: generalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The French Rules of Mechanical equipments of Fast Neutron nuclear Reactors (RCC-MR) aims at equipments included in a safety classification. The equipments concerned are those of the nuclear boiler and its auxiliaries: tanks, vessels, internal equipments of the reactor, exchangers, pumps, fittings, pipes, and supports. The present edition of the RCC-MR comprises 12 books presented in the present one in the volume A. The chapter RA 3000 defines the documents to be established in application of the RCC-MR rules. The chapter RA 5000 defines the requirements to take into account to establish and carry out quality Assurance programs according to the RCC-MR rules [fr

  19. Harmonization of welding qualification provisions in RCC-M and European standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, M.; Lainez, B.; Anastassiades, P.

    2007-01-01

    Since a long time, numerous precautions for welding have been integrated in the nuclear codes, in particular in the RCC-M applicable to pressurized water reactors, in order to guarantee a high quality level of permanent assemblies. In parallel, European and ISO standardization works have led to a harmonisation of practices on qualification of welding processes, welders and operators. In the context of the regulatory evolutions presented during this conference, it was judged appropriate to bring closer the RCC-M practices and those of EN and ISO standards, while taking the precaution of specifying, if necessary, the complementary provisions allowing maintaining guarantees of quality consistent with the prior experience feedback. This paper presents the amendments brought to the RCC-M Code by the 2005 and 2007 addenda, in order to respond to this objective, and develops their motivations. (authors) [fr

  20. Material report in support to RCC-MRX code 2010 stainless steel parts and products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelet, Olivier; Lebarbe, Thierry; Dubiez-Le Goff, Sophie; Bonne, Dominique; Gelineau, Odile

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Material Report dedicated to stainless steels parts and products issued by AFCEN (Association Francaise pour les regles de Conception et de Construction des Materiels des Chaudieres Electro-Nucleaires) in support to RCC-MRx 2010 Code. The RCC-MRx Code is the result of the merger of the RCC-MX 2008, developed in the context of the research reactor Jules Horowitz Reactor project, in the RCC-MR 2007, which set up rules applicable to the design of components operating at high temperature and to the Vacuum Vessel of ITER (a presentation of RCC-MRx 2010 Code is the subject of another paper proposed in this Congress; it explains in particular the status of this Code). This Material Report is part of a set of Criteria of RCC-MRx (this set of Criteria is under construction). The Criteria aim at explaining the design and construction rules of the Code. They cover analyses rules as well as part procurement, welding, methods of tests and examination and fabrication rules. The Material Report particularly provides justifications and explanations on requirements and features dealing with parts and products proposed in the Code. The Material Report contains the following information: Introduction of the grade(s): codes and standards and Reference Procurement Specifications covering parts and products, applications and experience gained, - Physical properties, - Mechanical properties used for design calculations (base metal and welds): basic mechanical properties, creep mechanical properties, irradiated mechanical properties, - Fabrication: experience gained, metallurgy, - Welding: weldability, experience gained during welding and repair procedure qualifications, - Non-destructive examination, - In-service behaviour. In the article, examples of data supplied in the Material Report dedicated to stainless steels will be exposed. (authors)

  1. ASME and RCC-MR comparison for the prevention of fatigue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autrusson, B.; Acker, D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this survey is to compare the simplified methods, without reference to the safety factor allowed for the mechanical properties. An application of both codes, RCC-MR and ASME, on the design of the wall mock-up of the NET project is made and also an estimation with an elastoplastic analysis. In the case of fatigue analysis according to ASME in the plastic field, the elastic stress is magnified by a K e factor derived from stress variation, S n , disregarding geometrical discontinuities. According to RCC-MR, the elastic maximum strain will magnified by two coefficients accounting for plasticity and variation of Poisson ratio

  2. RCC-C: Design and construction rules for fuel assemblies of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The RCC-C code contains all the requirements for the design, fabrication and inspection of nuclear fuel assemblies and the different types of core components (rod cluster control assemblies, burnable poison rod assemblies, primary and secondary source assemblies and thimble plug assemblies). The design, fabrication and inspection rules defined in RCC-C leverage the results of the research and development work pioneered in France, Europe and worldwide, and which have been successfully used by industry to design and build nuclear fuel assemblies and incorporate the resulting feedback. The code's scope covers: fuel system design, especially for assemblies, the fuel rod and associated core components, the characteristics to be checked for products and parts, fabrication methods and associated inspection methods. The RCC-C code is used by the operator of the PWR nuclear power plants in France as a reference when sourcing fuel from the world's top two suppliers in the PWR market, given that the French operator is the world's largest buyer of PWR fuel. Fuel for EPR projects is manufactured according to the provisions of the RCC-C code. The code is available in French and English. The 2005 edition has been translated into Chinese. Contents of the 2015 edition of the RCC-C code: Chapter 1 - General provisions: 1.1 Purpose of the RCC-C, 1.2 Definitions, 1.3 Applicable standards, 1.4 Equipment subject to the RCC-C, 1.5 Management system, 1.6 Processing of non-conformances; Chapter 2 - Description of the equipment subject to the RCC-C: 2.1 Fuel assembly, 2.2 Core components; Chapter 3 - Design: Safety functions, operating functions and environment of fuel assemblies and core components, design and safety principles; Chapter 4 - Manufacturing: 4.1 Materials and part characteristics, 4.2 Assembly requirements, 4.3 Manufacturing and inspection processes, 4.4 Inspection methods, 4.5 Certification of NDT inspectors, 4.6 Characteristics to be inspected for the

  3. GSK-3 inhibition in vitro and in vivo enhances antitumor effect of sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazoe, Hisashi; Bilim, Vladimir N. [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Ugolkov, Andrey V., E-mail: ugolkov@northwestern.edu [Tumor Biology Core, Center for Developmental Therapeutics, Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Silverman Hall B733, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Yuuki, Kaori; Naito, Sei; Nagaoka, Akira; Kato, Tomoyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Tomita, Yoshihiko, E-mail: ytomita@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorafenib treatment upregulated GSK-3{beta} levels in RCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3 suppressed xenograft RCC tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of GSK-3 enhanced antitumor effect of sorafenib in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor approved for the systemic treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, sorafenib treatment has a limited effect due to acquired chemoresistance of RCC. Previously, we identified glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) as a new therapeutic target in RCC. Here, we observed that sorafenib inhibits proliferation and survival of RCC cells. Significantly, we revealed that sorafenib enhances GSK-3 activity in RCC cells, which could be a potential mechanism of acquired chemoresistance. We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 potentiates sorafenib antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that combining GSK-3 inhibitor and sorafenib might be a potential new therapeutic approach for RCC treatment.

  4. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17, Chapter 4, Pulse Code Modulation Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A-4 Appendix 4-B. Citations ...investigation can be found in a paper by J. L. Maury, Jr. and J. Styles , “Development of Optimum Frame Synchronization Codes for Goddard Space Flight Center...Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 4, July 2017 B-1 APPENDIX 4-B Citations Aeronautical Radio, Inc. Mark 33 Digital Information Transfer

  5. 77 FR 17569 - United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC)-Transportation-Dangerous Goods Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... identified in the Joint Action Plan, the Transportation--Dangerous Goods Working Group led by senior...)-- Transportation--Dangerous Goods Working Group AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...--Dangerous Goods Working Group, of the United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC). Comments...

  6. RCC-E: Design and construction rules for electrical equipment of PWR nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    RCC-E describes the rules for designing, building and installing electrical and I and C systems and equipment for pressurized water reactors. The code was drafted in partnership with industry, engineering firms, manufacturers, building control firms and operators, and represents a collection of best practices in accordance with IAEA requirements and IEC standards. The code's scope covers: architecture and the associated systems, materials engineering and the qualification procedure for normal and accidental environmental conditions, facility engineering and management of common cause failures (electrical and I and C) and electromagnetic interference, testing and inspecting electrical characteristics, quality assurance requirements supplementing ISO 9001 and activity monitoring. Use: RCC-E has been used to build the following power plants: France's last 12 nuclear units (1,300 MWe (8) and 1,450 MWe (4)), 2 M310 reactors in Korea (2), 44 M310 (4), CPR-1000 (28), CPR-600 (6), HPR-1000 (4) and EPR (2) reactors in service or undergoing construction in China, 1 EPR reactor in France. RCC-E is used for maintenance operations in French power plants (58 units) and Chinese M310 and CPR-1000 power plants. RCC-E has been chosen for the construction of the EPR plants in Hinkley Point, UK. Contents of the 2016 edition of the RCC-E code: Volume 1 - General requirements and quality assurance; Volume 2 - Specification of requirements; Volume 3 - I and C systems; Volume 4 - Electrical systems; Volume 5 - Materials engineering; Volume 6 - Installation of electrical and I and C systems; Volume 7 - Inspection and test methods

  7. RCC-M - Design and Conception Rules for Mechanical Components of PWR Nuclear Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The design and construction rules applicable to mechanical components of PWR Nuclear Islands (RCC-M) are a part of the collection of design and construction rules for nuclear power plants. It covers the rules applicable to the design and manufacture of pressure boundaries of mechanical equipment of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The pressure components subject to the RCC-M are specified in A 4000. They include the reactor fluid systems (primary, secondary and auxiliary systems) and other components which are not subject to pressure: vessel internals, supports for pressure components subject to the RCC-M, nuclear island storage tanks. When a pressure equipment is subject to the RCC-M, all its elements subject to pressure are also, in accordance with the provisions of A 4000, and these elements are the same class as the component. In this case all the provisions of the RCC-M are applicable: design, procurement, manufacture, inspection and pressure testing. Elements which are not subject to pressure and which are subject to the RCC-M may be covered within the Code by limited specific provisions (procurement of materials for example). The other rules applicable to this equipment must be in contractual form. The assemblies comprising pressure equipment assembled by a manufacturer to constitute an integrated and functional whole, shall be subject to the rules indicated in this Code. Main objectives of Code Requirements are to ensure the integrity and mechanical stability over the equipment design life. Function ability and operability of equipment are not directly addressed in the Code. The RCC-M contributes to ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements. These requirements depend on the applicable regulatory context. The RCC-M is representative of the state of the art as concerns the design and manufacture of PWR components, ensuring an overall safety level tested through experience. The RCC-M consists of five sections, which provide rules for the design and

  8. The RCC-MR design code for LMFBR components. A useful basic for fusion reactor design tools development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acker, D.; Chevereau, G.

    1985-11-01

    LMFBR and fusion reactors exhibit common features with regard to structural materials (Stainless steels), temperature service level (550-600 0 C), loading types. So, design and construction rules used in France for LMFBR, that is to say RCC-MR Code, can constitute a good basis for fusion reactors design. Some original aspects of RCC-MR design rules are described, relating to unsignificant creep, ratchetting effect, fatigue and creep damage limits, creep damage evaluation, fatigue damage evaluation, buckling. The main originality of RCC-MR consists to propose comprehensive simplified rules based on elastic calculations and extended from classical cold temperatures to the elevated temperature domain

  9. The RCC-MR design code for LMFBR components. A useful basis for fusion reactor design tools development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acker, D.; Chevereau, G.

    1986-01-01

    LMFBR and fusion reactors exhibit common features with regard to structural materials, temperature service level, loading types. So, design and construction rules used in France for LMFBR, that is to say RCC-MR Code, can constitute a good basis for fusion reactors design. Some original aspects of RCC-MR design rules are described, relating to unsignificant creep, ratchetting effect, fatigue and creep damage limits, creep damage evaluation, fatigue damage evaluation, buckling. The main originality of RCC-MR consists to propose comprehensive simplified rules based on elastic calculations and extended from classical cold temperatures to the elevated temperature domain. (author)

  10. Application of the active flexible fixture with passive RCC function to peg-in-hole task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the active flexible fixture (AFLEF) with passive RCC to the peg-in-hole task on the disk in the X-band accelerator. The AFLEF can fix any work and position the fixed work at short range. In this paper, the 2-dimensional AFLEF is proposed as the simplified type and is provided with passive RCC function to be equipped with dexterity for a peg-in-hole task. As results of the experiment on the peg-in-hole task on the X-band accelerator disks with the AFLEF, we make the ability of the AFLEF for the task clear and also the boundary conditions to the complete task clear. (author)

  11. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17. Chapter 8. Digital Data Bus Acquisition Formatting Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    incorrect word count/message and illegal mode codes are not considered bus errors. 8.6.2 Source Signal The source of data is a signal conforming to...Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 8, July 2017 CHAPTER 8 Digital Data Bus Acquisition Formatting Standard Acronyms...check FCS frame check sequence HDDR high-density digital recording MIL-STD Military Standard msb most significant bit PCM pulse code modulation

  12. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17, Chapter 27, RF Network Access Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    to the physical media (i.e., the wireless RF network). On the transmission side, it is responsible for framing IP packets for physical transmission ...resolution bandwidth of 30 kHz. It was measured during the steady power condition during a burst transmission . Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard... power levels available for modulated burst transmission . Table 27-1. Transceiver Phase Noise Mask dBc/Hz Frequency Offset −30 dBc/Hz 10 Hz −60 dBc

  13. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17. Chapter 3. Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Standard 106-17 Chapter 3, July 2017 3-5 Table 3-4. Constant-Bandwidth FM Subcarrier Channels Frequency Criteria\\Channels: A B C D E F G H Deviation ...Telemetry Standards , RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 3, July 2017 3-i CHAPTER 3 Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards Acronyms...Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards ................................ 3-1 3.1 General

  14. RCC-CW - Rules for design and construction of PWR nuclear civil works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    RCC-CW describes the rules for designing, building and testing civil engineering works in PWR reactors. It explains the principles and requirements for the safety, serviceability and durability of concrete and metal frame structures, based on Eurocode design principles (European standards for the structural design of construction works) combined with specific measures for safety-class buildings. The code is produced as part of the RCC-CW Subcommittee, which includes all the parties involved in civil engineering works in the nuclear sector: clients, contractors, general and specialized firms, consultancies and inspection offices. The code covers the following areas relating to the design and construction of civil engineering works that play an important safety role: geotechnical aspects, reinforced concrete structures and galleries, pre-stressed containments with metal liner, metal containment and pool liners, metal frames, anchors, concrete cylinder pipes, containment leak tests. The RCC-CW code is available as an ETC-C version specific to EPR projects (European pressurized reactor). Contents of the 2016 edition of the RCC-CW Code: Part G - General: scope, standards, notations, quality management, general principles; Part D - Design: actions and combinations of actions, geotechnical aspects, pre-stressed or reinforced concrete structures, metal containment liners, metal pool liners, metal frames, anchors; Part C - Construction: geotechnical aspects, concrete, surface finish and formwork, reinforcement for reinforced concrete, pre-stressing processes, prefabricated concrete elements, metal containment liners, metal pool liners, metal frames, anchors, embedded pipelines, joint sealing, survey networks and tolerances; Part M - Maintenance and monitoring: containment integrity and rate tests

  15. Consideration of creep in design rules of AFCEN RCC-MRx 2012 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebarbe, T.; Petesch, C.; Lejeail, Y.; Lamagnere, P.; Dubiez-Le Goff, S.

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 edition of the RCC-MRx Code has been issued in French and English versions by AFCEN (Association Francaise pour les regles de Conception et de Construction des Materiels des Chaudieres Electro-nucleaires). This Code is the result of the merger of the RCC-MX 2008 developed in the context of the research reactor Jules Horowitz Reactor project, in the RCC-MR 2007 which set up rules applicable to the design of components operating at high temperature and to the Vacuum Vessel of ITER. This new edition is the opportunity to publish also the background of the rules. This paper is one illustration of what may be such a document, on a dedicated example, the creep rules. It contains an overview of the design rules associated to the creep damage and explains the purpose and the origins of these rules. This type of exercise is going to be generalized to all the parts of the code in AFCEN technical publications, the criteria. (authors)

  16. Germline fumarate hydratase mutations in patients with ovarian mucinous cystadenoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylisaukko-oja, Sanna K.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lehtonen, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene were recently shown to predispose to the dominantly inherited syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). HLRCC is characterized by benign leiomyomas of the skin and the uterus, renal cell carcinoma, and uterine...... leiomyosarcoma. The aim of this study was to identify new families with FH mutations, and to further examine the tumor spectrum associated with FH mutations. FH germline mutations were screened from 89 patients with RCC, skin leiomyomas or ovarian tumors. Subsequently, 13 ovarian and 48 bladder carcinomas were...

  17. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...

  18. Mitochondrial Contribution to Parkinson's Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony H. V. Schapira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the etiologies and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD should play an important role in enabling the development of novel treatment strategies to prevent or slow the progression of the disease. The last few years have seen enormous progress in this respect. Abnormalities of mitochondrial function and increased free radical mediated damage were described in post mortem PD brain before the first gene mutations causing familial PD were published. Several genetic causes are now known to induce loss of dopaminergic cells and parkinsonism, and study of the mechanisms by which these mutations produce this effect has provided important insights into the pathogenesis of PD and confirmed mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress pathways as central to PD pathogenesis. Abnormalities of protein metabolism including protein mis-folding and aggregation are also crucial to the pathology of PD. Genetic causes of PD have specifically highlighted the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction to PD: PINK1, parkin, DJ-1 and most recently alpha-synuclein proteins have been shown to localise to mitochondria and influence function. The turnover of mitochondria by autophagy (mitophagy has also become a focus of attention. This review summarises recent discoveries in the contribution of mitochondrial abnormalities to PD etiology and pathogenesis.

  19. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  20. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  1. A comparative study of physical and chemical properties of different pozzolanic materials used for roller compacted concrete RCC dams

    OpenAIRE

    Husein Malkawi Abdallah I.; Shatnawi Ehab; Husein Malkawi Dima A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the feasibility and the efficiency of using Natural Pozzolan and/or Rock flour in Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC) gravity dams. For this purpose, five identical mortar trial mixes were prepared using five different supplementary materials, i.e., fly ash produced in South Africa (proven to be effective in RCC construction), fly ash produced in Turkey, Jordanian natural pozzolan, Saudi natural pozzolan, and rock flour from Mujib Dam basalt quarry. The physical and chemical ...

  2. Achondroplasia: Development, pathogenesis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornitz, David M; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2017-04-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) cause achondroplasia (Ach), the most common form of dwarfism in humans, and related chondrodysplasia syndromes that include hypochondroplasia (Hch), severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans (SADDAN), and thanatophoric dysplasia (TD). FGFR3 is expressed in chondrocytes and mature osteoblasts where it functions to regulate bone growth. Analysis of the mutations in FGFR3 revealed increased signaling through a combination of mechanisms that include stabilization of the receptor, enhanced dimerization, and enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. Paradoxically, increased FGFR3 signaling profoundly suppresses proliferation and maturation of growth plate chondrocytes resulting in decreased growth plate size, reduced trabecular bone volume, and resulting decreased bone elongation. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that regulate growth plate chondrocytes, the pathogenesis of Ach, and therapeutic approaches that are being evaluated to improve endochondral bone growth in people with Ach and related conditions. Developmental Dynamics 246:291-309, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bayrak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A subset of renal cell carcinoma (RCC patients has been shown to respond to anti-EGFR therapy. As KRAS and BRAF mutations are associated with poor response to anti-EGFR therapy in some cancers, it has been suggested that screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in RCC may be a promising strategy to identify patients who might respond to EGFR-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation status of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF in RCC patients. Renal tumors and normal renal samples from forty-eight patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer were used in this study. Histological classification of the tumors was performed according to International Union against Cancer (UICC / American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC classification. Seventeen patients (48% had clear-cell RCC, 7 (20% had chromophobe RCC, and 11 patients (32% had papillary RCC. DNA isolated from the samples was subjected to melting curve mutation analysis for EGFR, BRAF and KRAS using ABI-3130 DNA sequencer. DNA sequencing analysis of RCC samples, when compared with morphologically normal matched regions, did not show any exon mutations. Our results do not support the notion that EGFR, KRAS and BRAF might be mutated in RCC. Normal 0 false false false TR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:TR; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  4. Proper understanding of relevant articles in RCC-M and PANE G-7-002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zaozhan

    2005-01-01

    The French code, 'Design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear island' RCC-M and the Russian code 'Regulations for strength analysis of equipment and pipelines of atomic power plants' PANE G-7-002, both for nuke plant design, are sometimes used in China, and discrepancies in understanding some articles of such foreign design codes will some times give different conclusions as 'acceptable' or 'unacceptable' the concerned material or product. Section IV of RCC-M concerns with qualification and performance of welding operations. Article S 3150 in this section covers the retesting procedures and article S 3152 in it relates to destructive tests. One sentence in Article S 3152 reads like this, 'Where an unsatisfactory result is due to the poor execution of the test or the presence of a defect in the specimen, the relevant result must be discarded and the test shall be repeated.' The 'presence of a defect' arose discrepancies in understanding the sentence because there is no definition in RCC-M to clarify their scopes such as how big a defect should be considered as a 'defect' that can invalidate the test results. Section 5.5 of PANE G-7-002 concerns the determination of critical brittle temperature. It stipulates that critical brittle temperature T k is a temperature at which the impact strength values must be higher than the specified ones. The specified criterion values of impact strength are related to the yield strength but it is not quite definite that the yield strength values in the table should be the documented minimum values for different materials or that they should be the tested results of the concerned lots of materials the specimen represents. The two different understandings of the yield strength values will sometimes give contrary conclusions. This paper introduces the different opinions in understanding the code texts, makes clear what it supports, and states in detail the reasons it so believes. (authors)

  5. RCC-M: Design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    AFCEN's RCC-M code concerns the mechanical components designed and manufactured for pressurized water reactors (PWR). It applies to pressure equipment in nuclear islands in safety classes 1, 2 and 3, and certain non-pressure components, such as vessel internals, supporting structures for safety class components, storage tanks and containment penetrations. RCC-M covers the following technical subjects: sizing and design, choice of materials and procurement. Fabrication and control, including: associated qualification requirements (procedures, welders and operators, etc.), control methods to be implemented, acceptance criteria for detected defects, documentation associated with the different activities covered, and quality assurance. The design, manufacture and inspection rules defined in RCC-M leverage the results of the research and development work pioneered in France, Europe and worldwide, and which have been successfully used by industry to design and build PWR nuclear islands. AFCEN's rules incorporate the resulting feedback. Use: France's last 16 nuclear units (P'4 and N4); 4 CP1 reactors in South Africa (2) and Korea (2); 44 M310 (4), CPR-1000 (28), CPR-600 (6), HPR-1000 (4) and EPR (2) reactors in service or undergoing construction in China; 4 EPR reactors in Europe: Finland (1), France (1) and UK (2). Content: Section I - nuclear island components, subsection 'A': general rules, subsection 'B': class 1 components, subsection 'C': class 2 components, subsection 'D': class 3 components, subsection 'E': small components, subsection 'G': core support structures, subsection 'H': supports, subsection 'J': low pressure or atmospheric storage tanks, subsection 'P': containment penetration, subsection 'Q': qualification of active mechanical components, subsection 'Z': technical appendices; section II - materials; section III - examination

  6. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  8. Evaluation of KALIMER IHTS piping using French RCC-MR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Kim, J. B.; Lee, J. H.

    2001-12-01

    In the present report, the evaluation of design integrity for the liquid metal reactor(LMR) of KALIMER IHTS(intermediate heat transport system) piping according to the French design guideline of RCC-MR RC3600 developed for secondary piping of LMR and the evaluation procedure was presented. The evaluation results showed that the results by the simple RC-3600 procedure of design by formula were more conservative than those of ASME section III subsection NH of the design by analysis for the class I structural components

  9. Role of heteroplasmic mutations in the mitochondrial genome and the ID4 gene promoter methylation region in the pathogenesis of chronic aplastic anemia in patients suffering from Kidney yin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xing; Wang, Jing-Yi; Liu, Kui; Cui, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Ya-Qin; Wang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    To analyze changes in gene amplification in the mitochondrial genome and in the ID4 gene promoter methylation region in patients with chronic aplastic anemia (CAA) suffering from Kidney (Shen) yin deficiency or Kidney yang deficiency. Bone marrow and oral epithelium samples were collected from CAA patients with Kidney yin deficiency or Kidney yang deficiency (20 cases). Bone marrow samples were collected from 20 healthy volunteers. The mitochondrial genome was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were used for sequencing and analysis. Higher mutational rates were observed in the ND1-2, ND4-6, and CYTB genes in CAA patients suffering from Kidney yin deficiency. Moreover, the ID4 gene was unmethylated in bone marrow samples from healthy individuals, but was methylated in some CAA patients suffering from Kidney yin deficiency (positive rate, 60%) and Kidney yang deficiency (positive rate, 55%). These data supported that gene mutations can alter the expression of respiratory chain enzyme complexes in CAA patients, resulting in energy metabolism impairment and promoting the physiological and pathological processes of hematopoietic failure. Functional impairment of the mitochondrial respiration chain induced by gene mutation may be an important reason for hematopoietic failure in patients with CAA. This change is closely related to maternal inheritance and Kidney yin deficiency. Finally, these data supported the assertion that it is easy to treat disease in patients suffering from yang deficiency and difficult to treat disease in patients suffering from yin deficiency.

  10. Modern concepts of pathogenesis of ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Володимирівна Дмитренко

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The modern concepts of ichthyosis are rather ambiguous and need more precise definition. The modern conception of pathogenesis of ichthysosis is offered and considered in this article.Aim. An aim is to analyze received data of our researches about molecular disturbances of keratin on the background of ichthyosis and the current data on the pathogenesis of disease.Materials and methods. An analysis of the results of research in 70 patients with ichthyosis by the methods of the flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and by immunologic methods is presented in an article.Results. Authors revealed molecular, immunologic and immunohistochemical changes that realizes the disturbance of keratinization on the background of this disease. The model of pathogenesis of the various manifestations of gene mutations that causes ichthyosis is proposed and it can be taken into account when elaborating the new directions of therapy.Conclusions. Gene mutations that cause ichthyosis realizes on the background of disturbance of the cell cycle causing cornification and disturb the local and general immune reactions that summarily lead to the clinical presentations of disease. 

  11. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...

  12. RCC-F: Design and construction rules for PWR fire protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The RCC-F code defines the rules for designing, building and installing the fire protection systems used to manage the nuclear hazards inherent in the outbreak of a fire inside the facility and thereby control the fundamental nuclear functions. The code provides fire protection recommendations in terms of: the industrial risk (loss of assets and/or operation), personnel safety, the environment. The code is divided into five main sections: generalities, design safety principles, fire protection design bases, construction provisions, rules for installing the fire protection components and equipment. The RCC-F code is available as an ETC-F version specifically for EPR projects (European pressurized reactor). Contents of the 2013 edition of the ETC-F code: Volume A - Generalities: Structure of ETC-F general points, documentation (in progress), chapter (provision) quality assurance; Volume B - Design safety principles: design nuclear safety principles; Volume C - Fire protection design bases: fire protection design bases; Volume D - Construction provisions: construction provisions; Volume E - Installation rules for fire protection: rules for installing the fire protection, components and equipment

  13. Feline Coronaviruses: Pathogenesis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, G; Thiel, H-J

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) belongs to the few animal virus diseases in which, in the course of a generally harmless persistent infection, a virus acquires a small number of mutations that fundamentally change its pathogenicity, invariably resulting in a fatal outcome. The causative agent of this deadly disease, feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), arises from feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). The review summarizes our current knowledge of the genome and proteome of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs), focusing on the viral surface (spike) protein S and the five accessory proteins. We also review the current classification of FCoVs into distinct serotypes and biotypes, cellular receptors of FCoVs and their presumed role in viral virulence, and discuss other aspects of FIPV-induced pathogenesis. Our current knowledge of genetic differences between FECVs and FIPVs has been mainly based on comparative sequence analyses that revealed "discriminatory" mutations that are present in FIPVs but not in FECVs. Most of these mutations result in amino acid substitutions in the S protein and these may have a critical role in the switch from FECV to FIPV. In most cases, the precise roles of these mutations in the molecular pathogenesis of FIP have not been tested experimentally in the natural host, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools including genetically engineered virus mutants. We discuss the recent progress in the development of FCoV reverse genetics systems suitable to generate recombinant field viruses containing appropriate mutations for in vivo studies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Creep-fatigue damage evaluation for SS-316LN (ORNL PLATES): - RCC-MR vs. ASME SEC III - NH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sati, Bhuwan Chandra; Jalaldeen, S.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of high temperature tests done on ORNL plate with deformation control loading, under creep-fatigue damage have been presented. The test results with methodology of RCC-MR and ASME-NH life prediction under creep-fatigue loading have been assessed. The stress relaxation effect in calculating the life using RCC-MR under creep-fatigue damage is found to be significant in presence of secondary stress. RCC-MR: 2007 is more realistic number of cycles (predicts 51 number of cycles) as compared to ASME-NH (predicts 312 number of cycles) which is demonstrated by the experimental work (observed 86 numbers of cycles). Between RCC-MR and experimental work, design code seems to be more conservative for life prediction due to creep-fatigue damage. For fatigue damage, the approaches are same and the difference comes from material properties and the starting stress for applying Neuber's rule. ASME approach has the limitation of stress range magnitude. ASME approach predicts lower elastic plus plastic strain for the cases having S* above the linear stress limit. For creep strain and creep damage evaluation, ASME and RCC-MR have different approaches for calculating the stress at the beginning and during the hold period. The RCC-MR takes account of cyclic hardening or softening effects (hardening in the present case of 316 LN) by means of the cyclic stress-strain curve and the benefit of symmetrization effects which are significant for this material. The ASME code neglects these effects and instead relies on an approach based on the isochronous stress-strain curves. (author)

  15. MDS: Recent progress in molecular pathogenesis and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are defined as hematopoietic stem cell disorders caused by various gene abnormalities. Recent analysis using next generation sequencing has provided great progress in identifying relationships between gene mutations and clinical phenotypes of MDS. It is estimated that one or more gene mutations occur in greater than 90% of MDS patients. More than 50 gene mutations affecting RNA splicing machinery, DNA methylation, histone modifications, transcription factors, signal transduction proteins, and components of the cohesion complex participate in the pathogenesis of MDS. The sequential accumulation of additional cooperating mutations drives disease evolution from clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) to symptomatic MDS and from MDS to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Mutations in RNA splicing and DNA methylation occur early and are considered founding mutations, whereas others that occur later are regarded as subclonal mutations. RUNX1 mutations are more likely to be subclonal; however, they apparently play a pivotal role in familial MDS. In addition, large alterations of chromosomes are involved in the pathogenesis of MDS. 5q- syndrome, which leads to haploinsufficiency of the located genes, has consistent clinical features. Understanding gene abnormalities of MDS patients can provide clinical information, including diagnosis, prognostic score, and prediction of response to therapy.

  16. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-12-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  17. Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Troppan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 8% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT, also known as MALT lymphoma, which was first described in 1983 by Isaacson and Wright. MALT lymphomas arise at a wide range of different extranodal sites, with the highest frequency in the stomach, followed by lung, ocular adnexa, and thyroid, and with a low percentage in the small intestine. Interestingly, at least 3 different, apparently site-specific, chromosomal translocations and missense and frameshift mutations, all pathway-related genes affecting the NF-κB signal, have been implicated in the development and progression of MALT lymphoma. However, these genetic abnormalities alone are not sufficient for malignant transformation. There is now increasing evidence suggesting that the oncogenic product of translocation cooperates with immunological stimulation in oncogenesis, that is, the association with chronic bacterial infection or autoaggressive process. This review mainly discusses MALT lymphomas in terms of their genetic aberration and association with chronic infections and summarizes recent advances in their molecular pathogenesis.

  18. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  19. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  20. Renal Cell Carcinoma With Chromosome 6p Amplification Including the TFEB Gene: A Novel Mechanism of Tumor Pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sean R; Grignon, David J; Cheng, Liang; Favazza, Laura; Gondim, Dibson D; Carskadon, Shannon; Gupta, Nilesh S; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2017-03-01

    Amplification of chromosome 6p has been implicated in aggressive behavior in several cancers, but has not been characterized in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We identified 9 renal tumors with amplification of chromosome 6p including the TFEB gene, 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and 6 from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) databases. Patients' ages were 28 to 78 years (median, 61 y). Most tumors were high stage (7/9 pT3a, 2/9 pN1). Using immunohistochemistry, 2/4 were positive for melanocytic markers and cathepsin K. Novel TFEB fusions were reported by TCGA in 2; however, due to a small composition of fusion transcripts compared with full-length transcripts (0.5/174 and 3.3/132 FPKM), we hypothesize that these represent secondary fusions due to amplification. Five specimens (4 TCGA, 1 fluorescence in situ hybridization) had concurrent chromosome 3p copy number loss or VHL deletion. However, these did not resemble clear cell RCC, had negative carbonic anhydrase IX labeling, lacked VHL mutation, and had papillary or unclassified histology (2/4 had gain of chromosome 7 or 17). One tumor each had somatic FH mutation and SMARCB1 mutation. Chromosome 6p amplification including TFEB is a previously unrecognized cytogenetic alteration in RCC, associated with heterogenous tubulopapillary eosinophilic and clear cell histology. The combined constellation of features does not fit cleanly into an existing tumor category (unclassified), most closely resembling papillary or translocation RCC. The tendency for high tumor stage, varied tubulopapillary morphology, and a subset with melanocytic marker positivity suggests the possibility of a unique tumor type, despite some variation in appearance and genetics.

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) as a potential biomarker in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mains, Jill Rachel; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Erik Morre

    Purpose To explore the impact of DCE-CT as a biomarker in mRCC.  Methods and Materials 12 patients with mRCC participating in a phase II trial with immunotherapy and bevacizumab and with a follow-up time of at least 2 years were included in this preliminary analysis. DCE-CT interpretation (max s...

  2. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  3. SEISMIC B E H AV I OUR OF R.C.C BUILDING WITH AND WITHOUT FLOATING COLUMNS

    OpenAIRE

    E. ANUSHA; E. V. RAGHVA RAO; N. CHENNA KESAVA

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of the project is to study the seismic behaviour of R.C.C building with and without floating column,G+5 structures has been selected for carrying out the project work. The building models are generated using software STAAD.

  4. RCC-MRx: Design and construction rules for mechanical components in high-temperature structures, experimental reactors and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The RCC-MRx code was developed for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), research reactors (RR) and fusion reactors (FR-ITER). It provides the rules for designing and building mechanical components involved in areas subject to significant creep and/or significant irradiation. In particular, it incorporates an extensive range of materials (aluminum and zirconium alloys in response to the need for transparency to neutrons), sizing rules for thin shells and box structures, and new modern welding processes: electron beam, laser beam, diffusion and brazing. The RCC-MR code was used to design and build the prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) developed by IGCAR in India and the ITER Vacuum Vessel. The RCC-Mx code is being used in the current construction of the RJH experimental reactor (Jules Horowitz reactor). The RCC-MRx code is serving as a reference for the design of the ASTRID project (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration), for the design of the primary circuit in MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) and the design of the target station of the ESS project (European Spallation Source). Contents of the 2015 edition of the RCC-MRx code: Section I General provisions; Section II Additional requirements and special provisions; Section III Rules for nuclear installation mechanical components: Volume I: Design and construction rules: Volume A (RA): General provisions and entrance keys, Volume B (RB): Class 1 components and supports, Volume C (RC): Class 2 components and supports, Volume D (RD): Class 3 components and supports, Volume K (RK): Examination, handling or drive mechanisms, Volume L (RL): Irradiation devices, Volume Z (Ai): Technical appendices; Volume II: Materials; Volume III: Examinations methods; Volume IV: Welding; Volume V: Manufacturing operations; Volume VI: Probationary phase rules

  5. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  6. Surgical treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC with level III–IV tumor venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Davydov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the results of nephrectomy, thrombectomy in RCC patients with level III–IV tumor venous thrombosis with and without cardiopulmonary bypass.Materials and methods. Medical data of 167 consecutive RCC patients with level III–IV tumor venous thrombosis underwent nephrectomy thrombectomy in N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center between 1998 and 2012 were collected. Right side tumor was in 122 (73.1 %, left side – in 42 (25.1 %, bilateral – in 3 (1.8 % cases. The extent of thrombus was defined as intrahepatic in 82 (49.1 %, supradiaphragmatic – in 85 (50.9 % (intrapericardial – in 44 (26.3 %, intraatrial – in 39 (23.4 %, intraventricular – in 2 (1.2 % cases. Nephrectomy, thrombectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 9 (5.4 %, 158 (94.6 % patients underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombectomy without CPBP and sternotomy. Intrapericardial IVC and right atrium were exposed through transdiaphragmatic approach and providing vascular control over infradiaphragmatic IVC and renal veins.Results. Median blood loss was 6000 (600–27 000 ml. Complications rate was 62.8 %, 90-day mortality – 13.2 %. Intraoperative complications were registered in 80 (47.9 %, postoperative – in 66 (40.5 % (grade II – 16 (9.8 %, grade IIIb – 1 (0.6 %, grade IVа – 28 (17.2 %, grade IVb – 3 (1.8 %, grade V – 18 (11.1 % patients. Modified thrombectomy technique insignificantly decreased blood loss compared to thrombectomy with CPB, did nоt increase complications rate including pulmonary vein thromboembolism, or mortality. Five-year overall, cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival was 46.2, 58.3 and 47.1 %, respectively. Thrombectomy technique did nоt affect survival.Conclusion. In selected patients with mobile thrombi transdiaphragmatic approach allows to avoid the use of CPBP and decrease surgical morbidity without survival compromising.

  7. Molecular Determinants of Influenza Virus Pathogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jaqueline M.; York, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunology because of their low cost, the wide availability of mouse-specific reagents, and the large number of mouse strains available, including knockout and transgenic strains. However, mice do not fully recapitulate the signs of influenza infection of humans: transmission of influenza between mice is much less efficient than in humans, and influenza viruses often require adaptation before they are able to efficiently replicate in mice. In the process of mouse adaptation, influenza viruses acquire mutations that enhance their ability to attach to mouse cells, replicate within the cells, and suppress immunity, among other functions. Many such mouse-adaptive mutations have been identified, covering all 8 genomic segments of the virus. Identification and analysis of these mutations have provided insight into the molecular determinants of influenza virulence and pathogenesis, not only in mice but also in humans and other species. In particular, several mouse-adaptive mutations of avian influenza viruses have proved to be general mammalian-adaptive changes that are potential markers of pre-pandemic viruses. As well as evaluating influenza pathogenesis, mice have also been used as models for evaluation of novel vaccines and anti-viral therapies. Mice can be a useful animal model for studying influenza biology as long as differences between human and mice infections are taken into account. PMID:25038937

  8. Fatigue assessment by the RCC-MR design rules: remarks on the elastic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleb, L.; Sidoroff, F.

    1999-01-01

    According to RCC--MR (French rules for mechanical engineering design of FBR), fatigue life assessment is based on the evaluation of the equivalent elastoplastic strain range resulting from a given cyclic loading. Two methods can be used according to whether an elastoplastic or an elastic structure analysis is performed. The elastic analysis is of course more attractive for it avoids a heavy iterative elastoplastic analysis and an expensive identification of the material behavior from mechanical tests. On the other hand it relies on some empirical extrapolation rules from the elastic to the real case. The purpose of the present paper is to draw attention to some limitations of this procedure. In particular attention will be focused on two points: 1, the classification of the applied stress into primary and secondary parts is essential and it is shown that the thermal stresses which are often considered as secondary may in some cases play a primary role; 2. the Neuber's rule which is used to evaluate the plastic strain from the elastic stress will be shown to be significantly wrong for some special configurations. This is in fact essentially related to situations where the elastic follow up effect is important. (authors)

  9. Wing Leading Edge RCC Rapid Response Damage Prediction Tool (IMPACT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert; Cottter, Paul; Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This rapid response computer program predicts Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE) damage caused by ice or foam impact during a Space Shuttle launch (Program "IMPACT2"). The program was developed after the Columbia accident in order to assess quickly WLE damage due to ice, foam, or metal impact (if any) during a Shuttle launch. IMPACT2 simulates an impact event in a few minutes for foam impactors, and in seconds for ice and metal impactors. The damage criterion is derived from results obtained from one sophisticated commercial program, which requires hours to carry out simulations of the same impact events. The program was designed to run much faster than the commercial program with prediction of projectile threshold velocities within 10 to 15% of commercial-program values. The mathematical model involves coupling of Orbiter wing normal modes of vibration to nonlinear or linear springmass models. IMPACT2 solves nonlinear or linear impact problems using classical normal modes of vibration of a target, and nonlinear/ linear time-domain equations for the projectile. Impact loads and stresses developed in the target are computed as functions of time. This model is novel because of its speed of execution. A typical model of foam, or other projectile characterized by material nonlinearities, impacting an RCC panel is executed in minutes instead of hours needed by the commercial programs. Target damage due to impact can be assessed quickly, provided that target vibration modes and allowable stress are known.

  10. Study on Flexural Behaviour of Ternary Blended Reinforced Self Compacting Concrete Beam with Conventional RCC Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshaline Seles, M.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Vivek, S. S.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    The conventional concrete when used for structures having dense congested reinforcement, the problems such as external compaction and vibration needs special attention. In such case, the self compacting concrete (SCC) which has the properties like flow ability, passing and filling ability would be an obvious answer. All those SCC flow behavior was governed by EFNARC specifications. In present study, the combination type of SCC was prepared by replacing cement with silica fume (SF) and metakaolin (MK) along with optimum dosages of chemical admixtures. From the fresh property test, cube compressive strength and cylinder split tensile strength, optimum ternary mix was obtained. In order to study the flexural behavior, the optimum ternary mix was taken in which beam specimens of size 1200 mm x 100 mm x 200 mm was designed as singly reinforced section according to IS: 456-2000, Limit state method. Finally the comparative experimental analysis was made between conventional RCC and SCC beams of same grade in terms of flexural strength namely yield load & ultimate load, load- deflection curve, crack size and pattern respectively.

  11. Comparison of elevated temperature design codes of ASME Subsection NH and RCC-MRx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong-Yeon, E-mail: hylee@kaeri.re.kr

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of elevated temperature design (ETD) codes was made. • Material properties and evaluation procedures were compared. • Two heat-resistant materials of Grade 91 steel and austenitic stainless steel 316 are the target materials in the present study. • Application of the ETD codes to Generation IV reactor components and a comparison of the conservatism was conducted. - Abstract: The elevated temperature design (ETD) codes are used for the design evaluation of Generation IV (Gen IV) reactor systems such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). In the present study, ETD code comparisons were made in terms of the material properties and design evaluation procedures for the recent versions of the two major ETD codes, ASME Section III Subsection NH and RCC-MRx. Conservatism in the design evaluation procedures was quantified and compared based on the evaluation results for SFR components as per the two ETD codes. The target materials are austenitic stainless steel 316 and Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which are the major two materials in a Gen IV SFR. The differences in the design evaluation procedures as well as the material properties in the two ETD codes are highlighted.

  12. Longterm results in the therapy of 100 cases of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, W.; Halama, J.M.; Halama, J.

    1990-01-01

    The success of renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-nephrectomy with radical lymph node dissection in stage I and II disease is undisputed. Through these measures 23% of metastases are controlled. The five-year survival time in stage III disease, however, stagnates at 35%±14% despite radical surgery. Also, the additional tumor-vaccine-therapy of the Mainz-Joint-Study-Group was successful only in stage I and II disease, whereas stage III disease did not benefit from this therapy. As 50% of all radically operated patients developed metastases within three years after surgery, the call by radiooncologists for supplementary radiotherapy beginning with stage III disease must be put foreward. The problems of therapy and chances of survival in generalized disease are demonstrated in 100 of our cases treated by surgery, radiotherapy and with MPA (medroxyprogesteroneacetate). Whereas Schmiedt et al. show a total survival time of 10.3 months after diagnosis of metastatic disease, the Offenbach patients achieved 16.5 months with a median survival time of 11.75 months. The necessity of therapeutic intervention is confirmed by the fact that the most favorable median survival time, 15.75 months, was achieved in metastatic disease involving three organs. We present here the special features of the individual organ manifestations and point out that not only the mean and median survival time, but also the very widely varying survival times in individual cases, make conscientious oncological post-treatment follow up and management a requirement. (orig.) [de

  13. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893942

  14. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome II: materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This book is the 8th of a whole set of 12 ones which constitute the edition 1985 of the RCC-MR. One deals with alloy and non-alloy steels on one hand, and with pieces and products (bars, plates, tubes, forgings and castings) on the other hand. The requirements concerning the mechanical properties, the chemical composition, the search of defects and their repair, the heat treatments, the tests to carry out and the delivery state are specified [fr

  15. Mouse RC/BTB2, a Member of the RCC1 Superfamily, Localizes to Spermatid Acrosomal Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xuening; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Hess, Rex A.; Henderson, Scott C.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-01-01

    Mouse RC/BTB2 is an unstudied protein of the RCC1 (Regulator of Chromosome Condensation) superfamily. Because of the significant remodeling of chromatin that occurs during spermiogenesis, we characterized the expression and localization of mouse RC/BTB2 in the testis and male germ cells. The Rc/btb2 gene yields two major transcripts: 2.3 kb Rc/btb2-s, present in most somatic tissues examined; and 2.5 kb Rc/btb2-t, which contains a unique non-translated exon in its 5′-UTR that is only detected in the testis. During the first wave of spermatogenesis, Rc/btb2-t mRNA is expressed from day 8 after birth, reaching highest levels of expression at day 30 after birth. The full-length protein contains three RCC1 domains in the N-terminus, and a BTB domain in the C-terminus. In the testis, the protein is detectable from day 12, but is progressively up-regulated to day 30 and day 42 after birth. In spermatids, some of the protein co-localizes with acrosomal markers sp56 and peanut lectin, indicating that it is an acrosomal protein. A GFP-tagged RCC1 domain is present throughout the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells. However, both GFP-tagged, full-length RC/BTB2 and a GFP-tagged BTB domain localize to vesicles in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, suggesting that the BTB domain might play a role in mediating full-length RC/BTB2 localization. Since RCC1 domains associate with Ran, a small GTPase that regulates molecular trafficking, it is possible that RC/BTB2 plays a role in transporting proteins during acrosome formation. PMID:22768142

  16. A comparative study of physical and chemical properties of different pozzolanic materials used for roller compacted concrete RCC dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husein Malkawi Abdallah I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the feasibility and the efficiency of using Natural Pozzolan and/or Rock flour in Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC gravity dams. For this purpose, five identical mortar trial mixes were prepared using five different supplementary materials, i.e., fly ash produced in South Africa (proven to be effective in RCC construction, fly ash produced in Turkey, Jordanian natural pozzolan, Saudi natural pozzolan, and rock flour from Mujib Dam basalt quarry. The physical and chemical properties of these pozzolanic materials were determined. The effectiveness of each one of these mineral admixtures used as a cement replacement material in controlling alkali silica reaction are studied and analyzed. Correlations were made between the mechanical properties for the five proposed mixes and a control mix using the Jordanian Portland Cement. The results demonstrate that the performance of Natural Pozzolana and/or rock flour as compared with that of fly ash and other pozzolanic material is very satisfactory and can be effectively used in RCC construction.

  17. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Singh, Renu

    2012-06-28

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia. Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago, exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic. Pathophysiologically, achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. In the initial stage, degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achalasia). Since the initial description, several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease, such as viral infection, other environmental factors, autoimmunity, and genetic factors. Though Chagas disease, which mimics achalasia, is caused by an infective agent, available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia. A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins, siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down's syndrome and Parkinson's disease. Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase, receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported. However, studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained. Currently, the disease is believed to be multi-factorial, with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus.

  18. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Singh, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia. Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago, exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic. Pathophysiologically, achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. In the initial stage, degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achalasia). Since the initial description, several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease, such as viral infection, other environmental factors, autoimmunity, and genetic factors. Though Chagas disease, which mimics achalasia, is caused by an infective agent, available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia. A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins, siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down’s syndrome and Parkinson’s disease. Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase, receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported. However, studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained. Currently, the disease is believed to be multi-factorial, with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus. PMID:22791940

  19. Thrombocytopenia in leukemia: Pathogenesis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi, Saeid; Behzad, Masumeh Maleki; Jaseb, Kaveh; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-02-20

    Leukemias, a heterogeneous group of hematological disorders, are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and morphologic abnormalities of hematopoietic cells. Thrombocytopenia is a common problem among leukemia types that can lead to hemorrhagic complications in patients. The purpose of this review article is to identify the conditions associated with the incidence of thrombocytopenia in leukemias. It can be stated that although translocations have been considered responsible for this complication in many studies, other factors such as bone marrow failure, genes polymorphism, a mutation in some transcription factors, and the adverse effects of treatment could be associated with pathogenesis and poor prognosis of thrombocytopenia in leukemias. Considering the importance of thrombocytopenia in leukemias, it is hoped that the recognition of risk factors increasing the incidence of this complication in leukemic patients would be useful for prevention and treatment of this disorder.

  20. RCC-E a Design Code for I and C and Electrical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haure, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the stakes and strength of the RCC-E code applicable to Electrical and Instrumentation and control systems and components as regards dealing with safety class functions. The document is interlacing specifications between Owners, safety authorities, designers, and suppliers IAEA safety guides and IEC standards. The code is periodically updated and published by French Society for Design and Construction rules for Nuclear Island Components (AFCEN). The code is compliant with third generation PWR nuclear islands and aims to suit with national regulations as needed in a companion document. The Feedback experience of Fukushima and the licensing of UKEPR in the framework of Generic Design Assessment are lessons learnt that should be considered in the upgrading of the code. The code gathers a set of requirements and relevant good practices of several PWR design and construction practices related to the electrical and I and C systems and components, and electrical engineering documents dealing with systems, equipment and layout designs. Comprehensive statement including some recent developments will be provided about: - Offsite and onsite sources requirements including sources dealing the total loss of off sites and main onsite sources. - Highlights of a relevant protection level against high frequencies disturbances emitted by lightning strokes, Interfaces data used by any supplier or designer such as site data, rooms temperature, equipment maximum design temperature, alternative current and direct current electrical network voltages and frequency variation ranges, environmental conditions decoupling data, - Environmental Qualification process including normal, mild (earthquake resistant), harsh and severe accident ambient conditions. A suit made approach based on families, which are defined as a combination of mission time, duration and abnormal conditions (pressure, temperature, radiation), enables to better cope with Environmental Qualifications

  1. Osteoblast role in osteoarthritis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruotti, Nicola; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco P

    2017-11-01

    Even if osteoarthritis pathogenesis is still poorly understood, numerous evidences suggest that osteoblasts dysregulation plays a key role in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. An abnormal expression of OPG and RANKL has been described in osteoarthritis osteoblasts, which is responsible for abnormal bone remodeling and decreased mineralization. Alterations in genes expression are involved in dysregulation of osteoblast function, bone remodeling, and mineralization, leading to osteoarthritis development. Moreover, osteoblasts produce numerous transcription factors, growth factors, and other proteic molecules which are involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. c-Ha-ras BamHI RFLP in human urothelial tumors and point mutations in hot codons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weismanova, E; Skovraga, M.; Kaluz, S.

    1993-01-01

    High-molecular weights DNAs from 30 bladder and renal cell carcinomas (RCC) were isolated and the c-Ha-ras the c-Ha-ras gene BamHI RFLP was examined. Amplification of c-Ha-ras with normal localization with regard to the size of alleles was found only in the case. One of the normally localized c-Ha-ras allele termed RCC c-H-ras of a length of about 6.6 kbp was cloned and an oncogene-activating point mutation was identified using two restriction enzymes. After comparison of CfrI and Cfr10I cleavage maps of RCC c-Ha-ras to complete nucleotide sequences of EJ/T24 c-Ha-ras oncogene and its normal counterpart, a point mutation was identified within codon 11 or 12. The use of CfrI and Cfr10I is of value for clinical practice in identification of point mutations in c-Ha-ras PCR product in neoplasia accompanied by somatic mutation of c-Ha-ras. The correlation among c-Ha-ras allele, amplification/loss, presence of point mutation and progression of neoplasia is discussed. (author)

  3. Intracellular lipid in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC): T2 weighted (T2W) MRI and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; Van der Pol, Christian B.; Moosavi, Bardia; McInnes, Matthew D.F. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mai, Kien T.; Flood, Trevor A. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate if pRCCs demonstrate intracellular lipid (i-lipid) at chemical-shift (CS) MRI, and assess T2W-MRI and pathologic characteristics. Sixty-two patients with a pRCC diagnosis underwent MRI over 11 years (IRB-approved). Two radiologists independently assessed for presence of i-lipid on CS-MRI and homogeneity on T2W-MRI. Inter-observer agreement was assessed via an intraclass correlation and results were compared using the Chi-square test. Discordant cases were reviewed to establish consensus. T2W SI-ratios (SI.tumor/SI.kidney) and CS-SI index were compared using independent t-tests and Spearman correlation. Two pathologists re-evaluated the histopathology. Nine of the 62 pRCCs (14.5 %) demonstrated i-lipid; agreement was moderate (ICC = 0.63). Pathology review depicted clear cells in four tumours and foamy histiocytes in five tumours. 25.8-35.4 % (ICC = 0.65) of tumours were homogeneous on T2W-MRI. No pRCC with i-lipid was considered homogeneous (p = 0.01-0.04). Overall, T2W SI-ratio and CS-SI index were 0.89 (±0.29) and -3.63 % (-7.27 to 11.42). pRCC with i-lipid had significantly higher T2W SI-ratio (p = 0.003). There was a correlation between the CS-SI index and T2W SI-ratio, (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). Intracellular lipid is uncommonly detected in pRCCs due to clear cell changes and foamy histiocytes. These tumours are associated with heterogeneously-increased SI in T2W-MRI. (orig.)

  4. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  5. Single classifier, OvO, OvA and RCC multiclass classification method in handheld based smartphone gait identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziff, Abdul Rafiez Abdul; Sulaiman, Md Nasir; Mustapha, Norwati; Perumal, Thinagaran

    2017-10-01

    Gait recognition is widely used in many applications. In the application of the gait identification especially in people, the number of classes (people) is many which may comprise to more than 20. Due to the large amount of classes, the usage of single classification mapping (direct classification) may not be suitable as most of the existing algorithms are mostly designed for the binary classification. Furthermore, having many classes in a dataset may result in the possibility of having a high degree of overlapped class boundary. This paper discusses the application of multiclass classifier mappings such as one-vs-all (OvA), one-vs-one (OvO) and random correction code (RCC) on handheld based smartphone gait signal for person identification. The results is then compared with a single J48 decision tree for benchmark. From the result, it can be said that using multiclass classification mapping method thus partially improved the overall accuracy especially on OvO and RCC with width factor more than 4. For OvA, the accuracy result is worse than a single J48 due to a high number of classes.

  6. Study on Viscoelastic Deformation Monitoring Index of an RCC Gravity Dam in an Alpine Region Using Orthogonal Test Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoying Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to present a method of determining viscoelastic deformation monitoring index of a Roller-compacted concrete (RCC gravity dam in an alpine region. By focusing on a modified deformation monitoring model considering frost heave and back analyzed mechanical parameters of the dam, the working state of viscoelasticity for the dam is illustrated followed by an investigation and designation of adverse load cases using orthogonal test method. Water pressure component is then calculated by finite element method, while temperature, time effect, and frost heave components are obtained through deformation statistical model considering frost heave. The viscoelastic deformation monitoring index is eventually determined by small probability and maximum entropy methods. The results show that (a with the abnormal probability 1% the dam deformation monitoring index for small probability and maximum entropy methods is 23.703 mm and 22.981 mm, respectively; thus the maximum measured displacement of the dam is less than deformation monitoring index, which indicates that the dam is currently in a state of safety operation and (b the obtained deformation monitoring index using orthogonal test method is more accurate due to the full consideration of more random factors; the method gained from this study will likely be of use to diagnose the working state for those RCC dams in alpine regions.

  7. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome 1, Volume H: Supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The present book is the fifth one of a whole set of 12 which constitute the present edition of the RCC-MR. The volume H applies to supports of equipments when these equipments are concerned by the RCC-MR rules in application of the chapter RA 4000 of the Tome 1, Vol A. One defines the field of application of this volume and the classification rules of supports in two levels. One defines the different types of supports and fasteners, as also the classification of the support elements in primary or resistance (or structure) elements and secondary (stability) elements. One defines the documents to be established for the components and their constitutive elements, the modalities of identification of pieces and welded joints, the rules to choose the materials of the support elements, the rules to follow for the support conception, the rules to follow for fabrication and tests, as also other rules than those given in the chapters RH 2000 to RH 4000, to homologate a standard support or a component of a standard support [fr

  8. On the pathogenesis of IDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Helqvist, S

    1994-01-01

    A model of the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, i.e. the initial phase of beta-cell destruction, is proposed: in a cascade-like fashion efficient antigen presentation, unbalanced cytokine, secretion and poor beta-cell defence result in beta-cell destruction by toxic free...

  9. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  10. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and ev...

  11. Epigenetics in Medullary Thyroid Cancer: From Pathogenesis to Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Dicitore, Alessandra; Messina, Erika; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland. Mutations of the RET proto-oncogene are implicated in the pathogenesis of MTC. Germline activating mutations of this gene have been reported in about 88-98% of familial MTCs, while somatic mutations of RET gene have been detected in about 23-70% of sporadic forms. Although these genetic events are well characterized, much less is known about the role of epigenetic abnormalities in MTC. The present review reports a detailed description of epigenetic abnormalities (DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNA profile), probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of MTC. A systematic review was performed using Pubmed and Google patents databases. We report the current understanding of epigenetic patterns in MTC and discuss the potential use of current knowledge in designing novel therapeutic strategies through epigenetic drugs, focusing on recent patents in this field. Taking into account the reversibility of epigenetic alterations and the recent development in this field, epigenetic therapy may emerge for clinical use in the near future for patients with advanced MTC.

  12. Nutritional rickets: pathogenesis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, John M

    2013-06-01

    Nutritional rickets remains a public health concern in many areas of the world despite cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. The roles of vitamin D deficiency, low dietary calcium intakes and the interrelationships between the two in the pathogenesis of the disease are discussed. It is now recognized that vitamin D deficiency in the pregnant and lactating mother predisposes to the development of rickets in the breastfed infant, and that cultural and social factors are important in the pathogenesis of the disease during the adolescent growth spurt. Prevention of rickets is dependent on the awareness of the medical profession and the general public of the need to ensure adequate intakes of vitamin D in at-risk populations, and of the importance of increasing dietary intakes of calcium using locally available and inexpensive foods in communities in which dietary calcium deficiency rickets is prevalent.

  13. Achondroplasia: pathogenesis and implications for future treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laederich, Melanie B; Horton, William A

    2010-08-01

    Although the genetic defect underlying achondroplasia has been known for over a decade, no effective therapies to stimulate bone growth have emerged. Here we review the recent literature and summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathology and examine their potential as therapeutic targets. Currently used preclinical models are discussed in the context of recent advances with a special focus on C-type natriuretic peptide. Research on the mutation in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) that causes achondroplasia suggests that disease results from increased signal transduction from the mutant receptor. Thus, current therapeutic strategies have focused on reducing signals emanating from FGFR3. First-generation therapies directly targeting FGFR3, such as kinase inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies, designed for targeting FGFR3 in cancer, are still in the preclinical phase and have yet to translate into the management of achondroplasia. Counteracting signal transduction pathways downstream of FGFR3 holds promise with the discovery that administration of C-type natriuretic peptide to achondroplastic mice ameliorates their clinical phenotype. However, more research into long-term effectiveness and safety of this strategy is needed. Direct targeting of therapeutic agents to growth plate cartilage may enhance efficacy and minimize side effects of these and future therapies. Current research into the pathogenesis of achondroplasia has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms of FGFR3-induced disease and has increased the number of approaches that we may use to potentially correct it. Further research is needed to validate these approaches in preclinical models of achondroplasia.

  14. Livedoid vasculopathy: A review of pathogenesis and principles of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Biju; Neema, Shekhar; Verma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous disease manifesting as recurrent ulcers on the lower extremities. The ulceration results in atrophic, porcelain white scars termed as atrophie blanche. The pathogenesis is yet to be understood with the main mechanism being hypercoagulability and inflammation playing a secondary role. The important procoagulant factors include protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden mutation, antithrombin III deficiency, prothrombin gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. Histopathology of livedoid vasculopathy is characterized by intraluminal thrombosis, proliferation of the endothelium and segmental hyalinization of dermal vessels. The treatment is multipronged with anti-thrombotic measures such as anti-platelet drugs, systemic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic therapy taking precedence over anti-inflammatory agents. Colchicine, hydroxychloroquine, vasodilators, intravenous immunoglobulin, folic acid, immunosuppressive therapy and supportive measures are also of some benefit. A multidisciplinary approach would go a long way in the management of these patients resulting in relief from pain and physical as well as psychological scarring.

  15. Mechanisms of mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ross L

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, a series of studies have provided genetic insight into the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). It is now known that JAK2V617F mutations are present in 90% of patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), 60% of patients with essential thrombocytosis (ET) and 50% of patients with myelofibrosis (MF). Despite the high prevalence of JAK2V617F mutations in these three myeloid malignancies, several questions remain. For example, how does one mutation contribute to the pathogenesis of three clinically distinct diseases, and how do some patients develop these diseases in the absence of a JAK2V617F mutation? Single nucleotide polymorphisms at various loci and somatic mutations, such as those in MPLW515L/K, TET2 and in exon 12 of JAK2, may also contribute to the pathogenesis of these MPNs. There are likely additional germline and somatic genetic factors important to the MPN phenotype. Additional studies of large MPN and control cohorts with new techniques will help identify these factors.

  16. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been frequently clinically ...

  17. Renal Cell Carcinoma Programmed Death-ligand 1, a New Direct Target of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-2 Alpha, is Regulated by von Hippel-Lindau Gene Mutation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messai, Yosra; Gad, Sophie; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Le Teuff, Gwenael; Couve, Sophie; Janji, Bassam; Kammerer, Solenne Florence; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Hasmim, Meriem; Ferlicot, Sophie; Baud, Véronique; Mejean, Arnaud; Mole, David Robert; Richard, Stéphane; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Albiges, Laurence; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Escudier, Bernard; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) frequently display a loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. To elucidate the putative relationship between VHL mutation status and immune checkpoint ligand programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression. A series of 32 renal tumors composed of 11 VHL tumor-associated and 21 sporadic RCCs were used to evaluate PD-L1 expression levels after sequencing of the three exons and exon-intron junctions of the VHL gene. The 786-O, A498, and RCC4 cell lines were used to investigate the mechanisms of PD-L1 regulation. Fisher's exact test was used for VHL mutation and Kruskal-Wallis test for PD-L1 expression. If no covariate accounted for the association of VHL and PD-L1, then a Kruskal-Wallis test was used; otherwise Cochran-Mantel-Haenzsel test was used. We also used the Fligner-Policello test to compare two medians when the distributions had different dispersions. We demonstrated that tumors from ccRCC patients with VHL biallelic inactivation (ie, loss of function) display a significant increase in PD-L1 expression compared with ccRCC tumors carrying one VHL wild-type allele. Using the inducible VHL 786-O-derived cell lines with varying hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) stabilization levels, we showed that PD-L1 expression levels positively correlate with VHL mutation and HIF-2α expression. Targeting HIF-2α decreased PD-L1, while HIF-2α overexpression increased PD-L1 mRNA and protein levels in ccRCC cells. Interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays revealed a direct binding of HIF-2α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element in the human PD-L1 proximal promoter in 786-O cells. Our work provides the first evidence that VHL mutations positively correlate with PD-L1 expression in ccRCC and may influence the response to ccRCC anti-PD-L1/PD-1 immunotherapy. We investigated the relationship between von Hippel-Lindau mutations and programmed death-ligand 1 expression. We

  18. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  19. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Gauler, T.; Bauer, S.; Antoch, G.; Schuette, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq 111 In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR registered -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  20. Emotion modelling towards affective pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, James Le

    2009-12-01

    Objective: There is a need in psychiatry for models that integrate pathological states with normal systems. The interaction of arousal and emotion is the focus of an exploration of affective pathogenesis. Method: Given that the explicit causes of affective disorder remain nascent, methods of linking emotion and disorder are evaluated. Results: A network model of emotional families is presented, in which emotions exist as quantal gradients. Morbid emotional states are seen as the activation of distal emotion sites. The phenomenology of affective disorders is described with reference to this model. Recourse is made to non-linear dynamic theory. Conclusions: Metaphoric emotion models have face validity and may prove a useful heuristic.

  1. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop...... and individualization for precision therapies. Many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event, the context of intratumoral plasticity and the causal driver action. Next-generation sequencing has begun to underline the persistent alterations, which may...

  2. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.

  3. Contribution of TARDBP mutations to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, H; Valdmanis, P N; Kabashi, E; Dion, P; Dupré, N; Camu, W; Meininger, V; Rouleau, G A

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the TARDBP gene, which encodes the TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43), have been described in individuals with familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We screened the TARDBP gene in 285 French sporadic ALS patients to assess the frequency of TARDBP mutations in ALS. Six individuals had potentially deleterious mutations of which three were novel including a Y374X truncating mutation and P363A and A382P missense mutations. This suggests that TARDBP mutations may predispose to ALS in approximately 2% of the individuals followed in this study. Our findings, combined with those from other collections, brings the total number of mutations in unrelated ALS patients to 17, further suggesting that mutations in the TARDBP gene have an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  4. Molecular Pathogenesis of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Wajih; Barnett, Michael H; Prain, Kerri; Broadley, Simon A

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare autoimmune disorder, distinct from multiple sclerosis, causing inflammatory lesions in the optic nerves and spinal cord. An autoantibody (NMO IgG) against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel expressed on astrocytes is thought to be causative. Peripheral production of the antibody is triggered by an unknown process in genetically susceptible individuals. Anti-AQP4 antibody enters the central nervous system (CNS) when the blood brain barrier is made permeable and has high affinity for orthogonal array particles of AQP4. Like other autoimmune diseases, Th17 cells and their effector cytokines (such as interleukin 6) have been implicated in pathogenesis. AQP4 expressing peripheral organs are not affected by NMO IgG, but the antibody causes extensive astrocytic loss in specific regions of the CNS through complement mediated cytotoxicity. Demyelination occurs during the inflammatory process and is probably secondary to oligodendrocyte apoptosis subsequent to loss of trophic support from astrocytes. Ultimately, extensive axonal injury leads to severe disability. Despite rapid advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis, unanswered questions remain, particularly with regards to disease mechanisms in NMO IgG seronegative cases. Increasing knowledge of the molecular pathology is leading to improved treatment strategies. PMID:23202933

  5. Pathogenesis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Jin Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is characterized by focal and segmental obliteration of glomerular capillary tufts with increased matrix. FSGS is classified as collapsing, tip, cellular, perihilar and not otherwise specified variants according to the location and character of the sclerotic lesion. Primary or idiopathic FSGS is considered to be related to podocyte injury, and the pathogenesis of podocyte injury has been actively investigated. Several circulating factors affecting podocyte permeability barrier have been proposed, but not proven to cause FSGS. FSGS may also be caused by genetic alterations. These genes are mainly those regulating slit diaphragm structure, actin cytoskeleton of podocytes, and foot process structure. The mode of inheritance and age of onset are different according to the gene involved. Recently, the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs has been highlighted. Podocytes and PECs have common mesenchymal progenitors, therefore, PECs could be a source of podocyte repopulation after podocyte injury. Activated PECs migrate along adhesion to the glomerular tuft and may also contribute to the progression of sclerosis. Markers of activated PECs, including CD44, could be used to distinguish FSGS from minimal change disease. The pathogenesis of FSGS is very complex; however, understanding basic mechanisms of podocyte injury is important not only for basic research, but also for daily diagnostic pathology practice.

  6. Pathogenesis of varicelloviruses in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2015-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue, simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and, although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Immunogenetics and genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Anup K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available vAutoimmune hepatitis is a progressive liver disease. Its pathogenesis is unclear, but needs a ‘trigger’ to initiate the disease in a genetically susceptible person. The susceptibility is partly related to MHCII class genes, and more so with human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Several mechanisms have been proposed which, however, cannot fully explain the immunologic findings in autoimmune hepatitis. The susceptibility to any autoimmune disease is determined by several factors where genetic and immunological alterations, along with, environmental factor are active. MHCII antigens as a marker for AIH, or a predictor of treatment response and prognosis has been investigated. Since MHCII antigens show significant ethnic heterogeneity, mutations in MHCII may merely act as only precursors of the surface markers of immune cells, which can be of significance, because the changes in HLA and MHC are missing in certain populations. One such marker is the CTLA-4 (CD152 gene mutation, reported in the phenotypes representing susceptibility to AIH. Other candidate genes of cytokines, TNF, TGF-beta1 etc, have also been investigated but with unvalidated results. Paediatric AIH show differences in genetic susceptibility. Genetic susceptibility or resistance to AIH may be associated with polypeptides in DRB1 with certain amino-acid sequences. Understanding which genes are implicated in genesis and/or disease progression will obviously help to identify key pathways in AIH and provide better insights into its pathogenesis. But studies to identify responsible genes are complex because of the complex trait of AIH.

  8. Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Meredith A

    2011-10-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of perfumes in pathogenesis of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagasra, Omar; Golkar, Zhabiz; Garcia, Miranda; Rice, Lakya N; Pace, Donald Gene

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are developmental conditions characterized by deficits in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and obsessive/stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although there is no reliable neurophysiological marker associated with ASDs, dysfunction of the parieto-frontal mirror neuron system and underdeveloped olfactory bulb (OB) has been associated with the disorder. It has been reported that the number of children who have ASD has increased considerably since the early 1990 s. In developed countries, it is now reported that 1-1.5% of children have ASD, and in the US it is estimated that one in 88 children suffer from ASD. Currently, there is no known cause for ASD. During the last three decades, the most commonly accepted paradigm about autism is that it is a genetically inherited disease. The recent trio analyses, in which both biological parents and the autistic child's exomes are sequenced, do not support this paradigm. On the other hand, the environmental factors that may induce genetic mutations in vitro have not been clearly identified, and there is little irrefutable evidence that pesticides, water born chemicals, or food preservatives play critical roles in inducing the genetic mutations associated with known intellectual deficiencies that have been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we hypothesize and provide scientific evidence that ASD is the result of exposure to perfumes and cosmetics. The highly mutagenic, neurotoxic, and neuromodulatory chemicals found in perfumes are often overlooked and ignored as a result of a giant loophole in the Federal Fair Packaging and Labeling Act of 1973, which explicitly exempts fragrance producers from having to disclose perfume ingredients on product labels. We hypothesize that perfumes and cosmetics may be important factors in the pathogenesis of ASD. Synthetic perfumes have gained global utility not only as perfumes but also as essential chemicals in detergents

  10. Modifier genes: Moving from pathogenesis to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Edward R B

    2017-09-01

    This commentary will focus on how we can use our knowledge about the complexity of human disease and its pathogenesis to identify novel approaches to therapy. We know that even for single gene Mendelian disorders, patients with identical mutations often have different presentations and outcomes. This lack of genotype-phenotype correlation led us and others to examine the roles of modifier genes in the context of biological networks. These investigations have utilized vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Since one of the goals of research on modifier genes and networks is to identify novel therapeutic targets, the challenges to patient access and compliance because of the high costs of medications for rare genetic diseases must be recognized. A recent article explored protective modifiers, including plastin 3 (PLS3) and coronin 1C (CORO1C), in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMA is an autosomal recessive deficit of survival motor neuron protein (SMN) caused by mutations in SMN1. However, the severity of SMA is determined primarily by the number of SMN2 copies, and this results in significant phenotypic variability. PLS3 was upregulated in siblings who were asymptomatic compared with those who had SMA2 or SMA3, but identical homozygous SMN1 deletions and equal numbers of SMN2 copies. CORO1C was identified by interrogation of the PLS3 interactome. Overexpression of these proteins rescued endocytosis in SMA models. In addition, antisense RNA for upregulation of SMN2 protein expression is being developed as another way of modifying the SMA phenotype. These investigations suggest the practical application of protective modifiers to rescue SMA phenotypes. Other examples of the potential therapeutic value of novel protective modifiers will be discussed, including in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and glycerol kinase deficiency. This work shows that while we live in an exciting era of genomic sequencing, a functional understanding of biology, the impact of its

  11. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to

  12. [Evolution of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in phylogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N

    2014-01-01

    The first atherosclerosis pandemics developed in phylogenesis when animals went out of the ocean, the second coincided with mutations of proteins that transferred zero-cholesterol esters, the third (present-day pandemics) results from disturbed biological function of trophology, abnormally high content of saturated fatty acids and their trans-forms in food, and blockade of bioavailability of polyenic FA (PNFA) for cells. The blood pool of ligand-free lipoproteins, phylogenetically early macrophages are only partly utilized in intima giving rise to atheromatosis. When active absorption of w-3 and w-6 PNFA is blocked, the cells synthesize by way of compensation non-physiological w-9 eicosanoids which creates the basis of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, pathology ofautocrine regulation, and paracrine humoral regulation of cell communities and the body. A rise in the frequency of non-infectious diseases above 5-7% is regarded as pathology of biological functions and reactions. Non-physiological environmental effects should be neutralized by normalization of tropholgy function, exotrophic biological reaction. Metabolic pandemics may have two outcomes. First: (a) effective reduction to a minimum of infavourable environmental effects, i.e. normalization of the nutritive function, (b) matching it with possibilities of lipoproteins, (c) reduction of morbidity and mortality from atherosclerosis. Second: man continues to develop as in phylogenesis and adapts himself to nonphysiological nutrition. Mortality from infarction and stroke will remain high during the next 40-50 thousand years. Increased content of w-3 PNFA in food without reduction of NAF with blockade of bioavailability will further facilitate atheromatosis. Man should rely on physiological nutrition, there is no reason to rely on hypolipidemic agents. Otherwise, the second outcome awaits the mankind. Tertium non datum.

  13. Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Paul J.; Collard, Harold R.; Jones, Kirk D.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fibrosing interstitial lung disease associated with aging that is characterized by the histopathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Although an understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF is incomplete, recent advances delineating specific clinical and pathologic features of IPF have led to better definition of the molecular pathways that are pathologically activated in the disease. In this review we highlight several of these advances, with a focus on genetic predisposition to IPF and how genetic changes, which occur primarily in epithelial cells, lead to activation of profibrotic pathways in epithelial cells. We then discuss the pathologic changes within IPF fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and we conclude with a summary of how these profibrotic pathways may be interrelated. PMID:24050627

  14. NSS for an RCC in a patient with renal insufficiency after heart transplant because of right ventricular tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Zyczkowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Krzysztof; Bryniarski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive therapy on the development of neoplasms has become the object of an ever increasing interest for clinicians all over the world. The literature on neoplasms development in the course of therapy following transplants has confirmed a considerable increase in the incidence of neoplasms of the skin and lymph nodes. Organ neoplasms developing in patients after transplants are characterized by increased progression, poor cellular diversification and a more unfavorable prognosis than in the general population The aim of the study is to present the case of a nephron-sparing surgery of a renal tumor (NSS) without any intraoperative ischaemia in a 55-year-old female patient with an orthotopic heart transplant and renal insufficiency following a prolonged immune suppression. It is estimated that the patients at the highest risk of neoplasm development are those in the first months after transplant, especially heart transplant. They require maximum doses of immunosuppressive drugs. In the case of patients with initial renal insufficiency the duration of ischaemia of the organ operated on should be minimized, and if possible, surgery should be conducted without clamping the renal pedicle. The surgical treatment of RCC (renal cell carcinoma) in transplant patients does not require any reduction in the amount of the immunosuppressive drugs.

  15. Diabetic Cataract—Pathogenesis, Epidemiology and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pollreisz

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics.

  16. First Delayed Resection Findings After Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) of Human Localised Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in the IRENE Pilot Phase 2a Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, Johann Jakob, E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Ricke, Jens, E-mail: jens.Ricke@med.ovgu.de; Pech, Maciej, E-mail: macej.pech@med.ovgu.de; Fischbach, Frank, E-mail: frank.fischbach@med.ovgu.de; Jürgens, Julian, E-mail: julian.juergens@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Siedentopf, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.siedentopf@med.ovgu.de; Roessner, Albert, E-mail: albert.roessner@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Porsch, Markus, E-mail: markus.porsch@med.ovgu.de; Baumunk, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.baumunk@med.ovgu.de; Schostak, Martin, E-mail: martin.schostak@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Köllermann, Jens, E-mail: jens.koellermann@sana.de [Sana Klinikum Offenbach Am Main, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Liehr, Uwe-Bernd, E-mail: uwe-bernd.liehr@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionIt is postulated that focal IRE affords complete ablation of soft-tissue tumours while protecting the healthy peritumoral tissue. Therefore, IRE may be an interesting option for minimally invasive, kidney-tissue-sparing, non-thermal ablation of renal tumours.AimWith this current pilot study (“IRENE trial”), we present the first detailed histopathological data of IRE of human RCC followed by delayed tumour resection. The aim of this interim analysis of the first three patients was to investigate the ablation efficiency of percutaneous image-guided focal IRE in RCC, to assess whether a complete ablation of T1a RCC and tissue preservation with the NanoKnife system is possible and to decide whether the ablation parameters need to be altered.MethodsFollowing resection 4 weeks after percutaneous IRE, the success of ablation and detailed histopathological description were used to check the ablation parameters.ResultsThe IRE led to a high degree of damage to the renal tumours (1 central, 2 peripheral; size range 15–17 mm). The postulated homogeneous, isomorphic damage was only partly confirmed. We found a zonal structuring of the ablation zone, negative margins and, enclosed within the ablation zone, very small tumour residues of unclear malignancy.ConclusionAccording to these initial, preliminary study results of the first three renal cases, a new zonal distribution of IRE damage was described and the curative intended, renal saving focal ablation of localised RCC below <3 cm by percutaneous IRE by the NanoKnife system appears to be possible, but needs further, systematic evaluation for this treatment method and treatment protocol.

  17. Local Control Rates of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) to Thoracic, Abdominal, and Soft Tissue Lesions Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altoos, Basel; Amini, Arya; Yacoub, Muthanna; Bourlon, Maria T.; Kessler, Elizabeth E.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Fisher, Christine M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Lam, Elaine T.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the radiographic response rate of SBRT compared to conventional fractionated radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) for thoracic, abdominal, skin and soft tissue RCC lesions treated at our institution. Fifty three lesions where included in the study (36 SBRT, 17 CF-EBRT), treated from 2004 to 2014 at our institution. We included patients that had thoracic, skin & soft tissue (SST), and abdominal metastases of histologically confirmed RCC. The most common SBRT fractionation was 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The median time of follow-up was 16 months (range 3–97 months). Median BED was 216.67 (range 66.67–460.0) for SBRT, and 60 (range 46.67–100.83) for CF-EBRT. Median radiographic local control rates at 12, 24, and 36 months were 100, 93.41, and 93.41 % for lesions treated with SBRT versus 62.02, 35.27 and 35.27 % for those treated with CF-EBRT (p < 0.001). Predictive factors for radiographic local control under univariate analysis included BED ≥ 100 Gy (HR, 0.048; 95 % CI, 0.006–0.382; p = 0.005), dose per fraction ≥ 9 Gy (HR, 0.631; 95 % CI, 0.429–0.931; p = 0.021), and gender (HR, 0.254; 95 % CI, 0.066–0.978; p = 0.048). Under multivariate analysis, there were no significant predictors for local control. Toxicity rates were low and equivalent in both groups, with no grade 4 or 5 side effects reported. SBRT is safe and effective for the treatment of RCC metastases to thoracic, abdominal and integumentary soft tissues. Radiographic response rates were greater and more durable using SBRT compared to CF-EBRT. Further prospective trials are needed to evaluate efficacy and safety of SBRT for RCC metastases

  18. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part I: General overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    Two French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. An important effort of development of these analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the frame of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and in the frame of R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in the 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles is composed of five parts: this first one presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components: plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Finally, part V presents the validation elements of the methods, with details on the process followed for their development and on evaluation of the accuracy of the proposed analytical methods. This first article of the series presents an overview of the calculation of K I and J in these two codes and describes briefly the defect assessment analyses. Specific details in the Appendix A16 of RCC-MR (LBB procedure and creep analyses) are also introduced in this article

  19. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  20. A dose-response relationship for time to bone pain resolution after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bony metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Dept. of Radiology, Section of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States); Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Blanco, Angel I.; Butler, E. Brian [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital/The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States)], email: bteh@tmhs.org; Lo, Simon S. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland (United States); Amato, Robert J. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Oncology, Univ. of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To investigate the utility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of painful renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone metastases, and for a possible dose effect on time to symptom relief. Material and methods. Eighteen patients with 24 painful osseous lesions from metastatic RCC were treated with SBRT. The most common treatment regimens were 24 Gy in 3 fractions and 40 Gy in 5 fractions. The times from treatment to first reported pain relief and time to symptom recurrence were evaluated. Median follow-up was 38 weeks (1-156 weeks). Results. Seventy-eight percent of all patients had pain relief. Patients treated with a BED > 85 Gy achieved faster and more durable pain relief compared to those treated with a BED < 85 Gy. There was decrease in time to pain relief after a change in treatment regimen to 8 Gy x 5 fractions (BED = 86). There was only one patient with grade 1 skin toxicity. No neurological or other toxicity was observed. Conclusions. SBRT can safely and effectively treat painful RCC bony metastases. There appears to be a relationship between radiation dose and time to stable pain relief.

  1. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part V: Elements of validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical Components of FBR Nuclear Islands and High Temperature Applications'. Development of analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the framework of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and by R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles consists of 5 parts: the first part presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide the compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). This part presents validation of the methods, with details on the process followed for their development and of the evaluation accuracy of the proposed analytical methods

  2. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part IV: Cracked elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    Two French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. Development of analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years through a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and through R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of papers is composed of five parts: the first presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Part V presents validation of the methods, with details on their accuracy. This paper presents the stress intensity factor and J calculation for cracked elbows. General data applicable for all defect geometries are first presented, and then, compendia for K I and σ ref calculations are provided for the available defect geometries

  3. Pathogenesis of ovarian cancer: current perspectives | Chesang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To present a review of current knowledge of the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and its clinical implications. Data Source: Extensive literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies. Study Selection: Studies in the English language about or related to pathogenesis of ovarian cancer were selected.

  4. Hand osteoarthritis: diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Balabanova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of synovitis, early-stage hand osteoarthritis (HOA mimics hand joint injury in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the topography of synovitis is diverse in these diseases:  distal interphalangeal and thumb joints are involved in the process in HOA. In the latter, tests are negative for immunological markers  (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, which is typical of RA.  The differences between HOA and RA are prominent, as evidenced  by hand X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging. Investigations  suggest that cytokine profile imbalance is implicated in the  pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, which brings it closer to RA. However, therapy for HOA has not been practically developed; there are only a few works on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and  biological agents in these patients. It is necessary to work out Russian guidelines for the treatment of HOA.

  5. The Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune complex GN that develops as a frequent complication of SLE. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis involves a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. The extrarenal etiology of systemic lupus is based on multiple combinations of genetic variants that compromise those mechanisms normally assuring immune tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. This loss of tolerance becomes clinically detectable by the presence of antinuclear antibodies. In addition, nucleic acids released from netting or apoptotic neutrophils activate innate and adaptive immunity via viral nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors. Therefore, many clinical manifestations of systemic lupus resemble those of viral infection. In lupus, endogenous nuclear particles trigger IFN-α signaling just like viral particles during viral infection. As such, dendritic cells, T helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells all contribute to the aberrant polyclonal autoimmunity. The intrarenal etiology of lupus nephritis involves antibody binding to multiple intrarenal autoantigens rather than the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local antibody production add to intrarenal complement activation as renal immunopathology progresses. Here we provide an update on the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to lupus nephritis and provide the rationale for the latest and novel treatment strategies. PMID:23929771

  6. An overview of Pazopanib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC in Ministry of Health (MOH, Malaysia: A multicentre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Feng Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pazopanib was listed in MOH, Malaysia’s drug formulary on July 2013 for the treatment of mRCC. Two landmark trials were used to support the listing i.e. VEG105192 and COMPARZ which showed a median progression free survival (PFS of 9.2 and 8.4 months respectively. The efficacy and tolerability of Pazopanib in patients with mRCC have been found to differ in Western and Asian populations. Due to the difference in tolerability, dose adjustment in Asian patients is required. In most MOH hospitals in Malaysia, we tend to start mRCC patients with a lower dose as most patients can’t tolerate 800 mg of Pazopanib. We aim to prognosticate and evaluate PFS in patients with mRCC treated in MOH, Malaysia. We also aim to correlate PFS of patients on different doses of Pazopanib. Methods: The largest referral centre in central and southern Malaysia was selected namely Hospital Kuala Lumpur and Hospital Sultan Ismail. A retrospective analysis was done for patients using hospital supply of Pazopanib from 2010 to 2016. PFS is defined as the time of Pazopanib initiation till 1st documented disease progression. Prognostic variables such as age, sex, race, histology, common sites of metastasis, number of organs involved, ECOG, modified MSKCC risk category, prior history of nephrectomy or systemic treatment and initial dose of Pazopanib was analysed. Results: There was a total of 87 patients with mRCC registered. Median time since diagnosis to initiation of Pazopanib was 5 months. PFS for the overall study population was 8.0 months (95%CI, 5.6–10.4 months. PFS based on dose showed 400 mg vs. 800 mg of Pazopanib was 9.0 months (95%CI 4.5–13.4 months vs. 6.0 months (95%CI 1.9–10.1 months respectively (p = 0.209. Modified MSKCC risk category was a significant prognostic variable (p = 0.045. Conclusion: This retrospective review shows no significant difference in PFS between 400 mg vs. 800 mg of Pazopanib. MOH hospitals in Malaysia have similar PFS

  7. Structural design of DEMO Divertor Cassette Body: provisional FEM analysis and introductive application of RCC-MRx design rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frosi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.frosi@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mazzone, Giuseppe [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); You, Jeong-Ha [Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the early steps in developing a structural fem model of DEMO Divertor. The study is focused on the thermal and structural analysis of the Cassette Body: a new geometry has been developed for this component: it is foreseen that the plasma facing component (PFC) will be directly placed on the cassette but for the Dome no choice has been adopted yet. For now the model contains only a suitable schematization of the Cassette Body and its objective is to analyze the effect produced by the main loads (electromagnetic loads, coolant pressure, thermal neutron and convective loads) on itself: an available estimate of loads is that one derived from ITER: for a proper translation some assumptions have been made and they are described in the paper. Now it is not a primary purpose to obtain some definitive statements about stresses, displacements, temperatures and so on; the authors want to construct a set of FEM models that will help all the decisions of DEMO Divertor design in its future development. This set is conceived as a tool that shall be improved to account for all the main enhancements that will be found in geometry, in material properties data and in load evaluations. Moreover, the main design variables (loads, material properties, some geometric items, mesh element size) are defined as parameters. This work considers also an introductive approach for future structural verification of the Divertor Cassette Body: so a concern of the Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical Components of Nuclear Installation (RCC-MRx) has been implemented. The FEM code used is Ansys rel. 15.

  8. Pathogenesis of Proteus mirabilis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium most noted for its swarming motility and urease activity, frequently causes catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) that are often polymicrobial. These infections may be accompanied by urolithiasis, development of bladder or kidney stones due to alkalinization of urine from urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis. Adherence of the bacterium to epithelial and catheter surfaces is mediated by 17 different fimbriae, most notably MR/P fimbriae. Repressors of motility are often encoded by these fimbrial operons. Motility is mediated by flagella encoded on a single contiguous 54 kb chromosomal sequence. On agar plates, P. mirabilis undergoes a morphological conversion to a filamentous swarmer cell expressing hundreds of flagella. When swarms from different strains meet, a line of demarcation, a “Dienes line”, develops due to the killing action of each strain’s type VI secretion system. During infection, histological damage is caused by cytotoxins including hemolysin and a variety of proteases, some autotransported. The pathogenesis of infection, including assessment of individual genes or global screens for virulence or fitness factors has been assessed in murine models of ascending UTI or CAUTI using both single-species and polymicrobial models. Global gene expression studies carried out in culture and in the murine model have revealed the unique metabolism of this bacterium. Vaccines, using MR/P fimbria and its adhesin, MrpH, have been shown to be efficacious in the murine model. A comprehensive review of factors associated with urinary tract infection is presented, encompassing both historical perspectives and current advances. PMID:29424333

  9. The pathogenesis of amyloidosis in periodic disease: Some aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Djndoyan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient information indicating the implication of dysfunction of interleukins (IL-6 and IL-1 in particular in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis in a number of autoinflammatory, rheumatic, and autoimmune diseases, including those in periodic disease (PD, has been recently accumulated. Its genetic defect – pirin mutation – gives rise to an alternative innate immune response (phagocytic cell activation to secrete IL-1 by macrophages and to activate T-helper cells. This causes imbalance in the synthesis of proinflammatory (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10, and IL-1 receptor antagonist cytokines. Moreover, the uncontrolled macrophage (monocyte secretion of a great deal of IL-6 that together with IL-1 is a mediator of the synthesis of the serum amyloid fibril protein precursor SAA by hepatocytes, neutrophils, and fibroblasts plays one of the key roles in the pathogenesis of PD through amyloidosis. With this, IL-6 stimulates the inflammatory process, by enhancing the release of lysosomal enzymes, reactive oxygen species, and eicosanoids (prostaglandins, leukotrienes, thromboxane from the polymorphic nuclear leukocytes, macrophages, endotheliocytes, and fibroblasts and by augmenting the chemotaxis of macrophages and neutrophils, and the degranulation of the latter, i.e. through its action on the effector cells of inflammation, and prepares the tissue basis for amyloid deposits in this fashion. Thus, the analysis of literary and own materials gives grounds to suggest that pirin mutation is a trigger of the synthesis of IL-1 and IL-6 in PD and their hypersecretion is an initial link of the synthesis of SAA.

  10. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline.

  11. Current understanding in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess McPherson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of atopic eczema over the past few decades. This article examines the multiple factors which are implicated in this process.

  12. Pathogenesis of Dengue Vaccine Viruses in Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    1973). Sabin (1948) showed that attenuated dpngiie, passed through mosquitoes, did not revert to pathogenicity frnr man. -7- Thus even if the vaccine ...AD-A138 518 PATHOGENESIS OF DENGUE VACCINE YIRUSES IN MOSQUITOES 1/ (U) YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CONN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE B J BEATY ET AL. 9i JAN 80 DRND7...34 ’ UNCLASSIFIED 0{) AD 0Pathogenesis of dengue vaccine viruses in mosquitoes -First Annual Report Barry I. Beaty, Ph.D. Thomas H. G

  13. Role of key-regulator genes in melanoma susceptibility and pathogenesis among patients from South Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casula, Milena; Sini, MariaCristina; Palomba, Grazia; The Italian Melanoma Intergroup; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Muggiano, Antonio; Cossu, Antonio; Budroni, Mario; Caracò, Corrado; Ascierto, Paolo A; Pagani, Elena; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Canzanella, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Several genetic alterations have been demonstrated to contribute to the development and progression of melanoma. In this study, we further investigated the impact of key-regulator genes in susceptibility and pathogenesis of such a disease. A large series (N = 846) of sporadic and familial cases originating from South Italy was screened for germline mutations in p16 CDKN2A , BRCA2, and MC1R genes by DHPLC analysis and automated DNA sequencing. Paired primary melanomas and lymph node metastases from same patients (N = 35) as well as melanoma cell lines (N = 18) were analyzed for somatic mutations in NRAS, BRAF, and p16 CDKN2A genes. For melanoma susceptibility, investigations at germline level indicated that p16 CDKN2A was exclusively mutated in 16/545 (2.9%) non-Sardinian patients, whereas BRCA2 germline mutations were observed in 4/91 (4.4%) patients from North Sardinia only. Two MC1R germline variants, Arg151Cys and Asp294His, were significantly associated with melanoma in Sardinia. Regarding genetic events involved in melanoma pathogenesis at somatic level, mutually-exclusive mutations of NRAS and BRAF genes were observed at quite same rate (about two thirds) in cultured and in vivo melanomas (either primary or metastatic lesions). Conversely, p16 CDKN2A gene alterations were observed at increased rates moving from primary to metastatic melanomas and melanoma cell lines. Activation of the ERK gene product was demonstrated to be consistently induced by a combination of molecular alterations (NRAS/BRAF mutations and p16 CDKN2A silencing). Our findings further clarified that: a) mutation prevalence in melanoma susceptibility genes may vary within each specific geographical area; b) multiple molecular events are accumulating during melanomagenesis

  14. Structural damages prevention of the ITER vacuum vessel and ports by elasto-plastic analysis with regards to RCC-MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.martinez@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Jun, Chang Hoon; Portafaix, Christophe; Alekseev, Alexander; Sborchia, Carlo; Choi, Chang-Ho [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Albin, Vincent [SOM Calcul – Groupe ORTEC, 121 ancien Chemin de Cassis – Immeuble Grand Pré, 13009 Marseille (France); Borrelly, Stephane [Sogeti High Tech, RE2, 180 rue René Descartes, Le Millenium – Bat C, 13857 Aix en Provence (France); Cambazar, Magali [Assystem EOS, 117 rue Jacquard, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gaucher, Thomas [SOM Calcul – Groupe ORTEC, 121 ancien Chemin de Cassis – Immeuble Grand Pré, 13009 Marseille (France); Sfarni, Samir; Tailhardat, Olivier [Assystem EOS, 117 rue Jacquard, 84120 Pertuis (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER vacuum vessel (VV) is a part of the first barrier to confine the plasma. • ITER VV as NPE necessitates a third party organization authorized by the French nuclear regulator to assure design, fabrication, and conformance testing and quality assurance, i.e. ANB. • Several types of damages have to be prevented in order to guarantee the structural integrity with regards to RCC-MR. • It is usual to employ non-linear analysis when the “classical” elastic analysis reaches its limit of linear application. • Several structural analyses were performed with many different global and local models of the whole ITER VV. - Abstract: Several types of damages have to be prevented in order to guarantee the structural integrity of a structure with regards to RCC-MR; the P-type damages which can result from the application to a structure of a steadily and regularly increasing loading or a constant loading and the S-type damages during operational loading conditions which can only result from repeated application of loadings associated to the progressive deformations and fatigue. Following RCC-MR, the S-type damages prevention has to be started only when the structural integrity is guaranteed against P-type damages. The verification of the last one on the ITER vacuum vessel and ports has been performed by limit analysis with elasto-(perfectly)plastic material behavior. It is usual to employ non-linear analysis when the “classical” elastic analysis reaches its limit of linear application. Some elasto-plastic analyses have been performed considering several cyclic loadings to evaluate also more realistic structural margins of the against S-type damages.

  15. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part II: Cracked plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. An important effort of development of these analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the frame of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and in the frame of R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in the 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles is composed of 5 parts: the first part presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Finally, part V presents the validation elements of the methods, with details on the process followed for the development and evaluation of the accuracy of the proposed analytical methods. This second article in the series presents all details for the stress intensity factor and J calculations for cracked plates. General data applicable for all defect geometries are first presented, and then, available defect geometries where compendia for K I and σ ref calculation are provided are given

  16. A PHASE II STUDY OF GEMCITABINE AND CAPECITABINE IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CANCER (RCC): SOUTHWEST ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY S0312

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Hussey, Michael; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Clark, Joseph I.; Lange, Marianne K.; Crawford, E. David

    2010-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine plus capecitabine has modest efficacy in patients with advanced RCC but has considerable toxicity. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a modified dose-schedule of this doublet in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic RCC. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients were treated with gemcitabine at 900mg/m2 on days 1,8,15 and capecitabine at 625mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 through 21, every 28 days. Eligible patients must have adequate performance status and end-organ function. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate (RR). No further evaluation of this regimen would be pursued if the RR was ≤ 5%. In an exploratory manner using archival specimens, we also evaluated potential markers of prognosis and treatment response including thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms and tumor expression of p53, PTEN, pAKT, pmTOR, and ERCC1. Results Of 43 patients registered, 1 was ineligible and 2 were not analyzable. There was 1 confirmed complete response (CR) and three unconfirmed partial responses (PR), for an overall response rate of 10% (95% CI: 3, 24). Nineteen patients (48%) had stable disease (SD). The six-month freedom-from-treatment-failure and overall survival rates were 20% (95% CI: 8, 32) and 75% (95% CI: 62, 88), respectively. Median survival time was 23 months (95% CI: 10, 37). One patient each experienced Grade 4 neutropenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia and hemolysis with renal failure. The most common Grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (12 patients), fatigue (5), and leucopenia (4). Patients with a best response of stable disease or better were more likely to have a decrease in expression of PTEN and an increased expression of pmTOR. Conclusions Gemcitabine plus capecitabine at this reduced dose-schedule benefits a small percentage of patients with RCC with an acceptable toxicity profile. The combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine may serve as a base regimen for combination therapy with targeted agents in select RCC

  17. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical equipments of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome 1, Volume Z: Other technical appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This book is the 7th of a whole set of 12 which constitute the present edition of the RCC-MR. The technical appendixes of this volume deal with the following characteristics and rules: calculation of screwed assemblies, analysis taking into account creep, welded joint characteristics, elastoplastic analysis of a structure under cyclic loads, elasto-visco-plastic analysis under cyclic loads, calculation rules of revolution shells under external presure and of cylinders under axial compression, design rules of linear supports, calculation rules of convex bottoms under internal pressure [fr

  18. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  19. Animal models of papillomavirus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, M Saveria

    2002-11-01

    Tumorigenesis due to papillomavirus (PV) infection was first demonstrated in rabbits and cattle early last century. Despite the evidence obtained in animals, the role of viruses in human cancer was dismissed as irrelevant. It took a paradigm shift in the late 1970s for some viruses to be recognised as 'tumour viruses' in humans, and in 1995, more than 60 years after Rous's first demonstration of CRPV oncogenicity, WHO officially declared that 'HPV-16 and HPV-18 are carcinogenic to humans'. Experimental studies with animal PVs have been a determining factor in this decision. Animal PVs have been studied both as agents of disease in animals and as models of human PV infection. In addition to the study of PV infection in whole animals, in vitro studies with animal PV proteins have contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms of cell transformation. Animal PVs cause distressing diseases in both farm and companion animals, such as teat papillomatosis in cattle, equine sarcoids and canine oral papillomatosis and there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of these problematic infections. Persistent and florid teat papillomatosis in cows can lead to mastitis, prevent the suckling of calves and make milking impossible; heavily affected animals are culled and so occasionally are whole herds. Equine sarcoids are often recurrent and untreatable and lead to loss of valuable animals. Canine oral papillomatosis can be very extensive and persistent and lead to great distress. Thus the continuing research in the biology of animal PVs is amply justified. BPVs and CRPV have been for many years the model systems with which to study the biology of HPV. Induction of papillomas and their neoplastic progression has been experimentally demonstrated and reproduced in cattle and rabbits, and virus-cofactor interactions have been elucidated in these systems. With the advancements in molecular and cell culture techniques, the direct study of HPV has become less

  20. JAK and MPL mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2008-03-01

    The Janus family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and tyrosine kinase 2) transduces signals downstream of type I and II cytokine receptors via signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). JAK3 is important in lymphoid and JAK2 in myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation. The thrombopoietin receptor MPL is one of several JAK2 cognate receptors and is essential for myelopoiesis in general and megakaryopoiesis in particular. Germline loss-of-function (LOF) JAK3 and MPL mutations cause severe combined immunodeficiency and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, respectively. Germline gain-of-function (GOF) MPL mutation (MPLS505N) causes familial thrombocytosis. Somatic JAK3 (e.g. JAK3A572V, JAK3V722I, JAK3P132T) and fusion JAK2 (e.g. ETV6-JAK2, PCM1-JAK2, BCR-JAK2) mutations have respectively been described in acute megakaryocytic leukemia and acute leukemia/chronic myeloid malignancies. However, current attention is focused on JAK2 (e.g. JAK2V617F, JAK2 exon 12 mutations) and MPL (e.g. MPLW515L/K/S, MPLS505N) mutations associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). A JAK2 mutation, primarily JAK2V617F, is invariably associated with polycythemia vera (PV). The latter mutation also occurs in the majority of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF). MPL mutational frequency in MPNs is substantially less (<10%). In general, despite a certain degree of genotype - phenotype correlations, the prognostic relevance of harbouring one of these mutations, or their allele burden when present, remains dubious. Regardless, based on the logical assumption that amplified JAK-STAT signalling is central to the pathogenesis of PV, ET and PMF, several anti-JAK2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and are currently being tested in humans with these disorders.

  1. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  2. Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation

    OpenAIRE

    JORDI SALAS; NURIA LASO; SERGI MAS; M. JOSE LAFUENTE; XAVIER CASTERAD; MANUEL TRIAS; ANTONIO BALLESTA; RAFAEL MOLINA; CARLOS ASCASO; SHICHUN ZHENG; JOHN K. WIENCKE; AMALIA LAFUENTE

    2004-01-01

    Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation BACKGROUND: The diversity of the Mediterranean diet and the heterogeneity of acquired genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) led us to examine the possible association between dietary factors and mutations, such as Ki-ras mutations, in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was based on 246 cases and 296 controls. For th...

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis Pathogenesis: a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Arab-Mazar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the latest articles which were published during 2013-2014, Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis was mentioned as a neglected sexual transmission disease (STD, while the exact mechanism of its pathogenesis has not been cleared yet. Although trichomonasiasis is easy curable, there is concern that resistance to drug are increasing. This common infection as concerning the important public health implications needs more research to be done for understanding the diagnosis, treatment, immunology and pathogenesis. In this review we searched all valuable and relevant information considering the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis. We referred to the information databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus and Google scholar. The used keywords were the combinations of T. vaginalis and words associated with pathogenicity. This review discusses the host-parasite interaction and pathogenicity of this parasite.

  4. Pathogenesis Concept Of Extracranial Dissections In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dissection of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery (EICA and Extracranial Vertebral Artery (EVA is an amportant cause of brain infarction with miscellaneous etiologies around the world. Methods: A prospective observational clinical study was conducted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran between 2008-2016. Diagnosis of brain infarction and TIA was made by stroke neurologist. Detection of EICA and EVA dissections were made by performing CT angiography  and MR angiography  or DSA in the suspected patients. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, territorial involvement, pathophysiology and pathogenesis of dissections were assessed in all of the patients. Pathogenesis of dissections was classified as Idiopathic, Trumatic, Postural and Genetic categories. Results: Twenty eight patients (21 males, 7 females were admitted with extracranial arterial dissection. Mean age of males and females with dissection was 39.81± 4.2 and 35.71±6.1 years respectively. Influence of gender on age of the patients was not significant, p>0.05. Among patients with extracranial dissection only 3.6% had atherosclerosis risk factors and 96.4% had no other cause for brain infarction. 100% of extracranial dissections in males occured in carotid territory, while 28.6% of females had dissection in the EVA. The influence of gender in territory of dissection was significant, p<0.05. Idiopathic dissections and genetic susceptibility was found in 10.7% and 3.6% of extracranial dissections respectively. 53.5% of the patienrs had trumatic pathogenesis for extracranial dissections and 32.1% developed dissection due to special neck  postures. Important details in pathophysiology and pathogenesis of extracranial dissections will be presented in the lecture. Conclusion: Stroke patients with extracranial dissections have characteristic demographic and  territorial involvement. Trumatic pathogenesis is the most frequent cause of dissection in Iran followed by neck

  5. Bordetella pertussis pathogenesis: current and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Scheller, Erich V.; Miller, Jeff F.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, has recently reemerged as a major public health threat despite high levels of vaccination against the etiological agent, Bordetella pertussis. In this Review, we describe the pathogenesis of this disease, with a focus on recent mechanistic insights into virulence factor function. We also discuss the changing epidemiology of pertussis and the challenges of vaccine development. Despite decades of research, many aspects of B. pertussis physiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. We highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed to develop improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24608338

  6. Insights in the pathogenesis of Dobermann hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandigers, Paulus Justinus Johannes

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Dobermann hepatitis has been under debate for several years. In this thesis two hypotheses were formulated and discussed. Hypothesis 1: In Dobermann dogs exists an autosomal genetic error in metabolism that leads to an abnormal copper metabolism which results in an increased

  7. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection involves interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is now clear that both bacterial virulence factors and host susceptibility play key roles in disease pathogenesis. The nature and levels of these interactions between these major factors has been found to determine the spectrum of clinical outcomes of the infection with this important bacterium. Virulence factors include the ...

  8. Frontoethmoidal encephaloceles, a study of their pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Eelco; Vermeij-Keers, C

    1997-01-01

    A prospective clinical study of 30 patients with frontoethmoidal encephaloceles was performed in order to find support for a proposed theory concerning its pathogenesis, based on a previously performed embryological study and relevant findings in the literature. According to this proposed theory the

  9. Immunological pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hoon Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory state of the gastrointestinal tract and can be classified into 2 main clinical phenomena: Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. The pathogenesis of IBD, including CD and UC, involves the presence of pathogenic factors such as abnormal gut microbiota, immune response dysregulation, environmental changes, and gene variants. Although many investigations have tried to identify novel pathogenic factors associated with IBD that are related to environmental, genetic, microbial, and immune response factors, a full understanding of IBD pathogenesis is unclear. Thus, IBD treatment is far from optimal, and patient outcomes can be unsatisfactory. As result of massive studying on IBD, T helper 17 (Th17 cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are investigated on their effects on IBD. A recent study of the plasticity of Th17 cells focused primarily on colitis. ILCs also emerging as novel cell family, which play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD immunopathogenesis is key to understanding the causes of IBD and can lead to the development of IBD therapies. The aim of this review is to explain the pathogenesis of IBD, with a focus on immunological factors and therapies.

  10. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was

  11. Osteonecrosis. Part 1. Risk factors and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Valeriyevna Ilyinykh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers different risk factors for osteonecrosis (ON and some aspects of its pathogenesis: impairments in the differentiation of stromal cells, the vascular provision of intraand extravasal genesis, the quality of proper bone tissue due to generalized or local osteoporosis, intravascular coagulation factors contributing to microthrombogenesis. The basic types of ON are identified.

  12. Tryptophan-induced pathogenesis of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To investigate the pathogenesis of breast cancer through targeted metabolomics of amino acids ... Furthermore, the biological function of tryptophan was determined through determining the influence ... profiling all the small molecules in the biosamples (e.g., .... is a promising therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer7.

  13. Hepatitis E: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Subrat K.; Varma, Satya P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a single, positive-sense, capped and poly A tailed RNA virus classified under the family Hepeviridae. Enteric transmission, acute self-limiting hepatitis, frequent epidemic and sporadic occurrence, high mortality in affected pregnants are hallmarks of hepatitis E infection. Lack of an efficient culture system and resulting reductionist approaches for the study of replication and pathogenesis of HEV made it to be a less understood agent. Early studies on animal models, sub-genomic expression of open reading frames (ORF) and infectious cDNA clones have helped in elucidating the genome organization, important stages in HEV replication and pathogenesis. The genome contains three ORF's and three untranslated regions (UTR). The 5′ distal ORF, ORF1 is translated by host ribosomes in a cap dependent manner to form the non-structural polyprotein including the viral replicase. HEV replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate which helps in the formation of the positive-sense genomic RNA and a single bi-cistronic sub-genomic RNA. The 3′ distal ORF's including the major structural protein pORF2 and the multifunctional host interacting protein pORF3 are translated from the sub-genomic RNA. Pathogenesis in HEV infections is not well articulated, and remains a concern due to the many aspects like host dependent and genotype specific variations. Animal HEV, zoonosis, chronicity in immunosuppressed patients, and rapid decompensation in affected chronic liver diseased patients warrants detailed investigation of the underlying pathogenesis. Recent advances about structure, entry, egress and functional characterization of ORF1 domains has furthered our understanding about HEV. This article is an effort to review our present understanding about molecular biology and pathogenesis of HEV. PMID:25755485

  14. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  15. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  17. The role of parvovirus B19 and the immune response in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R; Mattey, Derek L

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we review the evidence suggesting a possible role for B19 virus in the pathogenesis of a subset of cases of acute leukemia. Human parvovirus B19 infection may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute leukemia and may also precede the development of acute leukemia by up to 180 days. Parvovirus B19 targets erythroblasts in the bone marrow and may cause aplastic crisis in patients with shortened-red cell survival. Aplastic crisis represents a prodrome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 2% patients. There is a significant overlap between those HLA classes I and II alleles that are associated with a vigorous immune response and development of symptoms during B19 infection and those HLA alleles that predispose to development of acute leukemia. Acute symptomatic B19 infection is associated with low circulating IL-10 consistent with a vigorous immune response; deficient IL-10 production at birth was recently found to be associated with subsequent development of acute leukemia. Anti-B19 IgG has been associated with a particular profile of methylation of human cancer genes in patients with acute leukemia, suggesting an additional hit and run mechanism. The proposed role for parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia fits well with the delayed infection hypothesis and with the two-step mutation model, which describes carriage of the first mutation prior to birth, followed by suppression of hematopoiesis, which allows rapid proliferation of cells harboring the first mutation, acquisition of a second activating mutation, and expansion of cells carrying both mutations, resulting in acute leukemia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Deregulation of protein translation control, a potential game-changing hypothesis for Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Nkiliza, Aurore; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine

    2015-08-01

    Protein translation is one of the most fundamental and exquisitely controlled processes in biology, and is energetically demanding. The deregulation of this process is deleterious to cells, as demonstrated by several diseases caused by mutations in protein translation machinery. Emerging evidence now points to a role for protein translation in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD); a debilitating neurodegenerative movement disorder. In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that protein translation machinery, PD-associated proteins and PD pathology are connected in a functional network linking cell survival to protein translation control. This hypothesis is a potential game changer in the field of the molecular pathogenesis of PD, with implications for the development of PD diagnostics and disease-modifying therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Pathogenesis, Genetic Background, and the Role of Nutritional Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilita M. Moschos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness worldwide, mainly affecting people over 65 years old. Dry and wet ARDM are the main types of the disease, which seem to have a multifactorial background. The aim of this review is to summarize the mechanisms of ARMD pathogenesis and exhibit the role of diet and nutritional supplements in the onset and progression of the disease. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol, and, diet appear to interact with mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, contributing to the pathogenesis of ARMD. Inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress, induced by the daily exposure of retina to high pressure of oxygen and light radiation, have been also associated with ARMD lesions. Other than medical and surgical therapies, nutritional supplements hold a significant role in the prevention and treatment of ARMD, eliminating the progression of macular degeneration.

  20. Quebra do grão em Resíduos de Construção Civil (RCC induzida pelo processo de compactação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Marques da Silva

    Full Text Available Resumo Nas últimas décadas a geração de resíduos de construção civil (RCC tornou-se um fator relevante em todo o mundo. Dessa forma, é cada vez mais importante o reaproveitamento desse material, sobretudo em obras de grande consumo, tais como as obras rodoviárias. No entanto, a aplicação desses resíduos depende do conhecimento das propriedades químicas e mecânicas do material. Entre esses parâmetros destaca-se que a susceptibilidade à quebra do grão é de fundamental importância. Isso porque esse parâmetro influencia diretamente no comportamento do material através da resistência e da permeabilidade. O presente trabalho avaliou a quebra do grão em RCC induzida pelo processo de compactação através da aplicação das energias normal e modificada. Para isso o material foi dividido em frações com granulometrias diferentes. Dessa forma, foi analisada a influência da energia, do tamanho do grão, da mineralogia, do teor de umidade e da densidade da amostra. Os resultados indicaram que a ocorrência da quebra do grão está diretamente relacionada com a constituição mineralógica, observando-se que a maior fração estudada foi aquela que sofreu a menor quebra dos grãos. Adicionalmente, os resultados indicaram que a densidade de compactação da amostra também possui significativa influência no processo de quebra dos grãos.

  1. A pilot study of denileukin diftitox (DD) in combination with high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Elizabeth; Eklund, John; Martone, Brenda; Wang, Lili; Gidron, Adi; Macvicar, Gary; Rademaker, Alfred; Goolsby, Charles; Marszalek, Laura; Kozlowski, James; Smith, Norm; Kuzel, Timothy M

    2010-09-01

    High-dose (HD) IL-2 is approved to treat renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with modest response rates and significant toxicity. Enhancement of cytotoxic T-cell activity by IL-2 is 1 mechanism of action. IL-2 also stimulates regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs), which are associated with poor prognosis. Favorable outcomes are associated with greater rebound absolute lymphocyte count (Fumagalli 2003). DD depletes IL-2 receptor (CD25 component) expressing cells. We hypothesized that sequential therapy could complement each other; DD would deplete Tregs so IL-2 could more effectively stimulate proliferation and activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients (n=18) received standard HD IL-2 and 1 dose of DD daily for 3 days; periodic flow cytometry and complete blood counts were performed. Group A included 3 patients to assess safety only with DD 6 μg/kg between the IL-2 courses. Group B included 9 patients at 9 μg/kg DD before the IL-2 courses. Group C included 6 patients at 9 μg/kg DD between the IL-2 courses. Efficacy using the RECIST criteria was assessed after the treatment. Fifteen patients from a study of IL-2 without DD served as controls for toxicity comparison and 13 of these for flow cytometry comparisons. No unusual toxicity was noted. For group B/C patients receiving DD, the median decline in Tregs was 56.3% from pre-DD to post-DD (P=0.013). Peak absolute lymphocyte count change from baseline was +9980/μL for group B, +4470/μL for group C, and +4720/μL for the controls (P=0.005 B vs. C). The overall response rate was 5 of 15 (33%); 3 of 9 (33%) and 2 of 6 (33%) for groups B and C, respectively, including 2 patients with sarcomatoid RCC and 1 with earlier sunitinib therapy.

  2. Theories on the Pathogenesis of Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Sourial

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease defined by the presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue. The aetiology of endometriosis is complex and multifactorial, where several not fully confirmed theories describe its pathogenesis. This review examines existing theories on the initiation and propagation of different types of endometriotic lesions, as well as critically appraises the myriad of biologically relevant evidence that support or oppose each of the proposed theories. The current literature suggests that stem cells, dysfunctional immune response, genetic predisposition, and aberrant peritoneal environment may all be involved in the establishment and propagation of endometriotic lesions. An orchestrated scientific and clinical effort is needed to consider all factors involved in the pathogenesis of this multifaceted disease and to propose novel therapeutic targets to reach effective treatments for this distressing condition.

  3. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  4. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Naljayan, Mihran V.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia affecting 3-5% of all pregnancies is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. This disorder is characterized by a constellation of signs and symptoms, most notably new onset hypertension and proteinuria during the last trimester of pregnancy. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of preeclampsia with an emphasis on the role of circulating anti-angiogenic proteins in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and its complications will be discussed.

  5. Osmotin, a Pathogenesis-Related Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viktorová, J.; Krásný, Lukáš; Kamlar, M.; Nováková, M.; Macková, M.; Macek, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2012), s. 672-681 ISSN 1389-2037 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1654; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/09/1693 Program:GA; GA Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : osmotin * pathogenesis-related proteins * antifungal activity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.326, year: 2012

  6. Mid-Atlantic Microbial Pathogenesis Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    rheumatic fever, yet little is understood about the regulation of streptococcal genes involved in disease processes and survival in the host. Genome...of brucellosis, a disease that is characterized by abortion and infertility in ruminant animals and undulant fever in humans. In the natural hosts...were presented at this session. 15. SUBJECT TERMS bacteria, pathogenesis, microbiology, virulence, disease 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  7. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  8. MicroRNA and Pathogenesis of Enterovirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bing-Ching; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yu, Sung-Liang

    2016-01-06

    There are no currently available specific antiviral therapies for non-polio Enterovirus infections. Although several vaccines have entered clinical trials, the efficacy requires further evaluation, particularly for cross-strain protective activity. Curing patients with viral infections is a public health problem due to antigen alterations and drug resistance caused by the high genomic mutation rate. To conquer these limits in the development of anti-Enterovirus treatments, a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between Enterovirus and host cells is urgently needed. MicroRNA (miRNA) constitutes the biggest family of gene regulators in mammalian cells and regulates almost a half of all human genes. The roles of miRNAs in Enterovirus pathogenesis have recently begun to be noted. In this review, we shed light on recent advances in the understanding of Enterovirus infection-modulated miRNAs. The impacts of altered host miRNAs on cellular processes, including immune escape, apoptosis, signal transduction, shutdown of host protein synthesis and viral replication, are discussed. Finally, miRNA-based medication provides a promising strategy for the development of antiviral therapy.

  9. Understanding the Pathogenesis of Angelman Syndrome through Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihar Ranjan Jana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe mental retardation, lack of speech, ataxia, susceptibility to seizures, and unique behavioral features such as easily provoked smiling and laughter and autistic features. The disease is primarily caused by deletion or loss-of-function mutations of the maternally inherited UBE3A gene located within chromosome 15q11-q13. The UBE3A gene encodes a 100 kDa protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional coactivator. Emerging evidence now indicates that UBE3A plays a very important role in synaptic function and in regulation of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. A number of animal models for AS have been generated to understand the disease pathogenesis. The most widely used model is the UBE3A-maternal-deficient mouse that recapitulates most of the essential features of AS including cognitive and motor abnormalities. This paper mainly discusses various animal models of AS and how these models provide fundamental insight into understanding the disease biology for potential therapeutic intervention.

  10. [Anatomy and pathogenesis of diverticular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, T; Böttner, M

    2014-04-01

    Although diverticular disease is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal disorders the pathogenesis is not yet sufficiently clarified. The aim is to define the anatomy and pathogenesis of diverticular disease considering the risk factors and description of structural and functional alterations of the bowel wall. This article gives an appraisal of the literature, presentation and evaluation of classical etiological factors, analysis and discussion of novel pathogenetic concepts. Colonic diverticulosis is defined as an acquired out-pouching of multiple and initially asymptomatic pseudodiverticula through muscular gaps in the colon wall. Diverticular disease is characterized by diverticular bleeding and/or inflammatory processes (diverticulitis) with corresponding complications (e.g. abscess formation, fistula, covered and open perforation, peritonitis and stenosis). Risk factors for diverticular disease include increasing age, genetic predisposition, congenital connective tissue diseases, low fiber diet, high meat consumption and pronounced overweight. Alterations of connective tissue cause a weakening of preformed exit sites of diverticula and rigidity of the bowel wall with reduced flexibility. It is assumed that intestinal innervation disorders and structural alterations of the musculature induce abnormal contractile patterns with increased intraluminal pressure, thereby promoting the development of diverticula. Moreover, an increased release of pain-mediating neurotransmitters is considered to be responsible for persistent pain in chronic diverticular disease. According to the present data the pathogenesis of diverticular disease cannot be attributed to a single factor but should be considered as a multifactorial event.

  11. THE ROLE OF EPIDERMAL BARRIER IMPAIRMENTS IN ATOPIC DERMATITIS: MODERN CONCEPTS OF DISEASE PATHOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay N. Murashkin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by a recurring course and progressive decrease in the quality of life. Recent studies in this area demonstrate the multifaceted pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Interaction of such factors as epidermal dysfunction, immune system disorders, and the consequences of genetic mutations contributes not only to the development of the disease but also to its progression and chronic course. The article presents various components of the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, describes the role of lipids, thereby the new therapeutic targets are revealed to specialists.

  12. The pathogenesis of liver disease in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, David M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2009-01-01

    There are many potential reasons for increased liver-related mortality in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection compared with either infection alone. HIV infects multiple cells in the liver and might potentially alter the life cycle of HBV, although evidence to date is limited. Unique mutations in HBV have been defined in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals and might directly alter pathogenesis. In addition, an impaired HBV-specific T-cell immune response is likely to be important. The roles of microbial translocation, immune activation and increased hepatic stellate cell activation will be important areas for future study.

  13. Causes of epidermal filaggrin reduction and their role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Kezic, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    contribute to stratum corneum hydration and pH. The levels of filaggrin and its degradation products are influenced not only by the filaggrin genotype but also by inflammation and exogenous stressors. Pertinently, filaggrin deficiency is observed in patients with atopic dermatitis regardless of filaggrin...... mutation status, suggesting that the absence of filaggrin is a key factor in the pathogenesis of this skin condition. In this article we review the various causes of low filaggrin levels, centralizing the functional and morphologic role of a deficiency in filaggrin, its metabolites, or both...

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma identified by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Hornick, Jason L; Woda, Bruce; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-08-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of presumed hematopoietic origin showing morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of histiocytic differentiation. Somatic mutation importance in the pathogenesis or disease progression of histiocytic sarcoma was largely unknown. To identify somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma, we studied 5 histiocytic sarcomas [3 female and 2 male patients; mean age 54.8 (20-72), anatomic sites include lymph node, uterus, and pleura] and matched normal tissues from each patient as germ line controls. Somatic mutations in 50 "Hotspot" oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were examined using next generation sequencing. Three (out of five) histiocytic sarcoma cases carried somatic mutations in BRAF. Among them, G464V [variant frequency (VF) of 43.6 %] and G466R (VF of 29.6 %) located at the P loop potentially interfere with the hydrophobic interaction between P and activating loops and ultimately activation of BRAF. Also detected was BRAF somatic mutation N581S (VF of 7.4 %), which was located at the catalytic loop of BRAF kinase domain: its role in modifying kinase activity was unclear. A similar mutational analysis was also performed on nine acute monocytic/monoblastic leukemia cases, which did not identify any BRAF somatic mutations. Our study detected several BRAF mutations in histiocytic sarcomas, which may be important in understanding the tumorigenesis of this rare neoplasm and providing mechanisms for potential therapeutical opportunities.

  17. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  18. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erstad, Derek J.; Cusack, James C. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge

  19. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a common complication of many diseases. Its polyetiological pattern determines the specific features of lung morphological changes and the clinical course of ARDS. Objective: to analyze the pathogenesis of ARDS in the context of the general pathological processes underlying its development. Material and methods. More than 200 lungs from the people who had died from severe concomitant injury or ARDS-complicated pneumonia were investigated. More than 150 rat experiments simulated various types of lung injury: ventilator-induced lung injury with different ventilation parameters; reperfusion injuries (systemic circulation blockade due to 12-minute vascular fascicle ligation, followed by the recovery of cardiac performance and breathing; microcirculatory disorder (injection of a thromboplastin solution into the jugular vein; blood loss; betaine-pepsin aspiration; and closed chest injury. Different parts of the right and left lungs were histologically examined 1 and 3 hours and 1 and 3 days after initiation of the experiment. Lung pieces were fixed in 10% neutral formalin solution and embedded in paraffin. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and using the van Gieson and Weigert procedures; the Schiff test was used. Results. The influence of aggression factors (trauma, blood loss, aspiration, infection, etc. results in damage to the lung and particularly air-blood barrier structures (endothelium, alveolar epithelium, their basement membrane. In turn the alteration of cellular and extracellular structures is followed by the increased permeability of hemomicrocirculatory bed vessels, leading to the development of non-cardiogenic (interstitial, alveolar pulmonary edema that is a central component in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Conclusion. The diagnosis of the early manifestations of ARDS must account for the nature of an aggression factor, the signs confirming the alteration of the lung

  20. The pathogenesis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph R; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-12-01

    Interest in pathogenesis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) followed the observation of the high risk for the disease in HIV infection and the recent observation of an association with a variety of newer therapeutic modalities, e.g., natalizumab, an α4β1 integrin inhibitor, and efalizumab, an anti-CD11a monoclonal antibody. Any hypothesis of PML pathogenesis must account for a number of facts. Firstly, the causative agent JC virus is ubiquitously present, yet only a vanishingly small number of infected persons develop the disease. Secondly, disorders of cell-mediated immunity increase the risk of the disease, particularly HIV infection. Impaired innate immunity is not a risk for PML, and antibodies against JC virus are not protective. Thirdly, a latent period of several months appears necessary following the administration of natalizumab and efalizumab before PML develops. Fourthly, restoration of the immune system can arrest the PML. It is possible that infection with JC virus occurs with a form of the virus shed in the urine of as many as 40% of all adults and present in sewage worldwide. Once acquired, perhaps through an oropharyngeal route, it may replicate and disseminate. A neurotropic form of JC virus that replicates in glial tissues causes PML when immunosurveillance is impaired. There are many unanswered questions with respect to PML pathogenesis. How is virus acquired? What tissues are infected? What is the origin of the neurotropic form? When does virus enter brain? What is the role of central nervous system immunosurveillance? The lack of an animal model has made answering these questions challenging. © Discovery Medicine

  1. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo, Yeikou

    1975-01-01

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  2. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogenesis and treatment of diabetic glomerulopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marre, M.; Le Jeune, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Diabetic glomerulopathy is the consequence, at the glomerular level, of diabetes. Diagnosis is based on the association of proteinuria, arterial hypertension and an early reduction of glomerular filtration in a diabetic patient, generally insulin-dependent. Diabetic glomerulopathy is a complication of type I diabetes, which begins in childhood or adolescence, but can also be discovered in type II diabetes. A definite diagnosis requires histological evidences ; glomerular clearance measurements ( 125 I-iodothalamate or 51 Cr-EDTA) yield important information concerning glomerular filtration. The authors subsequently address pathogenesis and therapeutic regimens, and they report on the particularities of this condition in type II diabetes. (authors). 30 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Polycystic Kidney Disease: Pathogenesis and Potential Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiar, Vinita; Caplan, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a prevalent, inherited condition for which there is currently no effective specific clinical therapy. The disease is characterized by the progressive development of fluid-filled cysts derived from renal tubular epithelial cells which gradually compress the parenchyma and compromise renal function. Current interests in the field focus on understanding and exploiting signaling mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis as well as delineating the role of the primary cilium in cystogenesis. This review highlights the pathogenetic pathways underlying renal cyst formation as well as novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of PKD. PMID:21146605

  5. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K.; Hunstad, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. PMID:27692880

  7. The pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, A; Kawaoka, Y

    2001-10-01

    Ebola virus causes lethal hemorrhagic disease in humans, yet there are still no satisfactory biological explanations to account for its extreme virulence. This review focuses on recent findings relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of Ebola virus infection and developing vaccines and effective therapy. The available data suggest that the envelope glycoprotein and the interaction of some viral proteins with the immune system are likely to play important roles in the extraordinary pathogenicity of this virus. There are also indications that genetically engineered vaccines, including plasmid DNA and viral vectors expressing Ebola virus proteins, and passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies could be feasible options for the control of Ebola virus-associated disease.

  8. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  9. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Channelopathy Pathogenesis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina eSchmunk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole- genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects.

  11. Pathogenesis and treatment modalities of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valančienė, Greta; Jasaitienė, Daiva; Valiukevičienė, Skaidra

    2010-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily of the dermis and subcutaneous fat that ultimately leads to a scar-like sclerosis of connective tissue. The disorder manifests as various plaques of different shape and size with signs of skin inflammation, sclerosis, and atrophy. This is a relatively rare inflammatory disease characterized by a chronic course, unknown etiology, and insufficiently clear pathogenesis. Many factors may influence its appearance: trauma, genetic factors, disorders of the immune system or hormone metabolism, viral infections, toxic substances or pharmaceutical agents, neurogenic factors, and Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Various therapeutic modalities are being used for the treatment of localized scleroderma. There is no precise treatment scheme for this disease. A majority of patients can be successfully treated with topical pharmaceutical agents and phototherapy, but some of them with progressive, disseminated, and causing disability localized scleroderma are in need of systemic treatment. The aim of this article is not only to dispute about the clinical and morphological characteristics of localized scleroderma, but also to present the newest generalized data about the possible origin, pathogenesis, and treatment modalities of this disease.

  12. Penile cancer: epidemiology, pathogenesis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, M C G; Heideman, D A M; Snijders, P J F; Horenblas, S; Dillner, J; Meijer, C J L M

    2009-04-01

    Penile cancer is a disease with a high morbidity and mortality. Its prevalence is relatively rare, but the highest in some developing countries. Insight into its precursor lesions, pathogenesis and risk factors offers options to prevent this potentially mutilating disease. This review presents an overview of the different histologically and clinically identified precursor lesions of penile cancer and discusses the molecular pathogenesis, including the role of HPV in penile cancer development. A systematic review of the literature evaluating penile carcinogenesis, risk factors and molecular mechanisms involved. Careful monitoring of men with lichen sclerosis, genital Bowen's disease, erythroplasia of Queyrat and bowenoid papulosis seems useful, thereby offering early recognition of penile cancer and, subsequently, conservative therapeutic options. Special attention is given to flat penile lesions, which contain high numbers of HPV. Their role in HPV transmission to sexual partners is highlighted, but their potential to transform as a precursor lesion into penile cancer has been unsatisfactorily explored. Further research should not only focus on HPV mediated pathogenic pathways but also on the non-HPV related molecular and genetic factors that play a role in penile cancer development. Options for prevention of penile cancer include (neonatal) circumcision, limitation of penile HPV infections (either by prophylactic vaccination or condom use), prevention of phimosis, treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions, limiting PUVA treatment, smoking cessation and hygienic measures.

  13. Hypothalamic pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Honjo, Sachiko; Wada, Yoshiharu; Lkeda, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    There have recently been increasing experimental and clinical evidences suggesting that hypothalamic dysregulation may be one of the underlying mechanisms of abnormal glucose metabolism. First, increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity induced by uncontrollable excess stress may cause diabetes mellitus as well as dyslipidemia, visceral obesity, and osteoporosis with some resemblance to Cushing's disease. Second, several molecules are known to be expressed both in pancreas and hypothalamus; adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, malonyl-CoA, glucokinase, and AMP-activated protein kinase. Those molecules appear to form an integrated hypothalamic system, which may sense hypothalamic fuel status, especially glucose level, and inhibit action of insulin on hepatic gluconeogenesis, thereby forming a brain-liver circuit. Third, hypothalamic resistance to insulin as an adiposity signal may be involved in pathogenesis of peripheral insulin resistance. The results with mice with a neuron-specific disruption of the insulin receptor gene or those lacking insulin receptor substrate 2 in hypothalamus supported this possibility. Finally, it has very recently been suggested that dysregulation of clock genes in hypothalamus may cause abnormal glucose metabolism. Taken together, it is plausible that some hypothalamic abnormality may underlie at least some portion of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance in humans, and this viewpoint of hypothalamic pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes may lead to the development of new drugs for type 2 diabetes.

  14. Why do motor neurons degenerate? Actualization in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riancho, J; Gonzalo, I; Ruiz-Soto, M; Berciano, J

    2016-02-04

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Although a small proportion of ALS cases are familial in origin and linked to mutations in specific genes, most cases are sporadic and have a multifactorial aetiology. Some recent studies have increased our knowledge of ALS pathogenesis and raised the question of whether this disorder is a proteinopathy, a ribonucleopathy, an axonopathy, or a disease related to the neuronal microenvironment. This article presents a review of ALS pathogenesis. To this end, we have reviewed published articles describing either ALS patients or ALS animal models and we discuss how the main cellular pathways (gene processing, protein metabolism, oxidative stress, axonal transport, relationship with neuronal microenvironment) may be involved in motor neurons degeneration. ALS pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Recent studies suggest that although initial triggers may differ among patients, the final motor neurons degeneration mechanisms are similar in most patients once the disease is fully established. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Persistent Notochord in a Fetus with COL2A1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Codsi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple anomalies including micromelia, poor mineralization of the vertebrae, and a persistent notochord were identified on second trimester ultrasound in a fetus with a COL2A1 mutation. To our knowledge, this represents the first case of a persistent notochord associated with a COL2A1 mutation in humans. In this case report, we describe ultrasound and postmortem findings and review the pathogenesis associated with a persistent notochord.

  16. Outcomes of annual surveillance imaging in an adult and paediatric cohort of succinate dehydrogenase B mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufton, Nicola; Shapiro, Lucy; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Richards, Polly; Sahdev, Anju; Kumar, Ajith V; McAndrew, Lorraine; Martin, Lee; Berney, Daniel; Monson, John; Chew, Shern L; Waterhouse, Mona; Druce, Maralyn; Korbonits, Márta; Metcalfe, Karl; Drake, William M; Storr, Helen L; Akker, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    For 'asymptomatic carriers' of the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) gene mutations, there is currently no consensus as to the appropriate modality or frequency of surveillance imaging. We present the results of a surveillance programme of SDHB mutation carriers. Review of clinical outcomes of a surveillance regimen in patients identified to have an SDHB gene mutation, based on annual MRI, in a single UK tertiary referral centre. A total of 92 patients were identified with an SDHB gene mutation. a total of 27 index patients presented with symptoms, and 65 patients were identified as asymptomatic carriers. Annual MRI of the abdomen, with alternate year MRI of the neck, thorax and pelvis. Presence of an SDHB-related tumour included paraganglioma (PGL), phaeochromocytoma (PCC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). A total of 43 PGLs, eight PCCs and one RCC occurred in the 27 index patients (23 solitary, four synchronous, five metachronous). A further 15 SDHB-related tumours (11 PGLs, three RCCs, one GIST) were identified in the asymptomatic carriers on surveillance screening (25% of screened carriers): 10 on the first surveillance imaging and five on subsequent imaging 2-6 years later. A total of 11 patients had malignant disease. SDHB-related tumours are picked up as early as 2 years after initial negative surveillance scan. We believe the high malignancy rate and early identification rate of tumours justifies the use of 1-2 yearly imaging protocols and MRI-based imaging could form the mainstay of surveillance in this patient group thereby minimizing radiation exposure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. TRANSPOSITION OF GREAT ARTERIES: NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE PATHOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eUnolt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transposition of great arteries (TGA is one of the most common and severe congenital heart diseases (CHD. It is also one of the most mysterious CHD because it has no precedent in phylogenetic and ontogenetic development, it does not represent an alternative physiological model of blood circulation and its etiology and morphogenesis are still largely unknown. However, recent epidemiologic, experimental and genetic data suggest new insights into the pathogenesis. TGA is very rarely associated with the most frequent genetic syndromes, such as Turner, Noonan, Williams or Marfan syndromes, and in Down syndrome, it is virtually absent. The only genetic syndrome with a strong relation with TGA is Heterotaxy. Moreover, TGA is rather frequent in cases of isolated dextrocardia with situs solitus, showing link with defect of visceral situs. In lateralization defects TGA is frequently associated with asplenia syndrome. Nowadays, the most reliable method to induce TGA consists in treating pregnant mice with retinoic acid or with retinoic acid inhibitors. Following such treatment not only cases of TGA with d-ventricular loop have been registered, but also some cases of congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries (CCTGA. In another experiment, the embryos of mice treated with retinoic acid in day 6.5 presented Heterotaxy, suggesting a relationship among these morphologically different CHD. In some families, beside TGA cases, there were first-degree relatives with CCTGA. This data suggest that monogenic inheritance with a variable phenotypic expression could explain the familial aggregation of TGA and CCTGA. In some of these families we previously found multiple mutations in laterality genes including Nodal and ZIC3, confirming a pathogenetic relation between TGA and Heterotaxy. These overall data suggest to include TGA in the pathogenetic group of laterality defects instead of conotruncal abnormalities due to ectomesenchymal tissue migration.

  18. Influence of neutrophil defects on Burkholderia cepacia complex pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Porter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is a group of Gram-negative bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The primary patient populations infected with Bcc include individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF, as well as those with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD. While Bcc infection in CF is better characterized than in CGD, these two genetic diseases are not obviously similar and it is currently unknown if there is any commonality in host immune defects that is responsible for the susceptibility to Bcc. CF is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, resulting in manifestations in various organ systems, however the major cause of morbidity and mortality is currently due to bacterial respiratory infections. CGD, on the other hand, is a genetic disorder that is caused by defects in phagocyte NADPH oxidase. Because of the defect in CGD, phagocytes in these patients are unable to produce reactive oxygen species, which results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. Despite this significant defect in microbial clearance, the spectrum of pathogens frequently implicated in infections in CGD is relatively narrow and includes some bacterial species that are considered almost pathognomonic for this disorder. Very little is known about the cause of the specific susceptibility to Bcc over other potential pathogens more prevalent in the environment, and a better understanding of specific mechanisms required for bacterial virulence has become a high priority. This review will summarize both the current knowledge and future directions related to Bcc virulence in immunocompromised individuals with a focus on the roles of bacterial factors and neutrophil defects in pathogenesis.

  19. Point mutations associated with HIV-1 drug resistance, evasion of the immune response and AIDS pathogenesis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khati, M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA and Vpr, respectively pol Protease (PR) gag/pol cleavage pol Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Reverse transcription pol RNase H RNase H activity pol Integrase (IN) DNA provirus integration env Env (gp120 and gp41) gp120 binds CD4 receptor and CXCR4.../CCR5 co-receptors , gp41 mediates fusion tat Tat Viral transcription activator rev Rev RNA transport, stability and utilization factor (phosphoprotein) vif Vif Promotes virion maturation and infectivity vpr Vpr Promotes nuclear localization...

  20. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  1. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  2. The role of EBV in MS pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2006-01-01

    Environmental factors operate on a background of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of MS. Human herpesviruses, notably Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human endogenous retroviruses are factors associated with MS. EBV association is found in epidemiological surveys where late EBV infection...... confers a higher risk of MS, and EBV reactivation also appears to be linked to disease activity in early MS. MS patients have elevated anti-EBV antibody responses, both in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Molecular mimicry is found between certain EBV and myelin epitopes in the cell-mediated immune response....... EBV cannot stand alone as a causal factor of MS, but is likely to play an indirect role as an activator of the underlying disease process....

  3. Protein misfolding disorders: pathogenesis and intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    of the functional structure of cellular proteins. Aberrant proteins, the result of production errors, inherited or acquired amino acid substitutions or damage, especially oxidative modifications, can in many cases not fold correctly and will be trapped in misfolded conformations. To rid the cell of misfolded...... be accompanied by a gain-of-function pathogenesis, which in many cases determines the pathological and clinical features. Examples are Parkinson and Huntington diseases. Although a number of strategies have been tried to decrease the amounts of accumulated and aggregated proteins, a likely future strategy seems......Newly synthesized proteins in the living cell must go through a folding process to attain their functional structure. To achieve this in an efficient fashion, all organisms, including humans, have evolved a large set of molecular chaperones that assist the folding as well as the maintenance...

  4. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  5. Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, Metabolism, Pathogenesis and Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon V. R. Epps

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter species are a leading cause of bacterial-derived foodborne illnesses worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important enteropathogens of this genus and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions.

  6. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  7. Actinic Keratosis Pathogenesis Update and New Patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Melis, Marcello; Faina, Valentina; Romaniello, Federico; Didona, Dario; Cardone, Michele; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common premalignant skin lesion. Because of its increasing incidence, several efforts have been made to earlier detectection and to improve knowledge on photocarcinogenic pathways of keratinocytes. As a consequence, recently new discoveries have been done in this field. Starting from our previous review on actinic keratosis, we reviewed the literature focusing on pathogenesis and new patents in order to highlight the most recent progresses in diagnosis and therapeutic approach. Although several efforts have been done in the field of photodamaged skin, new upgrades in diagnosis and therapy are needed to detect superficial actinic keratosis earlier, to improve the disease free survival of patient and to better treat the field cancerization.

  8. Etiology and pathogenesis of antisperm antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farhad Shahsavar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antisperm antibodies (ASA occur in men and women and may significantly impair fertility. In this case, the testis is an immunologically privileged site where germ cell antigens are protected from autoimmune attack. However, due to disruption of the blood-testis barrier occurring from testicular injury, or as a consequence of trauma to the epididymis or vas deferens many testicular proteins get autoantigenic during immunological challenges resulting in the formation of ASA in the blood serum, seminal plasma or located on the sperm membrane. ASA have also been reported to be associated with inflammation, cryptorchidism, varicocele and surgical intervention in the genital organs. ASA may interfere with different sperm functions, which are essential for the fertilization process.This review article will help to increase our understanding of the specific mechanisms that elicit the autoimmune response to sperm and of the pathogenesis of ASA that leads to an antibody-mediated infertility.

  9. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, Jana; Slaby, Ondrej; Vyzula, Rostislav; Michalek, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  10. Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Abdul-Ghani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is manifested by decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and results from impaired insulin signaling and multiple post-receptor intracellular defects including impaired glucose transport, glucose phosphorylation, and reduced glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis. Insulin resistance is a core defect in type 2 diabetes, it is also associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Recent studies have reported a mitochondrial defect in oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle in variety of insulin resistant states. In this review, we summarize the cellular and molecular defects that contribute to the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  11. Pathogenesis of Graves' disease and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Graves' disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [de

  12. STUDIES ON THE PATHOGENESIS OF FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Elisha; Wood, W. Barry

    1955-01-01

    Further studies have been made of a pyrogenic substance which appears in the circulation of rabbits during the course of experimental fever induced by injection of typhoid vaccine. With the use of a passive transfer method and pyrogen-tolerant recipients, the biological properties of this substance have been differentiated from those of the uncleared vaccine in the circulation. The newly identified factor resembles leucocytic pyrogen in the rapidity with which it produces fever and in its failure to exhibit cross-tolerance with bacterial pyrogen. This striking similarity of properties suggests that the circulating factor is of endogenous origin and may arise from cell injury. A close correlation between its presence in the circulation and the existence of fever has been demonstrated. The possible relationship of these findings to the pathogenesis of fever is evident. PMID:13271667

  13. Some aspects of periodontitis pathogenesis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherbina I.N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory processes in the tissues surrounding tooth root are frequent enough and develop as the direct complication of caries. As acute periodontitis is manifested with grinding toothache and violation of ph¬y¬sio¬logical act of chewing, symptoms of general intoxication, the continuous sluggish chronic periodontitis is harmful and dangerous to the organism as well. It forms the state of chronic оdontogenetic intoxication and chroneosepsis with wrong functioning of some internal organs and body systems. The like complications can cause significant disturbance to the function of kidneys, liver, heart, joints and their treatment without ablating focus of inflammation is often in- effective; this must be taken into account by doctors-interns. However, scanning of the oral cavity by conservative means has its difficulties mostly because of ignoring pathogenesis of such inflammation. That is why activity of ferments of blood dehydrogenases from the periapical tissues of the teeth affected with the chronic periodontitis was studied. The level of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate degydrogenase of lymphocytes of 110 schoolchildren aged 13-17 years old was studied. The main group of examined individuals included those of infected with tuber¬culousis – 50 individuals, and the control group (60 individuals – clinically healthy ones without tuberculousis desease. All schoolchildren had 1 or 2 teeth affected with chronic periodontitis of the apical localization. The researchers found that a significant inhibition of activity of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate degydrogenase ferments occurs in the inflammatory periodontal tissues, which indicates to local immunity decline, and as a consequence, pathogenic bacteria activation. In people infected with tuberculousis these violations were more developed. Such features of periodontitis pathogenesis must be taken into account when providing a combined treatment.

  14. Research advances in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been developing rapidly in recent years and has become one of the most common liver diseases. However, its pathogenesis remains unclear, and there are no widely accepted therapeutic regimens. NAFLD has a complex pathogenesis with multiple factors involved, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, bile acid metabolic disorders, and autophagy. This article reviews the pathogenesis of NAFLD in order to provide a reference for further research and clinical treatment in the future.

  15. Preleukemic and second-hit mutational events in an acute myeloid leukemia patient with a novel germline RUNX1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Isaac Ks; Lee, Joanne; Ng, Christopher; Kosmo, Bustamin; Chiu, Lily; Seah, Elaine; Mok, Michelle Meng Huang; Tan, Karen; Osato, Motomi; Chng, Wee-Joo; Yan, Benedict; Tan, Lip Kun

    2018-01-01

    -treatment, including the germline RUNX1 mutation, were likely to be part of the preleukemic clone. Further studies are necessary to assess the prevalence of these preleukemic and secondary mutations in the larger FPD/AML patient cohort and establish their prognostic significance. Given the molecular heterogeneity of FPD/AML and other AML subtypes, a better understanding of mutational classes and their involvement in AML pathogenesis can improve risk stratification of patients for more effective and targeted therapy.

  16. A pathway-centric survey of somatic mutations in Chinese patients with colorectal carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ling

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies on colorectal carcinomas (CRC have identified multiple somatic mutations in four candidate pathways (TGF-β, Wnt, P53 and RTK-RAS pathways on populations of European ancestry. However, it is under-studied whether other populations harbor different sets of hot-spot somatic mutations in these pathways and other oncogenes. In this study, to evaluate the mutational spectrum of novel somatic mutations, we assessed 41 pairs of tumor-stroma tissues from Chinese patients with CRC, including 29 colon carcinomas and 12 rectal carcinomas. We designed Illumina Custom Amplicon panel to target 43 genes, including genes in the four candidate pathways, as well as several known oncogenes for other cancers. Candidate mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, and we further used SIFT and PolyPhen-2 to assess potentially functional mutations. We discovered 3 new somatic mutations in gene APC, TCF7L2, and PIK3CA that had never been reported in the COSMIC or NCI-60 databases. Additionally, we confirmed 6 known somatic mutations in gene SMAD4, APC, FBXW7, BRAF and PTEN in Chinese CRC patients. While most were previously reported in CRC, one mutation in PTEN was reported only in malignant endometrium cancer. Our study confirmed the existence of known somatic mutations in the four candidate pathways for CRC in Chinese patients. We also discovered a number of novel somatic mutations in these pathways, which may have implications for the pathogenesis of CRC.

  17. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Ashley A.; Randall, R. Lor; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12). This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered. PMID:21052502

  18. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Kowalewski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22(q24;q12. This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered.

  19. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana; Blume, Carolin; Sellner, Leopold; Jauch, Anna; Sill, Martin; Kater, Arnon P.; te Raa, G. Doreen; Geisler, Christian; van Oers, Marinus; Dietrich, Sascha; Dreger, Peter; Ho, Anthony D.; Paruzynski, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Glimm, Hanno; Zenz, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were

  20. Mutation and phenotypic spectrum in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous and Costello syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, A.L.; Albrecht, B.; Arici, C.; Burgt, I. van der; Buske, A.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Heller, R.; Horn, D.; Hubner, C.A.; Korenke, C.G.; Konig, R.; Kress, W.; Kruger, G.; Meinecke, P.; Mucke, J.; Plecko, B.; Rossier, E.; Schinzel, A.; Schulze, A.; Seemanova, E.; Seidel, H.; Spranger, S.; Tuysuz, B.; Uhrig, S.; Wieczorek, D.; Kutsche, K.; Zenker, M.

    2008-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) and Costello syndrome (CS) are congenital disorders with a significant clinical overlap. The recent discovery of heterozygous mutations in genes encoding components of the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway in both CFC and CS suggested a similar underlying pathogenesis of these two

  1. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were...

  2. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  3. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taghdiri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C in our patient. Another gene (ERCC6, which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  4. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdiri, Maryam; Dastsooz, Hassan; Fardaei, Majid; Mohammadi, Sanaz; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C) in our patient. Another gene ( ERCC6 ), which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  5. The role of apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain (ARC) in the therapeutic resistance of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): the crucial role of ARC in the inhibition of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Csaba; Funke, Sarah; Nitsche, Vanessa; Liverts, Anna; Zlachevska, Viktoriya; Gasis, Marcia; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Mahotka, Csaba; Schirmacher, Peter; Heikaus, Sebastian

    2017-05-02

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) display broad resistance against conventional radio- and chemotherapies, which is due at least in part to impairments in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. One important anti-apoptotic factor that is strongly overexpressed in RCCs and known to inhibit both apoptotic pathways is ARC (apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain). Expression and subcellular distribution of ARC in RCC tissue samples and RCC cell lines were determined by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent immunohistochemistry, respectively. Extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signalling were induced by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), ABT-263 or topotecan. ARC knock-down was performed in clearCa-12 cells using lentiviral transduction of pGIPZ. shRNAmir constructs. Extrinsic respectively intrinsic apoptosis were induced by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), ABT263 or topotecan. Potential synergistic effects were tested by pre-treatment with topotecan and subsequent treatment with ABT263. Activation of different caspases and mitochondrial depolarisation (JC-1 staining) were analysed by flow cytometry. Protein expression of Bcl-2 family members and ARC in RCC cell lines was measured by Western blotting. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test. Regarding the extrinsic pathway, ARC knockdown strongly enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing the activation level of caspase-8. Regarding the intrinsic pathway, ARC, which was only weakly expressed in the nuclei of RCCs in vivo, exerted its anti-apoptotic effect by impairing mitochondrial activation rather than inhibiting p53. Topotecan- and ABT-263-induced apoptosis was strongly enhanced following ARC knockdown in RCC cell lines. In addition, topotecan pre-treatment enhanced ABT-263-induced apoptosis and this effect was amplified in ARC-knockdown cells. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate the importance of ARC protein in the inhibition of both the extrinsic

  6. Arrestin gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, M; Wada, Y; Tamai, M

    1998-04-01

    To assess the clinical and molecular genetic studies of patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa associated with a mutation in the arrestin gene. Results of molecular genetic screening and case reports with DNA analysis and clinical features. University medical center. One hundred twenty anamnestically unrelated patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. DNA analysis was performed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by nucleotide sequencing to search for a mutation in exon 11 of the arrestin gene. Clinical features were characterized by visual acuity slitlamp biomicroscopy, fundus examinations, fluorescein angiography, kinetic visual field testing, and electroretinography. We identified 3 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa associated with a homozygous 1-base-pair deletion mutation in codon 309 of the arrestin gene designated as 1147delA. All 3 patients showed pigmentary retinal degeneration in the midperipheral area with or without macular involvement. Patient 1 had a sibling with Oguchi disease associated with the same mutation. Patient 2 demonstrated pigmentary retinal degeneration associated with a golden-yellow reflex in the peripheral fundus. Patients 1 and 3 showed features of retinitis pigmentosa without the golden-yellow fundus reflex. Although the arrestin 1147delA has been known as a frequent cause of Oguchi disease, this mutation also may be related to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. This phenomenon may provide evidence of variable expressivity of the mutation in the arrestin gene.

  7. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Child, A. (St. George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)); Peltonen, L. (Duncan Guthrie Institute, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A Novel Homozygous MYO7A Mutation: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Ahmadi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available MYO7A is an unconventional myosin that is essential for ordinary hearing and vision; mutations in the MYO7A gene result in Usher syndrome type 1B and other disorders. In this manuscript, we reported a mutation (c.4705delA in exon 35, causing the alteration of a Ser amino acid to Ala at codon 1569 (p.H2027del located within the first FERMdomain of the human protein myosin VIIA. This mutation involved in the pathogenesis of hearing loss, congenital night blindness, muscular weakness, skin problem, and difficulty in keeping balance in the 13-year-old female. After checkup the patient’s DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and amplification was performed by PCR. Sequencing method was performed for identification of the mutation. The c.4705delA mutation in exon 35 was found in the patient in heterozygosis form; this means that her mother and father were carriers. This mutation is located on the tail of the myosinVIIA protein and is associated with several disorders.

  9. Demonstrating concepts of pathogenesis using effectors of Phytophthora infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogenesis, or how pathogens cause disease, is an important concept in plant pathology. The study of pathogenesis in plant pathology has rapidly expanded and is now a significant portion of plant pathology research (especially research at the molecular level of host-pathogen interaction). With the...

  10. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer | Abdulkareem | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, ...

  11. Tryptophan-induced pathogenesis of breast cancer | Cao | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The pathogenesis of breast cancer remains unclear. Aims: To investigate the pathogenesis of breast cancer through targeted metabolomics of amino acids components in serum of patients with breast cancer. Methods: Patients with breast cancers were enrolled in our hospital between year January 1st, 2013 ...

  12. Pathogenesis of Nervous and Mental Diseases in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Ernest, Ed.

    Major pathogenic sources of mental diseases in children and a classification of these diseases are considered. Contributions include the following: pathogenesis of mental diseases in childhood by Ernest Harms, organ inferiority and psychiatric disorders by Bernard Shulman and Howard Klapman, pathogenesis of neurological disorders by George Gold,…

  13. [Transthyretin: it's miracle function and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) was previously called prealbumin because the band it formed on agarose gel electrophoresis at pH 8.6 was at the prealbumin position. However, it has been well documented that TTR of rodents does not show a prealbumin position on electrophoresis. Now, its name describes its function, binding to retinol binding protein (RBP) and T4. The serum concentration of the protein is 20-40 mg/dl, and TTR forms a tetramer. The plasma half life of the protein is 1.9 days. TTR is synthesized by the liver, retina, pancreas, and choroid plexus. In cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), it is the second most abundant protein, and is considered as an important protein in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, depression, and lead intoxication. In addition, TTR is a tryptophan-rich protein, it is used as one of the nutrition assessment proteins, it acts as an anti acute phase protein, and its plasma concentration decreases during inflammation and bacterial infection. Since TTR is a highly amyloidogenic protein because it contains a beta-sheet structure, it becomes a precursor protein in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy(FAP). Moreover, TTR plays important roles in various CNS disorders, diabetes melitus, and lipid metabolism.

  14. Misbehaving macrophages in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rachael A; Kupper, Thomas S

    2006-08-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease unique to humans. In this issue of the JCI, 2 studies of very different mouse models of psoriasis both report that macrophages play a key role in inducing psoriasis-like skin disease. Psoriasis is clearly a polygenic, inherited disease of uncontrolled cutaneous inflammation. The debate that currently rages in the field is whether psoriasis is a disease of autoreactive T cells or whether it reflects an intrinsic defect within the skin--or both. However, these questions have proven difficult to dissect using molecular genetic tools. In the current studies, the authors have used 2 different animal models to address the role of macrophages in disease pathogenesis: Wang et al. use a mouse model in which inflammation is T cell dependent, whereas the model used by Stratis et al. is T cell independent (see the related articles beginning on pages 2105 and 2094, respectively). Strikingly, both groups report an important contribution by macrophages, implying that macrophages can contribute to both epithelial-based and T cell-mediated pathways of inflammation.

  15. Canine neosporosis: perspectives on pathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva RC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo C Silva,1 Gustavo P Machado2 1Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Surgery of Small Animals, Dr Munhoz Veterinary Hospital, Itápolis, Brazil Abstract: Canine neosporosis is a worldwide disease caused by the obligate intracellular parasite protozoan Neospora caninum, manifesting mainly neurological symptoms. N. caninum has a heteroxenous life cycle and affects a wide range of warm-blooded animals. The domestic and wild canids are the definitive host of the parasite. They shed oocysts after ingestion of tissue cysts from infected intermediate hosts (ovine, equine, bovine, canine, and many other species, containing bradyzoites, or oocyst-contaminated water and food. The presence of dogs in farms is considered a risk factor for production animals. A wide range of diagnostic methods are currently available, but the most used is serology, ie, indirect fluorescent antibody test specific to the antibody detection in blood serum samples. No vaccine is available, but control strategies should be focused on the vertical and horizontal transmission of the parasite, ie, avoid feeding dogs with raw or undercooked meat, and taking care with water for human and animal consumption. No medicines to control the transplacental transmission are available yet. Keywords: neosporosis, Neospora caninum, pathogenesis, management, dogs

  16. Fibromyalgia Pathogenesis and Treatment Options Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Steven; Caldwell, William; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents and summarizes up-to-date literature on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for fibromyalgia patients. First, the most recent diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, as put forth by the American College of Rheumatology will be summarized. Clinical features, including chronic widespread pain, hyperalgesia, mood disorders, anxiety, and disturbed sleep patterns will be explored in-depth. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia involves alterations in multiple ascending and descending central nervous system pathways, as well as peripheral pathways, leading to heightened pain sensitivity. Risk factors have been studied extensively, and the most recent research focuses on various genetic influences and the contributions of stress and poor sleep. Lastly, the discussion in this article focuses on treatment options for fibromyalgia; some have been mainstay options for many years. Pharmacological agents include tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as some investigational agents. The evidence behind non-pharmacologic treatments, including massage therapy, exercise, and acupuncture, are discussed.

  17. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  18. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  19. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Fenton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used "premature ovarian failure" which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI.

  20. β-Cell Autophagy in Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Michelle R; Linnemann, Amelia K

    2018-05-01

    Nearly 100 years have passed since Frederick Banting and Charles Best first discovered and purified insulin. Their discovery and subsequent improvements revolutionized the treatment of diabetes, and the field continues to move at an ever-faster pace with respect to unique treatments for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Despite these advances, we still do not fully understand how apoptosis of the insulin-producing β-cells is triggered, presenting a challenge in the development of preventative measures. In recent years, the process of autophagy has generated substantial interest in this realm due to discoveries highlighting its clear role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. As a result, the number of studies focused on islet and β-cell autophagy has increased substantially in recent years. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known regarding the role of β-cell autophagy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, with an emphasis on new and exciting developments over the past 5 years. Further, we will discuss how these discoveries might be translated into unique treatments in the coming years.

  1. The Pathogenesis of Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseler, Laura; Chertow, Daniel S; Johnson, Karl M; Feldmann, Heinz; Morens, David M

    2017-01-24

    For almost 50 years, ebolaviruses and related filoviruses have been repeatedly reemerging across the vast equatorial belt of the African continent to cause epidemics of highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The 2013-2015 West African epidemic, by far the most geographically extensive, most fatal, and longest lasting epidemic in Ebola's history, presented an enormous international public health challenge, but it also provided insights into Ebola's pathogenesis and natural history, clinical expression, treatment, prevention, and control. Growing understanding of ebolavirus pathogenetic mechanisms and important new clinical observations of the disease course provide fresh clues about prevention and treatment approaches. Although viral cytopathology and immune-mediated cell damage in ebolavirus disease often result in severe compromise of multiple organs, tissue repair and organ function recovery can be expected if patients receive supportive care with fluids and electrolytes; maintenance of oxygenation and tissue perfusion; and respiratory, renal, and cardiovascular support. Major challenges for managing future Ebola epidemics include establishment of early and aggressive epidemic control and earlier and better patient care and treatment in remote, resource-poor areas where Ebola typically reemerges. In addition, it will be important to further develop Ebola vaccines and to adopt policies for their use in epidemic and pre-epidemic situations.

  2. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, L J M; Vromans, M E W; Dolstra, C H; Bossers, A; van Zijderveld, F G

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrP(Sc) was detected after 6 months in the tonsil and the ileal Peyer's patches. At 9 months postinfection, PrP(Sc) accumulation involved all gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymph nodes as well as the spleen. At this time point, PrP(Sc) accumulation in the peripheral neural tissues was first seen in the enteric nervous system of the caudal jejunum and ileum and in the coeliac-mesenteric ganglion. In the central nervous system, PrP(Sc) was first detected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the nervus Vagus in the medulla oblongata and in the intermediolateral column in the spinal cord segments T7-L1. At subsequent time points, PrP(Sc) was seen to spread within the lymphoid system to also involve all non-gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In the enteric nervous system, further spread of PrP(Sc) involved the neural plexi along the entire gastrointestinal tract and in the CNS the complete neuraxis. These findings indicate a spread of the BSE agent in sheep from the enteric nervous system through parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves to the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord.

  3. Preeclampsia: Updates in Pathogenesis, Definitions, and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Elizabeth; Prasanna, Devika; Brima, Wunnie; Jim, Belinda

    2016-06-06

    Preeclampsia is becoming an increasingly common diagnosis in the developed world and remains a high cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Delay in childbearing in the developed world feeds into the risk factors associated with preeclampsia, which include older maternal age, obesity, and/or vascular diseases. Inadequate prenatal care partially explains the persistent high prevalence in the developing world. In this review, we begin by presenting the most recent concepts in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Upstream triggers of the well described angiogenic pathways, such as the heme oxygenase and hydrogen sulfide pathways, as well as the roles of autoantibodies, misfolded proteins, nitric oxide, and oxidative stress will be described. We also detail updated definitions, classification schema, and treatment targets of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy put forth by obstetric and hypertensive societies throughout the world. The shift has been made to view preeclampsia as a systemic disease with widespread endothelial damage and the potential to affect future cardiovascular diseases rather than a self-limited occurrence. At the very least, we now know that preeclampsia does not end with delivery of the placenta. We conclude by summarizing the latest strategies for prevention and treatment of preeclampsia. A better understanding of this entity will help in the care of at-risk women before delivery and for decades after. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Large granular lymphocytic leukaemia pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Claire

    2011-02-01

    The WHO classification recognises three distinct disorders of large granular lymphocytes: T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukaemia (T-LGL), chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK-cells (CLPD-NK) and agressive NK-cell leukaemia. Despite the different cell of origin, there is considerable overlap between T-LGL and CLPD-NK in terms of clinical presentation and therapy. Many patients are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. Therapy, with immunosuppressant agents such as low dose methotrexate or ciclosporin, is usually indicated to correct cytopenias. In contrast, aggressive NK-cell leukaemia and the rare CD56(+) aggressive T-LGL leukaemia follow a fulminant clinical course, affect younger individuals and require more intensive combination chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplant in eligible patients. The relative rarity of these disorders means that there have been few clinical trials to inform management. However, there is now considerable interest in the pathogenesis of the chronic LGL leukaemias and this has stimulated early trials to evaluate novel agents which target the dysregulated apoptotic pathways characteristic of this disease. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Pathogenesis of trypanosome infections in cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.; Morrison, W.I.; Emery, D.L.; Akol, G.W.O.; Masake, R.A.; Moloo, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The potential application of radioisotopes are not discussed in this review of trypanosome pathogenesis in cattle. Initially, structural changes in the lymphoid system are characterized by marked proliferation and germinal centre formation, whereas in long-standing infections the lymphoid organs become depleted. These changes appear associated with immunodepression. Anaemia dominates the clinical disease syndrome in bovine trypanosomiasis. It develops with the onset of parasitaemia and is largely haemolytic, resulting from increased red blood cell destruction by phagocytosis. Several factors may be involved in this process including haemolysins produced by the trypanosome, immunological mechanisms, fever, disseminated intravascular coagulation and an expanded and active mononuclear phagocytic system. During this phase of the disease, cattle respond well to chemotherapy. However, in later phases of the disease, when trypanosomes cannot be detected, the anaemia sometimes persists and animals do not respond to treatment. Concerning the underlying mechanisms responsible for the anaemia, continued red cell destruction combined with some dyshaemopoiesis, associated with a defect in iron metabolism, appears responsible. Widespread tissue degeneration occurs. Organs particularly severely affected include the heart. Death in bovine trypanosomiasis is presumably due to a combination of anaemia, microcirculatory disturbances and myocardial damage. The factors incriminated in tissue damage probably vary with the species of trypanosome involved, although under natural field conditions it is common to find T. congolense, T. vivax and T. brucei in one animal. Likely pathogenic mechanisms in bovine include anoxia as a result of anaemia, microcirculatory disorders and hypersensitivity reactions

  6. Pathogenesis and prognosis of bilateral thalamic infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakase, Taizen; Ogura, Naoko; Maeda, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Takashi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Sato, Yuichi; Nagata, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Only a few reports have discussed the detailed clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of bilateral thalamic infarction. The thalamus is composed of different functional nuclei and supplied by vessels containing several variations from the main arteries, leading to difficulty in the precise evaluation of bilateral thalamic infarction. In the present study, we assessed the prognosis of bilateral thalamic infarction based on the distribution of stroke lesions. From among the consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted to hospital between April 2001 and March 2005, cases of acute bilateral thalamic infarction were selected for this study (n=9; 65.1±13.6 y.o.). The stroke lesions and vascular abnormalities were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography on admission. Outcome was evaluated from the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at discharge. Good outcome patients (mRS 0-2; n=5) showed memory disturbance, cognitive impairment and hypersomnia. On the other hand, quadriplegia, oculomotor disturbance and bulbar palsy were observed in the poor outcome patients (mRS≥4; n=4). The critical features of a poor outcome were the age at onset (72.0±15.3 vs. 58.2±11.9 y.o.), inclusion of brainstem lesions and total occlusion of the basilar artery. In conclusion, older age at onset and/or basilar artery occlusion may be critical factors for predicting a poor outcome in bilateral thalamic infarction cases. (author)

  7. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  8. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Children: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder in children that is characterized by persistent fever, splenomegaly with cytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Increased levels of various cytokines and soluble interleukin-2 receptor are biological markers of HLH. HLH can be classified into two major forms: primary and secondary. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), a type of primary HLH, is an autosomal recessive disorder that typically occurs in infancy and can be classified into five different subtypes (FHL types 1–5). In Japan, >80% of patients with FHL have either PRF1 (FHL type 2) or UNC13D (FHL type 3) defects. FHL is considered to be a disorder of T-cell function because the activity of NK cells or cytotoxic T lymphocytes as target cells is usually impaired. Moreover, Epstein–Barr virus-associated HLH (EBV-HLH) is considered a major subtype of secondary HLH. Any genetic background could have an effect on the pathogenesis of secondary HLH because EBV-HLH is considered to be particularly prevalent in Asian countries. For primary HLH, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only accepted curative therapy, although cord blood transplantation with a reduced-conditioning regimen has been used with superior outcomes. For secondary HLH, including EBV-HLH, immunochemotherapy based on the HLH-2004 protocol has been used. In the near future, the entire mechanism of HLH should be clarified to establish less toxic therapies, including cell therapy and gene targeting therapy. PMID:27242976

  9. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  10. Vitiligo: Pathogenesis, clinical variants and treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Giannicola; Greco, Antonio; Didona, Dario; Didona, Biagio; Granata, Guido; Manno, Alessandra; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo is a common chronic acquired disease of pigmentation whose etiology is unknown, which usually occurs with asymptomatic whitish patch or macule. Although several hypotheses have been proposed in the literature, the leading theory is still the auto-immune etiology linked to specific genetic mutations. Vitiligo can also be associated with several autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid diseases, alopecia areata, and halo nevi. Sensorineural hearing loss was reported in several vitiligo patients due to a reduction in the number of melanocytes contained in the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. Because of its complexity, several therapeutic options are available to treat this systemic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutational analysis of EGFR and related signaling pathway genes in lung adenocarcinomas identifies a novel somatic kinase domain mutation in FGFR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer L Marks

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of lung adenocarcinomas harbor somatic mutations in six genes that encode proteins in the EGFR signaling pathway, i.e., EGFR, HER2/ERBB2, HER4/ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, and KRAS. We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this signaling pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis.We analyzed genomic DNA from a total of 261 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. The coding sequences of 39 genes were screened for somatic mutations via high-throughput dideoxynucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified gene products. Mutations were considered to be somatic only if they were found in an independent tumor-derived PCR product but not in matched normal tissue. Sequencing of 9MB of tumor sequence identified 239 putative genetic variants. We further examined 22 variants found in RAS family genes and 135 variants localized to exons encoding the kinase domain of respective proteins. We identified a total of 37 non-synonymous somatic mutations; 36 were found collectively in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. One somatic mutation was a previously unreported mutation in the kinase domain (exon 16 of FGFR4 (Glu681Lys, identified in 1 of 158 tumors. The FGFR4 mutation is analogous to a reported tumor-specific somatic mutation in ERBB2 and is located in the same exon as a previously reported kinase domain mutation in FGFR4 (Pro712Thr in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line.This study is one of the first comprehensive mutational analyses of major genes in a specific signaling pathway in a sizeable cohort of lung adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest the majority of gain-of-function mutations within kinase genes in the EGFR signaling pathway have already been identified. Our findings also implicate FGFR4 in the pathogenesis of a subset of lung adenocarcinomas.

  12. Presence of atypical thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) mutations in triple-negative essential thrombocythemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabagnols, Xénia; Favale, Fabrizia; Pasquier, Florence; Messaoudi, Kahia; Defour, Jean Philippe; Ianotto, Jean Christophe; Marzac, Christophe; Le Couédic, Jean Pierre; Droin, Nathalie; Chachoua, Ilyas; Favier, Remi; Diop, M'boyba Khadija; Ugo, Valérie; Casadevall, Nicole; Debili, Najet; Raslova, Hana; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Bluteau, Olivier; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-01-21

    Mutations in signaling molecules of the cytokine receptor axis play a central role in myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) pathogenesis. Polycythemia vera is mainly related to JAK2 mutations, whereas a wider mutational spectrum is detected in essential thrombocythemia (ET) with mutations in JAK2, the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL), and the calreticulin (CALR) genes. Here, we studied the mutational profile of 17 ET patients negative for JAK2V617F, MPLW515K/L, and CALR mutations, using whole-exome sequencing and next-generation sequencing (NGS) targeted on JAK2 and MPL. We found several signaling mutations including JAK2V617F at very low allele frequency, 1 homozygous SH2B3 mutation, 1 MPLS505N, 1 MPLW515R, and 2 MPLS204P mutations. In the remaining patients, 4 presented a clonal and 7 a polyclonal hematopoiesis, suggesting that certain triple-negative ETs are not MPNs. NGS on 26 additional triple-negative ETs detected only 1 MPLY591N mutation. Functional studies on MPLS204P and MPLY591N revealed that they are weak gain-of-function mutants increasing MPL signaling and conferring either TPO hypersensitivity or independence to expressing cells, but with a low efficiency. Further studies should be performed to precisely determine the frequency of MPLS204 and MPLY591 mutants in a bigger cohort of MPN. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  14. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The pathogenesis of malaria: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2013-04-01

    With 3·3 billion people at risk of infection, malaria remains one of the world's most significant health problems. Increasing resistance of the main causative parasite to currently available drugs has created an urgent need to elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease in order to develop new treatments. A possible clue to such an understanding is that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum selectively absorbs vitamin A from the host and appears to use it for its metabolism; serum vitamin A levels are also reduced in children with malaria. Although vitamin A is essential in low concentration for numerous biological functions, higher concentrations are cytotoxic and pro-oxidant, and potentially toxic quantities of the vitamin are stored in the liver. During their life cycle in the host the parasites remain in the liver for several days before invading the red blood cells (RBCs). The hypothesis proposed is that the parasites emerge from the liver packed with vitamin A and use retinoic acid (RA), the main biologically active metabolite of vitamin A, as a cell membrane destabilizer to invade the RBCs throughout the body. The characteristic hemolysis and anemia of malaria and other symptoms of the disease may thus be manifestations of an endogenous form of vitamin A intoxication associated with high concentrations of RA but low concentrations of retinol (ROL). Retinoic acid released from the parasites may also affect the fetus and cause preterm birth and fetal growth restriction (FGR) as a function of the membranolytic and growth inhibitory effects of these compounds, respectively. Subject to testing, the hypothesis suggests that parasite vitamin A metabolism could become a new target for the treatment and prevention of malaria.

  16. Pathogenesis of diverticulosis and diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Marjorie M; Harris, Angela K

    2017-06-01

    Diverticulosis is defined by the presence of diverticula due to herniation of mucosa and muscularis mucosa through the muscularis propria at sites of vascular penetration in the colon and is asymptomatic in the vast majority affected. There are global differences of distribution, in Western industrialized societies, the most common site is in the left colon, but in Asia right sided diverticulosis predominates. Whilst present in 17.5% of a general population and 42% of all comers at endoscopy it is seen in 71% of those aged ≥80 years. Diverticular disease is defined as clinically significant and symptomatic diverticulosis, which may have an absence of macroscopically overt colitis and in true diverticulitis there is macroscopic inflammation of diverticula with related acute or chronic complications. Whilst overall, diverticulitis affects only 4% of those with diverticulosis, in younger patients (aged 40-49 years) this peaks at 11%. Diverticulosis is one of the most common chronic diseases, yet research in this field on pathogenesis has lagged behind other common conditions such as diabetes mellitus. However, in the last decade there have been major advances in taxonomy that can be used to relate to patients' outcome and treatment in both medicine and surgery. It has been shown there is an association with age, diet, drugs and smoking. Genetic studies have shown a familial association and a specific gene, TNFSF 15 may predict severity of disease. The role of the microbiome has been explored and microbial and metabolomic signatures are also important in predicting disease severity. That diverticulosis is a chronic disease is shown by mucosal pathology with subtle chronic inflammation present in those with asymptomatic diverticulosis and inflammation may lead to muscular hypertrophy, enteric nerve remodeling with disordered motility. The diverticulitis quality of life instrument shows that this condition impacts markedly on patients' well-being and prevention and

  17. Obesity Pathogenesis: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael W; Seeley, Randy J; Zeltser, Lori M; Drewnowski, Adam; Ravussin, Eric; Redman, Leanne M; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is among the most common and costly chronic disorders worldwide. Estimates suggest that in the United States obesity affects one-third of adults, accounts for up to one-third of total mortality, is concentrated among lower income groups, and increasingly affects children as well as adults. A lack of effective options for long-term weight reduction magnifies the enormity of this problem; individuals who successfully complete behavioral and dietary weight-loss programs eventually regain most of the lost weight. We included evidence from basic science, clinical, and epidemiological literature to assess current knowledge regarding mechanisms underlying excess body-fat accumulation, the biological defense of excess fat mass, and the tendency for lost weight to be regained. A major area of emphasis is the science of energy homeostasis, the biological process that maintains weight stability by actively matching energy intake to energy expenditure over time. Growing evidence suggests that obesity is a disorder of the energy homeostasis system, rather than simply arising from the passive accumulation of excess weight. We need to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this "upward setting" or "resetting" of the defended level of body-fat mass, whether inherited or acquired. The ongoing study of how genetic, developmental, and environmental forces affect the energy homeostasis system will help us better understand these mechanisms and are therefore a major focus of this statement. The scientific goal is to elucidate obesity pathogenesis so as to better inform treatment, public policy, advocacy, and awareness of obesity in ways that ultimately diminish its public health and economic consequences. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  18. TREM2 mutations are rare in a French cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Dayan, Sarah; Godard, Chloé; Van Bortel, Inge; De Septenville, Anne; Ciura, Sorana; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-10-01

    Homozygous mutations in TREM2 have been recently identified by exome sequencing in families presenting with frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-like phenotype. No study has evaluated the exact frequency of TREM2 mutations in cohorts of FTD patients so far. We sequenced TREM2 in 175 patients with pure FTD, mostly French, to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. No disease-causing mutation was identified in 175 individuals from the French cohort of FTD patients. We did not identify the polymorphism p.R47H (rs75932628), strongly associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that TREM2 mutations are extremely rare in patients with pure FTD, although further investigation in larger populations is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutation breeding in peas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaranowski, J [Institute of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Academy of Agriculture, Poznan (Poland); Micke, A [Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-02-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  20. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  1. SETBP1 mutations drive leukemic transformation in ASXL1-mutated MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, D; Kitaura, J; Matsui, H; Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Nagamachi, A; Kawabata, K C; Togami, K; Nagase, R; Horikawa, S; Saika, M; Micol, J-B; Hayashi, Y; Harada, Y; Harada, H; Inaba, T; Tien, H-F; Abdel-Wahab, O; Kitamura, T

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in ASXL1 are frequent in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and are associated with adverse survival, yet the molecular pathogenesis of ASXL1 mutations (ASXL1-MT) is not fully understood. Recently, it has been found that deletion of Asxl1 or expression of C-terminal-truncating ASXL1-MTs inhibit myeloid differentiation and induce MDS-like disease in mice. Here, we find that SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) mutations (SETBP1-MT) are enriched among ASXL1-mutated MDS patients and associated with increased incidence of leukemic transformation, as well as shorter survival, suggesting that SETBP1-MT play a critical role in leukemic transformation of MDS. We identify that SETBP1-MT inhibit ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SETBP1, resulting in increased expression. Expression of SETBP1-MT, in turn, inhibited protein phosphatase 2A activity, leading to Akt activation and enhanced expression of posterior Hoxa genes in ASXL1-mutant cells. Biologically, SETBP1-MT augmented ASXL1-MT-induced differentiation block, inhibited apoptosis and enhanced myeloid colony output. SETBP1-MT collaborated with ASXL1-MT in inducing acute myeloid leukemia in vivo. The combination of ASXL1-MT and SETBP1-MT activated a stem cell signature and repressed the tumor growth factor-β signaling pathway, in contrast to the ASXL1-MT-induced MDS model. These data reveal that SETBP1-MT are critical drivers of ASXL1-mutated MDS and identify several deregulated pathways as potential therapeutic targets in high-risk MDS.

  2. Comprehensive mutational profiling of core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duployez, Nicolas; Marceau-Renaut, Alice; Boissel, Nicolas; Petit, Arnaud; Bucci, Maxime; Geffroy, Sandrine; Lapillonne, Hélène; Renneville, Aline; Ragu, Christine; Figeac, Martin; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Lacombe, Catherine; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Cornillet, Pascale; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Leverger, Guy; Jourdan, Eric; Preudhomme, Claude

    2016-05-19

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;21) or inv(16) have been recognized as unique entities within AML and are usually reported together as core binding factor AML (CBF-AML). However, there is considerable clinical and biological heterogeneity within this group of diseases, and relapse incidence reaches up to 40%. Moreover, translocations involving CBFs are not sufficient to induce AML on its own and the full spectrum of mutations coexisting with CBF translocations has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we performed extensive mutational analysis by high-throughput sequencing in 215 patients with CBF-AML enrolled in the Phase 3 Trial of Systematic Versus Response-adapted Timed-Sequential Induction in Patients With Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Treating Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Interleukin-2 trials (age, 1-60 years). Mutations in genes activating tyrosine kinase signaling (including KIT, N/KRAS, and FLT3) were frequent in both subtypes of CBF-AML. In contrast, mutations in genes that regulate chromatin conformation or encode members of the cohesin complex were observed with high frequencies in t(8;21) AML (42% and 18%, respectively), whereas they were nearly absent in inv(16) AML. High KIT mutant allele ratios defined a group of t(8;21) AML patients with poor prognosis, whereas high N/KRAS mutant allele ratios were associated with the lack of KIT or FLT3 mutations and a favorable outcome. In addition, mutations in epigenetic modifying or cohesin genes were associated with a poor prognosis in patients with tyrosine kinase pathway mutations, suggesting synergic cooperation between these events. These data suggest that diverse cooperating mutations may influence CBF-AML pathophysiology as well as clinical behavior and point to potential unique pathogenesis of t(8;21) vs inv(16) AML. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Gilbert’s Syndrome: Terminology, Epidemiology, Genetics, Pathogenesis (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the review was the analysis of the literature about the prevalence, etiology, genetics and pathogenesis of Gilbert’s syndrome (GS. The scientific literature regarding GS with the keywords «Gilbert's syndrome», «hyperbilirubinemia», «uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT-1A» using PubMed as a search engine was reviewed. The abstracts of 75 articles, based on investigations held within the last 10 years were analyzed. The criterion for the selection of articles for the study was based on their close relevance to the topic. The results of researches covered in 10 articles and two reports were of the top interest and deep study. In medical litera­ture GS is described under the names of different syndromes: Gilbert’s syndrome, Meulengracht’s syndrome, Gilbert — Meulengracht syndrome, Gilbert — Lereboullet syndrome, and also such as: constitutional hepatic dysfunction, familial nonhemolytic jaundice, Gilbert’s type of hyperbilirubinemia, idiopathic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, Crigler — Najjar hyperbilirubinemia, Arias’ type (HBLRCN, hyperbilirubinemia I. GS is a predominantly hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia associated with the reduced activity of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT-1A in liver, which is encrypted in external resources as ICD-10 — E80.4; OMIM — 143500; DiseasesDB — 5218; MedlinePlus — 000301; eMedici­nemed — 870; MeSHD — 005878. UGT-1A isoforms are found in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, in the li­ver — UGT1A9, in the esophagus and stomach — UGT1A7, in the esophagus and intestines — UGT1A8, in the esophagus, bile ducts, stomach, intestines — UGT1A10, in kidneys — UGT1A19. The patients with GS have signs of disorders in all phases of metabolism of bilirubin — from its production to excretion: the lack of bilitranslocase which is responsible for the capture of bilirubin from the blood

  4. CT prediction of the Fuhrman grade of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC): towards the development of computer-assisted diagnostic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhdanpaa, Hannu; Hwang, Darryl; Cen, Steven; Quinn, Brian; Nayyar, Megha; Zhang, Xuejun; Chen, Frank; Desai, Bhushan; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Duddalwar, Vinay

    2015-10-01

    There are distinct quantifiable features characterizing renal cell carcinomas on contrast-enhanced CT examinations, such as peak tumor enhancement, tumor heterogeneity, and percent contrast washout. While qualitative visual impressions often suffice for diagnosis, quantitative metrics if developed and validated can add to the information available from standard of care diagnostic imaging. The purpose of this study is to assess the use of quantitative enhancement metrics in predicting the Fuhrman grade of clear cell RCC. 65 multiphase CT examinations with clear cell RCCs were utilized, 44 tumors with Fuhrman grades 1 or 2 and 21 tumors with grades 3 or 4. After tumor segmentation, the following data were extracted: histogram analysis of voxel-based whole lesion attenuation in each phase, enhancement and washout using mean, median, skewness, kurtosis, standard deviation, and interquartile range. Statistically significant difference was observed in 4 measured parameters between grades 1-2 and grades 3-4: interquartile range of nephrographic attenuation values, standard deviation of absolute enhancement, as well as interquartile range and standard deviation of residual nephrographic enhancement. Interquartile range of nephrographic attenuation values was 292.86 HU for grades 1-2 and 241.19 HU for grades 3-4 (p value 0.02). Standard deviation of absolute enhancement was 41.26 HU for grades 1-2 and 34.66 HU for grades 3-4 (p value 0.03). Interquartile range was 297.12 HU for residual nephrographic enhancement for grades 1-2 and 235.57 HU for grades 3-4 (p value 0.02), and standard deviation of the same was 42.45 HU for grades 1-2 and 37.11 for grades 3-4 (p value 0.04). Our results indicate that absolute enhancement is more heterogeneous for lower grade tumors and that attenuation and residual enhancement in nephrographic phase is more heterogeneous for lower grade tumors. This represents an important step in devising a predictive non-invasive model to predict the

  5. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenal Cortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Candida Barisson Villares Fragoso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune Albright syndrome and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH. [1-3]The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. in 1990. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear. [3] PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. in 2003 identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of McCune Albright syndrome. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production. [2, 4] With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion.In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia.

  6. Low frequency of c-MPL gene mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotaslou, A; Nadali, F; Chahardouli, B; Alizad Ghandforosh, N; Rostami, S H; Alimoghaddam, K; Ghavamzadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are a group of diseases characterized by increased proliferation of myeloid lineage. In addition to JAK2V617F mutation, several mutations in the c-MPL gene have been reported in patients with philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders that could be important in the pathogenesis of diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of c-MPL and JAK2V617F mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negativemyeloproliferative disorders. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with Philadelphia-negative MPD) Subgroups ET and PMF) and 25 healthy subjects as control group. The mutation status of c-MPL and Jak2V617F were investigated by using Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) and Allele-Specific PCR (AS-PCR), respectively. The results were confirmed by sequencing. Among 60 patients, 34 (56.6%) and 1(1.7%) had Jak2V617F and c-MPL mutation, respectively. Patients with Jak2V617F mutation had higher WBC counts and hemoglobin concentration than those without the mutation (p= 0.005, p=0.003). In addition, for all healthy subjects in control group, mutations were negative. The present study revealed that the c-MPL mutations unlike the Jak2V617F mutations are rare in Iranian patients with Ph-negative MPNs and the low mutation rate should be considered in the design of screening strategies of MPD patients.

  7. Transgenic animal models for study of the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang RB

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Renbao Chang,1 Xudong Liu,1 Shihua Li,2 Xiao-Jiang Li1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Huntington’s disease (HD is caused by a genetic mutation that results in polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal regions of huntingtin. As a result, this polyQ expansion leads to the misfolding and aggregation of mutant huntingtin as well as age-dependent neurodegeneration. The genetic mutation in HD allows for generating a variety of animal models that express different forms of mutant huntingtin and show differential pathology. Studies of these animal models have provided an important insight into the pathogenesis of HD. Mouse models of HD include transgenic mice, which express N-terminal or full-length mutant huntingtin ubiquitously or selectively in different cell types, and knock-in mice that express full-length mutant Htt at the endogenous level. Large animals, such as pig, sheep, and monkeys, have also been used to generate animal HD models. This review focuses on the different features of commonly used transgenic HD mouse models as well as transgenic large animal models of HD, and also discusses how to use them to identify potential therapeutics. Since HD shares many pathological features with other neurodegenerative diseases, identification of therapies for HD would also help to develop effective treatment for different neurodegenerative diseases that are also caused by protein misfolding and occur in an age-dependent manner. Keywords: transgenic animal models, Huntington’s disease, pathogenesis, therapy

  8. Reflections on the pathogenesis of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, J M; Gilbert-Barness, E F

    1990-01-01

    Present efforts to identify, isolate, and characterize in molecular terms the "consensus" segment of 21q sufficient to cause most of the major and some of the most characteristic minor manifestations of Down syndrome will soon provide answers to many questions. However, we think that a reductionist approach to explain the Down syndrome phenotype in a "linear" manner from the DNA sequence of the segment will be doomed to failure from the outset because of the open, complex, nonlinear, hierarchical nature of morphogenetic systems. Neo-Darwinism is under strong attack; most genetic changes accumulated over time may very well be of neutral effect, and detailed studies in several related groups of vertebrate species has shown that molecular and organismal evolution are largely independent of one another. It has been pointed out recently that biology lacks a theory of ontogenetic and phylogenetic development, and that a purely "genocentric" view of biology at the expense of the complexly hierarchical intrinsic epigenetic attributes of developmental systems is "out of focus with respect to ... biological organization and morphogenesis," and may be "a residue of nineteenth century romantic idealism." Down syndrome impresses us as a paradigm of increased developmental variability due to a deceleration of the rate of development (neoteny) with many anomalies of incomplete morphogenesis (vestigia), atavisms, increased morphometric variability with many decreased means, increased variances, and increased fluctuating asymmetry. These abnormalities, together with highly increased risk of prenatal death and postnatal morbidity, impaired growth, and abnormal CNS and gonadal structure and function characteristic of most aneuploidy syndromes, suggest to us that the pathogenesis of Down syndrome is best viewed in terms of the mechanisms of speciation. Transgenic experiment involving sequential or overlapping pieces of "the consensus segment" on distal 21q22.1-22.3 may help decide to

  9. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    carcinogens and even nutritional factors such as vitamin A. Ethanol causes not only vitamin A depletion but it also enhances its hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, induction of the microsomal pathway contributes to increased acetaldehyde generation, with formation of protein adducts, resulting in antibody production, enzyme inactivation and decreased DNA repair; it is also associated with a striking impairment of the capacity of the liver to utilize oxygen. Moreover, acetaldehyde promotes glutathione depletion, free-radical mediated toxicity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, acetaldehyde affects hepatic collagen synthesis: both in vivo and in vitro (in cultured myofibroblasts and lipocytes), ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde were found to increase collagen accumulation and mRNA levels for collagen. This new understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease may eventually improve therapy with drugs and nutrients.

  10. Diverse lifestyles and strategies of plant pathogenesis encoded in the genomes of eighteen Dothideomycetes fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin A Ohm

    Full Text Available The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemibiotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to analyze genome structure, evolution, and the diverse strategies of pathogenesis. The Dothideomycetes most likely evolved from a common ancestor more than 280 million years ago. The 18 genome sequences differ dramatically in size due to variation in repetitive content, but show much less variation in number of (core genes. Gene order appears to have been rearranged mostly within chromosomal boundaries by multiple inversions, in extant genomes frequently demarcated by adjacent simple repeats. Several Dothideomycetes contain one or more gene-poor, transposable element (TE-rich putatively dispensable chromosomes of unknown function. The 18 Dothideomycetes offer an extensive catalogue of genes involved in cellulose degradation, proteolysis, secondary metabolism, and cysteine-rich small secreted proteins. Ancestors of the two major orders of plant pathogens in the Dothideomycetes, the Capnodiales and Pleosporales, may have had different modes of pathogenesis, with the former having fewer of these genes than the latter. Many of these genes are enriched in proximity to transposable elements, suggesting faster evolution because of the effects of repeat induced point (RIP mutations. A syntenic block of genes, including oxidoreductases, is conserved in most Dothideomycetes and upregulated during infection in L. maculans, suggesting a possible function in response to oxidative stress.

  11. Interplay of HIV-1 phenotype and neutralizing antibody response in pathogenesis of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Leitner, T; Hodara, V; Jansson, M; Karlsson, A; Wahlberg, J; Rossi, P; Uhlén, M; Fenyö, E M; Albert, J

    1996-06-01

    A majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals display a rapid loss of CD4+ lymphocytes with fast progression towards overt acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, a small proportion of individuals infected by HIV-1 remain immunologically intact for many years. In order to identify factors that might influence the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection, 21 Italian mothers and 11 Swedish homosexual men were studied for the presence of autologous neutralizing antibodies in serum, biological phenotype of virus isolates and envelope variable region 3 (V3) sequences. The results were compared to the risk of mother-to-child transmission and progression of the disease. The presence of a neutralizing antibody response to the autologous virus as well as a virus with slow replicative capacity were linked both to low risk of mother-to-child transmission and non-progression of the disease. Patients whose peripheral blood mononuclear cells contained a mutation in the tip of the V3 loop (Arg318 to serine, lysine or leucine) significantly more often had neutralizing antibodies to autologous virus isolates containing arginine at this position. Thus, it appears that the interplay and balance between neutralizing antibody response of the host and the biological phenotype of HIV-1 strongly influence pathogenesis.

  12. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabian; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Wit, Pierre J. G. M. de; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-02-29

    The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemi)biotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to analyze genome structure, evolution, and the diverse strategies of pathogenesis. The Dothideomycetes most likely evolved from a common ancestor more than 280 million years ago. The 18 genome sequences differ dramatically in size due to variation in repetitive content, but show much less variation in number of (core) genes. Gene order appears to have been rearranged mostly within chromosomal boundaries by multiple inversions, in extant genomes frequently demarcated by adjacent simple repeats. Several Dothideomycetes contain one or more gene-poor, transposable element (TE)-rich putatively dispensable chromosomes of unknown function. The 18 Dothideomycetes offer an extensive catalogue of genes involved in cellulose degradation, proteolysis, secondary metabolism, and cysteine-rich small secreted proteins. Ancestors of the two major orders of plant pathogens in the Dothideomycetes, the Capnodiales and Pleosporales, may have had different modes of pathogenesis, with the former having fewer of these genes than the latter. Many of these genes are enriched in proximity to transposable elements, suggesting faster evolution because of the effects of repeat induced point (RIP) mutations. A syntenic block of genes, including oxidoreductases, is conserved in most Dothideomycetes and upregulated during infection in L. maculans, suggesting a possible function in response to oxidative stress.

  13. Pathogenesis of Lafora Disease: Transition of Soluble Glycogen to Insoluble Polyglucosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mitchell A; Nitschke, Silvia; Steup, Martin; Minassian, Berge A; Nitschke, Felix

    2017-08-11

    Lafora disease (LD, OMIM #254780) is a rare, recessively inherited neurodegenerative disease with adolescent onset, resulting in progressive myoclonus epilepsy which is fatal usually within ten years of symptom onset. The disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in either of the two genes EPM2A (laforin) or EPM2B (malin). It characteristically involves the accumulation of insoluble glycogen-derived particles, named Lafora bodies (LBs), which are considered neurotoxic and causative of the disease. The pathogenesis of LD is therefore centred on the question of how insoluble LBs emerge from soluble glycogen. Recent data clearly show that an abnormal glycogen chain length distribution, but neither hyperphosphorylation nor impairment of general autophagy, strictly correlates with glycogen accumulation and the presence of LBs. This review summarizes results obtained with patients, mouse models, and cell lines and consolidates apparent paradoxes in the LD literature. Based on the growing body of evidence, it proposes that LD is predominantly caused by an impairment in chain-length regulation affecting only a small proportion of the cellular glycogen. A better grasp of LD pathogenesis will further develop our understanding of glycogen metabolism and structure. It will also facilitate the development of clinical interventions that appropriately target the underlying cause of LD.

  14. Mutator activity in Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneyour, Y.; Koltin, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1983-01-01

    A strain with an elevated level of spontaneous mutations and an especially high rate of reversion at a specific locus (pab/sup -/) was identified. The mutator trait is recessive. UV sensitivity and the absence of a UV-specific endonucleolytic activity were associated with the enhancement of the mutation rate in mutator strains. The endonuclease associated with the regulation of the mutation rate also acted on single-stranded DNA. The molecular weight of this enzyme is about 38,000 daltons.

  15. A Gene Module-Based eQTL Analysis Prioritizing Disease Genes and Pathways in Kidney Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Qu Yang

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most common and most aggressive form of renal cell cancer (RCC. The incidence of RCC has increased steadily in recent years. The pathogenesis of renal cell cancer remains poorly understood. Many of the tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and dysregulated pathways in ccRCC need to be revealed for improvement of the overall clinical outlook of the disease. Here, we developed a systems biology approach to prioritize the somatic mutated genes that lead to dysregulation of pathways in ccRCC. The method integrated multi-layer information to infer causative mutations and disease genes. First, we identified differential gene modules in ccRCC by coupling transcriptome and protein-protein interactions. Each of these modules consisted of interacting genes that were involved in similar biological processes and their combined expression alterations were significantly associated with disease type. Then, subsequent gene module-based eQTL analysis revealed somatic mutated genes that had driven the expression alterations of differential gene modules. Our study yielded a list of candidate disease genes, including several known ccRCC causative genes such as BAP1 and PBRM1, as well as novel genes such as NOD2, RRM1, CSRNP1, SLC4A2, TTLL1 and CNTN1. The differential gene modules and their driver genes revealed by our study provided a new perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Moreover, we validated the results in independent ccRCC patient datasets. Our study provided a new method for prioritizing disease genes and pathways. Keywords: ccRCC, Causative mutation, Pathways, Protein-protein interaction, Gene module, eQTL

  16. HERC 1 ubiquitin ligase mutation affects neocortical, CA3 hippocampal and spinal cord projection neurons. An ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eRuiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and, hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  17. Oral candidiasis: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Patton, Lauren L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a clinical fungal infection that is the most common opportunistic infection affecting the human oral cavity. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatmentstrategies for oral candidiasis.

  18. [Morphology and pathogenesis of visceral manifestations of chronic alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S P

    1982-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is accompanied by systemic involvement of the internal organs. Clinico-morphological forms of chronic alcoholism are distinguished on the basis of the prevailing organ pathology, Morphological data are presented, and pathogenesis of the lesions of the liver, heart, pancreas, and kidneys in patients with chronic alcoholism is analysed. The hepatic form may present alcoholic dystrophy, hepatitis or cirrhosis which are stages of progressing hepatopathy. The toxic and metabolic effect of ethanol is important in the pathogenesis of liver lesion. The cardiac form is characterized by the development of alcoholic myocardiodystrophy. In addition to the toxic influence of ethanol, hormonal and electrolyte changes and microcirculatory disorders play a role in its pathogenesis. Chronic calcifying pancreatitis in chronic alcoholism is associated with the effect of ethanol on the mediatory system. The renal form any present necronephrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, glomerulonephritis or pyelonephritis. Their pathogenesis is determined by toxicity of ethanol, circulation of immune complexes in the blood, or immunosuppression.

  19. Tubuloreticular structures in different types of myositis: implications for pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, Irene M.; Hoogendijk, Jessica E.; Veldman, Henk; Ramkema, Marja; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; de Visser, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In dermatomyositis (DM) there is strong histopathological evidence of a microvascular pathogenesis, including endothelial microtubular inclusions. In nonspecific myositis, perimysial and perivascular infiltrates in the muscle biopsy similar to DM are found. Microtubular inclusions in endothelial

  20. Tubuloreticular structures in different types of myositis: Implications for pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, I.M.; Hoogendijk, J.E.; Veldman, H.; Ramkema, M; Weerman, M.A.V.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Visser, M.

    2008-01-01

    In dermatomyositis (DM) there is strong histopathological evidence of a microvascular pathogenesis, including endothelial microtubular inclusions. In nonspecific myositis, perimysial and perivascular infiltrates in the muscle biopsy similar to DM are found. Microtubular inclusions in endothelial

  1. Current insights in sepsis: from pathogenesis to new treatment targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a leading cause of ICU death. This review summarizes current knowledge on sepsis pathogenesis and new therapeutical strategies. Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome predominates in early sepsis, the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome causes

  2. Concurrent IDH1 and SMARCB1 Mutations in Pediatric Medulloblastoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moatasem El-Ayadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1 is a driver gene in several cancers including brain tumors such as low-grade and high-grade gliomas. Mutations of SMARCB1 were described in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and to date have not been associated with the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma. We report concurrent IDH1 and SMARCB1 mutations in a medulloblastoma patient. We searched the catalog of somatic mutations in cancer (COSMIC database and other mutation databases and -to our knowledge- this is the first reported case of medulloblastoma harboring both mutations together. Our patient is a 13-year-old male presenting with headache and vomiting at diagnosis. MRI revealed left cerebellar expansive lesion with no evidence of metastasis. A histopathological diagnosis of desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma was made after complete resection of the tumor. Immunophenotypic characterization and methylation profiling suggested a medulloblastoma with SHH activation. Next generation sequencing of a panel of 400 genes revealed heterozygous somatic IDH1(p.R132C, SMARCB1(p.R201Q, and CDH11(p.L625T mutations. The patient was treated according to the HIT-SIOP PNET 4 protocol. He is in complete remission more than 2 years after diagnosis. In conclusion, increasing use of high throughput sequencing will certainly increase the frequency with which rare mutations or mutation combinations are identified. The exact frequency of this mutation combination and whether it has any particular therapeutic implications or prognostic relevance requires further investigation.

  3. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Xose S.; Pinyol, Magda; Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Villamor, Neus; Escaramis, Georgia; Jares, Pedro; Beà, Sílvia; González-Díaz, Marcos; Bassaganyas, Laia; Baumann, Tycho; Juan, Manel; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Tubío, José M. C.; López, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Tornador, Cristian; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Hernández, Jesús M.; Puente, Diana A.; Freije, José M. P.; Velasco, Gloria; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Carrió, Anna; Guijarro, Sara; Enjuanes, Anna; Hernández, Lluís; Yagüe, Jordi; Nicolás, Pilar; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Castillo, Ester; Dohm, Juliane C.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; de Alava, Enrique; Miguel, Jesús San; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L.; Torrents, David; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Guigó, Roderic; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Klatt, Peter; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; Estivill, Xavier; Montserrat, Emili; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent leukaemia in adults in Western countries, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical presentation and evolution1,2. Two major molecular subtypes can be distinguished, characterized respectively by a high or low number of somatic hypermutations in the variable region of immunoglobulin genes3,4. The molecular changes leading to the pathogenesis of the disease are still poorly understood. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of four cases of CLL and identified 46 somatic mutations that potentially affect gene function. Further analysis of these mutations in 363 patients with CLL identified four genes that are recurrently mutated: notch 1 (NOTCH1), exportin 1 (XPO1), myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) and kelch-like 6 (KLHL6). Mutations in MYD88 and KLHL6 are predominant in cases of CLL with mutated immunoglobulin genes, whereas NOTCH1 and XPO1 mutations are mainly detected in patients with unmutated immunoglobulins. The patterns of somatic mutation, supported by functional and clinical analyses, strongly indicate that the recurrent NOTCH1, MYD88 and XPO1 mutations are oncogenic changes that contribute to the clinical evolution of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of CLL combining whole-genome sequencing with clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes. It highlights the usefulness of this approach for the identification of clinically relevant mutations in cancer. PMID:21642962

  4. Investigation of the Mitochondrial ATPase 6/8 and tRNA(Lys) Genes Mutations in Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryaei, Fahimeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Aryani, Omid; Dadgar, Sepideh; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2012-01-01

    Autism results from developmental factors that affect many or all functional brain systems. Brain is one of tissues which are crucially in need of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Autism is noticeably affected by mitochondrial dysfunction which impairs energy metabolism. Considering mutations within ATPase 6, ATPase 8 and tRNA(Lys) genes, associated with different neural diseases, and the main role of ATPase 6/8 in energy generation, we decided to investigate mutations on these mtDNA-encoded genes to reveal their roles in autism pathogenesis. In this experimental study, mutation analysis for the mentioned genes were performed in a cohort of 24 unrelated patients with idiopathic autism by employing amplicon sequencing of mtDNA fragments. In this study, 12 patients (50%) showed point mutations that represent a significant correlation between autism and mtDNA variations. Most of the identified substitutions (55.55%) were observed on MT-ATP6, altering some conserved amino acids to other ones which could potentially affect ATPase 6 function. Mutations causing amino acid replacement denote involvement of mtDNA genes, especially ATPase 6 in autism pathogenesis. MtDNA mutations in relation with autism could be remarkable to realize an understandable mechanism of pathogenesis in order to achieve therapeutic solutions.

  5. Consequences of Marfan mutations to expression of fibrillin gene and to the structure of microfibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltonen, L.; Karttunen, L.; Rantamaeki, T. [NPHI, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder which is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). Over 40 family-specific FBN1 mutations have been identified. We have characterized 18 different heterozygous mutations including amino acid substitutions, premature stop, and splicing defects leading to deletions or one insertion, and one compound heterozygote with two differently mutated FBN1 alleles inherited from his affected parents. To unravel the consequences of FBN1 mutations to the transcription of FBN1 gene, we have measured the steady state levels of mRNA transcribed from the normal and mutated alleles. The missense mutations do not affect the transcription of the allele while the nonsense mutation leads to lower steady state amount of mutated allele. For the dissection of molecular pathogenesis of FBN1 mutations we have performed rotary shadowing of the microfibrils produced by the cell cultures from MFS patients. The cells from the neonatal patients with established mutations produced only disorganized fibrillin aggregates but no clearly defined microfibrils could be detected, suggesting a major role of this gene region coding for exons 24-26 in stabilization and organization of the bead structure of microfibrils. From the cells of a rare compound heterozygote case carrying two different mutations, no detectable microfibrils could be detected whereas the cells of his parents with heterozygous mutations were able to form identifiable but disorganized microfibrils. In the cells of an MFS case caused by a premature stop removing the C-terminus of fibrillin, the microfibril assembly takes place but the appropriate packing of the microfibrils is disturbed suggesting that C-terminae are actually located within the interbead domain of the microfibrils.

  6. FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutations in benign lichenoid keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groesser, L; Herschberger, E; Landthaler, M; Hafner, C

    2012-04-01

    Benign lichenoid keratoses (BLKs) are solitary skin lesions which have been proposed to represent a regressive form of pre-existent epidermal tumours such as solar lentigo or seborrhoeic keratosis. However, the genetic basis of BLK is unknown. FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutations have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of seborrhoeic keratosis and solar lentigo. We thus investigated whether these mutations are also present in BLK. After manual microdissection and DNA isolation, 52 BLKs were screened for FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS hotspot mutations using SNaPshot(®) multiplex assays. We identified 6/52 (12%) FGFR3 mutations, 10/52 (19%) PIK3CA mutations, 6/52 (12%) HRAS mutations and 2/52 (4%) KRAS mutations. FGFR3 and RAS mutations were mutually exclusive. One BLK showed a simultaneous PIK3CA and HRAS mutation. In nine BLKs with a mutation, nonlesional control tissue from the epidermal margin and the dermal lymphocytic infiltrate were wild-type, indicating that these mutations are somatic. To demonstrate that these findings are specific, 10 samples of lichen planus were analysed without evidence for FGFR3, PIK3CA or RAS mutations. Our results indicate that FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutations are present in approximately 50% of BLKs. These findings support the concept on the molecular genetic level that at least a proportion of BLKs represents regressive variants resulting from former benign epidermal tumours such as seborrhoeic keratosis and solar lentigo. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  7. Genome-wide CpG island methylation analysis implicates novel genes in the pathogenesis of renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ricketts, Christopher J.; Morris, Mark R.; Gentle, Dean; Brown, Michael; Wake, Naomi; Woodward, Emma R.; Clarke, Noel; Latif, Farida; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to identify novel candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) implicated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we performed genome-wide methylation profiling of RCC using the HumanMethylation27 BeadChips to assess methylation at >14,000 genes. Two hundred and twenty hypermethylated probes representing 205 loci/genes were identified in genomic CpG islands. A subset of TSGs investigated in detail exhibited frequent tumor methylation, promoter methylation associated transcriptional silencing an...

  8. Congenital syndactyly in cattle: four novel mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 gene (LRP4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höltershinken Martin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolated syndactyly in cattle, also known as mulefoot, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable penetrance in different cattle breeds. Recently, two independent mutations in the bovine LRP4 gene have been reported as the primary cause of syndactyly in the Holstein and Angus cattle breeds. Results We confirmed the previously described LRP4 exon 33 two nucleotide substitution in most of the affected Holstein calves and revealed additional evidence for allelic heterogeneity by the identification of four new LRP4 non-synonymous point mutations co-segregating in Holstein, German Simmental and Simmental-Charolais families. Conclusion We confirmed a significant role of LRP4 mutations in the pathogenesis of congenital syndactyly in cattle. The newly detected missense mutations in the LRP4 gene represent independent mutations affecting different conserved protein domains. However, the four newly described LRP4 mutations do still not explain all analyzed cases of syndactyly.

  9. Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    exposure to the HFD or LFD, obese mice weighed significantly greater than lean mice (p=0.003, Table 1). There was no effect of HFD on non- fasted blood...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0164 TITLE: Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Victoria Bae...31 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  10. ROLE OF MAGNESIUM IN HEADACHE PATHOGENESIS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Akarachkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is dedicated to the problem of headache in children. This pathology is being found more frequently in pediatric and children’s neurologic practice. The authors examine headache pathogenesis from the position of magnesium deficiency. Analysis of results of the modern studies on magnesium deficiency and its correction in patients with headache indicates that magnesium metabolism may play an important role both in pathogenesis of different headache types and in its treatment and prevention.

  11. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0590 TITLE: SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: KATHLEEN M...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0590 SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT: Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a disorder that results in pure red cell aplasia, congenital

  12. Studies on the molecular pathogenesis of radiation pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yang

    2003-01-01

    Radiation pulmonary fibrosis (RPF) is a frequent side effect of thoracic radiotherapy for breast neoplasm and total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation. Studies on its pathogenesis have arrived at molecular level. Many cytokines, adhesion molecules and vasoactive substances all play important role in the course of RPF. Moreover, there exists genetic loci that has relation with RPF. Furthermore, studies on the molecular pathogenesis of RPF have provided new ideas and new measures for the precaution and therapy of RPF

  13. Prevalence and clinical significance of mediator complex subunit 12 mutations in 362 Han Chinese samples with uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Zou, Yang; Luo, Yong; Guo, Jiu-Bai; Liu, Fa-Ying; Zhou, Jiang-Yan; Zhang, Zi-Yu; Wan, Lei; Huang, Ou-Ping

    2017-07-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (ULs) are the most common gynecological benign tumors originating from the myometrium. Prevalent mutations in the mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) gene have been identified in ULs, and functional evidence has revealed that these mutations may promote the development of ULs. However, whether MED12 mutations are associated with certain clinical characteristics in ULs remains largely unknown. In the present study, the potential mutations of MED12 and its paralogous gene, mediator complex subunit 12-like (MED12L), were screened in 362 UL tumors from Han Chinese patients. A total of 158 out of 362 UL tumors (43.6%) were identified as harboring MED12 somatic mutations, and the majority of these mutations were restricted to the 44th residue. MED12 mutations were also observed in 2 out of 145 (1.4%) adjacent control myometrium. Furthermore, the mutation spectrum of MED12 in the concurrent leiomyomas was noticeably different. Correlation analysis of MED12 mutations with the available clinical features indicated that patients with mutated MED12 tended to have smaller cervical diameters. By contrast, no MED12L mutation was identified in the present samples. In summary, the present study demonstrated the presence of prevalent MED12 somatic mutations in UL samples, and the MED12 mutation was associated with smaller cervical diameters. The low mutation frequency of MED12 in adjacent control myometrium indicated that MED12 mutation may be an early event in the pathogenesis of ULs. Furthermore, MED12 mutation status in concurrent tumors from multiple leiomyomas supported several prior observations that the majority of these tumors arose independently.

  14. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  15. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  16. Mutation inactivation of Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene (NBS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS with NBS1 germ-line mutation is a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by genomic instability and enhanced cancer predisposition. The NBS1 gene codes for a protein, Nbs1(p95/Nibrin, involved in the processing/repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic alterations. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous NBS1 mice exhibited a higher incidence of HCC than did wild-type mice. The objective of the present study is to assess whether NBS1 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of human primary liver cancer, including HBV-associated HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. Eight missense NBS1 mutations were identified in six of 64 (9.4% HCCs and two of 18 (11.1% ICCs, whereas only one synonymous mutation was found in 89 control cases of cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B. Analysis of the functional consequences of the identified NBS1 mutations in Mre11-binding domain showed loss of nuclear localization of Nbs1 partner Mre11, one of the hallmarks for Nbs1 deficiency, in one HCC and two ICCs with NBS1 mutations. Moreover, seven of the eight tumors with NBS1 mutations had at least one genetic alteration in the TP53 pathway, including TP53 mutation, MDM2 amplification, p14ARF homozygous deletion and promoter methylation, implying a synergistic effect of Nbs1 disruption and p53 inactivation. Our findings provide novel insight on the molecular pathogenesis of primary liver cancer characterized by mutation inactivation of NBS1, a DNA repair associated gene.

  17. Hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules in toxic multinodular goiter share activating thyrotropin receptor mutations with solitary toxic adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonacchera, M; Chiovato, L; Pinchera, A; Agretti, P; Fiore, E; Cetani, F; Rocchi, R; Viacava, P; Miccoli, P; Vitti, P

    1998-02-01

    Toxic multinodular goiter is a cause of nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism and is believed to differ in its nature and pathogenesis from toxic adenoma. Gain-of-function mutations of the TSH receptor gene have been identified as a cause of toxic adenoma. The pathogenesis at the molecular level of hyperfunctioning nodules in toxic multinodular goiter has yet not been reported. Six patients with a single hot nodule within a multinodular goiter and 11 patients with toxic thyroid adenoma were enrolled in our study. At histology five hyperfunctioning nodules in multinodular goiters showed the features of adenomas, and one was identified as a hyperplastic nodule. The entire exon 10 of the TSH receptor gene was directly sequenced after PCR amplification from genomic DNA obtained from surgical specimens. Functional studies of mutated receptors were performed in COS-7 cells. Five out of 6 (83%) hyperfunctioning nodules within toxic multinodular goiters harbored a TSH receptor mutation. A TSH receptor mutation was also evident in the hyperfunctioning nodule that at histology had the features of noncapsulated hyperplastic nodule. Among toxic adenomas, 8 out of 11 (72%) nodules harbored a TSH receptor mutation. All the mutations were heterozygotic and somatic. Nonfunctioning nodules, whether adenomas or hyperplastic nodules present in association with hyperfunctioning nodules in the same multinodular goiters, had no TSH receptor mutation. All the mutations identified had constitutive activity as assessed by cAMP production after expression in COS-7 cells. Hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules in multinodular goiters recognize the same pathogenetic event (TSH receptor mutation) as toxic adenoma. Other mechanisms are implicated in the growth of nonfunctioning thyroid nodules coexistent in the same gland.

  18. Basal cell carcinoma pathogenesis and therapy involving hedgehog signaling and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Anshika; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Rana, Mehtab; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is driven by aberrant hedgehog signaling. Thus blocking this signaling pathway by small molecules such as vismodegib inhibits tumor growth. Primary cilium in the epidermal cells plays an integral role in the processing of hedgehog signaling-related proteins. Recent genomic studies point to the involvement of additional genetic mutations that might be associated with the development of BCCs, suggesting significance of other signaling pathways, such as WNT, NOTCH, mTOR, and Hippo, aside from hedgehog in the pathogenesis of this human neoplasm. Some of these pathways could be regulated by noncoding microRNA. Altered microRNA expression profile is recognized with the progression of these lesions. Stopping treatment with Smoothened (SMO) inhibitors often leads to tumor reoccurrence in the patients with basal cell nevus syndrome, who develop 10-100 of BCCs. In addition, the initial effectiveness of these SMO inhibitors is impaired due to the onset of mutations in the drug-binding domain of SMO. These data point to a need to develop strategies to overcome tumor recurrence and resistance and to enhance efficacy by developing novel single agent-based or multiple agents-based combinatorial approaches. Immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy could be additional successful approaches particularly if developed in combination with chemotherapy for inoperable and metastatic BCCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Linear ubiquitination is involved in the pathogenesis of optineurin-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Seshiru; Oikawa, Daisuke; Ishii, Ryohei; Ayaki, Takashi; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Kamei, Kiyoko; Takeyoshi, Izumi; Kawakami, Hideshi; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Hatada, Izuho; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Ito, Hidefumi; Nureki, Osamu; Tokunaga, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Optineurin (OPTN) mutations cause neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and glaucoma. Although the ALS-associated E478G mutation in the UBAN domain of OPTN reportedly abolishes its NF-κB suppressive activity, the precise molecular basis in ALS pathogenesis still remains unclear. Here we report that the OPTN-UBAN domain is crucial for NF-κB suppression. Our crystal structure analysis reveals that OPTN-UBAN binds linear ubiquitin with homology to NEMO. TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation is enhanced in OPTN-knockout cells, through increased ubiquitination and association of TNF receptor (TNFR) complex I components. Furthermore, OPTN binds caspase 8, and OPTN deficiency accelerates TNF-α-induced apoptosis by enhancing complex II formation. Immunohistochemical analyses of motor neurons from OPTN-associated ALS patients reveal that linear ubiquitin and activated NF-κB are partially co-localized with cytoplasmic inclusions, and that activation of caspases is elevated. Taken together, OPTN regulates both NF-κB activation and apoptosis via linear ubiquitin binding, and the loss of this ability may lead to ALS. PMID:27552911

  1. Unraveling the Pathogenesis of MDS: The NLRP3 Inflammasome and Pyroptosis Drive the MDS Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallman, David A; Cluzeau, Thomas; Basiorka, Ashley A; List, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by bone marrow cytological dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis in the setting of recurrent somatic gene mutations and chromosomal abnormalities. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms that drive a common clinical phenotype from a diverse array of genetic abnormalities have only recently begun to emerge. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the integral role of the innate immune system in upregulating inflammatory cytokines via NF-κB activation in the pathogenesis of MDS. Recent investigations implicate activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as a critical convergence signal in MDS with consequent clonal expansion and pyroptotic cell death though caspase-1 maturation. Specifically, the alarmin S100A9 and/or founder gene mutations trigger pyroptosis through the generation of reactive oxygen species leading to assembly and activation of the redox-sensitive NLRP3 inflammasome and β-catenin, assuring propagation of the MDS clone. More importantly, targeted inhibition of varied steps in this pathway restore effective hematopoiesis. Together, delineation of the role of pyroptosis in the clinical phenotype of MDS patients has identified novel therapeutic strategies that offer significant promise in the treatment of MDS.

  2. Transgenic animal models for study of the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Renbao; Liu, Xudong; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a genetic mutation that results in polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal regions of huntingtin. As a result, this polyQ expansion leads to the misfolding and aggregation of mutant huntingtin as well as age-dependent neurodegeneration. The genetic mutation in HD allows for generating a variety of animal models that express different forms of mutant huntingtin and show differential pathology. Studies of these animal models have provided an important insight into the pathogenesis of HD. Mouse models of HD include transgenic mice, which express N-terminal or full-length mutant huntingtin ubiquitously or selectively in different cell types, and knock-in mice that express full-length mutant Htt at the endogenous level. Large animals, such as pig, sheep, and monkeys, have also been used to generate animal HD models. This review focuses on the different features of commonly used transgenic HD mouse models as well as transgenic large animal models of HD, and also discusses how to use them to identify potential therapeutics. Since HD shares many pathological features with other neurodegenerative diseases, identification of therapies for HD would also help to develop effective treatment for different neurodegenerative diseases that are also caused by protein misfolding and occur in an age-dependent manner.

  3. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  4. Collagen expression in fibroblasts with a novel LMNA mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Desiree; Leistritz, Dru F.; Turner, Lesley; MacGregor, David; Ohson, Kamal; Dancey, Paul; Martin, George M.; Oshima, Junko

    2007-01-01

    Laminopathies are a group of genetic disorders caused by LMNA mutations; they include muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, and progeroid syndromes. We identified a novel heterozygous LMNA mutation, L59R, in a patient with the general appearance of mandibuloacral dysplasia and progeroid features. Examination of the nuclei of dermal fibroblasts revealed the irregular morphology characteristic of LMNA mutant cells. The nuclear morphological abnormalities of LMNA mutant lymphoblastoid cell lines were less prominent compared to those of primary fibroblasts. Since it has been reported that progeroid features are associated with increased extracellular matrix in dermal tissues, we compared a subset of these components in fibroblast cultures from LMNA mutants with those of control fibroblasts. There was no evidence of intracellular accumulation or altered mobility of collagen chains, or altered conversion of procollagen to collagen, suggesting that skin fibroblast-mediated matrix production may not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of this particular laminopathy

  5. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  6. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing ...

  7. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...

  8. Analysis of HFE and non-HFE gene mutations in Brazilian patients with hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Marin, Maria Lúcia Carnevale; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; Carrilho, Flair José; Goldberg, Anna Carla

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one-half of Brazilian patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) are neither homozygous for the C282Y mutation nor compound heterozygous for the H63D and C282Y mutations that are associated with HH in Caucasians. Other mutations have been described in the HFE gene as well as in genes involved in iron metabolism, such as transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) and ferroportin 1 (SCL40A1). To evaluate the role of HFE, TfR2 and SCL40A1 mutations in Brazilian subjects with HH. Nineteen male subjects (median age 42 [range: 20-72] years) with HH were evaluated using the Haemochromatosis StripAssay A. This assay is capable of detecting twelve HFE mutations, which are V53M, V59M, H63D, H63H, S65C, Q127H, P160delC, E168Q, E168X, W169X, C282Y and Q283, four TfR2 mutations, which are E60X, M172K, Y250X, AVAQ594-597del, and two SCL40A1 mutations, which are N144H and V162del. In our cohort, nine (47%) patients were homozygous for the C282Y mutation, two (11%) were heterozygous for the H63D mutation, and one each (5%) was either heterozygous for C282Y or compound heterozygous for C282Y and H63D. No other mutations in the HFE, TfR2 or SCL40A1 genes were observed in the studied patients. One-third of Brazilian subjects with the classical phenotype of HH do not carry HFE or other mutations that are currently associated with the disease in Caucasians. This observation suggests a role for other yet unknown mutations in the aforementioned genes or in other genes involved in iron homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HH in Brazil.

  9. Mutational analysis of FLASH and PTPN13 genes in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Goo; Lee, Sung Hak; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2008-01-01

    The Fas-Fas ligand system is considered a major pathway for induction of apoptosis in cells and tissues. FLASH was identified as a pro-apoptotic protein that transmits apoptosis signal during Fas-mediated apoptosis. PTPN13 interacts with Fas and functions as both suppressor and inducer of Fas-mediated apoptosis. There are polyadenine tracts in both FLASH (A8 and A9 in exon 8) and PTPN13 (A8 in exon 7) genes that could be frameshift mutation targets in colorectal carcinomas. Because genes encoding proteins in Fas-mediated apoptosis frequently harbor somatic mutations in cancers, we explored the possibility as to whether mutations of FLASH and PTPN13 are a feature of colorectal carcinomas. We analysed human FLASH in exon 8 and PTPN13 in exon 7 for the detection of somatic mutations in 103 colorectal carcinomas by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)- based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). We detected two mutations in FLASH gene, but none in PTPN13 gene. However, the two mutations were not frameshift (deletion or insertion) mutations in the polyadenine tracts of FLASH. The two mutations consisted of a deletion mutation (c.3734-3737delAGAA) and a missense mutation (c.3703A>C). These data indicate that frameshift mutation in the polyadenine tracts in both FLASH and PTPN13 genes is rare in colorectal carcinomas. Also, the data suggest that both FLASH and PTPN13 mutations in the polyadenine tracts may not have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinomas.

  10. SuhB Is a Regulator of Multiple Virulence Genes and Essential for Pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Xu, Chang; Jin, Yongxin; Sun, Ziyu; Liu, Chang; Shi, Jing; Chen, Gukui; Chen, Ronghao; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT During initial colonization and chronic infection, pathogenic bacteria encounter distinct host environments. Adjusting gene expression accordingly is essential for the pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has evolved complicated regulatory networks to regulate different sets of virulence factors to facilitate colonization and persistence. The type III secretion system (T3SS) and motility are associated with acute infections, while biofilm formation and the type VI secretion system (T6SS) are associated with chronic persistence. To identify novel regulatory genes required for pathogenesis, we screened a P. aeruginosa transposon (Tn) insertion library and found suhB to be an essential gene for the T3SS gene expression. The expression of suhB was upregulated in a mouse acute lung infection model, and loss of suhB resulted in avirulence. Suppression of T3SS gene expression in the suhB mutant is linked to a defective translation of the T3SS master regulator, ExsA. Further studies demonstrated that suhB mutation led to the upregulation of GacA and its downstream small RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, triggering T6SS expression and biofilm formation while inhibiting the T3SS. Our results demonstrate that an in vivo-inducible gene, suhB, reciprocally regulates genes associated with acute and chronic infections and plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:24169572

  11. Role of transmitted Gag CTL polymorphisms in defining replicative capacity and early HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Prince

    Full Text Available Initial studies of 88 transmission pairs in the Zambia Emory HIV Research Project cohort demonstrated that the number of transmitted HLA-B associated polymorphisms in Gag, but not Nef, was negatively correlated to set point viral load (VL in the newly infected partners. These results suggested that accumulation of CTL escape mutations in Gag might attenuate viral replication and provide a clinical benefit during early stages of infection. Using a novel approach, we have cloned gag sequences isolated from the earliest seroconversion plasma sample from the acutely infected recipient of 149 epidemiologically linked Zambian transmission pairs into a primary isolate, subtype C proviral vector, MJ4. We determined the replicative capacity (RC of these Gag-MJ4 chimeras by infecting the GXR25 cell line and quantifying virion production in supernatants via a radiolabeled reverse transcriptase assay. We observed a statistically significant positive correlation between RC conferred by the transmitted Gag sequence and set point VL in newly infected individuals (p = 0.02. Furthermore, the RC of Gag-MJ4 chimeras also correlated with the VL of chronically infected donors near the estimated date of infection (p = 0.01, demonstrating that virus replication contributes to VL in both acute and chronic infection. These studies also allowed for the elucidation of novel sites in Gag associated with changes in RC, where rare mutations had the greatest effect on fitness. Although we observed both advantageous and deleterious rare mutations, the latter could point to vulnerable targets in the HIV-1 genome. Importantly, RC correlated significantly (p = 0.029 with the rate of CD4+ T cell decline over the first 3 years of infection in a manner that is partially independent of VL, suggesting that the replication capacity of HIV-1 during the earliest stages of infection is a determinant of pathogenesis beyond what might be expected based on set point VL alone.

  12. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects.

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  16. Serial prenatal and postnatal MRI of dystroglycanopathy in a patient with familial B3GALNT2 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Mai-Lan; Glenn, Orit A.; Sherr, Eliott H.; Strober, Jonathan B.

    2017-01-01

    The dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of conditions, with mutations in B3GALNT2 described in association with congenital muscular dystrophy. The serial prenatal MRI findings in this disorder have not been well described. We present sequential prenatal and postnatal MRI findings in a boy with compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2, as well as the MRI findings of his two siblings with similar mutations. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis and neurodevelopment of congenital muscular dystrophy. (orig.)

  17. Serial prenatal and postnatal MRI of dystroglycanopathy in a patient with familial B3GALNT2 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Mai-Lan [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sherr, Eliott H. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); Strober, Jonathan B. [University of California, Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of conditions, with mutations in B3GALNT2 described in association with congenital muscular dystrophy. The serial prenatal MRI findings in this disorder have not been well described. We present sequential prenatal and postnatal MRI findings in a boy with compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2, as well as the MRI findings of his two siblings with similar mutations. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis and neurodevelopment of congenital muscular dystrophy. (orig.)

  18. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  19. [Identification of novel pathogenic gene mutations in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by whole-exome resequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio

    2015-12-01

    A new class of gene mutations, identified in the pathogenesis of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), includes DNMT3A, IDH1/2, TET2 and EZH2. However, these mutations are rare in pediatric AML cases, indicating that pathogeneses differ between adult and pediatric forms of AML. Meanwhile, the recent development of massively parallel sequencing technologies has provided a new opportunity to discover genetic changes across entire genomes or proteincoding sequences. In order to reveal a complete registry of gene mutations, we performed whole exome resequencing of paired tumor-normal specimens from 19 pediatric AML cases using Illumina HiSeq 2000. In total, 80 somatic mutations or 4.2 mutations per sample were identified. Many of the recurrent mutations identified in this study involved previously reported targets in AML, such as FLT3, CEBPA, KIT, CBL, NRAS, WT1 and EZH2. On the other hand, several genes were newly identified in the current study, including BCORL1 and major cohesin components such as SMC3 and RAD21. Whole exome resequencing revealed a complex array of gene mutations in pediatric AML genomes. Our results indicate that a subset of pediatric AML represents a discrete entity that could be discriminated from its adult counterpart, in terms of the spectrum of gene mutations.

  20. Effect of the G375C and G346E achondroplasia mutations on FGFR3 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan He

    Full Text Available Two mutations in FGFR3, G380R and G375C are known to cause achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism. The G380R mutation accounts for 98% of the achondroplasia cases, and thus has been studied extensively. Here we study the effect of the G375C mutation on the phosphorylation and the cross-linking propensity of full-length FGFR3 in HEK 293 cells, and we compare the results to previously published results for the G380R mutant. We observe identical behavior of the two achondroplasia mutants in these experiments, a finding which supports a direct link between the severity of dwarfism phenotypes and the level and mechanism of FGFR3 over-activation. The mutations do not increase the cross-linking propensity of FGFR3, contrary to previous expectations that the achondroplasia mutations stabilize the FGFR3 dimers. Instead, the phosphorylation efficiency within un-liganded FGFR3 dimers is increased, and this increase is likely the underlying cause for pathogenesis in achondroplasia. We further investigate the G346E mutation, which has been reported to cause achondroplasia in one case. We find that this mutation does not increase FGFR3 phosphorylation and decreases FGFR3 cross-linking propensity, a finding which raises questions whether this mutation is indeed a genetic cause for human dwarfism.

  1. Effect of the G375C and G346E achondroplasia mutations on FGFR3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan; Serrano, Christopher; Niphadkar, Nitish; Shobnam, Nadia; Hristova, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    Two mutations in FGFR3, G380R and G375C are known to cause achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism. The G380R mutation accounts for 98% of the achondroplasia cases, and thus has been studied extensively. Here we study the effect of the G375C mutation on the phosphorylation and the cross-linking propensity of full-length FGFR3 in HEK 293 cells, and we compare the results to previously published results for the G380R mutant. We observe identical behavior of the two achondroplasia mutants in these experiments, a finding which supports a direct link between the severity of dwarfism phenotypes and the level and mechanism of FGFR3 over-activation. The mutations do not increase the cross-linking propensity of FGFR3, contrary to previous expectations that the achondroplasia mutations stabilize the FGFR3 dimers. Instead, the phosphorylation efficiency within un-liganded FGFR3 dimers is increased, and this increase is likely the underlying cause for pathogenesis in achondroplasia. We further investigate the G346E mutation, which has been reported to cause achondroplasia in one case. We find that this mutation does not increase FGFR3 phosphorylation and decreases FGFR3 cross-linking propensity, a finding which raises questions whether this mutation is indeed a genetic cause for human dwarfism.

  2. Study of modifiers factors associated to mitochondrial mutations in individuals with hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa de Moraes, Vanessa Cristine; Alexandrino, Fabiana; Andrade, Paula Baloni; Camara, Marilia Fontenele; Sartorato, Edi Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Hearing impairment is the most prevalent sensorial deficit in the general population. Congenital deafness occurs in about 1 in 1000 live births, of which approximately 50% has hereditary cause in development countries. Non-syndromic deafness can be caused by mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Mutations in mtDNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic deafness in many families worldwide. However, the nuclear background influences the phenotypic expression of these pathogenic mutations. Indeed, it has been proposed that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in the MTRNR1 gene. The both putative nuclear modifiers genes TRMU and MTO1 encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial related to tRNA modification. It has been hypothesizes that human TRMU and also MTO1 nuclear genes may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of deafness-associated mitochondrial mutations. The aim of this work was to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial mutations, nuclear modifier genes mutations and aminoglycoside exposure in the deafness phenotype. Our findings suggest that the genetic background of individuals may play an important role in the pathogenesis of deafness-associated with mitochondrial mutation and aminoglycoside-induced.

  3. Somatic FAS mutations are common in patients with genetically undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, Kennichi C; Niemela, Julie E; Price, Susan; Davis, Joie; Hornung, Ronald L; Oliveira, João Bosco; Puck, Jennifer M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-06-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated numbers of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline mutations of the FAS gene (type Ia), whereas some cases have been noted to have a somatic mutation of FAS primarily in their DNT cells. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with somatic FAS mutations among a group of our ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and to further characterize them. We found more than one-third (12 of 31) of the patients tested had somatic FAS mutations, primarily involving the intracellular domain of FAS resulting in loss of normal FAS signaling. Similar to ALPS type Ia patients, the somatic ALPS patients had increased DNT cell numbers and elevated levels of serum vitamin B(12), interleukin-10, and sFAS-L. These data support testing for somatic FAS mutations in DNT cells from ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and a similar clinical and laboratory phenotype to that of ALPS type Ia. These findings also highlight the potential role for somatic mutations in the pathogenesis of nonmalignant and/or autoimmune hematologic conditions in adults and children.

  4. Androgen receptor (AR) promotes clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) migration and invasion via altering the circHIAT1/miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p/CDC42 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefeng; Sun, Yin; Tao, Wei; Fei, Xiang; Chang, Chawnshang

    2017-05-28

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the androgen receptor (AR) plays important roles to promote the metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The detailed mechanisms, especially how AR functions via altering the circular RNAs (circRNAs) remain unclear. Here we identified a new circRNA (named as circHIAT1) whose expression was lower in ccRCCs than adjacent normal tissues. Targeting AR could suppress ccRCC cell progression via increasing circHIAT1 expression. ChIP assay and luciferase assay demonstrated that AR suppressed circHIAT1 expression via regulating its host gene, Hippocampus Abundant Transcript 1 (HIAT1) expression at the transcriptional level. The consequences of AR-suppressed circHIAT1 resulted in deregulating miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p expressions, which increased CDC42 expression to enhance ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Increasing this newly identified signal via circHIAT1 suppressed AR-enhanced ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Together, these results suggested that circHIAT1 functioned as a metastatic inhibitor to suppress AR-enhanced ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Targeting this newly identified AR-circHIAT1-mediated miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p/CDC42 signals may help us develop potential new therapies to better suppress ccRCC metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Emmprin and KSHV: new partners in viral cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Bai, Lihua; Lu, Ying; Xu, Zengguang; Reiss, Krys; Del Valle, Luis; Kaleeba, Johnan; Toole, Bryan P; Parsons, Chris; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2013-09-01

    Emmprin (CD147; basigin) is a multifunctional glycoprotein expressed at higher levels by cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. Through direct effects within tumor cells and promotion of tumor-stroma interactions, emmprin participates in induction of tumor cell invasiveness, angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistance. Although its contribution to cancer progression has been widely studied, the role of emmprin in viral oncogenesis still remains largely unclear, and only a small body of available literature implicates emmprin-associated mechanisms in viral pathogenesis and tumorigenesis. We summarize these data in this review, focusing on the role of emmprin in pathogenesis associated with the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a common etiology for cancers arising in the setting of immune suppression. We also discuss future directions for mechanistic studies exploring roles for emmprin in viral cancer pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequent POLE1 p.S297F mutation in Chinese patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yang; Liu, Fa-Ying; Liu, Huai; Wang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Women' s Reproductive Health of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Central Laboratory, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Li, Wei [Key Laboratory of Women' s Reproductive Health of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Central Laboratory, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Huang, Mei-Zhen [Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Institute, Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330029 (China); Huang, Yan; Yuan, Xiao-Qun [Key Laboratory of Women' s Reproductive Health of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Central Laboratory, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Xu, Xiao-Yun [Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Institute, Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330029 (China); Huang, Ou-Ping, E-mail: huangouping@gmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Institute, Jiangxi Provincial Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330029 (China); He, Ming, E-mail: jxhm56@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Nanchang University School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nanchang 330006 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE1) functions primarily in nuclear DNA replication and repair. Recently, POLE1 mutations were detected frequently in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas while with lower frequency in several other types of cancer, and the p.P286R and p.V411L mutations were the potential mutation hotspots in human cancers. Nevertheless, the mutation frequency of POLE1 in ovarian cancer still remains largely unknown. Here, we screened a total of 251 Chinese samples with distinct subtypes of ovarian carcinoma for the presence of POLE1 hotspot mutations by direct sequencing. A heterozygous somatic POLE1 mutation, p.S297F (c.890C>T), but not p.P286R and p.V411L hotspot mutations observed in other cancer types, was identified in 3 out of 37 (8.1%) patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma; this mutation was evolutionarily highly conserved from Homo sapiens to Schizosaccharomyces. Of note, the POLE1 mutation coexisted with mutation in the ovarian cancer-associated PPP2R1A (protein phosphatase 2, regulatory subunit A, α) gene in a 46-year-old patient, who was also diagnosed with ectopic endometriosis in the benign ovary. In addition, a 45-year-old POLE1-mutated ovarian endometrioid carcinoma patient was also diagnosed with uterine leiomyoma while the remaining 52-year-old POLE1-mutated patient showed no additional distinctive clinical manifestation. In contrast to high frequency of POLE1 mutations in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, no POLE1 mutations were identified in patients with other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. Our results showed for the first time that the POLE1 p.S297F mutation, but not p.P286R and p.V411L hotspot mutations observed in other cancer types, was frequent in Chinese ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, but absent in other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. These results implicated that POLE1 p.S297F mutation might be actively involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, but might not be actively

  7. Frequent POLE1 p.S297F mutation in Chinese patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Yang; Liu, Fa-Ying; Liu, Huai; Wang, Feng; Li, Wei; Huang, Mei-Zhen; Huang, Yan; Yuan, Xiao-Qun; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Huang, Ou-Ping; He, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE1) functions primarily in nuclear DNA replication and repair. Recently, POLE1 mutations were detected frequently in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas while with lower frequency in several other types of cancer, and the p.P286R and p.V411L mutations were the potential mutation hotspots in human cancers. Nevertheless, the mutation frequency of POLE1 in ovarian cancer still remains largely unknown. Here, we screened a total of 251 Chinese samples with distinct subtypes of ovarian carcinoma for the presence of POLE1 hotspot mutations by direct sequencing. A heterozygous somatic POLE1 mutation, p.S297F (c.890C>T), but not p.P286R and p.V411L hotspot mutations observed in other cancer types, was identified in 3 out of 37 (8.1%) patients with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma; this mutation was evolutionarily highly conserved from Homo sapiens to Schizosaccharomyces. Of note, the POLE1 mutation coexisted with mutation in the ovarian cancer-associated PPP2R1A (protein phosphatase 2, regulatory subunit A, α) gene in a 46-year-old patient, who was also diagnosed with ectopic endometriosis in the benign ovary. In addition, a 45-year-old POLE1-mutated ovarian endometrioid carcinoma patient was also diagnosed with uterine leiomyoma while the remaining 52-year-old POLE1-mutated patient showed no additional distinctive clinical manifestation. In contrast to high frequency of POLE1 mutations in ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, no POLE1 mutations were identified in patients with other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. Our results showed for the first time that the POLE1 p.S297F mutation, but not p.P286R and p.V411L hotspot mutations observed in other cancer types, was frequent in Chinese ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, but absent in other subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. These results implicated that POLE1 p.S297F mutation might be actively involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian endometrioid carcinoma, but might not be actively

  8. The O-GlcNAc Transferase Intellectual Disability Mutation L254F Distorts the TPR Helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Mehmet; Llabrés, Salomé; Gorelik, Andrii; Ferenbach, Andrew T; Zachariae, Ulrich; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2018-05-17

    O-linked β-N-acetyl- D -glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) regulates protein O-GlcNAcylation, an essential post-translational modification that is abundant in the brain. Recently, OGT mutations have been associated with intellectual disability, although it is not understood how they affect OGT structure and function. Using a multi-disciplinary approach we show that the L254F OGT mutation leads to conformational changes of the tetratricopeptide repeats and reduced activity, revealing the molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutation breeding in pepper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalov, S [Plant Breeding Unit, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, Seibersdorf Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1986-03-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F{sub 1} hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M{sub 1} effects, handling the treated material in M{sub 1}, M{sub 2} and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  10. Mutation breeding in pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, S.

    1986-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F 1 hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M 1 effects, handling the treated material in M 1 , M 2 and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  11. Multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: missing pieces of an old puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanzadeh, Reza; Brück, Wolfgang; Minagar, Alireza; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2018-06-08

    Traditionally, multiple sclerosis (MS) was considered to be a CD4 T cell-mediated CNS autoimmunity, compatible with experimental autoimmune encephalitis model, which can be characterized by focal lesions in the white matter. However, studies of recent decades revealed several missing pieces of MS puzzle and showed that MS pathogenesis is more complex than the traditional view and may include the following: a primary degenerative process (e.g. oligodendroglial pathology), generalized abnormality of normal-appearing brain tissue, pronounced gray matter pathology, involvement of innate immunity, and CD8 T cells and B cells. Here, we review these findings and discuss their implications in MS pathogenesis.

  12. Modern views on the epidemiology, etiology and pathogenesis of gynecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Yashina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with one of the pressing andrological issues – gynecomastia, its etiology and pathogenesis. Based on the current epidemiological and experimental data, most common etiological factors of gynecomastia were investigated. A multiple-valued role of various causes of gynecomastia in several age-groups was revealed. Literature data show that gynecomastia may be a manifestation of various diseases: endocrine, genetic, systematic. As well as that, gynecomastia may occur in patients with oncological diseases. However, gynecomastia can be an iatrogenic complication. Currently, we continue to make insights to the problem of gynecomastia in order to be able to classify its etiological factors and determine its basic pathogenesis pathways.

  13. The Paradox of Feline Coronavirus Pathogenesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Wanderley Myrrha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline coronavirus (FCoV is an enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, of the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. FCoV is an important pathogen of wild and domestic cats and can cause a mild or apparently symptomless enteric infection, especially in kittens. FCoV is also associated with a lethal, systemic disease known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP. Although the precise cause of FIP pathogenesis remains unclear, some hypotheses have been suggested. In this review we present results from different FCoV studies and attempt to elucidate existing theories on the pathogenesis of FCoV infection.

  14. [Current concepts in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of central blindness in elderly population of the western world. The pathogenesis of this disease, likely multifactorial, is not well known, although a number of theories have been put forward, including oxidative stress, genetic interactions, hemodynamic imbalance, immune and inflammatory processes. The understanding of age-related macular degeneration pathogenesis will give rise to new approaches in prevention and treatment of the early and late stages of both atrophic and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Systematic approach to understanding the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Lihua; Luo, Hui; Li, Yisha; Zhu, Honglin

    2017-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complex heterogeneous autoimmune disease. Progressive organ fibrosis is a major contributor to SSc mortality. Despite extensive efforts, the underlying mechanism of SSc remains unclear. Efforts to understand the pathogenesis of SSc have included genomics, epigenetics, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies in the last decade. This review focuses on recent studies in SSc research based on multi-omics. The combination of these technologies can help us understand the pathogenesis of SSc. This review aims to provide important information for disease identification, therapeutic targets and potential biomarkers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggeridge, Martin I.; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-01-01

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis

  17. Pathogenetic Role of JAK2 V617F Mutation in Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chi Hsu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs is poorly understood. The hematopoietic progenitor cells of patients with polycythemia vera (PV or essential thrombocythemia (ET are characterized by hypersensitiv-ity to hematopoietic growth factors and formation of endogenous erythroid colonies. Recently, 4 groups reported almost simultaneously Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 V617F mutation in more than 80% of PV patients, 30% of patients with ET and in about 50% of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis. The identification of the JAK2 mutation represents a major advance in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPDs that will likely permit a new classification and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

  18. Mutated hilltop inflation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Barun Kumar

    2018-05-01

    In this work we re-investigate pros and cons of mutated hilltop inflation. Applying Hamilton-Jacobi formalism we solve inflationary dynamics and find that inflation goes on along the {W}_{-1} branch of the Lambert function. Depending on the model parameter mutated hilltop model renders two types of inflationary solutions: one corresponds to small inflaton excursion during observable inflation and the other describes large field inflation. The inflationary observables from curvature perturbation are in tune with the current data for a wide range of the model parameter. The small field branch predicts negligible amount of tensor to scalar ratio r˜ O(10^{-4}), while the large field sector is capable of generating high amplitude for tensor perturbations, r˜ O(10^{-1}). Also, the spectral index is almost independent of the model parameter along with a very small negative amount of scalar running. Finally we find that the mutated hilltop inflation closely resembles the α -attractor class of inflationary models in the limit of α φ ≫ 1.

  19. Mutation breeding in jute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mutagenic studies in jute in general dealt with the morphological abnormalities of the M 1 generation in great detail. Of late, induction of a wide spectrum of viable mutations have been reported in different varieties of both the species. Mutations affecting several traits of agronomic importance such as, plant height, time of flowering, fibre yield and quality, resistance to pests and diseases are also available. Cytological analysis of a large collection of induced mutants resulted in the isolation of seven trisomics in an olitorius variety. Several anatomical parameters which are the components of fibre yield, have also received attention. Some mutants with completely altered morphology were used for interpreting the evolution of leaf shape in Tiliaceas and related families. A capsularis variety developed using mutation breeding technique has been released for cultivation. Several others, including derivatives of inter-mutant hybridization have been found to perform well at different locations in the All India Coordinated Trials. Presently, chemical mutagenesis and induction of mutants of physiological significance are receiving considerable attention. The induced variability is being used in genetic and linkage studies. (author)

  20. The value of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD MR imaging in differentiation of renal solid mass and grading of renal cell carcinoma (RCC: analysis based on the largest cross-sectional area versus the entire whole tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Wu

    Full Text Available To study the value of assessing renal masses using different methods in parameter approaches and to determine whether BOLD MRI is helpful in differentiating RCC from benign renal masses, differentiating clear-cell RCC from renal masses other than clear-cell RCC and determining the tumour grade.Ninety-five patients with 139 renal masses (93 malignant and 46 benign who underwent abdominal BOLD MRI were enrolled. R2* values were derived from the largest cross-section (R2*largest and from the whole tumour (R2*whole. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements were analysed based on two measurements by the same observer and the first measurement from each observer, respectively, and these agreements are reported with intra-class correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals. The diagnostic value of the R2* value in the evaluation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic analysis.The intra-observer agreement was very good for R2*largest and R2*whole (all > 0.8. The inter-observer agreement of R2*whole (0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.69~0.79 was good and was significantly improved compared with the R2*largest (0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.52~0.68, as there was no overlap in the 95% confidence interval of the intra-class correlation coefficients. The diagnostic value in differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign lesions with R2*whole (AUC=0.79/0.78[observer1/observer2] and R2*largest (AUC=0.75[observer1] was good and significantly higher (p=0.01 for R2*largest[observer2] vs R2*whole[observer2], p 0.7 and were not significantly different (p=0.89/0.93 for R2*largest vs R2*whole[observer1/observer2], 0.96 for R2*whole[observer1] vs R2*largest[observer2] and 0.96 for R2*whole [observer2] vs R2*largest[observer1].BOLD MRI could provide a feasible parameter for differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign renal masses and for predicting clear-cell renal cell carcinoma grading. Compared with the largest cross

  1. Survival with AGS-003, an autologous dendritic cell-based immunotherapy, in combination with sunitinib in unfavorable risk patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC): Phase 2 study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Asim; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Logan, Theodore F; Lance, Raymond S; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M; Knox, Jennifer J; Master, Viraj A; Pal, Sumanta K; Miller, Wilson H; Karsh, Lawrence I; Tcherepanova, Irina Y; DeBenedette, Mark A; Williams, W Lee; Plessinger, Douglas C; Nicolette, Charles A; Figlin, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    AGS-003 is an autologous immunotherapy prepared from fully matured and optimized monocyte-derived dendritic cells, which are co-electroporated with amplified tumor RNA plus synthetic CD40L RNA. AGS-003 was evaluated in combination with sunitinib in an open label phase 2 study in intermediate and poor risk, treatment naïve patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Twenty-one intermediate and poor risk patients were treated continuously with sunitinib (4 weeks on, 2 weeks off per 6 week cycle). After completion of the first cycle of sunitinib, patients were treated with AGS-003 every 3 weeks for 5 doses, then every 12 weeks until progression or end of study. The primary endpoint was to determine the complete response rate. Secondary endpoints included clinical benefit, safety, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Immunologic response was also monitored. Thirteen patients (62%) experienced clinical benefit (9 partial responses, 4 with stable disease); however there were no complete responses in this group of intermediate and poor risk mRCC patients and enrollment was terminated early. Median PFS from registration was 11.2 months (95% CI 6.0, 19.4) and the median OS from registration was 30.2 months (95% CI 9.4, 57.1) for all patients. Seven (33%) patients survived for at least 4.5 years, while five (24%) survived for more than 5 years, including 2 patients who remain progression-free with durable responses for more than 5 years at the time of this report. AGS-003 was well tolerated with only mild injection-site reactions. The most common adverse events were related to expected toxicity from sunitinib therapy. In patients who had sequential samples available for immune monitoring, the magnitude of the increase in the absolute number of CD8(+) CD28(+) CD45RA(-) effector/memory T cells (CTLs) after 5 doses of AGS-003 relative to baseline, correlated with overall survival. AGS-003 in combination with sunitinib was

  2. Interleukin-7 receptor-α gene mutations are not detected in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozovski, Uri; Li, Ping; Harris, David; Ohanian, Maro; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in cancer cell genes are classified according to their functional significance. Those that provide the malignant cells with significant advantage are collectively referred to as driver mutations and those that do not, are the passenger mutations. Accordingly, analytical criteria to distinguish driver mutations from passenger mutations have been recently suggested. Recent studies revealed mutations in interleukin-7 receptor-α (IL7R) gene in 10% of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients and in only a few cases of pediatric B-ALL. IL7R mutations are also frequently found in patients with lung cancer, but whereas in pediatric T-ALL IL7R mutations are “drivers” (consisting of gain-of-function mutations within a narrow 50-base pair interval at exon 6 that confer cytokine-independent cell growth and promote tumor transformation), in lung cancer, mutations are substitution mutations randomly distributed across the gene and are probably only “passenger” events. Because the treatment response of adult T-ALL is significantly poorer than that of childhood T-ALL and because exon 6 IL7R mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood T-ALL, we sought to determine how the pattern of IL7R mutations varies between adult and childhood T-ALL. To that end, we sequenced the 50-base pair interval in exon 6 of the IL7R of DNA obtained from bone marrow samples of 35 randomly selected adult patients with T-ALL. Our analysis revealed that none of these 35 samples carried an IL7R mutation in exon 6. Whether differences in the genetic makeup of adult and childhood T-ALL explain the differential response to therapy remains to be determined

  3. TARDBP mutations in individuals with sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Valdmanis, Paul N; Dion, Patrick; Spiegelman, Dan; McConkey, Brendan J; Vande Velde, Christine; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Lacomblez, Lucette; Pochigaeva, Ksenia; Salachas, Francois; Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Camu, William; Meininger, Vincent; Dupre, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A

    2008-05-01

    Recently, TDP-43 was identified as a key component of ubiquitinated aggregates in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult-onset neurological disorder that leads to the degeneration of motor neurons. Here we report eight missense mutations in nine individuals--six from individuals with sporadic ALS (SALS) and three from those with familial ALS (FALS)--and a concurring increase of a smaller TDP-43 product. These findings further corroborate that TDP-43 is involved in ALS pathogenesis.

  4. Axonal Transport of TDP-43 mRNA Granules Is Impaired by ALS-Causing Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Alami, Nael H.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Carrasco, Monica A.; Williams, Luis A.; Winborn, Christina S.; Han, Steve S.W.; Kiskinis, Evangelos; Winborn, Brett; Freibaum, Brian D.; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Clare, Alison J.; Badders, Nisha M.; Bilican, Bilada; Chaum, Edward; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2014-01-01

    The RNA binding protein TDP-43 regulates RNA metabolism at multiple levels, including transcription, RNA splicing, and mRNA stability. TDP-43 is a major component of the cytoplasmic inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some types of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The importance of TDP-43 in disease is underscored by the fact that dominant missense mutations are sufficient to cause disease, although the role of TDP-43 in pathogenesis is unknown. ...

  5. Role of tumour necrosis factor in pathogenesis of radicular cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, W.U.R.; Idris, M.; Khan, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The radicular cyst is very common odontogenic cyst of the jaws, which is usually associated with a tooth with necrotic pulp. The cyst formation requires proliferation of the epithelial rest cells of Malassez present in the periodontal ligament. Proliferation of epithelial rest cells of Malassez is an essential event in the Pathogenesis of radicular cyst. The wall of the cyst contains epithelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts and other cells. TNF is one of inflammatory mediators, which is produced by macrophages and monocytes. This study was carried out to investigate the role of tumour necrosis factor in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst, which is by far the commonest cystic lesion of the jaws. Methods: Explants from 20 radicular cysts were cultured in vitro to grow the epithelial cells. However, the cultures were rapidly contaminated with fibroblasts and it was impossible to grow the epithelial cells separately. Therefore, the proliferative effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) was studied on mammalian epithelial cells. Results: TNF at low concentration had a proliferative effect on the epithelial cells, which may play some role in pathogenesis of radicular cyst. Conclusion: TNF stimulated the epithelial cell proliferation in low concentration and inhibit the proliferation in higher concentrations. These two effects may have some implications in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst. (author)

  6. The potential implication of eosinophil activation in the pathogenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    The potential implication of eosinophil activation in the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. INTRODUCTION. Asthma is recognized as an eosinophil mediated inflammation of the airways1. Eosinophils are major contributors to the damage in the airways of asthmatic patients which when activated, degranulate and release ...

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis: Pathogenesis and clinical implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Daniel; Dobler, G.; Mantke, O. D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2010), s. 223-232 ISSN 1477-8939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP302/10/P438; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Tick-borne encephalitis * Tick-borne encephalitis virus * Pathogenesis * Clinical data Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We described the cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related protein 5 gene in maize, named ZmPR5 (GenBank Accession Number: HM230665). Molecular and bioinformatic analyses of ZmPR5 revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 525 bp, encoding a protein of 175 amino acids (aa) and a deduced ...

  9. [AETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS GASTRO-DUODENALES ULCERATIVE LESIONS IN ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernekhovskaya, N E; Povalayev, A V; Layshenko, G A

    2015-01-01

    In review today conceptions of view to aetiology and pathogenesis gastro-duodenales ulcerative lesions in elderly. Atherosclerosis, ischemic disease of the heart and hypertension are reasons of acute ulcers and erosions in elderly. The breaking of microcirculation are very importance.

  10. Extrahepatic manifestations of cholestatic liver diseases: pathogenesis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Pruritus, fatigue, and metabolic bone disease are frequent complications of cholestatic liver diseases, which can be quite distressing for the patient and can considerably reduce the quality of life. The molecular pathogenesis of these extrahepatic manifestations of cholestasis is poorly understood,

  11. Role of Endogenous Peptides and Enzymes in the Pathogenesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease with the clinical manifestation of acute abdominal pain. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The exact mechanism(s) by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. However, one of the proposed mechanisms for induction ...

  12. Leprosy and the eye a review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: 1. To update knowledge on the current trends in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of leprosy 2. To highlight the ocular complications associated with leprosy. Methodology:Current literature on various aspects of leprosy research obtained from the Internet and supplemented by available journals ...

  13. The roles of environmental pollutants in the pathogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rise worldwide with a growing suspicion of association between environmental pollutants and diabetes. This paper reviewed the roles of environmental pollutants in the pathogenesis and increasing incidence of diabetes. Relevant information was retrieved from reliable sources in the internet using Google search engine.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB ... November, 2011. We described the cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related protein 5 gene in maize, named .... in two inbred lines was calculated using the ↵Ct method. .... Of the characterized PRs currently known, PR-1, PR-2,. PR-3 ...

  15. The puzzle of polymorphous light eruption : Patients and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schornagel, I.J.

    2007-01-01

    Polymorphous light eruption (PLE) is a photosensitivity disorder of which the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Patient history in PLE is important since lesions are transient and often not present at time of consultation. Phototesting is done to reproduce the PLE skin lesions and to obtain

  16. Recovery of active pathogenesis-related enzymes from the apoplast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overall protease activity intensity was higher in the symplast. Maximum symplast contamination of the apoplast was 2% as estimated by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, a biochemical marker for symplast. Accumulation of pathogenesis-related enzymatic activities in the apoplast of M. acuminata leaf tissue was ...

  17. Hidradenitis suppurativa : From pathogenesis to emerging treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson-Blok, Janine Louise

    2015-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic skin disease that is characterized by inflammation of the hair follicles. The cause of HS is largely unknown and the disease remains difficult to treat. Mrs. Janine Dickinson-Blok studied the pathogenesis of HS and the efficacy of existing and emerging

  18. Biomechanical considerations in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Andras; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Madry, Henning; Drobnič, Matej; Filardo, Giuseppe; Espregueira-Mendes, João; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and a major cause of disability. The knee is the large joint most affected. While chronological age is the single most important risk factor of osteoarthritis, the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis in the young patient is predominantly related to an

  19. Fatores críticos para a produção de agregado reciclado em usinas de reciclagem de RCC da região nordeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Virgínia Santana Melo

    Full Text Available As usinas de reciclagem de resíduos da construção civil (RCC no Brasil produzem agregado reciclado com alta variabilidade mineral e baixa empregabilidade. Suas atividades dependem da construção civil e das diretrizes para produção do agregado reciclado, com foco na substituição ao agregado natural. Este trabalho identifica fatores críticos para a produção de agregado reciclado em usinas de reciclagem de RCC por meio da avaliação das usinas da região Nordeste do Brasil, conforme a norma NBR 15114 (ABNT, 2004b. A pesquisa foi dividida em três etapas. Na primeira, foi estabelecida a fundamentação teórica do estudo. Na segunda fase, foram realizadas visitas às usinas para entrevistas, levantamento fotográfico e observação visual. Na última, os dados coletados foram analisados à luz das diretrizes brasileiras para produção de agregado reciclado. Como resultado, identificou-se que as usinas visitadas sofrem interferências negativas na produção decorrente da gestão dos resíduos da construção civil. Observou-se, ainda, que as usinas avaliadas apresentaram não conformidades em relação aos requisitos da NBR 15114. A contribuição principal deste trabalho é a identificação de fatores críticos e proposições para a produção do agregado reciclado com pureza mineral e maior empregabilidade.

  20. Detecting novel genetic mutations in Chinese Usher syndrome families using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ling-Hui; Jin, Xin; Xu, Hai-Wei; Li, Shi-Ying; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common cause of combined blindness and deafness inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Molecular diagnosis is of great significance in revealing the molecular pathogenesis and aiding the clinical diagnosis of this disease. However, molecular diagnosis remains a challenge due to high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH. This study explored an approach for detecting disease-causing genetic mutations in candidate genes in five index cases from unrelated USH families based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Through systematic data analysis using an established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, 10 pathogenic mutations in the USH disease genes were identified in the five USH families. Six of these mutations were novel: c.4398G > A and EX38-49del in MYO7A, c.988_989delAT in USH1C, c.15104_15105delCA and c.6875_6876insG in USH2A. All novel variations segregated with the disease phenotypes in their respective families and were absent from ethnically matched control individuals. This study expanded the mutation spectrum of USH and revealed the genotype-phenotype relationships of the novel USH mutations in Chinese patients. Moreover, this study proved that targeted NGS is an accurate and effective method for detecting genetic mutations related to USH. The identification of pathogenic mutations is of great significance for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of USH.

  1. Iron overload and HFE gene mutations in Czech patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalikova-Cimburova, Marketa; Kratka, Karolina; Stransky, Jaroslav; Putova, Ivana; Cieslarova, Blanka; Horak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of HFE gene mutations in Czech patients with chronic liver diseases and the influence of the mutations on iron status. The presence of HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S65C) analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method, presence of cirrhosis, and serum iron indices were compared among 454 patients with different chronic liver diseases (51 with chronic hepatitis B, 122 with chronic hepatitis C, 218 with alcoholic liver disease, and 63 patients with hemochromatosis). Chronic liver diseases patients other than hemochromatics did not have an increased frequency of HFE gene mutations compared to controls. Although 33.3% of patients with hepatitis B, 43% of patients with hepatitis C, and 73.2% of patients with alcoholic liver disease had elevated transferrin saturation or serum ferritin levels, the presence of HFE gene mutations was not significantly associated with iron overload in these patients. Additionally, patients with cirrhosis did not have frequencies of HFE mutations different from those without cirrhosis. This study emphasizes the importance, not only of C282Y, but also of the H63D homozygous genetic constellation in Czech hemochromatosis patients. Our findings show that increased iron indices are common in chronic liver diseases but {\\it HFE} mutations do not play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, and alcoholic liver disease.

  2. U2AF1 mutations alter splice site recognition in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Janine O; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Hayes, Brian; Murphy, Michele E; Zebari, Ahmad S; Bradley, Philip; Bradley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing studies have identified common mutations affecting genes encoding components of the RNA splicing machinery in hematological malignancies. Here, we sought to determine how mutations affecting the 3' splice site recognition factor U2AF1 alter its normal role in RNA splicing. We find that U2AF1 mutations influence the similarity of splicing programs in leukemias, but do not give rise to widespread splicing failure. U2AF1 mutations cause differential splicing of hundreds of genes, affecting biological pathways such as DNA methylation (DNMT3B), X chromosome inactivation (H2AFY), the DNA damage response (ATR, FANCA), and apoptosis (CASP8). We show that U2AF1 mutations alter the preferred 3' splice site motif in patients, in cell culture, and in vitro. Mutations affecting the first and second zinc fingers give rise to different alterations in splice site preference and largely distinct downstream splicing programs. These allele-specific effects are consistent with a computationally predicted model of U2AF1 in complex with RNA. Our findings suggest that U2AF1 mutations contribute to pathogenesis by causing quantitative changes in splicing that affect diverse cellular pathways, and give insight into the normal function of U2AF1's zinc finger domains. © 2015 Ilagan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  4. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  5. Induced skeletal mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a large-scale experiment that, by means of breeding tests, confirmed that many dominant skeletal mutations are induced by large-dose radiation exposure. The author also discusses: (1) the major advantages and disadvantages of the skeletal method in improving estimates of genetic hazard to man; (2) future uses of the skeletal method; (3) direct estimation of risk beyond the first generation using the skeletal method; and (4) the possibility of using the skeletal method as a quick and easy screen for chemical mutagens

  6. p53 and the pathogenesis of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, Cara L.; Ananthaswamy, Honnavara N.

    2007-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene and gene product are among the most diverse and complex molecules involved in cellular functions. Genetic alterations within the p53 gene have been shown to have a direct correlation with cancer development and have been shown to occur in nearly 50% of all cancers. p53 mutations are particularly common in skin cancers and UV irradiation has been shown to be a primary cause of specific 'signature' mutations that can result in oncogenic transformation. There are certain 'hot-spots' in the p53 gene where mutations are commonly found that result in a mutated dipyrimidine site. This review discusses the role of p53 from normal function and its dysfunction in pre-cancerous lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. Additionally, special situations are explored, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome in which there is an inherited p53 mutation, and the consequences of immune suppression on p53 mutations and the resulting increase in non-melanoma skin cancer in these patients

  7. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter contains brief articles on the use of radiation to induce mutations in plants; radiation-induced mutants in Chrysanthemum; disrupting the association between oil and protein content in soybean seeds; mutation studies on bougainvillea; a new pepper cultivar; and the use of mutation induction to improve the quality of yam beans. A short review of the seminar on the use of mutation and related biotechnology for crop improvement in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and a description of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on the application of DNA-based marker mutations for the improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop species are also included. Two tables are given: these are based on the ''FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database'' and show the number of mutated varieties and the number of officially released mutant varieties in particular crops/species. Refs and tabs

  8. Augmentation of phenotype in a transgenic Parkinson mouse heterozygous for a Gaucher mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Ianai; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Giasson, Benoit I; Nussbaum, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of the protein α-synuclein (SNCA) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is strongly supported by the facts that (i) missense and copy number mutations in the SNCA gene can cause inherited Parkinson's disease; and (ii) Lewy bodies in sporadic Parkinson's disease are largely composed of aggregated SNCA. Unaffected heterozygous carriers of Gaucher disease mutations have an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. As mutations in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GBA) are known to interfere with lysosomal protein degradation, GBA heterozygotes may demonstrate reduced lysosomal SNCA degradation, leading to increased steady-state SNCA levels and promoting its aggregation. We have created mouse models to investigate the interaction between GBA mutations and synucleinopathies. We investigated the rate of SNCA degradation in cultured primary cortical neurons from mice expressing wild-type mouse SNCA, wild-type human SNCA, or mutant A53T SNCA, in a background of either wild-type Gba or heterozygosity for the L444P GBA mutation associated with Gaucher disease. We also tested the effect of this Gaucher mutation on motor and enteric nervous system function in these transgenic animals. We found that human SNCA is stable, with a half-life of 61 h, and that the A53T mutation did not significantly affect its half-life. Heterozygosity for a naturally occurring Gaucher mutation, L444P, reduced GBA activity by 40%, reduced SNCA degradation and triggered accumulation of the protein in culture. This mutation also resulted in the exacerbation of motor and gastrointestinal deficits found in the A53T mouse model of Parkinson's disease. This study demonstrates that heterozygosity for a Gaucher disease-associated mutation in Gba interferes with SNCA degradation and contributes to its accumulation, and exacerbates the phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain

  9. Novel mutations in the USH1C gene in Usher syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparisi, María José; García-García, Gema; Jaijo, Teresa; Rodrigo, Regina; Graziano, Claudio; Seri, Marco; Simsek, Tulay; Simsek, Enver; Bernal, Sara; Baiget, Montserrat; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Aller, Elena; Millán, José María

    2010-12-31

    Usher syndrome type I (USH1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and vestibular areflexia. To date, five USH1 genes have been identified. One of these genes is Usher syndrome 1C (USH1C), which encodes a protein, harmonin, containing PDZ domains. The aim of the present work was the mutation screening of the USH1C gene in a cohort of 33 Usher syndrome patients, to identify the genetic cause of the disease and to determine the relative involvement of this gene in USH1 pathogenesis in the Spanish population. Thirty-three patients were screened for mutations in the USH1C gene by direct sequencing. Some had already been screened for mutations in the other known USH1 genes (myosin VIIA [MYO7A], cadherin-related 23 [CDH23], protocadherin-related 15 [PCDH15], and Usher syndrome 1G [USH1G]), but no mutation was found. Two novel mutations were found in the USH1C gene: a non-sense mutation (p.C224X) and a frame-shift mutation (p.D124TfsX7). These mutations were found in a homozygous state in two unrelated USH1 patients. In the present study, we detected two novel pathogenic mutations in the USH1C gene. Our results suggest that mutations in USH1C are responsible for 1.5% of USH1 disease in patients of Spanish origin (considering the total cohort of 65 Spanish USH1 patients since 2005), indicating that USH1C is a rare form of USH in this population.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism array lesions, TET2, DNMT3A, ASXL1 and CBL mutations are present in systemic mastocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Traina

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (SNP-A and new molecular defects may provide new insight in the pathogenesis of systemic mastocytosis (SM. SNP-A karyotyping was applied to identify recurrent areas of loss of heterozygosity and bidirectional sequencing was performed to evaluate the mutational status of TET2, DNMT3A, ASXL1, EZH2, IDH1/IDH2 and the CBL gene family. Overall survival (OS was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. We studied a total of 26 patients with SM. In 67% of SM patients, SNP-A karyotyping showed new chromosomal abnormalities including uniparental disomy of 4q and 2p spanning TET2/KIT and DNMT3A. Mutations in TET2, DNMT3A, ASXL1 and CBL were found in 23%, 12%, 12%, and 4% of SM patients, respectively. No mutations were observed in EZH2 and IDH1/IDH2. Significant differences in OS were observed for SM mutated patients grouped based on the presence of combined TET2/DNMT3A/ASXL1 mutations independent of KIT (P = 0.04 and sole TET2 mutations (P<0.001. In conclusion, TET2, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations are also present in mastocytosis and these mutations may affect prognosis, as demonstrated by worse OS in mutated patients.

  11. IDH1/2 mutations target a key hallmark of cancer by deregulating cellular metabolism in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunzhi; Moore, Lynette M; Li, Xia; Yung, W K Alfred; Zhang, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) enzymes have recently become a focal point for research aimed at understanding the biology of glioma. IDH1 and IDH2 are mutated in 50%-80% of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, oligoastrocytomas, and secondary glioblastomas but are seldom mutated in primary glioblastomas. Gliomas with IDH1/2 mutations always harbor other molecular aberrations, such as TP53 mutation or 1p/19q loss. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations may serve as prognostic factors because patients with an IDH-mutated glioma survive significantly longer than those with an IDH-wild-type tumor. However, the molecular pathogenic role of IDH1/2 mutations in the development of gliomas is unclear. The production of 2-hydroxyglutarate and enhanced NADP+ levels in tumor cells with mutant IDH1/2 suggest mechanisms through which these mutations contribute to tumorigenesis. Elucidating the pathogenesis of IDH mutations will improve understanding of the molecular mechanisms of gliomagenesis and may lead to development of a new molecular classification system and novel therapies.

  12. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga B, P.

    1984-01-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented. (Author)

  13. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  14. Hot-spot KIF5A mutations cause familial ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, David; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Müller, Kathrin; Grehl, Torsten; Petri, Susanne; Meyer, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Weydt, Patrick; Ruf, Wolfgang; Neuwirth, Christoph; Weber, Markus; Pinto, Susana; Claeys, Kristl G; Schrank, Berthold; Jordan, Berit; Knehr, Antje; Günther, Kornelia; Hübers, Annemarie; Zeller, Daniel; Kubisch, Christian; Jablonka, Sibylle; Sendtner, Michael; Klopstock, Thomas; de Carvalho, Mamede; Sperfeld, Anne; Borck, Guntram; Volk, Alexander E; Dorst, Johannes; Weis, Joachim; Otto, Markus; Schuster, Joachim; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko; Danzer, Karin M; Freischmidt, Axel; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Ludolph, Albert C; Andersen, Peter M; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2018-01-12

    frequency = 3.40%; P = 1.28 × 10-7). Our study demonstrates that mutations located specifically in a C-terminal hotspot of KIF5A can cause a classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis phenotype, and underline the involvement of intracellular transport processes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  15. Hot-spot KIF5A mutations cause familial ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Rüstem; Müller, Kathrin; Grehl, Torsten; Petri, Susanne; Meyer, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Weydt, Patrick; Ruf, Wolfgang; Neuwirth, Christoph; Weber, Markus; Pinto, Susana; Claeys, Kristl G; Schrank, Berthold; Jordan, Berit; Knehr, Antje; Günther, Kornelia; Hübers, Annemarie; Zeller, Daniel; Kubisch, Christian; Jablonka, Sibylle; Klopstock, Thomas; de Carvalho, Mamede; Sperfeld, Anne; Borck, Guntram; Volk, Alexander E; Dorst, Johannes; Weis, Joachim; Otto, Markus; Schuster, Joachim; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko; Danzer, Karin M; Freischmidt, Axel; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Ludolph, Albert C; Andersen, Peter M; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Weyen, Ute; Hermann, Andreas; Hagenacker, Tim; Koch, Jan Christoph; Lingor, Paul; Göricke, Bettina; Zierz, Stephan; Baum, Petra; Wolf, Joachim; Winkler, Andrea; Young, Peter; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek., Jan

    2018-01-01

    allele frequency = 3.40%; P = 1.28 × 10−7). Our study demonstrates that mutations located specifically in a C-terminal hotspot of KIF5A can cause a classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis phenotype, and underline the involvement of intracellular transport processes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathogenesis. PMID:29342275

  16. Role of JAK-STAT signaling in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ross L; Wernig, Gerlinde

    2006-01-01

    The identification of JAK2V617F mutations in polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocytosis (ET), and myelofibrosis (MF) represents an important advance in our understanding of these myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). Most, if not all, patients with PV and a significant number of patients with ET and MF are JAK2V617F positive, and the mutation likely arises in the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. JAK2V617F is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that is able to activate JAK-STAT signaling most efficiently when co-expressed with the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR), the thrombopoietin receptor (MPL), or the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (GCSFR). Data from murine models supports the central role of JAK2V617F in the pathogenesis of MPD, as expression of JAK2V617F in a bone marrow transplantation assay results in polycythemia and myelofibrosis in recipient mice. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling by JAK2V617F in some, but not all MPD patients with ET and MF led to the identification of the constitutively active MPLW515L allele in ET and MF. Small molecule inhibitors of JAK-STAT signaling are currently being developed, which offer potential for molecularly targeted therapy for patients with PV, ET, and MF. Despite these advances, many questions remain regarding the role of a single disease allele in three phenotypically distinct MPD, the potential clinical efficacy of JAK2 inhibitors, and the identity of oncogenic alleles in JAK2V617F/MPLW515-negative MPD.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter includes articles dealing with radiation induced mutation based plant breeding research findings aimed at improving productivity, disease resistance and tolerance of stress conditions

  18. Mutation breeding in mangosteen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Mangosteen the queen of the tropical fruits is apomitic and only a cultivar is reported and it reproduces asexually. Conventional breeding is not possible and the other methods to create variabilities are through genetic engineering and mutation breeding. The former technique is still in the infantry stage in mangosteen research while the latter has been an established tool in breeding to improve cultivars. In this mutation breeding seeds of mangosteen were irradiated using gamma rays and the LD 50 for mangosteen was determined and noted to be very low at 10 Gy. After sowing in the seedbed, the seedlings were transplanted in polybags and observed in the nursery bed for about one year before planted in the field under old oil palm trees in Station MARDI, Kluang. After evaluation and screening, about 120 mutant mangosteen plants were selected and planted in Kluang. The plants were observed and some growth data taken. There were some mutant plants that have good growth vigour and more vigorous that the control plants. The trial are now in the fourth year and the plants are still in the juvenile stage. (Author)

  19. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagel, Z.; Tutluer, M. I.; Peskircioglu, H.; Kantoglu, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parent varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 had been used in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. As a result of these experiments, two promising mutant lines were chosen and given to the Seed Registration and Certification Center for official registration These two promising mutants were tested at five different locations of Turkey, in 2004 and 2005 years. After 2 years of registration experiments one of outstanding mutants was officially released as mutant chickpea variety under the name TAEK-SAGEL, in 2006. Some basic characteristics of this mutant are; earliness (95-100 day), high yield capacity (180-220 kg/da), high seed protein (22-25 %), first pot height (20-25 cm), 100 seeds weight (42-48 g), cooking time (35-40 min) and resistance to Ascochyta blight.

  20. Two novel mutations in the EYS gene are possible major causes of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Hosono

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a highly heterogeneous genetic disease including autosomal recessive (ar, autosomal dominant (ad, and X-linked inheritance. Recently, arRP has been associated with mutations in EYS (Eyes shut homolog, which is a major causative gene for this disease. This study was conducted to determine the spectrum and frequency of EYS mutations in 100 Japanese arRP patients. To determine the prevalence of EYS mutations, all EYS exons were screened for mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification, and sequence analysis was performed. We detected 67 sequence alterations in EYS, of which 21 were novel. Of these, 7 were very likely pathogenic mutations, 6 were possible pathogenic mutations, and 54 were predicted non-pathogenic sequence alterations. The minimum observed prevalence of distinct EYS mutations in our study was 18% (18/100, comprising 9 patients with 2 very likely pathogenic mutations and the remaining 9 with only one such mutation. Among these mutations, 2 novel truncating mutations, c.4957_4958insA (p.S1653KfsX2 and c.8868C>A (p.Y2956X, were identified in 16 patients and accounted for 57.1% (20/35 alleles of the mutated alleles. Although these 2 truncating mutations were not detected in Japanese patients with adRP or Leber's congenital amaurosis, we detected them in Korean arRP patients. Similar to Japanese arRP results, the c.4957_4958insA mutation was more frequently detected than the c.8868C>A mutation. The 18% estimated prevalence of very likely pathogenic mutations in our study suggests a major involvement of EYS in the pathogenesis of arRP in the Japanese population. Mutation spectrum of EYS in 100 Japanese patients, including 13 distinct very likely and possible pathogenic mutations, was largely different from the previously reported spectrum in patients from non-Asian populations. Screening for c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A mutations in the EYS gene may therefore be very effective for the genetic testing

  1. Mutations in Epigenetic Modifiers in Myeloid Malignancies and the Prospect of Novel Epigenetic-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir T. Fathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, the discovery of a series of mutations in patients with myeloid malignancies has provided insight into the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs, myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Among these alterations have been mutations in genes, such as IDH1/2, TET2, DNMT3A, and EZH2, which appear to affect DNA and/or histone lysine methylation. Large clinical correlative studies are beginning to decipher the clinical importance, prevalence, and potential prognostic significance of these mutations. Additionally, burgeoning insight into the role of epigenetics in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies has prompted increased interest in development of novel therapies which target DNA and histone posttranslational modifications. DNA demethylating agents have been demonstrated to be clinically active in a subset of patients with MDS and AML and are used extensively. However, newer, more specific agents which alter DNA and histone modification are under preclinical study and development and are likely to expand our therapeutic options for these diseases in the near future. Here, we review the current understanding of the clinical importance of these newly discovered mutations in AML and MDS patients. We also discuss exciting developments in DNA methyltransferase inhibitor strategies and the prospect of novel histone lysine methyltransferase inhibitors.

  2. Studies on mutation techniques in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    Synthetical techniques for improving rice mutation breeding efficiency were studied. The techniques consist of corresponding relationship between radiosensitivity and mutation frequency, choosing appropriate materials, combination of physical and chemical mutagens, mutagenic effects of the new mutagenic agents as proton, ions, synchronous irradiation and space mutation. These techniques and methods for inducing mutations are very valuable to increase inducing mutation efficiency and breeding level

  3. Molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and impact of therapeutic advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Bandoh, Salome; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality and has an increasing incidence worldwide. HCC can be induced by multiple etiologies, is influenced by many risk factors, and has a complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, HCCs exhibit substantial heterogeneity, which compounds the difficulties in developing effective therapies against this highly lethal cancer. With advances in cancer biology and molecular and genetic profiling, a number of different mechanisms involved in the development and progression of HCC have been identified. Despite the advances in this area, the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma is still not completely understood. This review aims to elaborate our current understanding of the most relevant genetic alterations and molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of HCC, and anticipate the potential impact of future advances on therapeutic drug development. PMID:27239288

  4. Comparative Pathogenesis and Systems Biology for Biodefense Virus Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing vaccines to biothreat agents presents a number of challenges for discovery, preclinical development, and licensure. The need for high containment to work with live agents limits the amount and types of research that can be done using complete pathogens, and small markets reduce potential returns for industry. However, a number of tools, from comparative pathogenesis of viral strains at the molecular level to novel computational approaches, are being used to understand the basis of viral attenuation and characterize protective immune responses. As the amount of basic molecular knowledge grows, we will be able to take advantage of these tools not only to rationally attenuate virus strains for candidate vaccines, but also to assess immunogenicity and safety in silico. This review discusses how a basic understanding of pathogenesis, allied with systems biology and machine learning methods, can impact biodefense vaccinology.

  5. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  6. Diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of myositis: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, P-O; Schmidt, J

    2014-03-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing myopathy (NM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM) are four distinct subtypes of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies - in short myositis. Recent studies have shed some light on the unique pathogenesis of each entity. Some of the clinical features are distinct, but muscle biopsy is indispensable for making a reliable diagnosis. The use of magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles and detection of myositis-specific autoantibodies have become useful additions to our diagnostic repertoire. Only few controlled trials are available to substantiate current treatment approaches for myositis and hopes are high that novel modalities will become available within the next few years. In this review we provide an up-to-date overview of the pathogenesis and diagnostic approach of myositis. We aim to present a guide towards therapeutic and general management. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  7. Genes, autoimmunity and pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilherme, L; Köhler, K F; Postol, E; Kalil, J

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains incompletely understood. Several genes associated with RHD have been described; most of these are involved with immune responses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in a number of genes affect patients with RHD compared to controls. Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and human proteins, including cardiac myosin epitopes, vimentin and other intracellular proteins is central to the pathogenesis of RHD. Autoreactive T cells migrate from the peripheral blood to the heart and proliferate in the valves in response to stimulation with specific cytokines. The types of cells involved in the inflammation as well as different cytokine profiles in these patients are being investigated. High TNF alpha, interferon gamma, and low IL4 are found in the rheumatic valve suggesting an imbalance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines and probably contributing to the progressive and permanent valve damage. Animal model of ARF in the Lewis rat may further contribute towards understanding the ARF

  8. Influenza A Virus-Host Protein Interactions Control Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Shitao

    2017-08-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV), a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, is a highly transmissible respiratory pathogen and represents a continued threat to global health with considerable economic and social impact. IAV is a zoonotic virus that comprises a plethora of strains with different pathogenic profiles. The different outcomes of viral pathogenesis are dependent on the engagement between the virus and the host cellular protein interaction network. The interactions may facilitate virus hijacking of host molecular machinery to fulfill the viral life cycle or trigger host immune defense to eliminate the virus. In recent years, much effort has been made to discover the virus-host protein interactions and understand the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, we review the recent advances in our understanding of IAV-host interactions and how these interactions contribute to host defense and viral pathogenesis.

  9. Animal Models of Zika Virus Infection, Pathogenesis, and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas E; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that now causes epidemics affecting millions of people on multiple continents. The virus has received global attention because of some of its unusual epidemiological and clinical features, including persistent infection in the male reproductive tract and sexual transmission, an ability to cross the placenta during pregnancy and infect the developing fetus to cause congenital malformations, and its association with Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. This past year has witnessed an intensive effort by the global scientific community to understand the biology of ZIKV and to develop pathogenesis models for the rapid testing of possible countermeasures. Here, we review the recent advances in and utility and limitations of newly developed mouse and nonhuman primate models of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Wang; Chaoshu, Tang; Hongfang, Jin; Junbao, Du

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H 2 S and inflammatory processes. The role of H 2 S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H 2 S in atherosclerosis.

  11. Critical role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinrong; Luo, Shuaihantian; Huang, Yumeng; Lu, Qianjin

    2017-08-01

    Psoriasis is a common cutaneous disease with multifactorial etiology including genetic and non-genetic factors, such as drugs, smoking, drinking, diet, infection and mental stress. Now, the role of the interaction between environmental factors and genetics are considered to be a main factor in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. However, it is a challenge to explore the mechanisms how the environmental factors break the body balance to affect the onset and development of psoriasis. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of psoriasis and summarize numerous clinical data to reveal the association between environmental factors and psoriasis. In addition, we focus on the mechanisms of environmental risk factors impact on psoriasis and provide a series of potential treatments against environmental risk factors. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis Associated with Autoimmune Disease: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK is type of crescent-shaped inflammatory damage that occurs in the limbal region of the cornea. PUK is always combined with an epithelial defect and the destruction of the peripheral corneal stroma. PUK may have a connection to systemic conditions, such as long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Wegener granulomatosis (WG, relapsing polychondritis, classic polyarteritis nodosa and its variants, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. However, the most common connection is with RA, which is also the focus of this review. The pathogenesis of PUK is still unclear. It is thought that circulating immune complexes and cytokines exert an important influence on the progression of this syndrome. Treatment is applied to inhibit certain aspects of PUK pathogenesis.

  13. Persistent perineal sinus. Incidence, pathogenesis, risk factors, and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohsiriwat, V.

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the incidence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and therapeutic options for persistent perineal sinus (PPS), defined as a perineal wound that remains unhealed more than 6 months after surgery. The incidence of PPS after surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ranges from 3% to 70% and after abdominoperineal resection (APR) for Low rectal cancer, it can be up to 30%. These unhealed wounds are frequently related to perioperative pelvic or perineal sepsis. Crohn's disease (CD) and neoadjuvant radiation therapy are also important risk factors. The management of PPS is based on an understanding of pathogenesis and clinical grounds. The advantages and disadvantages of the current therapeutic approaches, including the topical administration of various drugs, vacuum-assisted closure, and perineal reconstruction with a muscle flap or a myocutaneous flap are also discussed. (author)

  14. HIV Infection of Macrophages: Implications for Pathogenesis and Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiera Leigh Clayton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although CD4+ T cells represent the major reservoir of persistent HIV and SIV infection, accumulating evidence suggests that macrophages also contribute. However, investigations of the role of macrophages are often underrepresented at HIV pathogenesis and cure meetings. This was the impetus for a scientific workshop dedicated to this area of study, held in Cambridge, MA in January 2017. The workshop brought together experts in the fields of HIV/SIV immunology/virology, macrophage biology and immunology, and animal models of HIV/SIV infection to facilitate discussions regarding the role of macrophages as a physiologically relevant viral reservoir, and the implications of macrophage infection for HIV pathogenesis and cure strategies. An emerging consensus that infected macrophages likely persist in the setting of combination antiretroviral therapy, driving persistent inflammation and contributing to the viral reservoir, indicate the importance of addressing macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells with future therapeutic strategies.

  15. Invasive mold infections: virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, Giulia; Borghi, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  16. Invasive Mold Infections: Virulence and Pathogenesis of Mucorales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  17. Pathogenesis and immunotherapy in cutaneous psoriasis: what can rheumatologists learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Helen; Nestle, Frank O

    2017-01-01

    This review presents our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis with a particular focus on recent areas of research and emerging concepts. Psoriasis arises in genetically predisposed individuals who have an abnormal innate and adaptive immune response to environmental factors. Recent studies have identified novel genetic, epigenetic and immunological factors that play a role in the disease pathogenesis. There is emerging evidence for the role of the skin microbiome in psoriasis. Studies have shown reduced diversity and altered composition of the skin microbiota in psoriasis. Recent advances in our understanding of the complex immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have led to the identification of crucial cytokines and cell signalling pathways that are targeted by a range of immunotherapies.

  18. Oral submucous fibrosis: An update on current theories of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Hunasgi, Santosh; Merkx, M A W; Gao, Shan; Brennan, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Over the last 40 years, many theories linking oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to various risk factors have been proposed. Spicy, pungent foods and irritants such as supari (areca nut), paan (betel leaves), tobacco (through chewing or smoking)-the common Asian habits of chewing the aforementioned agents-have all been incriminated as causative agents. Systemic factors such as nutritional deficiency, genetic predisposition and autoimmunity have also been proposed in the pathogenesis of OSMF. However, the precise aetiology of OSMF is still unknown, and no conclusive evidence has been found despite many extensive investigations on implicated factors. Most of the ideas proposed have been derived from the existing clinical and epidemiological data. We present a comprehensive review of the various theories regarding the pathogenesis of the condition, but have not concentrated on malignant transformation in this article. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. New discoveries in the pathogenesis and classification of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michelle; Ezzedine, Khaled; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Pandya, Amit G; Harris, John E

    2017-07-01

    Vitiligo is a common autoimmune disease that progressively destroys melanocytes in the skin, resulting in the appearance of patchy depigmentation. This disfiguring condition frequently affects the face and other visible areas of the body, which can be psychologically devastating. The onset of vitiligo often occurs in younger individuals and progresses for life, resulting in a heavy burden of disease and decreased quality of life. Presentation patterns of vitiligo vary, and recognition of these patterns provides both diagnostic and prognostic clues. Recent insights into disease pathogenesis offer a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, its associations, and potential for future treatments. The first article in this continuing medical education series outlines typical and atypical presentations of vitiligo, how they reflect disease activity, prognosis, and response to treatment. Finally, we discuss disease associations, risk factors, and our current understanding of disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema – cellular and molecular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Petta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary emphysema is a chronic obstructive disease, resulting fromimportant alterations in the whole distal structure of terminal bronchioles, either by enlargement of air spaces or by destruction of the alveolar wall, leading to loss of respiratory surface, decreased elastic recoil and lung hyperinflation. For many years, the hypothesis of protease-antiprotease unbalance prevailed as the central theme in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. According to this hypothesis, the release of active proteolytic enzymes, produced mainly by neutrophils and macrophages, degrades the extracellular matrix, affecting the integrity of its components, especially collagen and elastic fibers. However, new concepts involving cellular and molecular events were proposed, including oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, cellular senescence and failed lung tissue repair. The aim of this review paper was to evaluate the cellular and molecular mechanisms seen in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema.

  1. JAK2 V617F, MPL W515L and JAK2 Exon 12 Mutations in Chinese Patients with Primary Myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Lu, Mi-Ze; Jiang, Yuan-Qiang; Yang, Guo-Hua; Zhuang, Yun; Sun, Hong-Li; Shen, Yun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    JAK2 V617F, MPL W515L and JAK2 exon 12 mutations are novel acquired mutations that induce constitutive cytokine-independent activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). The discovery of these mutations provides novel mechanism for activation of signal transduction in hematopoietic malignancies. This research was to investigate their prevalence in Chinese patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). We introduced allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) combined with sequence analysis to simultaneously screen JAK2 V617F, MPL W515L and JAK2 exon 12 mutations in 30 patients with PMF. Fifteen PMF patients (50.0%) carried JAK2 V617F mutation, and only two JAK2 V617F-negative patients (6.7%) harbored MPL W515L mutation. None had JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Furthermore, these three mutations were not detected in 50 healthy controls. MPL W515L and JAK2 V617F mutations existed in PMF patients but JAK2 exon 12 mutations not. JAK2 V617F and MPL W515L and mutations might contribute to the primary molecular pathogenesis in patients with PMF.

  2. Mutations in LRRC50 predispose zebrafish and humans to seminomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander G Basten

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Seminoma is a subclass of human testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT, the most frequently observed cancer in young men with a rising incidence. Here we describe the identification of a novel gene predisposing specifically to seminoma formation in a vertebrate model organism. Zebrafish carrying a heterozygous nonsense mutation in Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing protein 50 (lrrc50 also called dnaaf1, associated previously with ciliary function, are found to be highly susceptible to the formation of seminomas. Genotyping of these zebrafish tumors shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH of the wild-type lrrc50 allele in 44.4% of tumor samples, correlating with tumor progression. In humans we identified heterozygous germline LRRC50 mutations in two different pedigrees with a family history of seminomas, resulting in a nonsense Arg488* change and a missense Thr590Met change, which show reduced expression of the wild-type allele in seminomas. Zebrafish in vivo complementation studies indicate the Thr590Met to be a loss-of-function mutation. Moreover, we show that a pathogenic Gln307Glu change is significantly enriched in individuals with seminoma tumors (13% of our cohort. Together, our study introduces an animal model for seminoma and suggests LRRC50 to be a novel tumor suppressor implicated in human seminoma pathogenesis.

  3. A patient with Werner syndrome and adiponectin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naotake; Hatanaka, Sachiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Kurosawa, Hiroko; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Iwai, Rie; Takahashi, Hidenori; Yoshida, Katsuya; Horie, Atsuya; Sakurai, Kenichi; Yagui, Kazuo; Saito, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shouji

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a premature aging disease characterized by genomic instability and increased cancer risk. Here, we report a 45-year-old diabetic man as the first Werner syndrome patient found to have an adiponectin gene mutation. Showing graying and loss of hair, skin atrophy, and juvenile cataract, he was diagnosed with Werner syndrome type 4 by molecular analysis. His serum adiponectin concentration was low. In the globular domain of the adiponectin gene, I164T in exon 3 was detected. When we examined effects of pioglitazone (15 mg/day) on serum adiponectin multimer and monomer concentrations using selective assays, the patient's relative percentage increased in adiponectin concentration was almost same as that in the 18 diabetic patients without an adiponectin mutation, but the absolute adiponectin concentration was half of those seen in diabetic patients treated with the same pioglitazone dose who had no adiponectin mutation. The response suggested that pioglitazone treatment might help to prevent future Werner syndrome-related acceleration of atherosclerosis. Present and further clinical relevant to atherosclerosis in this patient should be imformative concerning the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis in the presence of hypoadiponectinemia and insulin resistance.

  4. Advances in sarcoma gene mutations and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Seebacher, Nicole A; Hornicek, Francis; Guo, Zheng; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare and complex malignancies that have been associated with a poor prognostic outcome. Over the last few decades, traditional treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy has not significantly improved outcomes for most types of sarcomas. In recent years, there have been significant advances in the understanding of specific gene mutations that are important in driving the pathogenesis and progression of sarcomas. Identification of these new gene mutations, using next-generation sequencing and advanced molecular techniques, has revealed a range of potential therapeutic targets. This, in turn, may lead to the development of novel agents targeted to different sarcoma subtypes. In this review, we highlight the advances made in identifying sarcoma gene mutations, including those of p53, RB, PI3K and IDH genes, as well as novel therapeutic strategies aimed at utilizing these mutant genes. In addition, we discuss a number of preclinical studies and ongoing early clinical trials in sarcoma targeting therapies, as well as gene editing technology, which may provide a better choice for sarcoma patient management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Gökhan; Brown, Karen E; Kayserili, Hülya; Pohl, Esther; Caliebe, Almuth; Zahnleiter, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Bögershausen, Nina; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Altunoglu, Umut; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Rauch, Anita; Li, Yun; Thiel, Christian Thomas; Wollnik, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been shown to be causally involved in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. We establish CDK5RAP2 as a disease-causing gene for Seckel syndrome and show that loss of functional CDK5RAP2 leads to severe defects in mitosis and spindle organization, resulting in cells with abnormal nuclei and centrosomal pattern, which underlines the important role of centrosomal and mitotic proteins in the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, we present an intriguing case of possible digenic inheritance in Seckel syndrome: A severely affected child of nonconsanguineous German parents was found to carry heterozygous mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. This finding points toward a potential additive genetic effect of mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152.

  6. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Gökhan; Brown, Karen E; Kayserili, Hülya; Pohl, Esther; Caliebe, Almuth; Zahnleiter, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Bögershausen, Nina; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Altunoglu, Umut; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Rauch, Anita; Li, Yun; Thiel, Christian Thomas; Wollnik, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been shown to be causally involved in autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. We establish CDK5RAP2 as a disease-causing gene for Seckel syndrome and show that loss of functional CDK5RAP2 leads to severe defects in mitosis and spindle organization, resulting in cells with abnormal nuclei and centrosomal pattern, which underlines the important role of centrosomal and mitotic proteins in the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, we present an intriguing case of possible digenic inheritance in Seckel syndrome: A severely affected child of nonconsanguineous German parents was found to carry heterozygous mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. This finding points toward a potential additive genetic effect of mutations in CDK5RAP2 and CEP152. PMID:26436113

  7. Novel ITGB6 mutation in autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Koruyucu, M; Gencay, K; Bayram, M; Tuna, E B; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary defects in tooth enamel formation, amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), can be non-syndromic or syndromic phenotype. Integrins are signaling proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix communication, and their involvement in tooth development is well known. The purposes of this study were to identify genetic cause of an AI family and molecular pathogenesis underlying defective enamel formation. We recruited a Turkish family with isolated AI and performed mutational analyses to clarify the underlying molecular genetic etiology. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 transversion mutation in exon 4 (c.517G>C, p.Gly173Arg). The glycine at this position in the middle of the βI-domain is conserved among a wide range of vertebrate orthologs and human paralogs. Clinically, the enamel was generally thin and pitted with pigmentation. Thicker enamel was noted at the cervical area of the molars. In this study, we identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 mutation causing isolated AI, and this advances the understanding of normal and pathologic enamel development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Understanding Zika virus pathogenesis: an interview with Catherine Spong

    OpenAIRE

    Spong, Catherine Y.

    2016-01-01

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus has been linked to fetal abnormalities in pregnant women who have been infected. The scientific community is working toward understanding Zika virus pathogenesis to better manage affected women and children. In an interview with Dr. Catherine Spong, we discuss the aims and challenges of a forthcoming longitudinal study of a cohort of pregnant women in areas of current active Zika virus transmission.

  9. [EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER; ETIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, AND CLINICAL SYMPTOMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, K W; Zakharenko, S M; Kovalenko, A N; Semenov, A V; Fusin, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    The data on the prevalence of disease caused by Ebola virus, biological features of its pathogen, character of the epidemiological process, pathogenesis and clinical symptoms are presented. The disease is characterized by suppression of protective immunological mechanisms and systemic inflammatory reaction accounting for the lesions of vascular endothelium, hemostatic and immune systems. It eventually leads to polyorgan insufficiency and severe shock. Lethality amounts to 50%.

  10. UTIs in small animal patients: part 1: etiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Nicole; Loyd, Kimberly; Grauer, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur and how to classify them can help the practitioner to make a plan for treatment. This review summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, and host defense mechanisms associated with bacterial UTIs in dogs and cats. UTIs in Small Animal Patients: Part 2: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Complications will appear in the March/April 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association.

  11. Understanding Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis using ‘Omics’ approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic ePruneau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how Omics approaches improve our understanding of Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis, through a global and integrative strategy to identify genes and proteins involved in biochemical pathways key for pathogen-host-vector interactions.The Anaplasmataceae family comprises obligate intracellular bacteria mainly transmitted by arthropods. These bacteria are responsible for major human and animal endemic and emerging infectious diseases with important economic and public health impacts. In order to improve disease control strategies, it is essential to better understand their pathogenesis. Our work focused on four Anaplasmataceae, which cause important animal, human and zoonotic diseases: Anaplasma marginale, A. phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. ruminantium. Wolbachia spp. an endosymbiont of arthropods was also included in this review as a model of a non-pathogenic Anaplasmataceae.A gap analysis on Omics approaches on Anaplasmataceae was performed, which highlighted a lack of studies on the genes and proteins involved in the infection of hosts and vectors. Furthermore, most of the studies have been done on the pathogen itself, mainly on infectious free-living forms and rarely on intracellular forms. In order to perform a transcriptomic analysis of the intracellular stage of development, researchers developed methods to enrich bacterial transcripts from infected cells. These methods are described in this paper. Bacterial genes encoding outer membrane proteins, post-translational modifications, eukaryotic repeated motif proteins, proteins involved in osmotic and oxidative stress and hypothetical proteins have been identified to play a key role in Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis. Further investigations on the function of these outer membrane proteins and hypothetical proteins will be essential to confirm their role in the pathogenesis. Our work underlines the need for further studies in this domain and on host and vector responses

  12. Invasive mold infections : virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales

    OpenAIRE

    Morace, G.; Borghi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the...

  13. The fundamental role of endothelial cells in hantavirus pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi eHepojoki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae, is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in man, often with severe consequences. Vascular leakage is evident in severe hantavirus infections, and increased permeability contributes to the pathogenesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on hantavirus interactions with endothelial cells, and their effects on the increased vascular permeability.

  14. The fundamental role of endothelial cells in hantavirus pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hepojoki, Jussi; Vaheri, Antti; Strandin, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae, is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in man, often with severe consequences. Vascular leakage is evident in severe hantavirus infections, and increased permeability contributes to the pathogenesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on hantavirus interactions with hematopoietic and endothelial ...

  15. Understanding rare disease pathogenesis: a grand challenge for model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieter, Philip; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-10-01

    In this commentary, Philip Hieter and Kym Boycott discuss the importance of model organisms for understanding pathogenesis of rare human genetic diseases, and highlight the work of Brooks et al., "Dysfunction of 60S ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10) disrupts neurodevelopment and causes X-linked microcephaly in humans," published in this issue of GENETICS. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Macrophage models of Gaucher disease for evaluating disease pathogenesis and candidate drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-06-11

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Modelling Fanconi anemia pathogenesis and therapeutics using integration-free patient-derived iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang-Hui; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Li, Mo; Qu, Jing; Montserrat, Nuria; Tarantino, Carolina; Gu, Ying; Yi, Fei; Xu, Xiuling; Zhang, Weiqi; Ruiz, Sergio; Plongthongkum, Nongluk; Zhang, Kun; Masuda, Shigeo; Nivet, Emmanuel; Tsunekawa, Yuji; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Goebl, April; Aizawa, Emi; Kim, Na Young; Kim, Jessica; Dubova, Ilir; Li, Ying; Ren, Ruotong; Benner, Chris; Del Sol, Antonio; Bueren, Juan; Trujillo, Juan Pablo; Surralles, Jordi; Cappelli, Enrico; Dufour, Carlo; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2014-07-07

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability, congenital abnormalities, cancer predisposition and bone marrow (BM) failure. However, the pathogenesis of FA is not fully understood partly due to the limitations of current disease models. Here, we derive integration free-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an FA patient without genetic complementation and report in situ gene correction in FA-iPSCs as well as the generation of isogenic FANCA-deficient human embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. FA cellular phenotypes are recapitulated in iPSCs/ESCs and their adult stem/progenitor cell derivatives. By using isogenic pathogenic mutation-free controls as well as cellular and genomic tools, our model serves to facilitate the discovery of novel disease features. We validate our model as a drug-screening platform by identifying several compounds that improve hematopoietic differentiation of FA-iPSCs. These compounds are also able to rescue the hematopoietic phenotype of FA patient BM cells.

  18. Glutathionylation of Yersinia pestis LcrV and Its Effects on Plague Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mitchell

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glutathionylation, the formation of reversible mixed disulfides between glutathione and protein cysteine residues, is a posttranslational modification previously observed for intracellular proteins of bacteria. Here we show that Yersinia pestis LcrV, a secreted protein capping the type III secretion machine, is glutathionylated at Cys273 and that this modification promotes association with host ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3, moderates Y. pestis type III effector transport and killing of macrophages, and enhances bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. Secreted LcrV was purified and analyzed by mass spectrometry to reveal glutathionylation, a modification that is abolished by the codon substitution Cys273Ala in lcrV. Moreover, the lcrVC273A mutation enhanced the survival of animals in models of bubonic plague. Investigating the molecular mechanism responsible for these virulence attributes, we identified macrophage RPS3 as a ligand of LcrV, an association that is perturbed by the Cys273Ala substitution. Furthermore, macrophages infected by the lcrVC273A variant displayed accelerated apoptotic death and diminished proinflammatory cytokine release. Deletion of gshB, which encodes glutathione synthetase of Y. pestis, resulted in undetectable levels of intracellular glutathione, and we used a Y. pestis ΔgshB mutant to characterize the biochemical pathway of LcrV glutathionylation, establishing that LcrV is modified after its transport to the type III needle via disulfide bond formation with extracellular oxidized glutathione.

  19. Is Spinal Muscular Atrophy a disease of the motor neurons only: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Chiara; Ramirez, Agnese; Bucchia, Monica; Rinchetti, Paola; Rideout, Hardy; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Re, Diane B.; Corti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neurological disease that causes infant mortality; no effective therapies are currently available. SMA is due to homozygous mutations and/or deletions in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and subsequent reduction of the SMN protein, leading to the death of motor neurons. However, there is increasing evidence that in addition to motor neurons, other cell types are contributing to SMA pathology. In this review, we will discuss the involvement of non-motor neuronal cells, located both inside and outside the central nervous system, in disease onset and progression. These contribution of non-motor neuronal cells to disease pathogenesis has important therapeutic implications: in fact, even if SMN restoration in motor neurons is needed, it has been shown that optimal phenotypic amelioration in animal models of SMA requires a more widespread SMN correction. It will be crucial to take this evidence into account before clinical translation of the novel therapeutic approaches that are currently under development. PMID:26681261

  20. Modeling Fanconi Anemia pathogenesis and therapeutics using integration-free patient-derived iPSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, Nuria; Tarantino, Carolina; Gu, Ying; Yi, Fei; Xu, Xiuling; Zhang, Weiqi; Ruiz, Sergio; Plongthongkum, Nongluk; Zhang, Kun; Masuda, Shigeo; Nivet, Emmanuel; Tsunekawa, Yuji; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Goebl, April; Aizawa, Emi; Kim, Na Young; Kim, Jessica; Dubova, Ilir; Li, Ying; Ren, Ruotong; Benner, Chris; del Sol, Antonio; Bueren, Juan; Trujillo, Juan Pablo; Surralles, Jordi; Cappelli, Enrico; Dufour, Carlo; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability, congenital abnormalities, cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure. However, the pathogenesis of FA is not fully understood partly due to the limitations of current disease models. Here, we derive integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an FA patient without genetic complementation and report in situ gene correction in FA-iPSCs as well as the generation of isogenic FANCA deficient human embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. FA cellular phenotypes are recapitulated in iPSCs/ESCs and their adult stem/progenitor cell derivatives. By using isogenic pathogenic mutation-free controls as well as cellular and genomic tools, our model serves to facilitate the discovery of novel disease features. We validate our model as a drug-screening platform by identifying several compounds that improve hematopoietic differentiation of FA-iPSCs. These compounds are also able to rescue the hematopoietic phenotype of FA-patient bone marrow cells. PMID:24999918

  1. Molecular Pathogenesis of B-Cell Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder: What Do We Know So Far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morscio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a potentially fatal disease that arises in 2%–10% of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplants and is most frequently of B-cell origin. This very heterogeneous disorder ranges from benign lymphoproliferations to malignant lymphomas, and despite the clear association with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection, its etiology is still obscure. Although a number of risk factors have been identified (EBV serostatus, graft type, and immunosuppressive regimen, it is currently not possible to predict which transplant patient will eventually develop PTLD. Genetic studies have linked translocations (involving C-MYC, IGH, BCL-2, various copy number variations, DNA mutations (PIM1, PAX5, C-MYC, RhoH/TTF, and polymorphisms in both the host (IFN-gamma, IL-10, TGF-beta, HLA and the EBV genome to B-cell PTLD development. Furthermore, the tumor microenvironment seems to play an important role in the course of disease representing a local niche that can allow antitumor immune responses even in an immunocompromised host. Taken together, B-cell PTLD pathogenesis is very complex due to the interplay of many different (patient-dependent factors and requires thorough molecular analysis for the development of novel tailored therapies. This review aims at giving a global overview of the currently known parameters that contribute to the development of B-cell PTLD.

  2. Age-related epigenetic drift in the pathogenesis of MDS and AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegawa, Shinji; Gough, Sheryl M; Watanabe-Okochi, Naoko; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Nianxiang; Castoro, Ryan J; Estecio, Marcos R H; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Liang, Shoudan; Kitamura, Toshio; Aplan, Peter D; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2014-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematologic disorder that frequently evolves to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but mutations in epigenetic modifiers are common and the disease often responds to DNA methylation inhibitors. We analyzed DNA methylation in the bone marrow and spleen in two mouse models of MDS/AML, the NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) mouse and the RUNX1 mutant mouse model. Methylation array analysis showed an average of 512/3445 (14.9%) genes hypermethylated in NHD13 MDS, and 331 (9.6%) genes hypermethylated in RUNX1 MDS. Thirty-two percent of genes in common between the two models (2/3 NHD13 mice and 2/3 RUNX1 mice) were also hypermethylated in at least two of 19 human MDS samples. Detailed analysis of 41 genes in mice showed progressive drift in DNA methylation from young to old normal bone marrow and spleen; to MDS, where we detected accelerated age-related methylation; and finally to AML, which markedly extends DNA methylation abnormalities. Most of these genes showed similar patterns in human MDS and AML. Repeat element hypomethylation was rare in MDS but marked the transition to AML in some cases. Our data show consistency in patterns of aberrant DNA methylation in human and mouse MDS and suggest that epigenetically, MDS displays an accelerated aging phenotype.

  3. MO-DE-207B-05: Predicting Gene Mutations in Renal Cell Carcinoma Based On CT Imaging Features: Validation Using TCGA-TCIA Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Zhou, Z; Thomas, K; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to investigate the use of contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) features for the prediction of mutations of BAP1, PBRM1, and VHL genes in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: For this study, we used two patient databases with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The first one consisted of 33 patients from our institution (UT Southwestern Medical Center, UTSW). The second one consisted of 24 patients from the Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), where each patient is connected by a unique identi?er to the tissue samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). From the contrast enhanced CT image of each patient, tumor contour was first delineated by a physician. Geometry, intensity, and texture features were extracted from the delineated tumor. Based on UTSW dataset, we completed feature selection and trained a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to predict mutations of BAP1, PBRM1 and VHL genes. We then used TCIA-TCGA dataset to validate the predictive model build upon UTSW dataset. Results: The prediction accuracy of gene expression of TCIA-TCGA patients was 0.83 (20 of 24), 0.83 (20 of 24), and 0.75 (18 of 24) for BAP1, PBRM1, and VHL respectively. For BAP1 gene, texture feature was the most prominent feature type. For PBRM1 gene, intensity feature was the most prominent. For VHL gene, geometry, intensity, and texture features were all important. Conclusion: Using our feature selection strategy and models, we achieved predictive accuracy over 0.75 for all three genes under the condition of using patient data from one institution for training and data from other institutions for testing. These results suggest that radiogenomics can be used to aid in prognosis and used as convenient surrogates for expensive and time consuming gene assay procedures.

  4. Eosinophils in vasculitis: characteristics and roles in pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Paneez; Grayson, Peter C.; Klion, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granular leukocytes that are implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders, including asthma, helminth infection, and rare hypereosinophilic syndromes. Although peripheral and tissue eosinophilia can be a feature of many types of small-vessel and medium-vessel vasculitis, the role of eosinophils has been best studied in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), where eosinophils are a characteristic finding in all three clinical stages of the disorder. Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated an association between the presence of eosinophils and markers of eosinophil activation in the blood and tissues of patients with EGPA, the precise role of eosinophils in disease pathogenesis has been difficult to ascertain owing to the complexity of the disease process. In this regard, results of clinical trials using novel agents that specifically target eosinophils are providing the first direct evidence of a central role of eosinophils in EGPA. This Review focuses on the aspects of eosinophil biology most relevant to the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provides an update of current knowledge regarding the role of eosinophils in EGPA and other vasculitides. PMID:25003763

  5. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Flatz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV, the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF, is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cytochrome P450 in HIV pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. S. S.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    High prevalence of cigarette smoking in HIV patients is associated with increased HIV pathogenesis and disease progression. While the effect of smoking on the occurrence of lung cancer has been studied extensively, the association between smoking and HIV pathogenesis is poorly studied. We have recently shown the possible role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) in smoking/nicotine-mediated viral replication. In this review, we focus on the potential role of CYP pathway in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), important constituents of cigarette smoke, mediated HIV pathogenesis. More specifically, we will discuss the role of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which are the major PAH-activating CYP enzymes. Our results have shown that treatment with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) increases viral replication in HIV-infected macrophages. CSC contains PAH, which are known to be activated by CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 into procarcinogens/toxic metabolites. The expression of these CYPs is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHR), the cellular target of PAH, and an important player in various diseases including cancer. We propose that PAH/AHR-mediated CYP pathway is a novel target to develop new interventions for HIV positive smokers. PMID:26082767

  7. Host Lipid Mediators in Leprosy: The Hypothesized Contributions to Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of clinical forms observed in leprosy and its pathogenesis are dictated by the host’s immune response against Mycobacterium leprae, the etiological agent of leprosy. Previous results, based on metabolomics studies, demonstrated a strong relationship between clinical manifestations of leprosy and alterations in the metabolism of ω3 and ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, and the diverse set of lipid mediators derived from PUFAs. PUFA-derived lipid mediators provide multiple functions during acute inflammation, and some lipid mediators are able to induce both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses as determined by the cell surface receptors being expressed, as well as the cell type expressing the receptors. However, little is known about how these compounds influence cellular immune activities during chronic granulomatous infectious diseases, such as leprosy. Current evidence suggests that specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs are involved in the down-modulation of the innate and adaptive immune response against M. leprae and that alteration in the homeostasis of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators versus SPMs is associated with dramatic shifts in the pathogenesis of leprosy. In this review, we discuss the possible consequences and present new hypotheses for the involvement of ω3 and ω6 PUFA metabolism in the pathogenesis of leprosy. A specific emphasis is placed on developing models of lipid mediator interactions with the innate and adaptive immune responses and the influence of these interactions on the outcome of leprosy.

  8. Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy: Definition, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ruamviboonsuk, Paisan; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Youxin; Freund, K Bailey; Gomi, Fomi; Koh, Adrian H; Lee, Won-Ki; Wong, Tien Yin

    2018-05-01

    Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) is an age-related macular degeneration (AMD) subtype and is seen particularly in Asians. Previous studies have suggested disparity in response to intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents between PCV and typical AMD, and thus, the preferred treatment for PCV has remained unclear. Recent research has provided novel insights into the pathogenesis of PCV, and imaging studies based on OCT suggest that PCV belongs to a spectrum of conditions characterized by pachychoroid, in which disturbance in the choroidal circulation seems to be central to its pathogenesis. Advances in imaging, including enhanced depth imaging, swept-source OCT, en face OCT, and OCT angiography, have facilitated the diagnosis of PCV. Importantly, 2 large, multicenter randomized clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of anti-VEGF monotherapy and combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT) recently reported initial first-year outcomes, providing level I evidence to guide clinicians in choosing the most appropriate therapy for PCV. In this review, we summarize the latest updates in the epidemiologic features, pathogenesis, and advances in imaging and treatment trials, with a focus on the most recent key clinical trials. Finally, we propose current management guidelines and recommendations to help clinicians manage patients with PCV. Remaining gaps in current understanding of PCV, such as significance of polyp closure, high recurrence rate, and heterogeneity within PCV, are highlighted where further research is needed. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutation breeding in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradjanegara, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In Indonesia, soybean is one of the important crop after rice. It is generally cultivated in the lowlands and rarely in the highlands. Seeds of soybean variety ORBA were treated with various doses of fast neutrons, gamma rays, EMS and NaN 3 with the aims of studying the mutagen effects in M-1 and M-2 generations and also to select mutants adapted to highland conditions. D-50 doses for gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS were around 23 krad, 2,300 rad, 0.3%, respectively. Much higher chlorophyll mutation frequency was observed in EMS treatment of 0.3%. Seven mutants were shorter and four early mutants matured from 4 to 20 days earlier than the control plants. Two early mutants were quite adaptable in both the low and highlands and produced better yields than the parental material. (author)

  10. Founder Mutations in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, Soufir et al. report a founder mutation in the XPC DNA repair gene in 74% of families with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in the Maghreb region (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) of northern Africa. These patients have a high frequency of skin cancer. The presence of this founder mutation provides an opportunity for genetic counseling and early diagnosis of XP. PMID:20463673

  11. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH...

  12. The pathogenesis of Newcastle disease: A comparison of selected Newcastle disease virus wild-type strains and their infectious clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamatsu, Nobuko; King, Daniel J.; Seal, Bruce S.; Samal, Siba K.; Brown, Corrie C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of mutations of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) fusion (F) gene, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene, and phosphoprotein (P) gene and HN chimeras between the virulent Beaudette C and low virulence LaSota strains on pathogenesis and pathogenicity was examined in fully susceptible chickens. A virulent F cleavage site motif within a LaSota backbone increased pathogenicity and severity of clinical disease. A LaSota HN within a Beaudette C backbone decreased pathogenicity indices and disease severity. A Beaudette C HN within a LaSota backbone did not change either pathogenicity indices or severity of disease in chickens. Loss of glycosylation at site 4 of the HN or modified P gene of Beaudette C decreased pathogenicity indices and caused no overt clinicopathologic disease in chickens. Both pathogenicity indices and clinicopathologic examination demonstrated that the F, HN, and P genes of NDV collectively or individually can contribute to viral virulence

  13. Receptor tyrosine kinase mutations in developmental syndromes and cancer: two sides of the same coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonell, Laura M.; Kernohan, Kristin D.; Boycott, Kym M.; Sawyer, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a family of ligand-binding cell surface receptors that regulate a wide range of essential cellular activities, including proliferation, differentiation, cell-cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. As such, these proteins play an important role during development and throughout life; germline mutations in genes encoding RTKs cause several developmental syndromes, while somatic alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of many aggressive cancers. This creates an interesting paradigm in which mutation timing, type and location in a gene leads to different cell signaling and biological responses, and ultimately phenotypic outcomes. In this review, we highlight the roles of RTKs in developmental disorders and cancer. The multifaceted roles of these receptors, their genetic signatures and their signaling during developmental morphogenesis and oncogenesis are discussed. Additionally, we propose that comparative analysis of RTK mutations responsible for developmental syndromes may shed light on those driving tumorigenesis. PMID:26152202

  14. Prevalence of migraine in persons with the 3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, S.; Esserlind, A-L; Andersson, Z

    2016-01-01

    % vs. 6%; P persons with the mDNA 3243A>G mutation was found. This finding suggests a clinical association between a monogenetically inherited disorder......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Over the last three decades mitochondrial dysfunction has been postulated to be a potential mechanism in migraine pathogenesis. The lifetime prevalence of migraine in persons carrying the 3243A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA was investigated. METHODS: In this cross......-sectional study, 57 mDNA 3243A>G mutation carriers between May 2012 and October 2014 were included. As a control group, a population-based cohort from our epidemiological studies on migraine in Danes was used. History of headache and migraine was obtained by telephone interview, based on a validated semi...

  15. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  16. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  17. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  18. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  19. Analysis of Hungarian patients with Rett syndrome phenotype for MECP2, CDKL5 and FOXG1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzsiev, Kinga; Polgar, Noemi; Bene, Judit; Komlosi, Katalin; Karteszi, Judit; Hollody, Katalin; Kosztolanyi, Gyorgy; Renieri, Alessandra; Melegh, Bela

    2011-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is characterized by a relatively specific clinical phenotype. We screened 152 individuals with RTT phenotype. A total of 22 different known MECP2 mutations were identified in 42 subjects (27.6%). Of the 22 mutations, we identified 7 (31.8%) frameshift-causing deletions, 4 (18.2%) nonsense, 10 (45.5%) missense mutations and one insertion (4.5%). The most frequent pathologic changes were: p.Thr158Met (14.2%) and p.Arg133Cys (11.9%) missense, and p.Arg255Stop (9.5%) and p.Arg294Stop (9.5%) nonsense mutations. We also detected the c.925C >T (p.Arg309Trp) mutation in an affected patient, whose role in RTT pathogenesis is still unknown. Patients without detectable MECP2 defects were screened for mutations of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene, responsible for the early-onset variant of RTT. We discovered two novel mutations: c.607G >T resulting in a termination codon at aa203, disrupting the catalytic domain, and c.1708G >T leading to a stop at aa570 of the C terminus. Both patients with CDKL5 mutation presented therapy-resistant epilepsy and a phenotype fitting with the diagnosis of early-onset variant of RTT. No FOXG1 mutation was detected in any of the remaining patients. A total of 110 (72.5%) patients remained without molecular genetic diagnosis that necessitates further search for novel gene mutations in this phenotype. Our results also suggest the need of screening for CDKL5 mutations in patients with Rett phenotype tested negative for MECP2 mutations.

  20. Isolated growth hormone deficiency in two siblings because of paternal mosaicism for a mutation in the GH1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubahara, Mayuko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Niijima, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Michiyo; Kamijo, Takashi; Murata, Yoshiharu; Haruna, Hidenori; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in the GH1 gene have been identified in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD). Mutations causing aberrant splicing of exon 3 of GH1 that have been identified in IGHD are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, whereas other mutations in GH1 that have been identified in IGHD are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.   Two siblings born from nonconsanguineous healthy parents exhibited IGHD. To elucidate the cause, GH1 in all family members was analysed.   Two novel mutations in GH1, a point mutation in intron 3 and a 16-bp deletion in exon 3, were identified by sequence analyses. The intronic mutation was present in both siblings and was predicted to cause aberrant splicing. The deletion was present in one of the siblings as well as the mother with normal stature and was predicted to cause rapid degradation of mRNA through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The point mutation was not identified in the parents' peripheral blood DNA; however, it was detected in the DNA extracted from the father's sperms. As a trace of the mutant allele was detected in the peripheral blood of the father using PCR-RFLP, the mutation is likely to have occurred de novo at an early developmental stage before differentiation of somatic cells and germline cells.   This is the first report of mosaicism for a mutation in GH1 in a family with IGHD. It is clear that the intronic mutation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of IGHD in this family, as one of the siblings who had only the point mutation was affected. On the other hand, the other sibling was a compound heterozygote for the point mutation and the 16-bp deletion and it may be arguable whether IGHD in this patient should be regarded as autosomal dominant or recessive. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. The pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eStenfeldt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated-natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in

  2. Effect of the Streptococcus agalactiae Virulence Regulator CovR on the Pathogenesis of Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Matthew J; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ipe, Deepak S; Carey, Alison J; Smith, Joshua P; Voller, Nathan; Cripps, Allan W; Ulett, Glen C

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI). The role of the S. agalactiae global virulence regulator, CovR, in UTI pathogenesis is unknown. We used murine and human bladder uroepithelial cell models of UTI and S. agalactiae mutants in covR and related factors, including β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-h/c), surface-anchored adhesin HvgA, and capsule to study the role of CovR in UTI. We found that covR-deficient serotype III S. agalactiae 874391 was significantly attenuated for colonization in mice and adhesion to uroepithelial cells. Mice infected with covR-deficient S. agalactiae produced less proinflammatory cytokines than those infected with wild-type 874391. Acute cytotoxicity in uroepithelial cells triggered by covR-deficient but not wild-type 874391 was associated with significant caspase 3 activation. Mechanistically, covR mutation significantly altered the expression of several genes in S. agalactiae 874391 that encode key virulence factors, including β-h/c and HvgA, but not capsule. Subsequent mutational analyses revealed that HvgA and capsule, but not the β-h/c, exerted significant effects on colonization of the murine urinary tract in vivo. S. agalactiae CovR promotes bladder infection and inflammation, as well as adhesion to and viability of uroepithelial cells. The pathogenesis of S. agalactiae UTI is complex, multifactorial, and influenced by virulence effects of CovR, HvgA, and capsule. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Mutations of NPM1 gene in de novo acute myeloid leukaemia: determination of incidence, distribution pattern and identification of two novel mutations in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Firoz; Mandava, Swarna; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2009-06-01

    Mutations in the nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene have been recently described to occur in about one-third of acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs) and represent the most frequent genetic alteration currently known in this subset, specially in those with normal karyotype. This study explored the prevalence and clinical profile of NPM1 mutations in a cohort of 200 Indian adult and children with AML. NPM1 mutations were observed in 19.5% of all population and 34.2% of those with normal karyotype. Adults had a significantly higher incidence of NPM1 mutations than children [38 of 161 (23.6%) vs. 1 of 39 (2.5%), p = 0.002]. NPM1 mutations were significantly associated with normal karyotype (p = 0.001), high WBC count (p = 0.034), AML-M4 subtype (p = 0.039) and a gradient increase of mutation rate with the increase in age groups. Sequence analysis of 39 mutated cases revealed typical mutations (types A, B, D, Nm and H*) as well as two novel variations (types F1 and F2). Majority of the patients had mutation type A (69.2%), followed by B (5.1%), D (15.3%), H* (2.5%) and Nm (2.5%) all involving COOH terminal of the NPM1 protein. In conclusion, this study represents the first report of NPM1 mutation from Indian population and confirms that the incidence of NPM1 mutations varies considerably globally, with slightly lower incidence in Indian population compared to western countries. The current study also served to identify two novel NPM1 mutants that add new insights into the heterogeneity of genomic insertions at exon 12. More ongoing larger studies are warranted to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of AML that arises in this part of the world. Furthermore, we believe that in light of its high prevalence worldwide, inclusion of NPM1 mutation detection assay in diagnostic evaluations of AML may improve the efficacy of routine genetic characterization and allow assignment of patients to better-defined risk categories.

  4. Impact of mutations in Toll-like receptor pathway genes on esophageal carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daffolyn Rachael Fels Elliott

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC develops in an inflammatory microenvironment with reduced microbial diversity, but mechanisms for these influences remain poorly characterized. We hypothesized that mutations targeting the Toll-like receptor (TLR pathway could disrupt innate immune signaling and promote a microenvironment that favors tumorigenesis. Through interrogating whole genome sequencing data from 171 EAC patients, we showed that non-synonymous mutations collectively affect the TLR pathway in 25/171 (14.6%, PathScan p = 8.7x10-5 tumors. TLR mutant cases were associated with more proximal tumors and metastatic disease, indicating possible clinical significance of these mutations. Only rare mutations were identified in adjacent Barrett's esophagus samples. We validated our findings in an external EAC dataset with non-synonymous TLR pathway mutations in 33/149 (22.1%, PathScan p = 0.05 tumors, and in other solid tumor types exposed to microbiomes in the COSMIC database (10,318 samples, including uterine endometrioid carcinoma (188/320, 58.8%, cutaneous melanoma (377/988, 38.2%, colorectal adenocarcinoma (402/1519, 26.5%, and stomach adenocarcinoma (151/579, 26.1%. TLR4 was the most frequently mutated gene with eleven mutations in 10/171 (5.8% of EAC tumors. The TLR4 mutants E439G, S570I, F703C and R787H were confirmed to have impaired reactivity to bacterial lipopolysaccharide with marked reductions in signaling by luciferase reporter assays. Overall, our findings show that TLR pathway genes are recurrently mutated in EAC, and TLR4 mutations have decreased responsiveness to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and may play a role in disease pathogenesis in a subset of patients.

  5. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  6. DMPD: Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086373 Role of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Weighardt H,... of Toll-like receptor responses for sepsis pathogenesis. PubmedID 18086373 Title Role of Toll-like receptor... responses for sepsis pathogenesis. Authors Weighardt H, Holzmann B. Publication

  7. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) and infantile autism: Absence of previously reported point mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fon, E.A.; Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Autism is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric syndrome of unknown etiology. There is evidence that a deficiency in the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), essential for de novo purine biosynthesis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of certain cases. A point mutation in the ADSL gene, resulting in a predicted serine-to-proline substitution and conferring structural instability to the mutant enzyme, has been reported previously in 3 affected siblings. In order to determine the prevalence of the mutation, we PCR-amplified the exon spanning the site of this mutation from the genomic DNA of patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for autistic disorder. None of the 119 patients tested were found to have this mutation. Furthermore, on preliminary screening using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), no novel mutations were detected in the coding sequence of four ADSL exons, spanning approximately 50% of the cDNA. In light of these findings, it appears that mutations in the ADSL gene represent a distinctly uncommon cause of autism. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Col4a1 mutations cause progressive retinal neovascular defects and retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Marcel V; Mao, Mao; Pawlikowski, Bradley T; Kvezereli, Manana; Duncan, Jacque L; Libby, Richard T; John, Simon W M; Gould, Douglas B

    2016-01-27

    Mutations in collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1), a major component of basement membranes, cause multisystem disorders in humans and mice. In the eye, these include anterior segment dysgenesis, optic nerve hypoplasia and retinal vascular tortuosity. Here we investigate the retinal pathology in mice carrying dominant-negative Col4a1 mutations. To this end, we examined retinas longitudinally in vivo using fluorescein angiography, funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. We assessed retinal function by electroretinography and studied the retinal ultrastructural pathology. Retinal examinations revealed serous chorioretinopathy, retinal hemorrhages, fibrosis or signs of pathogenic angiogenesis with chorioretinal anastomosis in up to approximately 90% of Col4a1 mutant eyes depending on age and the specific mutation. To identify the cell-type responsible for pathogenesis we generated a conditional Col4a1 mutation and determined that primary vascular defects underlie Col4a1-associated retinopathy. We also found focal activation of Müller cells and increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors in retinas from Col4a1(+/Δex41)mice. Together, our findings suggest that patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations may be at elevated risk of retinal hemorrhages and that retinal examinations may be useful for identifying patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations who are also at elevated risk of hemorrhagic strokes.

  9. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic NOTCH2 mutations in splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Mark J; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Betz, Bryan L; Zhao, Lili; Weigelin, Helmut G; Chiang, Mark Y; Huebner-Chan, David R; Bailey, Nathanael G; Yang, David T; Bhagat, Govind; Miranda, Roberto N; Bahler, David W; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J

    2012-08-27

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), the most common primary lymphoma of spleen, is poorly understood at the genetic level. In this study, using whole-genome DNA sequencing (WGS) and confirmation by Sanger sequencing, we observed mutations identified in several genes not previously known to be recurrently altered in SMZL. In particular, we identified recurrent somatic gain-of-function mutations in NOTCH2, a gene encoding a protein required for marginal zone B cell development, in 25 of 99 (∼25%) cases of SMZL and in 1 of 19 (∼5%) cases of nonsplenic MZLs. These mutations clustered near the C-terminal proline/glutamate/serine/threonine (PEST)-rich domain, resulting in protein truncation or, rarely, were nonsynonymous substitutions affecting the extracellular heterodimerization domain (HD). NOTCH2 mutations were not present in other B cell lymphomas and leukemias, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; n = 15), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL; n = 15), low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 44), hairy cell leukemia (HCL; n = 15), and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 14). NOTCH2 mutations were associated with adverse clinical outcomes (relapse, histological transformation, and/or death) among SMZL patients (P = 0.002). These results suggest that NOTCH2 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of SMZL and are associated with a poor prognosis.

  10. Activating thyrotropin receptor mutations are present in nonadenomatous hyperfunctioning nodules of toxic or autonomous multinodular goiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonacchera, M; Agretti, P; Chiovato, L; Rosellini, V; Ceccarini, G; Perri, A; Viacava, P; Naccarato, A G; Miccoli, P; Pinchera, A; Vitti, P

    2000-06-01

    Toxic multinodular goiter, a heterogeneous disease producing hyperthyroidism, is frequently found in iodine-deficient areas. The pathogenesis of this common clinical entity is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to search for activating TSH receptor (TSHr) or Gs alpha mutations in areas of toxic or functionally autonomous multinodular goiters that appeared hyperfunctioning at thyroid scintiscan but did not clearly correspond to definite nodules at physical or ultrasonographic examination. Surgical tissue specimens from nine patients were carefully dissected, matching thyroid scintiscan and thyroid ultrasonography, to isolate hyperfunctioning and nonfunctioning areas even if they did not correspond to well-defined nodules. TSHr and Gs alpha mutations were searched for by direct sequencing after PCR amplification of genomic DNA. Only 2 adenomas were identified at microscopic examination, whereas the remaining 18 hyperfunctioning areas corresponded to hyperplastic nodules containing multiple aggregates of micromacrofollicules not surrounded by a capsule. Activating TSHr mutations were detected in 14 of these 20 hyperfunctioning areas, whereas no mutation was identified in nonfunctioning nodules or areas contained in the same gland. No Gs alpha mutation was found. In conclusion, activating TSHr mutations are present in the majority of nonadenomatous hyperfunctioning nodules scattered throughout the gland in patients with toxic or functionally autonomous multinodular goiter.

  11. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND1 T3394C mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Min; Guan, Minqiang; Zhao, Fuxing; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Tong, Yi; Yang, Li; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia

    2009-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of four Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T3394C (Y30H) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved tyrosine at position 30 of ND1, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups D4b and M9a. The occurrence of T3394C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in these four Chinese pedigrees carrying the T3394C mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T3394C mutation.

  12. Inverted formin 2 mutations with variable expression in patients with sporadic and hereditary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gbadegesin, Rasheed A

    2012-01-01

    Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a major cause of end-stage kidney disease. Recent advances in molecular genetics show that defects in the podocyte play a major role in its pathogenesis and mutations in inverted formin 2 (INF2) cause autosomal dominant FSGS. In order to delineate the role of INF2 mutations in familial and sporadic FSGS, we sought to identify variants in a large cohort of patients with FSGS. A secondary objective was to define an approach for genetic screening in families with autosomal dominant disease. A total of 248 individuals were identified with FSGS, of whom 31 had idiopathic disease. The remaining patients clustered into 64 families encompassing 15 from autosomal recessive and 49 from autosomal dominant kindreds. There were missense mutations in 8 of the 49 families with autosomal dominant disease. Three of the detected variants were novel and all mutations were confined to exon 4 of INF2, a regulatory region responsible for 90% of all changes reported in FSGS due to INF2 mutations. Thus, in our series, INF2 mutations were responsible for 16% of all cases of autosomal dominant FSGS, with these mutations clustered in exon 4. Hence, screening for these mutations may represent a rapid, non-invasive and cost-effective method for the diagnosis of autosomal dominant FSGS.

  13. Germ-line PHD1 and PHD2 mutations detected in patients with pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma-polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping; Fliedner, Stephanie M J; Shankavaram, Uma; Sun, Michael G; Bullova, Petra; Zhu, Roland; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Kourlas, Peter J; Merino, Maria; Kebebew, Electron; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated genetic/pathogenetic factors associated with a new clinical entity in patients presenting with pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PHEO/PGL) and polycythemia. Two patients without hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2A) mutations, who presented with similar clinical manifestations, were analyzed for other gene mutations, including prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) mutations. We have found for the first time a germ-line mutation in PHD1 in one patient and a novel germ-line PHD2 mutation in a second patient. Both mutants exhibited reduced protein stability with substantial quantitative protein loss and thus compromised catalytic activities. Due to the unique association of patients' polycythemia with borderline or mildly elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, we also performed an in vitro sensitivity assay of erythroid progenitors to EPO and for EPO receptor (EPOR) expression. The results show inappropriate hypersensitivity of erythroid progenitors to EPO in these patients, indicating increased EPOR expression/activity. In addition, the present study indicates that HIF dysregulation due to PHD mutations plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these tumors and associated polycythemia. The PHD1 mutation appears to be a new member contributing to the genetic landscape of this novel clinical entity. Our results support the existence of a specific PHD1- and PHD2-associated PHEO/PGL-polycythemia disorder. • A novel germ-l i n e PHD1 mutation causing heochromocytoma/paraganglioma and polycythemia. • Increased EPOR activity and inappropriate hypersensitivity of erythroid progenitors to EPO.

  14. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiangtian; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia; Guan Minxin

    2006-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA Cys , showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees

  15. [Heredity in renal and prostatic neoplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayer Galetti, T; D'Arrigo, L; De Zorzi, L; Patarnello, T

    1997-09-01

    There is an ever growing report of data supporting the evidence that accumulated genetic changes underlie the development of neoplasia. The paradigma of this multistep process is colon cancer were cancer onset is associated, over decades, with at least seven genetic events. The number of genetic alterations increases moving from adenomatous lesions to colon cancer and, although the genetic alterations occur according to a preferred sequence, the total accumulation of changes rather than their sequential order is responsible of tumor biological behavior. It is noteworthy that, at least for this neoplasia, carcinogenesis appears to arise as a result of the mutational activation of oncogenes coupled with the mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In some cases mutant suppressor genes appear to exert a phenotypic effect even when present in the heterozygous state thus been non "recessive" at the cellular level. The general features of this model may apply also to renal cell cancer (RCC) and prostate cancer (CaP). Extensive literature exists on the cytogenetic and molecular findings in RCC. Only 2% of RCC are familiar, but molecular genetic studies of these cancers have provided important informations on RCC pathogenesis. As with other cancers, familiar RCC is characterized by an early age of onset and frequent multicentricity. A pathological classification useful in studying these patients subdivide renal cancers in papillary (pRCC) and non papillary (RCC) neoplasms. The most common cause of inherited RCC is the Von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by retinal and cerebellar hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic cysts and RCC. Over 70% of these patients will develop an RCC by their sixth decade. In 1993 the isolation of the tumor suppressor gene in VHL disease at the level of chromosome 3p25-p26 have lead to a better understanding of RCC. Most missense mutations are associated with high risk of

  16. Amino-terminal residues of ΔNp63, mutated in ectodermal dysplasia, are required for its transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lena, Anna Maria; Duca, Sara; Novelli, Flavia; Melino, Sonia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Melino, Gerry; Candi, Eleonora

    2015-11-13

    p63, a member of the p53 family, is a crucial transcription factor for epithelial development and skin homeostasis. Heterozygous mutations in TP63 gene have been associated with human ectodermal dysplasia disorders. Most of these TP63 mutations are missense mutations causing amino acidic substitutions at p63 DNA binding or SAM domains that reduce or abolish the transcriptional activity of mutants p63. A significant number of mutants, however, resides in part of the p63 protein that apparently do not affect DNA binding and/or transcriptional activity, such as the N-terminal domain. Here, we characterize five p63 mutations at the 5' end of TP63 gene aiming to understand the pathogenesis of the diseases and to uncover the role of ΔNp63α N-terminus residues in determining its transactivation potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of a Novel Androgen Receptor Mutation in a Family With Multiple Components Compatible With the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Grete; Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E.

    2013-01-01

    showed features consistent with insufficient testis development and TDS.Conclusion: The presence of all hallmarks of TDS, including germ cell cancer, in a family with a novel AR mutation causing a partial decrease in AR function is in line with the concept that reduced androgen signaling may contribute......, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and testicular cancer, caused by a novel AR mutation.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the phenotype of the affected males, characterize functionally the novel AR mutation, and discuss the significance of partial androgen insufficiency in the pathogenesis of TDS...... analysis of the mutation in a gene-reporter assay showed a 50% reduction in AR-induced transcriptional activity. The affected males had elevated LH and T in accordance with decreased AR signaling. The histology and immunohistochemical profile of the testis tissue from the 2 patients with testicular cancer...

  18. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  19. Mutation breeding in malting barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Makoto; Sanada, Matsuyoshi

    1984-03-01

    The released varieties of malting barley through mutation breeding is more than ten in number, including foreign varieties. In Japan four varieties has been released so far. We started mutation breeding in 1956 together with cross breeding that we employed before. Until now, Gamma 4, Amagi Nijo 1 and Fuji Nijo 2 have been produced from the direct use of induced mutations and Nirasaki Nijo 8 from the indirect use of them. Mutation breeding has been used mainly in the partial improvement of agronomic characteristics since the selection for malting quality was very complicated. As the variety bred by induced mutation is usually equivalent to the original variety in malting quality, both this new variety and the original one could be cultivated in the same area without any problem on later malt production. Particularly when one farmer cultivates barley in an extensive acreage, he can harvest at the best time according to the different maturing time of each variety. From these points of view, mutation breeding is an efficient tool in malting barley breeding. Mutagens we have used so far are X-rays, ..gamma..-rays, neutron and chemicals such as dES. From our experience in selection, the low dose of radiation and chemical mutagens are more effective in selection of point mutation than the high dose of radiation which tends to produce many abnormal but few practical mutants. (author).

  20. Mutations in the VLGR1 gene implicate G-protein signaling in the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weston, M.D.; Luijendijk, M.W.J.; Humphrey, K.D.; Moller, C.G.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C