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Sample records for rcc cells vhl

  1. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL inactivation in sporadic clear cell renal cancer: associations with germline VHL polymorphisms and etiologic risk factors.

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    Lee E Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal tumor heterogeneity studies have utilized the von Hippel-Lindau VHL gene to classify disease into molecularly defined subtypes to examine associations with etiologic risk factors and prognosis. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of VHL inactivation in clear cell renal tumors (ccRCC and to evaluate relationships between VHL inactivation subgroups with renal cancer risk factors and VHL germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. VHL genetic and epigenetic inactivation was examined among 507 sporadic RCC/470 ccRCC cases using endonuclease scanning and using bisulfite treatment and Sanger sequencing across 11 CpG sites within the VHL promoter. Case-only multivariate analyses were conducted to identify associations between alteration subtypes and risk factors. VHL inactivation, either through sequence alterations or promoter methylation in tumor DNA, was observed among 86.6% of ccRCC cases. Germline VHL SNPs and a haplotype were associated with promoter hypermethylation in tumor tissue (OR = 6.10; 95% CI: 2.28-16.35, p = 3.76E-4, p-global = 8E-5. Risk of having genetic VHL inactivation was inversely associated with smoking due to a higher proportion of wild-type ccRCC tumors [former: OR = 0.70 (0.20-1.31 and current: OR = 0.56 (0.32-0.99; P-trend = 0.04]. Alteration prevalence did not differ by histopathologic characteristics or occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. ccRCC cases with particular VHL germline polymorphisms were more likely to have VHL inactivation through promoter hypermethylation than through sequence alterations in tumor DNA, suggesting that the presence of these SNPs may represent an example of facilitated epigenetic variation (an inherited propensity towards epigenetic variation in renal tissue. A proportion of tumors from current smokers lacked VHL alterations and may represent a biologically distinct clinical entity from inactivated cases.

  2. Trichloroethylene exposure and somatic mutations of the VHL gene in patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Fevotte Joelle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the association between exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE and mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene and the subsequent risk for renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Methods Cases were recruited from a case-control study previously carried out in France that suggested an association between exposures to high levels of TCE and increased risk of RCC. From 87 cases of RCC recruited for the epidemiological study, 69 were included in the present study. All samples were evaluated by a pathologist in order to identify the histological subtype and then be able to focus on clear cell RCC. The majority of the tumour samples were fixed either in formalin or Bouin's solutions. The majority of the tumours were of the clear cell RCC subtype (48 including 2 cystic RCC. Mutation screening of the 3 VHL coding exons was carried out. A descriptive analysis was performed to compare exposed and non exposed cases of clear cell RCC in terms of prevalence of mutations in both groups. Results In the 48 cases of RCC, four VHL mutations were detected: within exon 1 (c.332G>A, p.Ser111Asn, at the exon 2 splice site (c.463+1G>C and c.463+2T>C and within exon 3 (c.506T>C, p.Leu169Pro. No difference was observed regarding the frequency of mutations in exposed versus unexposed groups: among the clear cell RCC, 25 had been exposed to TCE and 23 had no history of occupational exposure to TCE. Two patients with a mutation were identified in each group. Conclusion This study does not confirm the association between the number and type of VHL gene mutations and exposure to TCE previously described.

  3. pVHL co-ordinately regulates CXCR4/CXCL12 and MMP2/MMP9 expression in human clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struckmann, K; Mertz, Kd; Steu, S

    2008-01-01

    Loss of pVHL function, characteristic for clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), causes increased expression of CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which triggers expression of metastasis-associated MMP2/MMP9 in different human cancers. The impact of pVHL on MMP2/MMP9 expression and their relationship to...

  4. Cyr61/CCN1 and CTGF/CCN2 mediate the proangiogenic activity of VHL-mutant renal carcinoma cells.

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    Chintalapudi, Mastan R; Markiewicz, Margaret; Kose, Nurgun; Dammai, Vincent; Champion, Kristen J; Hoda, Rana S; Trojanowska, Maria; Hsu, Tien

    2008-04-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein serves as a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-alpha subunits. Since HIF regulates critical angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and lesions in VHL gene are present in a majority of the highly vascularized renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is believed that deregulation of the VHL-HIF pathway is crucial for the proangiogenic activity of RCC. Although VEGF has been confirmed as a critical angiogenic factor upregulated in VHL-mutant cells, the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy specifically targeting VEGF signaling remains modest. In this study, we developed a three-dimensional in vitro assay to evaluate the ability of RCC cells to promote cord formation by the primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs). Compared with VHL wild-type cells, VHL-mutant RCC cells demonstrated a significantly increased proangiogenic activity, which correlated with increased secretion of cysteine-rich 61 (Cyr61)/cysteine-rich 61-connective tissue growth factor-nephroblastoma overexpressed (CCN) 1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2 and VEGF in conditioned culture medium. Both CCN proteins are required for HDMEC cord formation as shown by RNA interference knockdown experiments. Importantly, the proangiogenic activities conferred by the CCN proteins and VEGF are additive, suggesting non-overlapping functions. Expression of the CCN proteins is at least partly dependent on the HIF-2alpha function, the dominant HIF-alpha isoform expressed in RCC. Finally, immunohistochemical staining of Cyr61/CCN1 and CTGF/CCN2 in RCC tissue samples showed that increased expression of these proteins correlates with the loss of VHL protein expression. These findings strengthened the notion that the hypervascularized phenotype of RCC is afforded by multiple proangiogenic factors that function in parallel pathways.

  5. Prognostic and predictive value of VHL gene alteration in renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis and review.

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    Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Zang, Dae Young

    2017-02-21

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is often inactivated in sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) by mutation or promoter hypermethylation. The prognostic or predictive value of VHL gene alteration is not well established. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between the VHL alteration and clinical outcomes in patients with RCC. We searched PUBMED, MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles including following terms in their titles, abstracts, or keywords: 'kidney or renal', 'carcinoma or cancer or neoplasm or malignancy', 'von Hippel-Lindau or VHL', 'alteration or mutation or methylation', and 'prognostic or predictive'. There were six studies fulfilling inclusion criteria and a total of 633 patients with clear cell RCC were included in the study: 244 patients who received anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy in the predictive value analysis and 419 in the prognostic value analysis. Out of 663 patients, 410 (61.8%) had VHL alteration. The meta-analysis showed no association between the VHL gene alteration and overall response rate (relative risk = 1.47 [95% CI, 0.81-2.67], P = 0.20) or progression free survival (hazard ratio = 1.02 [95% CI, 0.72-1.44], P = 0.91) in patients with RCC who received VEGF-targeted therapy. There was also no correlation between the VHL alteration and overall survival (HR = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.56-1.14], P = 0.21). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that VHL gene alteration has no prognostic or predictive value in patients with clear cell RCC.

  6. The contribution of VHL substrate binding and HIF1-alpha to the phenotype of VHL loss in renal cell carcinoma.

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    Maranchie, Jodi K; Vasselli, James R; Riss, Joseph; Bonifacino, Juan S; Linehan, W Marston; Klausner, Richard D

    2002-04-01

    Clear-cell renal carcinoma is associated with inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. VHL is the substrate recognition subunit of an E3 ligase, known to target the alpha subunits of the HIF heterodimeric transcription factor for ubiquitin-mediated degradation under normoxic conditions. We demonstrate that competitive inhibition of the VHL substrate recognition site with a peptide derived from the oxygen degradation domain of HIF1alpha recapitulates the tumorigenic phenotype of VHL-deficient tumor cells. These studies prove that VHL substrate recognition is essential to the tumor suppressor function of VHL. We further demonstrate that normoxic stabilization of HIF1alpha alone, while capable of mimicking some aspects of VHL loss, is not sufficient to reproduce tumorigenesis, indicating that it is not the critical oncogenic substrate of VHL.

  7. Cyr61/CCN1 and CTGF/CCN2 mediate the pro-angiogenic activity of VHL mutant renal carcinoma cells

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    Chintalapudi, Mastan R.; Markiewicz, Margaret; Kose, Nurgun; Dammai, Vincent; Champion, Kristen J.; Hoda, Rana S.; Trojanowska, Maria; Hsu, Tien

    2008-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein serves as a negative regulator of hypoxia inducible factor-alpha subunit (HIF-α). Since HIF regulates critical angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and lesions in VHL gene are present in a majority of the highly vascularized renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is believed that deregulation of the VHL-HIF pathway is crucial for the pro-angiogenic activity of RCC. Although VEGF has been confirmed as a critical angiogenic factor up-regulated in VHL mutant cells, the efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapy specifically targeting VEGF signaling remains modest. In this study we developed a three-dimensional in vitro assay to evaluate the ability of RCC cells to promote cord formation by the primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs). Compared to VHL wild-type cells, VHL mutant RCC cells demonstrated a significantly increased pro-angiogenic activity, which correlated with increased secretion of Cyr61/CCN1, CTGF/CCN2 and VEGF in conditioned culture medium. Both CCN proteins are required for HDMEC cord formation as shown by RNAi knock-down experiments. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic activities conferred by the CCN proteins and VEGF are additive, suggesting non-overlapping functions. Expression of the CCN proteins is at least partly dependent on the HIF-2α function, the dominant HIF-α isoform expressed in RCC. Finally, immunohistochemical staining of Cyr61/CCN1 and CTGF/CCN2 in renal cell carcinoma tissue samples showed that increased expression of these proteins correlates with loss of VHL protein expression. These findings strengthened the notion that the hypervascularized phenotype of RCC is afforded by multiple pro-angiogenic factors that function in parallel pathways. PMID:18212329

  8. VHL-mediated hypoxia regulation of cyclin D1 in renal carcinoma cells.

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    Bindra, Ranjit S; Vasselli, James R; Stearman, Robert; Linehan, W Marston; Klausner, Richard D

    2002-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is associated with mutation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Cell lines derived from these tumors cannot exit the cell cycle when deprived of growth factors, and the ability to exit the cell cycle can be restored by the reintroduction of wild-type protein VHL (pVHL). Here, we report that cyclin D1 is overexpressed and remains inappropriately high in during contact inhibition in pVHL-deficient cell lines. In addition, hypoxia increased the expression of cyclin D1 specifically in pVHL-negative cell lines into which pVHL expression was restored. Hypoxic-induction of cyclin D1 was not observed in other pVHL-positive cell lines. This suggests a model whereby in some kidney cell types, pVHL may regulate a proliferative response to hypoxia, whereas the loss of pVHL leads to constitutively elevated cyclin D1 and abnormal proliferation under normal growth conditions.

  9. Familial Non-VHL Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    ... from the mother and 1 inherited from the father. Although a specific gene has not been discovered, familial non-VHL CCRCC appears to follow an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, in which a mutation happens in ...

  10. Bap1 and Pbrm1: Determinants of Tumor Grade and mTOR Activation in VHL-Deficient Mouse Models of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

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    Leung, Janet Y; Kim, William Y

    2017-08-01

    Large genome sequencing efforts have identified frequent mutations in the histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling genes BAP1 and PBRM1 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this issue of Cancer Discovery , Gu and colleagues model these genetic events in mice and report that dual inactivation of Vhl with either Bap1 or Pbrm1 results in faithful genetically engineered murine models of ccRCC. Moreover, their work establishes that Bap1 and Pbrm1 are determinants of tumor grade and mTORC1 activation and provocatively suggests that the cell of origin of ccRCC may lie in PAX8-expressing Bowman capsule cells. Cancer Discov; 7(8); 802-4. ©2017 AACR See related article by Gu et al., p. 900 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. VHL-dependent regulation of a β-dystroglycan glycoform and glycogene expression in renal cancer.

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    Aggelis, Vassilis; Craven, Rachel A; Peng, Jianhe; Harnden, Patricia; Schaffer, Lana; Hernandez, Gilberto E; Head, Steven R; Maher, Eamonn R; Tonge, Robert; Selby, Peter J; Banks, Rosamonde E

    2013-11-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers and targets in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a priority and one cellular compartment that is a rich potential source of such molecules is the plasma membrane. A shotgun proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins enriched by cell surface biotinylation and avidin affinity chromatography was explored using the UMRC2- renal cancer cell line, which lacks von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene function, to determine whether proteins of interest could be detected. Of the 814 proteins identified ~22% were plasma membrane or membrane-associated, including several with known associations with cancer. This included β-dystroglycan, the transmembrane subunit of the DAG1 gene product. VHL-dependent changes in the form of β-dystroglycan were detected in UMRC2-/+VHL transfectants. Deglycosylation experiments showed that this was due to differential sialylation. Analysis of normal kidney cortex and conventional RCC tissues showed that a similar change also occurred in vivo. Investigation of the expression of genes involved in glycosylation in UMRC2-/+VHL cells using a focussed microarray highlighted a number of enzymes involved in sialylation; upregulation of bifunctional UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) was validated in UMRC2- cells compared with their +VHL counterparts and also found in conventional RCC tissue. These results implicate VHL in the regulation of glycosylation and raise interesting questions regarding the extent and importance of such changes in RCC.

  12. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma versus Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in von Hippel-Lindau Disease: Treatment with Interleukin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Williams

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating between clear cell neuroendocrine tumor (NET of the pancreas and renal cell carcinoma (RCC metastatic to the pancreas can be challenging in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL. The clear cell features of both NET and RCC in VHL patients may lead to misdiagnosis, inaccurate staging, and alternative treatment. We present a patient in which this occurred. As clear cell NETs closely resembling metastatic RCC are distinctive neoplasms of VHL and metastatic RCC to the pancreas in the VHL population is rare, careful pathologic examination should be performed prior to subjecting patients to definitive surgical or medical therapies.

  13. The in vitro and in vivo effects of re-expressing methylated von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene in clear cell renal carcinoma with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

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    Alleman, Wade G; Tabios, Ray L; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Aprelikova, Olga N; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Rogers, Craig; Rodgers, Craig; Sopko, Nikolai A; Linehan, W Marston; Vasselli, James R

    2004-10-15

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is strongly associated with loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. The VHL gene is functionally lost through hypermethylation in up to 19% of sporadic ccRCC cases. We theorized that re-expressing VHL silenced by methylation in ccRCC cells, using a hypo-methylating agent, may be an approach to treatment in patients with this type of cancer. We test the ability of two hypo-methylating agents to re-express VHL in cell culture and in mice bearing human ccRCC and evaluate the effects of re-expressed VHL in these models. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to evaluate the ability of zebularine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCyd) to re-express VHL in four ccRCC cell lines with documented VHL gene silencing through hypermethylation. We evaluated if the VHL re-expressed after hypo-methylating agent treatment could recreate similar phenotypic changes in ccRCC cells observed when the VHL gene is re-expressed via transfection in cell culture and in a xenograft mouse model. Finally we evaluate global gene expression changes occurring in our cells, using microarray analysis. 5-Aza-dCyd was able to re-express VHL in our cell lines both in culture and in xenografted murine tumors. Well described phenotypic changes of VHL expression including decreased invasiveness into Matrigel, and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter-1 expression were observed in the treated lines. VHL methylated ccRCC xenografted tumors were significantly reduced in size in mice treated with 5-aza-dCyd. Mice bearing nonmethylated but VHL-mutated tumors showed no tumor shrinkage with 5-aza-dCyd treatment. Hypo-methylating agents may be useful in the treatment of patients having ccRCC tumors consisting of cells with methylated VHL.

  14. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor regulates programmed cell death 5-mediated degradation of Mdm2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P B; Klasson, T D; Pereboom, T C; Mans, D A; Nicastro, M; Boldt, K; Giles, R H; MacInnes, A W

    2015-01-01

    Functional loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein (pVHL), which is part of an E3-ubiquitin ligase complex, initiates most inherited and sporadic clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). Genetic inactivation of the TP53 gene in ccRCC is rare, suggesting that an alternate

  15. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene inhibits hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-induced invasion and branching morphogenesis in renal carcinoma cells.

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    Koochekpour, S; Jeffers, M; Wang, P H; Gong, C; Taylor, G A; Roessler, L M; Stearman, R; Vasselli, J R; Stetler-Stevenson, W G; Kaelin, W G; Linehan, W M; Klausner, R D; Gnarra, J R; Vande Woude, G F

    1999-09-01

    Loss of function in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene occurs in familial and most sporadic renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). VHL has been linked to the regulation of cell cycle cessation (G(0)) and to control of expression of various mRNAs such as for vascular endothelial growth factor. RCC cells express the Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and Met mediates invasion and branching morphogenesis in many cell types in response to hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We examined the HGF/SF responsiveness of RCC cells containing endogenous mutated (mut) forms of the VHL protein (VHL-negative RCC) with that of isogenic cells expressing exogenous wild-type (wt) VHL (VHL-positive RCC). We found that VHL-negative 786-0 and UOK-101 RCC cells were highly invasive through growth factor-reduced (GFR) Matrigel-coated filters and exhibited an extensive branching morphogenesis phenotype in response to HGF/SF in the three-dimensional (3D) GFR Matrigel cultures. In contrast, the phenotypes of A498 VHL-negative RCC cells were weaker, and isogenic RCC cells ectopically expressing wt VHL did not respond at all. We found that all VHL-negative RCC cells expressed reduced levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) relative to the wt VHL-positive cells, implicating VHL in the regulation of this molecule. However, consistent with the more invasive phenotype of the 786-0 and UOK-101 VHL-negative RCC cells, the levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were reduced and levels of the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were elevated compared to the noninvasive VHL-positive RCC cells. Moreover, recombinant TIMPs completely blocked HGF/SF-mediated branching morphogenesis, while neutralizing antibodies to the TIMPs stimulated HGF/SF-mediated invasion in vitro. Thus, the loss of the VHL tumor suppressor gene is central to changes that control tissue invasiveness, and a more invasive phenotype requires additional genetic changes seen in some but not all RCC lines. These

  16. Chorionic gonadotropin regulates the transcript level of VHL, p53, and HIF-2alpha in human granulosa lutein cells.

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    Herr, D; Keck, C; Tempfer, C; Pietrowski, Detlef

    2004-12-01

    The ovarian corpus luteum plays a critical role in reproduction being the primary source of circulating progesterone. After ovulation the corpus luteum is build by avascular granulosa lutein cells through rapid vascularization regulated by gonadotropic hormones. The present study was performed to investigate whether this process might be influenced by the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-dependent expression of different tumor suppressor genes and hypoxia dependent transcription factors. RNA was isolated from cultured granulosa lutein cells, transcribed into cDNA, and the transcript level of following genes were determined: RB-1, VHL, NF-1, NF-2, Wt-1, p53, APC, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), -2, and -3alpha. Additionally, the influence of hCG on the expression of VHL, p53, and HIf2alpha were investigated. We demonstrate that in human granulosa lutein cells the tumor suppressor genes RB-1, VHL, NF-1, NF-2, Wt-1, p53, and APC and the hypoxia dependent transcription factors HIF-1alpha, -2alpha, and -3alpha are expressed. In addition, we showed that hCG regulates the expression of p53, VHL, and HIF-2alpha. Our results indicate that hCG may determine the growth and development of the corpus luteum by mediating hypoxic and apoptotic pathways in human granulosa lutein cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Identification of 3 novel VHL germ-line mutations in Danish VHL patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Mette; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Sunde, Lone

    2012-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene.......von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which the patients develop retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas and clear-cell renal tumors. The autosomal dominant disease is caused by mutations in the VHL gene....

  18. A HIF-regulated VHL-PTP1B-Src signaling axis identifies a therapeutic target in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Suwaki, Natsuko; Vanhecke, Elsa; Atkins, Katelyn M.; Graf, Manuela; Swabey, Katherine; Huang, Paul; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Cassidy, Amy; Brewer, Daniel; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Workman, Paul; De-Bono, Johann; Kaye, Stan B.; Larkin, James

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease that is intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. While VEGF and mTOR targeted therapies have shown clinical activity, their effects are variable and short-lived, underscoring the need for improved treatment strategies for RCC. Here, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics and immunohistochemical profiling of 346 RCC specimens to determine that Src kinase signaling is elevated in RCC cells that retain ...

  19. t(6;11) renal cell carcinoma (RCC): expanded immunohistochemical profile emphasizing novel RCC markers and report of 10 new genetically confirmed cases.

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    Smith, Nathaniel E; Illei, Peter B; Allaf, Mohamed; Gonzalez, Nilda; Morris, Kerry; Hicks, Jessica; Demarzo, Angelo; Reuter, Victor E; Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J; Argani, Pedram

    2014-05-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) harboring the t(6;11)(p21;q12) translocation were first described in 2001 and recently recognized by the 2013 International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. Although these RCCs are known to label for melanocytic markers HMB45 and Melan A and the cysteine protease cathepsin K by immunohistochemistry (IHC), a comprehensive IHC profile has not been reported. We report 10 new t(6;11) RCCs, all confirmed by break-apart TFEB fluorescence in situ hybridization. A tissue microarray containing 6 of these cases and 7 other previously reported t(6;11) RCCs was constructed and immunolabeled for 21 different antigens. Additional whole sections of t(6;11) RCC were labeled with selected IHC markers. t(6;11) RCC labeled diffusely and consistently for cathepsin K and Melan A (13 of 13 cases) and almost always at least focally for HMB45 (12 of 13 cases). They labeled frequently for PAX8 (14 of 23 cases), CD117 (10 of 14 cases), and vimentin (9 of 13 cases). A majority of cases labeled at least focally for cytokeratin Cam5.2 (8 of 13 cases) and CD10 and RCC marker antigen (10 of 14 cases each). In contrast to a prior study's findings, only a minority of cases labeled for Ksp-cadherin (3 of 19 cases). The median H score (product of intensity score and percentage labeling) for phosphorylated S6, a marker of mTOR pathway activation, was 101, which is high relative to most other RCC subtypes. In summary, IHC labeling for PAX8, Cam5.2, CD10, and RCC marker antigen supports classification of the t(6;11) RCC as carcinomas despite frequent negativity for broad-spectrum cytokeratins and EMA. Labeling for PAX8 distinguishes the t(6;11) RCC from epithelioid angiomyolipoma, which otherwise shares a similar immunoprofile. CD117 labeling is more frequent in the t(6;11) RCC compared with the related Xp11 translocation RCC. Increased pS6 expression suggests a possible molecular target for the uncommon t(6;11) RCCs that

  20. t(6;11) Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) Expanded Immunohistochemical Profile Emphasizing Novel RCC Markers and Report of 10 New Genetically Confirmed Cases

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    Smith, Nathaniel E.; Illei, Peter B.; Allaf, Mohamed; Gonzalez, Nilda; Morris, Kerry; Hicks, Jessica; DeMarzo, Angelo; Reuter, Victor E.; Amin, Mahul B.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Netto, George J.; Argani, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) harboring the t(6;11)(p21;q12) translocation were first described in 2001 and recently recognized by the 2013 International Society of Uro-logical Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. Although these RCCs are known to label for melanocytic markers HMB45 and Melan A and the cysteine protease cath-epsin K by immunohistochemistry (IHC), a comprehensive IHC profile has not been reported. We report 10 new t(6;11) RCCs, all confirmed by break-apart TFEB fluorescence in situ hybridization. A tissue microarray containing 6 of these cases and 7 other previously reported t(6;11) RCCs was constructed and immunolabeled for 21 different antigens. Additional whole sections of t(6;11) RCC were labeled with selected IHC markers. t(6;11) RCC labeled diffusely and consistently for cathepsin K and Melan A (13 of 13 cases) and almost always at least focally for HMB45 (12 of 13 cases). They labeled frequently for PAX8 (14 of 23 cases), CD117 (10 of 14 cases), and vimentin (9 of 13 cases). A majority of cases labeled at least focally for cytokeratin Cam5.2 (8 of 13 cases) and CD10 and RCC marker antigen (10 of 14 cases each). In contrast to a prior study's findings, only a minority of cases labeled for Ksp-cadherin (3 of 19 cases). The median H score (product of intensity score and percentage labeling) for phosphorylated S6, a marker of mTOR pathway activation, was 101, which is high relative to most other RCC subtypes. In summary, IHC labeling for PAX8, Cam5.2, CD10, and RCC marker antigen supports classification of the t(6;11) RCC as carcinomas despite frequent negativity for broad-spectrum cytokeratins and EMA. Labeling for PAX8 distinguishes the t(6;11) RCC from epithelioid angiomyolipoma, which otherwise shares a similar immunoprofile. CD117 labeling is more frequent in the t(6;11) RCC compared with the related Xp11 translocation RCC. Increased pS6 expression suggests a possible molecular target for the uncommon t(6;11) RCCs that

  1. Novel interactions of the von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL) tumor suppressor with the CDKN1 family of cell cycle inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Minervini; Raffaele Lopreiato; Raissa Bortolotto; Antonella Falconieri; Geppo Sartori; Silvio C. E. Tosatto

    2017-01-01

    Germline inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor predisposes patients to develop different highly vascularized cancers. pVHL targets the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1?) for degradation, modulating the activation of various genes involved in hypoxia response. Hypoxia plays a relevant role in regulating cell cycle progression, inducing growth arrest in cells exposed to prolonged oxygen deprivation. However, the exact molecular details driving this transition...

  2. RCC2 over-expression in tumor cells alters apoptosis and drug sensitivity by regulating Rac1 activation.

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    Wu, Nan; Ren, Dong; Li, Su; Ma, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Yan; Xiao, Sheng

    2018-01-10

    Small GTP binding protein Rac1 is a component of NADPH oxidases and is essential for superoxide-induced cell death. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), and this activation can be blocked by regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2), which binds the switch regions of Rac1 to prevent access from GEFs. Three cancer cell lines with up- or down-regulation of RCC2 were used to evaluate cell proliferation, apoptosis, Rac1 signaling and sensitivity to a group of nine chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 expression in lung cancer and ovarian cancer were studied using immunochemistry stain of tumor tissue arrays. Forced RCC2 expression in tumor cells blocked spontaneous- or Staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. In contrast, RCC2 knock down in these cells resulted in increased apoptosis to STS treatment. The protective activity of RCC2 on apoptosis was revoked by a constitutively activated Rac1, confirming a role of RCC2 in apoptosis by regulating Rac1. In an immunohistochemistry evaluation of tissue microarray, RCC2 was over-expressed in 88.3% of primary lung cancer and 65.2% of ovarian cancer as compared to non-neoplastic lung and ovarian tissues, respectively. Because chemotherapeutic drugs can kill tumor cells by activating Rac1/JNK pathway, we suspect that tumors with RCC2 overexpression would be more resistant to these drugs. Tumor cells with forced RCC2 expression indeed had significant difference in drug sensitivity compared to parental cells using a panel of common chemotherapeutic drugs. RCC2 regulates apoptosis by blocking Rac1 signaling. RCC2 expression in tumor can be a useful marker for predicting chemotherapeutic response.

  3. Renal cell tumors with clear cell histology and intact VHL and chromosome 3p: a histological review of tumors from the Cancer Genome Atlas database.

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    Favazza, Laura; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Barod, Ravi; Rogers, Craig G; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Gupta, Nilesh S; Williamson, Sean R

    2017-11-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is by far the most common form of kidney cancer; however, a number of histologically similar tumors are now recognized and considered distinct entities. The Cancer Genome Atlas published data set was queried (http://cbioportal.org) for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumors lacking VHL gene mutation and chromosome 3p loss, for which whole-slide images were reviewed. Of the 418 tumors in the published Cancer Genome Atlas clear cell renal cell carcinoma database, 387 had VHL mutation, copy number loss for chromosome 3p, or both (93%). Of the remaining, 27/31 had whole-slide images for review. One had 3p loss based on karyotype but not sequencing, and three demonstrated VHL promoter hypermethylation. Nine could be reclassified as distinct or emerging entities: translocation renal cell carcinoma (n=3), TCEB1 mutant renal cell carcinoma (n=3), papillary renal cell carcinoma (n=2), and clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (n=1). Of the remaining, 6 had other clear cell renal cell carcinoma-associated gene alterations (PBRM1, SMARCA4, BAP1, SETD2), leaving 11 specimens, including 2 high-grade or sarcomatoid renal cell carcinomas and 2 with prominent fibromuscular stroma (not TCEB1 mutant). One of the remaining tumors exhibited gain of chromosome 7 but lacked histological features of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Two tumors previously reported to harbor TFE3 gene fusions also exhibited VHL mutation, chromosome 3p loss, and morphology indistinguishable from clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the significance of which is uncertain. In summary, almost all clear cell renal cell carcinomas harbor VHL mutation, 3p copy number loss, or both. Of tumors with clear cell histology that lack these alterations, a subset can now be reclassified as other entities. Further study will determine whether additional entities exist, based on distinct genetic pathways that may have implications for treatment.

  4. Tumor mutational load and immune parameters across metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC) risk groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Hsieh, James J.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared to patients with favorable or intermediate-risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole exome transcriptome data in RCC patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas that ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes –granzyme A and perforin – or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis found that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. PMID:27538576

  5. GSK-3 inhibition in vitro and in vivo enhances antitumor effect of sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazoe, Hisashi; Bilim, Vladimir N. [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Ugolkov, Andrey V., E-mail: ugolkov@northwestern.edu [Tumor Biology Core, Center for Developmental Therapeutics, Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Silverman Hall B733, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Yuuki, Kaori; Naito, Sei; Nagaoka, Akira; Kato, Tomoyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Tomita, Yoshihiko, E-mail: ytomita@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorafenib treatment upregulated GSK-3{beta} levels in RCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3 suppressed xenograft RCC tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of GSK-3 enhanced antitumor effect of sorafenib in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor approved for the systemic treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, sorafenib treatment has a limited effect due to acquired chemoresistance of RCC. Previously, we identified glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) as a new therapeutic target in RCC. Here, we observed that sorafenib inhibits proliferation and survival of RCC cells. Significantly, we revealed that sorafenib enhances GSK-3 activity in RCC cells, which could be a potential mechanism of acquired chemoresistance. We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 potentiates sorafenib antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that combining GSK-3 inhibitor and sorafenib might be a potential new therapeutic approach for RCC treatment.

  6. Lack of a Functional VHL Gene Product Sensitizes Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells to the Apoptotic Effects of the Protein Synthesis Inhibitor Verrucarin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girma M. Woldemichael

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Verrucarin A (VA is a small molecule derived from the fungal plant pathogen Myrothecium verrucaria and was identified as a selective inhibitor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC cell proliferation in a high-throughput screen of a library of naturally occurring small molecules. CCRCC arises as a result of loss-of-function mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene. Here we show that VA inhibits protein translation initiation culminating in apoptosis through the extrinsic signaling pathway. Reintroduction of the VHL gene in CCRCC cells afforded resistance to VA's apoptotic effects. This resistance is mediated in part by the formation of stress granules that entrap signaling molecules that initiate the apoptotic signaling cascade. The VHL gene product was found to be a component of stress granules that develop as result of VA treatment. These findings reveal an important role for the VHL gene product in cytotoxic stress response and have important implications for the rational development of VA-related compounds in chemotherapeutic targeting of CCRCC.

  7. Lack of a functional VHL gene product sensitizes renal cell carcinoma cells to the apoptotic effects of the protein synthesis inhibitor verrucarin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemichael, Girma M; Turbyville, Thomas J; Vasselli, James R; Linehan, W Marston; McMahon, James B

    2012-08-01

    Verrucarin A (VA) is a small molecule derived from the fungal plant pathogen Myrothecium verrucaria and was identified as a selective inhibitor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) cell proliferation in a high-throughput screen of a library of naturally occurring small molecules. CCRCC arises as a result of loss-of-function mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. Here we show that VA inhibits protein translation initiation culminating in apoptosis through the extrinsic signaling pathway. Reintroduction of the VHL gene in CCRCC cells afforded resistance to VA's apoptotic effects. This resistance is mediated in part by the formation of stress granules that entrap signaling molecules that initiate the apoptotic signaling cascade. The VHL gene product was found to be a component of stress granules that develop as result of VA treatment. These findings reveal an important role for the VHL gene product in cytotoxic stress response and have important implications for the rational development of VA-related compounds in chemotherapeutic targeting of CCRCC.

  8. Lack of a Functional VHL Gene Product Sensitizes Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells to the Apoptotic Effects of the Protein Synthesis Inhibitor Verrucarin A12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemichael, Girma M; Turbyville, Thomas J; Vasselli, James R; Linehan, W Marston; McMahon, James B

    2012-01-01

    Verrucarin A (VA) is a small molecule derived from the fungal plant pathogen Myrothecium verrucaria and was identified as a selective inhibitor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) cell proliferation in a high-throughput screen of a library of naturally occurring small molecules. CCRCC arises as a result of loss-of-function mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. Here we show that VA inhibits protein translation initiation culminating in apoptosis through the extrinsic signaling pathway. Reintroduction of the VHL gene in CCRCC cells afforded resistance to VA's apoptotic effects. This resistance is mediated in part by the formation of stress granules that entrap signaling molecules that initiate the apoptotic signaling cascade. The VHL gene product was found to be a component of stress granules that develop as result of VA treatment. These findings reveal an important role for the VHL gene product in cytotoxic stress response and have important implications for the rational development of VA-related compounds in chemotherapeutic targeting of CCRCC. PMID:22952429

  9. A multinodular goiter as the initial presentation of a renal cell carcinoma harbouring a novel VHL mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary involvement of the thyroid gland is rare. Often the origin of the tumor is difficult to identify from the material obtained by fine-needle aspiration cytology. Renal cell carcinoma of the clear-cell type is one of the more common carcinomas to metastasize to the thyroid gland. Somatic mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene are associated with the sporadic form of this tumor. We aimed to illustrate the potential utility of DNA based technologies to search for specific molecular markers in order to establish the anatomic site of origin. Case Presentation A 54-yr-old Caucasian male complaining of a rapidly increasing neck tumor was diagnosed as having a clear-cell tumor by fine-needle aspiration cytology. A positive staining for cytokeratin as well as for vimentin and CD10 in the absence of staining for thyroglobulin, calcitonin and TTF1 suggested a renal origin confirmed by computed tomography. Using frozen RNA, obtained from cells left inside the needle used for fine needle aspiration cytology, it was possible to identify a somatic mutation (680 delA in the VHL gene. Conclusion In the presence of a clear-cell tumor of the thyroid gland, screening for somatic mutations in the VHL gene in material derived from thyroid aspirates might provide additional information to immunocytochemical studies and therefore plays a contributory role to establish the final diagnosis. Moreover, in a near future, this piece of information might be useful to define a targeted therapy.

  10. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesen, H-J; Steinbeck, F; Maruschke, M; Koczan, D; Ziems, B; Hakenberg, O W

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs) presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25) and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58). Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes) has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949) leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and predictive value.

  11. Managing Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated Paraneoplastic Syndrome with Nephron-sparing Surgery in a Patient with von Hippel-Lindau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. DiBianco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A patient with germline von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene alteration and history of multiple tumors present with classical paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. She underwent open nephron sparing surgery with resolution of symptoms. She remained without recurrence of RCC for the initial 2 years of her follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first in which PNS was specifically resolved using a partial nephrectomy in a patient with VHL. This case report provides initial evidence for the potential role of nephron sparing surgery in the management of paraneoplastic symptoms associated with hereditary RCC.

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Programmed Death-ligand 1, a New Direct Target of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-2 Alpha, is Regulated by von Hippel-Lindau Gene Mutation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messai, Yosra; Gad, Sophie; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Le Teuff, Gwenael; Couve, Sophie; Janji, Bassam; Kammerer, Solenne Florence; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Hasmim, Meriem; Ferlicot, Sophie; Baud, Véronique; Mejean, Arnaud; Mole, David Robert; Richard, Stéphane; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Albiges, Laurence; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Escudier, Bernard; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) frequently display a loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. To elucidate the putative relationship between VHL mutation status and immune checkpoint ligand programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression. A series of 32 renal tumors composed of 11 VHL tumor-associated and 21 sporadic RCCs were used to evaluate PD-L1 expression levels after sequencing of the three exons and exon-intron junctions of the VHL gene. The 786-O, A498, and RCC4 cell lines were used to investigate the mechanisms of PD-L1 regulation. Fisher's exact test was used for VHL mutation and Kruskal-Wallis test for PD-L1 expression. If no covariate accounted for the association of VHL and PD-L1, then a Kruskal-Wallis test was used; otherwise Cochran-Mantel-Haenzsel test was used. We also used the Fligner-Policello test to compare two medians when the distributions had different dispersions. We demonstrated that tumors from ccRCC patients with VHL biallelic inactivation (ie, loss of function) display a significant increase in PD-L1 expression compared with ccRCC tumors carrying one VHL wild-type allele. Using the inducible VHL 786-O-derived cell lines with varying hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) stabilization levels, we showed that PD-L1 expression levels positively correlate with VHL mutation and HIF-2α expression. Targeting HIF-2α decreased PD-L1, while HIF-2α overexpression increased PD-L1 mRNA and protein levels in ccRCC cells. Interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays revealed a direct binding of HIF-2α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element in the human PD-L1 proximal promoter in 786-O cells. Our work provides the first evidence that VHL mutations positively correlate with PD-L1 expression in ccRCC and may influence the response to ccRCC anti-PD-L1/PD-1 immunotherapy. We investigated the relationship between von Hippel-Lindau mutations and programmed death-ligand 1 expression. We

  13. VHL Frameshift Mutation as Target of Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Drosophila melanogaster and Human HEK293 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Micale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many well-studied examples of human phenotypes resulting from nonsense or frameshift mutations that are modulated by Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD, a process that typically degrades transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs in order to prevent translation of unnecessary or aberrant transcripts. Different types of germline mutations in the VHL gene cause the von Hippel-Lindau disease, a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome with a marked phenotypic variability and age-dependent penetrance. By generating the Drosophila UAS:Upf1D45B line we showed the possible involvement of NMD mechanism in the modulation of the c.172delG frameshift mutation located in the exon 1 of Vhl gene. Further, by Quantitative Real-time PCR (QPCR we demonstrated that the corresponding c.163delG human mutation is targeted by NMD in human HEK 293 cells. The UAS:Upf1D45B line represents a useful system to identify novel substrates of NMD pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. Finally, we suggest the possible role of NMD on the regulation of VHL mutations.

  14. Novel homozygous VHL mutation in exon 2 is associated with congenital polycythemia but not with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanikova, Lucie; Lorenzo, Felipe; Yang, Chunzhang; Vankayalapati, Hari; Drachtman, Richard; Divoky, Vladimir; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-05-09

    Germline von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene mutations underlie dominantly inherited familial VHL tumor syndrome comprising a predisposition for renal cell carcinoma, pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, cerebral hemangioblastoma, and endolymphatic sac tumors. However, recessively inherited congenital polycythemia, exemplified by Chuvash polycythemia, has been associated with 2 separate 3' VHL gene mutations in exon 3. It was proposed that different positions of loss-of-function VHL mutations are associated with VHL syndrome cancer predisposition and only C-terminal domain-encoding VHL mutations would cause polycythemia. However, now we describe a new homozygous VHL exon 2 mutation of the VHL gene:(c.413C>T):P138L, which is associated in the affected homozygote with congenital polycythemia but not in her, or her-heterozygous relatives, with cancer or other VHL syndrome tumors. We show that VHL(P138L) has perturbed interaction with hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)1α. Further, VHL(P138L) protein has decreased stability in vitro. Similarly to what was reported in Chuvash polycythemia and some other instances of HIFs upregulation, VHL(P138L) erythroid progenitors are hypersensitive to erythropoietin. Interestingly, the level of RUNX1/AML1 and NF-E2 transcripts that are specifically upregulated in acquired polycythemia vera were also upregulated in VHL(P138L) granulocytes.

  15. Longterm results in the therapy of 100 cases of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, W.; Halama, J.M.; Halama, J.

    1990-01-01

    The success of renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-nephrectomy with radical lymph node dissection in stage I and II disease is undisputed. Through these measures 23% of metastases are controlled. The five-year survival time in stage III disease, however, stagnates at 35%±14% despite radical surgery. Also, the additional tumor-vaccine-therapy of the Mainz-Joint-Study-Group was successful only in stage I and II disease, whereas stage III disease did not benefit from this therapy. As 50% of all radically operated patients developed metastases within three years after surgery, the call by radiooncologists for supplementary radiotherapy beginning with stage III disease must be put foreward. The problems of therapy and chances of survival in generalized disease are demonstrated in 100 of our cases treated by surgery, radiotherapy and with MPA (medroxyprogesteroneacetate). Whereas Schmiedt et al. show a total survival time of 10.3 months after diagnosis of metastatic disease, the Offenbach patients achieved 16.5 months with a median survival time of 11.75 months. The necessity of therapeutic intervention is confirmed by the fact that the most favorable median survival time, 15.75 months, was achieved in metastatic disease involving three organs. We present here the special features of the individual organ manifestations and point out that not only the mean and median survival time, but also the very widely varying survival times in individual cases, make conscientious oncological post-treatment follow up and management a requirement. (orig.) [de

  16. Von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Harbud, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    These clinical guidelines outline the criteria and recommendations for diagnostic and genetic work-up of families suspected of von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL), as well as recommendations for prophylactic surveillance for vHL patients. The guideline has been composed by the Danish Coordination Group...... for vHL which is comprised of Danish doctors and specialists interested in vHL. The recommendations are based on longstanding clinical experience, Danish original research, and extensive review of the international literature. vHL is a hereditary multi-tumour disease caused by germline mutations...... of the disease, and/or in individuals with a vHL-associated manifestation; i.e. a hemangioblastoma in the retina or the central nervous system, familial or bilateral pheochromocytomas, familial, multiple, or early onset renal cell carcinomas, and in individuals with an endolymphatic sac tumour in the inner ear...

  17. Functional significance of erythropoietin in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Christudas; Johnson, David W; Vesey, David A; Gobe, Glenda C

    2013-01-01

    One of the molecules regulated by the transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), is the hypoxia-responsive hematopoietic factor, erythropoietin (EPO). This may have relevance to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), where mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene are major risk factors for the development of familial and sporadic RCC. VHL mutations up-regulate and stabilize HIF, which in turn activates many downstream molecules, including EPO, that are known to promote angiogenesis, drug resistance, proliferation and progression of solid tumours. HIFs typically respond to hypoxic cellular environment. While the hypoxic microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of tumours in general, it is of special significance in the case of RCC because of the link between VHL, HIF and EPO. EPO and its receptor, EPOR, are expressed in many cancers, including RCC. This limits the use of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) to treat anaemia in cancer patients, because the rhEPO may be stimulatory to the cancer. EPO may also stimulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in RCC, and pathological EMT has a key role in cancer progression. In this mini review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of EPO in RCC. The available data, either for or against the use of EPO in RCC patients, are equivocal and insufficient to draw a definitive conclusion

  18. Constitutional von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene deletions detected in VHL families by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, S D; Zbar, B; Pak, E; Ault, D O; Humphrey, J S; Pham, T; Hurley, K; Weil, R J; Park, W S; Kuzmin, I; Stolle, C; Glenn, G; Liotta, L A; Lerman, M I; Klausner, R D; Linehan, W M; Zhuang, Z

    1999-11-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer syndrome predisposing to a variety of tumor types that include retinal hemangioblastomas, hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system, renal cell carcinomas, pancreatic cysts and tumors, pheochromocytomas, endolymphatic sac tumors, and epididymal cystadenomas [W. M. Linehan et al., J. Am. Med. Assoc., 273: 564-570, 1995; E. A. Maher and W. G. Kaelin, Jr., Medicine (Baltimore), 76: 381-391, 1997; W. M. Linehan and R. D. Klausner, In: B. Vogelstein and K. Kinzler (eds.), The Genetic Basis of Human Cancer, pp. 455-473, McGraw-Hill, 1998]. The VHL gene was localized to chromosome 3p25-26 and cloned [F. Latif et al., Science (Washington DC), 260: 1317-1320, 1993]. Germline mutations in the VHL gene have been detected in the majority of VHL kindreds. The reported frequency of detection of VHL germline mutations has varied from 39 to 80% (J. M. Whaley et al., Am. J. Hum. Genet., 55: 1092-1102, 1994; Clinical Research Group for Japan, Hum. Mol. Genet., 4: 2233-2237, 1995; F. Chen et al., Hum. Mutat., 5: 66-75, 1995; E. R. Maher et al., J. Med. Genet., 33: 328-332, 1996; B. Zbar, Cancer Surv., 25: 219-232, 1995). Recently a quantitative Southern blotting procedure was found to improve this frequency (C. Stolle et al., Hum. Mutat., 12: 417-423, 1998). In the present study, we report the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as a method to detect and characterize VHL germline deletions. We reexamined a group of VHL patients shown previously by single-strand conformation and sequencing analysis not to harbor point mutations in the VHL locus. We found constitutional deletions in 29 of 30 VHL patients in this group using cosmid and P1 probes that cover the VHL locus. We then tested six phenotypically normal offspring from four of these VHL families: two were found to carry the deletion and the other four were deletion-free. In addition, germline mosaicism of the VHL gene was identified in

  19. Intracellular lipid in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC): T2 weighted (T2W) MRI and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; Van der Pol, Christian B.; Moosavi, Bardia; McInnes, Matthew D.F. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mai, Kien T.; Flood, Trevor A. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate if pRCCs demonstrate intracellular lipid (i-lipid) at chemical-shift (CS) MRI, and assess T2W-MRI and pathologic characteristics. Sixty-two patients with a pRCC diagnosis underwent MRI over 11 years (IRB-approved). Two radiologists independently assessed for presence of i-lipid on CS-MRI and homogeneity on T2W-MRI. Inter-observer agreement was assessed via an intraclass correlation and results were compared using the Chi-square test. Discordant cases were reviewed to establish consensus. T2W SI-ratios (SI.tumor/SI.kidney) and CS-SI index were compared using independent t-tests and Spearman correlation. Two pathologists re-evaluated the histopathology. Nine of the 62 pRCCs (14.5 %) demonstrated i-lipid; agreement was moderate (ICC = 0.63). Pathology review depicted clear cells in four tumours and foamy histiocytes in five tumours. 25.8-35.4 % (ICC = 0.65) of tumours were homogeneous on T2W-MRI. No pRCC with i-lipid was considered homogeneous (p = 0.01-0.04). Overall, T2W SI-ratio and CS-SI index were 0.89 (±0.29) and -3.63 % (-7.27 to 11.42). pRCC with i-lipid had significantly higher T2W SI-ratio (p = 0.003). There was a correlation between the CS-SI index and T2W SI-ratio, (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). Intracellular lipid is uncommonly detected in pRCCs due to clear cell changes and foamy histiocytes. These tumours are associated with heterogeneously-increased SI in T2W-MRI. (orig.)

  20. Understanding familial and non-familial renal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodmer, Daniëlle; van den Hurk, Wilhelmina; van Groningen, Jan J. M.; Eleveld, Marc J.; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Weterman, Marian A. J.; van Kessel, Ad Geurts

    2002-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of familial and non-familial cases of conventional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) revealed a critical role(s) for multiple genes on human chromosome 3. For some of these genes, e.g. VHL, such a role has been firmly established, whereas for others, definite confirmation is

  1. Understanding familial and non-familial renal cell cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodmer, D.; Hurk, W.H. van den; Groningen, J.J.M. van; Eleveld, M.J.; Martens, G.J.M.; Weterman, M.A.J.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of familial and non-familial cases of conventional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) revealed a critical role(s) for multiple genes on human chromosome 3. For some of these genes, e.g. VHL, such a role has been firmly established, whereas for others, definite confirmation is

  2. Noncoding RNA Expression and Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Distinguish Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (TC-RCC) from Other Renal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Charles H; Armesto, María; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Arestín, María; Manterola, Lorea; Goicoechea, Ibai; Larrea, Erika; Caffarel, María M; Araujo, Angela M; Sole, Carla; Sperga, Maris; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej; López, José I

    2018-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) is a rare recently described renal neoplasm characterized by gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical differences from other renal tumor types and was recently classified as a distinct entity. However, this distinction remains controversial particularly because some genetic studies suggest a close relationship with papillary RCC (PRCC). The molecular basis of this disease remains largely unexplored. We therefore performed noncoding (nc) RNA/miRNA expression analysis and targeted next-generation sequencing mutational profiling on 13 TC-RCC cases (11 pure, two mixed TC-RCC/PRCC) and compared with other renal neoplasms. The expression profile of miRNAs and other ncRNAs in TC-RCC was distinct and validated 10 differentially expressed miRNAs by quantitative RT-PCR, including miR-155 and miR-34a, that were significantly down-regulated compared with PRCC cases (n = 22). With the use of targeted next-generation sequencing we identified mutations in 14 different genes, most frequently (>60% of TC-RCC cases) in ABL1 and PDFGRA genes. These mutations were present in  600) of The Cancer Genome Atlas database. In summary, this study is by far the largest molecular study of TC-RCC cases and the first to investigate either ncRNA expression or their genomic profile. These results add molecular evidence that TC-RCC is indeed a distinct entity from PRCC and other renal neoplasms. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. VHL genetic alteration in CCRCC does not determine de-regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyhan, Michelle J

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-alpha (HIF-alpha), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2\\/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. METHODS: The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL\\'s protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. RESULTS: VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10\\/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1alpha, HIF-2alpha and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15\\/17), 100% (17\\/17) and 88.2% (15\\/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2\\/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. CONCLUSION: As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), these data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracz, Adam F.; Szczylik, Cezary; Porta, Camillo; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence is highest in highly developed countries and it is the seventh most common neoplasm diagnosed. RCC management include nephrectomy and targeted therapies. Type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) pathway plays an important role in cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. IGF-1 and insulin share overlapping downstream signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) stimulation may promote malignant transformation promoting cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and inhibiting apoptosis. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients with IGF1R overexpression have 70 % increased risk of death compared to patients who had tumors without IGF1R expression. IGF1R signaling deregulation may results in p53, WT, BRCA1, VHL loss of function. RCC cells with high expression of IGF1R are more resistant to chemotherapy than cells with low expression. Silencing of IGF1R increase the chemosensitivity of ccRCC cells and the effect is greater in VHL mutated cells. Understanding the role of IGF-1 signaling pathway in RCC may result in development of new targeted therapeutic interventions. First preclinical attempts with anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibodies or fragment antigen-binding (Fab) fragments alone or in combination with an mTOR inhibitor were shown to inhibit in vitro growth and reduced the number of colonies formed by of RCC cells

  5. Phospholamban Is Downregulated by pVHL-Mediated Degradation through Oxidative Stress in Failing Heart

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    Shunichi Yokoe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The E3 ubiquitin ligase, von Hippel–Lindau (VHL, regulates protein expression by polyubiquitination. Although the protein VHL (pVHL was reported to be involved in the heart function, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that pVHL was upregulated in hearts from two types of genetically dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM mice models. In comparison with the wild-type mouse, both DCM mice models showed a significant reduction in the expression of phospholamban (PLN, a potent inhibitor of sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, and enhanced interaction between pVHL and PLN. To clarify whether pVHL is involved in PLN degradation in failing hearts, we used carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP-lowering reagent, to mimic the heart failure condition in PLN-expressing HEK293 cells and found that CCCP treatment resulted in PLN degradation and increased interaction between PLN and pVHL. However, these effects were reversed with the addition of N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Furthermore, the co-transfection of VHL and PLN in HEK293 cells decreased PLN expression under oxidative stress, whereas knockdown of VHL increased PLN expression both under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Together, we propose that oxidative stress upregulates pVHL expression to induce PLN degradation in failing hearts.

  6. Surgical treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC with level III–IV tumor venous thrombosis

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    M. I. Davydov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the results of nephrectomy, thrombectomy in RCC patients with level III–IV tumor venous thrombosis with and without cardiopulmonary bypass.Materials and methods. Medical data of 167 consecutive RCC patients with level III–IV tumor venous thrombosis underwent nephrectomy thrombectomy in N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center between 1998 and 2012 were collected. Right side tumor was in 122 (73.1 %, left side – in 42 (25.1 %, bilateral – in 3 (1.8 % cases. The extent of thrombus was defined as intrahepatic in 82 (49.1 %, supradiaphragmatic – in 85 (50.9 % (intrapericardial – in 44 (26.3 %, intraatrial – in 39 (23.4 %, intraventricular – in 2 (1.2 % cases. Nephrectomy, thrombectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 9 (5.4 %, 158 (94.6 % patients underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombectomy without CPBP and sternotomy. Intrapericardial IVC and right atrium were exposed through transdiaphragmatic approach and providing vascular control over infradiaphragmatic IVC and renal veins.Results. Median blood loss was 6000 (600–27 000 ml. Complications rate was 62.8 %, 90-day mortality – 13.2 %. Intraoperative complications were registered in 80 (47.9 %, postoperative – in 66 (40.5 % (grade II – 16 (9.8 %, grade IIIb – 1 (0.6 %, grade IVа – 28 (17.2 %, grade IVb – 3 (1.8 %, grade V – 18 (11.1 % patients. Modified thrombectomy technique insignificantly decreased blood loss compared to thrombectomy with CPB, did nоt increase complications rate including pulmonary vein thromboembolism, or mortality. Five-year overall, cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival was 46.2, 58.3 and 47.1 %, respectively. Thrombectomy technique did nоt affect survival.Conclusion. In selected patients with mobile thrombi transdiaphragmatic approach allows to avoid the use of CPBP and decrease surgical morbidity without survival compromising.

  7. VHL type 2B mutations retain VBC complex form and function.

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    Kathryn E Hacker

    Full Text Available von Hippel-Lindau disease is characterized by a spectrum of hypervascular tumors, including renal cell carcinoma, hemangioblastoma, and pheochromocytoma, which occur with VHL genotype-specific differences in penetrance. VHL loss causes a failure to regulate the hypoxia inducible factors (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha, resulting in accumulation of both factors to high levels. Although HIF dysregulation is critical to VHL disease-associated renal tumorigenesis, increasing evidence points toward gradations of HIF dysregulation contributing to the degree of predisposition to renal cell carcinoma and other manifestations of the disease.This investigation examined the ability of disease-specific VHL missense mutations to support the assembly of the VBC complex and to promote the ubiquitylation of HIF. Our interaction analysis supported previous observations that VHL Type 2B mutations disrupt the interaction between pVHL and Elongin C but maintain partial regulation of HIF. We additionally demonstrated that Type 2B mutant pVHL forms a remnant VBC complex containing the active members ROC1 and Cullin-2 which retains the ability to ubiquitylate HIF-1alpha.Our results suggest that subtypes of VHL mutations support an intermediate level of HIF regulation via a remnant VBC complex. These findings provide a mechanism for the graded HIF dysregulation and genetic predisposition for cancer development in VHL disease.

  8. MicroRNAs Associated with Von Hippel-Lindau Pathway in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanza, Lisa-Maria; Seles, Maximilian; Stotz, Michael; Fosselteder, Johannes; Hutterer, Georg C; Pichler, Martin; Stiegelbauer, Verena

    2017-11-22

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most common renal neoplasia and can be divided into three main histologic subtypes, among which clear cell RCC is by far the most common form of kidney cancer. Despite substantial advances over the last decade in the understanding of RCC biology, surgical treatments, and targeted and immuno-therapies in the metastatic setting, the prognosis for advanced RCC patients remains poor. One of the major problems with RCC treatment strategies is inherent or acquired resistance towards therapeutic agents over time. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation, has added new dimensions to the development of novel diagnostic and treatment tools. Because of an association between Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) genes with chromosomal loss in 3p25-26 and clear cell RCC, miRNAs have attracted considerable scientific interest over the last years. The loss of VHL function leads to constitutional activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway and to consequent expression of numerous angiogenic and carcinogenic factors. Since miRNAs represent key players of carcinogenesis, tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, as well as in development of metastases in RCC, they might serve as potential therapeutic targets. Several miRNAs are already known to be dysregulated in RCC and have been linked to biological processes involved in tumor angiogenesis and response to anti-cancer therapies. This review summarizes the role of different miRNAs in RCC angiogenesis and their association with the VHL gene, highlighting their potential role as novel drug targets.

  9. MicroRNAs Associated with Von Hippel–Lindau Pathway in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa-Maria Schanza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC are the most common renal neoplasia and can be divided into three main histologic subtypes, among which clear cell RCC is by far the most common form of kidney cancer. Despite substantial advances over the last decade in the understanding of RCC biology, surgical treatments, and targeted and immuno-therapies in the metastatic setting, the prognosis for advanced RCC patients remains poor. One of the major problems with RCC treatment strategies is inherent or acquired resistance towards therapeutic agents over time. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation, has added new dimensions to the development of novel diagnostic and treatment tools. Because of an association between Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL genes with chromosomal loss in 3p25-26 and clear cell RCC, miRNAs have attracted considerable scientific interest over the last years. The loss of VHL function leads to constitutional activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF pathway and to consequent expression of numerous angiogenic and carcinogenic factors. Since miRNAs represent key players of carcinogenesis, tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, as well as in development of metastases in RCC, they might serve as potential therapeutic targets. Several miRNAs are already known to be dysregulated in RCC and have been linked to biological processes involved in tumor angiogenesis and response to anti-cancer therapies. This review summarizes the role of different miRNAs in RCC angiogenesis and their association with the VHL gene, highlighting their potential role as novel drug targets.

  10. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Gauler, T.; Bauer, S.; Antoch, G.; Schuette, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq 111 In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR registered -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  11. Progression of Epididymal Maldevelopment Into Hamartoma-like Neoplasia in VHL Disease

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    Gautam U. Mehta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene and activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF in susceptible cells precedes formation of tumorlets and frank tumor in the epididymis of male VHL patients. We performed detailed histologic and molecular pathologic analysis of tumor-free epididymal tissues from VHL patients to obtain further insight into early epididymal tumorigenesis. Four epididymides from two VHL patients were serially sectioned to allow for three-dimensional visualization of morphologic changes. Areas of interest were genetically analyzed by tissue microdissection, immunohistochemistry for HIF and markers for mesonephric differentiation, and in situ hybridization for HIF downstream target vascular endothelial growth factor. Structural analysis of the epididymides revealed marked deviations from the regular anatomic structure resulting from impaired organogenesis. Selected efferent ductules were represented by disorganized mesonephric cells, and the maldeveloped mesonephric material was VHL-deficient by allelic deletion analysis. Furthermore, we observed maldeveloped mesonephric material near cystic structures, which were also VHL-deficient and were apparent derivatives of maldeveloped material. Finally, a subset of VHL-deficient cells was structurally integrated in regular efferent ductules; proliferation of intraductular VHL-deficient cells manifests itself as papillary growth into the ductular lumen. Furthermore, we clarify that that there is a pathogenetic continuum between microscopic tumorlets and formation of tumor. In multiple locations, three-dimensional reconstruction revealed papillary growth to extend deeply into ductular lumina, indicative of progression into early hamartoma-like neoplasia. We conclude epididymal tumorigenesis in VHL disease to occur in two distinct sequential steps: maldevelopment of VHL-deficient mesonephric cells, followed by neoplastic papillary proliferation.

  12. Somatic VHL gene alterations in MEN2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Christian A; Brouwers, Frederieke M; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Tannapfel, Andrea; Libutti, Steven K; Zhuang, Zhengping; Pacak, Karel; Neumann, Hartmut PH; Paschke, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in RET are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), an autosomal dominantly inherited cancer syndrome that is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma, and parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma. Recent studies suggest a 'second hit' mechanism resulting in amplification of mutant RET. Somatic VHL gene alterations are implicated in the pathogenesis of MEN2 pheochromocytomas. We hypothesized that somatic VHL gene alterations are also important in the pathogenesis of MEN2-associated MTC. We analyzed 6 MTCs and 1 C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) specimen from 7 patients with MEN2A and RET germline mutations in codons 609, 618, 620, or 634, using microdissection, microsatellite analysis, phosphorimage densitometry, and VHL mutation analysis. First, we searched for allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET by using the polymorphic markers D10S677, D10S1239, and RET on thyroid tissue from these patients. Evidence for RET amplification by this technique could be demonstrated in 3 of 6 MTCs. We then performed LOH analysis using D3S1038 and D3S1110 which map to the VHL gene locus at 3p25/26. VHL gene deletion was present in 3 MTCs. These 3 MTCs also had an allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET. Mutation analysis of the VHL gene showed a somatic frameshift mutation in 1 MTC that also demonstrated LOH at 3p25/26. In the 2 other MTCs with allelic imbalance of RET and somatic VHL gene deletion, no somatic VHL mutation could be detected. The CCH specimen did neither reveal RET imbalance nor somatic VHL gene alterations. These data suggest that a RET germline mutation is necessary for development of CCH, that allelic imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET may set off tumorigenesis, and that somatic VHL gene alterations may not play a major role in tumorigenesis of MEN2A-associated MTC

  13. A dose-response relationship for time to bone pain resolution after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bony metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Dept. of Radiology, Section of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States); Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Blanco, Angel I.; Butler, E. Brian [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital/The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States)], email: bteh@tmhs.org; Lo, Simon S. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland (United States); Amato, Robert J. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Oncology, Univ. of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To investigate the utility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of painful renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone metastases, and for a possible dose effect on time to symptom relief. Material and methods. Eighteen patients with 24 painful osseous lesions from metastatic RCC were treated with SBRT. The most common treatment regimens were 24 Gy in 3 fractions and 40 Gy in 5 fractions. The times from treatment to first reported pain relief and time to symptom recurrence were evaluated. Median follow-up was 38 weeks (1-156 weeks). Results. Seventy-eight percent of all patients had pain relief. Patients treated with a BED > 85 Gy achieved faster and more durable pain relief compared to those treated with a BED < 85 Gy. There was decrease in time to pain relief after a change in treatment regimen to 8 Gy x 5 fractions (BED = 86). There was only one patient with grade 1 skin toxicity. No neurological or other toxicity was observed. Conclusions. SBRT can safely and effectively treat painful RCC bony metastases. There appears to be a relationship between radiation dose and time to stable pain relief.

  14. The Roles of VHL-Dependent Ubiquitination in Signaling and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qing [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yang, Haifeng, E-mail: qing_zhang@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Haifeng Yang, E-mail: yangh2@ccf.org [Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, NB-40, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2012-04-12

    The function of tumor suppressor VHL is compromised in the vast majority of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and its mutations or loss of expression was causal for this disease. pVHL was found to be a substrate recognition subunit of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, and most of the tumor-derived mutations disrupt this function. pVHL was found to bind to the alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and promote their ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Proline hydroxylation on key sites of HIFα provides the binding signal for pVHL E3 ligase complex. Beside HIFα, several other VHL targets have been identified, including activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), RNA polymerase II subunits RPB1 and hsRPB7, atypical protein kinase C (PKC), Sprouty2, β-adrenergic receptor II, and Myb-binding protein p160. HIFα is the most well studied substrate and has been proven to be critical for pVHL’s tumor suppressor function, but the activated EGFR and PKC and other pVHL substrates might also be important for tumor growth and drug response. Their regulations by pVHL and their relevance to signaling and cancer are discussed.

  15. An overview of Pazopanib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC in Ministry of Health (MOH, Malaysia: A multicentre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Feng Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pazopanib was listed in MOH, Malaysia’s drug formulary on July 2013 for the treatment of mRCC. Two landmark trials were used to support the listing i.e. VEG105192 and COMPARZ which showed a median progression free survival (PFS of 9.2 and 8.4 months respectively. The efficacy and tolerability of Pazopanib in patients with mRCC have been found to differ in Western and Asian populations. Due to the difference in tolerability, dose adjustment in Asian patients is required. In most MOH hospitals in Malaysia, we tend to start mRCC patients with a lower dose as most patients can’t tolerate 800 mg of Pazopanib. We aim to prognosticate and evaluate PFS in patients with mRCC treated in MOH, Malaysia. We also aim to correlate PFS of patients on different doses of Pazopanib. Methods: The largest referral centre in central and southern Malaysia was selected namely Hospital Kuala Lumpur and Hospital Sultan Ismail. A retrospective analysis was done for patients using hospital supply of Pazopanib from 2010 to 2016. PFS is defined as the time of Pazopanib initiation till 1st documented disease progression. Prognostic variables such as age, sex, race, histology, common sites of metastasis, number of organs involved, ECOG, modified MSKCC risk category, prior history of nephrectomy or systemic treatment and initial dose of Pazopanib was analysed. Results: There was a total of 87 patients with mRCC registered. Median time since diagnosis to initiation of Pazopanib was 5 months. PFS for the overall study population was 8.0 months (95%CI, 5.6–10.4 months. PFS based on dose showed 400 mg vs. 800 mg of Pazopanib was 9.0 months (95%CI 4.5–13.4 months vs. 6.0 months (95%CI 1.9–10.1 months respectively (p = 0.209. Modified MSKCC risk category was a significant prognostic variable (p = 0.045. Conclusion: This retrospective review shows no significant difference in PFS between 400 mg vs. 800 mg of Pazopanib. MOH hospitals in Malaysia have similar PFS

  16. Acute Vhl gene inactivation induces cardiac HIF-dependent erythropoietin gene expression.

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    Marta Miró-Murillo

    Full Text Available Von Hippel Lindau (Vhl gene inactivation results in embryonic lethality. The consequences of its inactivation in adult mice, and of the ensuing activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, have been explored mainly in a tissue-specific manner. This mid-gestation lethality can be also circumvented by using a floxed Vhl allele in combination with an ubiquitous tamoxifen-inducible recombinase Cre-ER(T2. Here, we characterize a widespread reduction in Vhl gene expression in Vhl(floxed-UBC-Cre-ER(T2 adult mice after dietary tamoxifen administration, a convenient route of administration that has yet to be fully characterized for global gene inactivation. Vhl gene inactivation rapidly resulted in a marked splenomegaly and skin erythema, accompanied by renal and hepatic induction of the erythropoietin (Epo gene, indicative of the in vivo activation of the oxygen sensing HIF pathway. We show that acute Vhl gene inactivation also induced Epo gene expression in the heart, revealing cardiac tissue to be an extra-renal source of EPO. Indeed, primary cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cardiac cells both induce Epo gene expression when exposed to low O(2 tension in a HIF-dependent manner. Thus, as well as demonstrating the potential of dietary tamoxifen administration for gene inactivation studies in UBC-Cre-ER(T2 mouse lines, this data provides evidence of a cardiac oxygen-sensing VHL/HIF/EPO pathway in adult mice.

  17. Efficient generation of patient-matched malignant and normal primary cell cultures from clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients: clinically relevant models for research and personalized medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Nazleen C.; Gedye, Craig; Apostoli, Anthony J.; Brown, Kevin R.; Paterson, Joshua; Stickle, Natalie; Robinette, Michael; Fleshner, Neil; Hamilton, Robert J.; Kulkarni, Girish; Zlotta, Alexandre; Evans, Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Moffat, Jason; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Ailles, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have few therapeutic options, as ccRCC is unresponsive to chemotherapy and is highly resistant to radiation. Recently targeted therapies have extended progression-free survival, but responses are variable and no significant overall survival benefit has been achieved. Commercial ccRCC cell lines are often used as model systems to develop novel therapeutic approaches, but these do not accurately recapitulate primary ccRCC tumors at the genomic and transcriptional levels. Furthermore, ccRCC exhibits significant intertumor genetic heterogeneity, and the limited cell lines available fail to represent this aspect of ccRCC. Our objective was to generate accurate preclinical in vitro models of ccRCC using tumor tissues from ccRCC patients. ccRCC primary single cell suspensions were cultured in fetal bovine serum (FBS)-containing media or defined serum-free media. Established cultures were characterized by genomic verification of mutations present in the primary tumors, expression of renal epithelial markers, and transcriptional profiling. The apparent efficiency of primary cell culture establishment was high in both culture conditions, but genotyping revealed that the majority of cultures contained normal, not cancer cells. ccRCC characteristically shows biallelic loss of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene, leading to accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and expression of HIF target genes. Purification of cells based on expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a cell surface HIF target, followed by culture in FBS enabled establishment of ccRCC cell cultures with an efficiency of >80 %. Culture in serum-free conditions selected for growth of normal renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. Transcriptional profiling of ccRCC and matched normal cell cultures identified up- and down-regulated networks in ccRCC and comparison to The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed the clinical validity of our cell cultures. The ability

  18. Dicty_cDB: VHL434 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHL434 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16336-1 VHL434P (Link... to Original site) VHL434F 546 VHL434Z 778 VHL434P 1304 - - Show VHL434 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHL434 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U16336-1 Original site URL http://dict...EVMSCNKFSSKRIGYLAASQSFNEGTDVIVLATHQIRKDFLS SNQSEAYLALNCLSNICTTDLARELANDILTLLSTQKTHILKRAITVLYKIFLRYPES-- - --...GFDISWASFKIVEVMSCNKFSSKRIGYLAASQSFNEGTDVIVLATHQIRKDFLS SNQSEAYLALNCLSNICTTDLARELANDILTLLSTQKTHILKRAITVLYKIFL

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHL663 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHL663 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15767-1 VHL663P (Link... to Original site) VHL663F 574 VHL663Z 702 VHL663P 1256 - - Show VHL663 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHL663 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15767-1 Original site URL http://dict...WPDGFKYFFVDNQAGDSESAKSGKNLPIQRDIELNWNGEAYEYSNSNYFPINGQG FNDVSYPV--- ---SYATGKCEPDSSLCNDNNICTIDICVHEGILDGLPQG...ik rqelvgqmvlsifl*itklviqnlpnlvkifqfkeiss*igmekhmniviqitsqltdkv smm*aiq--- ---SYATGKCEPDSSLCNDNNICTIDICVHEGI

  20. HDAC 1 and 6 modulate cell invasion and migration in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ku, ShengYu; Ciamporcero, Eric; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Attwood, Kris; Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Shen, Li; Ellis, Leigh; Sotomayor, Paula; Swetzig, Wendy; Huang, Ray; Conroy, Dylan; Orillion, Ashley; Das, Gokul; Pili, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been reported to be overexpressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), whereas the expression of class II HDACs is unknown. Four isogenic cell lines C2/C2VHL and 786-O/786-OVHL with differential VHL expression are used in our studies. Cobalt chloride is used to mimic hypoxia in vitro. HIF-2α knockdowns in C2 and 786-O cells is used to evaluate the effect on HDAC 1 expression and activity. Invasion and migration assays are used to investigate the role of HDAC 1 and HDAC 6 expression in ccRCC cells. Comparisons are made between experimental groups using the paired T-test, the two-sample Student’s T-test or one-way ANOVA, as appropriate. ccRCC and the TCGA dataset are used to observe the clinical correlation between HDAC 1 and HDAC 6 overexpression and overall and progression free survival. Our analysis of tumor and matched non-tumor tissues from radical nephrectomies showed overexpression of class I and II HDACs (HDAC6 only in a subset of patients). In vitro, both HDAC1 and HDAC6 over-expression increased cell invasion and motility, respectively, in ccRCC cells. HDAC1 regulated invasiveness by increasing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Furthermore, hypoxia stimulation in VHL-reconstituted cell lines increased HIF isoforms and HDAC1 expression. Presence of hypoxia response elements in the HDAC1 promoter along with chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggests that HIF-2α is a transcriptional regulator of HDAC1 gene. Conversely, HDAC6 and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) were co-localized in cytoplasm of ccRCC cells and HDAC6 enhanced cell motility by decreasing acetylated α-tubulin expression, and this biological effect was attenuated by either biochemical or pharmacological inhibition. Finally, analysis of human ccRCC specimens revealed positive correlation between HIF isoforms and HDAC. HDAC1 mRNA upregulation was associated with worse overall survival in the TCGA dataset. Taking together, these results

  1. A pilot study of denileukin diftitox (DD) in combination with high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Elizabeth; Eklund, John; Martone, Brenda; Wang, Lili; Gidron, Adi; Macvicar, Gary; Rademaker, Alfred; Goolsby, Charles; Marszalek, Laura; Kozlowski, James; Smith, Norm; Kuzel, Timothy M

    2010-09-01

    High-dose (HD) IL-2 is approved to treat renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with modest response rates and significant toxicity. Enhancement of cytotoxic T-cell activity by IL-2 is 1 mechanism of action. IL-2 also stimulates regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs), which are associated with poor prognosis. Favorable outcomes are associated with greater rebound absolute lymphocyte count (Fumagalli 2003). DD depletes IL-2 receptor (CD25 component) expressing cells. We hypothesized that sequential therapy could complement each other; DD would deplete Tregs so IL-2 could more effectively stimulate proliferation and activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients (n=18) received standard HD IL-2 and 1 dose of DD daily for 3 days; periodic flow cytometry and complete blood counts were performed. Group A included 3 patients to assess safety only with DD 6 μg/kg between the IL-2 courses. Group B included 9 patients at 9 μg/kg DD before the IL-2 courses. Group C included 6 patients at 9 μg/kg DD between the IL-2 courses. Efficacy using the RECIST criteria was assessed after the treatment. Fifteen patients from a study of IL-2 without DD served as controls for toxicity comparison and 13 of these for flow cytometry comparisons. No unusual toxicity was noted. For group B/C patients receiving DD, the median decline in Tregs was 56.3% from pre-DD to post-DD (P=0.013). Peak absolute lymphocyte count change from baseline was +9980/μL for group B, +4470/μL for group C, and +4720/μL for the controls (P=0.005 B vs. C). The overall response rate was 5 of 15 (33%); 3 of 9 (33%) and 2 of 6 (33%) for groups B and C, respectively, including 2 patients with sarcomatoid RCC and 1 with earlier sunitinib therapy.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) as a potential biomarker in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mains, Jill Rachel; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Erik Morre

    Purpose To explore the impact of DCE-CT as a biomarker in mRCC.  Methods and Materials 12 patients with mRCC participating in a phase II trial with immunotherapy and bevacizumab and with a follow-up time of at least 2 years were included in this preliminary analysis. DCE-CT interpretation (max s...

  3. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but biomarkers of activity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene status, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR or stem cell factor receptor (KIT expression, and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC. Methods: A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry. Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were calculated and then compared based on expression status. The Chi-square test, the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses. Results: Of 59 patients, objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%. The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months. There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features: Male gender, number of metastatic sites 2 or less, VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive. Eleven patients (18.6% had evidence of VHL mutation, with an objective response rate of 45.5%, which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%. VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P = 0.938 or PFS (P = 0.277. The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients, respectively, which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P = 0.026 and P = 0.043. Conclusion

  4. CT prediction of the Fuhrman grade of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC): towards the development of computer-assisted diagnostic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhdanpaa, Hannu; Hwang, Darryl; Cen, Steven; Quinn, Brian; Nayyar, Megha; Zhang, Xuejun; Chen, Frank; Desai, Bhushan; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Duddalwar, Vinay

    2015-10-01

    There are distinct quantifiable features characterizing renal cell carcinomas on contrast-enhanced CT examinations, such as peak tumor enhancement, tumor heterogeneity, and percent contrast washout. While qualitative visual impressions often suffice for diagnosis, quantitative metrics if developed and validated can add to the information available from standard of care diagnostic imaging. The purpose of this study is to assess the use of quantitative enhancement metrics in predicting the Fuhrman grade of clear cell RCC. 65 multiphase CT examinations with clear cell RCCs were utilized, 44 tumors with Fuhrman grades 1 or 2 and 21 tumors with grades 3 or 4. After tumor segmentation, the following data were extracted: histogram analysis of voxel-based whole lesion attenuation in each phase, enhancement and washout using mean, median, skewness, kurtosis, standard deviation, and interquartile range. Statistically significant difference was observed in 4 measured parameters between grades 1-2 and grades 3-4: interquartile range of nephrographic attenuation values, standard deviation of absolute enhancement, as well as interquartile range and standard deviation of residual nephrographic enhancement. Interquartile range of nephrographic attenuation values was 292.86 HU for grades 1-2 and 241.19 HU for grades 3-4 (p value 0.02). Standard deviation of absolute enhancement was 41.26 HU for grades 1-2 and 34.66 HU for grades 3-4 (p value 0.03). Interquartile range was 297.12 HU for residual nephrographic enhancement for grades 1-2 and 235.57 HU for grades 3-4 (p value 0.02), and standard deviation of the same was 42.45 HU for grades 1-2 and 37.11 for grades 3-4 (p value 0.04). Our results indicate that absolute enhancement is more heterogeneous for lower grade tumors and that attenuation and residual enhancement in nephrographic phase is more heterogeneous for lower grade tumors. This represents an important step in devising a predictive non-invasive model to predict the

  5. E2-EPF UCP regulates stability and functions of missense mutant pVHL via ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyeong-Su; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Hee Won; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Im, Dong-Soo; Lim, Jung Hwa; Jung, Cho-Rok

    2015-10-26

    Missense mutation of VHL gene is frequently detected in type 2 VHL diseases and linked to a wide range of pVHL functions and stability. Certain mutant pVHLs retain ability to regulate HIFs but lose their function by instability. In this case, regulating of degradation of mutant pVHLs, can be postulated as therapeutic method. The stability and cellular function of missense mutant pVHLs were determine in HEK293T transient expressing cell and 786-O stable cell line. Ubiquitination assay of mutant VHL proteins was performed in vitro system. Anticancer effect of adenovirus mediated shUCP expressing was evaluated using ex vivo mouse xenograft assay. Three VHL missense mutants (V155A, L158Q, and Q164R) are directly ubiquitinated by E2-EPF UCP (UCP) in vitro. Mutant pVHLs are more unstable than wild type in cell. Missense mutant pVHLs interact with UCP directly in both in vitro and cellular systems. Lacking all of lysine residues of pVHL result in resistance to ubiquitination thereby increase its stability. Missense mutant pVHLs maintained the function of E3 ligase to ubiquitinate HIF-1α in vitro. In cells expressing mutant pVHLs, Glut-1 and VEGF were relatively upregulated compared to their levels in cells expressing wild-type. Depletion of UCP restored missense mutant pVHLs levels and inhibited cell growth. Adenovirus-mediated shUCP RNA delivery inhibited tumor growth in ex vivo mouse xenograft model. These data suggest that targeting of UCP can be one of therapeutic method in type 2 VHL disease caused by unstable but functional missense mutant pVHL.

  6. Radiosensitization of renal cell carcinoma in vitro through the induction of autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Pires, Isabel M.; Blick, Christopher; Hill, Mark A.; Ferguson, David J.P.; Chan, Denise A.; Hammond, Ester M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: For patients diagnosed with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), there are few therapeutic options. Radiation therapy is predominantly used to treat metastasis and has not proven effective in the adjuvant setting for renal cancer. Furthermore, RCC is resistant to standard cytotoxic chemotherapies. Targeted anti-angiogenics are the standard of care for RCC but are not curative. Newer agents, such as mTOR inhibitors and others that induce autophagy, have shown great promise for treating RCC. Here, we investigate the potential use of the small molecule STF-62247 to modulate radiation. Materials and methods: Using RCC cell lines, we evaluate sensitivity to radiation in addition to agents that induce autophagic cell death by clonogenic survival assays. Furthermore, these were also tested under physiological oxygen levels. Results: STF-62247 specifically induces autophagic cell death in cells that have lost VHL, an essential mutation in the development of RCC. Treatment with STF-62247 did not alter cell cycle progression but when combined with radiation increased cell killing under oxic and hypoxic/physiological conditions. Conclusions: This study highlights the possibility of combining targeted therapeutics such as STF-62247 or temsirolimus with radiation to reduce the reliance on partial or full nephrectomy and improve patient prognosis.

  7. Wnt Signaling in Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Qi Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC accounts for 90% of all kidney cancers. Due to poor diagnosis, high resistance to the systemic therapies and the fact that most RCC cases occur sporadically, current research switched its focus on studying the molecular mechanisms underlying RCC. The aim is the discovery of new effective and less toxic anti-cancer drugs and novel diagnostic markers. Besides the PI3K/Akt/mTOR, HGF/Met and VHL/hypoxia cellular signaling pathways, the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in RCC is commonly studied. Wnt signaling and its targeted genes are known to actively participate in different biological processes during embryonic development and renal cancer. Recently, studies have shown that targeting this pathway by alternating/inhibiting its intracellular signal transduction can reduce cancer cells viability and inhibit their growth. The targets and drugs identified show promising potential to serve as novel RCC therapeutics and prognostic markers. This review aims to summarize the current status quo regarding recent research on RCC focusing on the involvement of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and how its understanding could facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic targets, new drugs and diagnostic biomarkers.

  8. Microtubular stability affects pVHL-mediated regulation of HIF-1alpha via the p38/MAPK pathway in hypoxic cardiomyocytes.

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    Miao Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous research found that structural changes of the microtubule network influence glycolysis in cardiomyocytes by regulating the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α during the early stages of hypoxia. However, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanism of the changes of HIF-1α caused by microtubule network alternation. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL, as a ubiquitin ligase, is best understood as a negative regulator of HIF-1α. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In primary rat cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cardiac cells, microtubule-stabilization was achieved by pretreating with paclitaxel or transfection of microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4 overexpression plasmids and microtubule-depolymerization was achieved by pretreating with colchicine or transfection of MAP4 siRNA before hypoxia treatment. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for overexpressing pVHL or silencing of pVHL expression were constructed and transfected in primary rat cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells. With different microtubule-stabilizing and -depolymerizing treaments, we demonstrated that the protein levels of HIF-1α were down-regulated through overexpression of pVHL and were up-regulated through knockdown of pVHL in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Importantly, microtubular structure breakdown activated p38/MAPK pathway, accompanied with the upregulation of pVHL. In coincidence, we found that SB203580, a p38/MAPK inhibitor decreased pVHL while MKK6 (Glu overexpression increased pVHL in the microtubule network altered-hypoxic cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that pVHL plays an important role in the regulation of HIF-1α caused by the changes of microtubular structure and the p38/MAPK pathway participates in the process of pVHL change following microtubule network alteration in hypoxic cardiomyocytes.

  9. A patient with bilateral pheochromocytoma as part of a Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL syndrome type 2C

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    Rinkes Inne

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disease. It is relatively recent that type 2C was identified as a separate group solely presenting with pheochromocytomas. As an illustration, an interesting case is presented of a pregnant woman with refractory hypertension. It proved to be the first manifestation of bilateral pheochromocytomas. The family history may indicate the diagnosis, but only identification of a germ line mutation in the DNA of a patient will confirm carriership. Case presentation A 27 year pregnant patient with intra uterine growth retardation presented with hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral adrenal pheochromocytoma. She underwent laparoscopic adrenelectomy and a missense mutation (Gly93Ser in exon 1 of the VHL gene on chromosome 3 (p25 – p26 was shown in the patient, her father and her daughter confirming the diagnosis of VHL. Conclusion In almost all VHL families molecular genetic analysis of DNA will demonstrate an inherited mutation. Because of the involvement in several organs, periodic clinical evaluation should take place in a well coordinated, multidisciplinary setting. VHL disease can be classified into several subtypes. VHL type 2C patients present with pheochromocytomas without evidence of haemangioblastomas in the central nervous system and/or retina and a low risk of renal cell carcinoma. Therefore, in such families, periodic clinical screening can be focussed on pheochromocytomas.

  10. The role of apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain (ARC) in the therapeutic resistance of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): the crucial role of ARC in the inhibition of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Csaba; Funke, Sarah; Nitsche, Vanessa; Liverts, Anna; Zlachevska, Viktoriya; Gasis, Marcia; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Mahotka, Csaba; Schirmacher, Peter; Heikaus, Sebastian

    2017-05-02

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) display broad resistance against conventional radio- and chemotherapies, which is due at least in part to impairments in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. One important anti-apoptotic factor that is strongly overexpressed in RCCs and known to inhibit both apoptotic pathways is ARC (apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain). Expression and subcellular distribution of ARC in RCC tissue samples and RCC cell lines were determined by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent immunohistochemistry, respectively. Extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signalling were induced by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), ABT-263 or topotecan. ARC knock-down was performed in clearCa-12 cells using lentiviral transduction of pGIPZ. shRNAmir constructs. Extrinsic respectively intrinsic apoptosis were induced by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), ABT263 or topotecan. Potential synergistic effects were tested by pre-treatment with topotecan and subsequent treatment with ABT263. Activation of different caspases and mitochondrial depolarisation (JC-1 staining) were analysed by flow cytometry. Protein expression of Bcl-2 family members and ARC in RCC cell lines was measured by Western blotting. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test. Regarding the extrinsic pathway, ARC knockdown strongly enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing the activation level of caspase-8. Regarding the intrinsic pathway, ARC, which was only weakly expressed in the nuclei of RCCs in vivo, exerted its anti-apoptotic effect by impairing mitochondrial activation rather than inhibiting p53. Topotecan- and ABT-263-induced apoptosis was strongly enhanced following ARC knockdown in RCC cell lines. In addition, topotecan pre-treatment enhanced ABT-263-induced apoptosis and this effect was amplified in ARC-knockdown cells. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate the importance of ARC protein in the inhibition of both the extrinsic

  11. Accelerated pavement testing of thin RCC over soil cement pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three full-scale roller compacted concrete (RCC pavement sections built over a soil cement base were tested under accelerated pavement testing (APT. The RCC thicknesses varied from 102 mm (4 in. to 152 mm (6 in. and to 203 mm (8 in., respectively. A bi-directional loading device with a dual-tire load assembly was used for this experiment. Each test section was instrumented with multiple pressure cells and strain gages. The objective was to evaluate the structural performance and load carrying capacity of thin RCC-surfaced pavements under accelerated loading. The APT results generally indicated that all three RCC pavement sections tested in this study possessed very high load carrying capacity; an estimated pavement life in terms of equivalent single axle load (ESAL for the thinnest RCC section (i.e., RCC thickness of 102 mm evaluated was approximately 19.2 million. It was observed that a fatigue failure would be the primary pavement distress type for a thin RCC pavement under trafficking. Specifically, the development of fatigue cracking was found to originate from a longitudinal crack at the edge or in the center of a tire print, then extended and propagated, and eventually merged with cracks of other directions. Instrumentation results were used to characterize the fatigue damage under different load magnitudes. Finally, based on the APT performance of this experiment, two fatigue models for predicting the fatigue life of thin RCC pavements were developed. Keywords: Roller compacted concrete, APT, Pavement performance, Non-destructive testing, Fatigue analysis

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHL364 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHL364 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16205-1 - (Link to Or...iginal site) - - VHL364Z 668 - - - - Show VHL364 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHL364 (Link to dicty...Base) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U16205-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.b...mino Acid sequence ---KKVTIAEAKEIFEKQYRDLYTVSQDVTKLAIQSAEQNGIVFLDEIDKICTSRESIKN GGDASTDGVQRDLLPIVEGCMVSTKYGQ...itwyh*tyrrgykf*lxys*r*nscfrysrh*ktfk Frame B: ---KKVTIAEAKEIFEKQYRDLYTVSQDVTKLAIQSAEQNGIVFLDEIDKICTSRESIKN G

  13. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  14. E2-EPF UCP targets pVHL for degradation and associates with tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Cho-Rok; Hwang, Kyung-Sun; Yoo, Jinsang; Cho, Won-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Woo Ho; Im, Dong-Soo

    2006-07-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, pVHL, forms part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that targets specific substrates for degradation, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), which is involved in tumor progression and angiogenesis. It remains unclear, however, how pVHL is destabilized. Here we show that E2-EPF ubiquitin carrier protein (UCP) associates with and targets pVHL for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in cells, thereby stabilizing HIF-1alpha. UCP is detected coincidently with HIF-1alpha in human primary liver, colon and breast tumors, and metastatic cholangiocarcinoma and colon cancer cells. UCP level correlates inversely with pVHL level in most tumor cell lines. In vitro and in vivo, forced expression of UCP boosts tumor-cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis through effects on the pVHL-HIF pathway. Our results suggest that UCP helps stabilize HIF-1alpha and may be a new molecular target for therapeutic intervention in human cancers.

  15. First Delayed Resection Findings After Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) of Human Localised Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in the IRENE Pilot Phase 2a Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, Johann Jakob, E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Ricke, Jens, E-mail: jens.Ricke@med.ovgu.de; Pech, Maciej, E-mail: macej.pech@med.ovgu.de; Fischbach, Frank, E-mail: frank.fischbach@med.ovgu.de; Jürgens, Julian, E-mail: julian.juergens@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Siedentopf, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.siedentopf@med.ovgu.de; Roessner, Albert, E-mail: albert.roessner@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Porsch, Markus, E-mail: markus.porsch@med.ovgu.de; Baumunk, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.baumunk@med.ovgu.de; Schostak, Martin, E-mail: martin.schostak@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Köllermann, Jens, E-mail: jens.koellermann@sana.de [Sana Klinikum Offenbach Am Main, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Liehr, Uwe-Bernd, E-mail: uwe-bernd.liehr@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionIt is postulated that focal IRE affords complete ablation of soft-tissue tumours while protecting the healthy peritumoral tissue. Therefore, IRE may be an interesting option for minimally invasive, kidney-tissue-sparing, non-thermal ablation of renal tumours.AimWith this current pilot study (“IRENE trial”), we present the first detailed histopathological data of IRE of human RCC followed by delayed tumour resection. The aim of this interim analysis of the first three patients was to investigate the ablation efficiency of percutaneous image-guided focal IRE in RCC, to assess whether a complete ablation of T1a RCC and tissue preservation with the NanoKnife system is possible and to decide whether the ablation parameters need to be altered.MethodsFollowing resection 4 weeks after percutaneous IRE, the success of ablation and detailed histopathological description were used to check the ablation parameters.ResultsThe IRE led to a high degree of damage to the renal tumours (1 central, 2 peripheral; size range 15–17 mm). The postulated homogeneous, isomorphic damage was only partly confirmed. We found a zonal structuring of the ablation zone, negative margins and, enclosed within the ablation zone, very small tumour residues of unclear malignancy.ConclusionAccording to these initial, preliminary study results of the first three renal cases, a new zonal distribution of IRE damage was described and the curative intended, renal saving focal ablation of localised RCC below <3 cm by percutaneous IRE by the NanoKnife system appears to be possible, but needs further, systematic evaluation for this treatment method and treatment protocol.

  16. Local Control Rates of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) to Thoracic, Abdominal, and Soft Tissue Lesions Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altoos, Basel; Amini, Arya; Yacoub, Muthanna; Bourlon, Maria T.; Kessler, Elizabeth E.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Fisher, Christine M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Lam, Elaine T.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the radiographic response rate of SBRT compared to conventional fractionated radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) for thoracic, abdominal, skin and soft tissue RCC lesions treated at our institution. Fifty three lesions where included in the study (36 SBRT, 17 CF-EBRT), treated from 2004 to 2014 at our institution. We included patients that had thoracic, skin & soft tissue (SST), and abdominal metastases of histologically confirmed RCC. The most common SBRT fractionation was 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The median time of follow-up was 16 months (range 3–97 months). Median BED was 216.67 (range 66.67–460.0) for SBRT, and 60 (range 46.67–100.83) for CF-EBRT. Median radiographic local control rates at 12, 24, and 36 months were 100, 93.41, and 93.41 % for lesions treated with SBRT versus 62.02, 35.27 and 35.27 % for those treated with CF-EBRT (p < 0.001). Predictive factors for radiographic local control under univariate analysis included BED ≥ 100 Gy (HR, 0.048; 95 % CI, 0.006–0.382; p = 0.005), dose per fraction ≥ 9 Gy (HR, 0.631; 95 % CI, 0.429–0.931; p = 0.021), and gender (HR, 0.254; 95 % CI, 0.066–0.978; p = 0.048). Under multivariate analysis, there were no significant predictors for local control. Toxicity rates were low and equivalent in both groups, with no grade 4 or 5 side effects reported. SBRT is safe and effective for the treatment of RCC metastases to thoracic, abdominal and integumentary soft tissues. Radiographic response rates were greater and more durable using SBRT compared to CF-EBRT. Further prospective trials are needed to evaluate efficacy and safety of SBRT for RCC metastases

  17. Survival with AGS-003, an autologous dendritic cell-based immunotherapy, in combination with sunitinib in unfavorable risk patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC): Phase 2 study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Asim; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Logan, Theodore F; Lance, Raymond S; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M; Knox, Jennifer J; Master, Viraj A; Pal, Sumanta K; Miller, Wilson H; Karsh, Lawrence I; Tcherepanova, Irina Y; DeBenedette, Mark A; Williams, W Lee; Plessinger, Douglas C; Nicolette, Charles A; Figlin, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    AGS-003 is an autologous immunotherapy prepared from fully matured and optimized monocyte-derived dendritic cells, which are co-electroporated with amplified tumor RNA plus synthetic CD40L RNA. AGS-003 was evaluated in combination with sunitinib in an open label phase 2 study in intermediate and poor risk, treatment naïve patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Twenty-one intermediate and poor risk patients were treated continuously with sunitinib (4 weeks on, 2 weeks off per 6 week cycle). After completion of the first cycle of sunitinib, patients were treated with AGS-003 every 3 weeks for 5 doses, then every 12 weeks until progression or end of study. The primary endpoint was to determine the complete response rate. Secondary endpoints included clinical benefit, safety, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Immunologic response was also monitored. Thirteen patients (62%) experienced clinical benefit (9 partial responses, 4 with stable disease); however there were no complete responses in this group of intermediate and poor risk mRCC patients and enrollment was terminated early. Median PFS from registration was 11.2 months (95% CI 6.0, 19.4) and the median OS from registration was 30.2 months (95% CI 9.4, 57.1) for all patients. Seven (33%) patients survived for at least 4.5 years, while five (24%) survived for more than 5 years, including 2 patients who remain progression-free with durable responses for more than 5 years at the time of this report. AGS-003 was well tolerated with only mild injection-site reactions. The most common adverse events were related to expected toxicity from sunitinib therapy. In patients who had sequential samples available for immune monitoring, the magnitude of the increase in the absolute number of CD8(+) CD28(+) CD45RA(-) effector/memory T cells (CTLs) after 5 doses of AGS-003 relative to baseline, correlated with overall survival. AGS-003 in combination with sunitinib was

  18. Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene loss in renal cell carcinoma promotes oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via Akt-1 and MEK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Justin; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Xanthopoulos, Julie; Linehan, W Marston; Bottaro, Donald P; Vasselli, James R

    2008-10-01

    Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent form of kidney cancer and is frequently associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene function, resulting in the aberrant transcriptional activation of genes that contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, including transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. To determine the functional impact of EGFR activation on RCC, we suppressed critical components of this pathway: EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1. Stable transfection of RCC cells with plasmids bearing shRNA directed against each of these genes was used to individually suppress their expression. Transfectants were characterized for growth and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. RCC cell transfectants displayed significantly reduced growth rate and matrix invasion in vitro and RCC tumor xenograft growth rate in vivo. Analysis of tumor cells that emerged after extended periods in each model showed that significant EGFR suppression was sustained, whereas Akt-1 and MEK-1 knock-down cells had escaped shRNA suppression. EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1 are individually critical for RCC cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, and even partial suppression of each can have a significant impact on tumor progression. The emergence of transfectants that had escaped Akt-1 and MEK-1 suppression during tumorigenicity experiments suggests that these effectors may each be more critical than EGFR for RCC tumorigenesis, consistent with results from clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors for RCC, where durable clinical responses have not been seen.

  19. Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Gene Loss in Renal Cell Carcinoma Promotes Oncogenic Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling via Akt-1 and MEK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Justin; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Xanthopoulos, Julie; Linehan, W. Marston; Bottaro, Donald P.; Vasselli, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most prevalent form of kidney cancer and is frequently associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene function, resulting in the aberrant transcriptional activation of genes that contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, including transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. To determine the functional impact of EGFR activation on RCC, we suppressed critical components of this pathway: EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1. Methods Stable transfection of RCC cells with plasmids bearing shRNA directed against each of these genes was used to individually suppress their expression. Transfectants were characterized for growth and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Results RCC cell transfectants displayed significantly reduced growth rate and matrix invasion in vitro and RCC tumor xenograft growth rate in vivo. Analysis of tumor cells that emerged after extended periods in each model showed that significant EGFR suppression was sustained, whereas Akt-1 and MEK-1 knockdown cells had escaped shRNA suppression. Conclusions EGFR, Akt-1, and MEK-1 are individually critical for RCC cell invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, and even partial suppression of each can have a significant impact on tumor progression. The emergence of transfectants that had escaped Akt-1 and MEK-1 suppression during tumorigenicity experiments suggests that these effectors may each be more critical than EGFR for RCC tumorigenesis, consistent with results from clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors for RCC, where durable clinical responses have not been seen. PMID:18243508

  20. Androgen receptor (AR) promotes clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) migration and invasion via altering the circHIAT1/miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p/CDC42 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefeng; Sun, Yin; Tao, Wei; Fei, Xiang; Chang, Chawnshang

    2017-05-28

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the androgen receptor (AR) plays important roles to promote the metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The detailed mechanisms, especially how AR functions via altering the circular RNAs (circRNAs) remain unclear. Here we identified a new circRNA (named as circHIAT1) whose expression was lower in ccRCCs than adjacent normal tissues. Targeting AR could suppress ccRCC cell progression via increasing circHIAT1 expression. ChIP assay and luciferase assay demonstrated that AR suppressed circHIAT1 expression via regulating its host gene, Hippocampus Abundant Transcript 1 (HIAT1) expression at the transcriptional level. The consequences of AR-suppressed circHIAT1 resulted in deregulating miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p expressions, which increased CDC42 expression to enhance ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Increasing this newly identified signal via circHIAT1 suppressed AR-enhanced ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Together, these results suggested that circHIAT1 functioned as a metastatic inhibitor to suppress AR-enhanced ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Targeting this newly identified AR-circHIAT1-mediated miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p/CDC42 signals may help us develop potential new therapies to better suppress ccRCC metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding familial and non-familial renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodmer, Daniëlle; van den Hurk, Wilhelmina; van Groningen, Jan J M; Eleveld, Marc J; Martens, Gerard J M; Weterman, Marian A J; van Kessel, Ad Geurts

    2002-10-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of familial and non-familial cases of conventional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) revealed a critical role(s) for multiple genes on human chromosome 3. For some of these genes, e.g. VHL, such a role has been firmly established, whereas for others, definite confirmation is still pending. Additionally, a novel role for constitutional chromosome 3 translocations as risk factors for conventional RCC development is rapidly emerging. Also, several candidate loci have been mapped to other chromosomes in both familial and non-familial RCCs of distinct histologic subtypes. The MET gene on chromosome 7, for example, was found to be involved in both forms of papillary RCC. A PRCC-TFE3 fusion gene is typically encountered in t(X;1)-positive non-familial papillary RCCs and results in abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint in a dominant-negative fashion, thus leading to RCC. Together, these data turn human RCC into a model system in which different aspects of both familial and non-familial syndromes may act as novel paradigms for cancer development.

  2. Modeling Renal Cell Carcinoma in Mice: Bap1 and Pbrm1 Inactivation Drive Tumor Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yi-Feng; Cohn, Shannon; Christie, Alana; McKenzie, Tiffani; Wolff, Nicholas; Do, Quyen N; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Pedrosa, Ivan; Wang, Tao; Dey, Anwesha; Busslinger, Meinrad; Xie, Xian-Jin; Hammer, Robert E; McKay, Renée M; Kapur, Payal; Brugarolas, James

    2017-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by BAP1 and PBRM1 mutations, which are associated with tumors of different grade and prognosis. However, whether BAP1 and PBRM1 loss causes ccRCC and determines tumor grade is unclear. We conditionally targeted Bap1 and Pbrm1 (with Vhl ) in the mouse using several Cre drivers. Sglt2 and Villin proximal convoluted tubule drivers failed to cause tumorigenesis, challenging the conventional notion of ccRCC origins. In contrast, targeting with PAX8, a transcription factor frequently overexpressed in ccRCC, led to ccRCC of different grades. Bap1 -deficient tumors were of high grade and showed greater mTORC1 activation than Pbrm1 -deficient tumors, which exhibited longer latency. Disrupting one allele of the mTORC1 negative regulator, Tsc1 , in Pbrm1 -deficient kidneys triggered higher grade ccRCC. This study establishes Bap1 and Pbrm1 as lineage-specific drivers of ccRCC and histologic grade, implicates mTORC1 as a tumor grade rheostat, and suggests that ccRCCs arise from Bowman capsule cells. Significance: Determinants of tumor grade and aggressiveness across cancer types are poorly understood. Using ccRCC as a model, we show that Bap1 and Pbrm1 loss drives tumor grade. Furthermore, we show that the conversion from low grade to high grade can be promoted by activation of mTORC1. Cancer Discov; 7(8); 900-17. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Leung and Kim, p. 802 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 783 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. A PHASE II STUDY OF GEMCITABINE AND CAPECITABINE IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CANCER (RCC): SOUTHWEST ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY S0312

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Hussey, Michael; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Clark, Joseph I.; Lange, Marianne K.; Crawford, E. David

    2010-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine plus capecitabine has modest efficacy in patients with advanced RCC but has considerable toxicity. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a modified dose-schedule of this doublet in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic RCC. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients were treated with gemcitabine at 900mg/m2 on days 1,8,15 and capecitabine at 625mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 through 21, every 28 days. Eligible patients must have adequate performance status and end-organ function. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate (RR). No further evaluation of this regimen would be pursued if the RR was ≤ 5%. In an exploratory manner using archival specimens, we also evaluated potential markers of prognosis and treatment response including thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms and tumor expression of p53, PTEN, pAKT, pmTOR, and ERCC1. Results Of 43 patients registered, 1 was ineligible and 2 were not analyzable. There was 1 confirmed complete response (CR) and three unconfirmed partial responses (PR), for an overall response rate of 10% (95% CI: 3, 24). Nineteen patients (48%) had stable disease (SD). The six-month freedom-from-treatment-failure and overall survival rates were 20% (95% CI: 8, 32) and 75% (95% CI: 62, 88), respectively. Median survival time was 23 months (95% CI: 10, 37). One patient each experienced Grade 4 neutropenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia and hemolysis with renal failure. The most common Grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (12 patients), fatigue (5), and leucopenia (4). Patients with a best response of stable disease or better were more likely to have a decrease in expression of PTEN and an increased expression of pmTOR. Conclusions Gemcitabine plus capecitabine at this reduced dose-schedule benefits a small percentage of patients with RCC with an acceptable toxicity profile. The combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine may serve as a base regimen for combination therapy with targeted agents in select RCC

  4. RCC-MX (2008 edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, X.; Drubay, B.

    2008-10-01

    The RCC-MX books is a compilation of design and construction rules for the mechanical materials of experimental reactors, for their auxiliaries and irradiation devices. This second edition includes the updates of references to NF, EN and ISO standards, the compliance with the regulations for nuclear pressure equipments, and the feedback since the 2005 edition. It comprises 9 books and a CD-Rom and includes a presentation document. The RCC-MX has been developed for the Jules Horowitz reactor but can be used for the design and construction of new projects of new experimental reactors or new equipments and devices for existing facilities. Content: - Book 1: general dispositions, materials for experimental reactors and their auxiliaries, for irradiation devices and for control or handling mechanisms, complementary requirements and particular dispositions; - Book 2: materials for the reactor and for its level 1 auxiliaries; - Book 3: materials for the reactor and for its level 2 and level 3 auxiliaries, control and handling mechanisms, materials for irradiation devices; - Book 4: technical appendixes - materials characteristics (steels and alloys); - Book 5: technical appendixes (design rules); - Book 6: technical specifications of materials; - Book 7: tests and control methods; - Book 8: welding; - Book 9: fabrication. (J.S.)

  5. Von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Harbud, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    for vHL which is comprised of Danish doctors and specialists interested in vHL. The recommendations are based on longstanding clinical experience, Danish original research, and extensive review of the international literature. vHL is a hereditary multi-tumour disease caused by germline mutations....../MRI of the abdomen, e) annual plasma-metanephrine, plasma-normetanephrine, and plasma-chromogranin A tests, and f) annual hearing examination at a department of audiology. It is advised that one doctor takes on the responsibility of coordination of and referral to the many examinations, and the communication...

  6. The value of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD MR imaging in differentiation of renal solid mass and grading of renal cell carcinoma (RCC: analysis based on the largest cross-sectional area versus the entire whole tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Wu

    Full Text Available To study the value of assessing renal masses using different methods in parameter approaches and to determine whether BOLD MRI is helpful in differentiating RCC from benign renal masses, differentiating clear-cell RCC from renal masses other than clear-cell RCC and determining the tumour grade.Ninety-five patients with 139 renal masses (93 malignant and 46 benign who underwent abdominal BOLD MRI were enrolled. R2* values were derived from the largest cross-section (R2*largest and from the whole tumour (R2*whole. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements were analysed based on two measurements by the same observer and the first measurement from each observer, respectively, and these agreements are reported with intra-class correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals. The diagnostic value of the R2* value in the evaluation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic analysis.The intra-observer agreement was very good for R2*largest and R2*whole (all > 0.8. The inter-observer agreement of R2*whole (0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.69~0.79 was good and was significantly improved compared with the R2*largest (0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.52~0.68, as there was no overlap in the 95% confidence interval of the intra-class correlation coefficients. The diagnostic value in differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign lesions with R2*whole (AUC=0.79/0.78[observer1/observer2] and R2*largest (AUC=0.75[observer1] was good and significantly higher (p=0.01 for R2*largest[observer2] vs R2*whole[observer2], p 0.7 and were not significantly different (p=0.89/0.93 for R2*largest vs R2*whole[observer1/observer2], 0.96 for R2*whole[observer1] vs R2*largest[observer2] and 0.96 for R2*whole [observer2] vs R2*largest[observer1].BOLD MRI could provide a feasible parameter for differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign renal masses and for predicting clear-cell renal cell carcinoma grading. Compared with the largest cross

  7. Comparisons of ratchetting analysis methods using RCC-M, RCC-MR and ASME codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yu; Cabrillat, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper compares the simplified ratcheting analysis methods used in RCC-M, RCC-MR and ASME with some examples. Firstly, comparisons of the methods in RCC-M and efficiency diagram in RCC-MR are investigated. A special method is used to describe these two methods with curves in one coordinate, and the different conservation is demonstrated. RCC-M method is also be interpreted by SR (second ratio) and v (efficiency index) which is used in RCC-MR. Hence, we can easily compare the previous two methods by defining SR as abscissa and v as ordinate and plotting two curves of them. Secondly, comparisons of the efficiency curve in RCC-MR and methods in ASME-NH APPENDIX T are investigated, with significant creep. At last, two practical evaluations are performed to show the comparisons of aforementioned methods. (authors)

  8. MO-DE-207B-05: Predicting Gene Mutations in Renal Cell Carcinoma Based On CT Imaging Features: Validation Using TCGA-TCIA Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Zhou, Z; Thomas, K; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to investigate the use of contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) features for the prediction of mutations of BAP1, PBRM1, and VHL genes in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: For this study, we used two patient databases with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The first one consisted of 33 patients from our institution (UT Southwestern Medical Center, UTSW). The second one consisted of 24 patients from the Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), where each patient is connected by a unique identi?er to the tissue samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). From the contrast enhanced CT image of each patient, tumor contour was first delineated by a physician. Geometry, intensity, and texture features were extracted from the delineated tumor. Based on UTSW dataset, we completed feature selection and trained a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to predict mutations of BAP1, PBRM1 and VHL genes. We then used TCIA-TCGA dataset to validate the predictive model build upon UTSW dataset. Results: The prediction accuracy of gene expression of TCIA-TCGA patients was 0.83 (20 of 24), 0.83 (20 of 24), and 0.75 (18 of 24) for BAP1, PBRM1, and VHL respectively. For BAP1 gene, texture feature was the most prominent feature type. For PBRM1 gene, intensity feature was the most prominent. For VHL gene, geometry, intensity, and texture features were all important. Conclusion: Using our feature selection strategy and models, we achieved predictive accuracy over 0.75 for all three genes under the condition of using patient data from one institution for training and data from other institutions for testing. These results suggest that radiogenomics can be used to aid in prognosis and used as convenient surrogates for expensive and time consuming gene assay procedures.

  9. Epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, and risk factors for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Paglino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite only accounting for approximately 2% of all new primary cancer cases, renal cell carcinoma (RCC incidence has dramatically increased over time. Incidence rates vary greatly according to geographic areas, so that it is extremely likely that exogenous risk factors could play an important role in the development of this cancer. Several risk factors have been linked with RCC, including cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension (and antihypertensive drugs, chronic kidney diseases (also dialysis and transplantation, as well as the use of certain analgesics. Furthermore, although RCC has not generally been considered an occupational cancer, several types of occupationally-derived exposures have been implicated in its pathogenesis. These include exposure to asbestos, chlorinated solvents, gasoline, diesel exhaust fumes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, printing inks and dyes, cadmium and lead. Finally, families with a predisposition to the development of renal neoplasms were identified and the genes involved discovered and characterized. Therefore, there are now four well-characterized, genetically determined syndromes associated with an increased incidence of kidney tumors, i.e., Von Hippel Lindau (VHL, Hereditary Papillary Renal Carcinoma (HPRC, Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome (BHD, and Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (HLRCC. This review will address present knowledge about the epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and risk factors of RCC.

  10. Management Strategies and Outcomes for VHL-related Craniospinal Hemangioblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christ Ordookhanian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are rare and benign tumors accounting for less than 2% of all central nervous system (CNS tumors. The vast majority of hemangioblastomas occur sporadically, whereas a small number of cases, especially in younger patients, are associated with Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL syndrome. It is thought that loss of tumor suppressor function of the VHL gene results in stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha with downstream activation of cellular proliferative and angiogenic genes that promote tumorigenesis. VHL-related hemangioblastomas predominantly occur in the cerebellum and spine. Lesions are often diagnosed on contrast-enhanced craniospinal MRIs, and the diagnosis of VHL occurs through assessment for germline VHL mutations. Surgical resection remains the primary treatment modality for symptomatic or worrisome lesions, with excellent local control rates and neurological outcomes. Stereotactic radiotherapy can be employed in patients who are deemed high risk for surgery, have multiple lesions, or have non-resectable lesions. Given the tendency for development of either new or multiple lesions, close radiographic surveillance is often recommended for asymptomatic lesions.

  11. Ser80Ile mutation and a concurrent Pro25Leu variant of the VHL gene in an extended Hungarian von Hippel-Lindau family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazakas Ferenc

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by development of cystic and tumorous lesions at multiple sites, including the brain, spinal cord, kidneys, adrenals, pancreas, epididymis and eyes. The clinical phenotype results from molecular abnormalities of the VHL tumor suppressor gene, mapped to human chromosome 3p25-26. The VHL gene encodes two functionally active VHL proteins due to the presence of two translational initiation sites separated by 53 codons. The majority of disease-causing mutations have been detected downstream of the second translational initiation site, but there are conflicting data as to whether few mutations located in the first 53 codons, such as the Pro25Leu could have a pathogenic role. In this paper we report a large Hungarian VHL type 2 family consisting of 32 members in whom a disease-causing AGT80AAT (Ser80Ile c.239G>A, p.Ser80Ile mutation, but not the concurrent CCT25CTT (Pro25Leu c.74C>T, p.Pro25Leu variant co-segregated with the disease. To our knowledge, the Ser80Ile mutation has not been previously described in VHL type 2 patients with high risk of pheochromocytoma and renal cell cancer. Therefore, this finding represents a novel genotype-phenotype association and VHL kindreds with Ser80Ile mutation will require careful surveillance for pheochromocytoma. We concluded that the Pro25Leu variant is a rare, neutral variant, but the presence such a rare gene variant may make genetic counseling difficult.

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma With Chromosome 6p Amplification Including the TFEB Gene: A Novel Mechanism of Tumor Pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sean R; Grignon, David J; Cheng, Liang; Favazza, Laura; Gondim, Dibson D; Carskadon, Shannon; Gupta, Nilesh S; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2017-03-01

    Amplification of chromosome 6p has been implicated in aggressive behavior in several cancers, but has not been characterized in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We identified 9 renal tumors with amplification of chromosome 6p including the TFEB gene, 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and 6 from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) databases. Patients' ages were 28 to 78 years (median, 61 y). Most tumors were high stage (7/9 pT3a, 2/9 pN1). Using immunohistochemistry, 2/4 were positive for melanocytic markers and cathepsin K. Novel TFEB fusions were reported by TCGA in 2; however, due to a small composition of fusion transcripts compared with full-length transcripts (0.5/174 and 3.3/132 FPKM), we hypothesize that these represent secondary fusions due to amplification. Five specimens (4 TCGA, 1 fluorescence in situ hybridization) had concurrent chromosome 3p copy number loss or VHL deletion. However, these did not resemble clear cell RCC, had negative carbonic anhydrase IX labeling, lacked VHL mutation, and had papillary or unclassified histology (2/4 had gain of chromosome 7 or 17). One tumor each had somatic FH mutation and SMARCB1 mutation. Chromosome 6p amplification including TFEB is a previously unrecognized cytogenetic alteration in RCC, associated with heterogenous tubulopapillary eosinophilic and clear cell histology. The combined constellation of features does not fit cleanly into an existing tumor category (unclassified), most closely resembling papillary or translocation RCC. The tendency for high tumor stage, varied tubulopapillary morphology, and a subset with melanocytic marker positivity suggests the possibility of a unique tumor type, despite some variation in appearance and genetics.

  13. pVHL's kryptonite: E2-EPF UCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohh, Michael

    2006-08-01

    E2-EPF ubiquitin carrier protein (UCP) is a member of an E2 family of enzymes that catalyzes the ligation of ubiquitin to proteins targeted for destruction by the proteasome. UCP is overexpressed in common human cancers, suggesting its involvement in oncogenesis, but a physiologic target of UCP has not been identified. In a recent report published in Nature Medicine, Jung et al. identified von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, which targets the alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) for ubiquitin-mediated destruction, as a bona fide substrate of UCP and demonstrated a potential pVHL-HIF pathway-dependent role for UCP in cancer development.

  14. Suppression of mitochondrial respiration with auraptene inhibits the progression of renal cell carcinoma: involvement of HIF-1α degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yunseon; Han, Jeongsu; Kim, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jungim; Lee, Min Joung; Jeong, Soyeon; Ryu, Min Jeong; Seo, Kang-Sik; Choi, Song-Yi; Shong, Minho; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-11-10

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression resulting from the uncontrolled migration and enhanced angiogenesis is an obstacle to effective therapeutic intervention. Tumor metabolism has distinctive feature called Warburg effect, which enhances the aerobic glycolysis rapidly supplying the energy for migration of tumor. To manipulate this metabolic change characteristic of aggressive tumors, we utilized the citrus extract, auraptene, known as a mitochondrial inhibitor, testing its anticancer effects against the RCC4 cell line. We found that auraptene impaired RCC4 cell motility through reduction of mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic pathway-related genes. It also strongly disrupted VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), a key regulator of cancer metabolism, migration and angiogenesis that is stably expressed in RCCs by virtue of a genetic mutation in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor protein, was impeded by auraptene, which blocked HIF-1a translation initiation without causing cytotoxicity. We suggest that blockade HIF-1a and reforming energy metabolism with auraptene is an effective approach for suspension RCC progression.

  15. Plutonium recycle concept for RCC - type PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet, H.; Charlier, A.; Deramaix, P.; Vanderberg, C.

    1975-01-01

    Self-generated Pu recycling schemes in RCC-type PWRs have been defined. The main results of survey studies performed to compare the relative merits of various Pu recycle strategies and the merits of alternative solutions of the assembly design such as the Pu-island assembly or the all-Pu assembly are presented [fr

  16. Tumor signatures of PTHLH overexpression, high serum calcium, and poor prognosis were observed exclusively in clear cell but not non clear cell renal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Shioi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuhiko; Ito, Hiroki; Kondo, Keiichi; Hasumi, Hisashi; Sano, Futoshi; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Kishida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Yoji; Yamanaka, Shoji; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    High serum calcium (Ca) due to aberrant secretion of tumor parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) is a well-known paraneoplastic sign and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the status of serum Ca and tumor PTHLH expression have not been verified using the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) renal tumor classification. We retrospectively reviewed corrected serum Ca levels at initial onset (n = 683) and/or as of recurrence (n = 71) in patients with RCC. We also examined a total of 623 renal parenchymal tumor samples for PTHLH mRNA expressions by quantitative real-time PCR. High serum Ca concomitant with PTHLH overexpression in tumors was observed exclusively in clear cell RCC but not in other non clear cell subtype tumors, including papillary, chromophobe, collecting-duct, unclassified, and other rare subtype RCCs or in benign oncocytomas and angiomyolipomas. In clear cell RCC, PTHLH expression was significantly high in male patients, and was associated with a symptomatic presentation, higher grade, and higher stage cases, whereas it was not associated with VHL gene status. Univariate analyses demonstrated that high PTHLH expression was strongly associated with poor outcome both in overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for patients who underwent standard nephrectomy. Further multivariate Cox analyses revealed that the PTHLH expressions remained as independent prognostic parameters for OS but not for DFS. These data suggest that the previously characterized tumor signatures of high serum Ca due to high PTHLH expression and poor prognosis are clear cell RCC-specific features, whereas these characteristics are rare in non clear cell RCCs

  17. The contemporary role of ablative treatment approaches in the management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): focus on radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, Tobias; Kroeger, Nils; Zimmermann, Uwe; Burchardt, Martin; Belldegrun, Arie S; Pantuck, Allan J

    2014-06-01

    Currently, most of renal tumors are small, low grade, with a slow growth rate, a low metastatic potential, and with up to 30 % of these tumors being benign on the final pathology. Moreover, they are often diagnosed in elderly patients with preexisting medical comorbidities in whom the underlying medical conditions may pose a greater risk of death than the small renal mass. Concerns regarding overdiagnosis and overtreatment of patients with indolent small renal tumors have led to an increasing interest in minimally invasive, ablative as an alternative to extirpative interventions for selected patients. To provide an overview about the state of the art in radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation in the clinical management of renal cell carcinoma. A PubMed wide the literature search of was conducted. International consensus panels recommend ablative techniques in patients who are unfit for surgery, who are not considered candidates for or elect against elective surveillance, and who have small renal masses. The most often used techniques are cryoablation and RFA. These ablative techniques offer potentially curative outcomes while conferring several advantages over extirpative surgery, including improved patient procedural tolerance, faster recovery, preservation of renal function, and reduction in the risk of intraoperative and postsurgical complications. While it is likely that outcomes associated with ablative modalities will improve with further advances in technology, their application will expand to more elective indications as longer-term efficacy data become available. Ablative techniques pose a valid treatment option in selected patients.

  18. Potent and selective chemical probe of hypoxic signalling downstream of HIF-α hydroxylation via VHL inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Julianty; Galdeano, Carles; Soares, Pedro; Gadd, Morgan S.; Grzes, Katarzyna M.; Ellis, Lucy; Epemolu, Ola; Shimamura, Satoko; Bantscheff, Marcus; Grandi, Paola; Read, Kevin D.; Cantrell, Doreen A.; Rocha, Sonia; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-11-01

    Chemical strategies to using small molecules to stimulate hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) activity and trigger a hypoxic response under normoxic conditions, such as iron chelators and inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes, have broad-spectrum activities and off-target effects. Here we disclose VH298, a potent VHL inhibitor that stabilizes HIF-α and elicits a hypoxic response via a different mechanism, that is the blockade of the VHL:HIF-α protein-protein interaction downstream of HIF-α hydroxylation by PHD enzymes. We show that VH298 engages with high affinity and specificity with VHL as its only major cellular target, leading to selective on-target accumulation of hydroxylated HIF-α in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion in different cell lines, with subsequent upregulation of HIF-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels. VH298 represents a high-quality chemical probe of the HIF signalling cascade and an attractive starting point to the development of potential new therapeutics targeting hypoxia signalling.

  19. Identification and validation of novel prognostic markers in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabjerg, Maj

    2017-10-01

    Kidney cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC)) is one of the most deadly malignancies due to frequent late diagnosis and poor treatment options. Histologically, RCC embraces a wide variety of different subtypes with the clear cell variant (ccRCC) being the most common, accounting for 75-90% of all RCCs. At present, the surveillance protocols for follow-up of RCC patients after radical nephrectomy are based on the American Joint Committee on Cancers (AJCC) pathological tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification system. Other comprehensive staging modalities have emerged and have been implemented in an attempt to improve prognostication by combining other pathological and clinical variables, including Fuhrman nuclear grade and Leibovich score. However, even early stage tumors remain at risk of metastatic progression after surgical resection and 20-40% of patients undergoing nephrectomy for clinically localized RCC will develop a recurrence. Identifying this high-risk group of RCC patients remains a challenge. Hence, novel molecular prognostic biomarkers are needed to better predict clinical outcomes. An intensive search within this field has been ongoing in the past few years, and the three main predictive and prognostic markers validated in RCC are Von Hippel Lindau (VHL), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Nonetheless, the use of these is still debated and none of them have yet been implemented in clinical routine. RCC is resistant to conventional oncological therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiation. The availability of novel targeted therapies directed against tumorigenic and angiogenic pathways have increased over the last years, and the outcome of patients with advanced RCC has significantly improved as a consequence. Unfortunately, all patients eventually become resistant. Thus, the development of novel targeted therapies is of great importance. The aim of this thesis was therefore to contribute in the search for novel

  20. Compromised JMJD6 histone demethylase activity impacts on VHL gene repression in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahari, Sruthi; Post, Martin; Rolfo, Alessandro; Weksberg, Rosanna; Caniggia, Isabella

    2018-01-24

    The von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein is a key executor of the cellular hypoxic response that is compromised in preeclampsia, a serious disorder complicating 5-7% of pregnancies. To date, the mechanisms controlling VHL gene expression in the human placenta remain elusive. We examined VHL epigenetic regulation in normal pregnancy and in preeclampsia, a pathology characterized by placental hypoxia. Placentae were obtained from early-onset (E-PE: n=56; <34 weeks of gestation) and late onset preeclampsia (L-PE: n=19; ≥ 34 weeks of gestation). Placentae from healthy normotensive age-matched preterm and term pregnancies (PTC: n=43; TC: n=23) were included as controls. We measured the activity of Jumonji domain containing protein 6 (JMJD6), a Fe2+ and oxygen-dependent histone demethylase, and examined its function in the epigenetic control of VHL. JMJD6 regulates VHL gene expression in the human placenta. VHL downregulation in preeclampsia is dependent on decreased JMJD6 demethylase activity due to hypoxia and reduced Fe2+ bioavailability. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed decreased association of JMJD6 and its histone targets with the VHL promoter. Findings in preeclampsia were corroborated in a murine model of pharmacological hypoxia using FG-4592. Placentae from FG-4592 treated mice exhibited reduced VHL levels, accompanied by placental morphological alterations and reduced pup weights. Notably, Fe2+ supplementation rescued JMJD6 histone demethylase activity in histone from E-PE and FG-4592-treated mice. Our study uncovers novel epigenetic regulation of VHL and its functional consequences for altered oxygen and iron homeostasis in preeclampsia. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society

  1. mTOR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barilla, R.; Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 4 % of all malignancies. Much is known about the pathogenesis of RCC because of studies examining its close relationship with dysfunction of the Von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates nutritional needs, cell growth, and angiogenesisi in cells by down regulating or up regulating a variety of proteins including HIF. Until 2005, only a single agent high dose interleukin 2 was approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. More recently thanks to better knowledge in the field of molecular biology new treatment options appeared. Sunitinib and bevacizumab are currently considered to be treatment of first choice for patients in good and intermediate prognostic group and sorafenib is preferred second line treatment in the same patient population pretreated with cytokines after disease progression. Temsirolimus and everolimus, rapamycin analouges, have recently been tested in III trials in first and second line treatment in patients with advanced metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  2. Coronin-1C and RCC2 guide mesenchymal migration by trafficking Rac1 and controlling GEF exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rosalind C.; Cowell, Christopher A. M.; Hammond, Christina L.; Bergen, Dylan J. M.; Roper, James A.; Feng, Yi; Rendall, Thomas C. S.; Race, Paul R.; Bass, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sustained forward migration through a fibrillar extracellular matrix requires localization of protrusive signals. Contact with fibronectin at the tip of a cell protrusion activates Rac1, and for linear migration it is necessary to dampen Rac1 activity in off-axial positions and redistribute Rac1 from non-protrusive membrane to the leading edge. Here, we identify interactions between coronin-1C (Coro1C), RCC2 and Rac1 that focus active Rac1 to a single protrusion. Coro1C mediates release of inactive Rac1 from non-protrusive membrane and is necessary for Rac1 redistribution to a protrusive tip and fibronectin-dependent Rac1 activation. The second component, RCC2, attenuates Rac1 activation outside the protrusive tip by binding to the Rac1 switch regions and competitively inhibiting GEF action, thus preventing off-axial protrusion. Depletion of Coro1C or RCC2 by RNA interference causes loss of cell polarity that results in shunting migration in 1D or 3D culture systems. Furthermore, morpholinos against Coro1C or RCC2, or mutation of any of the binding sites in the Rac1–RCC2–Coro1C complex delays the arrival of neural crest derivatives at the correct location in developing zebrafish, demonstrating the crucial role in migration guidance in vivo. PMID:25074804

  3. The phenotype of polycythemia due to Croatian homozygous VHL (571C>G:H191D) mutation is different from that of Chuvash polycythemia (VHL 598C>T:R200W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasic, Nikica Ljubas; Piterkova, Lucie; Huff, Chad; Bilic, Ernest; Yoon, Donghoon; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Niu, Xiaomei; Nekhai, Sergei; Gordeuk, Victor; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-04-01

    Mutations of VHL (a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factors) have position-dependent distinct cancer phenotypes. Only two known inherited homozygous VHL mutations exist and they cause polycythemia: Chuvash R200W and Croatian H191D. We report a second polycythemic Croatian H191D homozygote distantly related to the first propositus. Three generations of both families were genotyped for analysis of shared ancestry. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to better define their phenotypes, with an emphasis on a comparison with Chuvash polycythemia. The VHL H191D mutation did not segregate in the family defined by the known common ancestors of the two subjects, suggesting a high prevalence in Croatians, but haplotype analysis indicated an undocumented common ancestor ∼six generations ago as the founder of this mutation. We show that erythropoietin levels in homozygous VHL H191D individuals are higher than in VHL R200W patients of similar ages, and their native erythroid progenitors, unlike Chuvash R200W, are not hypersensitive to erythropoietin. This observation contrasts with a report suggesting that polycythemia in VHL R200W and H191D homozygotes is due to the loss of JAK2 regulation from VHL R200W and H191D binding to SOCS1. In conclusion, our studies further define the hematologic phenotype of VHL H191D and provide additional evidence for phenotypic heterogeneity associated with the positional effects of VHL mutations.

  4. Isoform-specific interactions of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein

    OpenAIRE

    Minervini, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Gabriella M.; Masiero, Alessandro; Sartori, Elena; Corr?, Samantha; Potenza, Emilio; Costa, Rodolfo; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) is considered one of the main causes for malignant renal clear-cell carcinoma (ccRCC) insurgence. In human, pVHL exists in two isoforms, pVHL19 and pVHL30 respectively, displaying comparable tumor suppressor abilities. Mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been also correlated with ccRCC insurgence and ineffectiveness of treatment. A recent proteomic analysis linked full length pVHL30 with p53 pathway regulation t...

  5. The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher J. Ricketts; Aguirre A. De Cubas; Huihui Fan; Christof C. Smith; Martin Lang; Ed Reznik; Reanne Bowlby; Ewan A. Gibb; Rehan Akbani; Rameen Beroukhim; Donald P. Bottaro; Toni K. Choueiri; Richard A. Gibbs; Andrew K. Godwin; Scott Haake

    2018-01-01

    Summary: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is not a single disease, but several histologically defined cancers with different genetic drivers, clinical courses, and therapeutic responses. The current study evaluated 843 RCC from the three major histologic subtypes, including 488 clear cell RCC, 274 papillary RCC, and 81 chromophobe RCC. Comprehensive genomic and phenotypic analysis of the RCC subtypes reveals distinctive features of each subtype that provide the foundation for the development of sub...

  6. Prevalence, birth incidence, and penetrance of von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Galanakis, Michael Carter Bisgaard; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2017-01-01

    the international diagnostic criteria. We found an overall penetrance of 87% at age 60 years. When considering only vHL patients who have not attended surveillance, 20% will still be asymptomatic at age 60 years. This should be considered in the context of genetic counselling, especially when assessing the risk...... of vHL in asymptomatic adult first-degree relatives who are often not genetically tested.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 14 December 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.173....

  7. Development of synchronous VHL syndrome tumors reveals contingencies and constraints to tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Rosalie; Horswell, Stuart; Rowan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    are contingent upon the nature of 3p loss of heterozygosity occurring early in tumorigenesis. However, despite distinct 3p events, genomic, proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses reveal evidence for convergence upon the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. Four germline tumors in this young patient...... a germline VHL mutation, the evolutionary principles of contingency and convergence in tumor development are complementary. In this small set of patients with early stage VHL-associated tumors, there is reduced mutation burden and limited evidence of intra-tumor heterogeneity....

  8. Creep design rules in french ''RCC-MR'' code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, H.

    1986-04-01

    In this paper, four points enlightening the originality of the ''RCC-MR'' analysis rules in the creep range will be discussed. The three first points will concern elastic analysis, the fourth one materials data. The rules given in this paper are applicable for class 1 components and level A conditions. They are given by way of illustration in a simplified form

  9. Sequential Ground Motion Effects on the Behavior of a Base-Isolated RCC Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sequential ground motion effects on the dynamic responses of reinforced concrete containment (RCC buildings with typical isolators are studied in this paper. Although the base isolation technique is developed to guarantee the security and integrity of RCC buildings under single earthquakes, seismic behavior of base-isolated RCC buildings under sequential ground motions is deficient. Hence, an ensemble of as-recorded sequential ground motions is employed to study the effect of including aftershocks on the seismic evaluation of base-isolated RCC buildings. The results indicate that base isolation can significantly attenuate the earthquake shaking of the RCC building under not only single earthquakes but also seismic sequences. It is also found that the adverse aftershock effect on the RCC can be reduced due to the base isolation applied to the RCC. More importantly, the study indicates that disregarding aftershocks can induce significant underestimation of the isolator displacement for base-isolated RCC buildings.

  10. The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricketts, Christopher J.; De Cubas, Aguirre A.; Fan, Huihui; Smith, Christof C.; Lang, Martin; Reznik, Ed; Bowlby, Reanne; Gibb, Ewan A.; Akbani, Rehan; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bottaro, Donald P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Haake, Scott; Hakimi, A. Ari; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Hsieh, James J.; Ho, Thai H.; Kanchi, Rupa S.; Krishnan, Bhavani; Kwaitkowski, David J.; Lui, Wembin; Merino, Maria J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Myers, Jerome; Nickerson, Michael L.; Reuter, Victor E.; Schmidt, Laura S.; Shelley, Carl Simon; Shen, Hui; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Wheeler, David A.; Yang, Lixing; Kim, William T.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Caesar-Johnson, Samantha J.; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Kasapi, Melpomeni; Ferguson, Martin L.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Cho, Juok; DeFreitas, Timothy; Frazer, Scott; Gehlenborg, Nils; Getz, Gad; Heiman, David I.; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lin, Pei; Meier, Sam; Noble, Michael S.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Doug; Zhang, Hailei; Bernard, Brady; Chambwe, Nyasha; Dhankani, Varsha; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kramer, Roger; Leinonen, Kalle; Liu, Yuexin; Miller, Michael; Reynolds, Sheila; Shmulevich, Ilya; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Zhang, Wei; Akbani, Rehan; Broom, Bradley M.; Hegde, Apurva M.; Ju, Zhenlin; Kanchi, Rupa S.; Korkut, Anil; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Ng, Kwok Shing; Rao, Arvind; Ryan, Michael; Wang, Jing; Weinstein, John N.; Zhang, Jiexin; Abeshouse, Adam; Armenia, Joshua; Chakravarty, Debyani; Chatila, Walid K.; de Bruijn, Ino; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin E.; Heins, Zachary J.; Kundra, Ritika; La, Konnor; Ladanyi, Marc; Luna, Augustin; Nissan, Moriah G.; Ochoa, Angelica; Phillips, Sarah M.; Reznik, Ed; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sheridan, Robert; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Taylor, Barry S.; Wang, Jioajiao; Zhang, Hongxin; Anur, Pavana; Peto, Myron; Spellman, Paul; Benz, Christopher; Stuart, Joshua M.; Wong, Christopher K.; Yau, Christina; Hayes, D. Neil; Parker, Joel S.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Carlsen, Rebecca; Chuah, Eric; Dhalla, Noreen; Holt, Robert; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lee, Darlene; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Mungall, Karen; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sadeghi, Sara; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Tse, Kane; Wong, Tina; Berger, Ashton C.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cibulskis, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gao, Galen F.; Ha, Gavin; Meyerson, Matthew; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shih, Juliann; Kucherlapati, Melanie H.; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Baylin, Stephen; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Lai, Phillip H.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Fan, Cheng; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Perou, Amy H.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Fan, Huihui; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W.; Shen, Hui; Zhou, Wanding; Bellair, Michelle; Chang, Kyle; Covington, Kyle; Creighton, Chad J.; Dinh, Huyen; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Drummond, Jennifer; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glenn, Robert; Hale, Walker; Han, Yi; Hu, Jianhong; Korchina, Viktoriya; Lee, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiuping; Morgan, Margaret; Morton, Donna; Muzny, Donna; Santibanez, Jireh; Sheth, Margi; Shinbrot, Eve; Wang, Linghua; Wang, Min; Wheeler, David A.; Xi, Liu; Zhao, Fengmei; Hess, Julian; Appelbaum, Elizabeth L.; Bailey, Matthew; Cordes, Matthew G.; Ding, Li; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Mardis, Elaine R.; McLellan, Michael D.; Miller, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Wilson, Richard K.; Crain, Daniel; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Corcoran, Niall; Costello, Tony; Hovens, Christopher; Carvalho, Andre L.; de Carvalho, Ana C.; Fregnani, José H.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Reis, Rui M.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Silveira, Henrique C.S.; Vidal, Daniel O.; Burnette, Andrew; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Hermes, Beth; Noss, Ardene; Singh, Rosy; Anderson, Matthew L.; Castro, Patricia D.; Ittmann, Michael; Huntsman, David; Kohl, Bernard; Le, Xuan; Thorp, Richard; Andry, Chris; Duffy, Elizabeth R.; Lyadov, Vladimir; Paklina, Oxana; Setdikova, Galiya; Shabunin, Alexey; Tavobilov, Mikhail; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Berkowitz, Ross; Cramer, Daniel; Feltmate, Colleen; Horowitz, Neil; Kibel, Adam; Muto, Michael; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Malykh, Andrei; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Barrett, Wendi; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Shimmel, Kristen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Sloan, Andrew E.; De Rose, Agostino; Giuliante, Felice; Goodman, Marc; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Eckman, John; Harr, Jodi; Myers, Jerome; Tucker, Kelinda; Zach, Leigh Anne; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hu, Hai; Kvecher, Leonid; Larson, Caroline; Mural, Richard J.; Somiari, Stella; Vicha, Ales; Zelinka, Tomas; Bennett, Joseph; Iacocca, Mary; Rabeno, Brenda; Swanson, Patricia; Latour, Mathieu; Lacombe, Louis; Têtu, Bernard; Bergeron, Alain; McGraw, Mary; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Chabot, John; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Sepulveda, Antonia; Su, Tao; Wang, Timothy; Potapova, Olga; Voronina, Olga; Desjardins, Laurence; Mariani, Odette; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Sastre, Xavier; Stern, Marc Henri; Cheng, Feixiong; Signoretti, Sabina; Berchuck, Andrew; Bigner, Darell; Lipp, Eric; Marks, Jeffrey; McCall, Shannon; McLendon, Roger; Secord, Angeles; Sharp, Alexis; Behera, Madhusmita; Brat, Daniel J.; Chen, Amy; Delman, Keith; Force, Seth; Khuri, Fadlo; Magliocca, Kelly; Maithel, Shishir; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Owonikoko, Taofeek; Pickens, Alan; Ramalingam, Suresh; Shin, Dong M.; Sica, Gabriel; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Eijckenboom, Wil; Gillis, Ad; Korpershoek, Esther; Looijenga, Leendert; Oosterhuis, Wolter; Stoop, Hans; van Kessel, Kim E.; Zwarthoff, Ellen C.; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Cuppini, Lucia; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; DiMeco, Francesco; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Mattei, Luca; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Chen, Chu; Houck, John; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Hartmann, Arndt; Stoehr, Christine; Stoehr, Robert; Taubert, Helge; Wach, Sven; Wullich, Bernd; Kycler, Witold; Murawa, Dawid; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Chung, Ki; Edenfield, W. Jeffrey; Martin, Julie; Baudin, Eric; Bubley, Glenn; Bueno, Raphael; De Rienzo, Assunta; Richards, William G.; Kalkanis, Steven; Mikkelsen, Tom; Noushmehr, Houtan; Scarpace, Lisa; Girard, Nicolas; Aymerich, Marta; Campo, Elias; Giné, Eva; Guillermo, Armando López; Van Bang, Nguyen; Hanh, Phan Thi; Phu, Bui Duc; Tang, Yufang; Colman, Howard; Evason, Kimberley; Dottino, Peter R.; Martignetti, John A.; Gabra, Hani; Juhl, Hartmut; Akeredolu, Teniola; Stepa, Serghei; Hoon, Dave; Ahn, Keunsoo; Kang, Koo Jeong; Beuschlein, Felix; Breggia, Anne; Birrer, Michael; Bell, Debra; Borad, Mitesh; Bryce, Alan H.; Castle, Erik; Chandan, Vishal; Cheville, John; Copland, John A.; Farnell, Michael; Flotte, Thomas; Giama, Nasra; Ho, Thai; Kendrick, Michael; Kocher, Jean Pierre; Kopp, Karla; Moser, Catherine; Nagorney, David; O'Brien, Daniel; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Patel, Tushar; Petersen, Gloria; Que, Florencia; Rivera, Michael; Roberts, Lewis; Smallridge, Robert; Smyrk, Thomas; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Torbenson, Michael; Yang, Ju Dong; Zhang, Lizhi; Brimo, Fadi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Gonzalez, Ana Maria Angulo; Behrens, Carmen; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Broaddus, Russell; Czerniak, Bogdan; Esmaeli, Bita; Fujimoto, Junya; Gershenwald, Jeffrey; Guo, Charles; Lazar, Alexander J.; Logothetis, Christopher; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Moran, Cesar; Ramondetta, Lois; Rice, David; Sood, Anil; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thompson, Timothy; Troncoso, Patricia; Tsao, Anne; Wistuba, Ignacio; Carter, Candace; Haydu, Lauren; Hersey, Peter; Jakrot, Valerie; Kakavand, Hojabr; Kefford, Richard; Lee, Kenneth; Long, Georgina; Mann, Graham; Quinn, Michael; Saw, Robyn; Scolyer, Richard; Shannon, Kerwin; Spillane, Andrew; Stretch, onathan; Synott, Maria; Thompson, John; Wilmott, James; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Chan, Timothy A.; Ghossein, Ronald; Gopalan, Anuradha; Levine, Douglas A.; Reuter, Victor; Singer, Samuel; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Broudy, Thomas; Mirsaidi, Cyrus; Nair, Praveen; Drwiega, Paul; Miller, Judy; Smith, Jennifer; Zaren, Howard; Park, Joong Won; Hung, Nguyen Phi; Kebebew, Electron; Linehan, W. Marston; Metwalli, Adam R.; Pacak, Karel; Pinto, Peter A.; Schiffman, Mark; Schmidt, Laura S.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Worrell, Robert; Yang, Hannah; Moncrieff, Marc; Goparaju, Chandra; Melamed, Jonathan; Pass, Harvey; Botnariuc, Natalia; Caraman, Irina; Cernat, Mircea; Chemencedji, Inga; Clipca, Adrian; Doruc, Serghei; Gorincioi, Ghenadie; Mura, Sergiu; Pirtac, Maria; Stancul, Irina; Tcaciuc, Diana; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Arnaout, Angel; Bartlett, John; Engel, Jay; Gilbert, Sebastien; Parfitt, Jeremy; Sekhon, Harman; Thomas, George; Rassl, Doris M.; Rintoul, Robert C.; Bifulco, Carlo; Tamakawa, Raina; Urba, Walter; Hayward, Nicholas; Timmers, Henri; Antenucci, Anna; Facciolo, Francesco; Grazi, Gianluca; Marino, Mirella; Merola, Roberta; de Krijger, Ronald; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne Paule; Piché, Alain; Chevalier, Simone; McKercher, Ginette; Birsoy, Kivanc; Barnett, Gene; Brewer, Cathy; Farver, Carol; Naska, Theresa; Pennell, Nathan A.; Raymond, Daniel; Schilero, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; Williams, Felicia; Morrison, Carl; Borgia, Jeffrey A.; Liptay, Michael J.; Pool, Mark; Seder, Christopher W.; Junker, Kerstin; Omberg, Larsson; Dinkin, Mikhail; Manikhas, George; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio; Chesla, David; Cottingham, Sandra; Dubina, Michael; Moiseenko, Fedor; Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Becker, Karl Friedrich; Janssen, Klaus Peter; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H.; Aziz, Dina; Bell, Sue; Cebulla, Colleen M.; Davis, Amy; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J. Bradley; Hilty, Joe; Kumar, Bahavna; Lang, James; Lehman, Norman L.; Mandt, Randy; Nguyen, Phuong; Pilarski, Robert; Rai, Karan; Schoenfield, Lynn; Senecal, Kelly; Wakely, Paul; Hansen, Paul; Lechan, Ronald; Powers, James; Tischler, Arthur; Grizzle, William E.; Sexton, Katherine C.; Kastl, Alison; Henderson, Joel; Porten, Sima; Waldmann, Jens; Fassnacht, Martin; Asa, Sylvia L.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Couce, Marta; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Simon, Ronald; Tennstedt, Pierre; Olabode, Oluwole; Nelson, Mark; Bathe, Oliver; Carroll, Peter R.; Chan, June M.; Disaia, Philip; Glenn, Pat; Kelley, Robin K.; Landen, Charles N.; Phillips, Joanna; Prados, Michael; Simko, Jeffry; Smith-McCune, Karen; VandenBerg, Scott; Roggin, Kevin; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Kendler, Ady; Sifri, Suzanne; Steele, Ruth; Jimeno, Antonio; Carey, Francis; Forgie, Ian; Mannelli, Massimo; Carney, Michael; Hernandez, Brenda; Campos, Benito; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christin; Unterberg, Andreas; von Deimling, Andreas; Bossler, Aaron; Galbraith, Joseph; Jacobus, Laura; Knudson, Michael; Knutson, Tina; Ma, Deqin; Milhem, Mohammed; Sigmund, Rita; Godwin, Andrew K.; Madan, Rashna; Rosenthal, Howard G.; Adebamowo, Clement; Adebamowo, Sally N.; Boussioutas, Alex; Beer, David; Giordano, Thomas; Mes-Masson, Anne Marie; Saad, Fred; Bocklage, Therese; Landrum, Lisa; Mannel, Robert; Moore, Kathleen; Moxley, Katherine; Postier, Russel; Walker, Joan; Zuna, Rosemary; Feldman, Michael; Valdivieso, Federico; Dhir, Rajiv; Luketich, James; Pinero, Edna M.Mora; Quintero-Aguilo, Mario; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Dos Santos, Jose Sebastião; Kemp, Rafael; Sankarankuty, Ajith; Tirapelli, Daniela; Catto, James; Agnew, Kathy; Swisher, Elizabeth; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce; Shelley, Carl Simon; Godwin, Eryn M.; Kendall, Sara; Shipman, Cassaundra; Bradford, Carol; Carey, Thomas; Haddad, Andrea; Moyer, Jeffey; Peterson, Lisa; Prince, Mark; Rozek, Laura; Wolf, Gregory; Bowman, Rayleen; Fong, Kwun M.; Yang, Ian; Korst, Robert; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Fantacone-Campbell, J. Leigh; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Kovatich, Albert J.; Shriver, Craig D.; DiPersio, John; Drake, Bettina; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Heath, Sharon; Ley, Timothy; Van Tine, Brian; Westervelt, Peter; Rubin, Mark A.; Lee, Jung Il; Aredes, Natália D.; Mariamidze, Armaz; Spellman, Paul T.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Linehan, W. Marston

    2018-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is not a single disease, but several histologically defined cancers with different genetic drivers, clinical courses, and therapeutic responses. The current study evaluated 843 RCC from the three major histologic subtypes, including 488 clear cell RCC, 274 papillary RCC,

  11. Creep-fatigue rules in the RCC-MR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drubay, B.

    1988-01-01

    In 1978, CEA, Electricite de France (EDF) and NOVATOME decided to draw up a complete set of design and construction rules for LMFBR components. This RCC-MR code issued in June 1985 and completed in November 1987 was chosen as a sound basis for the next European Fast Reactor (EFR). The purpose of this paper is to describe the present RCC-MR creep-fatigue design rules to be applied with elastic analysis including the modifications adopted in the first addenda. This method is based on a separate evaluation of a fatigue usage fraction V and creep rupture usage fraction W with the common linear summation rule. The fatigue usage fraction is obtained from continuous fatigue curves (without hold times) and from total strain ranges (elastic + plastic + creep). The creep rupture usage fraction W is obtained from stress to rupture curves and a stress σk evaluating the stress generated during the cycle. (author)

  12. RCC1 regulates inner centromeric composition in a Ran-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael Shaofei; Furuta, Maiko; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Dasso, Mary

    2018-01-01

    RCC1 associates to chromatin dynamically within mitosis and catalyzes Ran-GTP production. Exogenous RCC1 disrupts kinetochore structure in Xenopus egg extracts (XEEs), but the molecular basis of this disruption remains unknown. We have investigated this question, utilizing replicated chromosomes that possess paired sister kinetochores. We find that exogenous RCC1 evicts a specific subset of inner KT proteins including Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1) and the chromosome passenger complex (CPC). We generated RCC1 mutants that separate its enzymatic activity and chromatin binding. Strikingly, Sgo1 and CPC eviction depended only on RCC1's chromatin affinity but not its capacity to produce Ran-GTP. RCC1 similarly released Sgo1 and CPC from synthetic kinetochores assembled on CENP-A nucleosome arrays. Together, our findings indicate RCC1 regulates kinetochores at the metaphase-anaphase transition through Ran-GTP-independent displacement of Sgo1 and CPC.

  13. Management of Gene Variants of Unknown Significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alosi, Daniela; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Hemmingsen, Sophie Nowak

    2017-01-01

    by germline mutations in the VHL gene, which predispose to the development of multiple tumors such as central nervous system hemangioblastomas and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Objective: We propose a method for the evaluation of VUS pathogenicity through our experience with the VHL missense mutation c.241C...... (IHC); 3) Assessment of the variant’s impact on protein structure and function, using multiple databases, in silico algorithms, and reports of functional studies. Results: Only one family member had clinical signs of vHL with early-onset RCC. IHC analysis showed no VHL protein expressed in the tumor...

  14. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Solitary, Sporadic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Outcome Analysis Based on Clear-Cell versus Papillary Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Mustafa M; Schmit, Grant D; Kurup, A Nicholas; Schmitz, John J; Boorjian, Stephen A; Geske, Jennifer; Thompson, R Houston; Callstrom, Matthew R; Atwell, Thomas D

    2018-06-07

    To evaluate treatment outcomes with percutaneous cryoablation (PCA) based on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) histology. Patients treated with PCA for a solitary, sporadic stage T1a RCC from 2003 to 2016 were identified from a single institution's renal ablation registry. Patients with multiple tumors, history of RCC, or genetic syndromes associated with RCC (n = 60); no specific RCC subtype determined from core biopsy (n = 66); RCC subtype other than clear-cell or papillary (n = 7); or less than 3 mo of follow-up imaging (n = 5) were excluded. In total, 173 patients met study inclusion criteria. Oncologic outcomes, clinical outcomes, and complications were evaluated based on tumor subtype. Of the 173 patients who underwent PCA for a stage T1a RCC, 130 (75%) had clear-cell RCC (ccRCC) and 43 (25%) had papillary RCC (pRCC). Median tumor size was 2.9 cm (range, 1.3-4.0 cm). Technically successful cryoablation was achieved in all 173 patients. Local tumor recurrence developed in 6 patients with ccRCC (4.6%), new renal tumors developed in 1 patient (0.8%), and metastatic RCC developed in 1 patient (0.8%) who also had local tumor recurrence. No patients with pRCC showed local tumor recurrence, new renal tumors, or metastatic disease. The 5-year disease-free survival rate in patients with ccRCC was 88%, compared with 100% in patients with pRCC (P = .48). Nine patients (5.2%), all with ccRCC, experienced major complications (P = .11). Percutaneous ablation is a viable treatment option for patients with clinical stage T1a pRCC and ccRCC. Percutaneous ablation may be a very favorable treatment strategy particularly for pRCC. Copyright © 2018 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Cul2-Rbx1-EloBC-VHL Ubiquitin Ligase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardote, Teresa A F; Gadd, Morgan S; Ciulli, Alessio

    2017-06-06

    Cullin RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) function in the ubiquitin proteasome system to catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from E2 conjugating enzymes to specific substrate proteins. CRLs are large dynamic complexes and attractive drug targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors and chemical inducers of protein degradation. The atomic details of whole CRL assembly and interactions that dictate subunit specificity remain elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of a pentameric CRL2 VHL complex, composed of Cul2, Rbx1, Elongin B, Elongin C, and pVHL. The structure traps a closed state of full-length Cul2 and a new pose of Rbx1 in a trajectory from closed to open conformation. We characterize hotspots and binding thermodynamics at the interface between Cul2 and pVHL-EloBC and identify mutations that contribute toward a selectivity switch for Cul2 versus Cul5 recognition. Our findings provide structural and biophysical insights into the whole Cul2 complex that could aid future drug targeting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Variability of inter-observer agreement on feasibility of partial nephrectomy before and after neoadjuvant axitinib for locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC): independent analysis from a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Jose A; Devine, Catherine E; Fellman, Bryan M; Urbauer, Diana L; Abel, E Jason; Allaf, Mohamad E; Bex, Axel; Lane, Brian R; Thompson, R Houston; Wood, Christopher G

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate how many patients could have undergone partial nephrectomy (PN) rather than radical nephrectomy (RN) before and after neoadjuvant axitinib therapy, as assessed by five independent urological oncologists, and to study the variability of inter-observer agreement. Pre- and post-systemic treatment computed tomography scans from 22 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma in a phase II neoadjuvant axitinib trial were reviewed by five independent urological oncologists. R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score and κ statistics were calculated. The median R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score changed from 11 before treatment to 10 after treatment (P = 0.002). Five tumours with moderate complexity before axitinib treatment remained moderate complexity after treatment. Of 17 tumours with high complexity before axitinib treatment, three became moderate complexity after treatment. The overall κ statistic was 0.611. Moderate-complexity κ was 0.611 vs a high-complexity κ of 0.428. Before axitinib treatment the κ was 0.550 vs 0.609 after treatment. After treatment with axitinib, all five reviewers agreed that only five patients required RN (instead of eight before treatment) and that 10 patients could now undergo PN (instead of three before treatment). The odds of PN feasibility were 22.8-times higher after treatment with axitinib. There is considerable variability in inter-observer agreement on the feasibility of PN in patients treated with neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Although more patients were candidates for PN after neoadjuvant axitinib therapy, it remains difficult to identify these patients a priori. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Stage-dependent prognostic impact of molecular signatures in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Weber,1,2 Matthias Meinhardt,3 Stefan Zastrow,1 Andreas Wienke,4 Kati Erdmann,1 Jörg Hofmann,1 Susanne Fuessel,1 Manfred P Wirth11Department of Urology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 2Department of Oncology and Hematology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, Germany; 3Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 4Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, GermanyPurpose: To enhance prognostic information of protein biomarkers for clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs, we analyzed them within prognostic groups of ccRCC harboring different tumor characteristics of this clinically and molecularly heterogeneous tumor entity.Methods: Tissue microarrays from 145 patients with primary ccRCC were immunohistochemically analyzed for VHL (von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, Ki67 (marker of proliferation 1, p53 (tumor protein p53, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, survivin (baculoviral IAP repeat containing 5, and UEA-1 (ulex europaeus agglutinin I to assess microvessel-density.Results: When analyzing all patients, nuclear staining of Ki67 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.12 and nuclear survivin (nS; HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.08 were significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS. In the cohort of patients with advanced localized or metastasized ccRCC, high staining of Ki67, p53 and nS predicted shorter DSS (Ki67: HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02–1.11; p53: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01–1.09; nS: HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.14. In organ-confined ccRCC, patients with high p21-staining had a longer DSS (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92–0.99. In a multivariate model with stepwise backward elimination, tumor size and p21-staining showed a significant association with DSS in patients with "organ-confined" ccRCCs. The p21-staining increased the concordance index of tumor size from

  18. Analysis of Pumphouse RCC Frame Structure for Soil Structure Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mr A.S. Thombare; Prof. V.P. Kumbhar; Prof. A.H. Kumbhar

    2016-01-01

    When structure is built on ground some elements of structure are direct contact with soil. When loads are applied on structure internal forces are developed in both the structure as well as in soil. It results in deformation of both the components which are independent to each other. This are called soil structure interaction. The analysis is done by using (Bentley STAAD.Pro V8i Version 2007) software. The analysis carried out been pump house structure R.C.C. frame structure find ...

  19. Mouse RC/BTB2, a Member of the RCC1 Superfamily, Localizes to Spermatid Acrosomal Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xuening; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Hess, Rex A.; Henderson, Scott C.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-01-01

    Mouse RC/BTB2 is an unstudied protein of the RCC1 (Regulator of Chromosome Condensation) superfamily. Because of the significant remodeling of chromatin that occurs during spermiogenesis, we characterized the expression and localization of mouse RC/BTB2 in the testis and male germ cells. The Rc/btb2 gene yields two major transcripts: 2.3 kb Rc/btb2-s, present in most somatic tissues examined; and 2.5 kb Rc/btb2-t, which contains a unique non-translated exon in its 5′-UTR that is only detected in the testis. During the first wave of spermatogenesis, Rc/btb2-t mRNA is expressed from day 8 after birth, reaching highest levels of expression at day 30 after birth. The full-length protein contains three RCC1 domains in the N-terminus, and a BTB domain in the C-terminus. In the testis, the protein is detectable from day 12, but is progressively up-regulated to day 30 and day 42 after birth. In spermatids, some of the protein co-localizes with acrosomal markers sp56 and peanut lectin, indicating that it is an acrosomal protein. A GFP-tagged RCC1 domain is present throughout the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells. However, both GFP-tagged, full-length RC/BTB2 and a GFP-tagged BTB domain localize to vesicles in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, suggesting that the BTB domain might play a role in mediating full-length RC/BTB2 localization. Since RCC1 domains associate with Ran, a small GTPase that regulates molecular trafficking, it is possible that RC/BTB2 plays a role in transporting proteins during acrosome formation. PMID:22768142

  20. Characterizing the outcomes of metastatic papillary renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor Wells, John; Donskov, Frede; Fraccon, Anna P

    2017-01-01

    Outcomes of metastatic papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) patients are poorly characterized in the era of targeted therapy. A total of 5474 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the International mRCC Database Consortium (IMDC) were retrospectively analyzed. Outcomes were...... compared between clear cell (ccRCC; n = 5008) and papillary patients (n = 466), and recorded type I and type II papillary patients (n = 30 and n = 165, respectively). Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall response rate (ORR) favored ccRCC over pRCC. OS was 8 months longer...

  1. RCC Plug Repair Thermal Tools for Shuttle Mission Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alvaro C.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    A thermal math model for the Space Shuttle Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) Plug Repair was developed to increase the confidence in the repair entry performance and provide a real-time mission support tool. The thermal response of the plug cover plate, local RCC, and metallic attach hardware can be assessed with this model for any location on the wing leading edge. The geometry and spatial location of the thermal mesh also matches the structural mesh which allows for the direct mapping of temperature loads and computation of the thermoelastic stresses. The thermal model was correlated to a full scale plug repair radiant test. To utilize the thermal model for flight analyses, accurate predictions of protuberance heating were required. Wind tunnel testing was performed at CUBRC to characterize the heat flux in both the radial and angular directions. Due to the complexity of the implementation of the protuberance heating, an intermediate program was developed to output the heating per nodal location for all OML surfaces in SINDA format. Three Design Reference Cases (DRC) were evaluated with the correlated plug thermal math model to bound the environments which the plug repair would potentially be used.

  2. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual: Windows Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilcox, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating broadband atmospheric longwave and solar shortwave radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer's response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument's responsivity. This is a user's manual and guide to the RCC software.

  3. LOSS OF JAK2 REGULATION VIA VHL-SOCS1 E3 UBIQUITIN HETEROCOMPLEX UNDERLIES CHUVASH POLYCYTHEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ryan C.; Sufan, Roxana I.; Zhou, Bing; Heir, Pardeep; Bunda, Severa; Sybingco, Stephanie S.; Greer, Samantha N.; Roche, Olga; Heathcote, Samuel A.; Chow, Vinca W.K.; Boba, Lukasz M.; Richmond, Terri D.; Hickey, Michele M.; Barber, Dwayne L.; Cheresh, David A.; Simon, M. Celeste; Irwin, Meredith S.; Kim, William Y.; Ohh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Chuvash polycythemia (CP) is a rare congenital form of polycythemia caused by homozygous R200W and H191D mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene whose gene product is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying some of the hallmark features of CP such as hypersensitivity to erythropoietin are unclear. Here, we show that VHL directly binds suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) to form a heterodimeric E3 ligase that targets phosphorylated (p)JAK2 for ubiquitin-mediated destruction. In contrast, CP-associated VHL mutants have altered affinity for SOCS1 and fail to engage and degrade pJAK2. Systemic administration of a highly selective JAK2 inhibitor, TG101209, reverses the disease phenotype in vhlR200W/R200W knock-in mice, a model that faithfully recapitulates human CP. These results reveal VHL as a SOCS1-cooperative negative regulator of JAK2 and provide compelling biochemical and preclinical evidence for JAK2- targeted therapy in CP patients. PMID:21685897

  4. Cutaneous metastasis of bilateral renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Fariba; Alizadeh, Mansur; Noroozinia, Farahnaz; Moradi, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant lethal tumour with high potential of metastasis. However, metastasis from RCC to the skin is much less common. It is virtually a sign of poor prognosis. We represent a 42 years old man with bilateral RCC of clear cell type followed by metastasis to the scalp one month later. In this case the relatively young age of the patient, bilaterality of RCC and occurance of skin metastasis in the absence of recurrent kidney tumour are interesting.

  5. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ananda Kumar; Dr. C. Selvamony; A. Seeni; Dr. T. R. Sethuraman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral lo...

  6. The homozygous VHL(D126N) missense mutation is associated with dramatically elevated erythropoietin levels, consequent polycythemia, and early onset severe pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Susmita; Lanikova, Lucie; Kapralova, Katarina; Acharya, Suchitra; Swierczek, Sabina; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wolfe, Lawrence; Prchal, Josef T

    2014-11-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia sensing mediated by transcription factors. Mutations in exon 3 of the VHL gene lead to Chuvash (VHL(R200W)) and Croatian (VHL(H191D)) polycythemias. Here, we describe an infant of Bangladesh ethnicity with a novel homozygous VHL(D126N) mutation with congenital polycythemia and dramatically elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, who developed severe fatal pulmonary hypertension. In contrast to Chuvash polycythemia, erythroid progenitors (BFU-Es) did not reveal a marked EPO hypersensitivity. Further, NF-E2 and RUNX1 transcripts that correlate with BFU-Es EPO hypersensitivity in polycythemic mutations were not elevated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Characteristics of scientific production in Special Education in Virtual Health Library (VHL: a bibliometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pizzani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize, through bibliometric approach, the scientific literature in this Special Education in the databases of the Virtual Health Library (VHL. The VHL is coordinated by BIREME - Specialized Center of the Pan American Health Organization whose objective is to promote the dissemination and use of scientific information in health. Method: The research methodology was performed by observing the following steps: a literature review on education special and bibliometrics, data collection from the site of BIREME about the presence of special education in the databases, organization, processing and bibliometric analysis of data collected using the software MS Excel and Vantage Point. Results: indicators produced allow signal that the predominant language of scientific production was the Portuguese and the majority of records were written individually, the themes addressed were psychology and developmental psychology. Conclusion: These bibliometric indicators characterizing the state of the art of scientific literature in Special Education at the various bases Data Bireme and also showed a field of interconnections between Health Sciences and Special Education.

  8. Downregulation of NF-ΚB1 enhances the radiosensitivity of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikegami, Amanda; Silva, Luiz Felipe Teixeira da; Bellini, Maria Helena [Instituto De Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) accounts for ∼80% of all renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and has the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene mutated. The lack of VHL protein leads to a constitutionally active Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) pathway that confers both chemoresistance and radioresistance for renal tumor. HIF pathway is known to interact with the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB). Increased NF-κB activity is associated with the development and progression of RCC (IKEGAMI A, TEIXEIRA LF. BRAGA MS et al. The American Society for Cell Biology 2016; 26: 3948-3955). Objective: Evaluate the synergistic effect of NF-kB1 knockdown and ionizing radiation in murine renal adenocarcinoma cell line. Methods: The murine renal adenocarcinoma cell line (Renca cells) (ATCC, USA) was cultured in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% FBS and penicillin/streptomycin. Lentiviral shRNA vector was used to knockdown of NF-KB1 gene in Renca cells, as described previously (1). In the clonogenic cell survival assay, the cells were irradiated by {sup 60}Co source in the range from 0 to 10 Gy, using the GammaCell 220 – Irradiation Unit of Canadian-Atomic Energy Commision Ltd. (CTR-IPEN). After 10-14 days of culture, cell colonies were fixed and stained with formaldehyde 4% and rhodamine B 2% and counted. To assess cell viability, tetrazolium [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5- (3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-MTS] was performed within 24 hours after irradiation at a dose of 10Gy. The survival variables α e β were fitted according to the linear quadratic equation (SF=exp[-αD-βD2]); SF=survival fraction, D=dose of irradiation and P value was determined by F test. Multiple comparisons were assessed by One-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni´s tests with GraphPad Prism version 6.0 software. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Data are shown as the mean ± SD. Results: The Renca-shRNA-NF-kB1 cells were found

  9. Downregulation of NF-ΚB1 enhances the radiosensitivity of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Amanda; Silva, Luiz Felipe Teixeira da; Bellini, Maria Helena

    2017-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) accounts for ∼80% of all renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and has the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene mutated. The lack of VHL protein leads to a constitutionally active Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) pathway that confers both chemoresistance and radioresistance for renal tumor. HIF pathway is known to interact with the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB). Increased NF-κB activity is associated with the development and progression of RCC (IKEGAMI A, TEIXEIRA LF. BRAGA MS et al. The American Society for Cell Biology 2016; 26: 3948-3955). Objective: Evaluate the synergistic effect of NF-kB1 knockdown and ionizing radiation in murine renal adenocarcinoma cell line. Methods: The murine renal adenocarcinoma cell line (Renca cells) (ATCC, USA) was cultured in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% FBS and penicillin/streptomycin. Lentiviral shRNA vector was used to knockdown of NF-KB1 gene in Renca cells, as described previously (1). In the clonogenic cell survival assay, the cells were irradiated by 60 Co source in the range from 0 to 10 Gy, using the GammaCell 220 – Irradiation Unit of Canadian-Atomic Energy Commision Ltd. (CTR-IPEN). After 10-14 days of culture, cell colonies were fixed and stained with formaldehyde 4% and rhodamine B 2% and counted. To assess cell viability, tetrazolium [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5- (3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-MTS] was performed within 24 hours after irradiation at a dose of 10Gy. The survival variables α e β were fitted according to the linear quadratic equation (SF=exp[-αD-βD2]); SF=survival fraction, D=dose of irradiation and P value was determined by F test. Multiple comparisons were assessed by One-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni´s tests with GraphPad Prism version 6.0 software. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Data are shown as the mean ± SD. Results: The Renca-shRNA-NF-kB1 cells were found to be

  10. Simulation analysis of temperature control on RCC arch dam of hydropower station

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIA, Shi-fa

    2017-12-01

    The temperature analysis of roller compacted concrete (RCC) dam plays an important role in their design and construction. Based on three-dimensional finite element method, in the computation of temperature field, many cases are included, such as air temperature, elevated temperature by cement hydration heat, concrete temperature during placing, the influence of water in the reservoir, and boundary temperature. According to the corresponding parameters of RCC arch dam, the analysis of temperature field and stress field during the period of construction and operation is performed. The study demonstrates that detailed thermal stress analysis should be performed for RCC dams to provide a basis to minimize and control the occurrence of thermal cracking.

  11. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ananda Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral load reviews are also presented. This review paper is prepared to find out the performance of basalt fibre reinforced polymer BFRP composite retrofitted reinforced cement concrete single end bearing piles.

  12. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MRi is proposing, with its partner, Exotherm Corp (Camden, NJ) to demonstrate the feasibility of using exothermic brazing to join RCC (or C:SiC) composites to itself...

  13. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  14. Test and Analysis Correlation of Form Impact onto Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge RCC Panel 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan; Melis, Matthew; Carney, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) began their study of the space shuttle Columbia accident, "physics-based" analyses using LS-DYNA were applied to characterize the expected damage to the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge from high-speed foam impacts. Forensic evidence quickly led CAIB investigators to concentrate on the left wing leading edge RCC panels. This paper will concentrate on the test of the left-wing RCC panel 8 conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the correlation with an LS-DYNA analysis. The successful correlation of the LS-DYNA model has resulted in the use of LS-DYNA as a predictive tool for characterizing the threshold of damage for impacts of various debris such as foam, ice, and ablators onto the RCC leading edge for shuttle return-to-flight.

  15. Application of a polycarboxylate ether admixture in RCC dam construction[ACI SP-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmus, S.M.F.; Christensen, B.J.; Varley, N.J. [BASF Construction Chemicals Asia Pacific, Shanghai (China)

    2006-07-01

    Chemical admixtures are used in dam construction to improve plasticity of the dry materials mixture over time. Roller compacted concrete (RCC) has been used on many dam projects in China. However, the use of RCC has frequently resulted in water reduction problems. This paper provided details of an admixture based on polycarboxylate ether (PCE) which was developed to improve the quality of RCC constructions at the JinHong dam in China. Use of the polymer at the JinHong dam resulted in a vibration sensitive concrete that was sustained over time. Under identical mix-design and compaction conditions in the laboratory, specific gravity of the RCC was increased from 2417 kg/m{sup 3} to 2463 kg/m{sup 3}. The high specific gravity of the material resulted in satisfactory strength data from the dam project. The key-ratio of the splitting tensile strength versus compressive strength was higher than 8 per cent in all cases. A key advantage of the tailored PCE-RCC was the short Vebe times sustained over elapsed time in the RCC. Without additional compaction or vibration efforts, the specific density of RCC was better than conventional admixture technologies. The reduced viscosity provided cement paste films which formed on the surface of each layer of the RCC, which resulted in better bonding between the layers. It was concluded that the new PCE polymer is compatible with alternative retarder systems, which contributes to more extensive setting times under strict hydration regimes. 7 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. High volume fly ash RCC for dams - I : mixture optimization and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, S. [PEAB Construction Co., Oslo (Norway); Lahus, O. [Norwegian Building Research Inst., Oslo (Norway)

    2001-07-01

    Roller compacted concretes (RCC) were developed for the Norwegian Skjerka hydropower project. RCCs were developed to have a high-volume fly ash content to address environmental issues, including the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions associated with dam construction. They also makes good use of waste product and conserve natural resources. This study examined a series of mixtures to determine the appropriateness of using RCC as a competing alternative to the traditional rock fill dam proposed for the Skjerka hydropower project. The main advantage of RCC is speed, allowing a relatively large dam to be constructed in just one summer season, saving financial costs and providing early return on the investment. In addition, fly ash can be used in the structure, using clean and renewable energy. Several procedures to proportion RCC mixtures were proposed, including the optimal paste volume method which is based on the assumption that an optimal RCC should have just enough paste to fill the space between particles when the granular skeleton has reached its maximum density under compaction. With this assumption, RCC tests began in 1998 in the laboratories of the Norwegian Building Research Institute. An ordinary portland cement was used and combined with ordinary low lime fly ash. Both coarse and fine aggregate were used. The tests determined the optimum paste-mortar ratio, the content of coarse aggregates and the production of specimens for test on hardened and fresh concrete. The study showed that the compressive strength of RCC increased with increasing cement/(cement + fly ash) ratio. The permeability coefficient decreased with increasing cement-content and increasing cement/(cement + fly ash) ratio due to the slow pozzolanic reaction of fly ash making a more open pore structure. It was concluded that an optimized mixture can result in a high performance RCC in terms of fresh and hardened concrete properties. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs.

  17. Metastasis in renal cell carcinoma: Biology and implications for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple advances have been made in systemic therapy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC, metastatic RCC remains incurable. In the current review, we focus on the underlying biology of RCC and plausible mechanisms of metastasis. We further outline evolving strategies to combat metastasis through adjuvant therapy. Finally, we discuss clinical patterns of metastasis in RCC and how distinct systemic therapy approaches may be considered based on the anatomic location of metastasis.

  18. CNPY2 promoted the proliferation of renal cell carcinoma cells and increased the expression of TP53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Ito, Saya; Ueda, Takashi; Morioka, Yukako; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Ueno, Akihisa; Nakagawa, Hideo; Fujihara, Atsuko; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Hongo, Fumiya; Ukimura, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying the progression of the disease are not well understood. The data in this report suggest that canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) is a promoter of RCC progression. We found that CNPY2 significantly promoted growth of RCC cells and upregulated TP53 gene expression. Although TP53 is widely known as a tumor suppressor, in RCC TP53 promoted tumor cell growth. A typical p53 target gene, CDKN1A, was upregulated by both p53 and CNPY2 in RCC cells, suggesting that CNPY2 increased the expression level of TP53. Consistent with these results, CNPY2 and TP53 expression levels were positively correlated in RCC patients. These findings suggested that CNPY2 promoted cancer cell growth in RCC through regulating TP53 gene expression. - Highlights: • CNPY2 promoted growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. • TP53 expression levels were increased by CNPY2 in RCC cells. • Growth of RCC cells was promoted by TP53. • CNPY2 expression positively correlated with TP53 expression in RCC patients.

  19. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome 1, Volume A: generalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The French Rules of Mechanical equipments of Fast Neutron nuclear Reactors (RCC-MR) aims at equipments included in a safety classification. The equipments concerned are those of the nuclear boiler and its auxiliaries: tanks, vessels, internal equipments of the reactor, exchangers, pumps, fittings, pipes, and supports. The present edition of the RCC-MR comprises 12 books presented in the present one in the volume A. The chapter RA 3000 defines the documents to be established in application of the RCC-MR rules. The chapter RA 5000 defines the requirements to take into account to establish and carry out quality Assurance programs according to the RCC-MR rules [fr

  20. A Rare Case of a Renal Cell Carcinoma Confined to the Isthmus of a Horseshoe Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kongnyuy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseshoe kidney (HSK is the most common renal anomaly. Reports of the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC in HSK are conflicting. Very few cases of isthmus-located RCC have been reported in the literature. We report a unique case of an isthmus-located RCC. Proper vascular and tumor imaging prior to surgery is key to successful tumor removal.

  1. The occult nature of intramedullary spinal cord metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are characterised by a tendency to metastasise widely, often while remaining occult. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCM) from RCC may be the presenting feature of the disease or present at any time in the disease course. This case report discusses an ISCM from RCC which became manifested at the time of resection of the primary tumour. We review the literature published on ISCM from RCC from 1990 to date comparing disease characteristics and presentations.

  2. Harmonization of welding qualification provisions in RCC-M and European standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, M.; Lainez, B.; Anastassiades, P.

    2007-01-01

    Since a long time, numerous precautions for welding have been integrated in the nuclear codes, in particular in the RCC-M applicable to pressurized water reactors, in order to guarantee a high quality level of permanent assemblies. In parallel, European and ISO standardization works have led to a harmonisation of practices on qualification of welding processes, welders and operators. In the context of the regulatory evolutions presented during this conference, it was judged appropriate to bring closer the RCC-M practices and those of EN and ISO standards, while taking the precaution of specifying, if necessary, the complementary provisions allowing maintaining guarantees of quality consistent with the prior experience feedback. This paper presents the amendments brought to the RCC-M Code by the 2005 and 2007 addenda, in order to respond to this objective, and develops their motivations. (authors) [fr

  3. Material report in support to RCC-MRX code 2010 stainless steel parts and products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelet, Olivier; Lebarbe, Thierry; Dubiez-Le Goff, Sophie; Bonne, Dominique; Gelineau, Odile

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Material Report dedicated to stainless steels parts and products issued by AFCEN (Association Francaise pour les regles de Conception et de Construction des Materiels des Chaudieres Electro-Nucleaires) in support to RCC-MRx 2010 Code. The RCC-MRx Code is the result of the merger of the RCC-MX 2008, developed in the context of the research reactor Jules Horowitz Reactor project, in the RCC-MR 2007, which set up rules applicable to the design of components operating at high temperature and to the Vacuum Vessel of ITER (a presentation of RCC-MRx 2010 Code is the subject of another paper proposed in this Congress; it explains in particular the status of this Code). This Material Report is part of a set of Criteria of RCC-MRx (this set of Criteria is under construction). The Criteria aim at explaining the design and construction rules of the Code. They cover analyses rules as well as part procurement, welding, methods of tests and examination and fabrication rules. The Material Report particularly provides justifications and explanations on requirements and features dealing with parts and products proposed in the Code. The Material Report contains the following information: Introduction of the grade(s): codes and standards and Reference Procurement Specifications covering parts and products, applications and experience gained, - Physical properties, - Mechanical properties used for design calculations (base metal and welds): basic mechanical properties, creep mechanical properties, irradiated mechanical properties, - Fabrication: experience gained, metallurgy, - Welding: weldability, experience gained during welding and repair procedure qualifications, - Non-destructive examination, - In-service behaviour. In the article, examples of data supplied in the Material Report dedicated to stainless steels will be exposed. (authors)

  4. Egr-1 and serum response factor are involved in growth factors- and serum-mediated induction of E2-EPF UCP expression that regulates the VHL-HIF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung Hwa; Jung, Cho-Rok; Lee, Chan-Hee; Im, Dong-Soo

    2008-11-01

    E2-EPF ubiquitin carrier protein (UCP) has been shown to be highly expressed in common human cancers and target von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) for proteosomal degradation in cells, thereby stabilizing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha. Here, we investigated cellular factors that regulate the expression of UCP gene. Promoter deletion assay identified binding sites for early growth response-1 (Egr-1) and serum response factor (SRF) in the UCP promoter. Hepatocyte or epidermal growth factor (EGF), or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced UCP expression following early induction of Egr-1 expression in HeLa cells. Serum increased mRNA and protein levels of SRF and UCP in the cell. By electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, sequence-specific DNA-binding of Egr-1 and SRF to the UCP promoter was detected in nuclear extracts from HeLa cells treated with EGF and serum, respectively. Overexpression of Egr-1 or SRF increased UCP expression. RNA interference-mediated depletion of endogenous Egr-1 or SRF impaired EGF- or serum-mediated induction of UCP expression, which was required for cancer cell proliferation. Systemic delivery of EGF into mice also increased UCP expression following early induction of Egr-1 expression in mouse liver. The induced UCP expression by the growth factors or serum increased HIF-1alpha protein level under non-hypoxic conditions, suggesting that the Egr-1/SRF-UCP-VHL pathway is in part responsible for the increased HIF-1alpha protein level in vitro and in vivo. Thus, growth factors and serum induce expression of Egr-1 and SRF, respectively, which in turn induces UCP expression that positively regulates cancer cell growth.

  5. ASME and RCC-MR comparison for the prevention of fatigue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autrusson, B.; Acker, D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this survey is to compare the simplified methods, without reference to the safety factor allowed for the mechanical properties. An application of both codes, RCC-MR and ASME, on the design of the wall mock-up of the NET project is made and also an estimation with an elastoplastic analysis. In the case of fatigue analysis according to ASME in the plastic field, the elastic stress is magnified by a K e factor derived from stress variation, S n , disregarding geometrical discontinuities. According to RCC-MR, the elastic maximum strain will magnified by two coefficients accounting for plasticity and variation of Poisson ratio

  6. RCC-C: Design and construction rules for fuel assemblies of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The RCC-C code contains all the requirements for the design, fabrication and inspection of nuclear fuel assemblies and the different types of core components (rod cluster control assemblies, burnable poison rod assemblies, primary and secondary source assemblies and thimble plug assemblies). The design, fabrication and inspection rules defined in RCC-C leverage the results of the research and development work pioneered in France, Europe and worldwide, and which have been successfully used by industry to design and build nuclear fuel assemblies and incorporate the resulting feedback. The code's scope covers: fuel system design, especially for assemblies, the fuel rod and associated core components, the characteristics to be checked for products and parts, fabrication methods and associated inspection methods. The RCC-C code is used by the operator of the PWR nuclear power plants in France as a reference when sourcing fuel from the world's top two suppliers in the PWR market, given that the French operator is the world's largest buyer of PWR fuel. Fuel for EPR projects is manufactured according to the provisions of the RCC-C code. The code is available in French and English. The 2005 edition has been translated into Chinese. Contents of the 2015 edition of the RCC-C code: Chapter 1 - General provisions: 1.1 Purpose of the RCC-C, 1.2 Definitions, 1.3 Applicable standards, 1.4 Equipment subject to the RCC-C, 1.5 Management system, 1.6 Processing of non-conformances; Chapter 2 - Description of the equipment subject to the RCC-C: 2.1 Fuel assembly, 2.2 Core components; Chapter 3 - Design: Safety functions, operating functions and environment of fuel assemblies and core components, design and safety principles; Chapter 4 - Manufacturing: 4.1 Materials and part characteristics, 4.2 Assembly requirements, 4.3 Manufacturing and inspection processes, 4.4 Inspection methods, 4.5 Certification of NDT inspectors, 4.6 Characteristics to be inspected for the

  7. Adult renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid morphology represents a neoplastic dedifferentiation analogous to sarcomatoid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman-Fredricks, Jennifer R; Herrera, Loren; Bracho, Jorge; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Leveillee, Raymond; Rey, Luis; Jorda, Merce

    2011-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with rhabdoid morphology (RCC-RM) is a recently described variant of RCC, which has an aggressive biologic behavior and poor prognosis, akin to sarcomatoid RCC. The current World Health Organization classification of RCC does not include the rhabdoid phenotype as a distinct histologic entity. The aim of this study is to investigate whether RCC-RM represents a dedifferentiation of a classifiable-type World Health Organization RCC or a carcinosarcoma with muscle differentiation. We reviewed 168 cases of RCC obtained between 2003 and 2008. From these cases, 10 (6%) were found to have areas of classic rhabdoid morphology. Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, desmin, CD10, and CD117 was performed in each case using the labeled streptavidin-biotin method. Rhabdoid differentiation was identified in association with conventional-type RCC (9) and with unclassifiable-type RCC with spindle cell morphology (1). In all cases, both the rhabdoid and nonrhabdoid tumoral areas were positive for cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for desmin. Cytokeratin positivity in the rhabdoid areas was focal. In cases associated with conventional-type RCC, CD10 was positive in both the rhabdoid and nonrhabdoid foci. CD117 was negative in these tumors. The unclassifiable-type RCC with spindle cell morphology was negative for both CD10 and CD117. The similar immunophenotype between the rhabdoid and nonrhabdoid tumoral foci supports the origin of the rhabdoid cells from the classifiable-type RCC. Areas of rhabdoid morphology do not represent muscle metaplastic differentiation. Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid morphology may represent a dedifferentiation of a classifiable-type RCC, similar to that of sarcomatoid differentiation. The recognition of RCC-RM is important as it allows for the inclusion of these high-grade malignancies into a category associated with poor prognosis despite lacking the spindle cell component

  8. Genotype and phenotype correlation in von Hippel-Lindau disease based on alteration of the HIF-α binding site in VHL protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Jie; Wang, Jiang-Yi; Peng, Shuang-He; Li, Teng; Ning, Xiang-Hui; Hong, Bao-An; Liu, Jia-Yuan; Wu, Peng-Jie; Zhou, Bo-Wen; Zhou, Jing-Cheng; Qi, Nie-Nie; Peng, Xiang; Zhang, Jiu-Feng; Ma, Kai-Fang; Cai, Lin; Gong, Kan

    2018-03-29

    PurposeVon Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare hereditary cancer syndrome that reduces life expectancy. We aimed to construct a more valuable genotype-phenotype correlation based on alterations in VHL protein (pVHL).MethodsVHL patients (n = 339) were recruited and grouped based on mutation types: HIF-α binding site missense (HM) mutations, non-HIF-α binding site missense (nHM) mutations, and truncating (TR) mutations. Age-related risks of VHL-associated tumors and patient survival were compared.ResultsMissense mutations conferred an increased risk of pheochromocytoma (HR = 1.854, p = 0.047) compared with truncating mutations. The risk of pheochromocytoma was lower in the HM group than in the nHM group (HR = 0.298, p = 0.003) but was similar between HM and TR groups (HR = 0.901, p = 0.810). Patients in the nHM group had a higher risk of pheochromocytoma (HR = 3.447, p counseling and pathogenesis studies.Genetics in Medicine advance online publication, 29 March 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.261.

  9. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17, Chapter 4, Pulse Code Modulation Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A-4 Appendix 4-B. Citations ...investigation can be found in a paper by J. L. Maury, Jr. and J. Styles , “Development of Optimum Frame Synchronization Codes for Goddard Space Flight Center...Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 4, July 2017 B-1 APPENDIX 4-B Citations Aeronautical Radio, Inc. Mark 33 Digital Information Transfer

  10. 77 FR 17569 - United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC)-Transportation-Dangerous Goods Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... identified in the Joint Action Plan, the Transportation--Dangerous Goods Working Group led by senior...)-- Transportation--Dangerous Goods Working Group AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...--Dangerous Goods Working Group, of the United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC). Comments...

  11. Evaluation of renal cell carcinoma histological subtype and fuhrman grade using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Nozaki, Sayumi; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan); Nagashima, Yoji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Surgical Pathology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    We evaluated {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake by renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine whether different histological subtypes and Fuhrman grades can be distinguished. We retrospectively reviewed the records and maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) of 147 patients with 154 RCCs who underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) prior to tumour resection. The SUVmax was significantly lower in chromophobe RCC (chRCC) tumours than in clear cell RCC (ccRCC; p = 0.003) and papillary RCC (pRCC; p = 0.034) tumours. The mean tumour SUVmax was 4.58 ± 4.1 (range, 1.29-30.4) for ccRCC, 3.98 ± 1.9 (range, 0.49-6.72) for pRCC, and 1.93 ± 0.9 (range, 0.89-3.41) for chRCC. The SUVmax was not significantly different between the ccRCC and pRCC groups. In ccRCC and pRCC tumours, high-grade tumours had a significantly greater SUVmax (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) than low-grade tumours by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Mann-Whitney U test. In ccRCC, multivariate regression analysis indicated that the SUVmax was a significant indicator of Fuhrman grade. No significant differences in uptake were observed between high- and low-grade chRCC tumours. The SUVmax obtained using FDG-PET/CT may be an important indicator for predicting tumour grade in ccRCC and pRCC. (orig.)

  12. RCC-E: Design and construction rules for electrical equipment of PWR nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    RCC-E describes the rules for designing, building and installing electrical and I and C systems and equipment for pressurized water reactors. The code was drafted in partnership with industry, engineering firms, manufacturers, building control firms and operators, and represents a collection of best practices in accordance with IAEA requirements and IEC standards. The code's scope covers: architecture and the associated systems, materials engineering and the qualification procedure for normal and accidental environmental conditions, facility engineering and management of common cause failures (electrical and I and C) and electromagnetic interference, testing and inspecting electrical characteristics, quality assurance requirements supplementing ISO 9001 and activity monitoring. Use: RCC-E has been used to build the following power plants: France's last 12 nuclear units (1,300 MWe (8) and 1,450 MWe (4)), 2 M310 reactors in Korea (2), 44 M310 (4), CPR-1000 (28), CPR-600 (6), HPR-1000 (4) and EPR (2) reactors in service or undergoing construction in China, 1 EPR reactor in France. RCC-E is used for maintenance operations in French power plants (58 units) and Chinese M310 and CPR-1000 power plants. RCC-E has been chosen for the construction of the EPR plants in Hinkley Point, UK. Contents of the 2016 edition of the RCC-E code: Volume 1 - General requirements and quality assurance; Volume 2 - Specification of requirements; Volume 3 - I and C systems; Volume 4 - Electrical systems; Volume 5 - Materials engineering; Volume 6 - Installation of electrical and I and C systems; Volume 7 - Inspection and test methods

  13. LDL cholesterol counteracts the antitumour effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors against renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Sei; Makhov, Peter; Astsaturov, Igor; Golovine, Konstantin; Tulin, Alexei; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G; Kolenko, Vladimir M

    2017-04-25

    Treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) significantly improves survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, about one-quarter of the RCC patients are primarily refractory to treatment with TKIs. We examined viability of RCC and endothelial cells treated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and/or TKIs. Next, we validated the potential role of PI3K/AKT signalling in LDL-mediated TKI resistance. Finally, we examined the effect of a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet on the response of RCC xenograft tumours to sunitinib. The addition of LDL cholesterol increases activation of PI3K/AKT signalling and compromises the antitumour efficacy of TKIs against RCC and endothelial cells. Furthermore, RCC xenograft tumours resist TKIs in mice fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. The ability of renal tumours to maintain their cholesterol homoeostasis may be a critical component of TKI resistance in RCC patients.

  14. Differentiation of low- and high-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma: Tumor size versus CT perfusion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Kang, Qinqin; Xu, Bing; Guo, Hairuo; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Tiegong; Ye, Hui; Wu, Xinhuai

    To compare the utility of tumor size and CT perfusion parameters for differentiation of low- and high-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Tumor size, Equivalent blood volume (Equiv BV), permeability surface-area product (PS), blood flow (BF), and Fuhrman pathological grading of clear cell RCC were retrospectively analyzed. High-grade clear cell RCC had significantly higher tumor size and lower PS than low grade. Tumor size positively correlated with Fuhrman grade, but PS negatively did. Tumor size and PS were significantly independent indexes for differentiating high-grade from low-grade clear cell RCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. RCC-M - Design and Conception Rules for Mechanical Components of PWR Nuclear Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The design and construction rules applicable to mechanical components of PWR Nuclear Islands (RCC-M) are a part of the collection of design and construction rules for nuclear power plants. It covers the rules applicable to the design and manufacture of pressure boundaries of mechanical equipment of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The pressure components subject to the RCC-M are specified in A 4000. They include the reactor fluid systems (primary, secondary and auxiliary systems) and other components which are not subject to pressure: vessel internals, supports for pressure components subject to the RCC-M, nuclear island storage tanks. When a pressure equipment is subject to the RCC-M, all its elements subject to pressure are also, in accordance with the provisions of A 4000, and these elements are the same class as the component. In this case all the provisions of the RCC-M are applicable: design, procurement, manufacture, inspection and pressure testing. Elements which are not subject to pressure and which are subject to the RCC-M may be covered within the Code by limited specific provisions (procurement of materials for example). The other rules applicable to this equipment must be in contractual form. The assemblies comprising pressure equipment assembled by a manufacturer to constitute an integrated and functional whole, shall be subject to the rules indicated in this Code. Main objectives of Code Requirements are to ensure the integrity and mechanical stability over the equipment design life. Function ability and operability of equipment are not directly addressed in the Code. The RCC-M contributes to ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements. These requirements depend on the applicable regulatory context. The RCC-M is representative of the state of the art as concerns the design and manufacture of PWR components, ensuring an overall safety level tested through experience. The RCC-M consists of five sections, which provide rules for the design and

  16. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome: a case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solav, Shrikant; Bhandari, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is a hereditary autosomal dominant disorder caused by defective tumor suppression gene at 3p25-p26. The gene for VHL disease is found on chromosome 3, and is inherited in a dominant fashion. The VHL gene is a tumor suppressor gene. This means that its role in a normal cell is to stop the uncontrolled growth and proliferation. It is characterized by abnormal growth of blood vessels. It strikes the eyes, central nervous system, kidneys, endocrine glands, etc. It predisposes the patient to retinal angiomas, central nervous system hemangioblastoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), pheochromocytomas, islet cell tumor of the pancreas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renal, pancreatic, epididymal cysts. We present a case of familial VHL syndrome whose Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was truly positive for adrenal pheochromocytoma but was falsely negative for RCC. Review of literature related to this entity is made. (author)

  17. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Okudo, Jerome; Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that ...

  18. The RCC-MR design code for LMFBR components. A useful basic for fusion reactor design tools development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acker, D.; Chevereau, G.

    1985-11-01

    LMFBR and fusion reactors exhibit common features with regard to structural materials (Stainless steels), temperature service level (550-600 0 C), loading types. So, design and construction rules used in France for LMFBR, that is to say RCC-MR Code, can constitute a good basis for fusion reactors design. Some original aspects of RCC-MR design rules are described, relating to unsignificant creep, ratchetting effect, fatigue and creep damage limits, creep damage evaluation, fatigue damage evaluation, buckling. The main originality of RCC-MR consists to propose comprehensive simplified rules based on elastic calculations and extended from classical cold temperatures to the elevated temperature domain

  19. The RCC-MR design code for LMFBR components. A useful basis for fusion reactor design tools development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acker, D.; Chevereau, G.

    1986-01-01

    LMFBR and fusion reactors exhibit common features with regard to structural materials, temperature service level, loading types. So, design and construction rules used in France for LMFBR, that is to say RCC-MR Code, can constitute a good basis for fusion reactors design. Some original aspects of RCC-MR design rules are described, relating to unsignificant creep, ratchetting effect, fatigue and creep damage limits, creep damage evaluation, fatigue damage evaluation, buckling. The main originality of RCC-MR consists to propose comprehensive simplified rules based on elastic calculations and extended from classical cold temperatures to the elevated temperature domain. (author)

  20. Application of the active flexible fixture with passive RCC function to peg-in-hole task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the active flexible fixture (AFLEF) with passive RCC to the peg-in-hole task on the disk in the X-band accelerator. The AFLEF can fix any work and position the fixed work at short range. In this paper, the 2-dimensional AFLEF is proposed as the simplified type and is provided with passive RCC function to be equipped with dexterity for a peg-in-hole task. As results of the experiment on the peg-in-hole task on the X-band accelerator disks with the AFLEF, we make the ability of the AFLEF for the task clear and also the boundary conditions to the complete task clear. (author)

  1. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17. Chapter 8. Digital Data Bus Acquisition Formatting Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    incorrect word count/message and illegal mode codes are not considered bus errors. 8.6.2 Source Signal The source of data is a signal conforming to...Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 8, July 2017 CHAPTER 8 Digital Data Bus Acquisition Formatting Standard Acronyms...check FCS frame check sequence HDDR high-density digital recording MIL-STD Military Standard msb most significant bit PCM pulse code modulation

  2. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17, Chapter 27, RF Network Access Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    to the physical media (i.e., the wireless RF network). On the transmission side, it is responsible for framing IP packets for physical transmission ...resolution bandwidth of 30 kHz. It was measured during the steady power condition during a burst transmission . Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard... power levels available for modulated burst transmission . Table 27-1. Transceiver Phase Noise Mask dBc/Hz Frequency Offset −30 dBc/Hz 10 Hz −60 dBc

  3. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17. Chapter 3. Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Standard 106-17 Chapter 3, July 2017 3-5 Table 3-4. Constant-Bandwidth FM Subcarrier Channels Frequency Criteria\\Channels: A B C D E F G H Deviation ...Telemetry Standards , RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 3, July 2017 3-i CHAPTER 3 Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards Acronyms...Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards ................................ 3-1 3.1 General

  4. RCC-CW - Rules for design and construction of PWR nuclear civil works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    RCC-CW describes the rules for designing, building and testing civil engineering works in PWR reactors. It explains the principles and requirements for the safety, serviceability and durability of concrete and metal frame structures, based on Eurocode design principles (European standards for the structural design of construction works) combined with specific measures for safety-class buildings. The code is produced as part of the RCC-CW Subcommittee, which includes all the parties involved in civil engineering works in the nuclear sector: clients, contractors, general and specialized firms, consultancies and inspection offices. The code covers the following areas relating to the design and construction of civil engineering works that play an important safety role: geotechnical aspects, reinforced concrete structures and galleries, pre-stressed containments with metal liner, metal containment and pool liners, metal frames, anchors, concrete cylinder pipes, containment leak tests. The RCC-CW code is available as an ETC-C version specific to EPR projects (European pressurized reactor). Contents of the 2016 edition of the RCC-CW Code: Part G - General: scope, standards, notations, quality management, general principles; Part D - Design: actions and combinations of actions, geotechnical aspects, pre-stressed or reinforced concrete structures, metal containment liners, metal pool liners, metal frames, anchors; Part C - Construction: geotechnical aspects, concrete, surface finish and formwork, reinforcement for reinforced concrete, pre-stressing processes, prefabricated concrete elements, metal containment liners, metal pool liners, metal frames, anchors, embedded pipelines, joint sealing, survey networks and tolerances; Part M - Maintenance and monitoring: containment integrity and rate tests

  5. Consideration of creep in design rules of AFCEN RCC-MRx 2012 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebarbe, T.; Petesch, C.; Lejeail, Y.; Lamagnere, P.; Dubiez-Le Goff, S.

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 edition of the RCC-MRx Code has been issued in French and English versions by AFCEN (Association Francaise pour les regles de Conception et de Construction des Materiels des Chaudieres Electro-nucleaires). This Code is the result of the merger of the RCC-MX 2008 developed in the context of the research reactor Jules Horowitz Reactor project, in the RCC-MR 2007 which set up rules applicable to the design of components operating at high temperature and to the Vacuum Vessel of ITER. This new edition is the opportunity to publish also the background of the rules. This paper is one illustration of what may be such a document, on a dedicated example, the creep rules. It contains an overview of the design rules associated to the creep damage and explains the purpose and the origins of these rules. This type of exercise is going to be generalized to all the parts of the code in AFCEN technical publications, the criteria. (authors)

  6. A novel mutation causing nephronophthisis in the Lewis polycystic kidney rat localises to a conserved RCC1 domain in Nek8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCooke John K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nephronophthisis (NPHP as a cause of cystic kidney disease is the most common genetic cause of progressive renal failure in children and young adults. NPHP is characterized by abnormal and/or loss of function of proteins associated with primary cilia. Previously, we characterized an autosomal recessive phenotype of cystic kidney disease in the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK rat. Results In this study, quantitative trait locus analysis was used to define a ~1.6Mbp region on rat chromosome 10q25 harbouring the lpk mutation. Targeted genome capture and next-generation sequencing of this region identified a non-synonymous mutation R650C in the NIMA (never in mitosis gene a- related kinase 8 ( Nek8 gene. This is a novel Nek8 mutation that occurs within the regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1-like region of the protein. Specifically, the R650C substitution is located within a G[QRC]LG repeat motif of the predicted seven bladed beta-propeller structure of the RCC1 domain. The rat Nek8 gene is located in a region syntenic to portions of human chromosome 17 and mouse 11. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed abnormally long cilia on LPK kidney epithelial cells, and fluorescence immunohistochemistry for Nek8 protein revealed altered cilia localisation. Conclusions When assessed relative to other Nek8 NPHP mutations, our results indicate the whole propeller structure of the RCC1 domain is important, as the different mutations cause comparable phenotypes. This study establishes the LPK rat as a novel model system for NPHP and further consolidates the link between cystic kidney disease and cilia proteins.

  7. A comparative study of physical and chemical properties of different pozzolanic materials used for roller compacted concrete RCC dams

    OpenAIRE

    Husein Malkawi Abdallah I.; Shatnawi Ehab; Husein Malkawi Dima A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the feasibility and the efficiency of using Natural Pozzolan and/or Rock flour in Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC) gravity dams. For this purpose, five identical mortar trial mixes were prepared using five different supplementary materials, i.e., fly ash produced in South Africa (proven to be effective in RCC construction), fly ash produced in Turkey, Jordanian natural pozzolan, Saudi natural pozzolan, and rock flour from Mujib Dam basalt quarry. The physical and chemical ...

  8. Coffee consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Samuel O; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Diehl, Nancy D; Serie, Daniel J; Custer, Kaitlynn M; Arnold, Michelle L; Wu, Kevin J; Cheville, John C; Thiel, David D; Leibovich, Bradley C; Parker, Alexander S

    2017-08-01

    Studies have suggested an inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC); however, data regarding decaffeinated coffee are limited. We conducted a case-control study of 669 incident RCC cases and 1,001 frequency-matched controls. Participants completed identical risk factor questionnaires that solicited information about usual coffee consumption habits. The study participants were categorized as non-coffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee drinkers. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for multiple risk factors for RCC. Compared with no coffee consumption, we found an inverse association between caffeinated coffee consumption and RCC risk (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.57-0.99), whereas we observed a trend toward increased risk of RCC for consumption of decaffeinated coffee (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.98-2.19). Decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated also with increased risk of the clear cell RCC (ccRCC) subtype, particularly the aggressive form of ccRCC (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.01-3.22). Consumption of caffeinated coffee is associated with reduced risk of RCC, while decaffeinated coffee consumption is associated with an increase in risk of aggressive ccRCC. Further inquiry is warranted in large prospective studies and should include assessment of dose-response associations.

  9. Knockdown of MAGEA6 Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Signaling to Inhibit Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xueting; Xie, Jing; Huang, Hang; Deng, Zhexian

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A6 (MAGEA6) is a cancer-specific ubiquitin ligase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The current study tested MAGEA6 expression and potential function in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MAGEA6 and AMPK expression in human RCC tissues and RCC cells were tested by Western blotting assay and qRT-PCR assay. shRNA method was applied to knockdown MAGEA6 in human RCC cells. Cell survival and proliferation were tested by MTT assay and BrdU ELISA assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was tested by the TUNEL assay and single strand DNA ELISA assay. The 786-O xenograft in nude mouse model was established to test RCC cell growth in vivo. MAGEA6 is specifically expressed in RCC tissues as well as in the established (786-O and A498) and primary human RCC cells. MAGEA6 expression is correlated with AMPKα1 downregulation in RCC tissues and cells. It is not detected in normal renal tissues nor in the HK-2 renal epithelial cells. MAGEA6 knockdown by targeted-shRNA induced AMPK stabilization and activation, which led to mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in-activation and RCC cell death/apoptosis. AMPK inhibition, by AMPKα1 shRNA or the dominant negative AMPKα1 (T172A), almost reversed MAGEA6 knockdown-induced RCC cell apoptosis. Conversely, expression of the constitutive-active AMPKα1 (T172D) mimicked the actions by MAGEA6 shRNA. In vivo, MAGEA6 shRNA-bearing 786-O tumors grew significantly slower in nude mice than the control tumors. AMPKα1 stabilization and activation as well as mTORC1 in-activation were detected in MAGEA6 shRNA tumor tissues. MAGEA6 knockdown inhibits human RCC cells via activating AMPK signaling. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A generic RNA-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine strategy for renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Christiane; Regn, Sybille; Weinzierl, Andreas; Noessner, Elfriede; Schendel, Dolores J

    2005-01-01

    We present a generic dendritic cell (DC) vaccine strategy for patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) based on the use of RNA as a source of multiplex tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Instead of preparing RNA from tumor tissue of each individual RCC patient, we propose to substitute RNA prepared from a well characterized highly immunogenic RCC cell line (RCC-26 tumor cells) as a generic source of TAAs for loading of DCs. We demonstrate here that efficient RNA transfer can be achieved using lipofection of immature DCs, which are subsequently matured with a cytokine cocktail to express high levels of MHC and costimulatory molecules as well as the chemokine receptor CCR7. Neither RNA itself nor the lipid component impacted on the phenotype or the cytokine secretion of mature DCs. Following RNA loading, DCs derived from HLA-A2-positive donors were able to activate effector-memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for a TAA ligand expressed by the RCC-26 cell line. CTL responses to RNA-loaded DCs reached levels comparable to those stimulated directly by the RCC-26 tumor cells. Furthermore, DCs expressing tumor cell RNA primed naïve T cells, yielding T cell lines with cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion after contact with RCC tumor cells. RCC-26 cell lines are available as good manufacturing practice (GMP)-certified reagents enabling this source of RNA to be easily standardized and adapted for clinical testing. In addition, well defined immune monitoring tools, including the use of RNA expressing B cell lines, are available. Thus, this DC vaccine strategy can be directly compared with an ongoing gene therapy trial using genetically-engineered variants of the RCC-26 cell line as vaccines for RCC patients with metastatic disease. PMID:16045799

  11. A generic RNA-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine strategy for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noessner Elfriede

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a generic dendritic cell (DC vaccine strategy for patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC based on the use of RNA as a source of multiplex tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. Instead of preparing RNA from tumor tissue of each individual RCC patient, we propose to substitute RNA prepared from a well characterized highly immunogenic RCC cell line (RCC-26 tumor cells as a generic source of TAAs for loading of DCs. We demonstrate here that efficient RNA transfer can be achieved using lipofection of immature DCs, which are subsequently matured with a cytokine cocktail to express high levels of MHC and costimulatory molecules as well as the chemokine receptor CCR7. Neither RNA itself nor the lipid component impacted on the phenotype or the cytokine secretion of mature DCs. Following RNA loading, DCs derived from HLA-A2-positive donors were able to activate effector-memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs specific for a TAA ligand expressed by the RCC-26 cell line. CTL responses to RNA-loaded DCs reached levels comparable to those stimulated directly by the RCC-26 tumor cells. Furthermore, DCs expressing tumor cell RNA primed naïve T cells, yielding T cell lines with cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion after contact with RCC tumor cells. RCC-26 cell lines are available as good manufacturing practice (GMP-certified reagents enabling this source of RNA to be easily standardized and adapted for clinical testing. In addition, well defined immune monitoring tools, including the use of RNA expressing B cell lines, are available. Thus, this DC vaccine strategy can be directly compared with an ongoing gene therapy trial using genetically-engineered variants of the RCC-26 cell line as vaccines for RCC patients with metastatic disease.

  12. The Expression of BTS-2 Enhances Cell Growth and Invasiveness in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quoc Thang; Oue, Naohide; Yamamoto, Yuji; Shigematsu, Yoshinori; Sekino, Yohei; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Uraoka, Naohiro; Tiwari, Mamata; Yasui, Wataru

    2017-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of cancer in developed countries. Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2) gene, which encodes BST2 transmembrane glycoprotein, is overexpressed in several cancer types. In the present study, we analyzed the expression and function of BST2 in RCC. BST2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 123 RCC cases. RNA interference was used to inhibit BST2 expression in a RCC cell line. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that 32% of the 123 RCC cases were positive for BST2. BST2 expression was positively associated with tumour stage. Furthermore, BST2 expression was an independent predictor of survival in patients with RCC. BST2 siRNA-transfected Caki-1 cells displayed significantly reduced cell growth and invasive activity relative to negative control siRNA-transfected cells. These results suggest that BST2 plays an important role in the progression of RCC. Because BST2 is expressed on the cell membrane, BST2 is a good therapeutic target for RCC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Proper understanding of relevant articles in RCC-M and PANE G-7-002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zaozhan

    2005-01-01

    The French code, 'Design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear island' RCC-M and the Russian code 'Regulations for strength analysis of equipment and pipelines of atomic power plants' PANE G-7-002, both for nuke plant design, are sometimes used in China, and discrepancies in understanding some articles of such foreign design codes will some times give different conclusions as 'acceptable' or 'unacceptable' the concerned material or product. Section IV of RCC-M concerns with qualification and performance of welding operations. Article S 3150 in this section covers the retesting procedures and article S 3152 in it relates to destructive tests. One sentence in Article S 3152 reads like this, 'Where an unsatisfactory result is due to the poor execution of the test or the presence of a defect in the specimen, the relevant result must be discarded and the test shall be repeated.' The 'presence of a defect' arose discrepancies in understanding the sentence because there is no definition in RCC-M to clarify their scopes such as how big a defect should be considered as a 'defect' that can invalidate the test results. Section 5.5 of PANE G-7-002 concerns the determination of critical brittle temperature. It stipulates that critical brittle temperature T k is a temperature at which the impact strength values must be higher than the specified ones. The specified criterion values of impact strength are related to the yield strength but it is not quite definite that the yield strength values in the table should be the documented minimum values for different materials or that they should be the tested results of the concerned lots of materials the specimen represents. The two different understandings of the yield strength values will sometimes give contrary conclusions. This paper introduces the different opinions in understanding the code texts, makes clear what it supports, and states in detail the reasons it so believes. (authors)

  14. RCC-M: Design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    AFCEN's RCC-M code concerns the mechanical components designed and manufactured for pressurized water reactors (PWR). It applies to pressure equipment in nuclear islands in safety classes 1, 2 and 3, and certain non-pressure components, such as vessel internals, supporting structures for safety class components, storage tanks and containment penetrations. RCC-M covers the following technical subjects: sizing and design, choice of materials and procurement. Fabrication and control, including: associated qualification requirements (procedures, welders and operators, etc.), control methods to be implemented, acceptance criteria for detected defects, documentation associated with the different activities covered, and quality assurance. The design, manufacture and inspection rules defined in RCC-M leverage the results of the research and development work pioneered in France, Europe and worldwide, and which have been successfully used by industry to design and build PWR nuclear islands. AFCEN's rules incorporate the resulting feedback. Use: France's last 16 nuclear units (P'4 and N4); 4 CP1 reactors in South Africa (2) and Korea (2); 44 M310 (4), CPR-1000 (28), CPR-600 (6), HPR-1000 (4) and EPR (2) reactors in service or undergoing construction in China; 4 EPR reactors in Europe: Finland (1), France (1) and UK (2). Content: Section I - nuclear island components, subsection 'A': general rules, subsection 'B': class 1 components, subsection 'C': class 2 components, subsection 'D': class 3 components, subsection 'E': small components, subsection 'G': core support structures, subsection 'H': supports, subsection 'J': low pressure or atmospheric storage tanks, subsection 'P': containment penetration, subsection 'Q': qualification of active mechanical components, subsection 'Z': technical appendices; section II - materials; section III - examination

  15. Colonic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: helical-CT demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Candamio, M.J.; Pombo, S.; Pombo, F.

    2000-01-01

    Clinically evident colonic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rare. In the present study a hypervascular sigmoid mass was demonstrated on arterial-phase helical CT using a water enema in a patient who had suffered left nephrectomy 8 years previously for RCC. The intense and early enhancement of the lesion suggested the possibility of a solitary colonic metastasis from RCC, a diagnosis which was pathologically confirmed. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Tobacco Smoke (TS) on Growth of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    tumor suppressor Accomplishments: What were the major goals of the project? It is a discovery level study to collect and genetically analyze...pathologist who identifies histological types of tumors and actually flash -freezes the specimens, and a laboratory technician who processes the tissues

  17. Autocrine CSF-1 and CSF-1 Receptor Co-expression Promotes Renal Cell Carcinoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Schimanski, Carl Christoph; Schwartz, Melvin M.; Schwarting, Andreas; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is increasing in incidence but the molecular mechanisms regulating its growth remain elusive. Co-expression of the monocytic growth factor CSF-1 and its receptor CSF-1R on renal tubular epithelial cells (TEC) will promote proliferation and anti-apoptosis during regeneration of renal tubules. Here we show that a CSF-1-dependent autocrine pathway is also responsible for the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). CSF-1 and CSF-1R were co-expressed in RCC and TEC proximally adjacent to RCC. CSF-1 engagement of CSF-1R promoted RCC survival and proliferation and reduced apoptosis, in support of the likelihood that CSF-1R effector signals mediate RCC growth. In vivo CSF-1R blockade using a CSF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor decreased RCC proliferation and macrophage infiltration in a manner associated with a dramatic reduction in tumor mass. Further mechanistic investigations linked CSF-1 and EGF signaling in RCC. Taken together, our results suggest that budding RCC stimulates the proximal adjacent microenvironment in the kidney to release mediators of CSF-1, CSF-1R and EGF expression in RCC. Further, our findings imply that targeting CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling may be therapeutically effective in RCC. PMID:22052465

  18. NSS for an RCC in a patient with renal insufficiency after heart transplant because of right ventricular tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Zyczkowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Krzysztof; Bryniarski, Piotr; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressive therapy on the development of neoplasms has become the object of an ever increasing interest for clinicians all over the world. The literature on neoplasms development in the course of therapy following transplants has confirmed a considerable increase in the incidence of neoplasms of the skin and lymph nodes. Organ neoplasms developing in patients after transplants are characterized by increased progression, poor cellular diversification and a more unfavorable prognosis than in the general population The aim of the study is to present the case of a nephron-sparing surgery of a renal tumor (NSS) without any intraoperative ischaemia in a 55-year-old female patient with an orthotopic heart transplant and renal insufficiency following a prolonged immune suppression. It is estimated that the patients at the highest risk of neoplasm development are those in the first months after transplant, especially heart transplant. They require maximum doses of immunosuppressive drugs. In the case of patients with initial renal insufficiency the duration of ischaemia of the organ operated on should be minimized, and if possible, surgery should be conducted without clamping the renal pedicle. The surgical treatment of RCC (renal cell carcinoma) in transplant patients does not require any reduction in the amount of the immunosuppressive drugs.

  19. [Heredity in renal and prostatic neoplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayer Galetti, T; D'Arrigo, L; De Zorzi, L; Patarnello, T

    1997-09-01

    There is an ever growing report of data supporting the evidence that accumulated genetic changes underlie the development of neoplasia. The paradigma of this multistep process is colon cancer were cancer onset is associated, over decades, with at least seven genetic events. The number of genetic alterations increases moving from adenomatous lesions to colon cancer and, although the genetic alterations occur according to a preferred sequence, the total accumulation of changes rather than their sequential order is responsible of tumor biological behavior. It is noteworthy that, at least for this neoplasia, carcinogenesis appears to arise as a result of the mutational activation of oncogenes coupled with the mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In some cases mutant suppressor genes appear to exert a phenotypic effect even when present in the heterozygous state thus been non "recessive" at the cellular level. The general features of this model may apply also to renal cell cancer (RCC) and prostate cancer (CaP). Extensive literature exists on the cytogenetic and molecular findings in RCC. Only 2% of RCC are familiar, but molecular genetic studies of these cancers have provided important informations on RCC pathogenesis. As with other cancers, familiar RCC is characterized by an early age of onset and frequent multicentricity. A pathological classification useful in studying these patients subdivide renal cancers in papillary (pRCC) and non papillary (RCC) neoplasms. The most common cause of inherited RCC is the Von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder characterized by retinal and cerebellar hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic cysts and RCC. Over 70% of these patients will develop an RCC by their sixth decade. In 1993 the isolation of the tumor suppressor gene in VHL disease at the level of chromosome 3p25-p26 have lead to a better understanding of RCC. Most missense mutations are associated with high risk of

  20. Evaluation of KALIMER IHTS piping using French RCC-MR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Kim, J. B.; Lee, J. H.

    2001-12-01

    In the present report, the evaluation of design integrity for the liquid metal reactor(LMR) of KALIMER IHTS(intermediate heat transport system) piping according to the French design guideline of RCC-MR RC3600 developed for secondary piping of LMR and the evaluation procedure was presented. The evaluation results showed that the results by the simple RC-3600 procedure of design by formula were more conservative than those of ASME section III subsection NH of the design by analysis for the class I structural components

  1. Solid renal tumor severity in von Hippel Lindau disease is related to germline deletion length and location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranchie, Jodi K; Afonso, Anoushka; Albert, Paul S; Kalyandrug, Sivaram; Phillips, John L; Zhou, Shubo; Peterson, James; Ghadimi, Bijan M; Hurley, Katheen; Riss, Joseph; Vasselli, James R; Ried, Thomas; Zbar, Berton; Choyke, Peter; Walther, McClellan M; Klausner, Richard D; Linehan, W Marston

    2004-01-01

    von Hippel Lindau disease (VHL) is an autosomal dominant familial cancer syndrome linked to alteration of the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Affected patients are predisposed to develop pheochromocytomas and cystic and solid tumors of the kidney, CNS, pancreas, retina, and epididymis. However, organ involvement varies considerably among families and has been shown to correlate with the underlying germline alteration. Clinically, we observed a paradoxically lower prevalence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients with complete germline deletion of VHL. To determine if a relationship existed between the type of VHL deletion and disease, we retrospectively evaluated 123 patients from 55 families with large germline VHL deletions, including 42 intragenic partial deletions and 13 complete VHL deletions, by history and radiographic imaging. Each individual and family was scored for cystic or solid involvement of CNS, pancreas, and kidney, and for pheochromocytoma. Germline deletions were mapped using a combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative Southern and Southern blot analysis. An age-adjusted comparison demonstrated a higher prevalence of RCC in patients with partial germline VHL deletions relative to complete deletions (48.9 vs. 22.6%, p=0.007). This striking phenotypic dichotomy was not seen for cystic renal lesions or for CNS (p=0.22), pancreas (p=0.72), or pheochromocytoma (p=0.34). Deletion mapping revealed that development of RCC had an even greater correlation with retention of HSPC300 (C3orf10), located within the 30-kb region of chromosome 3p, immediately telomeric to VHL (52.3 vs. 18.9%, p <0.001), suggesting the presence of a neighboring gene or genes critical to the development and maintenance of RCC. Careful correlation of genotypic data with objective phenotypic measures will provide further insight into the mechanisms of tumor formation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Implication de la mucine membranaire MUC1 dans la progression tumorale rénale et identification de nouvelles cibles thérapeutiques

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillez , Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma corresponds to 5% of all adult malignancies and originates from renal tubules. The main histologic subtype is represented by clear renal cell carcinoma. Ninety percent of cRCC present a biallelic inactivation of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene resulting in constitutive activation of hypoxia signaling pathway via the Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) -1 transcription factor that contributes to the physiology of tumours. cRCC is typically highly resistant to ...

  3. Opposite prognostic roles of HIF1β and HIF2β expressions in bone metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szendroi, Attila; Szász, A. Marcell; Kardos, Magdolna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognostic markers of bone metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer (ccRCC) are poorly established. We tested prognostic value of HIF1β/HIF2β and their selected target genes in primary tumors and corresponding bone metastases. RESULTS: Expression of HIF2β was lower in mRCC both at m...

  4. RCC-F: Design and construction rules for PWR fire protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The RCC-F code defines the rules for designing, building and installing the fire protection systems used to manage the nuclear hazards inherent in the outbreak of a fire inside the facility and thereby control the fundamental nuclear functions. The code provides fire protection recommendations in terms of: the industrial risk (loss of assets and/or operation), personnel safety, the environment. The code is divided into five main sections: generalities, design safety principles, fire protection design bases, construction provisions, rules for installing the fire protection components and equipment. The RCC-F code is available as an ETC-F version specifically for EPR projects (European pressurized reactor). Contents of the 2013 edition of the ETC-F code: Volume A - Generalities: Structure of ETC-F general points, documentation (in progress), chapter (provision) quality assurance; Volume B - Design safety principles: design nuclear safety principles; Volume C - Fire protection design bases: fire protection design bases; Volume D - Construction provisions: construction provisions; Volume E - Installation rules for fire protection: rules for installing the fire protection, components and equipment

  5. Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma: a new radiological entity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, F.; Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Helenon, O.; Correas, J.M. [Necker Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Lemaitre, L. [Claude Huriez Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lille (France); Andre, M. [La-Conception Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille (France); Meuwly, J.Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sengel, C. [Grenoble Hospital, Department of Radiology, Grenoble (France); Derchi, L. [Universita di Genova, Radiologia - DICMI, Genova (Italy); Yacoub, M. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bordeaux (France); Verkarre, V. [Necker Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2016-04-15

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) is a recently identified renal malignancy. While approximately 100 cases of TC-RCC have been reported in the pathology literature, imaging features have not yet been clearly described. The purpose of this review is to describe the main radiologic features of this rare sub-type of RCC on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based jointly on the literature and findings from a multi-institutional retrospective HIPAA-compliant review of pathology and imaging databases. Using a combination of sonographic and CT/MRI features, diagnosis of TC-RCC appeared to be strongly suggested in many cases. (orig.)

  6. Integrative genome-wide expression profiling identifies three distinct molecular subgroups of renal cell carcinoma with different patient outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beleut Manfred

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is characterized by a number of diverse molecular aberrations that differ among individuals. Recent approaches to molecularly classify RCC were based on clinical, pathological as well as on single molecular parameters. As a consequence, gene expression patterns reflecting the sum of genetic aberrations in individual tumors may not have been recognized. In an attempt to uncover such molecular features in RCC, we used a novel, unbiased and integrative approach. Methods We integrated gene expression data from 97 primary RCC of different pathologic parameters, 15 RCC metastases as well as 34 cancer cell lines for two-way nonsupervised hierarchical clustering using gene groups suggested by the PANTHER Classification System. We depicted the genomic landscape of the resulted tumor groups by means of Single Nuclear Polymorphism (SNP technology. Finally, the achieved results were immunohistochemically analyzed using a tissue microarray (TMA composed of 254 RCC. Results We found robust, genome wide expression signatures, which split RCC into three distinct molecular subgroups. These groups remained stable even if randomly selected gene sets were clustered. Notably, the pattern obtained from RCC cell lines was clearly distinguishable from that of primary tumors. SNP array analysis demonstrated differing frequencies of chromosomal copy number alterations among RCC subgroups. TMA analysis with group-specific markers showed a prognostic significance of the different groups. Conclusion We propose the existence of characteristic and histologically independent genome-wide expression outputs in RCC with potential biological and clinical relevance.

  7. Different Cytokine and Chemokine Expression Patterns in Malignant Compared to Those in Nonmalignant Renal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gelbrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Cytokines and chemokines are widely involved in cancer cell progression and thus represent promising candidate factors for new biomarkers. Methods. Four renal cell cancer (RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, RCC4, and A498 and a nonmalignant renal cell line (RC-124 were examined with respect to their proliferation. The cytokine and chemokine expression pattern was examined by a DNA array (Human Cytokines & Chemokines RT2 Profiler PCR Array; Qiagen, Hilden, Germany, and expression profiles were compared. Results. Caki-1 and 786-O cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation rates, whereas RCC4 and A498 cells demonstrated attenuated proliferation, compared to nonmalignant RC-124 cells. Expression analysis revealed 52 cytokines and chemokines primarily involved in proliferation and inflammation and differentially expressed not only in malignant and nonmalignant renal cells but also in the four RCC cell lines. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the expression of 84 cytokines and chemokines in four RCC cell lines compared to that in a nonmalignant renal cell line. VEGFA, NODAL, and BMP6 correlated with RCC cell line proliferation and, thus, may represent putative clinical biomarkers for RCC progression as well as for RCC diagnosis and prognosis.

  8. Creep-fatigue damage evaluation for SS-316LN (ORNL PLATES): - RCC-MR vs. ASME SEC III - NH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sati, Bhuwan Chandra; Jalaldeen, S.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of high temperature tests done on ORNL plate with deformation control loading, under creep-fatigue damage have been presented. The test results with methodology of RCC-MR and ASME-NH life prediction under creep-fatigue loading have been assessed. The stress relaxation effect in calculating the life using RCC-MR under creep-fatigue damage is found to be significant in presence of secondary stress. RCC-MR: 2007 is more realistic number of cycles (predicts 51 number of cycles) as compared to ASME-NH (predicts 312 number of cycles) which is demonstrated by the experimental work (observed 86 numbers of cycles). Between RCC-MR and experimental work, design code seems to be more conservative for life prediction due to creep-fatigue damage. For fatigue damage, the approaches are same and the difference comes from material properties and the starting stress for applying Neuber's rule. ASME approach has the limitation of stress range magnitude. ASME approach predicts lower elastic plus plastic strain for the cases having S* above the linear stress limit. For creep strain and creep damage evaluation, ASME and RCC-MR have different approaches for calculating the stress at the beginning and during the hold period. The RCC-MR takes account of cyclic hardening or softening effects (hardening in the present case of 316 LN) by means of the cyclic stress-strain curve and the benefit of symmetrization effects which are significant for this material. The ASME code neglects these effects and instead relies on an approach based on the isochronous stress-strain curves. (author)

  9. Renal cell carcinoma: new insights and challenges for a clinician scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingarev, Roman; Jaimes, Edgar A

    2017-08-01

    There is a growing recognition of the complex interplay between renal cell cancer (RCC), kidney function, mechanical reduction of nephron mass, and systemic agents targeting the cancer. Earlier detection of RCC and rising life expectancy of cancer survivors places a greater emphasis on preservation of renal function after cancer resection and during systemic therapy. Unique adverse effects associated with RCC drugs not only help reveal cancer pathophysiology but also expand our knowledge of normal cell signaling and metabolism. In this review, we outline our current understanding of RCC biology and treatment, their bidirectional relationship with kidney function, and unmet research needs in this field. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Interventional Management of a Renal Cell Carcinoma by Radiofrequency Ablation with Tagging and Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Penzkofer, Tobias; Bruners, Philipp; Gunther, Rolf W.; Brehmer, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few years, percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been successfully established as a viable treatment modality for small peripheral renal cell carcinoma (RCC). This technique is limited by central tumor location and tumor size. We report the interventional management of a 5.3 cm mixed RCC with central and exophytic parts by combining the RF ablation with embolization, tagging, and retrograde, as well as anterograde cooling. The potential pitfalls of complex hybrid interventions for treating RCC are discussed

  11. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 downregulated by von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor pVHL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, Peter; Sulitkova, Jitka; Lisztwan, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    Organ-specific metastasis is governed, in part, by interactions between chemokine receptors on cancer cells and matching chemokines in target organs. For example, malignant breast cancer cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and commonly metastasize to organs that are an abundant source of t...

  12. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wu, Kaijie [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Gao, Dexuan [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated with Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Xinyang; Chen, Yule; Du, Yuefeng; Song, Wenbin; Ma, Zhenkun [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Authement, Craig; Saha, Debabrata [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong, E-mail: jt.hsieh@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); He, Dalin, E-mail: dalinhe@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment.

  13. SEISMIC B E H AV I OUR OF R.C.C BUILDING WITH AND WITHOUT FLOATING COLUMNS

    OpenAIRE

    E. ANUSHA; E. V. RAGHVA RAO; N. CHENNA KESAVA

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of the project is to study the seismic behaviour of R.C.C building with and without floating column,G+5 structures has been selected for carrying out the project work. The building models are generated using software STAAD.

  14. Racial difference in histologic subtype of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshan, Andrew F; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Matthew E; Purdue, Mark P; Rathmell, W Kimryn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has rapidly increased in incidence for over two decades. The most common histologic subtypes of RCC, clear cell, papillary, and chromophobe have distinct genetic and clinical characteristics; however, epidemiologic features of these subtypes have not been well characterized, particularly regarding any associations between race, disease subtypes, and recent incidence trends. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, we examined differences in the age-adjusted incidence rates and trends of RCC subtypes, including analysis focusing on racial differences. Incidence rates increased over time (2001–2009) for all three subtypes. However, the proportion of white cases with clear cell histology was higher than among blacks (50% vs. 31%, respectively), whereas black cases were more likely than white cases to have papillary RCC (23% vs. 9%, respectively). Moreover, papillary RCC incidence increased more rapidly for blacks than whites (P < 0.01) over this period. We also observed that increased incidence of papillary histology among blacks is not limited to the smallest size strata. We observed racial differences in proportionate incidence of RCC subtypes, which appear to be increasing over time; this novel finding motivates further etiologic, clinical, molecular, and genetic studies. Using national data, we observed a higher proportion of black renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cases with papillary histology compared to Caucasian cases. We also observed time trends in black-white incidence differences in histologic RCC subtypes, with rapid increases in the disproportionate share of black cases with papillary histology

  15. Renal cell carcinoma in children and adolescence: Our experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Literature on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in children is lacking. Occasional case report has been mentioned. Aims and objective of our study are to evaluate the clinical presentation and outcome in children with RCC. Patients and Methods: Records of 11 children and adolescence, from January 2007 to June ...

  16. More than 10 years survival with sequential therapy in a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, J.L.; Wang, F.L.; Yi, X.M.; Qin, W.J.; Wu, G.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Huan, Y. [Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, L.J.; Zhang, G.; Yu, L.; Zhang, Y.T.; Qin, R.L.; Tian, C.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-10-31

    Although radical nephrectomy alone is widely accepted as the standard of care in localized treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC), which invariably leads to an unfavorable outcome despite the use of multiple therapies. Currently, sequential targeted agents are recommended for the management of mRCC, but the optimal drug sequence is still debated. This case was a 57-year-old man with clear-cell mRCC who received multiple therapies following his first operation in 2003 and has survived for over 10 years with a satisfactory quality of life. The treatments given included several surgeries, immunotherapy, and sequentially administered sorafenib, sunitinib, and everolimus regimens. In the course of mRCC treatment, well-planned surgeries, effective sequential targeted therapies and close follow-up are all of great importance for optimal management and a satisfactory outcome.

  17. Downregulation of the long noncoding RNA TUG1 inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Lu, Wei; Huang, Yiqiang; Shi, Jizhou; Wu, Xun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Runze; Cai, Zhiming; Wu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNAs, a newly discovered category of noncoding genes, play a leading role in various biological processes, including tumorigenesis. In our study, we aimed to examine the TUG1 expression, and explore the influence of TUG1 silencing on cell proliferation and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. The TUG1 expression level was detected using quantitative real-time PCR reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in 40 paired clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and adjacent paired normal tissues, as well as four RCC cell lines and one normal human proximal tubule epithelial cell line HK-2. Small interfering RNA was applied to suppress the TUG1 expression in RCC cell lines (A489 and A704). In vitro assays were conducted to further deliberate its potential functions in RCC progression. The relative TUG1 expression was significantly higher in ccRCC tissues compared to the adjacent normal renal tissues. In addition, higher TUG1 expression was equally detected in RCC cell lines (particularly in A498 and A704) compared to HK-2. The ccRCC specimens with higher TUG1 expression had a higher Fuhrman grade and larger tumor size than those with lower TUG1 expression. In vitro assays results suggested that knockdown of TUG1 suppressed RCC cells migration, invasion and proliferation, while the apoptosis process was activated. Our results indicate that TUG1 is identified as a novel oncogene in the morbid state of RCC, which potentially acts as a therapeutic target/biomarker in RCC. The graphic abstract of the present work.

  18. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Okudo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that was evaluated for back pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling of bilateral lower extremities and subsequently disconjugate gaze and diplopia. Brain MRI confirmed metastasis to the clivus. She was started on radiotherapy and was planned for chemotherapy and transfer to a nursing home. When a patient presents with sudden unusual cranial nerve pathology, the possibility of metastatic RCC should be sought.

  19. Unusual Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Clivus with Cranial Nerve Deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudo, Jerome; Anusim, Nwabundo

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has unusual presentation affecting elderly males with a smoking history. The incidence of RCC varies while the incidence of spread of RCC to the clivus is rare. The typicality of RCC presentation includes hematuria, flank pain, and a palpable flank mass; however, RCC can also present with clival metastasis. The unique path of the abducens nerve in the clivus makes it susceptible to damage in metastasis. We report a case of a 54-year-old African American female that was evaluated for back pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling of bilateral lower extremities and subsequently disconjugate gaze and diplopia. Brain MRI confirmed metastasis to the clivus. She was started on radiotherapy and was planned for chemotherapy and transfer to a nursing home. When a patient presents with sudden unusual cranial nerve pathology, the possibility of metastatic RCC should be sought.

  20. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Gastric Ulcer: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhareth Al Juboori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC accounts for approximately 3% of all adult malignancies. True gastrointestinal metastases, specifically to gastric wall, have been rarely observed. Herein we describe a case of delayed metastasis to gastric wall occurring more than a decade after previously curative nephrectomy for RCC. A 67-year-old male with history of right radical nephrectomy in 2001 for RCC was found to have an asymptomatic right lower lobe solitary lung mass upon routine follow-up in 2011, with final biopsy results showing metastatic RCC for which he was treated accordingly. In 2014, patient was evaluated for dyspepsia with microcytic anemia and underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. EGD revealed a solitary one-centimeter atypical ulcer in the posterior mid gastric body with biopsy results being consistent with metastatic RCC. Our literature review has yielded thirty-six reported cases of RCC in association with gastric wall metastases.

  1. RCC-MRx: Design and construction rules for mechanical components in high-temperature structures, experimental reactors and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The RCC-MRx code was developed for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), research reactors (RR) and fusion reactors (FR-ITER). It provides the rules for designing and building mechanical components involved in areas subject to significant creep and/or significant irradiation. In particular, it incorporates an extensive range of materials (aluminum and zirconium alloys in response to the need for transparency to neutrons), sizing rules for thin shells and box structures, and new modern welding processes: electron beam, laser beam, diffusion and brazing. The RCC-MR code was used to design and build the prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) developed by IGCAR in India and the ITER Vacuum Vessel. The RCC-Mx code is being used in the current construction of the RJH experimental reactor (Jules Horowitz reactor). The RCC-MRx code is serving as a reference for the design of the ASTRID project (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration), for the design of the primary circuit in MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) and the design of the target station of the ESS project (European Spallation Source). Contents of the 2015 edition of the RCC-MRx code: Section I General provisions; Section II Additional requirements and special provisions; Section III Rules for nuclear installation mechanical components: Volume I: Design and construction rules: Volume A (RA): General provisions and entrance keys, Volume B (RB): Class 1 components and supports, Volume C (RC): Class 2 components and supports, Volume D (RD): Class 3 components and supports, Volume K (RK): Examination, handling or drive mechanisms, Volume L (RL): Irradiation devices, Volume Z (Ai): Technical appendices; Volume II: Materials; Volume III: Examinations methods; Volume IV: Welding; Volume V: Manufacturing operations; Volume VI: Probationary phase rules

  2. Maslinic acid inhibits proliferation of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and suppresses angiogenesis of endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth Thakor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the introduction of many novel therapeutics in clinical practice, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC remains a treatment-re-sistant cancer. As red and processed meat are considered risk factors for RCC, and a vegetable-rich diet is thought to reduce this risk, research into plant-based therapeutics may provide valuable complementary or alternative therapeutics for the management of RCC. Herein, we present the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of maslinic acid, which occurs naturally in edible plants, particularly in olive fruits, and also in a variety of medicinal plants. Human RCC cell lines (ACHN, Caki-1, and SN12K1, endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cell line [HUVEC], and primary cultures of kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC were treated with maslinic acid. Maslinic acid was relatively less toxic to PTEC when compared with RCC under similar experimental conditions. In RCC cell lines, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and colony formation. In HUVEC, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in capillary tube formation in vitro and vascular endothelial growth factor. This study provides a rationale for incorporating a maslinic acid–rich diet either to reduce the risk of developing kidney cancer or as an adjunct to existing antiangiogenic therapy to improve efficacy.

  3. Evaluation of morphologically unclassified renal cell carcinoma with electron microscopy and novel renal markers: implications for tumor reclassification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, Romualdo; Hewan-Lowe, Karlene; Yin, Ming

    2013-02-01

    Despite progress in the classification of renal cell carcinomas (RCC), a subset of these carcinomas remains unclassified (RCC-U). Patients with RCC-U usually present at a late stage and have a poor prognosis. Several studies have attempted to extract new classifications of newly recognized renal carcinomas from the group of RCC-U. However, to date, no studies in the literature have attempted to characterize the RCC-U with unrecognizable cell types beyond the morphologic evaluation on H&E-stained sections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this group of RCC-U using electron microscopy and novel renal markers. Ten cases of such RCC-U were identified for this study. At the ultrastructural level, they did not show typical morphology that resembled any of the well-studied, recognizable subtypes of RCC. However, they did reveal features of renal tubular epithelial differentiation. The histologic, ultrastructural, and immunophenotypic features indicated that these tumors are poorly differentiated renal epithelial tumors, possibly derived from the proximal nephron, with an immunohistochemical profile similar to high-grade clear cell RCC. It is, therefore, proposed that this group of renal carcinomas be renamed "poorly differentiated renal cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified." The current study showed that PAX-8 and carbonic anhydrase IX are reliable markers for this novel group of renal carcinoma, and that electron microscopy is an important adjunct in the evaluation of new and unusual renal entities.

  4. Sunitinib-induced hypertension, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia as predictors of good prognosis in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rautiola, Juhana; Donskov, Frede; Peltola, Katriina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical significance of hypertension, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia as possible new biomarkers of sunitinib efficacy in non-trial metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 181 consecutive mRCC patients were treated with sunitinib. Thir...... of sunitinib efficacy patients with mRCC. Our results may help to individualize sunitinib dosing during therapy based on these common sunitinib-related AEs....

  5. The Role of Compounds Derived from Natural Supplement as Anticancer Agents in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Inamul; Subramanian, Arvind; Huang, Chao H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Banerjee, Snigdha; Banerjee, Sushanta K.

    2017-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is the most prominent kidney cancer derived from renal tubules and accounts for roughly 85% of all malignant kidney cancer. Every year, over 60,000 new cases are registered, and about 14,000 people die from RCC. The incidence of this has been increasing significantly in the U.S. and other countries. An increased understanding of molecular biology and the genomics of RCC has uncovered several signaling pathways involved in the progression of this cancer. Significant ...

  6. Harnessing the p53-PUMA Axis to Overcome DNA Damage Resistance in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to DNA damage–induced apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and a major cause of treatment failure and lethal disease outcome. A tumor entity that is largely resistant to DNA-damaging therapies including chemo- or radiotherapy is renal cell carcinoma (RCC. This study was designed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of DNA damage resistance in RCC to develop strategies to resensitize tumor cells to DNA damage–induced apoptosis. Here, we show that apoptosis-resistant RCC cells have a disconnect between activation of p53 and upregulation of the downstream proapoptotic protein p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA. We demonstrate that this disconnect is not caused by gene-specific repression through CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF but instead by aberrant chromatin compaction. Treatment with an HDAC inhibitor was found to effectively reactivate PUMA expression on the mRNA and protein level and to revert resistance to DNA damage–induced cell death. Ectopic expression of PUMA was found to resensitize a panel of RCC cell lines to four different DNA-damaging agents tested. Remarkably, all RCC cell lines analyzed were wild-type for p53, and a knockdown was likewise able to sensitize RCC cells to acute genotoxic stress. Taken together, our results indicate that DNA damage resistance in RCC is reversible, involves the p53-PUMA axis, and is potentially targetable to improve the oncological outcomes of RCC patients.

  7. Renal cell carcinoma in long-term survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma in early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleitz, Julie M.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Kurzrock, Eric A.; Wyatt-Ashmead, Josephine; McGavran, Loris; Koyle, Martin; Odom, Lorrie F.; West, Daniel C.; Martin, Kenneth W.

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rare in children and comprises only 1-3% of all pediatric primary renal tumors. Recently, several case reports have described RCC developing in patients previously treated for advanced stage neuroblastoma (NB). Our experience with four patients treated for advanced stage NB during early childhood who developed RCC later in life are added to 14 others in the literature. These patients and our review of the literature suggest an association between RCC and NB that warrants further study. (orig.)

  8. Testicular Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Rouvinov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Testicular metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC are extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only 33 cases have been described in the literature. Most of the reported cases are of unilateral testicular metastasis from RCC. We report a case of metachronous ipsilateral testicular metastasis from RCC in a 78-year-old man 6 years after nephrectomy. Scrotal ultrasonography showed a 4 × 5 cm mass in the right testis. Right inguinal orchiectomy was performed for diagnosis. Computed tomography revealed liver and lung metastases. First-line therapy with sunitinib was started in November 2016 for metastatic RCC.

  9. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  10. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu [Department of Urology, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hwa [Department of Urology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam 463-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Sup, E-mail: KYUNGSUP59@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  11. Aqueous Extract of Paeonia suffruticosa Inhibits Migration and Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells via Suppressing VEGFR-3 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC cells are characterized by strong drug resistance and high metastatic incidence. In this study, the effects of ten kinds of Chinese herbs on RCC cell migration and proliferation were examined. Aqueous extract of Paeonia suffruticosa (PS-A exerted strong inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, mobility, and invasion. The results of mouse xenograft experiments showed that the treatment of PS-A significantly suppressed tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. We further found that PS-A markedly decreased expression of VEGF receptor-3 (VEGFR-3 and phosphorylation of FAK in RCC cells. Moreover, the activation of Rac-1, a modulator of cytoskeletal dynamics, was remarkably reduced by PS-A. Additionally, PS-A suppressed polymerization of actin filament as demonstrated by confocal microscopy analysis and decreased the ratio of F-actin to G-actin in RCC cells, suggesting that PS-A inhibits RCC cell migration through modulating VEGFR-3/FAK/Rac-1 pathway to disrupt actin filament polymerization. In conclusion, this research elucidates the effects and molecular mechanism for antimigration of PS-A on RCC cells and suggests PS-A to be a therapeutic or adjuvant strategy for the patients with aggressive RCC.

  12. Inhibiting prenylation augments chemotherapy efficacy in renal cell carcinoma through dual inhibition on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangrong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Peng, Xiaochun; Huang, Wei

    2017-11-18

    Prenylation is a posttranslational lipid modification required for the proper functions of a number of proteins involved in cell regulation. Here, we show that prenylation inhibition is important for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) growth, survival and response to chemotherapy, and its underlying mechanism may be contributed to mitochondrial dysfunction. We first demonstrated that a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor pitavastatin inhibited mevalonate pathway and thereby prenylation in RCC cells. In addition, pitavastatin is effective in inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis in a panel of RCC cell lines. Combination of pitavastatin and paclitaxel is significantly more effective than pitavastatin or paclitaxel alone as shown by both in vitro cell culture system and in vivo RCC xenograft model. Importantly, pitavastatin treatment inhibits mitochondrial respiration via suppressing mitochondrial complex I and II enzyme activities. Interestingly, different from mitochondrial inhibitor phenformin that inhibits mitochondrial respiration but activates glycolytic rate in RCC cells, pitavastatin significantly decreases glycolytic rate. The dual inhibitory action of pitavastatin on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis results in remarkable energy depletion and oxidative stress in RCC cells. In addition, inhibition of prenylation by depleting Isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt) also mimics the inhibitory effects of pitavastatin in RCC cells. Our work demonstrates the previously unappreciated association between prenylation inhibition and energy metabolism in RCC, which can be therapeutically exploited, likely in tumors that largely rely on energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ovatodiolide Targets β-Catenin Signaling in Suppressing Tumorigenesis and Overcoming Drug Resistance in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jar-Yi Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated β-catenin signaling is intricately involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC carcinogenesis and progression. Determining potential β-catenin signaling inhibitors would be helpful in ameliorating drug resistance in advanced or metastatic RCC. Screening for β-catenin signaling inhibitors involved in silico inquiry of the PubChem Bioactivity database followed by TCF/LEF reporter assay. The biological effects of ovatodiolide were evaluated in 4 RCC cell lines in vitro and 2 RCC cell lines in a mouse xenograft model. The synergistic effects of ovatodiolide and sorafenib or sunitinib were examined in 2 TKI-resistant RCC cell lines. Ovatodiolide, a pure compound of Anisomeles indica, inhibited β-catenin signaling and reduced RCC cell viability, survival, migration/invasion, and in vitro cell or in vivo mouse tumorigenicity. Cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in a normal kidney epithelial cell line with the treatment. Ovatodiolide reduced phosphorylated β-catenin (S552 that inhibited β-catenin nuclear translocation. Moreover, ovatodiolide decreased β-catenin stability and impaired the association of β-catenin and transcription factor 4. Ovatodiolide combined with sorafenib or sunitinib overcame drug resistance in TKI-resistant RCC cells. Ovatodiolide may be a potent β-catenin signaling inhibitor, with synergistic effects with sorafenib or sunitinib, and therefore, a useful candidate for improving RCC therapy.

  14. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as mandibular metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC has different manifestations, including uncommon metastasis and paraneoplastic syndromes. Here we report a rare case of RCC presenting as metastasis to the mandible. A 57-year-old patient with mandibular swelling was referred to the dentist. After necessary evaluations, an incisional biopsy of mandible showed metastatic RCC. The patient was referred to the urologist. The patient underwent right radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination showed clear renal cell carcinoma. Every abnormal bone lesion in the oral cavity should be evaluated carefully and the possibility of a malignant lesion should always be considered.

  15. EphA2 Is a Potential Player of Malignant Cellular Behavior in Non-Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells but Not in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Chul; Cho, Sung Yong; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Lee, Seung Bae; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Jeong, Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of EphA2 in malignant cellular behavior in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells and whether FAK/RhoA signaling can act as downstream effectors of EphA2 on RCC cells. Expression of EphA2 protein in non-metastatic RCC (Caki-2 and A498), metastatic RCC cells (Caki-1 and ACHN), HEK-293 cells and prostate cancer cells (PC-3 and DU-145; positive controls of EphA2 expression) was evaluated by Western blot. Changes in mRNA or protein expression of EphA2, FAK or membrane-bound RhoA following EphA2, FAK or RhoA small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or Western blot. The effect of siRNA treatment on cellular viability, apoptosis and invasion was analyzed by cell counting kit-8, Annexin-V and modified Matrigel-Boyden assays, respectively. In all RCC cell lines, the expression of EphA2 protein was detectable at variable levels; however, in HEK-293 cells, EphA2 expression was very low. Treatment with EphA2 siRNA significantly reduced the expression of EphA2 mRNA and protein in all RCC cell lines. For non-metastatic RCC cells (Caki-2 and A498) but not metastatic RCC cells (Caki-1 and ACHN), cellular viability, invasiveness, resistance to apoptosis, expression of membrane-bound RhoA protein and FAK phosphorylation were significantly decreased in EphA2 siRNA-treated cells compared to the control. In non-metastatic RCC cells, FAK siRNA significantly attenuated the invasiveness, resistance to apoptosis, as well as expression of membrane-bound RhoA protein without changing protein expression of EphA2. RhoA siRNA significantly decreased the malignant cellular behavior and expression of membrane-bound RhoA protein without changing EphA2 protein expression or FAK phosphorylation. Our data provide the first functional evidence that the EphA2/FAK/RhoA signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignant cellular behavior of RCC and appears to be functional particularly in the early stage of

  16. Fatigue assessment by the RCC-MR design rules: remarks on the elastic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleb, L.; Sidoroff, F.

    1999-01-01

    According to RCC--MR (French rules for mechanical engineering design of FBR), fatigue life assessment is based on the evaluation of the equivalent elastoplastic strain range resulting from a given cyclic loading. Two methods can be used according to whether an elastoplastic or an elastic structure analysis is performed. The elastic analysis is of course more attractive for it avoids a heavy iterative elastoplastic analysis and an expensive identification of the material behavior from mechanical tests. On the other hand it relies on some empirical extrapolation rules from the elastic to the real case. The purpose of the present paper is to draw attention to some limitations of this procedure. In particular attention will be focused on two points: 1, the classification of the applied stress into primary and secondary parts is essential and it is shown that the thermal stresses which are often considered as secondary may in some cases play a primary role; 2. the Neuber's rule which is used to evaluate the plastic strain from the elastic stress will be shown to be significantly wrong for some special configurations. This is in fact essentially related to situations where the elastic follow up effect is important. (authors)

  17. Wing Leading Edge RCC Rapid Response Damage Prediction Tool (IMPACT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert; Cottter, Paul; Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This rapid response computer program predicts Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE) damage caused by ice or foam impact during a Space Shuttle launch (Program "IMPACT2"). The program was developed after the Columbia accident in order to assess quickly WLE damage due to ice, foam, or metal impact (if any) during a Shuttle launch. IMPACT2 simulates an impact event in a few minutes for foam impactors, and in seconds for ice and metal impactors. The damage criterion is derived from results obtained from one sophisticated commercial program, which requires hours to carry out simulations of the same impact events. The program was designed to run much faster than the commercial program with prediction of projectile threshold velocities within 10 to 15% of commercial-program values. The mathematical model involves coupling of Orbiter wing normal modes of vibration to nonlinear or linear springmass models. IMPACT2 solves nonlinear or linear impact problems using classical normal modes of vibration of a target, and nonlinear/ linear time-domain equations for the projectile. Impact loads and stresses developed in the target are computed as functions of time. This model is novel because of its speed of execution. A typical model of foam, or other projectile characterized by material nonlinearities, impacting an RCC panel is executed in minutes instead of hours needed by the commercial programs. Target damage due to impact can be assessed quickly, provided that target vibration modes and allowable stress are known.

  18. Study on Flexural Behaviour of Ternary Blended Reinforced Self Compacting Concrete Beam with Conventional RCC Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshaline Seles, M.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Vivek, S. S.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    The conventional concrete when used for structures having dense congested reinforcement, the problems such as external compaction and vibration needs special attention. In such case, the self compacting concrete (SCC) which has the properties like flow ability, passing and filling ability would be an obvious answer. All those SCC flow behavior was governed by EFNARC specifications. In present study, the combination type of SCC was prepared by replacing cement with silica fume (SF) and metakaolin (MK) along with optimum dosages of chemical admixtures. From the fresh property test, cube compressive strength and cylinder split tensile strength, optimum ternary mix was obtained. In order to study the flexural behavior, the optimum ternary mix was taken in which beam specimens of size 1200 mm x 100 mm x 200 mm was designed as singly reinforced section according to IS: 456-2000, Limit state method. Finally the comparative experimental analysis was made between conventional RCC and SCC beams of same grade in terms of flexural strength namely yield load & ultimate load, load- deflection curve, crack size and pattern respectively.

  19. Comparison of elevated temperature design codes of ASME Subsection NH and RCC-MRx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong-Yeon, E-mail: hylee@kaeri.re.kr

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of elevated temperature design (ETD) codes was made. • Material properties and evaluation procedures were compared. • Two heat-resistant materials of Grade 91 steel and austenitic stainless steel 316 are the target materials in the present study. • Application of the ETD codes to Generation IV reactor components and a comparison of the conservatism was conducted. - Abstract: The elevated temperature design (ETD) codes are used for the design evaluation of Generation IV (Gen IV) reactor systems such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). In the present study, ETD code comparisons were made in terms of the material properties and design evaluation procedures for the recent versions of the two major ETD codes, ASME Section III Subsection NH and RCC-MRx. Conservatism in the design evaluation procedures was quantified and compared based on the evaluation results for SFR components as per the two ETD codes. The target materials are austenitic stainless steel 316 and Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which are the major two materials in a Gen IV SFR. The differences in the design evaluation procedures as well as the material properties in the two ETD codes are highlighted.

  20. Large prospective investigation of meat intake, related mutagens, and risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Carrie R; Cross, Amanda J; Graubard, Barry I; Park, Yikyung; Ward, Mary H; Rothman, Nathaniel; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Chow, Wong-Ho; Sinha, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    The evidence for meat intake and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk is inconsistent. Mutagens related to meat cooking and processing, and variation by RCC subtype may be important to consider. In a large US cohort, we prospectively investigated intake of meat and meat-related compounds in relation to risk of RCC, as well as clear cell and papillary RCC histologic subtypes. Study participants (492,186) completed a detailed dietary assessment linked to a database of heme iron, heterocyclic amines (HCA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrate, and nitrite concentrations in cooked and processed meats. Over 9 (mean) y of follow-up, we identified 1814 cases of RCC (498 clear cell and 115 papillary adenocarcinomas). HRs and 95% CIs were estimated within quintiles by using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Red meat intake [62.7 g (quintile 5) compared with 9.8 g (quintile 1) per 1000 kcal (median)] was associated with a tendency toward an increased risk of RCC [HR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.40; P-trend = 0.06] and a 2-fold increased risk of papillary RCC [P-trend = 0.002]. Intakes of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a marker of PAHs, and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), an HCA, were associated with a significant 20-30% elevated risk of RCC and a 2-fold increased risk of papillary RCC. No associations were observed for the clear cell subtype. Red meat intake may increase the risk of RCC through mechanisms related to the cooking compounds BaP and PhIP. Our findings for RCC appeared to be driven by strong associations with the rarer papillary histologic variant. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015.

  1. Present and future perspectives on immunotherapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: Going to the core or beating around the bush?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Kawashima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic lesions of renal cell carcinoma (RCC occasionally regress spontaneously after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Although this is an exceptionally rare occurrence, RCC has thus been postulated to be immunogenic. Immunotherapies, including cytokine therapy, peptide-based vaccines, and immune checkpoint inhibitors have therefore been used to treat patients with advanced, metastatic RCC. We review the history, trends, and recent progress in immunotherapy for advanced RCC and discuss future perspectives, with consideration of our experimental work on galectin 9 and PINCH as promising specific immunotherapy targets. 

  2. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome II: materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This book is the 8th of a whole set of 12 ones which constitute the edition 1985 of the RCC-MR. One deals with alloy and non-alloy steels on one hand, and with pieces and products (bars, plates, tubes, forgings and castings) on the other hand. The requirements concerning the mechanical properties, the chemical composition, the search of defects and their repair, the heat treatments, the tests to carry out and the delivery state are specified [fr

  3. Oncology Gold Standard™ practical consensus recommendations 2016 for treatment of advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, U; Parikh, P M; Prabhash, K; Tongaonkar, H B; Chibber, P; Dabkara, D; Deshmukh, C; Ghadyalpatil, N; Hingmire, S; Joshi, A; Raghunath, S K; Rajappa, S; Rajendranath, R; Rawal, S K; Singh, Manisha; Singh, R; Somashekhar, S P; Sood, R

    2016-01-01

    The Oncology Gold Standard (OGS) Expert Group on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) developed the consensus statement to provide community oncologists practical guidelines on the management of advanced clear cell (cc) RCC using published evidence, practical experience of experts in real life management, and results of a nationwide survey involving 144 health-care professionals. Six broad question categories containing 33 unique questions cover major situations in the routine management of RCC. This document serves as a ready guide for the standard of care to optimize outcome. The table of "Take Home Messages" at the end is a convenient tool for busy practitioners.

  4. Oncology Gold Standard™ practical consensus recommendations 2016 for treatment of advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Batra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Oncology Gold Standard (OGS Expert Group on renal cell carcinoma (RCC developed the consensus statement to provide community oncologists practical guidelines on the management of advanced clear cell (cc RCC using published evidence, practical experience of experts in real life management, and results of a nationwide survey involving 144 health-care professionals. Six broad question categories containing 33 unique questions cover major situations in the routine management of RCC. This document serves as a ready guide for the standard of care to optimize outcome. The table of "Take Home Messages" at the end is a convenient tool for busy practitioners.

  5. A comparative study of physical and chemical properties of different pozzolanic materials used for roller compacted concrete RCC dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husein Malkawi Abdallah I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the feasibility and the efficiency of using Natural Pozzolan and/or Rock flour in Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC gravity dams. For this purpose, five identical mortar trial mixes were prepared using five different supplementary materials, i.e., fly ash produced in South Africa (proven to be effective in RCC construction, fly ash produced in Turkey, Jordanian natural pozzolan, Saudi natural pozzolan, and rock flour from Mujib Dam basalt quarry. The physical and chemical properties of these pozzolanic materials were determined. The effectiveness of each one of these mineral admixtures used as a cement replacement material in controlling alkali silica reaction are studied and analyzed. Correlations were made between the mechanical properties for the five proposed mixes and a control mix using the Jordanian Portland Cement. The results demonstrate that the performance of Natural Pozzolana and/or rock flour as compared with that of fly ash and other pozzolanic material is very satisfactory and can be effectively used in RCC construction.

  6. The allele frequency of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene in the Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Hui-Ju; Shu, Wei-Pang; Tsai, Yi-Chang; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2011-10-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p25-26 is implicated in VHL disease. Two informative single nucleotide polymorphisms are at positions 19 and 1149 on the nucleotide sequence from Gene Bank NM_000551. In this study we examined the allele frequencies at these two loci in the Taiwanese population and compared the results to those from European ethnic populations. The allele frequency was examined in 616 healthy individuals including 301 university students and 315 neonates. Both A/G polymorphisms were investigated using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis created by restriction enzymes, BsaJ I and Acc I. Among these subjects, the allele frequencies at 19 SNP and 1149 SNP for variant G were 0.130 and 0.133, respectively. And these results were significant differences from those of the Caucasian populations. In addition, 90% of the tested subjects had identical genotypes at these two loci suggesting the existence of nonrandom association of alleles. We found that the G allele frequency at these two loci in the Taiwanese population is much lower than that in people from Western countries. This phenomenon may be attributed to ethnic effects. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Isolated omental metastasis of renal cell carcinoma after extraperitoneal open partial nephrectomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of metachronously developed, isolated omental metastasis of an initially T1 clear-cell RCC. Constitutional symptoms, despite a long interval since nephrectomy, should raise the possibility of a paraneoplastic syndrome being associated with metastatic RCC. Morphological and molecular imaging studies together with histopathological documentation will be diagnostic.

  8. Everolimus-induced pneumonitis associates with favourable outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penttilä, P; Donskov, F; Rautiola, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors may induce pneumonitis. We analysed the association of pneumonitis with outcomes in everolimus treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-five mRCC patients received everolimus at Helsinki University...

  9. Amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor gene in renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hariry, Iman; Powles, Thomas; Lau, Mike R

    2010-01-01

    Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may be of prognostic value in renal cell cancer (RCC). Gene amplification of EGFR was investigated in a cohort of 315 patients with advanced RCC from a previously reported randomised study. Using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, only 2...

  10. Rate of renal cell carcinoma subtypes in different races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sankin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We sought to identify racial differences among histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC between black and non-black patients in an equal-access health care system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We established a multi-institutional, prospective database of patients undergoing partial or radical nephrectomy between January 1, 2000 and Sept 31, 2009. For the purposes of this study, data captured included age at diagnosis, race, tumor size, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of capsular invasion, margin status, and tumor histology. RESULTS: 204 kidney tumors were identified (Table-1. Of these, 117 (57.4% were in black patients and 87 (42.6% were in non-black patients. Age at surgery ranged from 37 to 87 with a median of 62. Tumor size ranged from 1.0 to 22.0 cm with a median of 5.0 cm. Overall, tumors were composed of clear cell RCC in 97 cases (47.5%, papillary RCC in 65 cases (31.9%, chromophobe RCC in 13 cases (6.4%, collecting duct/medullary RCC in 2 cases (1.0%, RCC with multiple histological subtypes in 8 cases (3.9%, malignant tumors of other origin in 6 cases (2.9%, and benign histology in 13 cases (6.4%. Among black patients, papillary RCC was seen in 56 cases (47.9%, compared to 9 cases (10.3% among non-black patients (p < 0.001 (Table-2. Clear cell RCC was present in 38 (32.5% of black patients and in 59 (67.8% of non-blacks (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, papillary RCC had a much higher occurrence among black patients compared to non-black patients. This is the first study to document such a great racial disparity among RCC subtypes.

  11. Progression of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma via Inhibition of RhoA-ROCK Axis by PARG1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichiro Miyazaki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most lethal urological malignancy with high risk of recurrence; thus, new prognostic biomarkers are needed. In this study, a new RCC antigen, PTPL1 associated RhoGAP1 (PARG1, was identified by using serological identification of recombinant cDNA expression cloning with sera from RCC patients. PARG1 protein was found to be differentially expressed in RCC cells among patients. High PARG1 expression is significantly correlated with various clinicopathological factors relating to cancer cell proliferation and invasion, including G3 percentage (P = .0046, Ki-67 score (p expression is also correlated with high recurrence of N0M0 patients (P = .0084 and poor prognosis in RCC patients (P = .0345. Multivariate analysis has revealed that high PARG1 expression is an independent factor for recurrence (P = .0149 of N0M0 RCC patients. In in vitro studies, depletion of PARG1by siRNA in human RCC cell lines inhibited their proliferation through inducing G1 cell cycle arrest via upregulation of p53 and subsequent p21Cip1/Waf1, which are mediated by increased RhoA-ROCK activities. Similarly, PARG1 depletion cells inhibited invasion ability via increasing RhoA-ROCK activities in the RCC cell lines. Conversely, overexpression of PARG1 on human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T promotes its cell proliferation and invasion. These results indicate that PARG1 plays crucial roles in progression of human RCC in increasing cell proliferation and invasion ability via inhibition of the RhoA-ROCK axis, and PARG1 is a poor prognostic marker, particularly for high recurrence of N0M0 RCC patients.

  12. Breast Cancer with Synchronous Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Ravi; Kumar, Durgesh; Kumar, K V Veerendra; Premlatha, C S

    2016-10-01

    Primary cancer arising from multiple organs is a well known fact. Synchronous tumours have been most commonly associated with kidney cancer. Bladder, prostate, colorectal and lung cancer are the most common synchronous primaries with Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) identified till date. We found metachronous tumours of breast with RCC in literature search which included both metastatic tumours as well second primaries. Overall, 25 cases of metastatic breast tumours and eight cases of second primary in previously treated RCC have been reported in the literature. Here, we are reporting a case of synchronous presentation of carcinoma breast with RCC which is very rare because most of the multiple malignancies reported in the literature are metastatic tumours or metachronous breast malignancy with RCC.

  13. RCC-E a Design Code for I and C and Electrical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haure, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the stakes and strength of the RCC-E code applicable to Electrical and Instrumentation and control systems and components as regards dealing with safety class functions. The document is interlacing specifications between Owners, safety authorities, designers, and suppliers IAEA safety guides and IEC standards. The code is periodically updated and published by French Society for Design and Construction rules for Nuclear Island Components (AFCEN). The code is compliant with third generation PWR nuclear islands and aims to suit with national regulations as needed in a companion document. The Feedback experience of Fukushima and the licensing of UKEPR in the framework of Generic Design Assessment are lessons learnt that should be considered in the upgrading of the code. The code gathers a set of requirements and relevant good practices of several PWR design and construction practices related to the electrical and I and C systems and components, and electrical engineering documents dealing with systems, equipment and layout designs. Comprehensive statement including some recent developments will be provided about: - Offsite and onsite sources requirements including sources dealing the total loss of off sites and main onsite sources. - Highlights of a relevant protection level against high frequencies disturbances emitted by lightning strokes, Interfaces data used by any supplier or designer such as site data, rooms temperature, equipment maximum design temperature, alternative current and direct current electrical network voltages and frequency variation ranges, environmental conditions decoupling data, - Environmental Qualification process including normal, mild (earthquake resistant), harsh and severe accident ambient conditions. A suit made approach based on families, which are defined as a combination of mission time, duration and abnormal conditions (pressure, temperature, radiation), enables to better cope with Environmental Qualifications

  14. A case–control study of occupation/industry and renal cell carcinoma risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, Sara; Rothman, Nathanial; Chow, Wong-Ho; Purdue, Mark P; Colt, Joanne S; Schwartz, Kendra; Davis, Faith G; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Munuo, Stella S; Wacholder, Sholom; Stewart, Patricia A; Graubard, Barry I

    2012-01-01

    The role of occupation in the etiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is unclear. Here, we investigated associations between employment in specific occupations and industries and RCC, and its most common histologic subtype, clear cell RCC (ccRCC). Between 2002 and 2007, a population-based case–control study of Caucasians and African Americans (1,217 cases; 1,235 controls) was conducted within the Detroit and Chicago metropolitan areas to investigate risk factors for RCC. As part of this study, occupational histories were ascertained through in-person interviews. We computed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) relating occupation and industry to RCC risk using adjusted unconditional logistic regression models. Employment in the agricultural crop production industry for five years or more was associated with RCC (OR = 3.3 [95% CI = 1.0-11.5]) and ccRCC in particular (OR = 6.3 [95% CI = 1.7-23.3], P for trend with duration of employment = 0.0050). Similarly, RCC risk was elevated for employment of five years or longer in non-managerial agricultural and related occupations (OR RCC = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.0-4.5]; OR ccRCC = 3.1 [95% CI = 1.4-6.8]). Employment in the dry-cleaning industry was also associated with elevated risk (OR RCC = 2.0 [95% CI = 0.9-4.4], P for trend = 0.093; OR ccRCC = 3.0 [95% CI = 1.2-7.4], P for trend = 0.031). Suggestive elevated associations were observed for police/public safety workers, health care workers and technicians, and employment in the electronics, auto repair, and cleaning/janitorial services industries; protective associations were suggested for many white-collar jobs including computer science and administrative occupations as well employment in the business, legislative, and education industries. Our findings provide support for an elevated risk of RCC in the agricultural and dry-cleaning industries and suggest that these associations may be stronger for the ccRCC subtype. Additional studies are needed to confirm

  15. Meat and fish consumption and the risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Linseisen, Jakob; Overvad, Kim; Wurtz, Anne Mette Lund; Roswall, Nina; Tjonneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Bastide, Nadia; Palli, Domenico; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Weikert, Steffen; Steffen, Annika; Kuehn, Tilman; Li, Kuanrong; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Peppa, Eleni; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Hjartaker, Anette; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Jakszyn, Paula; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Santiuste de Pablos, Carmen; Molina-Montes, Esther; Alonso de la Torre, Ramon; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Mattias; Ljungberg, Borje; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Cross, Amanda J.; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Riboli, Elio; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) incidence varies worldwide with a higher incidence in developed countries and lifestyle is likely to contribute to the development of this disease. We examined whether meat and fish consumption were related to the risk of RCC in the European Prospective Investigation into

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Everolimus for Second-Line Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Serbia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, Jovan; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Sabo, Ana; Tomic, Zdenko; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: New targeted therapeutics for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) enable an increment in progression-free survival (PFS) ranging from 2 to 6 months. Compared with best supportive care, everolimus demonstrated an additional PFS of 3 months in patients with mRCC whose disease had

  17. Concurrent inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 by WYE-687 inhibits renal cell carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Pan

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORin renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents a valuable oncotarget for treatment. We here tested the potential anti-RCC activity by a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor WYE-687in vitro and in vivo.WYE-687 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative to established RCC cell lines (786-O and A498 and primary human RCC cells. Yet, it was non-cytotoxic toHK-2 tubular epithelial cells.WYE-687 provoked caspase-dependent apoptosis in the RCC cells. At the molecular level, WYE-687 almost completely blocked mTORC1 (p-S6K1 and p-S6 and mTORC2 (p-Akt Ser 473 activation in both 786-Ocells and primary human RCC cells, where it downregulated both hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression. Significantly, oral administration of WYE-687 potently suppressed786-O tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. mTORC1/2 activation and HIF-1α/2α expression were also remarkably downregulated in WYE-687-treated tumor tissues. Thus, our preclinical results imply that WYE-687 may have important translational value for the treatment of RCC.

  18. Augmented telomerase activity, reduced telomere length and the presence of alternative lengthening of telomere in renal cell carcinoma: plausible predictive and diagnostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deeksha; Sharma, Ujjawal; Khajuria, Ragini; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we analyzed 100 cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for telomerase activity, telomere length and alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) using the TRAP assay, TeloTTAGGG assay kit and immunohistochemical analysis of ALT associated promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies respectively. A significantly higher (P=0.000) telomerase activity was observed in 81 cases of RCC which was correlated with clinicopathological features of tumor for instance, stage (P=0.008) and grades (P=0.000) but not with the subtypes of RCC (P = 0.355). Notwithstanding, no correlation was found between telomerase activity and subtypes of RCC. Strikingly, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in RCC (P=0.000) to that of corresponding normal renal tissues and it is well correlated with grades (P=0.016) but not with stages (P=0.202) and subtypes (P=0.669) of RCC. In this study, telomere length was also negatively correlated with the age of patients (r(2)=0.528; P=0.000) which supports the notion that it could be used as a marker for biological aging. ALT associated PML bodies containing PML protein was found in telomerase negative cases of RCC. It suggests the presence of an ALT pathway mechanism to maintain the telomere length in telomerase negative RCC tissues which was associated with high stages of RCC, suggesting a prevalent mechanism for telomere maintenance in high stages. In conclusion, the telomerase activity and telomere length can be used as a diagnostic as well as a predictive marker in RCC. The prevalence of ALT mechanism in high stages of RCC is warranted for the development of anti-ALT inhibitors along with telomerase inhibitor against RCC as a therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear localization of the CK2α-subunit correlates with poor prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabjerg, Maj; Guerra, Barbara; Oliván-Viguera, Aida

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2a, one of the two catalytic isoforms of the protein kinase CK2 has been shown to contribute to tumor development, tumor proliferation and suppression of apoptosis in various malignancies. We conducted this study to investigate CK2 expression in different subtypes of Renal Cell...... Carcinoma (RCC) and in the benign oncocytoma. qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed that CK2a expression was significantly increased at the mRNA and protein levels in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). Also the kinase activity of CK2 was significantly increased in ccRCC compared to normal...... renal cortex. Nuclear protein expression of CK2a correlated in univariate analysis with poor Progression Free Survival (HR = 8.11, p = 0.016). Functional analyses (cell proliferation assay) revealed an inhibitory effect of Caki-2 cell growth following CK2 inhibition with CX-4945. Our results suggest...

  20. Improved overall survival after implementation of targeted therapy for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Results from the Danish Renal Cancer Group (DARENCA) study-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V.; Donskov, Frede; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2014-01-01

    AbstractAim To evaluate the implementation of targeted therapy on overall survival (OS) in a complete national cohort of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods All Danish patients with mRCC referred for first line treatment with immunotherapy, TKIs or mTOR-inhibitors between...

  1. Combined treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitor labeled gold nanorod encapsulated albumin with laser thermal ablation in a renal cell carcinoma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript served to characterize and evaluate Human Serum Albumin-encapsulated Nanoparticles (NPs) for drug delivery of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with induction of photothermal ablation (PTA) combination therapy of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). RCC is the most common type of kidney c...

  2. The role of glutathione transferases in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćorić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggest that members of the subfamily of cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs possess roles far beyond the classical glutathione-dependent enzymatic conjugation of electrophilic metabolites and xenobiotics. Namely, monomeric forms of certain GSTs are capable of forming protein: protein interactions with protein kinases and regulate cell apoptotic pathways. Due to this dual functionality of cytosolic GSTs, they might be implicated in both the development and the progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Prominent genetic heterogeneity, resulting from the gene deletions, as well as from SNPs in the coding and non-coding regions of GST genes, might affect GST isoenzyme profiles in renal parenchyma and therefore serve as a valuable indicator for predicting the risk of cancer development. Namely, GSTs are involved in the biotransformation of several compounds recognized as risk factors for RCC. The most potent carcinogen of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diol epoxides, present in cigarette smoke, is of benzo(apyrene (BPDE, detoxified by GSTs. So far, the relationship between GST genotype and BPDE-DNA adduct formation, in determining the risk for RCC, has not been evaluated in patients with RCC. Although the association between certain individual and combined GST genotypes and RCC risk has been debated in a the literature, the data on the prognostic value of GST polymorphism in patients with RCC are scarce, probably due to the fact that the molecular mechanism supporting the role of GSTs in RCC progression has not been clarified as yet.

  3. T-cell receptor Vβ skewing frequently occurs in refractory cytopenia of childhood and is associated with an expansion of effector cytotoxic T cells: a prospective study by EWOG-MDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalbers, A M; Heuvel-Eibrink, M M van den; Baumann, I; Beverloo, H B; Driessen, G J; Dworzak, M; Fischer, A; Göhring, G; Hasle, H; Locatelli, F; De Moerloose, B; Noellke, P; Schmugge, M; Stary, J; Yoshimi, A; Zecca, M; Zwaan, C M; Dongen, J J M van; Pieters, R; Niemeyer, C M; Velden, V H J van der; Langerak, A W

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy (IST), consisting of antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A, is effective in refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC), suggesting that, similar to low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes in adult patients, T lymphocytes are involved in suppressing hematopoiesis in a subset of RCC patients. However, the potential role of a T-cell-mediated pathophysiology in RCC remains poorly explored. In a cohort of 92 RCC patients, we prospectively assessed the frequency of T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable (Vβ) domain skewing in bone marrow and peripheral blood by heteroduplex PCR, and analyzed T-cell subsets in peripheral blood by flow cytometry. TCRVβ skewing was present in 40% of RCC patients. TCRVβ skewing did not correlate with bone marrow cellularity, karyotype, transfusion history, HLA-DR15 or the presence of a PNH clone. In 28 patients treated with IST, TCRVβ skewing was not clearly related with treatment response. However, TCRVβ skewing did correlate with a disturbed CD4 + /CD8 + T-cell ratio, a reduction in naive CD8 + T cells, an expansion of effector CD8 + T cells and an increase in activated CD8 + T cells (defined as HLA-DR + , CD57 + or CD56 + ). These data suggest that T lymphocytes contribute to RCC pathogenesis in a proportion of patients, and provide a rationale for treatment with IST in selected patients with RCC

  4. Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Brian I; McDermott, David F; Hammers, Hans; Bro, William; Bukowski, Ronald M; Faba, Bernard; Faba, Jo; Figlin, Robert A; Hutson, Thomas; Jonasch, Eric; Joseph, Richard W; Leibovich, Bradley C; Olencki, Thomas; Pantuck, Allan J; Quinn, David I; Seery, Virginia; Voss, Martin H; Wood, Christopher G; Wood, Laura S; Atkins, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has produced durable clinical benefit in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). In the past, patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have achieved complete responses, many of which have lasted for multiple decades. More recently, a large number of new agents have been approved for RCC, several of which attack tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and VEGF receptors (VEGFR), as well as tumor metabolism, inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Additionally, a new class of immunotherapy agents, immune checkpoint inhibitors, is emerging and will play a significant role in the treatment of patients with RCC. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a Task Force, which met to consider the current role of approved immunotherapy agents in RCC, to provide guidance to practicing clinicians by developing consensus recommendations and to set the stage for future immunotherapeutic developments in RCC.

  5. Urinary volatile organic compounds as potential biomarkers for renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, DONGCHUN; WANG, CHANGSONG; PI, XIN; GUO, LEI; WANG, YUE; LI, MINGJUAN; FENG, YUE; LIN, ZIWEI; HOU, WEI; LI, ENYOU

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no adequate, sensitive, reproducible, specific and noninvasive biomarker that can reliably be used to detect renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Previous studies have elucidated the urinary non-volatile metabolic profile of RCC. However, whether urinary volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles are able to identify RCC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, urine was collected from 22 patients with RCC and 25 healthy subjects. Principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis were used to compare the data of patients and healthy subjects, and preoperative and postoperative patients undergoing radical nephrectomy. In total, 11 VOC biomarkers were elevated in the RCC patients compared to the healthy subjects, which were phenol; decanal; 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione; 1-bromo-1-(3-methyl-1-pentenylidene)-2,2,3,3-tetramethyl-cyclopropane; nonanal; 3-ethyl-3-methylheptane; isolongifolene-5-ol; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione, 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); tetradecane; aniline; and 2,6,10,14-tetramethyl-pentadecane. Three biomarkers were decreased in RCC patients: styrene, 4-heptanone and dimethylsilanediol. In preoperative patients, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone were elevated, while 6-t-butyl-2,2,9,9-tetramethyl-3,5-decadien-7-yne were decreased when compared to postoperative patients. Compared with the healthy subjects, RCC has a unique VOC profile, suggesting that VOC profiles may be a useful diagnostic assay for RCC. PMID:27347408

  6. Single classifier, OvO, OvA and RCC multiclass classification method in handheld based smartphone gait identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziff, Abdul Rafiez Abdul; Sulaiman, Md Nasir; Mustapha, Norwati; Perumal, Thinagaran

    2017-10-01

    Gait recognition is widely used in many applications. In the application of the gait identification especially in people, the number of classes (people) is many which may comprise to more than 20. Due to the large amount of classes, the usage of single classification mapping (direct classification) may not be suitable as most of the existing algorithms are mostly designed for the binary classification. Furthermore, having many classes in a dataset may result in the possibility of having a high degree of overlapped class boundary. This paper discusses the application of multiclass classifier mappings such as one-vs-all (OvA), one-vs-one (OvO) and random correction code (RCC) on handheld based smartphone gait signal for person identification. The results is then compared with a single J48 decision tree for benchmark. From the result, it can be said that using multiclass classification mapping method thus partially improved the overall accuracy especially on OvO and RCC with width factor more than 4. For OvA, the accuracy result is worse than a single J48 due to a high number of classes.

  7. Study on Viscoelastic Deformation Monitoring Index of an RCC Gravity Dam in an Alpine Region Using Orthogonal Test Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoying Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to present a method of determining viscoelastic deformation monitoring index of a Roller-compacted concrete (RCC gravity dam in an alpine region. By focusing on a modified deformation monitoring model considering frost heave and back analyzed mechanical parameters of the dam, the working state of viscoelasticity for the dam is illustrated followed by an investigation and designation of adverse load cases using orthogonal test method. Water pressure component is then calculated by finite element method, while temperature, time effect, and frost heave components are obtained through deformation statistical model considering frost heave. The viscoelastic deformation monitoring index is eventually determined by small probability and maximum entropy methods. The results show that (a with the abnormal probability 1% the dam deformation monitoring index for small probability and maximum entropy methods is 23.703 mm and 22.981 mm, respectively; thus the maximum measured displacement of the dam is less than deformation monitoring index, which indicates that the dam is currently in a state of safety operation and (b the obtained deformation monitoring index using orthogonal test method is more accurate due to the full consideration of more random factors; the method gained from this study will likely be of use to diagnose the working state for those RCC dams in alpine regions.

  8. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome 1, Volume H: Supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The present book is the fifth one of a whole set of 12 which constitute the present edition of the RCC-MR. The volume H applies to supports of equipments when these equipments are concerned by the RCC-MR rules in application of the chapter RA 4000 of the Tome 1, Vol A. One defines the field of application of this volume and the classification rules of supports in two levels. One defines the different types of supports and fasteners, as also the classification of the support elements in primary or resistance (or structure) elements and secondary (stability) elements. One defines the documents to be established for the components and their constitutive elements, the modalities of identification of pieces and welded joints, the rules to choose the materials of the support elements, the rules to follow for the support conception, the rules to follow for fabrication and tests, as also other rules than those given in the chapters RH 2000 to RH 4000, to homologate a standard support or a component of a standard support [fr

  9. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  10. The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Christopher J. Ricketts

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is not a single disease, but several histologically defined cancers with different genetic drivers, clinical courses, and therapeutic responses. The current study evaluated 843 RCC from the three major histologic subtypes, including 488 clear cell RCC, 274 papillary RCC, and 81 chromophobe RCC. Comprehensive genomic and phenotypic analysis of the RCC subtypes reveals distinctive features of each subtype that provide the foundation for the development of subtype-specific therapeutic and management strategies for patients affected with these cancers. Somatic alteration of BAP1, PBRM1, and PTEN and altered metabolic pathways correlated with subtype-specific decreased survival, while CDKN2A alteration, increased DNA hypermethylation, and increases in the immune-related Th2 gene expression signature correlated with decreased survival within all major histologic subtypes. CIMP-RCC demonstrated an increased immune signature, and a uniform and distinct metabolic expression pattern identified a subset of metabolically divergent (MD ChRCC that associated with extremely poor survival. : Ricketts et al. find distinctive features of each RCC subtype, providing the foundation for development of subtype-specific therapeutic and management strategies. Somatic alteration of BAP1, PBRM1, and metabolic pathways correlates with subtype-specific decreased survival, while CDKN2A alteration, DNA hypermethylation, and Th2 immune signature correlate with decreased survival within all subtypes. Keywords: clear cell renal cell carcinoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, CDKN2A, DNA hypermethylation, immune signature, chromatin remodeling, TCGA, PanCanAtlas

  11. Synergistic Effects of Cabozantinib and EGFR-Specific CAR-NK-92 Cells in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chimeric antigen receptor-modified immune effector cell (CAR-T and CAR-NK therapies are newly developed adoptive treatments of cancers. However, their therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors is limited. Combining CAR-T or CAR-NK cells with chemotherapeutic drugs to treat solid tumor may be a promising strategy. We developed an epidermal growth factor- (EGFR- specific third-generation CAR. NK-92 cells were modified with the CAR by lentivirus infection. The specific killing ability of the CAR-modified NK-92 cells (CAR-NK-92 against renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines was confirmed in vitro. The synergistic effects of cabozantinib and EGFR-specific CAR-NK-92 cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the CAR-NK-92 cells lyse RCC cells in an EGFR-specific manner. Treatment with cabozantinib could increase EGFR and decrease PD-L1 membrane surface expression in RCC cells and enhance the killing ability of CAR-NK-92 cells against the RCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CAR-NK-92 cells show synergistic therapeutic efficacy with cabozantinib against human RCC xenograft models. Our results provided the basis for combination with chemotherapy as a novel strategy for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of CAR-modified immune effector cells for solid tumors.

  12. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

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    Sugiyama Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC, overexpress FABP7. The abundant expression of FABP7 in primary RCCs compared to certain RCC-derived cell lines may allow the definition of the molecular components of FABP7's regulatory system. Results We determined FABP7 mRNA levels in six RCC cell lines. Two were highly expressed, whereas the other and the embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 were weakly expressed FABP7 transcripts. Western blot analysis of the cell lines detected strong FABP7 expression only in one RCC cell line. Promoter activity in the RCC cell lines was 3- to 21-fold higher than that of HEK293. Deletion analysis demonstrated that three FABP7 promoter regions contributed to upregulated expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell. Competition analysis of gel shifts indicated that OCT1, OCT6, and nuclear factor I (NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region. Supershift experiments indicated that BRN2 (POU3F2 and NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region as well. There was an inverse correlation between FABP7 promoter activity and BRN2 mRNA expression. The FABP7-positive cell line's NFI-DNA complex migrated faster than in other cell lines. Levels of NFIA mRNA were higher in the HEK293 cell line than in any of the six RCC cell lines. In contrast, NFIC mRNA expression was lower in the HEK293 cell line than in the six RCC cell lines. Conclusions Three putative FABP7 promoter regions drive reporter gene expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell line. BRN2 and NFI may be key

  13. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T

  14. Renal Cell Carcinoma Perfusion before and after Radiofrequency Ablation Measured with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Tze Min; Sourbron, Steven; Wilson, Daniel Jonathan; Magee, Derek; Gregory, Walter Martin; Selby, Peter John; Buckley, David L

    2018-01-08

    To investigate if the early treatment effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be detected with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI and to correlate RCC perfusion with RFA treatment time. 20 patients undergoing RFA of their 21 RCCs were evaluated with DCE-MRI before and at one month after RFA treatment. Perfusion was estimated using the maximum slope technique at two independent sittings. Total RCC blood flow was correlated with total RFA treatment time, tumour location, size and histology. DCE-MRI examinations were successfully evaluated for 21 RCCs (size from 1.3 to 4 cm). Perfusion of the RCCs decreased significantly ( p measuring RCC perfusion before and after RFA. Perfusion significantly decreases in the zone of ablation, suggesting that it may be useful for the assessment of treatment efficacy. Pre-RFA RCC blood flow may be used to predict RFA treatment time.

  15. Urinary collecting system invasion is associated with poor survival in patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, George C; Boorjian, Stephen A; Ziegelmann, Matthew J; Westerman, Mary E; Lohse, Christine M; Leibovich, Bradley C; Cheville, John C; Thompson, R Houston

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of urinary collecting system invasion (UCSI) in a large series of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients with clear-cell RCC treated with nephrectomy between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed from a prospectively maintained registry. One urological pathologist re-reviewed all slides. Cancer-specific survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and associations of UCSI with death from RCC were evaluated using Cox models. Of the 859 patients with clear-cell RCC, 58 (6.8%) had UCSI. At last follow-up, 310 patients had died from RCC at a median of 1.8 years after surgery. The median follow-up for patients alive at last follow-up was 8.2 years. The estimated cancer-specific survival at 10 years after surgery for patients with UCSI was 17%, compared with 60% for patients without UCSI (P system invasion is associated with poor prognosis among patients with clear-cell RCC. If validated, consideration should be given to including UCSI in future staging systems. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The IGF-I/JAK2-STAT3/miR-21 signaling pathway may be associated with human renal cell carcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying; Zhao, An; Cheng, Guoping; Xu, Jingjing; Ji, Enming; Sun, Wenyong

    2017-07-04

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the highest mortality rate of the genitourinary cancers, and the treatment options are very limited. Thus, identification of molecular mechanisms underlying RCC tumorigenesis, is critical for identifying biomarkers for RCC diagnosis and prognosis. To validate whether the IGF-I/JAK2-STAT3/miR-21 signaling pathway is associated with human RCC cell growth. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. The MTT assay was performed to determine cell survival rate. The Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit was used to detect cell apoptosis. We employed RCC tissues and cell lines (A498; ACHN; Caki-1; Caki-2 and 786-O) in the study. IGF-I, and its inhibitor (NT-157) were administrated to detect the effects of IGF-I on the expression of miR-21 and p-JAK2. JAK2 inhibitor (AG490), and si-STAT3 were used to detect the effects of JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway on the expression of miR-21. In our study, we firstly showed that the expression levels of IGF-I and miR-21 were up-regulated in RCC tissues and cell lines. After exogenous IGF-I treatment, the expression levels of miR-21, p-IGF-IR and p-JAK2 were significantly increased, whereas NT-157 treatment showed the reversed results. Further study indicated that JAK2 inhibitor or si-STAT3 significantly reversed the IGF-I-induced miR-21 expression level. Finally, we found that IGF-I treatment significantly prompted human RCC cell survival and inhibited cell apoptosis, and NT-157 treatment showed the reversed results. The IGF-I/JAK2-STAT3/miR-21 signaling pathway may be associated with human RCC cell growth.

  17. Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma: Role of the Radiologist in the Era of Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagare, Atul B; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2017-08-01

    For the past decade, advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been at the forefront of oncologic innovation. Our rapidly evolving understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of RCC has revolutionized the management of advanced RCC; 10 novel molecular targeted agents and immune checkpoint inhibitor have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of advanced RCC in a little over a decade. Amid this progress, imaging has assumed a central role in metastatic surveillance and follow-up of advanced RCC. State-of-the-art knowledge of the molecular basis of RCC and its treatment and imaging will help ensure that the radiology community remains relevant and central in the care of patients with advanced RCC. This article will review developments in management of advanced RCC from a radiologist's perspective to highlight our clinical role. It will describe how the underlying molecular mechanisms of RCC provide specific targets for novel anticancer agents. The relationship between the mechanisms of action of these novel anticancer agents and the imaging appearance of tumor response will be discussed, along with the available tumor response criteria and their strengths and weaknesses, thus assisting radiologists in response assessment in the setting of clinical trials or routine practice. The class- and drug-specific toxicities and complications associated with the novel anticancer agents will be summarized, since these are frequently missed or misinterpreted and require the radiologist's input in prompt detection and management. The potential role of radiogenomics and texture analysis in the management of advanced RCC will also be discussed. © RSNA, 2017.

  18. Human anti-CAIX antibodies mediate immune cell inhibition of renal cell carcinoma in vitro and in a humanized mouse model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, De-Kuan; Moniz, Raymond J; Xu, Zhongyao; Sun, Jiusong; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-06-11

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) IX is a surface-expressed protein that is upregulated by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and represents a prototypic tumor-associated antigen that is overexpressed on renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therapeutic approaches targeting CAIX have focused on the development of CAIX inhibitors and specific immunotherapies including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, current in vivo mouse models used to characterize the anti-tumor properties of fully human anti-CAIX mAbs have significant limitations since the role of human effector cells in tumor cell killing in vivo is not directly evaluated. The role of human anti-CAIX mAbs on CAIX(+) RCC tumor cell killing by immunocytes or complement was tested in vitro by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) as well as on CAIX(+) RCC cellular motility, wound healing, migration and proliferation. The in vivo therapeutic activity mediated by anti-CAIX mAbs was determined by using a novel orthotopic RCC xenograft humanized animal model and analyzed by histology and FACS staining. Our studies demonstrate the capacity of human anti-CAIX mAbs that inhibit CA enzymatic activity to result in immune-mediated killing of RCC, including nature killer (NK) cell-mediated ADCC, CDC, and macrophage-mediated ADCP. The killing activity correlated positively with the level of CAIX expression on RCC tumor cell lines. In addition, Fc engineering of anti-CAIX mAbs was shown to enhance the ADCC activity against RCC. We also demonstrate that these anti-CAIX mAbs inhibit migration of RCC cells in vitro. Finally, through the implementation of a novel orthotopic RCC model utilizing allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice, we show that anti-CAIX mAbs are capable of mediating human immune response in vivo including tumor infiltration of NK cells and activation of T cells, resulting in

  19. Methylation of 10 miRNA genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and their diagnostic value

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    V. I. Loginov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is characterized by the high (30–40 % of cases frequency of lethal outcomes which at metastasis reaches 90 %. Lack of efficient diagnostics at early stages of a disease indicates the need of searching on new ccRCC markers.Objective: for definition of methylation role of some tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA genes in ccRCC pathogenesis and progression and marker identification for ccRCC diagnostics and metastasis predictions.Materials and methods. The alterations of methylation status of 10 miRNA genes were determined by methylation specific polymerase chain reaction in tumor DNA samples and matched histologically unchanged tissues from 70 patients with ccRCC, as well as in DNA samples of kidney tissues from 19 post-mortal individuals without cancer history. Methylation of MIR MIR-107, -130b and -148a genes in ccRCC was studied for the first time.Results. It was shown that 8 miRNA genes (MIR-9-1/3, -34b/c, -124a-1/2/3, -129-2, -130b were methylated in ccRCC tumors with significantly higher frequency than in the matched histologically unchanged kidney tissues. It was established the association of methylation of 4 miRNA genes (MIR-107, -124a-3, -129-2, -130b with ccRCC progression (stage, tumor size, differentiation grade, including metastasis in the lymph nodes or distant organs, revealed for MIR-107 and -129-2. The association of MIR-107 and -130b methylation with progression of ccRCC is shown for the first time. Potential marker systems are made for ccRCC diagnostics using tumor biopsy; according to the ROC analysis, systems from 4 and 5 genes (MIR-9-1, -4b/c, -124a-3, -129-2/with addition of MIR-130b are characterized by high clinical sensitivity of 90 % and specificity of 94 % (area under ROC curve 0.93 and 0.94. Conclusion. The received results will form the basis of noninvasive ccRCC diagnostics further development. To conclude, it is shown the association of methylation of 9

  20. Screening disrupted molecular functions and pathways associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma using Gibbs sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Ning; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yu; Zhai, Xu; Yang, Chuan-Ce; Cao, Bin; Chong, Tie

    2017-10-01

    To explore the disturbed molecular functions and pathways in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) using Gibbs sampling. Gene expression data of ccRCC samples and adjacent non-tumor renal tissues were recruited from public available database. Then, molecular functions of expression changed genes in ccRCC were classed to Gene Ontology (GO) project, and these molecular functions were converted into Markov chains. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm was implemented to perform posterior inference and identify probability distributions of molecular functions in Gibbs sampling. Differentially expressed molecular functions were selected under posterior value more than 0.95, and genes with the appeared times in differentially expressed molecular functions ≥5 were defined as pivotal genes. Functional analysis was employed to explore the pathways of pivotal genes and their strongly co-regulated genes. In this work, we obtained 396 molecular functions, and 13 of them were differentially expressed. Oxidoreductase activity showed the highest posterior value. Gene composition analysis identified 79 pivotal genes, and survival analysis indicated that these pivotal genes could be used as a strong independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with ccRCC. Pathway analysis identified one pivotal pathway - oxidative phosphorylation. We identified the differentially expressed molecular functions and pivotal pathway in ccRCC using Gibbs sampling. The results could be considered as potential signatures for early detection and therapy of ccRCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. EMMPRIN promotes angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion and resistance to sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma, and its level predicts patient outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mototaka; Nakai, Yasutomo; Nakata, Wataru; Yoshida, Takahiro; Hatano, Koji; Kawashima, Atsunari; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Uemura, Motohide; Takayama, Hitoshi; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) has been reported to play crucial roles, including in angiogenesis, in several carcinomas. However, the correlation between EMMPRIN levels and angiogenesis expression profile has not been reported, and the role of EMMPRIN in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the association of EMMPRIN with angiogenesis, its value in prognosis, and its roles in RCC. EMMPRIN expression was examined in 50 RCC patients treated with radical nephrectomy. Angiogenesis, proliferation, and invasion activity were evaluated using EMMPRIN knockdown RCC cell lines. The size of EMMPRIN-overexpressing xenografts was measured and the degree of angiogenesis was quantified. EMMPRIN expression was evaluated in RCC patients who received sunitinib therapy and in sunitinib-resistant cells. Further, the relation between EMMPRIN expression and sensitivity to sunitinib was examined. EMMPRIN score was significantly associated with clinicopathological parameters in RCC patients, as well as being significantly correlated with microvessel area (MVA) in immature vessels and with prognosis. Down-regulation of EMMPRIN by siRNA led to decreased VEGF and bFGF expression, cell proliferation, and invasive potential. EMMPRIN over-expressing xenografts showed accelerated growth and MVA of immature vessels. EMMPRIN expression was significantly increased in patients who received sunitinib therapy as well as in sunitinib-resistant 786-O cells (786-suni). EMMPRIN-overexpressing RCC cells were resistant to sunitinib. Our findings indicate that high expression of EMMPRIN in RCC plays important roles in tumor progression and sunitinib resistance. Therefore, EMMPRIN could be a novel target for the treatment of RCC.

  2. EMMPRIN promotes angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion and resistance to sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma, and its level predicts patient outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mototaka Sato

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN has been reported to play crucial roles, including in angiogenesis, in several carcinomas. However, the correlation between EMMPRIN levels and angiogenesis expression profile has not been reported, and the role of EMMPRIN in renal cell carcinoma (RCC is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the association of EMMPRIN with angiogenesis, its value in prognosis, and its roles in RCC.EMMPRIN expression was examined in 50 RCC patients treated with radical nephrectomy. Angiogenesis, proliferation, and invasion activity were evaluated using EMMPRIN knockdown RCC cell lines. The size of EMMPRIN-overexpressing xenografts was measured and the degree of angiogenesis was quantified. EMMPRIN expression was evaluated in RCC patients who received sunitinib therapy and in sunitinib-resistant cells. Further, the relation between EMMPRIN expression and sensitivity to sunitinib was examined.EMMPRIN score was significantly associated with clinicopathological parameters in RCC patients, as well as being significantly correlated with microvessel area (MVA in immature vessels and with prognosis. Down-regulation of EMMPRIN by siRNA led to decreased VEGF and bFGF expression, cell proliferation, and invasive potential. EMMPRIN over-expressing xenografts showed accelerated growth and MVA of immature vessels. EMMPRIN expression was significantly increased in patients who received sunitinib therapy as well as in sunitinib-resistant 786-O cells (786-suni. EMMPRIN-overexpressing RCC cells were resistant to sunitinib.Our findings indicate that high expression of EMMPRIN in RCC plays important roles in tumor progression and sunitinib resistance. Therefore, EMMPRIN could be a novel target for the treatment of RCC.

  3. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Haghighatkhah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC

  4. Pattern of Care Study in Metastatic Renal-Cell Carcinoma in the Preimmunotherapy Era in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmeier, Nadja; Rothschild, Sacha I; Rothermundt, Christian; Cathomas, Richard; Schardt, Julian; Berthold, Dominik; von Burg, Philippe; Müller, Beat; Beyer, Jörg; Vogt, Deborah R; Stenner, Frank

    2018-02-02

    In metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC), physicians have a plethora of therapeutic choices, with the latest addition of checkpoint inhibitors. However, many questions regarding the best use of the respective drugs remain unanswered. Therefore, it is important to examine and summarize the outcome of real-world experiences to understand the practical value of the various drugs in daily use and foster optimal treatment algorithms for patients with renal-cell carcinoma. We sought to describe the pattern of care in mRCC under circumstances with access to all therapeutic options for patients. We examined the outcome of patients with mRCC who were treated at 8 major centers in Switzerland, mainly with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Data from 110 patients with mRCC who had undergone more than one systemic therapy were collected and analyzed. We assessed the pattern of care for patients with mRCC in an unrestricted health care system and outcomes with regard to the respective treatment sequences. We also studied the compliance of individual therapies with published guidelines and correlated the adherence to outcome. Finally, immediate versus deferred treatment and the number of received therapeutic drug lines were analyzed. Median survival of patients treated with targeted agents for mRCC was 2.0 years. Exposure to more than 2 lines of systemic drugs did not improve outcome of patients with mRCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of obesity and adiponectin signaling in patients with renal cell carcinoma: A potential mechanism for the "obesity paradox".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryuichi; Narita, Shintaro; Huang, Mingguo; Nara, Taketoshi; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Takayama, Koichiro; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Maeno, Atsushi; Saito, Mitsuru; Inoue, Takamitsu; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Satoh, Shigeru; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2017-01-01

    Although obesity increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), obese patients with RCC experience longer survival than non-obese patients. However, the mechanism of this "obesity paradox" is unknown. We examined the impact of preoperative BMI, serum total adiponectin (sAd) level, total adiponectin secretion from perinephric adipose tissue, and intratumoral expression of adiponectin receptors on RCC aggressiveness and survival. We also investigated the mechanism underlying enhanced cancer aggressiveness in RCC cells stimulated with exogenous adiponectin. Overweight and obese patients had significantly lower grade cancers than normal patients in all patients and in those without metastasis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.027, respectively). Cancer-specific survival was significantly longer in overweight and obese patients than in normal patients in all patients (p = 0.035). There was a weak inverse correlation between sAd level and BMI in RCC patients (r = -0.344, p = 0.002). Tumor size was slightly correlated with sAd level, and high sAd was significantly associated with poor overall survival rates in patients with non-metastatic RCC (p = 0.035). Adiponectin levels in perinephric adipose tissue and intratumoral AdipoR1/R2 expression were not correlated with RCC aggressiveness or survival. Proliferation significantly increased in 786-O and Caki-2 cells exposed to exogenous adiponectin, whereas cell invasion and migration were unaffected. In addition, exogenous adiponectin significantly inhibited starvation- and metformin-induced apoptosis, and up-regulated p-AMPK and Bcl-xL levels. In summary, low BMI and high adiponectin levels are associated with aggressive cell behaviors and poor survival in surgically-treated RCC patients. The effects of adiponectin on proliferation and apoptosis might underlie the "obesity paradox" of RCC.

  6. The impact of obesity and adiponectin signaling in patients with renal cell carcinoma: A potential mechanism for the "obesity paradox".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Ito

    Full Text Available Although obesity increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, obese patients with RCC experience longer survival than non-obese patients. However, the mechanism of this "obesity paradox" is unknown. We examined the impact of preoperative BMI, serum total adiponectin (sAd level, total adiponectin secretion from perinephric adipose tissue, and intratumoral expression of adiponectin receptors on RCC aggressiveness and survival. We also investigated the mechanism underlying enhanced cancer aggressiveness in RCC cells stimulated with exogenous adiponectin. Overweight and obese patients had significantly lower grade cancers than normal patients in all patients and in those without metastasis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.027, respectively. Cancer-specific survival was significantly longer in overweight and obese patients than in normal patients in all patients (p = 0.035. There was a weak inverse correlation between sAd level and BMI in RCC patients (r = -0.344, p = 0.002. Tumor size was slightly correlated with sAd level, and high sAd was significantly associated with poor overall survival rates in patients with non-metastatic RCC (p = 0.035. Adiponectin levels in perinephric adipose tissue and intratumoral AdipoR1/R2 expression were not correlated with RCC aggressiveness or survival. Proliferation significantly increased in 786-O and Caki-2 cells exposed to exogenous adiponectin, whereas cell invasion and migration were unaffected. In addition, exogenous adiponectin significantly inhibited starvation- and metformin-induced apoptosis, and up-regulated p-AMPK and Bcl-xL levels. In summary, low BMI and high adiponectin levels are associated with aggressive cell behaviors and poor survival in surgically-treated RCC patients. The effects of adiponectin on proliferation and apoptosis might underlie the "obesity paradox" of RCC.

  7. Chemotherapeutic drugs sensitize human renal cell carcinoma cells to ABT-737 by a mechanism involving the Noxa-dependent inactivation of Mcl-1 or A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantl Niko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human renal cell carcinoma (RCC is very resistant to chemotherapy. ABT-737 is a novel inhibitor of anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family that has shown promise in various preclinical tumour models. Results We here report a strong over-additive pro-apoptotic effect of ABT-737 and etoposide, vinblastine or paclitaxel but not 5-fluorouracil in cell lines from human RCC. ABT-737 showed very little activity as a single agent but killed RCC cells potently when anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 or, unexpectedly, A1 was targeted by RNAi. This potent augmentation required endogenous Noxa protein since RNAi directed against Noxa but not against Bim or Puma reduced apoptosis induction by the combination of ABT-737 and etoposide or vinblastine. At the level of mitochondria, etoposide-treatment had a similar sensitizing activity and allowed for ABT-737-induced release of cytochrome c. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic drugs can overcome protection afforded by Mcl-1 and A1 through endogenous Noxa protein in RCC cells, and the combination of such drugs with ABT-737 may be a promising strategy in RCC. Strikingly, A1 emerged in RCC cell lines as a protein of similar importance as the well-established Mcl-1 in protection against apoptosis in these cells.

  8. [The theme of disaster in health care: profile of technical and scientific production in the specialized database on disasters of the Virtual Health Library - VHL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Vania; Ximenes, Elisa Francioli; Carvalho, Mauren Lopes de; Alpino, Tais de Moura Ariza; Freitas, Carlos Machado de

    2014-09-01

    In the specialized database of the Virtual Health Library (VHL), the DISASTER database highlights the importance of the theme for the health sector. The scope of this article is to identify the profiles of technical and scientific publications in the specialized database. Based on systematic searches and the analysis of results it is possible to determine: the type of publication; the main topics addressed; the most common type of disasters mentioned in published materials, countries and regions as subjects, historic periods with the most publications and the current trend of publications. When examining the specialized data in detail, it soon becomes clear that the number of major topics is very high, making a specific search process in this database a challenging exercise. On the other hand, it is encouraging that the disaster topic is discussed and assessed in a broad and diversified manner, associated with different aspects of the natural and social sciences. The disaster issue requires the production of interdisciplinary knowledge development to reduce the impacts of disasters and for risk management. In this way, since the health sector is a interdisciplinary area, it can contribute to knowledge production.

  9. Ethnic variation of the histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Ezenwa

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The commonest histological subtype of RCC in each of the studied ethnic groups in Singapore is clear cell carcinoma. However, most of the cancer deaths in Chinese (16.9% and Malays (66.7% were associated with the papillary cell type, while in Indians the sarcomatoid component prevailed (9.7%. Thus, the usual prognostic trend for RCC subtypes cannot be applied to all Singaporean ethnicities, necessitating individualization of prognosis for each group.

  10. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  11. MicroRNA-187, down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and associated with lower survival, inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun [Foshan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Foshan (China); Lei, Ting [Zhongshan People’s Hospital, Zhongshan (China); Xu, Congjie [Department of Urology, Pepole’s Hospital of Hainan Province, Haikou (China); Li, Huan; Ma, Wenmin; Yang, Yunxia; Fan, Shuming [Foshan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Foshan (China); Liu, Yuchen, E-mail: s_ycliu1@stu.edu.cn [Anhui Medical University, Hefei (China)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •miR-187 is down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). •Down-regulation of miR-187 is associated with poor outcomes in patients with ccRCC. •miR-187 inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3 in ccRCC. -- Abstract: Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are frequently associated with the aggressive malignant behavior of human cancers, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Based on the preliminary deep sequencing data, we hypothesized that miR-187 may play an important role in ccRCC development. In this study, we found that miR-187 was down-regulated in both tumor tissue and plasma of ccRCC patients. Lower miR-187 expression levels were associated with higher tumor grade and stage. All patients with high miR-187 expression survived 5 years, while with low miR-187 expression, only 42% survived. Suppressed in vitro proliferation, inhibited in vivo tumor growth, and decreased motility were observed in cells treated with the miR-187 expression vector. Further studies showed that B7 homolog 3 (B7-H3) is a direct target of miR-187. Over-expression of miR-187 decreased B7-H3 mRNA level and repressed B7-H3-3′-UTR reporter activity. Knockdown of B7-H3 using siRNA resulted in similar phenotype changes as that observed for overexpression of miR-187. Our data suggest that miR-187 is emerging as a novel player in the disease state of ccRCC. miR-187 plays a tumor suppressor role in ccRCC.

  12. MicroRNA-187, down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and associated with lower survival, inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jun; Lei, Ting; Xu, Congjie; Li, Huan; Ma, Wenmin; Yang, Yunxia; Fan, Shuming; Liu, Yuchen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •miR-187 is down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). •Down-regulation of miR-187 is associated with poor outcomes in patients with ccRCC. •miR-187 inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3 in ccRCC. -- Abstract: Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are frequently associated with the aggressive malignant behavior of human cancers, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Based on the preliminary deep sequencing data, we hypothesized that miR-187 may play an important role in ccRCC development. In this study, we found that miR-187 was down-regulated in both tumor tissue and plasma of ccRCC patients. Lower miR-187 expression levels were associated with higher tumor grade and stage. All patients with high miR-187 expression survived 5 years, while with low miR-187 expression, only 42% survived. Suppressed in vitro proliferation, inhibited in vivo tumor growth, and decreased motility were observed in cells treated with the miR-187 expression vector. Further studies showed that B7 homolog 3 (B7-H3) is a direct target of miR-187. Over-expression of miR-187 decreased B7-H3 mRNA level and repressed B7-H3-3′-UTR reporter activity. Knockdown of B7-H3 using siRNA resulted in similar phenotype changes as that observed for overexpression of miR-187. Our data suggest that miR-187 is emerging as a novel player in the disease state of ccRCC. miR-187 plays a tumor suppressor role in ccRCC

  13. Urinary total arsenic and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine are associated with renal cell carcinoma in an area without obvious arsenic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jan-Show [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsiu-Yuan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-01

    8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most reliable and abundant markers of DNA damage. The study was designed to explore the relationship between urinary 8-OHdG and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to investigate whether individuals with a high level of 8-OHdG would have a modified odds ratio (OR) of arsenic-related RCC. This case–control study was conducted with 132 RCC patients and 245 age- and sex-matched controls from a hospital-based pool between November 2006 and May 2009. Pathological verification of RCC was completed by image-guided biopsy or surgical resection of renal tumors. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Concentrations of urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Level of urinary 8-OHdG was significantly associated with the OR of RCC in a dose–response relationship after multivariate adjustment. Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. The greatest OR (3.50) was seen in the individuals with high urinary 8-OHdG and high urinary total arsenic. A trend test indicated that the OR of RCC was increased with one of these factors and was further increased with both (p = 0.002). In conclusion, higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of the RCC. High levels of 8-OHdG combined with urinary total arsenic might be indicative of arsenic-induced RCC. -- Highlights: ► Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. ► Higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of RCC risk. ► Urinary 8-OHdG may modify arsenic related RCC risk.

  14. Timing the Landmark Events in the Evolution of Clear Cell Renal Cell Cancer: TRACERx Renal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Thomas J.; Turajlic, Samra; Rowan, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by near-universal loss of the short arm of chromosome 3, deleting several tumor suppressor genes. We analyzed whole genomes from 95 biopsies across 33 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We find hotspots of point mutations in the...

  15. Management of Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma with Invasion of the Duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Schlussel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is rare but aggressive, with greater than 20% of patients presenting with stage III or IV, disease. Surgical resection of the primary tumor regardless of stage is the treatment of choice, and en bloc resection of involved organs provides the only potential chance for cure. This case report describes a patient with metastatic right-sided RCC with invasion of the inferior vena cava and duodenum managed by en block resection and pancreaticoduodenectomy. This report will review the workup and treatment of locally advanced RCC, as well as the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the setting of metastatic disease.

  16. Quantitative promoter methylation analysis of multiple cancer-related genes in renal cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Jorge

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of cancer-associated genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis and may serve as a cancer biomarker. In this study we aimed at defining a quantitative gene promoter methylation panel that might identify the most prevalent types of renal cell tumors. Methods A panel of 18 gene promoters was assessed by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QMSP in 85 primarily resected renal tumors representing the four major histologic subtypes (52 clear cell (ccRCC, 13 papillary (pRCC, 10 chromophobe (chRCC, and 10 oncocytomas and 62 paired normal tissue samples. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation levels were determined and correlated with standard clinicopathological parameters. Results Significant differences in methylation levels among the four subtypes of renal tumors were found for CDH1 (p = 0.0007, PTGS2 (p = 0.002, and RASSF1A (p = 0.0001. CDH1 hypermethylation levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to chRCC and oncocytoma (p = 0.00016 and p = 0.0034, respectively, whereas PTGS2 methylation levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to pRCC (p = 0.004. RASSF1A methylation levels were significantly higher in pRCC than in normal tissue (p = 0.035. In pRCC, CDH1 and RASSF1A methylation levels were inversely correlated with tumor stage (p = 0.031 and nuclear grade (p = 0.022, respectively. Conclusion The major subtypes of renal epithelial neoplasms display differential aberrant CDH1, PTGS2, and RASSF1A promoter methylation levels. This gene panel might contribute to a more accurate discrimination among common renal tumors, improving preoperative assessment and therapeutic decision-making in patients harboring suspicious renal masses.

  17. Quantitative promoter methylation analysis of multiple cancer-related genes in renal cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Vera L; Henrique, Rui; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Pinto, Mafalda; Oliveira, Jorge; Lobo, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of cancer-associated genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis and may serve as a cancer biomarker. In this study we aimed at defining a quantitative gene promoter methylation panel that might identify the most prevalent types of renal cell tumors. A panel of 18 gene promoters was assessed by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QMSP) in 85 primarily resected renal tumors representing the four major histologic subtypes (52 clear cell (ccRCC), 13 papillary (pRCC), 10 chromophobe (chRCC), and 10 oncocytomas) and 62 paired normal tissue samples. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation levels were determined and correlated with standard clinicopathological parameters. Significant differences in methylation levels among the four subtypes of renal tumors were found for CDH1 (p = 0.0007), PTGS2 (p = 0.002), and RASSF1A (p = 0.0001). CDH1 hypermethylation levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to chRCC and oncocytoma (p = 0.00016 and p = 0.0034, respectively), whereas PTGS2 methylation levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to pRCC (p = 0.004). RASSF1A methylation levels were significantly higher in pRCC than in normal tissue (p = 0.035). In pRCC, CDH1 and RASSF1A methylation levels were inversely correlated with tumor stage (p = 0.031) and nuclear grade (p = 0.022), respectively. The major subtypes of renal epithelial neoplasms display differential aberrant CDH1, PTGS2, and RASSF1A promoter methylation levels. This gene panel might contribute to a more accurate discrimination among common renal tumors, improving preoperative assessment and therapeutic decision-making in patients harboring suspicious renal masses

  18. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to

  19. T-cell Responses in the Microenvironment of Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma-Implications for Adoptive Cell Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Westergaard, Marie Christine Wulff; Kjeldsen, Julie Westerlin

    2018-01-01

    In vitro expansion of large numbers of highly potent tumor-reactive T cells appears a prerequisite for effective adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) as shown in metastatic melanoma (MM). We therefore sought to determine whether renal cell carcinomas (RCC...

  20. Hepatitis C infection and renal cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karn; Wijarnpreecha[1; Pitchaphon; Nissaisorakarn[2; Suthanya; Sornprom[1; Charat; Thongprayoon[1; Natanong; Thamcharoen[1; Kunlatida; Maneenil[3; Alexander; J; Podboy[4; Wisit; Cheungpasitporn[5

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS A literature search was performed from inception until February 2016. Studies that reported relative risks,odd ratios, hazard ratios or standardized incidence ratio comparing the risk of RCC among HCV-infected participants vs those without HCV infection were included. Participants without HCV infection were used as comparators. Pooled odds ratios and 95%CI were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method.RESULTS Seven observational studies were with 196826 patients were included in the analysis to assess the risk of RCC in patients with HCV. A significantly increased risk of RCC among participants with HCV infection was found with a pooled RR of 1.86 (95%CI: 1.11-3.11). The association between RCC and HCV was marginally insignificant after a sensitivity analysis limited only to studies with adjusted analysis, with a pooled RR of 1.50 (95%CI:0.93-2.42).CONCLUSION Our study demonstrated a potential association between HCV infection and RCC. Further studies of RCC surveillance in patients with HCV are required.

  1. Inverse association of leptin levels with renal cell carcinoma: results from a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis N; Petridou, Eleni Th; Dessypris, Nick; Terzidis, Agapios; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Chrousos, George P

    2009-01-01

    Leptin is primarily produced in adipose tissue and appears to play a modulatory role between metabolism and immunity. Given that obesity, a state of chronic inflammation, is an established risk factor for Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC), we investigated the association between plasma leptin levels and RCC risk. This case-control study included 70 patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed RCC and 280 age-, gender- and district of residence-matched controls. Anthropometric data, socio-demographic variables, medical history, lifestyle habits and dietary data were derived from a personal interview. Serum leptin and adiponectin levels were determined using standard commercial kits. Adjusted odds ratios for RCC risk were derived through multiple logistic regression analyses. Leptin levels were inversely associated with RCC risk (OR: 0.53, CI: 0.28- 0.99, p = 0.05), even after controlling for potential confounding factors, such as Body Mass Index (BMI), recent weight change, history of diabetes mellitus and other obesity related hormones, notably adiponectin. The precise mechanism linking obesity with RCC remains unclear; however, the inverse association of leptin with RCC might be attributed, at least in part, to hormonal cross-talk with complex neuron-endocrine and immune circuits. These findings, if confirmed in prospective and interventional studies, might further elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Prognostic significance of overexpressed long non-coding RNA TUG1 in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P-Q; Wu, Y-X; Zhong, X-D; Liu, B; Qiao, G

    2017-01-01

    The long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) study has gradually become one of the hot topics in the field of RNA biology. However, little is known about the pathological role of lncRNA TUG1 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. This study attempted to investigate the association of lncRNA TUG1 expression with progression and prognosis in ccRCC patients. Using qRT-PCR, the expression of TUG1 was measured in 203 ccRCC tissues and 45 adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Then, the relationships between TUG1 level and the clinicopathological factors of patients with ccRCC were analyzed. The prognostic significance was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. The relative level of TUG1was significantly higher in ccRCC tissues compared to the adjacent non-tumor tissues (p TUG1 was associated significantly with histological grade, tumor stage, lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis (all p TUG1 expression levels were associated with a shorter overall survival (p TUG1 expression was an independent prognostic marker of poor outcome. These findings suggested that TUG1 may act as a tumor promoter in ccRCC and could serve as a potential therapeutic target for this tumor.

  3. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelated medical event. Two incidental renal lesions were found and ultimately removed by radical nephrectomy. The smaller lesion had multiple small cystic spaces lined by hobnail cells with high nuclear grade separated by fibrous stroma. This morphology and the expression of proximal (CD10, AMACR and distal tubule cell (CK19 markers by immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of TCRC. The larger lesion was a typical ccRCC, with Fuhrman's nuclear grade 3 and confined to the kidney. Molecular characterization of both neoplasms using virtual karyotyping was performed to assess relatedness of these tumors. Low grade areas (Fuhrman grade 2 of the ccRCC showed loss of 3p and gains in chromosomes 5 and 7, whereas oncocytic areas displayed additional gain of 2p and loss of 10q; the high grade areas (Fuhrman grade 3 showed several additional imbalances. In contrast, the TCRC demonstrated a distinct profile with gains of chromosomes 8 and 17 and loss of 9. In conclusion, ccRCC and TCRC show distinct genomic copy number profiles and chromosomal imbalances in TCRC might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Second, the presence of a ccRCC with varying degrees of differentiation exemplifies the sequence of chromosomal imbalances acquired during tumor progression. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1790525735655283

  4. Metallothionein gene expression in renal cell carcinoma

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    Deeksha Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metallothioneins (MTs are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich proteins. In general, MT is known to modulate three fundamental processes: (1 the release of gaseous mediators such as hydroxyl radical or nitric oxide, (2 apoptosis and (3 the binding and exchange of heavy metals such as zinc, cadmium or copper. Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between the expression of MT with invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis in various cancers. Most of the previous studies primarily used immunohistochemistry to analyze localization of MT in renal cell carcinoma (RCC. No information is available on the gene expression of MT2A isoform in different types and grades of RCC. Materials and Methods: In the present study, total RNA was isolated from 38 histopathologically confirmed cases of RCC of different types and grades. Corresponding adjacent normal renal parenchyma was taken as control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR analysis was done for the MT2A gene expression using b-actin as an internal control. All statistical calculations were performed using SPSS software. Results: The MT2A gene expression was found to be significantly increased (P < 0.01 in clear cell RCC in comparison with the adjacent normal renal parenchyma. The expression of MT2A was two to three-fold higher in sarcomatoid RCC, whereas there was no change in papillary and collecting duct RCC. MT2A gene expression was significantly higher in lower grade (grades I and II, P < 0.05, while no change was observed in high-grade tumor (grade III and IV in comparison to adjacent normal renal tissue. Conclusion: The first report of the expression of MT2A in different types and grades of RCC and also these data further support the role of MT2A in tumorigenesis.

  5. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jan-Show [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shu-Pin [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsiu-Yuan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  6. Clinical Relevance of Gene Copy Number Variation in Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Blanchard, France; Sesboue, Richard; Flaman, Jean-Michel; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Pfister, Christian; Di Fiore, Frédéric

    2018-02-23

    Gene copy number variations (CNVs) have been reported to be frequent in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with potential prognostic value for some. However, their clinical utility, especially to guide treatment of metastatic disease remains to be established. Our objectives were to assess CNVs on a panel of selected genes and determine their clinical relevance in patients who underwent treatment of metastatic RCC. The genetic assessment was performed on frozen tissue samples of clear cell metastatic RCC using quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction of short fluorescent fragment method to detect CNVs on a panel of 14 genes of interest. The comparison of the electropherogram obtained from both tumor and normal renal adjacent tissue allowed for CNV identification. The clinical, biologic, and survival characteristics were assessed for their associations with the most frequent CNVs. Fifty patients with clear cell metastatic RCC were included. The CNV rate was 21.4%. The loss of CDKN2A and PLG was associated with a higher tumor stage (P relevance, especially those located on CDKN2A, PLG, and ALDOB, in a homogeneous cohort of patients with clear cell metastatic RCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Initial Presentation of Renal Cell Carcinoma as a Metastatic Mass within the Masseter Muscle: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Eun; Lee, Han Bee; Cho, Woo Ho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ji Hae; Kang, Min Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Pathology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often concomitant with distant metastasis, and these metastases are the first sign of an otherwise occult primary. Whereas metastasis of RCC to the head and neck has been reported, metastasis to the masseter muscle, which is composed of skeletal muscle, is quite rare. We now report the case of a 66-year-old man who had a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, with RCC metastasis of a well-defined intensely enhancing hypervascular mass in the masseter muscle as the initial presentation. We present the imaging findings of this case and a literature review about radiologic differential diagnosis of intramasseteric masses.

  8. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, E; Molina, A M; Carbonaro, M; Akhtar, N H; Giannakakou, P; Tagawa, S T; Nanus, D M

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous disease with regards to histology, progression, and response to treatment. Cytotoxic chemotherapy has been extensively studied in metastatic RCC (mRCC). Responses in most studies are modest and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Targeted therapies have significantly improved outcomes in mRCC; however, most patients eventually relapse and die of their disease. Early clinical data suggest that combinations of chemotherapy and targeted agents are clinically active and are well tolerated. We reviewed the available literature for published clinical trials incorporating traditional chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of mRCC. These papers were identified through a Medline search and were included if they employed at least one chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of mRCC. The literature was also reviewed for information regarding mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance. The data regarding the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy in mRCC consist of small, non-randomized phase I and II studies. The major response proportions with single agent chemotherapies are low but combination regimens either with other cytotoxic agents, cytokines, or targeted agents have demonstrated moderate activity. Disparate trial designs and lack of head to head clinical trials make it difficult to compare the efficacy of chemotherapy with that of immunotherapy or targeted agents. Chemotherapy is particularly useful in patients with collecting duct histology and predominantly sarcomatoid differentiation. Chemotherapy resistance may be mediated by overexpression of p-glycoprotein efflux pumps and the dysregulation of the microtubule-hypoxia inducible factor signaling axis. The role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment for clear cell RCC remains poorly defined. Cytotoxic chemotherapy is considered a standard of care in patients with mRCC with predominantly sarcomatoid differentiation and collecting duct RCC variants (Motzer et al

  9. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part I: General overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    Two French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. An important effort of development of these analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the frame of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and in the frame of R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in the 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles is composed of five parts: this first one presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components: plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Finally, part V presents the validation elements of the methods, with details on the process followed for their development and on evaluation of the accuracy of the proposed analytical methods. This first article of the series presents an overview of the calculation of K I and J in these two codes and describes briefly the defect assessment analyses. Specific details in the Appendix A16 of RCC-MR (LBB procedure and creep analyses) are also introduced in this article

  10. Pathological significance and prognostic roles of densities of CD57+ cells, CD68+ cells, and mast cells, and their ratios in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiromi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Yasuda, Takuji; Nakamura, Yuichiro; Araki, Kyohei; Sagara, Yuji; Matsuo, Tomohiro; Ohba, Kojiro; Sakai, Hideki

    2018-05-19

    The immune system is closely associated with malignant behavior in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therefore, understanding the pathological roles of immune cells in tumor stroma is essential to discuss the pathological characteristics of RCC. In this study, the clinical significance of densities of CD57+ cells, CD68+ cells, and mast cells, and their ratios were investigated in patients with clear cell RCC. The densities of CD57+, CD68+, and mast cells were evaluated by immunohistochemical techniques in 179 patients. Proliferation index (PI), apoptotic index (AI), and microvessel density (MVD) were evaluated by using anti-Ki-67, anti-cleaved caspase-3, and anti-CD31 antibodies, respectively. The density of CD57+ cell was negatively correlated with grade, pT stage, and metastasis, although densities of CD68+ cell and mast cell were positively correlated. Ratios of CD68+ cell/CD57+ cell and mast cell/CD57+ cell were significantly correlated with grade, pT stage, and metastasis. Survival analyses showed that the CD68+ cell/CD57+ cell ratio was a significant predictor for cause-specific survival by multi-variate analyses (hazard ratio=1.41, 95% confidential interval=1.03-1.93, P=.031), and was significantly correlated with PI, AI, and MVD (r=.47; P <. 001, r=-.31, P<.001, and r=.40, P<.001, respectively). In conclusion, CD57+ cell, CD68+ cell, and mast cell played important roles in malignancy in clear cell RCC. The CD68+ cell/CD57+ cell ratio was strongly correlated with pathological features and prognosis in these patients because this ratio reflected the status of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Colony, hanging drop, and methylcellulose three dimensional hypoxic growth optimization of renal cell carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Damian; Brodaczewska, Klaudia K; Lipiec, Monika; Szymanski, Łukasz; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of the common urologic malignancies, comprising 3% of all human neoplasms, and the incidence of kidney cancer is rising annually. We need new approaches to target tumor cells that are resistant to current therapies and that give rise to recurrence and treatment failure. In this study, we focused on low oxygen tension and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture incorporation to develop a new RCC growth model. We used the hanging drop and colony formation methods, which are common in 3D culture, as well as a unique methylcellulose (MC) method. For the experiments, we used human primary RCC cell lines, metastatic RCC cell lines, human kidney cancer stem cells, and human healthy epithelial cells. In the hanging drop assay, we verified the potential of various cell lines to create solid aggregates in hypoxic and normoxic conditions. With the semi-soft agar method, we also determined the ability of various cell lines to create colonies under different oxygen conditions. Different cell behavior observed in the MC method versus the hanging drop and colony formation assays suggests that these three assays may be useful to test various cell properties. However, MC seems to be a particularly valuable alternative for 3D cell culture, as its higher efficiency of aggregate formation and serum independency are of interest in different areas of cancer biology.

  12. Evaluation of oxidative stress status and antioxidant capacity in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aldemir, Mustafa; Karaguzel, Ersagun; Okulu, Emrah; Gudeloglu, Ahmet; Ener, Kemal; Ozayar, Asim; Erel, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated and compared the serum oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and the control group. Material and methods The prospective study consisted of 97 patients with RCC (Group 1) and 80 age and sex matched healthy volunteers (Group 2). Group 1 and 2 were compared concerning serum mean total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), arylesterase, total thiol, catalase (CAT), myeloperoxidase (M...

  13. Establishment of a large panel of patient-derived preclinical models of human renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Herv?; B?raud, Claire; Bethry, Audrey; Danilin, Sabrina; Lindner, V?ronique; Coquard, Catherine; Rothhut, Sylvie; Massfelder, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish a large panel of preclinical models of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) directly from patients, faithfully reproducing the biological features of the original tumor. RCC tissues (all stages/subtypes) were collected for 8 years from 336 patients undergoing surgery, xenografted subcutaneously in nude mice, and serially passaged into new mice up to 13 passages. Tissue samples from the primary tumor and tumors grown in mice through passages were ...

  14. Induction and regulation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand/Apo-2 ligand-mediated apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Thomas S; Fialkov, Jonathan M; Scott, David L; Azuhata, Takeo; Williams, Richard D; Wall, Nathan R; Altieri, Dario C; Sandler, Anthony D

    2002-06-01

    The lack of effective therapy for disseminated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has stimulated the search for novel treatments including immunotherapeutic strategies. However, poor therapeutic responses and marked toxicity associated with immunological agents has limited their use. The tumor necrosis factor family member tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)/Apo-2 ligand induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor cell types, while having little cytotoxic activity against normal cells. In this study the activation and regulation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and TRAIL receptor expression in human RCC cell lines and pathologic specimens was examined. TRAIL induced caspase-mediated apoptotic death of RCC cells with variable sensitivities among the cell lines tested. Compared with TRAIL-sensitive RCC cell lines (A-498, ACHN, and 769-P), the TRAIL-resistant RCC cell line (786-O) expressed lesser amounts of the death-inducing TRAIL receptors, and greater amounts of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis. Incubation of 786-O with actinomycin D increased the expression of the death-inducing TRAIL receptors and, concomitantly, decreased the intracellular levels of survivin, resulting in TRAIL-induced apoptotic death. The link between survivin and TRAIL regulation was confirmed when an increase in TRAIL resistance was observed after overexpression of survivin in the TRAIL-sensitive, survivin-negative RCC line A-498. These findings, along with our observation that TRAIL receptors are expressed in RCC tumor tissue, suggest that TRAIL may be useful as a therapeutic agent for RCC and that survivin may partially regulate TRAIL-induced cell death.

  15. Curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of renal cancer cells by suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Ziming; Chong, Tie; Yang, Jie; Li, Hongliang; Chen, Haiwen

    2017-10-01

    The radiation resistance of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains the primary obstacle to improve patient survival. This study aimed to investigate the effects of curcumin on the radiosensitivity of RCC cells. Human RCC cell (ACHN) was exposed to irradiation (IR) and/or curcumin treatment. Cell viability, DNA repair, cell cycle, and apoptosis, were evaluated by MTT, immunofluoresence staining and flow cytometry. Moreover, ACHN cells were xenografted into nude mice and subjected to IR and/or curcumin treatment. The expression of NF-κB signaling related proteins in ACHN cells and xenografts was detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that curcumin significantly increased radiosensitivity of ACHN cells by inhibiting the cell proliferation and DNA damage repair, causing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, inducing apoptosis in vitro, and suppressing the growth of xenografts in vivo. In addition, curcumin enhanced radiosensitivity was through markedly inhibiting IR-induced NF-κB signaling by modulating the related protein expressions including NF-κBP65, I-κB, VEGF, COX2, and Bcl-2 in ACHN cells, which was further strengthened by NF-κB inhibitor PDTC treatment. Thus, curcumin may confer radiosensitivity on RCC via inhibition of NF-κB activation and its downstream regulars, suggesting the potential application of curcumin as an adjuvant in radiotherapy of RCC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part V: Elements of validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical Components of FBR Nuclear Islands and High Temperature Applications'. Development of analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the framework of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and by R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles consists of 5 parts: the first part presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide the compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). This part presents validation of the methods, with details on the process followed for their development and of the evaluation accuracy of the proposed analytical methods

  17. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part IV: Cracked elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    Two French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. Development of analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years through a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and through R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of papers is composed of five parts: the first presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Part V presents validation of the methods, with details on their accuracy. This paper presents the stress intensity factor and J calculation for cracked elbows. General data applicable for all defect geometries are first presented, and then, compendia for K I and σ ref calculations are provided for the available defect geometries

  18. Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Prognosis of Xp11.2 Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma: Multicenter, Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Min Soo; Jeong, Chang Wook; Song, Cheryn; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Seo, Seong Il; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Chung, Jin Soo; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kwak, Cheol

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of Xp11.2 translocation (Xp11.2t) renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from a multicenter study and compare them with clear-cell RCC using a propensity score matching analysis. Between 2004 and 2013, 8384 consecutive patients from 7 institutions who were diagnosed with RCC were reviewed, and the pathologically confirmed Xp11.2t cases were enrolled. The oncological outcomes of Xp11.2t were compared with those of clear-cell RCC by selecting matched cases using 1:3 propensity score matching methods in a precollected clear-cell RCC data set from our hospital. The patients were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of age of onset, either before (early) or after (late) 45 years old. Xp11.2t was found in 61 cases, corresponding to 0.72% of RCC cases for the 10 years. The mean age was 38.2 ± 19.4 years, and the mean tumor size was 6.2 ± 3.9 cm. The Xp11.2t cases were at more advanced stages and showed tendencies to involve lymph nodes at diagnosis. After the matching, there were no significant differences in recurrence-free and overall survival compared with clear-cell RCC. The age of incidence for Xp11.2t had a bimodal distribution, which was most common in the 30s and smaller peak in the 60s. Xp11.2t corresponded to a significantly worse prognosis for overall survival in late onset (after 45 years) subgroup (P = .038; hazard ratio, 3.199; 95% confidence interval, 1.065-9.609). This neoplasm has more aggressive clinicopathologic features at diagnosis. In older patients with onset age > 45 years, Xp11.2t showed a significantly worse prognosis than clear-cell RCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the thyroid gland: ultrasonographic features and the diagnostic role of core needle biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ok Kyu; Koo, Ja Seung; Kwak, Jin Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The aims of this study were to present the ultrasonographic (US) features of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the thyroid gland and to evaluate the diagnostic utility of fine needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB). Eight patients with nine metastatic RCC nodules in the thyroid glands who were treated from January 2002 to March 2015 in a single tertiary hospital were consecutively selected and retrospectively reviewed. US features and clinical history were obtained from the institution’s medical database. FNA was performed nine times on eight nodules and CNB was performed six times on six nodules. The diagnostic utility of FNA and CNB was evaluated. All nine nodules showed mass formation without diffuse thyroid involvement. On ultrasonography, metastatic RCC nodules were solid (100%), hypoechoic (100%), and ovalshaped nodules with a well-defined smooth margin (88.9%) and increased vascularity (100%, with 55% showing extensive vascularity). No calcifications were noted in any nodules. Lymph node metastasis and direct extension to nearby structures beyond the thyroid gland were not found. One FNA (11%) was able to confirm metastatic RCC, whereas all six CNBs confirmed metastatic RCC. Metastatic RCC appears as oval-shaped hypoechoic solid nodules with well-defined smooth margins, no calcifications, and increased vascularity on ultrasonography. Characteristic US features along with a previous history of RCC should raise clinical suspicion, and CNB should be performed to make an accurate diagnosis.

  20. Application of ADC measurement in characterization of renal cell carcinomas with different pathological types and grades by 3.0 T diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaoduo, E-mail: yxd98@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Lin, Meng, E-mail: linmeng77xp@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Ouyang, Han, E-mail: hbybj@sohu.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhou, Chunwu, E-mail: cjr.zhouchunwu@163.vip.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhang, Hongtu, E-mail: zhanghongtu1010@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value obtained with 3.0 T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) with different pathological subtypes and grades. Materials and methods: A total of 137 patients who were diagnosed with RCC and underwent DWI were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathological examination of surgical specimens. Images of DWI were obtained with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. The ADC values in the solid area of tumors and in the corresponding regions of contralateral normal renal parenchyma were measured and analyzed statistically. Results: The mean ADC value was significantly lower in RCC (1.381 {+-} 0.444 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) than in normal renal parenchyma (2.232 {+-} 0.221 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) (P < 0.001). The ADC value was also statistically different between clear cell RCC (CCRCC) and non-CCRCC, and between different grades of CCRCC except grade I vs II and grade III vs IV. Conclusion: ADC measurement on 3.0 T DWI provides useful information in diagnostic work-up of RCC in terms of differentiation of RCC and normal renal parenchyma, and characterization of RCC with different pathological subtypes and grades.

  1. Combined effects of DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3A polymorphisms and urinary total arsenic levels on the risk for clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu-Mei [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiue, Horng-Sheng [Department of Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Wei-Jen [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ying-Chin [Department of Family Medicine, Shung Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Health Examination, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Our previous study showed that high urinary total arsenic levels were associated with higher odds ratio (OR) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) might influence DNMT enzyme activity associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the association of five SNPs from DNMT1 (rs8101626 and rs2228611), DNMT3A (rs34048824 and rs1550117), and DNMT3B (rs1569686) with the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We also examined the combined effects of DNMT genotypes and urinary arsenic levels on ccRCC risk. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study, which included 293 subjects with ccRCC and 293 age- and gender-matched controls. The urinary arsenic species were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotypes were investigated using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. We observed that the DNMT1 rs8101626 G/G genotype was significantly associated with reduced odds ratio (OR) of ccRCC [OR = 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14–0.99]. Subjects with concurrent DNMT1 rs8101626 A/A + A/G and DNMT3A rs34048824 T/T + T/C genotypes had significantly higher OR for ccRCC [OR = 2.88, 95% CI 1.44–5.77]. Participants with the high-risk genotype of DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 with concurrently high urinary total arsenic levels had even higher OR of ccRCC in a dose-response manner. This is the first study to evaluate variant DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 genotypes that modify the arsenic-related ccRCC risk in a geographic area without significant arsenic exposure in Taiwan. - Highlights: • High urinary total arsenic level or polymorphism of DNMT1 increased the OR of ccRCC. • High risk genotypes of combination of DNMT1 and DNMT3A increased the OR of ccRCC. • A joint effect of urinary total arsenic level and DNMTs genotypes may affect ccRCC.

  2. Structural design of DEMO Divertor Cassette Body: provisional FEM analysis and introductive application of RCC-MRx design rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frosi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.frosi@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mazzone, Giuseppe [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); You, Jeong-Ha [Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the early steps in developing a structural fem model of DEMO Divertor. The study is focused on the thermal and structural analysis of the Cassette Body: a new geometry has been developed for this component: it is foreseen that the plasma facing component (PFC) will be directly placed on the cassette but for the Dome no choice has been adopted yet. For now the model contains only a suitable schematization of the Cassette Body and its objective is to analyze the effect produced by the main loads (electromagnetic loads, coolant pressure, thermal neutron and convective loads) on itself: an available estimate of loads is that one derived from ITER: for a proper translation some assumptions have been made and they are described in the paper. Now it is not a primary purpose to obtain some definitive statements about stresses, displacements, temperatures and so on; the authors want to construct a set of FEM models that will help all the decisions of DEMO Divertor design in its future development. This set is conceived as a tool that shall be improved to account for all the main enhancements that will be found in geometry, in material properties data and in load evaluations. Moreover, the main design variables (loads, material properties, some geometric items, mesh element size) are defined as parameters. This work considers also an introductive approach for future structural verification of the Divertor Cassette Body: so a concern of the Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical Components of Nuclear Installation (RCC-MRx) has been implemented. The FEM code used is Ansys rel. 15.

  3. Late simultaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the submandibular and thyroid glands seven years after radical nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Mohammed S; White, Sharon J; Oommen, George; Birney, Esther; Majumdar, Samit

    2010-01-01

    Background. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastasis to the salivary glands is extremely rare. Most cases reported previously have involved the parotid gland and only six cases involving the submandibular gland exist in the current literature. Metastasis of RCC to thyroid gland is also rare but appears to be more common than to salivary glands. Methods and Results. We present the first case of simultaneous metastasis to the submandibular and thyroid glands from clear cell RCC in a 61-year-old woman who presented seven years after the primary treatment. The submandibular and thyroid glands were excised completely with preservation of the marginal mandibular and recurrent laryngeal nerves, respectively. Conclusion. Metastatic disease should always be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients who present with painless salivary or thyroid gland swelling with a previous history of RCC. If metastatic disease is confined only to these glands, prompt surgical excision can be curative.

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing to Detect Deletion of RB1 and ERBB4 Genes in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Potential Role in Distinguishing Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma from Renal Oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Cornejo, Kristine M; Cheng, Liang; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Cosar, Ediz F; Woda, Bruce A; Jiang, Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Overlapping morphologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features make it difficult to diagnose chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) and renal oncocytoma (RO). Because ChRCC is a malignant tumor, whereas RO is a tumor with benign behavior, it is important to distinguish these two entities. We aimed to identify genetic markers that distinguish ChRCC from RO by using next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS for hotspot mutations or gene copy number changes was performed on 12 renal neoplasms, including seven ChRCC and five RO cases. Matched normal tissues from the same patients were used to exclude germline variants. Rare hotspot mutations were found in cancer-critical genes (TP53 and PIK3CA) in ChRCC but not RO. The NGS gene copy number analysis revealed multiple abnormalities. The two most common deletions were tumor-suppressor genes RB1 and ERBB4 in ChRCC but not RO. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on 65 cases (ChRCC, n = 33; RO, n = 32) to verify hemizygous deletion of RB1 (17/33, 52%) or ERBB4 (11/33, 33%) in ChRCC, but not in RO (0/32, 0%). In total, ChRCCs (23/33, 70%) carry either a hemizygous deletion of RB1 or ERBB4. The combined use of RB1 and ERBB4 fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect deletion of these genes may offer a highly sensitive and specific assay to distinguish ChRCC from RO. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The entire miR-200 seed family is strongly deregulated in clear cell renal cell cancer compared to the proximal tubular epithelial cells of the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duns, Gerben; van den Berg, Anke; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; van Duivenbode, Inge; Giezen, Cor; Kluiver, Joost; van Goor, Harry; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; van den Berg, Eva; Kok, Klaas

    Despite numerous studies reporting deregulated microRNA (miRNA) and gene expression patterns in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), no direct comparisons have been made to its presumed normal counterpart: the renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs). The aim of this study was to

  6. Multilevel Genomics-Based Taxonomy of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengju Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive molecular characterization (including DNA methalylation and copy number, RNA, and protein expression, we classified 894 renal cell carcinomas (RCCs of various histologic types into nine major genomic subtypes. Site of origin within the nephron was one major determinant in the classification, reflecting differences among clear cell, chromophobe, and papillary RCC. Widespread molecular changes associated with TFE3 gene fusion or chromatin modifier genes were present within a specific subtype and spanned multiple subtypes. Differences in patient survival and in alteration of specific pathways (including hypoxia, metabolism, MAP kinase, NRF2-ARE, Hippo, immune checkpoint, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR could further distinguish the subtypes. Immune checkpoint markers and molecular signatures of T cell infiltrates were both highest in the subtype associated with aggressive clear cell RCC. Differences between the genomic subtypes suggest that therapeutic strategies could be tailored to each RCC disease subset.

  7. Clinical Studies Applying Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells for the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara E. Jäkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC seems to be resistant to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy and the general treatment regimen of cytokine therapy produces only modest responses while inducing severe side effects. Nowadays standard of care is the treatment with VEGF-inhibiting agents or mTOR inhibition; nevertheless, immunotherapy can induce complete remissions and long-term survival in selected patients. Among different adoptive lymphocyte therapies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells have a particularly advantageous profile as these cells are easily available, have a high proliferative rate, and exhibit a high antitumor activity. Here, we reviewed clinical studies applying CIK cells, either alone or with standard therapies, for the treatment of RCC. The adverse events in all studies were mild, transient, and easily controllable. In vitro studies revealed an increased antitumor activity of peripheral lymphocytes of participants after CIK cell treatment and CIK cell therapy was able to induce complete clinical responses in RCC patients. The combination of CIK cell therapy and standard therapy was superior to standard therapy alone. These studies suggest that CIK cell immunotherapy is a safe and competent treatment strategy for RCC patients and further studies should investigate different treatment combinations and schedules for optimal application of CIK cells.

  8. Body composition by computed tomography as a predictor of toxicity in patients with renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cushen, Samantha J

    2014-04-21

    Sunitinib is a standard first-line option for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Body composition is a prognostic factor in cancer patients and patients with loss of skeletal muscle mass and fat-free mass (FFM) are prone to dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during targeted drug therapy. We investigated whether body composition by computed tomography predicted DLT from sunitinib in mRCC.

  9. Genome-wide CpG island methylation analysis implicates novel genes in the pathogenesis of renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ricketts, Christopher J.; Morris, Mark R.; Gentle, Dean; Brown, Michael; Wake, Naomi; Woodward, Emma R.; Clarke, Noel; Latif, Farida; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to identify novel candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) implicated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we performed genome-wide methylation profiling of RCC using the HumanMethylation27 BeadChips to assess methylation at >14,000 genes. Two hundred and twenty hypermethylated probes representing 205 loci/genes were identified in genomic CpG islands. A subset of TSGs investigated in detail exhibited frequent tumor methylation, promoter methylation associated transcriptional silencing an...

  10. Chronic lymphocytic lymphoma and concomitant renal cell carcinoma (Clear Cell Type: Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Uz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present report, a 73 years-old male patient who developed clear cell type renal cell carcinoma (RCC 5 years after the diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL and plausible explanations for this association were discussed by the authors. The incidence of CLL and RCC occurring in the same patient is higher than that expected in the general population. Various explicative hypotheses of this concurrence include treatment-related development of a second malignancy, immunomodulatory mechanisms, viral aetiology, cytokine (interleukin 6 release from a tumor, and common genetic mutations. Further investigations are warranted.

  11. A case–control study of occupation/industry and renal cell carcinoma risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Sara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of occupation in the etiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC is unclear. Here, we investigated associations between employment in specific occupations and industries and RCC, and its most common histologic subtype, clear cell RCC (ccRCC. Methods Between 2002 and 2007, a population-based case–control study of Caucasians and African Americans (1,217 cases; 1,235 controls was conducted within the Detroit and Chicago metropolitan areas to investigate risk factors for RCC. As part of this study, occupational histories were ascertained through in-person interviews. We computed odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs relating occupation and industry to RCC risk using adjusted unconditional logistic regression models. Results Employment in the agricultural crop production industry for five years or more was associated with RCC (OR = 3.3 [95% CI = 1.0-11.5] and ccRCC in particular (OR = 6.3 [95% CI = 1.7-23.3], P for trend with duration of employment = 0.0050. Similarly, RCC risk was elevated for employment of five years or longer in non-managerial agricultural and related occupations (ORRCC = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.0-4.5]; ORccRCC = 3.1 [95% CI = 1.4-6.8]. Employment in the dry-cleaning industry was also associated with elevated risk (ORRCC = 2.0 [95% CI = 0.9-4.4], P for trend = 0.093; ORccRCC = 3.0 [95% CI = 1.2-7.4], P for trend = 0.031. Suggestive elevated associations were observed for police/public safety workers, health care workers and technicians, and employment in the electronics, auto repair, and cleaning/janitorial services industries; protective associations were suggested for many white-collar jobs including computer science and administrative occupations as well employment in the business, legislative, and education industries. Conclusions Our findings provide support for an elevated risk of RCC in the agricultural and dry-cleaning industries and

  12. Warburg effect's manifestation in aggressive pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas: insights from a mouse cell model applied to human tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M J Fliedner

    Full Text Available A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT cells has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC. We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in

  13. Progression of renal cell carcinoma is inhibited by genistein and radiation in an orthotopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillman, Gilda G; Wang, Yu; Che, Mingxin; Raffoul, Julian J; Yudelev, Mark; Kucuk, Omer; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported the potentiation of radiotherapy by the soy isoflavone genistein for prostate cancer using prostate tumor cells in vitro and orthotopic prostate tumor models in vivo. However, when genistein was used as single therapy in animal models, it promoted metastasis to regional para-aortic lymph nodes. To clarify whether these intriguing adverse effects of genistein are intrinsic to the orthotopic prostate tumor model, or these results could also be recapitulated in another model, we used the orthotopic metastatic KCI-18 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) model established in our laboratory. The KCI-18 RCC cell line was generated from a patient with papillary renal cell carcinoma. Following orthotopic renal implantation of KCI-18 RCC cells and serial in vivo kidney passages in nude mice, we have established a reliable and predictable metastatic RCC tumor model. Mice bearing established kidney tumors were treated with genistein combined with kidney tumor irradiation. The effect of the therapy was assessed on the primary tumor and metastases to various organs. In this experimental model, the karyotype and histological characteristics of the human primary tumor are preserved. Tumor cells metastasize from the primary renal tumor to the lungs, liver and mesentery mimicking the progression of RCC in humans. Treatment of established kidney tumors with genistein demonstrated a tendency to stimulate the growth of the primary kidney tumor and increase the incidence of metastasis to the mesentery lining the bowel. In contrast, when given in conjunction with kidney tumor irradiation, genistein significantly inhibited the growth and progression of established kidney tumors. These findings confirm the potentiation of radiotherapy by genistein in the orthotopic RCC model as previously shown in orthotopic models of prostate cancer. Our studies in both RCC and prostate tumor models demonstrate that the combination of genistein with primary tumor irradiation is a more

  14. Culture in embryonic kidney serum and xeno-free media as renal cell carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma cancer stem cells research model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Krzysztof M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Szczylik, Cezary; Porta, Camillo; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2018-04-01

    The use of fetal bovine serum hinders obtaining reproducible experimental results and should also be removed in hormone and growth factor studies. In particular hormones found in FBS act globally on cancer cell physiology and influence transcriptome and metabolome. The aim of our study was to develop a renal carcinoma serum free culture model optimized for (embryonal) renal cells in order to select the best study model for downstream auto-, para- or endocrine research. Secondary aim was to verify renal carcinoma stem cell culture for this application. In the study, we have cultured renal cell carcinoma primary tumour cell line (786-0) as well as human kidney cancer stem cells in standard 2D monolayer cultures in Roswell Park Memorial Institute Medium or Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium and Complete Human Kidney Cancer Stem Cell Medium, respectively. Serum-free, animal-component free Human Embryonic Kidney 293 media were tested. Our results revealed that xeno-free embryonal renal cells optimized culture media provide a useful tool in RCC cancer biology research and at the same time enable effective growth of RCC. We propose bio-mimic RCC cell culture model with specific serum-free and xeno-free medium that promote RCC cell viability.

  15. Structural damages prevention of the ITER vacuum vessel and ports by elasto-plastic analysis with regards to RCC-MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.martinez@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Jun, Chang Hoon; Portafaix, Christophe; Alekseev, Alexander; Sborchia, Carlo; Choi, Chang-Ho [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Albin, Vincent [SOM Calcul – Groupe ORTEC, 121 ancien Chemin de Cassis – Immeuble Grand Pré, 13009 Marseille (France); Borrelly, Stephane [Sogeti High Tech, RE2, 180 rue René Descartes, Le Millenium – Bat C, 13857 Aix en Provence (France); Cambazar, Magali [Assystem EOS, 117 rue Jacquard, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gaucher, Thomas [SOM Calcul – Groupe ORTEC, 121 ancien Chemin de Cassis – Immeuble Grand Pré, 13009 Marseille (France); Sfarni, Samir; Tailhardat, Olivier [Assystem EOS, 117 rue Jacquard, 84120 Pertuis (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER vacuum vessel (VV) is a part of the first barrier to confine the plasma. • ITER VV as NPE necessitates a third party organization authorized by the French nuclear regulator to assure design, fabrication, and conformance testing and quality assurance, i.e. ANB. • Several types of damages have to be prevented in order to guarantee the structural integrity with regards to RCC-MR. • It is usual to employ non-linear analysis when the “classical” elastic analysis reaches its limit of linear application. • Several structural analyses were performed with many different global and local models of the whole ITER VV. - Abstract: Several types of damages have to be prevented in order to guarantee the structural integrity of a structure with regards to RCC-MR; the P-type damages which can result from the application to a structure of a steadily and regularly increasing loading or a constant loading and the S-type damages during operational loading conditions which can only result from repeated application of loadings associated to the progressive deformations and fatigue. Following RCC-MR, the S-type damages prevention has to be started only when the structural integrity is guaranteed against P-type damages. The verification of the last one on the ITER vacuum vessel and ports has been performed by limit analysis with elasto-(perfectly)plastic material behavior. It is usual to employ non-linear analysis when the “classical” elastic analysis reaches its limit of linear application. Some elasto-plastic analyses have been performed considering several cyclic loadings to evaluate also more realistic structural margins of the against S-type damages.

  16. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part II: Cracked plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. An important effort of development of these analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the frame of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and in the frame of R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in the 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles is composed of 5 parts: the first part presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Finally, part V presents the validation elements of the methods, with details on the process followed for the development and evaluation of the accuracy of the proposed analytical methods. This second article in the series presents all details for the stress intensity factor and J calculations for cracked plates. General data applicable for all defect geometries are first presented, and then, available defect geometries where compendia for K I and σ ref calculation are provided are given

  17. Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical equipments of FBR nuclear islands: RCC-MR. Tome 1, Volume Z: Other technical appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This book is the 7th of a whole set of 12 which constitute the present edition of the RCC-MR. The technical appendixes of this volume deal with the following characteristics and rules: calculation of screwed assemblies, analysis taking into account creep, welded joint characteristics, elastoplastic analysis of a structure under cyclic loads, elasto-visco-plastic analysis under cyclic loads, calculation rules of revolution shells under external presure and of cylinders under axial compression, design rules of linear supports, calculation rules of convex bottoms under internal pressure [fr

  18. Structurally modified curcumin analogs inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation and promote apoptosis of human renal cell carcinoma and melanoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Bill

    Full Text Available The Janus kinase-2 (Jak2-signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3 pathway is critical for promoting an oncogenic and metastatic phenotype in several types of cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC and melanoma. This study describes two small molecule inhibitors of the Jak2-STAT3 pathway, FLLL32 and its more soluble analog, FLLL62. These compounds are structurally distinct curcumin analogs that bind selectively to the SH2 domain of STAT3 to inhibit its phosphorylation and dimerization. We hypothesized that FLLL32 and FLLL62 would induce apoptosis in RCC and melanoma cells and display specificity for the Jak2-STAT3 pathway. FLLL32 and FLLL62 could inhibit STAT3 dimerization in vitro. These compounds reduced basal STAT3 phosphorylation (pSTAT3, and induced apoptosis in four separate human RCC cell lines and in human melanoma cell lines as determined by Annexin V/PI staining. Apoptosis was also confirmed by immunoblot analysis of caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Pre-treatment of RCC and melanoma cell lines with FLLL32/62 did not inhibit IFN-γ-induced pSTAT1. In contrast to FLLL32, curcumin and FLLL62 reduced downstream STAT1-mediated gene expression of IRF1 as determined by Real Time PCR. FLLL32 and FLLL62 significantly reduced secretion of VEGF from RCC cell lines in a dose-dependent manner as determined by ELISA. Finally, each of these compounds inhibited in vitro generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These data support further investigation of FLLL32 and FLLL62 as lead compounds for STAT3 inhibition in RCC and melanoma.

  19. [Clinical study on patients with renal-cell carcinoma accompanied with Von Hippel-Lindau disease treated with radiofrequency ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nao, Tomoya; Shimamoto, Tsutomu; Karashima, Takashi; Kamei, Maiko; Fukuhara, Hideo; Fukata, Satoshi; Satake, Hirofumi; Ashida, Shingo; Yamasaki, Ichiro; Kamata, Masayuki; Inoue, Keiji; Yamanishi, Tomoaki; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Satoshi; Shuin, Taro

    2014-09-01

    We report 12 renal cell carcinomas in 6 patients with Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The mean age of the patients was 46 (range 38-53) years (male : 4, female : 2). Computed tomography (CT)-guided transcutaneous RFA was performed under conscious sedation with local anesthetics. The mean size of the tumors was 2.4 (range 0.7-8.1) cm. Nine of the 12 tumors (75%) were locally well controlled. However, 3 tumors in 2 patients developed visceral metastases after RFA. While minimal flank pain, nausea, perinephritic hematoma and lumbago were observed, there was no major complication during or after the procedure. The therapy with CT-guided transcutaneous RFA is efficient and minimal invasive for renal cell carcinoma in patients with VHL, leading to preservation of renal function.

  20. Biphasic papillary renal cell carcinoma is a rare morphological variant with frequent multifocality: a study of 28 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Kiril; Athanazio, Daniel; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Yilmaz, Helene; Clouston, David; Agaimy, Abbas; Williamson, Sean R; Brimo, Fadi; Lopez, Jose I; Ulamec, Monika; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Kassem, Maysoun; Gupta, Nilesh; Hartmann, Arndt; Leroy, Xavier; Bashir, Samir Al; Yilmaz, Asli; Hes, Ondřej

    2018-04-01

    To further characterise biphasic squamoid renal cell carcinoma (RCC), a recently proposed variant of papillary RCC. We identified 28 tumours from multiple institutions. They typically showed two cell populations-larger cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and higher-grade nuclei, surrounded by smaller, amphophilic cells with scanty cytoplasm. The dual morphology was variable (median 72.5% of tumour, range 5-100%); emperipolesis was found in all cases. The male/female ratio was 2:1, and the median age was 55 years (range 39-86 years). The median tumour size was 20 mm (range 9-65 mm). Pathological stage pT1a was found in 21 cases, pT1b in three, and pT3a and pT3b in one each (two not available). Multifocality was found in 32%: multifocal biphasic RCC in one case, biphasic + papillary RCC in two cases, biphasic + clear cell RCC in three cases, biphasic + low-grade urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis in one case, and biphasic + Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in one case. Positive immunostains included: PAX8, cytokeratin (CK) 7, α-methylacyl-CoA racemase, epithelial membrane antigen, and vimentin. Cyclin D1 was expressed only in the larger cells. The Ki67 index was higher in the larger cells (median 5% versus ≤1%). Negative stains included: carbonic anhydrase 9, CD117, GATA-3, WT1, CK5/6, and CK20; CD10 and 34βE12 were variably expressed. Gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 were found in two evaluated cases. Follow-up was available for 23 patients (median 24 months, range 1-244 months): 19 were alive without disease, one was alive with recurrence, and one had died of disease (two had died of other causes). Biphasic papillary RCC is a rare variant of papillary RCC, and is often multifocal. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Role of Compounds Derived from Natural Supplement as Anticancer Agents in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Inamul; Subramanian, Arvind; Huang, Chao H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Banerjee, Snigdha; Banerjee, Sushanta K.

    2017-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is the most prominent kidney cancer derived from renal tubules and accounts for roughly 85% of all malignant kidney cancer. Every year, over 60,000 new cases are registered, and about 14,000 people die from RCC. The incidence of this has been increasing significantly in the U.S. and other countries. An increased understanding of molecular biology and the genomics of RCC has uncovered several signaling pathways involved in the progression of this cancer. Significant advances in the treatment of RCC have been reported from agents approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that target these pathways. These agents have become drugs of choice because they demonstrate clinical benefit and increased survival in patients with metastatic disease. However, the patients eventually relapse and develop resistance to these drugs. To improve outcomes and seek approaches for producing long-term durable remission, the search for more effective therapies and preventative strategies are warranted. Treatment of RCC using natural products is one of these strategies to reduce the incidence. However, recent studies have focused on these chemoprevention agents as anti-cancer therapies given they can inhibit tumor cell grow and lack the severe side effects common to synthetic compounds. This review elaborates on the current understanding of natural products and their mechanisms of action as anti-cancer agents. The present review will provide information for possible use of these products alone or in combination with chemotherapy for the prevention and treatment of RCC. PMID:29301217

  2. The Role of Compounds Derived from Natural Supplement as Anticancer Agents in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Inamul; Subramanian, Arvind; Huang, Chao H; Godwin, Andrew K; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J; Banerjee, Snigdha; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2017-12-31

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is the most prominent kidney cancer derived from renal tubules and accounts for roughly 85% of all malignant kidney cancer. Every year, over 60,000 new cases are registered, and about 14,000 people die from RCC. The incidence of this has been increasing significantly in the U.S. and other countries. An increased understanding of molecular biology and the genomics of RCC has uncovered several signaling pathways involved in the progression of this cancer. Significant advances in the treatment of RCC have been reported from agents approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that target these pathways. These agents have become drugs of choice because they demonstrate clinical benefit and increased survival in patients with metastatic disease. However, the patients eventually relapse and develop resistance to these drugs. To improve outcomes and seek approaches for producing long-term durable remission, the search for more effective therapies and preventative strategies are warranted. Treatment of RCC using natural products is one of these strategies to reduce the incidence. However, recent studies have focused on these chemoprevention agents as anti-cancer therapies given they can inhibit tumor cell grow and lack the severe side effects common to synthetic compounds. This review elaborates on the current understanding of natural products and their mechanisms of action as anti-cancer agents. The present review will provide information for possible use of these products alone or in combination with chemotherapy for the prevention and treatment of RCC.

  3. Comparison of circulating and intratumoral regulatory T cells in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Gati; Amal, Gorrab; Raja, Marrakchi; Amine, Derouiche; Mohammed, Chebil; Amel, Ben Ammar Elgaaied

    2015-05-01

    The clear evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) exists in the tumor microenvironment raises the question why renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progresses. Numerous studies support the implication of CD4(+)CD25(high) regulatory T (Treg) cells in RCC development. We aimed in this study to characterize the phenotype and function of circulating and intratumoral Treg cells of RCC patient in order to evaluate their implication in the inhibition of the local antitumor immune response. Our results demonstrate that the proportion of Treg in TIL was, in average, similar to that found in circulating CD4(+) T cells of patients or healthy donors. However, intratumoral Treg exhibit a marked different phenotype when compared with the autologous circulating Treg. A higher CD25 mean level, HLA-DR, Fas, and GITR, and a lower CD45RA expression were observed in intratumoral Treg, suggesting therefore that these cells are effector in the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, intratumoral Treg showed a higher inhibitory function on autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when compared with circulating Treg that may be explained by an overexpression of FoxP3 transcription factor. These findings suggest that intratumoral Treg could be major actors in the impairment of local antitumor immune response for RCC patients.

  4. A 3D Human Renal Cell Carcinoma-on-a-Chip for the Study of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris P; Tsuchida, Connor; Zheng, Ying; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Akilesh, Shreeram

    2018-06-01

    Tractable human tissue-engineered 3D models of cancer that enable fine control of tumor growth, metabolism, and reciprocal interactions between different cell types in the tumor microenvironment promise to accelerate cancer research and pharmacologic testing. Progress to date mostly reflects the use of immortalized cancer cell lines, and progression to primary patient-derived tumor cells is needed to realize the full potential of these platforms. For the first time, we report endothelial sprouting induced by primary patient tumor cells in a 3D microfluidic system. Specifically, we have combined primary human clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells from six independent donors with human endothelial cells in a vascularized, flow-directed, 3D culture system ("ccRCC-on-a-chip"). The upregulation of key angiogenic factors in primary human ccRCC cells, which exhibited unique patterns of donor variation, was further enhanced when they were cultured in 3D clusters. When embedded in the matrix surrounding engineered human vessels, these ccRCC tumor clusters drove potent endothelial cell sprouting under continuous flow, thus recapitulating the critical angiogenic signaling axis between human ccRCC cells and endothelial cells. Importantly, this phenotype was driven by a primary tumor cell-derived biochemical gradient of angiogenic growth factor accumulation that was subject to pharmacological blockade. Our novel 3D system represents a vascularized tumor model that is easy to image and quantify and is fully tunable in terms of input cells, perfusate, and matrices. We envision that this ccRCC-on-a-chip will be valuable for mechanistic studies, for studying tumor-vascular cell interactions, and for developing novel and personalized antitumor therapies. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Estramustine-binding protein (EMBP) in renal cell carcinoma immunohistochemistry, immunoscintigraphy and in vitro estramustine effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgren, M.; Westlin, J.E.; Letocha, H.; Nordgren, H.; Kaelkner, K.M.; Nilsson, S.

    1996-01-01

    The present report shows that the human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines, A498 and CAKI-2, express the estramustine-binding protein (EMBP). The RCC cell lines investigated were highly sensitive for estramustine, with cell arrest in atypical metaphase. In vitro experiments using a fluorimetric cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) showed a pronounced cytotoxic effect mediate by estramustine. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumoru specimens from patients with RCC showed positive staining for EMBP in 12/16 cases. Immunoscintigraphy was performed in an experimental system in nude mice, heterotransplanted with the CAKI-2 cell line. A radiolabelled monoclonal anti-EMBP antibody was used. The results show a specific uptake of the antibody in the RCC tumour, expressed as a percentage of the injected dose per gram tissue, which ranged from 4.03 to 6.9. The results obtained from the basis for clinical studies on the feasibility of utilizing estramustine in the management of RCC. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal anti-EMBP antibody is of potential use for in vivo characterization of the malignancy and in the selection patients suitable for treatment with estramustine. (orig.)

  6. Primary clear cell renal carcinoma cells display minimal mitochondrial respiratory capacity resulting in pronounced sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition by 3-Bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, H; Lindgren, D; Mandahl Forsberg, A; Mulder, H; Axelson, H; Johansson, M E

    2015-01-08

    Changes of cellular metabolism are an integral property of the malignant potential of most cancer cells. Already in the 1930s, Otto Warburg observed that tumor cells preferably utilize glycolysis and lactate fermentation for energy production, rather than the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation dominating in normal cells, a phenomenon today known as the Warburg effect. Even though many tumor types display a high degree of aerobic glycolysis, they still retain the activity of other energy-producing metabolic pathways. One exception seems to be the clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma, ccRCC, where the activity of most other pathways than that of glycolysis has been shown to be reduced. This makes ccRCC a promising candidate for the use of glycolytic inhibitors in treatment of the disease. However, few studies have so far addressed this issue. In this report, we show a strikingly reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity of primary human ccRCC cells, resulting in enhanced sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition by 3-Bromopyruvate (3BrPA). This effect was largely absent in established ccRCC cell lines, a finding that highlights the importance of using biologically relevant models in the search for new candidate cancer therapies. 3BrPA markedly reduced ATP production in primary ccRCC cells, followed by cell death. Our data suggest that glycolytic inhibitors such as 3BrPA, that has been shown to be well tolerated in vivo, should be further analyzed for the possible development of selective treatment strategies for patients with ccRCC.

  7. Cardiac Metastasis in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... Metastatic disease of the heart is over twenty times more common than primary heart tumors [1]. They are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Cardiac involvement in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) commonly arises from direct ...

  8. Outcome of Patients With Metastatic Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results From the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chittoria, Namita; Choueiri, Toni K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. Data regarding outcome in the targeted therapy era are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical, prognostic, and treatment parameters in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with and without sarcomatoid histology......% intermediate risk, and 40% vs. 24% poor risk; P system metastases (6...... of second- (P = .018) and third-line (P systemic therapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS)/overall survival (OS) was 4.5/10.4 months in sRCC patients and 7.8/22.5 months in non-sRCC patients (P

  9. Regression of established renal cell carcinoma in nude mice using lentivirus-transduced human T cells expressing a human anti-CAIX chimeric antigen receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Shuk-Yee Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a tumor-associated antigen and marker of hypoxia that is overexpressed on > 90% of clear-cell type renal cell carcinoma (RCC but not on neighboring normal kidney tissue. Here, we report on the construction of two chimeric antigen receptors (CARs that utilize a carbonic anhydrase (CA domain mapped, human single chain antibody (scFv G36 as a targeting moiety but differ in their capacity to provide costimulatory signaling for optimal T cell proliferation and tumor cell killing. The resulting anti-CAIX CARs were expressed on human primary T cells via lentivirus transduction. CAR-transduced T cells (CART cells expressing second-generation G36-CD28-TCRζ exhibited more potent in vitro antitumor effects on CAIX+ RCC cells than first-generation G36-CD8-TCRζ including cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and clonal expansion. Adoptive G36-CD28-TCRζ CART cell therapy combined with high-dose interleukin (IL-2 injection also lead to superior regression of established RCC in nude mice with evidence of tumor cell apoptosis and tissue necrosis. These results suggest that the fully human G36-CD28-TCRζ CARs should provide substantial improvements over first-generation mouse anti-CAIX CARs in clinical use through reduced human anti-mouse antibody responses against the targeting scFv and administration of lower doses of T cells during CART cell therapy of CAIX+ RCC.

  10. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...

  11. Comparison of Utility of Histogram Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and R2* for Differentiation of Low-Grade From High-Grade Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and R2* for differentiating low-grade from high-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Forty-six patients with pathologically confirmed clear cell RCC underwent preoperative BOLD and DWI MRI of the kidneys. ADCs based on the entire tumor volume were calculated with b value combinations of 0 and 800 s/mm(2). ROI-based R2* was calculated with eight TE combinations of 6.7-22.8 milliseconds. Histogram analysis of tumor ADCs and R2* values was performed to obtain mean; median; width; and fifth, 10th, 90th, and 95th percentiles and histogram inhomogeneity, kurtosis, and skewness for all lesions. Thirty-three low-grade and 13 high-grade clear cell RCCs were found at pathologic examination. The TNM classification and tumor volume of clear cell RCC significantly correlated with histogram ADC and R2* (ρ = -0.317 to 0.506; p histogram ADC and R2* indexes, 10th percentile ADC had the highest accuracy (91.3%) in discriminating low- from high-grade clear cell RCC. R2* in discriminating hemorrhage was achieved with a threshold of 68.95 Hz. At this threshold, high-grade clear cell RCC had a significantly higher prevalence of intratumor hemorrhage (high-grade, 76.9%; low-grade, 45.4%; p Histogram analysis of ADC and R2* allows differentiation of low- from high-grade clear cell RCC with high accuracy.

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Perfusion before and after Radiofrequency Ablation Measured with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Min Wah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate if the early treatment effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA on renal cell carcinoma (RCC can be detected with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI and to correlate RCC perfusion with RFA treatment time. Materials and methods: 20 patients undergoing RFA of their 21 RCCs were evaluated with DCE-MRI before and at one month after RFA treatment. Perfusion was estimated using the maximum slope technique at two independent sittings. Total RCC blood flow was correlated with total RFA treatment time, tumour location, size and histology. Results: DCE-MRI examinations were successfully evaluated for 21 RCCs (size from 1.3 to 4 cm. Perfusion of the RCCs decreased significantly (p < 0.0001 from a mean of 203 (±80 mL/min/100 mL before RFA to 8.1 (±3.1 mL/min/100 mL after RFA with low intra-observer variability (r ≥ 0.99, p < 0.0001. There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.95 between time to complete ablation and pre-treatment total RCC blood flow. Tumours with an exophytic location exhibit the lowest mean RFA treatment time. Conclusion: DCE-MRI can detect early treatment effects by measuring RCC perfusion before and after RFA. Perfusion significantly decreases in the zone of ablation, suggesting that it may be useful for the assessment of treatment efficacy. Pre-RFA RCC blood flow may be used to predict RFA treatment time.

  13. Metabonomic profiling of renal cell carcinoma: High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human serum with multivariate data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongchang; Dong Baijun; Liu Xia; Xuan Hanqing; Huang Yiran; Lin Donghai

    2008-01-01

    Metabonomic profiling using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis of human serum samples was used to characterize metabolic profiles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We found distinct, easily detectable differences between (a) RCC patients and healthy humans, (b) RCC patients with metastases and without metastases, and (c) RCC patients before and after nephrectomy. Compared to healthy human serum, RCC serum had higher levels of lipid (mainly very low-density lipoproteins), isoleucine, leucine, lactate, alanine, N-acetylglycoproteins, pyruvate, glycerol, and unsaturated lipid, together with lower levels of acetoacetate, glutamine, phosphatidylcholine/choline, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and glucose. This pattern was somewhat reversed after nephrectomy. Altered metabolite concentrations are most likely the result of the cells switching to glycolysis to maintain energy homeostasis following the loss of ATP caused by impaired TCA cycle in RCC. Serum NMR spectra combined with principal component analysis techniques offer an efficient, convenient way of depicting tumour biochemistry and stratifying tumours under different pathophysiological conditions. It may be able to assist early diagnosis and postoperative surveillance of human malignant diseases using single blood samples

  14. Radiation therapy following targeted therapy in oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Faure, Marjorie; Rybikowski, Stanislas; Dermeche, Slimane; Tyran, Marguerite; Calderon, Benoit; Thomassin, Jeanne; Walz, Jochen; Salem, Naji

    2015-11-01

    Up to 40% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with initially localized disease eventually develop metastasis following nephrectomy. The current standard of care for metastatic RCC (mRCC) is targeted therapy. However, complete response remains rare. A state of oligometastatic disease may exist, in which metastases are present in a limited number of locations; such cases may benefit from metastasis-directed local therapy, based on the evidence supporting resection of limited-volume metastases, allowing for improved disease control. We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of response of RCC metastases, in patients treated with targeted therapies followed by radiation therapy (RT) of residual metastatic lesions in Paoli-Calmettes Institute (Marseille, France). We analyzed disease response rates, response to sequential strategy, relapse at the irradiated locations and disease evolution. The median follow-up was 34.1 months (range, 19.2-54.5 months). No progression at the irradiated sites was observed. A total of 5 patients had stable disease at the irradiated locations at the last follow-up; 3 remained in complete remission at the assessment, and 2 were stable. Excellent local response and clinical benefit may be achieved without added toxicity. In conclusion, sequential therapeutic strategies with RT following systemic treatment using sunitinib appear to be highly effective in patients with progressive mRCC and prompt the conduction of further confirmatory trials.

  15. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC.

  16. Rhein inhibits malignant phenotypes of human renal cell carcinoma by impacting on MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma YL

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Li Ma,* Fang Chen,* Jun ShiDepartment of Nephrology, Huaihe Hospital Henan University, Kaifeng, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Rhein, an anthraquinone derivative of rhubarb, is traditionally used in Chinese herbal medicine. Now emerging studies suggest its antitumor properties in many human cancers. The present study aims to investigate the antitumor role of Rhein and its possible mechanism in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC.Materials and methods: Three RCC cell lines (A489, 786-O and ACHN were used as the cell models. We applied CCK-8, cell counting, colony formation, wound healing and Transwell assays to assess the antitumor roles of Rhein in RCC cells in vitro. The therapeutic efficacy of Rhein was further evaluated by intraperitoneal administrations in tumor formation of mice. Western blot was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of action of Rhein.Results: Rhein inhibited RCC cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also suppressed RCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Moreover, Rhein was able to inhibit tumor growth in nude mice by intraperitoneal administration in vivo. Mechanistically, the protein levels of phosphorylated MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, phosphorylated Akt and two targets of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells pathway, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and CCND1 were all markedly reduced by Rhein treatment.Conclusion: Rhein processed the antitumor effects in RCC cells by inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and these tumor-suppressing functions might be mediated by MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways.Keywords: Rhein, renal cell carcinoma, antitumor effects, MAPK, NF-κB

  17. Targeting CXCR4 reverts the suppressive activity of T-regulatory cells in renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Sara; Napolitano, Maria; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Desicato, Sonia; Maro, Salvatore Di; Marinelli, Luciana; Fragale, Alessandra; Buoncervello, Maria; Persico, Francesco; Gabriele, Lucia; Novellino, Ettore; Longo, Nicola; Pignata, Sandro; Perdonà, Sisto; Scala, Stefania

    2017-09-29

    With the intent to identify biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) the functional status of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) was investigated in primary RCC. Tregs were isolated from tumoral-(TT), peritumoral tissue-(PT) and peripheral blood-(PB) of 42 primary RCC patients and function evaluated through effector T cells (Teff) proliferation, cytokines release and demethylation of Treg Specific Region (TSDR). The highest value of Tregs was detected in TT with the uppermost amount of effector-Tregs-(CD4 + CD25 hi FOXP3 hi CD45RA - ). PB-RCC Tregs efficiently suppress Teff proliferation compared to healthy donor (HD)-Tregs and, at the intrapatient evaluation, TT-derived Tregs were the most suppressive. Higher demethylation TSDR was detected in TT- and PB-RCC Tregs vs HD-Tregs ( P <0,001). CXCR4 is highly expressed on Tregs, thus we wished to modulate Tregs function through CXCR4 inhibition. CXCR4 antagonism, elicited by a new peptidic antagonist, Peptide-R29, efficiently reversed Tregs suppression of Teff proliferation. Thus Tregs functional evaluation precisely reflects Tregs status and may be a reliable biomarker of tumoral immune response. In addition, treatment with CXCR4 antagonist, impairing Tregs function, could improve the anticancer immune response, in combination with conventional therapy and/or immunotherapy such as checkpoints inhibitors.

  18. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-07

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  19. Quebra do grão em Resíduos de Construção Civil (RCC induzida pelo processo de compactação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Marques da Silva

    Full Text Available Resumo Nas últimas décadas a geração de resíduos de construção civil (RCC tornou-se um fator relevante em todo o mundo. Dessa forma, é cada vez mais importante o reaproveitamento desse material, sobretudo em obras de grande consumo, tais como as obras rodoviárias. No entanto, a aplicação desses resíduos depende do conhecimento das propriedades químicas e mecânicas do material. Entre esses parâmetros destaca-se que a susceptibilidade à quebra do grão é de fundamental importância. Isso porque esse parâmetro influencia diretamente no comportamento do material através da resistência e da permeabilidade. O presente trabalho avaliou a quebra do grão em RCC induzida pelo processo de compactação através da aplicação das energias normal e modificada. Para isso o material foi dividido em frações com granulometrias diferentes. Dessa forma, foi analisada a influência da energia, do tamanho do grão, da mineralogia, do teor de umidade e da densidade da amostra. Os resultados indicaram que a ocorrência da quebra do grão está diretamente relacionada com a constituição mineralógica, observando-se que a maior fração estudada foi aquela que sofreu a menor quebra dos grãos. Adicionalmente, os resultados indicaram que a densidade de compactação da amostra também possui significativa influência no processo de quebra dos grãos.

  20. Essential role for SphK1/S1P signaling to regulate hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression and activity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquerel, P; Gstalder, C; Müller, D; Laurent, J; Brizuela, L; Sabbadini, R A; Malavaud, B; Pyronnet, S; Martineau, Y; Ader, I; Cuvillier, O

    2016-03-14

    The sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway has been reported to modulate the expression of the canonical transcription factor hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α in multiple cell lineages. HIF-2α is also frequently overexpressed in solid tumors but its role has been mostly studied in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, where HIF-2α has been established as a driver of a more aggressive disease. In this study, the role of SphK1/S1P signaling with regard to HIF-2α was investigated in various cancer cell models including ccRCC cells. Under hypoxic conditions or in ccRCC lacking a functional von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene and expressing high levels of HIF-2α, SphK1 activity controls HIF-2α expression and transcriptional activity through a phospholipase D (PLD)-driven mechanism. SphK1 silencing promotes a VHL-independent HIF-2α loss of expression and activity and reduces cell proliferation in ccRCC. Importantly, downregulation of SphK1 is associated with impaired Akt and mTOR signaling in ccRCC. Taking advantage of a monoclonal antibody neutralizing extracellular S1P, we show that inhibition of S1P extracellular signaling blocks HIF-2α accumulation in ccRCC cell lines, an effect mimicked when the S1P transporter Spns2 or the S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) is silenced. Here, we report the first evidence that the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway regulates the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible HIF-2α in diverse cancer cell lineages notably ccRCC, where HIF-2α has been established as a driver of a more aggressive disease. These findings demonstrate that SphK1/S1P signaling may act as a canonical regulator of HIF-2α expression in ccRCC, giving support to its inhibition as a therapeutic strategy that could contribute to reduce HIF-2 activity in ccRCC.

  1. Novel approach to recurrent cavoatrial renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Jennifer L; George, Timothy J; Beaty, Claude A; Allaf, Mohamad E; Black, James H; Shah, Ashish S

    2012-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with cavoatrial extension is a rare and complex problem. Complete resection is difficult but correlates with favorable patient outcomes. We present 2 cases of successful reoperative resections of recurrent RCC in patients with level III-IV cavoatrial involvement. We used a thoracoabdominal approach, peripheral cannulation, and hypothermic circulatory arrest. We advocate this novel approach as a successful means of avoiding a more difficult reoperation. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High calcium concentration in bones promotes bone metastasis in renal cell carcinomas expressing calcium-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeckel, Elke; Haber, Tobias; Prawitt, Dirk; Junker, Kerstin; Hampel, Christian; Thüroff, Joachim W; Roos, Frederik C; Brenner, Walburgis

    2014-02-28

    The prognosis for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is related to a high rate of metastasis, including 30% of bone metastasis. Characteristic for bone tissue is a high concentration of calcium ions. In this study, we show a promoting effect of an enhanced extracellular calcium concentration on mechanisms of bone metastasis via the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and its downstream signaling molecules. Our analyses were performed using 33 (11/category) matched specimens of normal and tumor tissue and 9 (3/category) primary cells derived from RCC patients of the 3 categories: non-metastasized, metastasized into the lung and metastasized into bones during a five-year period after nephrectomy. Expression of CaSR was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot analyses and flow cytometry, respectively. Cells were treated by calcium and the CaSR inhibitor NPS 2143. Cell migration was measured in a Boyden chamber with calcium (10 μM) as chemotaxin and proliferation by BrdU incorporation. The activity of intracellular signaling mediators was quantified by a phospho-kinase array and Western blot. The expression of CaSR was highest in specimens and cells of patients with bone metastases. Calcium treatment induced an increased migration (19-fold) and proliferation (2.3-fold) exclusively in RCC cells from patients with bone metastases. The CaSR inhibitor NPS 2143 elucidated the role of CaSR on the calcium-dependent effects. After treatment with calcium, the activity of AKT, PLCγ-1, p38α and JNK was clearly enhanced and PTEN expression was almost completely abolished in bone metastasizing RCC cells. Our results indicate a promoting effect of extracellular calcium on cell migration and proliferation of bone metastasizing RCC cells via highly expressed CaSR and its downstream signaling pathways. Consequently, CaSR may be regarded as a new prognostic marker predicting RCC bone metastasis.

  3. Quantitative computer-aided diagnostic algorithm for automated detection of peak lesion attenuation in differentiating clear cell from papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, and fat-poor angiomyolipoma on multiphasic multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Heidi; Young, Jonathan R; Douek, Michael L; Brown, Matthew S; Sayre, James; Raman, Steven S

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the performance of a novel, quantitative computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) algorithm on four-phase multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to detect peak lesion attenuation to enable differentiation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) from chromophobe RCC (chRCC), papillary RCC (pRCC), oncocytoma, and fat-poor angiomyolipoma (fp-AML). We queried our clinical databases to obtain a cohort of histologically proven renal masses with preoperative MDCT with four phases [unenhanced (U), corticomedullary (CM), nephrographic (NP), and excretory (E)]. A whole lesion 3D contour was obtained in all four phases. The CAD algorithm determined a region of interest (ROI) of peak lesion attenuation within the 3D lesion contour. For comparison, a manual ROI was separately placed in the most enhancing portion of the lesion by visual inspection for a reference standard, and in uninvolved renal cortex. Relative lesion attenuation for both CAD and manual methods was obtained by normalizing the CAD peak lesion attenuation ROI (and the reference standard manually placed ROI) to uninvolved renal cortex with the formula [(peak lesion attenuation ROI - cortex ROI)/cortex ROI] × 100%. ROC analysis and area under the curve (AUC) were used to assess diagnostic performance. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare peak ROI between CAD and manual method. The study cohort comprised 200 patients with 200 unique renal masses: 106 (53%) ccRCC, 32 (16%) oncocytomas, 18 (9%) chRCCs, 34 (17%) pRCCs, and 10 (5%) fp-AMLs. In the CM phase, CAD-derived ROI enabled characterization of ccRCC from chRCC, pRCC, oncocytoma, and fp-AML with AUCs of 0.850 (95% CI 0.732-0.968), 0.959 (95% CI 0.930-0.989), 0.792 (95% CI 0.716-0.869), and 0.825 (95% CI 0.703-0.948), respectively. On Bland-Altman analysis, there was excellent agreement of CAD and manual methods with mean differences between 14 and 26 HU in each phase. A novel, quantitative CAD algorithm enabled robust peak HU lesion detection

  4. TFE3-positive renal cell carcinomas are not always Xp11 translocation carcinomas: Report of a case with a TPM3-ALK translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorner, Paul Scott; Shago, Mary; Marrano, Paula; Shaikh, Furqan; Somers, Gino R

    2016-10-01

    Translocation-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a distinct subtype of RCC with gene rearrangements of the TFE3 or TFEB loci. The TFE3 gene is located at Xp11 and can fuse to a number of translocation partners, resulting in high nuclear expression of TFE3 protein. TFE3 immunostaining is often used as a surrogate marker for a TFE3 translocation. We report a case of an RCC that expressed TFE3 but showed only gain of TFE3 rather than a translocation. Moreover, this case had a t(1;2) translocation fusing ALK and TMP3, identical to that seen in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour. There was resulting overexpression of ALK protein in a cytoplasmic and membranous pattern. The patient was not treated with chemotherapy but following regional nodal recurrence, an ALK inhibitor was added and the patient remains alive one year later. There are only rare reports of RCC with an ALK-TMP3 fusion, and these tumours can express TFE3 on some unknown basis not related to a TFE3 translocation. Any RCC positive for TFE3 and lacking a translocation should be tested for ALK expression and translocation. Recognition of this subtype of RCC will allow ALK inhibitor therapy to be added, in the hope of improving patient outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma With CAIX CAR-engineered T cells: Clinical Evaluation and Management of On-target Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, C.H.; Sleijfer, S.; Steenbergen, S. van; Elzakker, P. van; Krimpen, B. van; Groot, C. de; Vulto, A.; Bakker, M. den; Oosterwijk, E.; Debets, R.; Gratama, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antibody receptor (CAR) against carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) were administered to 12 patients with CAIX-expressing metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 infusions of a total of

  6. The option value of innovative treatments for non-small cell lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton Snider, Julia; Batt, Katharine; Wu, Yanyu; Tebeka, Mahlet Gizaw; Seabury, Seth

    2017-10-01

    To develop a model of the option value a therapy provides by enabling patients to live to see subsequent innovations and to apply the model to the case of nivolumab in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A model of the option value of nivolumab in RCC and NSCLC was developed and estimated. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and published clinical trial results were used to estimate survival curves for metastatic cancer patients with RCC, squamous NSCLC, or nonsquamous NSCLC. To estimate the conventional value of nivolumab, survival with the pre-nivolumab standard of care was compared with survival with nivolumab assuming no future innovation. To estimate the option value of nivolumab, long-term survival trends in RCC and squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC were measured in SEER to forecast mortality improvements that nivolumab patients may live to see. Compared with the previous standard of care, nivolumab extended life expectancy by 6.3 months in RCC, 7.5 months in squamous NSCLC, and 4.5 months in nonsquamous NSCLC, according to conventional methods. Accounting for expected future mortality trends, nivolumab patients are likely to gain an additional 1.2 months in RCC, 0.4 months in squamous NSCLC, and 0.5 months in nonsquamous NSCLC. These option values correspond to 18%, 5%, and 10% of the conventional value of nivolumab, respectively. Option value is important when valuing therapies like nivolumab that extend life in a rapidly evolving area of care.

  7. The Fuhrman grading system has no prognostic value in patients with nonsarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Sandra; Janssen, Martin; Roos, Frederik C; Becker, Frank; Steinestel, Julie; Abbas, Mahmoud; Steinestel, Konrad; Wegener, Gerd; Siemer, Stefan; Thüroff, Joachim W; Hofmann, Rainer; Stöckle, Michael; Schrader, Mark; Hartmann, Arndt; Hasenfus, Andrea; Kuczyk, Markus A; Junker, Kerstin; Schrader, Andres J

    2014-12-01

    The prognostic value of the Fuhrman nuclear grading system has been questioned for chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) because this subtype frequently displays nuclear and nucleolar pleomorphism. The present study reevaluates this grading system in a series of patients with nonsarcomatoid chRCC. We identified 176 patients (3.6%) with nonsarcomatoid chRCC in a total of 4897 patients who underwent surgery for renal cell carcinoma at 5 centers in Germany between 1990 and 2010. The mean follow-up was 51.1 months. The 3 groups (G1 versus G2 versus G3/4) were comparable in terms of age, sex, tumor diameter, and lymph node metastasis. They only differed significantly in tumor stage (P = .01) and the incidence of synchronous visceral metastasis (P = .04). The 5-year cancer-specific survival rates were 84.4% for G1 (n = 32), 84.3% for G2 (n = 108), and 74.1% for G3/4 tumors (n = 33) (P = .58). Accordingly, multivariate analysis including age, sex, tumor stage, and metastatic disease did not identify Fuhrman grading as an independent predictor of cancer-specific survival in patients with chRCC (P = .4). We were able to demonstrate in a large multicenter cohort that the Fuhrman grading system does not qualify as a prognostic tool in patients with chRCC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of RPLND and Metastasectomy in the Management of Oligometastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, H; Srivatsa, N; Hemalatha, S; Shweta, S; Raghunath, S K

    2018-03-01

    Although lymphadenectomy is currently accepted as most accurate and reliable staging procedure for lymph node metastases, its therapeutic benefit in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) still remains controversial. Although the new, targeted therapy paradigms have changed the treatment of patients with advanced RCC and offer prolonged survival, cure is extremely uncommon in the absence of surgical resections. In this paper, the current role of metastasectomy is reviewed. Review the available literature concerning the role of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and metastasectomy in outcome of oligometastatic RCC. A PubMed search was conducted to identify original articles, review articles, and editorials addressing the role of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and metastasectomy in outcome of oligometastatic RCC. Keywords included renal tumors, renal cell cancer, kidney cancer, lymphadenectomy, metastasectomy, and oligometastases. While there is no randomized study available, recent large observational studies have better defined the prognosis of patients with metastatic RCC with or without metastasectomy and RPLND. To date, the available evidence suggests that RPLND and metastasectomy may be beneficial when technically feasible in patients with locally advanced (unfavorable clinical and pathologic characteristics) and oligometastatic disease. A proportion of patients will achieve long-term survival with aggressive surgical resection.

  9. BC-Box Motif-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of Somatic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kanno

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL functions to induce neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs and skin-derived precursors (SKPs. Here we identified a neuronal differentiation domain (NDD in pVHL. Neuronal differentiation of SKPs was induced by intracellular delivery of a peptide composed of the amino-acid sequences encoded by the NDD. Neuronal differentiation mediated by the NDD was caused by the binding between it and elongin C followed by Janus kinase-2 (JAK2 ubiquitination of JAK2 and inhibition of the JAK2/the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3(STAT3 pathway. The NDD in pVHL contained the BC-box motif ((A,P,S,TLXXX (A,C XXX(A,I,L,V corresponding to the binding site of elongin C. Therefore, we proposed that other BC-box proteins might also contain an NDD; and subsequently also identified in them an NDD containing the amino-acid sequence encoded by the BC-box motif in BC-box proteins. Furthermore, we showed that different NDD peptide-delivered cells differentiated into different kinds of neuron-like cells. That is, dopaminergic neuron-like cells, cholinergic neuron-like cells, GABAnergic neuron-like cells or rhodopsin-positive neuron-like cells were induced by different NDD peptides. These novel findings might contribute to the development of a new method for promoting neuronal differentiation and shed further light on the mechanism of neuronal differentiation of somatic stem cells.

  10. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  11. Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Dhingra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC in the absence of history of primary tumor is difficult as it can be confused with other clear cell tumors. We report here a case of cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of RCC in a patient who had nephrectomy done 9 years back at some other centre, but did not have any records with him. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of primary internal organ malignancy in patients presenting with cutaneous lesions and therefore conduct a careful examination and get necessary investigations. Prompt diagnosis and treatment will have its bearing on the eventual outcome.

  12. The Effect of Anatomical Location of Lymph Node Metastases on Cancer Specific Survival in Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nini, Alessandro; Larcher, Alessandro; Cianflone, Francesco; Trevisani, Francesco; Terrone, Carlo; Volpe, Alessandro; Regis, Federica; Briganti, Alberto; Salonia, Andrea; Montorsi, Francesco; Bertini, Roberto; Capitanio, Umberto

    2018-01-01

    Positive nodal status (pN1) is an independent predictor of survival in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. However, no study to date has tested whether the location of lymph node (LN) metastases does affect oncologic outcomes in a population submitted to radical nephrectomy (RN) and extended lymph node dissection (eLND). To describe nodal disease dissemination in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) patients and to assess the effect of the anatomical sites and the number of nodal areas affected on cancer specific mortality (CSM). The study included 415 patients who underwent RN and eLND, defined as the removal of hilar, side-specific (pre/paraaortic or pre/paracaval) and interaortocaval LNs for ccRCC, at two institutions. Descriptive statistics were used to depict nodal dissemination in pN1 patients, stratified according to nodal site and number of involved areas. Multivariable Cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to explore the relationship between pN1 disease features and survival outcomes. Median number of removed LN was 14 (IQR 9-19); 23% of patients were pN1. Among patients with one involved nodal site, 54 and 26% of patients were positive only in side-specific and interaortocaval station, respectively. The most frequent nodal site was the interaortocaval and side-specific one, for right and left ccRCC, respectively. Interaortocaval nodal positivity (HR 2.3, CI 95%: 1.3-3.9, p < 0.01) represented an independent predictor of CSM. When ccRCC patient harbour nodal disease, its spreading can occur at any nodal station without involving the others. The presence of interoartocaval positive nodes does affect oncologic outcomes. Lymph node invasion in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma is not following a fixed anatomical pattern. An extended lymph node dissection, during treatment for primary kidney tumour, would aid patient risk stratification and multimodality upfront treatment.

  13. Overexpression of SATB1 is associated with biologic behavior in human renal cell carcinoma.

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    Chao Cheng

    Full Text Available Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (SATB1 has been reported to be aberrantly expressed in various cancers and correlated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the function of SATB1 in RCC remains unclear. With the combination of immunohistochemistry, western blotting, immunofluorescence, qRT-PCR, and cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays, we found that levels of SATB1 mRNA and protein were dramatically increased in human ccRCC tissues (P<0.001 for both, and upregulation of SATB1 was significantly associated with depth of invasion (P<0.001, lymph node status (P = 0.001 and TNM stage (P = 0.009. SATB1 knockdown inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of 786-O cells, whereas SATB1 overexpression promoted the growth and aggressive phenotype of ACHN cells in vitro. Furthermore, SATB1 expression was positively correlated with ZEB2 expression (P = 0.013, and inversely linked to levels of SATB2 and E-cadherin (P = 0.005 and P<0.001, respectively in ccRCC tissues. Our data provide a basis for the concept that overexpression of SATB1 may play a critical role in the acquisition of an aggressive phenotype for RCC cells through EMT, providing new insights into the significance of SATB1 in invasion and metastasis of ccRCC, which may contribute to fully elucidating the exact mechanism of development and progression of RCC.

  14. The Somatic Genomic Landscape of Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Caleb F; Ricketts, Christopher J; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bristow, Christopher A; Donehower, Lawrence A; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B; Tickoo, Satish K; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hakimi, A Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A Gordon; Laird, Peter W; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Park, Peter J; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A; Linehan, W Marston; Gibbs, Richard A; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J

    2014-01-01

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mtDNA and whole-genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared

  15. A CpG-methylation-based assay to predict survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jin-Huan; Haddad, Ahmed; Wu, Kai-Jie; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Kapur, Payal; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhao, Liang-Yun; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Jian-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yan-Hong; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xie, Dan; Liao, Bing; Li, Cai-Xia; Li, Pei-Xing; Wang, Zong-Ren; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Shi, Lei; Liu, Qing-Zuo; Gao, Zhen-Li; He, Da-Lin; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Li, Quan-Zhen; Margulis, Vitaly; Luo, Jun-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) display divergent clinical behaviours. Molecular markers might improve risk stratification of ccRCC. Here we use, based on genome-wide CpG methylation profiling, a LASSO model to develop a five-CpG-based assay for ccRCC prognosis that can be used with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens. The five-CpG-based classifier was validated in three independent sets from China, United States and the Cancer Genome Atlas data set. The classifier predicts the overall survival of ccRCC patients (hazard ratio=2.96−4.82; P=3.9 × 10−6−2.2 × 10−9), independent of standard clinical prognostic factors. The five-CpG-based classifier successfully categorizes patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, with significant differences of clinical outcome in respective clinical stages and individual ‘stage, size, grade and necrosis' scores. Moreover, methylation at the five CpGs correlates with expression of five genes: PITX1, FOXE3, TWF2, EHBP1L1 and RIN1. Our five-CpG-based classifier is a practical and reliable prognostic tool for ccRCC that can add prognostic value to the staging system. PMID:26515236

  16. Twelve-year survival after multiple recurrences and repeated metastasectomies for renal cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jue

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC presents a therapeutic challenge for clinicians because of the unpredictable clinical course, resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy and the limited response to immunotherapy. Patients and Methods We report a case of a 62-year-old woman who underwent nephrectomy for T4N0 RCC, clear cell type, Fuhrman grade 3/4 in 1999. The patinet subsequently had multiple tumor recurrences. Results The patient underwent eight metastasectomies, including multiple partial left nephrectomies, right adrenalectomy, a complete left nephrectomy, and distal pancreatectomy. She remains well and tumor free 12 years after initial diagnosis. Conclusion Repeated resections after initial metastasectomy can be carried out safely and provide long-term survival in selected patients with recurrent metastasis from RCC. The findings from our case indicate that close follow-up for the early detection of recurrence and complete resection of metastases can improve the results after repeated resection.

  17. Identification of miR-508-3p and miR-509-3p that are associated with cell invasion and migration and involved in the apoptosis of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Qingna; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Chunjuan; Wan, Jun; Yu, Zhendong; Guo, Xin; Qin, Jie; Chen, Jing; Lu, Ruijing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Previous method was the second-generation sequencing technology. ► miR-508-3p and miR-509-3p were significantly down-regulated in RCC tissues. ► They can inhibit cell proliferation and migration and promote cell apoptosis. ► The expression of miR-508-3p was significantly decreased in RCC patients plasma. ► miR-508-3p may be a novel diagnostic marker of RCC. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as powerful regulators of multiple processes linked to human cancer, including cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration, suggesting that the regulation of miRNA function could play a critical role in cancer progression. Recent studies have found that human serum/plasma contains stably expressed miRNAs. If they prove indicative of disease states, miRNAs measured from peripheral blood samples may be a source for routine clinical detection of cancer. Our studies showed that both miR-508-3p and miR-509-3p were down-regulated in renal cancer tissues. The level of miR-508-3p but not miR-509-3p in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patient plasma demonstrated significant differences from that in control plasma. In addition, the overexpression of miR-508-3p and miR-509-3p suppressed the proliferation of RCC cells (786-0), induced cell apoptosis and inhibited cell migration in vitro. Our data demonstrated that miR-508-3p and miR-509-3p played an important role as tumor suppressor genes during tumor formation and that they may serve as novel diagnostic markers for RCC.

  18. Combination of mTOR and MAPK Inhibitors—A Potential Way to Treat Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Chauhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common neoplasm that occurs in the kidney and is marked by a unique biology, with a long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. In the past few years, there have been significant advancements to understand the biology of RCC. This has led to the introduction of novel targeted therapies in the management of patients with metastatic disease. Patients treated with targeted therapies for RCC had shown positive impact on overall survival, however, no cure is possible and patients need to undergo treatment for long periods of time, which raises challenges to manage the associated adverse events. Moreover, many patients may not respond to it and even response may not last long enough in the responders. Many inhibitors of the Mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway are currently being used in treatment of advanced RCC. Studies showed that inhibitions of mTOR pathways induce Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK escape cell death and cells become resistant to mTOR inhibitors. Because of this, there is a need to inhibit both pathways with their inhibitors comparatively for a better outcome and treatment of patients with RCC.

  19. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte therapy for ovarian cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Donia, Marco; Westergaard, Marie Christine Wulff

    2015-01-01

    stimulated the interest in developing this approach for other indications. Here, we summarize the early clinical data in the field of adoptive cell transfer therapy (ACT) using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and ovarian cancer (OC). In addition we describe...

  20. Renal cell carcinoma: evolving approaches to advanced non-clear cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y.C. Heng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC has changed dramatically with the introduction of targeted therapies including sunitinib, sorafenib, and temsirolimus. Because patients with conventional clear cell histology account for 75- 80% of all patients with RCC, there has been little accumulated evidence on the treatment of patients with non-clear cell histologies. Most clinical trials have excluded them from enrolment, except for randomized studies investigating temsirolimus. Many retrospective studies on the use of all three of these targeted therapies in patients with non-clear cell histology have demonstrated response rates ranging from 3.7%–16%. Although response rates may not be as high compared to patients with clear cell histologies, targeted therapy does provide a clinically meaningful response.

  1. Novel gene fusion of PRCC-MITF defines a new member of MiT family translocation renal cell carcinoma: clinicopathological analysis and detection of the gene fusion by RNA sequencing and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Ye, Sheng-Bing; Wang, Xuan; Li, Rui; Shi, Shan-Shan; Fang, Ru; Zhang, Ru-Song; Ma, Heng-Hui; Lu, Zhen-Feng; Shen, Qin; Bao, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Rao, Qiu

    2018-04-01

    MITF, TFE3, TFEB and TFEC belong to the same microphthalmia-associated transcription factor family (MiT). Two transcription factors in this family have been identified in two unusual types of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): Xp11 translocation RCC harbouring TFE3 gene fusions and t(6;11) RCC harbouring a MALAT1-TFEB gene fusion. The 2016 World Health Organisation classification of renal neoplasia grouped these two neoplasms together under the category of MiT family translocation RCC. RCCs associated with the other two MiT family members, MITF and TFEC, have rarely been reported. Herein, we identify a case of MITF translocation RCC with the novel PRCC-MITF gene fusion by RNA sequencing. Histological examination of the present tumour showed typical features of MiT family translocation RCCs, overlapping with Xp11 translocation RCC and t(6;11) RCC. However, this tumour showed negative results in TFE3 and TFEB immunochemistry and split fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) assays. The other MiT family members, MITF and TFEC, were tested further immunochemically and also showed negative results. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of a PRCC-MITF gene fusion: a fusion of PRCC exon 5 to MITF exon 4. We then developed FISH assays covering MITF break-apart probes and PRCC-MITF fusion probes to detect the MITF gene rearrangement. This study both proves the recurring existence of MITF translocation RCC and expands the genotype spectrum of MiT family translocation RCCs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genetic engineering of human NK cells to express CXCR2 improves migration to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Veronika; Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Zendehdel, Rosa; Seitz, Christina; Duivenvoorden, Annet; Wennerberg, Erik; Colón, Eugenia; Scherman-Plogell, Ann-Helén; Lundqvist, Andreas

    2017-09-19

    Adoptive natural killer (NK) cell transfer is being increasingly used as cancer treatment. However, clinical responses have so far been limited to patients with hematological malignancies. A potential limiting factor in patients with solid tumors is defective homing of the infused NK cells to the tumor site. Chemokines regulate the migration of leukocytes expressing corresponding chemokine receptors. Various solid tumors, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), readily secrete ligands for the chemokine receptor CXCR2. We hypothesize that infusion of NK cells expressing high levels of the CXCR2 chemokine receptor will result in increased influx of the transferred NK cells into tumors, and improved clinical outcome in patients with cancer. Blood and tumor biopsies from 14 primary RCC patients were assessed by flow cytometry and chemokine analysis. Primary NK cells were transduced with human CXCR2 using a retroviral system. CXCR2 receptor functionality was determined by Calcium flux and NK cell migration was evaluated in transwell assays. We detected higher concentrations of CXCR2 ligands in tumors compared with plasma of RCC patients. In addition, CXCL5 levels correlated with the intratumoral infiltration of CXCR2-positive NK cells. However, tumor-infiltrating NK cells from RCC patients expressed lower CXCR2 compared with peripheral blood NK cells. Moreover, healthy donor NK cells rapidly lost their CXCR2 expression upon in vitro culture and expansion. Genetic modification of human primary NK cells to re-express CXCR2 improved their ability to specifically migrate along a chemokine gradient of recombinant CXCR2 ligands or RCC tumor supernatants compared with controls. The enhanced trafficking resulted in increased killing of target cells. In addition, while their functionality remained unchanged compared with control NK cells, CXCR2-transduced NK cells obtained increased adhesion properties and formed more conjugates with target cells. To increase the success of NK

  3. Nanotechnology combined therapy: tyrosine kinase-bound gold nanorod and laser thermal ablation produce a synergistic higher treatment response of renal cell carcinoma in animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunologically naïve nude mice (Athymic Nude-Foxn1nu) were injected bilaterally on the flanks (n=36) with 2.5 x 106 cells of a human metastatic renal cell carcinoma cell line (RCC 786-O). Subcutaneous xenograft tumors developed 1 cm palpable nodules. AuNR encapsulated in Human Serum Albumin (HSA) P...

  4. Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Renal Cell Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Angel I.; Teh, Bin S.; Amato, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be radioresistant; therefore, conventional radiotherapy (RT) fraction sizes of 1.8 to 2 Gy are thought to have little role in the management of primary RCC, especially for curative disease. In the setting of metastatic RCC, conventionally fractionated RT has been an effective palliative treatment in 50% of patients. Recent technological advances in radiation oncology have led to the clinical implementation of image-guided radiotherapy, allowing biologically potent doses to the tumors intra- and extra-cranially. As predicted by radiobiologic modeling, favorable outcomes have been observed with highly hypofractionated schemes modeled after the experience with intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for RCC brain metastases with reported local control rates averaging 85%. At present, both primary and metastatic RCC tumors may be successfully treated using stereotactic approaches, which utilize steep dose gradients to maximally preserve function and avoid toxicity of adjacent organs including liver, uninvolved kidney, bowel, and spinal cord regions. Future endeavors will combine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with novel targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and targeted rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, to maximize both local and systemic control

  5. Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Renal Cell Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Angel I.; Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Amato, Robert J., E-mail: Robert.amato@uth.tmc.edu [Division of Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-10-26

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be radioresistant; therefore, conventional radiotherapy (RT) fraction sizes of 1.8 to 2 Gy are thought to have little role in the management of primary RCC, especially for curative disease. In the setting of metastatic RCC, conventionally fractionated RT has been an effective palliative treatment in 50% of patients. Recent technological advances in radiation oncology have led to the clinical implementation of image-guided radiotherapy, allowing biologically potent doses to the tumors intra- and extra-cranially. As predicted by radiobiologic modeling, favorable outcomes have been observed with highly hypofractionated schemes modeled after the experience with intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for RCC brain metastases with reported local control rates averaging 85%. At present, both primary and metastatic RCC tumors may be successfully treated using stereotactic approaches, which utilize steep dose gradients to maximally preserve function and avoid toxicity of adjacent organs including liver, uninvolved kidney, bowel, and spinal cord regions. Future endeavors will combine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with novel targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and targeted rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, to maximize both local and systemic control.

  6. Treatment options for renal cell carcinoma in renal allografts: a case series from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Darden C; Al-Geizawi, Samer M; Farney, Alan C; Rogers, Jeffrey; Burkart, John M; Assimos, Dean G; Stratta, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is more common in renal transplant and dialysis patients than the general population. However, RCC in transplanted kidneys is rare, and treatment has previously consisted of nephrectomy with a return to dialysis. There has been recent interest in nephron-sparing procedures as a treatment option for RCC in allograft kidneys in an effort to retain allograft function. Four patients with RCC in allograft kidneys were treated with nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, or radiofrequency ablation. All of the patients are without evidence of recurrence of RCC after treatment. We found nephron-sparing procedures to be reasonable initial options in managing incidental RCCs diagnosed in functioning allografts to maintain an improved quality of life and avoid immediate dialysis compared with radical nephrectomy of a functioning allograft. However, in non-functioning renal allografts, radical nephrectomy may allow for a higher chance of cure without the loss of transplant function. Consequently, radical nephrectomy should be utilized whenever the allograft is non-functioning and the patient's surgical risk is not prohibitive. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Zoledronic acid use in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma or bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Eastham, James A

    2010-06-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and 40% of patients with bladder cancer develop bone metastases that can disrupt normal bone homeostasis and place patients at risk for potentially life-limiting skeletal-related events (SREs). In the absence of bone-directed therapies, patients with RCC may experience up to four SREs per year. In patients with bone metastases from RCC or bladder cancer, zoledronic acid (ZOL) significantly reduced the risk of SREs compared with placebo. In addition to its bone-protective effects, preclinical and early clinical evidence indicates that ZOL prevents tumor progression. For example, retrospective subset analysis in patients with RCC indicated that ZOL extended time to disease progression and demonstrated a trend toward improved overall survival compared with placebo. Additionally, a study in patients with bone metastases from bladder cancer demonstrated that ZOL improved 1-year overall survival compared with placebo. Bone metastases place a heavy burden on patients with RCC or bladder cancer, and early, continuous treatment with ZOL may provide anticancer benefits in addition to important patient quality of life. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in patients with poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, Andrea; McDermott, David F; Atkins, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    An improved understanding of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) biology has translated into major advances in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in recent years. Clinical and pathologic criteria can be used to identify RCC patients with poor prognoses. Such patients, however, are often excluded from the cancer clinical trials that guide treatment recommendations. This article reviews available information on the management of patients with metastatic RCC and poor risk features, focusing on the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. While patients with poor risk features have a more guarded outcome, treatment with temsirolimus has produced meaningful improvements in overall survival for this population. Definitive phase III trial data are lacking for the VEGF pathway inhibitors in patients with poor prognostic features. However, available data suggest that such patients tolerate VEGF pathway blockade reasonably well and are likely to achieve some benefit relative to treatment with interferon. Ongoing translational research efforts may help to define novel treatment approaches specific for patients with metastatic RCC and poor prognostic features

  9. Perineural Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Illustration with a Proposed Anatomic Mechanism and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Krauss, William E; Amrami, Kimberly K; Parisi, Joseph E; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Perineural spread (PNS) is an unusual mechanism of tumor extension and has been typically reported in squamous cell carcinoma, adenocystic carcinoma, and desmoplastic melanoma. Our group has previously demonstrated PNS in rectal, prostate, bladder, and cervical cancer from the primary site along the autonomic nerves to the major somatic nerves and even intradurally. We believe similar principles apply to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well, despite the different anatomy. We performed a retrospective search to identify cases of intradural-extramedullary metastases of RCC caused by PNS. Strict anatomic and imaging inclusion criteria were defined: only lesions located between T6 and L3 were included, and PNS as a potential cause had to be supported by imaging evidence. Although 3 cases of spinal intradural metastases were identified, only one met our strict inclusion criteria. A 61-year-old woman developed a late intradural-extramedullary metastasis of RCC 16 years after the original diagnosis that we believe represents an example of visceral organ PNS. RCC can propagate via PNS from the primary tumor along the autonomic nerves to the aorticorenal, celiac, and mesenteric ganglia and then along the thoracic and lumbar splanchnic nerves to the corresponding spinal nerves and intradurally. We present radiologic evidence together with the review of the literature to support the premise that PNS of RCC not only occurs but goes unrecognized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The frequency of tumor-infiltrating Tie-2-expressing monocytes in renal cell carcinoma: its relationship to angiogenesis and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jindong; Zhang, Guangbo; Sun, Bo; Yuan, Hexing; Huang, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianglei; Wei, Xuedong; Zhang, Xuefeng; Hou, Jianquan

    2013-10-01

    To examine the frequency of tumor-infiltrating Tie-2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and its association with microvessel density (MVD) and other clinical-pathologic features. This study enrolled 65 consecutive patients with RCC treated with radical nephrectomy. The frequency of tumor-infiltrating TEMs, which was defined as CD14(+) Tie-2(+) cells, was assessed using flow cytometry. MVD was measured by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 antibody. The association between clinicopathologic parameters, MVD, and the frequency of tumor-infiltrating TEMs in RCC was assessed. High frequency of tumor-infiltrating TEMs was significantly associated with advanced stage (P = .018), positive lymph nodes (P = .013), high grade (P = .019), and metastases (P = .006). Correlation analysis revealed that the frequency of TEMs was positively correlated with MVD. Our findings revealed a significant association between prognostic tumor features, MVD, and the frequency of tumor-infiltrating TEMs in RCC and indicated that TEMs may play an important role in angiogenesis and progression of RCC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancers as wounds that do not heal: differences and similarities between renal regeneration/repair and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riss, Joseph; Khanna, Chand; Koo, Seongjoon; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Yang, Howard H; Hu, Ying; Kleiner, David E; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schaefer, Carl F; Ben-Sasson, Shmuel A; Yang, Liming; Powell, John; Kane, David W; Star, Robert A; Aprelikova, Olga; Bauer, Kristin; Vasselli, James R; Maranchie, Jodi K; Kohn, Kurt W; Buetow, Ken H; Linehan, W Marston; Weinstein, John N; Lee, Maxwell P; Klausner, Richard D; Barrett, J Carl

    2006-07-15

    Cancers have been described as wounds that do not heal, suggesting that the two share common features. By comparing microarray data from a model of renal regeneration and repair (RRR) with reported gene expression in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we asked whether those two processes do, in fact, share molecular features and regulatory mechanisms. The majority (77%) of the genes expressed in RRR and RCC were concordantly regulated, whereas only 23% were discordant (i.e., changed in opposite directions). The orchestrated processes of regeneration, involving cell proliferation and immune response, were reflected in the concordant genes. The discordant gene signature revealed processes (e.g., morphogenesis and glycolysis) and pathways (e.g., hypoxia-inducible factor and insulin-like growth factor-I) that reflect the intrinsic pathologic nature of RCC. This is the first study that compares gene expression patterns in RCC and RRR. It does so, in particular, with relation to the hypothesis that RCC resembles the wound healing processes seen in RRR. However, careful attention to the genes that are regulated in the discordant direction provides new insights into the critical differences between renal carcinogenesis and wound healing. The observations reported here provide a conceptual framework for further efforts to understand the biology and to develop more effective diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for renal tumors and renal ischemia.

  12. Genetic basis of cancer of the kidney: disease-specific approaches to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W Marston; Vasselli, James; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Walther, McClellan M; Merino, Maria; Choyke, Peter; Vocke, Cathy; Schmidt, Laura; Isaacs, Jennifer S; Glenn, Gladys; Toro, Jorge; Zbar, Berton; Bottaro, Donald; Neckers, Len

    2004-09-15

    Studies during the past two decades have shown that kidney cancer is not a single disease; it is made up of a number of different types of cancer that occur in this organ. Clear cell renal carcinoma is characterized by mutation of the VHL gene. The VHL gene product forms a heterotrimeric complex with elongin C, elongin B, and Cul-2 to target hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2alpha for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. VHL-/- clear cell renal carcinoma overexpresses epidermal growth factor receptor and transforming growth factor alpha. Both hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor are potential therapeutic targets in clear cell renal carcinoma. Studies of the hereditary form of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC) determined that the c-Met proto-oncogene on chromosome 7 is the gene for HPRC and for a number of sporadic papillary RCCs. The HPRC c-Met mutations are activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the gene. The gene for a new form of hereditary RCC (Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome) associated with cutaneous tumors, lung cysts, and colon polyps or cancer has recently been identified. Studies are currently under way to determine what type of gene BHD is and how damage to this gene leads to kidney cancer. Individuals affected with hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell carcinoma are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas (fibroids), and type 2 papillary RCC. The HLRC gene has been found to be the Krebs cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase. Studies are under way to understand the downstream pathway of this cancer gene.

  13. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasis to Ipsilateral Parotid and Submandibular Glands: Report of a Case with Sonoelastographic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, Mehtap; Dogruyol, Sureyya Vudali; Idilman, Ilkay S.; Unal, Ozlem; Ipek, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) – also known as hypernephroma or grawitz tumor – accounts for 3% of the adulthood malignancies. Approximately 30–40% of the patients have metastasis at the time of the diagnosis and most common sites for metastasis are lung, regional lymph nodes, bone and liver. A total of 8–14% of the patients with RCC has head and neck metastasis. However, metastasis to major salivary glands is rarely seen. In this paper, we aimed to report a RCC case with metastasis to parotid and submandibular glands that has the same sonographic and sonoelastographic findings with the primary tumor. 66-year old woman with RCC history was referred to our radiology department for neck ultrasound (US) with painful swelling in the right parotid gland region. A well-defined, 37×21 mm sized hypoechoic heterogeneous solid mass was detected in the superficial-deep lobe of the right parotid gland. The mass was prominently hypervascular in color Doppler ultrasonography scan. Coincidentally, a 13×13 mm hypoechoic lobulated solid mass was detected in the right submandibular gland with similar sonographic findings. Real-time sonoelastography (SEL) was performed to the masses and both of them were blue-green colored that indicates hard tissue. An US and SEL evaluation was also performed to the renal mass (RCC) of the patient. The primary mass was also similar in sonographic and SEL appearance as salivary gland masses. In the patient history, she revealed chemotherapy-radiotherapy treatment 1.5 years ago due to inoperable mass in the mid-lower pole of the left kidney diagnosed as clear cell RCC with vascular invasion, liver, lung and brain metastasis. Because of known primary tumor, the masses in the salivary glands were suspected to be metastatic and a tru-cut biopsy was performed. Pathological result was reported as clear cell RCC metastasis. The etiology of RCC is still unknown and metastatic involvement can be seen at unexpected tissue and organs. Metastatic disease

  14. Expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 2A in renal cell carcinomas and potential mechanism for kidney carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuliang; Guo, Xiaoqiang; Yu, Wenshui; Li, Cailing; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (MAT2A) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) by joining methionine and ATP. SAMe is a methyl donor for transmethylation and has an important role for DNA and/or protein methylation. MAT2A is expressed widely in many tissues especially in kidney. Several studies have demonstrated that there are abnormal expressions of MAT2A in several kinds of cancers such as liver and colon cancers. But the relationship of MAT2A between renal cell carcinomas (RCC) is less understood. The mRNA expression level of the MAT2A gene was determined in 24 RCC patients and 4 RCC cell lines, using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The MAT2A protein content was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis in 55 RCC patients. The mRNA levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also analysized in patients using RT-PCR. The correlations between the MAT2A and HO-1 as well as COX-2 were analyzed with nonparametric Spearman method. MAT2A transcript was significantly downregulated in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis and western blotting indicated that level of MAT2A protein was decreased in cancer tissues. The statistical analysis reveals a negative correlation between MAT2A and HO-1 expression in RCC patients and cell lines (P < 0.01). This study demonstrated that MAT2A was lower expression in cancer tissues, suggesting that it may be involved in the development of RCC. MAT2A is a transcriptional corepressor for HO-1 expression by supplying SAM for methyltransferases, which may be one of potential mechanism of MAT2A as tumor suppressor in kidney carcinogenesis

  15. Expression of minichromosome maintenance genes in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong HB

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hongbin Zhong,1,* Bin Chen,1,* Henrique Neves,2 Jinchun Xing,1 Youxin Ye,1 Ying Lin,1 Guohong Zhuang,3 Shu-Dong Zhang,4 Jiyi Huang,1,5 Hang Fai Kwok2 1Xiang’an Branch, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, People’s Republic of China; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau SAR; 3Medical College of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, People’s Republic of China; 4Northern Ireland Centre for Stratified Medicine, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, Ulster University, Londonderry, UK; 5The First Clinical School of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Minichromosome maintenance (MCM proteins play an essential role in DNA replication. They have been shown to be overexpressed in various types of cancer. However, the role of this family in renal cell carcinoma (RCC is widely unknown. In this study, we have identified a number of RCC datasets in the Gene Expression Omnibus database and also investigated the correlation between the expression levels of MCM genes and clinicopathological parameters. We found that the expression levels of MCM genes are positively correlated with one another. Expression levels of MCM2, MCM5, MCM6, and MCM7, but not of MCM3 and MCM4, were higher in RCC compared to paired adjacent normal tissue. Only the expression level of MCM4, but not of other MCMs, was positively correlated with tumor grade. In addition, a high-level expression of MCM2 in either primary tumor or metastases of RCC predicted a shorter disease-free survival time, while a high-level expression of MCM4 or MCM6 in primary tumor was also associated with poorer disease-free survival. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that patients with their primary RCC overexpressing 2 or more MCM genes had a shorter disease-free survival time, while those with RCC metastases overexpressing 3 or more MCM genes had a shorter

  16. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  17. Epistaxis as the First Manifestation of Silent Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report with Relevant Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, You Me; Kim, Bong Man

    2016-01-01

    The paranasal sinuses are known to be a rare location for metastasis. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent primary tumor to metastasize to the sinonasal region, followed by lung and breast cancer. In particular, clear cell type RCC, which represents approximately 85% of RCCs, is characterized by early metastasis, and it sometimes spreads to unusual sites (1, 2). Metastatic tumors in the paranasal sinuses are distributed in the maxillary, sphenoid, ethmoid, and frontal sinuses, in order of decreasing frequency. Symptoms are usually nonspecific, but epistaxis is the most common sign, due to the hypervascularity of the primary tumor. The prognosis is uncertain, but the 5-year survival rate fluctuates between 15% and 30%. The purpose of this case report is to document a rare case of silent RCC that first presented as epistaxis due to nasal cavity and ethmoid sinus metastasis

  18. Active smoking may negatively affect response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keizman, Daniel; Gottfried, Maya; Ish-Shalom, Maya; Maimon, Natalie; Peer, Avivit; Neumann, Avivit; Hammers, Hans; Eisenberger, Mario A; Sinibaldi, Victoria; Pili, Roberto; Hayat, Henry; Kovel, Svetlana; Sella, Avishay; Boursi, Ben; Weitzen, Rony; Mermershtain, Wilmosh; Rouvinov, Keren; Berger, Raanan; Carducci, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes are risk factors for renal cell carcinoma development. Their presence has been associated with a worse outcome in various cancers. We sought to determine their association with outcome of sunitinib treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). An international multicenter retrospective study of sunitinib-treated mRCC patients was performed. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association between outcome and the pretreatment status of smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and other known prognostic factors. Between 2004 and 2013, 278 mRCC patients were treated with sunitinib: 59 were active smokers, 67 were obese, 73 were diabetic, and 165 had pretreatment hypertension. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9 months, and overall survival (OS) was 22 months. Factors associated with PFS were smoking status (past and active smokers: hazard ratio [HR]: 1.17, p = .39; never smokers: HR: 2.94, p non-clear cell histology (HR: 1.62, p = .011), pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio >3 (HR: 3.51, p smoking status (past and active smokers: HR: 1.25, p = .29; never smokers: HR: 2.7, p 3 (HR: 2.95, p smoking may negatively affect the PFS and OS of sunitinib-treated mRCC. Clinicians should consider advising patients to quit smoking at initiation of sunitinib treatment for mRCC.

  19. MiT Family Translocation-Associated Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Contemporary Update With Emphasis on Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Martin J; Udager, Aaron M; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-10-01

    Translocation-associated renal cell carcinoma (t-RCC) is a relatively uncommon subtype of renal cell carcinoma characterized by recurrent gene rearrangements involving the TFE3 or TFEB loci. TFE3 and TFEB are members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MiT) family, which regulates differentiation in melanocytes and osteoclasts, and MiT family gene fusions activate unique molecular programs that can be detected immunohistochemically. Although the overall clinical behavior of t-RCC is variable, emerging molecular data suggest the possibility of targeted approaches to advanced disease. Thus, distinguishing t-RCC from its morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular mimics may have important clinical implications. The differential diagnosis for t-RCC includes a variety of common renal neoplasms, particularly those demonstrating clear cell and papillary features; in addition, because of immunophenotypic overlap and/or shared molecular abnormalities (ie, TFE3 gene rearrangement), a distinctive set of nonepithelial renal tumors may also warrant consideration. Directed ancillary testing is an essential aspect to the workup of t-RCC cases and may include a panel of immunohistochemical stains, such as PAX8, pancytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen, carbonic anhydrase IX, HMB-45, and Melan-A. Dual-color, break-apart fluorescent in situ hybridization for TFE3 or TFEB gene rearrangement may be helpful in diagnostically challenging cases or when molecular confirmation is needed.

  20. Genomic expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism profiling discriminates chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Min-Han; Furge, Kyle A; Kort, Eric; Giraud, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Vielh, Philippe; Amsellem-Ouazana, Delphine; Debré, Bernard; Flam, Thierry; Thiounn, Nicolas; Zerbib, Marc; Wong, Chin Fong; Benoît, Gérard; Droupy, Stéphane; Molinié, Vincent; Vieillefond, Annick; Tan, Puay Hoon; Richard, Stéphane; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Hwei Ling; Yang, Ximing J; Ditlev, Jonathon; Matsuda, Daisuke; Khoo, Sok Kean; Sugimura, Jun; Fujioka, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) and renal oncocytoma are two distinct but closely related entities with strong morphologic and genetic similarities. While chRCC is a malignant tumor, oncocytoma is usually regarded as a benign entity. The overlapping characteristics are best explained by a common cellular origin, and the biologic differences between chRCC and oncocytoma are therefore of considerable interest in terms of carcinogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. Previous studies have been relatively limited in terms of examining the differences between oncocytoma and chromophobe RCC. Gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix HGU133Plus2 platform was applied on chRCC (n = 15) and oncocytoma specimens (n = 15). Supervised analysis was applied to identify a discriminatory gene signature, as well as differentially expressed genes. High throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed on independent samples (n = 14) using Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 100 K arrays to assess correlation between expression and gene copy number. Immunohistochemical validation was performed in an independent set of tumors. A novel 14 probe-set signature was developed to classify the tumors internally with 93% accuracy, and this was successfully validated on an external data-set with 94% accuracy. Pathway analysis highlighted clinically relevant dysregulated pathways of c-erbB2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in chRCC, but no significant differences in p-AKT or extracellular HER2 expression was identified on immunohistochemistry. Loss of chromosome 1p, reflected in both cytogenetic and expression analysis, is common to both entities, implying this may be an early event in histogenesis. Multiple regional areas of cytogenetic alterations and corresponding expression biases differentiating the two entities were identified. Parafibromin, aquaporin 6, and synaptogyrin 3 were novel immunohistochemical markers effectively discriminating

  1. Genomic expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism profiling discriminates chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiounn Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC and renal oncocytoma are two distinct but closely related entities with strong morphologic and genetic similarities. While chRCC is a malignant tumor, oncocytoma is usually regarded as a benign entity. The overlapping characteristics are best explained by a common cellular origin, and the biologic differences between chRCC and oncocytoma are therefore of considerable interest in terms of carcinogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. Previous studies have been relatively limited in terms of examining the differences between oncocytoma and chromophobe RCC. Methods Gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix HGU133Plus2 platform was applied on chRCC (n = 15 and oncocytoma specimens (n = 15. Supervised analysis was applied to identify a discriminatory gene signature, as well as differentially expressed genes. High throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping was performed on independent samples (n = 14 using Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 100 K arrays to assess correlation between expression and gene copy number. Immunohistochemical validation was performed in an independent set of tumors. Results A novel 14 probe-set signature was developed to classify the tumors internally with 93% accuracy, and this was successfully validated on an external data-set with 94% accuracy. Pathway analysis highlighted clinically relevant dysregulated pathways of c-erbB2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling in chRCC, but no significant differences in p-AKT or extracellular HER2 expression was identified on immunohistochemistry. Loss of chromosome 1p, reflected in both cytogenetic and expression analysis, is common to both entities, implying this may be an early event in histogenesis. Multiple regional areas of cytogenetic alterations and corresponding expression biases differentiating the two entities were identified. Parafibromin, aquaporin 6, and synaptogyrin 3 were novel

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of intravenous bis-1 f(ab')(2) administration in renal-cell cancer-patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R. A. J.; Kroesen, B. J.; Mesander, G.; Sleijfer, D. T.; The, T. Hauw; Mulder, N. H.; de Leij, L

    We report the immunomodulatory effects of an intravenous treatment with F(ab')(2) fragments of the bispecific monoclonal antibody BIS-1 during subcutaneous recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) therapy of renal cell cancer (RCC) patients. BIS-1 is directed against both the CD3 antigen on T cells and the

  3. Commentary on: "An integrated metabolic atlas of clear cell renal cell carcinoma." Hakimi AA, Reznik E, Lee CH, Creighton CJ, Brannon AR, Luna A, Aksoy BA, Liu EM, Shen R, Lee W, Chen Y, Stirdivant SM, Russo P, Chen YB, Tickoo SK, Reuter VE, Cheng EH, Sander C, Hsieh JJ.: Cancer Cell. 2016 Jan 11;29(1):104-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byron H

    2017-09-01

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, manifested through alterations in metabolites. We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response. Tumor progression and metastasis were associated with metabolite increases in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism pathways. We develop an analytic pipeline and visualization tool (metabolograms) to bridge the gap between TCGA transcriptomic profiling and our metabolomic data, which enables us to assemble an integrated pathway-level metabolic atlas and to demonstrate discordance between transcriptome and metabolome. Lastly, expression profiling was performed on a high-glutathione cluster, which corresponds to a poor-survival subgroup in the ccRCC TCGA cohort. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficient generation of dopamine neuron-like cells from skin-derived precursors with a synthetic peptide derived from von Hippel-Lindau protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsuhiko; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko; Yokoyama, Takaakira; Mimura, Toshiro; Nishiguchi, Takao; Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Yamamoto, Isao; Kanno, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) from mammalian dermis represent neural crest-related stem cells capable of differentiating into both neural and mesodermal progency. SKPs are of clinical interest because they serve as accessible autologous donor cells for neuronal repair for neuronal intractable diseases. However, little is known about the efficient generation of neurons from SKPs, and phenotypes of neurons generated from SKPs have been restricted. In addition, the neuronal repair using their generated neurons as donor cells has not been achieved. The von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) is one of the proteins that play an important role during neuronal differentiation, and recently neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells by intracellular delivery of a synthetic VHL peptide derived from elongin BC-binding site has been demonstrated. In the present study, a synthetic VHL peptide derived from elongin BC-binding site was conjugated to the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-TAT protein (TATVHL peptide) to facilitate entry into cells, and we demonstrate the efficient generation of cells with dopaminergic phenotype from SKPs with the intracellular delivery of TATVHL peptide, and characterized the generated cells. The TATVHL peptide-treated SKPs expressed neuronal marker proteins, particularly dopamine neuron markers, and also up-regulated mRNA levels of proneural basic helix-loop-helix factors. After the TATVHL peptide treatment, transplanted SKPs into Parkinson's disease (PD) model rats sufficiently differentiated into dopamine neuron-like cells in PD model rats, and partially but significantly corrected behavior of PD model rats. The generated dopamine neuron-like cells are expected to serve as donor cells for neuronal repair for PD.

  5. Valproic acid sensitizes metformin-resistant human renal cell carcinoma cells by upregulating H3 acetylation and EMT reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Muyun; Mao, Shaowei; Lu, Guoliang; Li, Liang; Lan, Xiaopeng; Huang, Zhongxian; Chen, Yougen; Zhao, Miaoqing; Zhao, Yueran; Xia, Qinghua

    2018-04-17

    Metformin (Met) is a widely available diabetic drug and shows suppressed effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metabolism and proliferation. Laboratory studies in RCC suggested that metformin has remarkable antitumor activities and seems to be a potential antitumor drug. But the facts that metformin may be not effective in reducing the risk of RCC in cancer clinical trials made it difficult to determine the benefits of metformin in RCC prevention and treatment. The mechanisms underlying the different conclusions between laboratory experiments and clinical analysis remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to determine whether long-term metformin use can induce resistance in RCC, whether metformin resistance could be used to explain the disaccord in laboratory and clinical studies, and whether the drug valproic acid (VPA), which inhibits histone deacetylase, exhibits synergistic cytotoxicity with metformin and can counteract the resistance of metformin in RCC. We performed CCK8, transwell, wound healing assay, flow cytometry and western blotting to detect the regulations of proliferation, migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in 786-O, ACHN and metformin resistance 786-O (786-M-R) cells treated with VPA, metformin or a combination of two drugs. We used TGF-β, SC79, LY294002, Rapamycin, protein kinase B (AKT) inhibitor to treat the 786-O or 786-M-R cells and detected the regulations in TGF-β /pSMAD3 and AMPK/AKT pathways. 786-M-R was refractory to metformin-induced antitumor effects on proliferation, migration, cell cycle and cell apoptosis. AMPK/AKT pathways and TGF-β/SMAD3 pathways showed low sensibilities in 786-M-R. The histone H3 acetylation diminished in the 786-M-R cells. However, the addition of VPA dramatically upregulated histone H3 acetylation, increased the sensibility of AKT and inhibited pSMAD3/SMAD4, letting the combination of VPA and metformin remarkably reappear the anti-tumour effects of metformin in 786-M-R cells. VPA not only exhibits

  6. Isolated Splenic Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.G. Moir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the case of a 70-year-old woman with a previous history of a left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC, who developed general malaise and fatigue. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated an enhancing 6 × 7 cm necrotic lesion in the lower pole of the spleen suggestive of a metastasis. Given the highly suspicious nature of the lesion we proceeded to splenectomy. The tumour did not breach the splenic capsule, and there was no local diaphragmatic involvement. The mass was concluded to be a true metastasis of the original RCC rather than local recurrence of the disease. The causes of isolated solid splenic lesions are wide and varied, however a past or present history of malignancy should lead to a high index of suspicion for a splenic metastasis. We report an extremely unusual case of spread from a RCC.

  7. Volumetry of metastases from renal cell carcinoma. Comparison with the RECIST criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graser, A.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Stief, C.; Staehler, M.

    2008-01-01

    For patients with metastasized renal cell carcinoma (RCC), imaging techniques are of great importance. Currently, therapy widely relies on antiangiogenic factors, which frequently lead to relatively subtle changes in the size of lesions. From this aspect the commonly used RECIST criteria (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors) must be considered as imprecise for the evaluation of the response to therapy. This article gives a review on new software-based volumetric methods, which allow therapy-induced changes in the size of metastases from RCC to be detected with higher sensitivity and reproducibility. A comparison of RECIST and volumetry was carried out with data from patients with metastasized RCC to demonstrate the higher sensitivity of the 3D volumetric procedure. (orig.) [de

  8. Novel immunotherapy approaches for metastatic urothelial and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Shao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC and urothelial carcinoma (UC remains a major challenge. Past research has implicated the immune system in tumor surveillance of both malignancies, leading to the application of immunotherapy agents for both cancers. Among them, the most promising agents are the checkpoint blockade drugs, such as antibodies targeting the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4, programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1, and PD-1 ligand (PD-L1. In normal physiology, these immune checkpoints act as inhibitory signals to fine-tune the duration and strength of immune reactions, which is pivotal for maintaining self-tolerance. However, tumor cells also utilize immune checkpoint pathways to evade anti-tumor immune response, leading to disease progression and metastasis. Thus, there has been intense preclinical and clinical effort focused on the application of checkpoint inhibitors in metastatic RCC and UC. To date, nivolumab (anti-PD-1 and atezolizumab (anti-PD-L1 have been approved for the treatment of metastatic RCC and UC, respectively. Despite these successes, challenges remain in how to further improve response rates to immunotherapy and how to select patients that will benefit from this approach. In this report, we review existing data and research on immunotherapy in metastatic RCC and UC.

  9. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muglia, Valdair F., E-mail: fmuglia@fmrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CCIFM/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica. Faculdade de Medicina; Prando, Adilson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imaginologia

    2015-05-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes. (author)

  10. CT differentiation of renal tumor invading parenchyma and pelvis: renal cell carcinoma vs transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Cho, Seong Beum; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung

    1994-01-01

    The differentiation between renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) is important due to the different methods of treatment and prognosis. But occasionally it is difficult to draw a distinction between the two diseases when renal parenchyma and renal collecting systems are invaded simultaneously. We reviewed CT scans of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma which showed involvement of renal parenchyma and renal sinus fat on CT. Retrospective analysis was performed by 3 abdominal radiologists. Check points were renal contour bulging or reinform shape, location of mass center, intact parenchyma overlying the tumor, cystic change, calcification, LN metastasis, vessel invasion, and perirenal extention. There were renal contour bulging due to the tumor mass in 33 out of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma, where a and nine of 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma maintained the reinform appearance. This is significant statiscal difference between the two(P<0.005). Center of all TCCs were located in the renal sinus, and 24 out of 35 cases of RCC were located in the cortex(P<0.005). Thirty-six out of 37 cases of RCC lost the overlying parenchyma, where as 4 out of 9 cases of well enhanced TCC had intact overlying parenchyma(P<0.005) RCC showed uptic change within the tumor mags in 31 cases which was significanity higher than the 4 cases in TCC(P<0.05). CT findings of renal cell carcinoma are contour bulging, peripheral location, obliteration of parenchyma, and cystic change. Findings of transitional cell carcinoma are reinform appearance, central location within the kidney, intact overlying parenchyma, and rare cystic change

  11. The impact of genetic heterogeneity on biomarker development in kidney cancer assessed by multiregional sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankin, Alexander; Hakimi, Abraham A; Mikkilineni, Nina; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Silk, Mikhail T; Liang, Yupu; Mano, Roy; Chevinsky, Michael; Motzer, Robert J; Solomon, Stephen B; Cheng, Emily H; Durack, Jeremy C; Coleman, Jonathan A; Russo, Paul; Hsieh, James J

    2014-01-01

    Primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genetic heterogeneity may lead to an underestimation of the mutational burden detected from a single site evaluation. We sought to characterize the extent of clonal branching involving key tumor suppressor mutations in primary ccRCC and determine if genetic heterogeneity could limit the mutation profiling from a single region assessment. Ex vivo core needle biopsies were obtained from three to five different regions of resected renal tumors at a single institution from 2012 to 2013. DNA was extracted and targeted sequencing was performed on five genes associated with ccRCC (von-Hippel Lindau [VHL], PBRM1, SETD2, BAP1, and KDM5C). We constructed phylogenetic trees by inferring clonal evolution based on the mutations present within each core and estimated the predictive power of detecting a mutation for each successive tumor region sampled. We obtained 47 ex vivo biopsy cores from 14 primary ccRCC's (median tumor size 4.5 cm, IQR 4.0–5.9 cm). Branching patterns of various complexities were observed in tumors with three or more mutations. A VHL mutation was detected in nine tumors (64%), each time being present ubiquitously throughout the tumor. Other genes had various degrees of regional mutational variation. Based on the mutations' prevalence we estimated that three different tumor regions should be sampled to detect mutations in PBRM1, SETD2, BAP1, and/or KDM5C with 90% certainty. The mutational burden of renal tumors varies by region sampled. Single site assessment of key tumor suppressor mutations in primary ccRCC may not adequately capture the genetic predictors of tumor behavior

  12. Clinical presentation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, R.A.; Ashraf, S.; Jamil, N.

    2015-01-01

    Most common malignant tumour of the kidney is Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and is known for its unpredictable clinical behaviour. Aetiology and risk factors are not completely understood. Extensive workup is being done in the understanding of the disease, especially to diagnose early and to treat promptly. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical presentation and pathological pattern of RCC. Methods: After approval from ethical committee a retrospective review of records was conducted extending from January 2012 to January 2014 to identify clinical characteristics of renal cell carcinomas. The study included all renal cancer patients presented to Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore with in this specified period. The data was retrieved regarding, history, physical examination and necessary investigations such as ultrasonography of abdomen and pelvis and CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. Results: There were total of 50 cases. The male to female ratio was 3:2. Mean age of patients were 52.38 (18-93) years old. Most common clinical presentation was gross haematuria(66%).The mean tumour size was 8.34 (3-24) cm. Tumour histology were clear cell (84%), papillary transitional cell carcinoma (12%) and oncosytoma contributed 4%. Conclusion: We observed that large number of the patients with RCC presented with haematuria and most of them were male. Common pathological type was clear cell carcinoma. (author)

  13. First-line sunitinib versus pazopanib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Results from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Morales, Jose Manuel; Swierkowski, Marcin; Wells, J Connor

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sunitinib (SU) and pazopanib (PZ) are standards of care for first-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, how the efficacy of these drugs translates into effectiveness on a population-based level is unknown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used the International mR...

  14. International variations and trends in renal cell carcinoma incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znaor, Ariana; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Laversanne, Mathieu; Jemal, Ahmedin; Bray, Freddie

    2015-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence rates are higher in developed countries, where up to half of the cases are discovered incidentally. Declining mortality trends have been reported in highly developed countries since the 1990s. To compare and interpret geographic variations and trends in the incidence and mortality of RCC worldwide in the context of controlling the future disease burden. We used data from GLOBOCAN, the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents series, and the World Health Organisation mortality database to compare incidence and mortality rates in more than 40 countries worldwide. We analysed incidence and mortality trends in the last 10 yr using joinpoint analyses of the age-standardised rates (ASRs). RCC incidence in men varied in ASRs (World standard population) from approximately 1/100,000 in African countries to >15/100,000 in several Northern and Eastern European countries and among US blacks. Similar patterns were observed for women, although incidence rates were commonly half of those for men. Incidence rates are increasing in most countries, most prominently in Latin America. Although recent mortality trends are stable in many countries, significant declines were observed in Western and Northern Europe, the USA, and Australia. Southern European men appear to have the least favourable RCC mortality trends. Although RCC incidence is still increasing in most countries, stabilisation of mortality trends has been achieved in many highly developed countries. There are marked absolute differences and opposing RCC mortality trends in countries categorised as areas of higher versus lower human development, and these gaps appear to be widening. Renal cell cancer is becoming more commonly diagnosed worldwide in both men and women. Mortality is decreasing in the most developed settings, but not in low- and middle-income countries, where access to and the availability of optimal therapies are likely to be limited. Copyright © 2014 European Association of

  15. A polymorphism in the splice donor site of ZNF419 results in the novel renal cell carcinoma-associated minor histocompatibility antigen ZAPHIR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Broen

    Full Text Available Nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT can induce remission in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC, but this graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect is often accompanied by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Here, we evaluated minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA-specific T cell responses in two patients with metastatic RCC who were treated with reduced-intensity conditioning SCT followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI. One patient had stable disease and emergence of SMCY.A2-specific CD8+ T cells was observed after DLI with the potential of targeting SMCY-expressing RCC tumor cells. The second patient experienced partial regression of lung metastases from whom we isolated a MiHA-specific CTL clone with the capability of targeting RCC cell lines. Whole genome association scanning revealed that this CTL recognizes a novel HLA-B7-restricted MiHA, designated ZAPHIR, resulting from a polymorphism in the splice donor site of the ZNF419 gene. Tetramer analysis showed that emergence of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood occurred in the absence of GVHD. Furthermore, the expression of ZAPHIR in solid tumor cell lines indicates the involvement of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cell responses in selective GVT immunity. These findings illustrate that the ZNF419-encoded MiHA ZAPHIR is an attractive target for specific immunotherapy after allogeneic SCT.

  16. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middel, Peter; Brauneck, Sven; Meyer, Werner; Radzun, Heinz-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response

  17. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. Methods We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. Results The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Conclusion Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response.

  18. Editor’s Pick: Targeted Agents in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma on Dialysis: Myths and Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Guida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR pathway, as well as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors have revolutionised the therapeutic landscape of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC in the past decade, greatly improving the survival rates of these patients. However, translating results of registrative Phase III trials into everyday clinical practice is often troublesome, since real-world patients are completely different from those enrolled in randomised controlled Phase III trials. Prospective data on active oncological treatments in mRCC patients on dialysis are dramatically lacking. This literature review summarises and critically comments on available data relative to mRCC patients on dialysis receiving either VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents, or mTOR inhibitors. Although prospective studies would definitely be warranted in these specific patient populations, all the available data suggest that mRCC patients on dialysis have the same outcome, both in terms of efficacy and safety, as mRCC patients with normal or marginally impaired kidney function, when treated with VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents and/or mTOR inhibitors.

  19. Hsa-let-7a functions as a tumor suppressor in renal cell carcinoma cell lines by targeting c-myc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yongchao; Yin, Bingde; Zhang, Changcun; Zhou, Libin [Department of Urology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200080 (China); Fan, Jie, E-mail: jief67@sina.com [Department of Urology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200080 (China)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the first to test the let-7a/c-myc loop in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Let-7a down-regulated c-myc in three renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc target genes were down-regulated because of the let-7a-mediated down-regulation of c-myc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The let-7a/c-myc loop has a significant function in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. -- Abstract: Widespread functions of the c-myc pathway play a crucial role in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) carcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated the connection between proto-oncogenic c-myc and anti-neoplastic hsa-let-7a (let-7a) in RCC cell lines. The levels of c-myc and let-7a in 3 RCC cell lines (769P, Caki-1 and 786O) were measured after transfecting the cells with let-7a mimics or a negative control. The change in c-myc protein level was confirmed by Western blot. The anti-neoplastic function of let-7a was evaluated using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for proliferation analysis and cell flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. The changes of downstream targets of c-myc were measured using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results suggest for the first time that let-7a acts as a tumor suppressor in RCC cell lines by down-regulating c-myc and c-myc target genes such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1 (CCND1) and the miR17-92 cluster, which is accompanied by proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest.

  20. Chemosensitization of Human Renal Cell Cancer Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Antiapoptotic Gene Clusterin

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    Tobias Zellweger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal cell cancer (RCC is a chemoresistant disease with no active chemotherapeutic agent achieving objective response rates higher than 15%. Clusterin is a cell survival gene that increases in human renal tubular epithelial cells after various states of injury and disease. Downregulation of clusterin, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO, has recently been shown to increase chemosensitivity in several prostate cancer models. The objectives in this study were to evaluate clusterin expression levels in human RCC and normal kidney tissue, and to test whether clusterin ASO could also enhance chemosensitivity in human RCC Caki-2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining was used to characterize clusterin expression in 67 RCC and normal kidney tissues obtained from radical nephrectomy specimens. Northern blot analysis was used to assess changes in clusterin mRNA expression after ASO and paclitaxel treatment. The effects of combined clusterin ASO and paclitaxel treatment on Caki-2 cell growth was examined using an MTT assay. Athymic mice bearing Caki-2 tumors were treated with clusterin ASO alone, clusterin ASO plus paclitaxel, and mismatch control oligonucleotides plus paclitaxel, over a period of 28 days with measurement of tumor volumes once weekly over 8 weeks. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry of normal and malignant kidney tissue sections of 67 patients demonstrated positive clusterin staining for almost all RCC (98% and an overexpression, compared to normal tissue, in a majority of RCC (69%. Clusterin ASO, but not mismatch control oligonucleotides, decreased clusterin mRNA expression in Caki-2 cells in a dosedependent and sequence-specific manner. Pretreatment of Caki-2 cells with clusterin ASO significantly enhanced chemosensitivity to paclitaxel in vitro. Characteristic apoptotic DNA laddering was observed after combined treatment with ASO plus paclitaxel, but not with either agent alone. In vivo

  1. Assessing the Response to Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Technical Insights and Practical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, A.; Fournier, L.; Lassau, N.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Nathan, P.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Powles, T.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: The introduction of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has resulted in new challenges for assessing response to therapy, and conventional response criteria using computed tomography (CT) are limited. It is widely recognised that targeted therapies may lead to

  2. Targeted therapy of renal cell carcinoma: synergistic activity of cG250-TNF and IFNg.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, S.; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Adrian, N.; Oosterwijk, E.; Fischer, E.; Wuest, T.; Stenner, F.; Perani, A.; Cohen, L.; Knuth, A.; Divgi, C.; Jager, D.; Scott, A.M.; Ritter, G.; Old, L.J.; Renner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic targeting of G250/Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) represents a promising strategy for treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The well characterized human-mouse chimeric G250 (cG250) antibody has been shown in human studies to specifically enrich in CA-IX positive tumors and was

  3. Body Composition in Relation to Clinical Outcomes in Renal Cell Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Alina; Kampman, Ellen; Knijnenburg, Nathalja C.; Mulders, Peter F.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Baracos, Vickie E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Several studies suggest that body composition (ie, body proportions of muscle and fat defined by computed tomography) is associated with clinical outcomes of several cancer types, including renal cell cancer (RCC). Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence

  4. Targeted therapies for renal cell carcinoma: review of adverse event management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisen, T.; Sternberg, C.N.; Robert, C.; Mulders, P.F.; Pyle, L.; Zbinden, S.; Izzedine, H.; Escudier, B.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), overall survival has improved, and patients are being treated continuously for increasingly long periods of time. This has raised challenges in the management of adverse events (AEs) associated with the six targeted

  5. Metastasis is promoted by a bioenergetic switch: New targets for progressive renal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langbein, Sigrun; Frederiks, Wilma M.; zur Hansen, Axel; Popa, Juljane; Lehmann, Jan; Weiss, Christel; Alken, Peter; Coy, Johannes F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted therapies have demonstrated clinical benefit with limited impact on long-term disease specific survival in the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC). New opportunities for the treatment of tumors that are resistant or have relapsed, are needed. Increased anaerobic glucose fermentation to

  6. Review of succinate dehydrogenase-deficient renal cell carcinoma with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Kuroda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC was first identified in 2004 and has been integrated into the 2016 WHO classification of RCC. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH is an enzyme complex composed of four protein subunits (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD. The tumor which presents this enzyme mutation accounts for 0.05 to 0.2% of all renal carcinomas. Multiple tumors may occur in approximately 30% of affected patients. SDHB-deficient RCC is the most frequent, and the tumor histologically consists of cuboidal cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, vacuolization, flocculent intracytoplasmic inclusion and indistinct cell borders. Ultrastructurally, the tumor contains abundant mitochondria. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells are positive for SDHA, but negative for SDHB in SDHB-, SDHC- and SDHD-deficient RCCs. However, SDHA-deficient RCC shows negativity for both SDHA and SDHB. In molecular genetic analyses, a germline mutation in the SDHB , SDHC or SDHD gene (in keeping with most patients having germline mutations in an SDH gene has been identified in patients with or without a family history of renal tumors, paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma or gastrointestinal stromal tumor. While most tumors are low grade, some tumors may behave in an aggressive fashion, particularly if they are high nuclear grade, and have coagulative necrosis or sarcomatoid differentiation.

  7. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate overall survival (OS) after treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Material and methods. One-hundred and forty...

  8. Can duplex Doppler ultrasound replace computerized tomography in staging patients with renal cell carcinoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, SD; Mensink, HJA

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) and computerized tomography (CT) in staging patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sixty-six patients were evaluated pre-operatively with duplex Doppler ultrasound and CT. The results were

  9. Cost utility analysis of everolimus in the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlović, J.; Minović, I.; Bruinsma, A.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) is becoming an important part of Dutch health care expenditure due to expensive pharmaceutical options for disease control and lack of adequate prevention methods. New targeted therapeutics, such as sunitinib, sorafenib and everolimus, have recently

  10. RENAL MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS: RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

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    Elisangela Giachini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of malignant kidney tumors, to contribute to identifying factors which the diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas. Through this study, we understand that kidney disease over the years had higher incidence rates, especially in adults in the sixth decade of life. The renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the third most common malignancy of the genitourinary tract, affecting 2% to 3% of the population. There are numerous ways of diagnosis; however, the most important are ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. In general most of the patients affected by the CCR, have a good prognosis when diagnosed early and subjected to an effective treatment. This study conducted a literature review about the CCR, through this it was possible to understand the development needs of the imaging methods used for precise diagnosis and classification of RCC through the TNM system.

  11. Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

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    Hes Frederik J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A germline mutation in the Von-Hippel Lindau (VHL gene predisposes carriers to development of abundantly vascularised tumours in the retina, cerebellum, spine, kidney, adrenal gland and pancreas. Most VHL patients die from the consequences of cerebellar haemangioblastoma or renal cell carcinoma. The VHL gene is a tumour suppressor gene and is involved in angiogenesis by regulation of the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α. Clinical diagnosis of VHL can be confirmed by molecular genetic analysis of the VHL gene, which is informative in virtually all VHL families. A patient with (suspicion for VHL is an indication for genetic counselling and periodical examination.

  12. Cytoreductive nephrectomy vs medical therapy as initial treatment: a rational approach to the sequence question in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Philippe E; Fishman, Mayer N

    2010-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be considered as two distinct entities: localized and metastatic disease. We conducted a review of the scientific literature published within the past decade pertaining to cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic RCC. Retrospective data and historical prospective series have demonstrated the survival benefit of debulking nephrectomy in well-selected RCC patients. New medical therapies, including vascular endothelial growth factor and mTOR pathway blocking drugs, are active biological agents, with survival improvement and potential regression of metastatic and primary tumors. Our current therapeutic challenge is the optimal integration of multimodal therapy consisting of systemic therapy and surgery including cytoreductive nephrectomy, debulking, and metastasectomy. Empiric data to guide this decision are limited. The decision concerning whether medical or surgical therapy should be the primary treatment approach selected must be made on an individual basis, taking into account patient performance status, clinical parameters, and physician expertise and recommendations, thus making each case a unique therapeutic challenge.

  13. Dendritic-cell-based immunotherapy evokes potent anti-tumor immune responses in CD105+ human renal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Weng, De-Sheng; Pan, Ke; Zhou, Zi-Qi; Pan, Qiu-Zhong; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yan; Jiang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Chang-Long; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Chang, Alfred E; Wicha, Max S; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Li, Qiao; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2017-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapeutic agents; they are usually less sensitive to conventional cancer therapies, and could cause tumor relapse. An ideal therapeutic strategy would therefore be to selectively target and destroy CSCs, thereby preventing tumor relapse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with antigen derived from CD105+ human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) CSCs against renal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified "stem-like" characteristics of CD105+ cells in two human RCC cell lines: A498 and SK-RC-39. Loading with cell lysates did not change the characteristics of the DCs. However, DCs loaded with lysates derived from CD105+ CSCs induced more functionally specific active T cells and specific antibodies against CSCs, and clearly depressed the tumor growth in mice. Our results could form the basis for a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy for human RCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy for primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersaell, Peter J.; Blomgren, Henric; Lax, Ingmar; Kaelkner, Karl-Mikael; Linder, Christina; Lundell, Goeran; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson, Sten; Naeslund, Ingemar; Pisa, Pavel; Svedman, Christer

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated the results of using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for 58 patients with renal cell carcinomas (RCC) who were evaluated restrospectively for response rates, local control rates and side effects. Patients and methods: From October 1997 to January 2003, 50 patients suffering from metastatic RCC and eight patients with inoperable primary RCC received high-dose fraction SRT while placed in a stereotactic body-frame. The most common dose/fractionation schedules used were 8 Gyx4, 10 Gyx4 and 15 Gyx3 during approximately 1 week. Results: SRT-treated tumor lesions regressed totally in 30% of the patients at 3-36 months, whereas 60% of the patients had a partial volume reduction or no change after a median follow-up of 37 months (SD 17.4) for censored and 13 months (SD 12.9) for uncensored patients. Side effects were generally mild. Of 162 treated tumors, only three recurred, yielding a local control rate of 90-98%, considering the 8% non-evaluable sites as defined here. For patients with one to three metastases, the time to new spread was 9 months. Conclusions: Our use of SRT for patients with primary and metastatic RCC yielded a high local control rate with low toxicity. Patients with one to three metastases, local recurrences after nephrectomy or inoperable primary tumors benefited the most, i.e. had fewer distant recurrences (13/23) and longer survival times compared to patients with >3 metastases (24/27 recurrences)

  15. Update on contemporary management of clinically localized renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, J J; Thiel, D D; Castle, E P

    2012-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to increase in incidence with the largest increase manifesting in small, organ-confined tumors. This review outlines the epidemiology and current data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC. In this manuscript, the current data outlining the benefit of nephron sparing to the overall survival of the patient is described. The data pertaining to minimally invasive nephron sparing is also explained in detail. From laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy to watchful waiting and percutaneous ablation, the urologist is continually assaulted with new data for the management of clinically-localized RCC. The data can be confusing, and much of it is conflicting. The addition of new scoring systems or nomograms may aid in predicting which therapy would be most beneficial in certain patient groups. New scoring systems may also predict the difficulty of surgical resection and predict surgical complications. The limitations of the data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC are also outlined.

  16. Evaluation of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bayrak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A subset of renal cell carcinoma (RCC patients has been shown to respond to anti-EGFR therapy. As KRAS and BRAF mutations are associated with poor response to anti-EGFR therapy in some cancers, it has been suggested that screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in RCC may be a promising strategy to identify patients who might respond to EGFR-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation status of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF in RCC patients. Renal tumors and normal renal samples from forty-eight patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer were used in this study. Histological classification of the tumors was performed according to International Union against Cancer (UICC / American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC classification. Seventeen patients (48% had clear-cell RCC, 7 (20% had chromophobe RCC, and 11 patients (32% had papillary RCC. DNA isolated from the samples was subjected to melting curve mutation analysis for EGFR, BRAF and KRAS using ABI-3130 DNA sequencer. DNA sequencing analysis of RCC samples, when compared with morphologically normal matched regions, did not show any exon mutations. Our results do not support the notion that EGFR, KRAS and BRAF might be mutated in RCC. Normal 0 false false false TR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:TR; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  17. Renal Cell Cancer: What Can We Learn from Pre-Operative Studies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James, E-mail: james.larkin@rmh.nhs.uk [Department of Medical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-08

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) affects approximately 60,000 people in Europe and in the United States each year (Ferlay et al., 2007; Jemal et al., 2010), and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The incidence of RCC is rising, perhaps because of the widespread use of abdominal imaging, resulting in an increased detection of small renal masses, and surgical intervention for these (Hollingsworth et al., 2006; Falebita et al., 2009). Surgery remains an integral part of the management of RCC, and is the only curative treatment in patients with disease confined to the kidney and its regional vasculature and lymph nodes. However, about 30% of patients are diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) at presentation (Motzer et al., 1996) and a similar proportion will later develop metastases (Leibovich et al., 2003). Until 2007, a combination of cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) and immunotherapy, usually interferon-α, was considered to be the standard of care for those patients presenting with mRCC deemed fit enough, although cytokine therapy was associated with modest benefits and much toxicity (Coppin et al., 2005). The basis for nephrectomy in the context of metastatic disease was provided by two similar prospective trials which randomized patients to CN plus interferon or interferon alone. Combined analysis of the two trials demonstrated a median survival of 13.6 months for surgery plus interferon, and 7.8 months for interferon alone (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.55–0.87, p = 0.002; Flanigan et al., 2004). The simplest rationale for why CN might improve survival in mRCC is a reduction in overall tumor burden, thus delaying time to a lethal burden of disease; other theories include a decrease in the amount of tumor shedding and systemic signaling from the primary renal mass, effective palliation of pain, bleeding and paraneoplastic syndromes, and removal of a source of significant immunosuppression. The latter was proposed on the basis of reports

  18. Iodine quantification to distinguish clear cell from papillary renal cell carcinoma at dual-energy multidetector CT: a multireader diagnostic performance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileto, Achille; Marin, Daniele; Alfaro-Cordoba, Marcela; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Eusemann, Christian D; Scribano, Emanuele; Blandino, Alfredo; Mazziotti, Silvio; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2014-12-01

    To investigate whether dual-energy multidetector row computed tomographic (CT) imaging with iodine quantification is able to distinguish between clear cell and papillary renal cell carcinoma ( RCC renal cell carcinoma ) subtypes. In this retrospective, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study, 88 patients (57 men, 31 women) with diagnosis of either clear cell or papillary RCC renal cell carcinoma at pathologic analysis, who underwent contrast material-enhanced dual-energy nephrographic phase study between December 2007 and June 2013, were included. Five readers, blinded to pathologic diagnosis, independently evaluated all cases by determining the lesion iodine concentration on color-coded iodine maps. The receiving operating characteristic curve analysis was adopted to estimate the optimal threshold for discriminating between clear cell and papillary RCC renal cell carcinoma , and results were validated by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. Interobserver agreement was assessed by using an intraclass correlation coefficient. The correlation between tumor iodine concentration and tumor grade was investigated. A tumor iodine concentration of 0.9 mg/mL represented the optimal threshold to discriminate between clear cell and papillary RCC renal cell carcinoma , and it yielded the following: sensitivity, 98.2% (987 of 1005 [95% confidence interval: 97.7%, 98.7%]); specificity, 86.3% (272 of 315 [95% confidence interval: 85.0%, 87.7%]); positive predictive value, 95.8% (987 of 1030 [95% confidence interval: 95.0%, 96.6%]); negative predictive value, 93.7% (272 of 290 [95% confidence interval: 92.8%, 94.7%]); overall accuracy of 95.3% (1259 of 1320 [95% confidence interval: 94.6%, 96.2%]), with an area under the curve of 0.923 (95% confidence interval: 0.913, 0.933). An excellent agreement was found among the five readers in measured tumor iodine concentration (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.9990 [95% confidence interval: 0. 9987, 0.9993). A

  19. Prognostic Significance of Blood Type A in Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kyungtae; Park, Young Hyun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kwak, Cheol

    2016-08-25

    In this study, we evaluated the prognostic significance of the ABO blood type in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who had undergone partial or radical nephrectomy. Information on the ABO blood type was obtained from 1750 patients with RCC. A total of 1243 men and 507 women (mean age, 55.41 ± 12.43 years) with RCC who had undergone partial or radical nephrectomy were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up duration was 35.0 months (interquartile range [IQR], 16.0-67.0). During the follow-up period, 271 patients experienced RCC recurrence, and 137 patients died from RCC. Type A was the most common blood type (568, 32.5%), followed by type O (525, 30.0%), type B (464, 26.5%), and type AB (193, 11.0%). Generally, blood type was not associated with any clinicopathological factors. Unlike blood type O, the multivariate analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) showed that blood type non-O (A, B, and AB) was an independent prognostic factor for a worse outcome (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24- 2.37, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.71, P = .001; 95% CI: 1.08-2.13, HR = 1.51, P = .016; 95% CI: 1.03-2.43, HR = 1.58, P = .037, respectively). Cancer-specific survival (CSS) analysis showed that blood type A was an independent factor associated with a worse prognosis for CSS (95% CI: 1.05-2.64, HR 1.66, P = .031, respectively). The ABO blood type is significantly associated with PFS and CSS in patients with RCC following partial or radical nephrectomy. Blood type non-O (A, B, and AB) is an independent prognostic factor for a worse PFS outcome, and blood type A is an independent factor associated with a worse CSS prognosis. .

  20. Renal cell cancer in Israel: sex and ethnic differences in incidence and mortality, 1980-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabeia, Jalal; Kaluski, Dorit Nitzan; Barchana, Micha; Dichtiar, Rita; Green, Manfred S

    2010-06-01

    The causes of renal cell cancer (RCC) remain largely unexplained. While the incidence is generally higher in men than in women, little has been reported on ethnic differences. We examine trends in RCC incidence and mortality rates among Israeli Arab and Jewish populations and compared with the rates in other countries. Age-adjusted RCC incidence and mortality rates in Israel, during 1980-2004, were calculated by sex and population group, using the National Cancer Registry. They were compared with the United States based on the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results [SEER] program and the IARC database for international comparisons. While RCC incidence rates in Israel are similar to the United States and the European average, the rates are significantly higher among Israeli Jews than Arabs. Men are affected more than women. Incidence rates over the last 24 years have increased among all men and Jewish women, but not among Arab women. Among men, the incidence rate ratio for Jews to Arabs declined from 3.96 in 1980-1982 to 2.34 in 2001-2004, whereas for women there was no change. The mortality rates were higher among Jews than Arab and among men than women. There were no significant change in the mortality rates and rate ratios. Our findings demonstrate marked ethnic differences in RCC in Israel. The lower incidence among Arabs stands in contrast to the higher prevalence of potential risk factors for RCC in this population group. Genetic factors, diet and other lifestyle factors could play protective roles. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Safety and efficacy results of the advanced renal cell carcinoma sorafenib expanded access program in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Walter M; Figlin, Robert A; McDermott, David F; Dutcher, Janice P; Knox, Jennifer J; Miller, Wilson H; Hainsworth, John D; Henderson, Charles A; George, Jeffrey R; Hajdenberg, Julio; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Ernstoff, Marc S; Drabkin, Harry A; Curti, Brendan D; Chu, Luis; Ryan, Christopher W; Hotte, Sebastien J; Xia, Chenghua; Cupit, Lisa; Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-03-01

    The Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Sorafenib (ARCCS) program made sorafenib available to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) before regulatory approval. In this nonrandomized, open-label expanded access program, 2504 patients from the United States and Canada were treated with oral sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. Safety and efficacy were explored overall and in subgroups of patients including those with no prior therapy, nonclear cell (nonclear cell) RCC, brain metastases, prior bevacizumab treatment, and elderly patients. Sorafenib was approved for RCC 6 months after study initiation, at which time patients with no prior therapy or with nonclear cell RCC could enroll in an extension protocol for continued assessment for a period of 6 months. The most common grade > or =2 drug-related adverse events were hand-foot skin reaction (18%), rash (14%), hypertension (12%), and fatigue (11%). In the 1891 patients evaluable for response, complete response was observed in 1 patient, partial response in 67 patients (4%), and stable disease for at least 8 weeks in 1511 patients (80%). Median progression-free survival in the extension population was 36 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI], 33-45 weeks; censorship rate, 56%); median overall survival in the entire population was 50 weeks (95% CI, 46-52 weeks; censorship rate, 63%). The efficacy and safety results were similar across the subgroups. Sorafenib 400 mg twice daily demonstrated activity and a clinically acceptable toxicity profile in all patient subsets enrolled in the ARCCS expanded access program (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00111020).

  2. Anti tumor vaccination with hybrid dendritic-tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuto, Jose Alexandre M.; Neves, Andreia R.; Ensina, Luis Felipe C.; Anselmo, Luciene B.

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and the possibility of their use for cancer vaccination has renewed the interest in this therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, the ideal immunization protocol with these cells has not been described yet. In this paper we describe the preliminary results of a protocol using autologous tumor and allogeneic dendritic hybrid cell vaccination every 6 weeks, for metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Thirty-five patients were enrolled between March 2001 and March 2003. Though all patients included presented with large tumor burdens and progressive diseases, 71% of them experienced stability after vaccination, with durations up to 19 months. Among RCC patients 3/22 (14%) presented objective responses. The median time to progression was 4 months for melanoma and 5.7 months for RCC patients; no significant untoward effects were noted. Furthermore, immune function, as evaluated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens and by peripheral blood proliferative responses to tumor-specific and nonspecific stimuli, presented a clear tendency to recover in vaccinated patients. These data indicate that dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrid vaccination affects the natural history of advanced cancer and provide support for its study in less advanced patients, who should, more likely, benefit even more from this approach. (author)

  3. Identification of Molecular Tumor Markers in Renal Cell Carcinomas with TFE3 Protein Expression by RNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Pflueger

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma (tRCC is defined by chromosomal translocations involving the TFE3 transcription factor at chromosome Xp11.2. Genetically proven TFE3 tRCCs have a broad histologic spectrum with overlapping features to other renal tumor subtypes. In this study,we aimed for characterizing RCC with TFE3 protein expression. Using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq as a discovery tool, we analyzed fusion transcripts, gene expression profile, and somatic mutations in frozen tissue of one TFE3 tRCC. By applying a computational analysis developed to call chimeric RNA molecules from paired-end RNA-Seq data, we confirmed the known TFE3 translocation. Its fusion partner SFPQ has already been described as fusion partner in tRCCs. In addition, an RNAread-through chimera between TMED6 and COG8 as well as MET and KDR (VEGFR2 point mutations were identified. An EGFR mutation, but no chromosomal rearrangements, was identified in a control group of five clear cell RCCs (ccRCCs. The TFE3 tRCC could be clearly distinguished from the ccRCCs by RNA-Seq gene expression measurements using a previously reported tRCC gene signature. In validation experiments using reverse transcription-PCR, TMED6-COG8 chimera expression was significantly higher in nine TFE3 translocated and six TFE3-expressing/non-translocated RCCs than in 24 ccRCCs (P<.001 and 22 papillaryRCCs (P<.05-.07. Immunohistochemical analysis of selected genes from the tRCC gene signature showed significantly higher eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 2 (EEF1A2 and Contactin 3 (CNTN3 expression in 16 TFE3 translocated and six TFE3-expressing/non-translocated RCCs than in over 200 ccRCCs (P < .0001, both.

  4. Axitinib in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma: design, development, and place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellesoeur A

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audrey Bellesoeur, Edith Carton, Jerome Alexandre, Francois Goldwasser, Olivier Huillard Department of Medical Oncology, Hopital Cochin AP-HP, Paris, France Abstract: Since 2005, the approved first-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma consists in tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs. Axitinib is an oral second-generation TKI and a potent VEGFR inhibitor with a half maximal inhibitory concentration for the VEGF family receptors 10-fold lower than other TKIs. Axitinib activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC patients has been studied in various settings and particularly as second-line treatment. In this setting, axitinib with clinically based dose escalation compared to sorafenib has demonstrated an improvement in progression-free survival in a randomized Phase III trial leading to US Food and Drug Administration approval. In the first-line setting, axitinib failed to demonstrate improved efficacy over sorafenib, but the field of RCC treatment is rapidly changing with novel TKIs as cabozantinib or the emergence of check point inhibitors as nivolumab and the place of axitinib in therapy is therefore challenged. In this review, we focus on axitinib pharmacological and clinical properties in RCC patients and discuss its place in the treatment of patients with RCC. Keywords: renal cell carcinoma, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor, axitinib, pharmacology

  5. MicroRNA-214 Reduces Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Receptor Expression and Downstream mTORC1 Signaling in Renal Carcinoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Falguni; Dey, Nirmalya; Bera, Amit; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Elevated IGF-1/insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) autocrine/paracrine signaling in patients with renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis of the disease independent of their von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) status. Increased expression of IGF-1R in renal cancer cells correlates with their potency of tumor development and progression. The mechanism by which expression of IGF-1R is increased in renal carcinoma is not known. We report that VHL-deficient and VHL-positive renal cancer cells possess significantly decreased levels of mature, pre-, and pri-miR-214 than normal proximal tubular epithelial cells. We identified an miR-214 recognition element in the 3′UTR of IGF-1R mRNA and confirmed its responsiveness to miR-214. Overexpression of miR-214 decreased the IGF-1R protein levels, resulting in the inhibition of Akt kinase activity in both types of renal cancer cells. IGF-1 provoked phosphorylation and inactivation of PRAS40 in an Akt-dependent manner, leading to the activation of mTORC1 signal transduction to increase phosphorylation of S6 kinase and 4EBP-1. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants of PRAS40 and 4EBP-1 significantly inhibited IGF-1R-driven proliferation of renal cancer cells. Expression of miR-214 suppressed IGF-1R-induced phosphorylation of PRAS40, S6 kinase, and 4EBP-1, indicating inhibition of mTORC1 activity. Finally, miR-214 significantly blocked IGF-1R-forced renal cancer cell proliferation, which was reversed by expression of 3′UTR-less IGF-1R and constitutively active mTORC1. Together, our results identify a reciprocal regulation of IGF-1R levels and miR-214 expression in renal cancer cells independent of VHL status. Our data provide evidence for a novel mechanism for IGF-1R-driven renal cancer cell proliferation involving miR-214 and mTORC1. PMID:27226530

  6. C-reactive protein in patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Usefulness in identifying patients most likely to benefit from initial nephrectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroki; Kishida, Takeshi; Miura, Takeshi; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Yao, Masahiro; Shioi, Koichi; Murakami, Takayuki; Takizawa, Akitoshi; Sano, Futoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Mizuno, Nobuhiko; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered a useful serum marker for patients with RCC. However, its clinical utility in advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma (AM-RCC), particularly in deciding whether to perform nephrectomy at the onset, is not well studied. We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with AM-RCC, including 18 patients underwent potentially curative surgery, 111 underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy, and 52 received medical treatment only. CRP cutoff points were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used for survival tests. ROC analysis suggested that grouping patients according to 3 CRP ranges was a rational model. Patients with highly elevated CRP (≥67.0 mg/L) presented remarkably poor prognosis despite treatment (nephrectomy or medical treatment only). Cox regression models demonstrated that risk factors of overall survival for patients who underwent nephrectomy were the CRP ranges defined in this study (≤18.0 mg/L, >18.0 and <67.0 mg/L, and ≥67.0 mg/L), ECOG PS (0, 1, and ≥2), and number of metastatic organ sites (0–1 and ≥2). The retrospective design is a limitation of this study. Our study demonstrated that the serum CRP level is a statistically significant prognostic parameter for patients with AM-RCC. The data also indicated that pretreatment serum CRP level provides useful prognostic information that helps in deciding whether to perform initial nephrectomy for patients with AM-RCC

  7. Attenuation of everolimus-induced cytotoxicity by a protective autophagic pathway involving ERK activation in renal cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yizhou; Tian, Xiaofang; Wang, Quan; He, Weiyang; Fan, Jing; Gou, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Aim The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical target for cancer treatment and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) has been approved for treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the limited efficacy of RAD001 has led to the development of drug resistance. Autophagy is closely related to cell survival and death, which may be activated under RAD001 stimulation. The aim of the present study was to identify the underlying mechanisms of RAD001 resistance in RCC cells through cytoprotective autophagy involving activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Methods and results: RAD001 strongly induced autophagy of RCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. Importantly, suppression of autophagy by the pharmacological inhibitor chloroquine effectively enhanced RAD001-induced apoptotic cytotoxicity, as demonstrated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Western blot analysis, indicating a cytoprotective role for RAD001-induced autophagy. In addition, as was shown by the MTT assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, RAD001 robustly activated ERK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Activation of ERK was inhibited by the pharmacological inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244), which effectively promoted RAD001-induced cell death. Moreover, employing AZD6244 markedly attenuated RAD001-induced autophagy and enhanced RAD001-induced apoptosis, which play a central role in RAD001-induced cell death. Furthermore, RAD001-induced autophagy is regulated by ERK-mediated phosphorylation of Beclin-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. Conclusion These results suggest that RAD001-induced autophagy involves activation of the ERK, which may impair cytotoxicity of RAD001 in RCC cells. Thus, inhibition of the activation of ERK pathway-mediated autophagy may be useful to overcome chemoresistance to RAD001. PMID:29719377

  8. Body Composition in Relation to Clinical Outcomes in Renal Cell Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieling, Alina; Kampman, Ellen; Knijnenburg, Nathalja C; Mulders, Peter F; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Baracos, Vickie E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2016-12-04

    Several studies suggest that body composition (ie, body proportions of muscle and fat defined by computed tomography) is associated with clinical outcomes of several cancer types, including renal cell cancer (RCC). To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence on body composition in relation to clinical outcomes in RCC. Literature was reviewed through October 2016 using PubMed and Embase. We included studies investigating computed tomography-measured cross-sectional areas of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), perinephric fat, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), skeletal muscle index (SMI), and skeletal muscle radiodensity (SMD) in relation to perioperative outcomes, treatment toxicity, and survival in RCC patients. We included 28 studies with a total of 6608 patients. Binary classification of body composition was used in most studies. In metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients treated with antiangiogenic drugs, dose-limiting toxicity was more frequent in patients with low versus high SMI (four studies, risk difference = 16%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2-31%, p = 0.03, I 2 = 26%). Low versus high SMI (six studies, hazard ratio = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.08-2.03, p = 0.02, I 2 = 28%) and SMD (four studies, HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.20-2.03, p = 0.0008, I 2 = 0%) were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in mRCC. Low versus high VAT and perinephric fat were not consistently associated with perioperative outcomes and survival. No associations for SAT were found. Low SMI is associated with increased dose-limiting toxicity, and low SMI and SMD are associated with increased overall mortality in mRCC. The association of VAT, perinephric fat, and SAT with clinical outcomes needs further investigation, also in localized RCC. We reviewed studies assessing the association of body composition with clinical outcomes in renal cell cancer. We demonstrated higher risk of dose-limiting toxicity and overall mortality for metastatic renal cell cancer patients with low

  9. Phase I/II safety study of transfusion of prion-filtered red cell concentrates in transfusion-dependent patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, M R

    2010-08-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) is a fatal transfusion transmissible prion infection. No test for vCJD in the donor population is currently available. Therefore, prion removal by filtration of red cell concentrate (RCC) is an attractive option for prevention.

  10. Generation of chimeric bispecific G250/anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a tool to combat renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Coney, L. R.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) G250 binds to a tumour-associated antigen, expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which has been demonstrated to be a suitable target for antibody-mediated immunotherapy. A bispecific antibody having both G250 and anti-CD3 specificity can cross-link G250

  11. Superior target delineation for stereotactic body radiotherapy of bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma on MRI compared to CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Fieke M.; Van Der Velden, Joanne M.; Gerlich, Anne S.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Eppinga, Wietse S.C.; Kasperts, Nicolien; Verlaan, Jorrit J.; Pameijer, Frank A.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) there has been a treatment shift towards targeted therapy, which has resulted in improved overall survival. Therefore, there is a need for better local control of the tumor and its metastases. Image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma of the Kidney with Synchronous Ipsilateral Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Atilgan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with flank pain and gross macroscopic hematuria. Radiologic examination revealed a solid mass in the left kidney and additionally another mass in the ureteropelvic junction of the same kidney with severe hydronephrosis. Left nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff removel was performed, and histopathological evolution showed a Fuhrman grade 3 clear cell type RCC with low-grade TCC of the pelvis.

  13. Guidelines for the definition of time-to-event end points in renal cell cancer clinical trials: results of the DATECAN project†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramar, A; Negrier, S; Sylvester, R; Joniau, S; Mulders, P; Powles, T; Bex, A; Bonnetain, F; Bossi, A; Bracarda, S; Bukowski, R; Catto, J; Choueiri, T K; Crabb, S; Eisen, T; El Demery, M; Fitzpatrick, J; Flamand, V; Goebell, P J; Gravis, G; Houédé, N; Jacqmin, D; Kaplan, R; Malavaud, B; Massard, C; Melichar, B; Mourey, L; Nathan, P; Pasquier, D; Porta, C; Pouessel, D; Quinn, D; Ravaud, A; Rolland, F; Schmidinger, M; Tombal, B; Tosi, D; Vauleon, E; Volpe, A; Wolter, P; Escudier, B; Filleron, T

    2015-12-01

    In clinical trials, the use of intermediate time-to-event end points (TEEs) is increasingly common, yet their choice and definitions are not standardized. This limits the usefulness for comparing treatment effects between studies. The aim of the DATECAN Kidney project is to clarify and recommend definitions of TEE in renal cell cancer (RCC) through a formal consensus method for end point definitions. A formal modified Delphi method was used for establishing consensus. From a 2006-2009 literature review, the Steering Committee (SC) selected 9 TEE and 15 events in the nonmetastatic (NM) and metastatic/advanced (MA) RCC disease settings. Events were scored on the range of 1 (totally disagree to include) to 9 (totally agree to include) in the definition of each end point. Rating Committee (RC) experts were contacted for the scoring rounds. From these results, final recommendations were established for selecting pertinent end points and the associated events. Thirty-four experts scored 121 events for 9 end points. Consensus was reached for 31%, 43% and 85% events during the first, second and third rounds, respectively. The expert recommend the use of three and two endpoints in NM and MA setting, respectively. In the NM setting: disease-free survival (contralateral RCC, appearance of metastases, local or regional recurrence, death from RCC or protocol treatment), metastasis-free survival (appearance of metastases, regional recurrence, death from RCC); and local-regional-free survival (local or regional recurrence, death from RCC). In the MA setting: kidney cancer-specific survival (death from RCC or protocol treatment) and progression-free survival (death from RCC, local, regional, or metastatic progression). The consensus method revealed that intermediate end points have not been well defined, because all of the selected end points had at least one event definition for which no consensus was obtained. These clarified definitions of TEE should become standard practice in

  14. The Role of Everolimus in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Meskawi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Everolimus (RAD001 is an orally administered agent that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin serine-threonine kinase. A phase III pivotal trial on everolimus, published in 2008, provided the first evidence for the efficacy of sequential therapy for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC. In this study, everolimus was used after failure of one or several previous lines of therapy, and it demonstrated a 3-month survival benefit relative to placebo. Currently, based on the level 1 evidence, everolimus represents the molecule of choice for third-line therapy after failure of previous two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. However, second-line use after failure of one TKI is challenged by two new molecules (nivolumab and cabozantinib, which proved to have better efficacy with similar toxicity profile. In non-clear cell metastatic RCC, the current evidence recommends everolimus as a second-line therapy after failure of previous first-line sunitinib.

  15. Phase I dose escalation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of naptumomab estafenatox alone in patients with advanced cancer and with docetaxel in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghaei, Hossein; Alpaugh, Katherine; Hedlund, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    recognizing the tumor-associated antigen 5T4. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer (PC), and renal cell cancer (RCC) received 5 daily boluses of ABR-217620 (3-month cycles) in escalating doses to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD; ABR-217620 dose...

  16. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford R Hirsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future.

  17. ROLE OF THE MORPHOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF INTRATUMORAL MICROVESSELS AND THE PROLIFERATIVE ACTIVITY OF TUMOR CELLS IN RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Gorban

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential factors for tumor growth, progression, and metastasis.Objective: to assess the relationship between the values of proliferative activity and the morphometric parameters of intratumoral microvessels in metastatic and localized carcinomas of the kidney.Materials and methods. Surgical specimens taken from 54 patients (32 men and 22 women aged 26 to 69 years (mean age 55 ± 1.5 years with the verified diagnosis of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC were studied.Conclusion. Proliferative activity and angioarchitectonics are an important biological characteristic of a tumor of unequal clinical value in RCC. Metastatic carcinoma has a higher proliferative activity and a low tumor vascularization than those of localized carcinoma.

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-06-07

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50-80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen.

  19. Integrative genome-wide gene expression profiling of clear cell renal cell carcinoma in Czech Republic and in the United States.

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    Magdalena B Wozniak

    Full Text Available Gene expression microarray and next generation sequencing efforts on conventional, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC have been mostly performed in North American and Western European populations, while the highest incidence rates are found in Central/Eastern Europe. We conducted whole-genome expression profiling on 101 pairs of ccRCC tumours and adjacent non-tumour renal tissue from Czech patients recruited within the "K2 Study", using the Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChips to explore the molecular variations underlying the biological and clinical heterogeneity of this cancer. Differential expression analysis identified 1650 significant probes (fold change ≥2 and false discovery rate <0.05 mapping to 630 up- and 720 down-regulated unique genes. We performed similar statistical analysis on the RNA sequencing data of 65 ccRCC cases from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project and identified 60% (402 of the downregulated and 74% (469 of the upregulated genes found in the K2 series. The biological characterization of the significantly deregulated genes demonstrated involvement of downregulated genes in metabolic and catabolic processes, excretion, oxidation reduction, ion transport and response to chemical stimulus, while simultaneously upregulated genes were associated with immune and inflammatory responses, response to hypoxia, stress, wounding, vasculature development and cell activation. Furthermore, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of 317 TCGA ccRCC/adjacent non-tumour renal tissue pairs indicated that deregulation of approximately 7% of genes could be explained by epigenetic changes. Finally, survival analysis conducted on 89 K2 and 464 TCGA cases identified 8 genes associated with differential prognostic outcomes. In conclusion, a large proportion of ccRCC molecular characteristics were common to the two populations and several may have clinical implications when validated further through large clinical cohorts.

  20. Renal Sinus Fat Invasion and Tumoral Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava-Renal Vein: Only Confined to Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Turker Acar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid angiomyolipoma (E-AML, accounting for 8% of renal angiomyolipoma, is usually associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS and demonstrates aggressive behavior. E-AML is macroscopically seen as a large infiltrative necrotic tumor with occasional extension into renal vein and/or inferior vena cava. However, without history of TS, renal sinus and venous invasion E-AML would be a challenging diagnosis, which may lead radiologists to misinterpret it as a renal cell carcinoma (RCC. In this case presentation, we aimed to report cross-sectional imaging findings of two cases diagnosed as E-AML and pathological correlation of these aforementioned masses mimicking RCC.

  1. Renal sinus fat invasion and tumoral thrombosis of the inferior vena cava-renal vein: only confined to renal cell carcinoma.

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    Acar, Turker; Harman, Mustafa; Guneyli, Serkan; Sen, Sait; Elmas, Nevra

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid angiomyolipoma (E-AML), accounting for 8% of renal angiomyolipoma, is usually associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS) and demonstrates aggressive behavior. E-AML is macroscopically seen as a large infiltrative necrotic tumor with occasional extension into renal vein and/or inferior vena cava. However, without history of TS, renal sinus and venous invasion E-AML would be a challenging diagnosis, which may lead radiologists to misinterpret it as a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this case presentation, we aimed to report cross-sectional imaging findings of two cases diagnosed as E-AML and pathological correlation of these aforementioned masses mimicking RCC.

  2. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Thyroid Gland, Presenting Like Anaplastic Carcinoma of Thyroid

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    Khalid Riaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has unpredictable and diverse behavior. The classic triad of hematuria, loin pain, and abdominal mass is uncommon. At time of diagnosis, 25%–30% of patients are found to have metastases. Bones, lungs, liver, and brain are the frequent sites of metastases. RCC with metastasis to the head and neck region and thyroid gland is the rarest manifestation and anaplastic carcinoma behaving metastatic thyroid mass is an extremely rare presentation of RCC. Case Presentation. A 56-year-old Saudi man with past history of right radical nephrectomy 5 years back presented with 3 months history of rapid increasing neck mass with dysphagia, presenting like anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Tru-cut biopsy turned out to be metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient was treated with radiation therapy 30 Gy in 10 fractions to mass. Patient died 4 months after the discovery of anaplastic thyroid looking metastasis. Conclusion. Rapidly progressing thyroid metastases secondary to RCC are rare and found often unresectable which are not amenable to surgery. Palliative radiotherapy can be considered for such patients.

  3. Despite differential gene expression profiles pediatric MDS derived mesenchymal stromal cells display functionality in vitro.

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    Calkoen, F G J; Vervat, C; van Pel, M; de Haas, V; Vijfhuizen, L S; Eising, E; Kroes, W G M; 't Hoen, P A C; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Egeler, R M; van Tol, M J D; Ball, L M

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous disease covering a spectrum ranging from aplasia (RCC) to myeloproliferation (RAEB(t)). In adult-type MDS there is increasing evidence for abnormal function of the bone-marrow microenvironment. Here, we extensively studied the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from children with MDS. MSCs were expanded from the bone-marrow of 17 MDS patients (RCC: n=10 and advanced MDS: n=7) and pediatric controls (n=10). No differences were observed with respect to phenotype, differentiation capacity, immunomodulatory capacity or hematopoietic support. mRNA expression analysis by Deep-SAGE revealed increased IL-6 expression in RCC- and RAEB(t)-MDS. RCC-MDS MSC expressed increased levels of DKK3, a protein associated with decreased apoptosis. RAEB(t)-MDS revealed increased CRLF1 and decreased DAPK1 expressions. This pattern has been associated with transformation in hematopoietic malignancies. Genes reported to be differentially expressed in adult MDS-MSC did not differ between MSC of pediatric MDS and controls. An altered mRNA expression profile, associated with cell survival and malignant transformation, of MSC derived from children with MDS strengthens the hypothesis that the micro-environment is of importance in this disease. Our data support the understanding that pediatric and adult MDS are two different diseases. Further evaluation of the pathways involved might reveal additional therapy targets. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Red cell concentrate storage and transport temperature.

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    Hancock, V; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the current U.K. guidelines for storage and transport of red cell concentrates (RCC) in saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol (SAGM). The guidelines stipulate storage at 2-6 °C but allow exposure to between 1-10 °C core temperature in a single occurrence of less than 5 h and a surface temperature of 2-10 °C for no more than 12 h during transportation. Twenty RCC units in SAGM were selected on the day of blood collection (day 0) and in vitro quality was tested pre- and post-temperature deviation at 10 °C and up to day 42 of storage. Each group of 10 RCC units was incubated for either 12 h or for both 5 and 12 h. Haemolysis was below the 0·8% U.K. limit at day 42 in all units, although there was an unexpected trend towards lower haemolysis in packs incubated for 5 and 12 h rather than just 12 h alone. Supernatant potassium was significantly higher than reference data on day 35 (P levels of adenosine triphosphate and, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to reference data from previous studies, throughout storage. These results suggest that exposure to 10 °C for 12 h or for 5 and 12 h did not adversely affect in vitro red cell quality for the remainder of the components shelf life. © 2011 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2011 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  5. Clinical Study on Patients with Renal-Cell Carcinoma Accompanied with Von Hippel Lindau Disease Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

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    波越, 朋也; 島本, 力; 辛島, 尚; 亀井, 麻依子; 福原, 秀雄; 深田, 聡; 佐竹, 宏文; 蘆田, 真吾; 山崎, 一郎; 鎌田, 雅行; 井上, 啓史; 山西, 伴明; 小川,