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Sample records for rays spectrometers metodos

  1. Methods for fitting of efficiency curves obtained by means of HPGe gamma rays spectrometers; Metodos de ajuste de curvas de eficiencia obtidas por meio de espectrometros de HPGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Vanderlei

    2002-07-01

    The present work describes a few methodologies developed for fitting efficiency curves obtained by means of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The interpolated values were determined by simple polynomial fitting and polynomial fitting between the ratio of experimental peak efficiency and total efficiency, calculated by Monte Carlo technique, as a function of gamma-ray energy. Moreover, non-linear fitting has been performed using a segmented polynomial function and applying the Gauss-Marquardt method. For the peak area obtainment different methodologies were developed in order to estimate the background area under the peak. This information was obtained by numerical integration or by using analytical functions associated to the background. One non-calibrated radioactive source has been included in the curve efficiency in order to provide additional calibration points. As a by-product, it was possible to determine the activity of this non-calibrated source. For all fittings developed in the present work the covariance matrix methodology was used, which is an essential procedure in order to give a complete description of the partial uncertainties involved. (author)

  2. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  3. The Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, W. C.; Binder, A. B.; Hubbard, G. S.; McMurry, R. E., Jr.; Miller, M. C.; Prettyman, T. H.

    1996-03-01

    The third mission in the NASA Discovery series is Lunar Prospector. It is scheduled for launch on 9 October, 1997 into a circular, 100 km altitude lunar polar orbit. The nominal mission lifetime is one year. One of the five components of its experimental payload is a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS), whose primary scientific objective is to provide global maps of the lunar elemental composition to depths of 20 cm. Scientifically discriminating results are expected for Fe, Ti, U, Th, K, Si, O, and perhaps Al, Ca, and Mg. In combination with a separate neutron spectrometer, also included on Lunar Prospector, a secondary objective of GRS is to search for, and determine the abundance of water ice to depths of 50 cm within permanently shaded craters at the lunar poles. Both experiments will also be used to search for, and determine the abundance of hydrogen implanted by the solar wind into lunar regolith to depths of 50 cm, thereby providing maps of regolith maturity. All Lunar Prospector experiments will be mounted at the ends of three, 1.9-m long booms that define the spin-plane of the satellite. The Lunar Prospector spin axis will be perpendicular to the lunar orbital plane and be flipped by 180deg half way through the mission.

  4. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  5. [Development of X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chen; Gu, Mu; Di, Wang; Cao, Dun-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Huang, Shi-Ming

    2009-08-01

    An X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer was developed with an X-ray tube and a spectrometer. The X-ray tube, spectrometer, autocontrol method and data processing selected were roundly evaluated. The wavelength and detecting efficiency of the apparatus were calibrated with the mercury and tungsten bromine standard lamps, and the X-ray excited emission spectra of BaF2, Cs I (Tl) crystals were measured. The results indicate that the apparatus has advantages of good wavelength resolution, high stability, easy to operation and good radioprotection. It is a wery effective tool for exploration of new scintillation materials.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in himematsutake was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The atomic percentage of the metals was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Results show that the accumulation of ...

  7. New X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Molecular Structures

    2016-07-01

    A preliminary Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer has recently been installed and tested at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL). The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle with 1 m diameter. The instrument has been tested at the Zr-K edge.

  8. [The X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Based on Pyroelectric Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-fan; Fan, Rui-rui; Guo, Dong-ya; Zhang, Chun-lei; Gao, Min; Wang, Jin-zhou; Liu, Ya-qing; Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huan-yu

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric X-ray generator is implemented, and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is accomplished by combining the pyroelectric X-ray generator with a high energy resolution silicon drift detector. Firstly, the parameters of the X-ray generator are decided by analyzing and calculating the influence of the thickness of the pyroelectriccrystal and the thickness of the target on emitted X-ray. Secondly, the emitted X-ray is measured. The energy of emitted X-ray is from 1 to 27 keV, containing the characteristic X-ray of Cu and Ta, and the max counting rate is more than 3 000 per second. The measurement also proves that the detector of the spectrometer has a high energy resolution which the FWMH is 210 eV at 8. 05 keV. Lastly, samples of Fe, Ti, Cr and high-Ti basalt are analyzed using the spectrometer, and the results are agreed with the elements of the samples. It shows that the spectrometer consisting of a pyroelectric X-ray generator and a silicon drift detector is effective for element analysis. Additionally, because each part of the spectrometer has a small volume, it can be easily modified to a portable one which is suitable for non-destructive, on-site and quick element analysis.

  9. Method of fabricating an imaging X-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, G. E.; Burgess, A. S.

    1986-10-01

    A process for fabricating an X-ray spectrometer having imaging and energy resolution of X-ray sources is discussed. The spectrometer has an array of adjoinging rectangularly shaped detector cells formed in a silicon body. The walls of the cells are created by laser drilling holes completely through the silicon body and diffusing n(+) phosphorous doping material therethrough. A thermally migrated aluminum electrode is formed centrally through each of the cells.

  10. Milli X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Eagle III Micro XRF unit is similar to a traditional XRF unit, with the primary difference being that the X-rays are focused by a polycapillary optic into a spot...

  11. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  12. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G.T.; Webb, Z.W.; Bradley, J.A.; Nagle, K.P.; Heald, S.M.; Gordon, R.A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2008-01-01

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed ???1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K?? x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L??2 partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary. ?? 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  13. X-ray Crystal Spectrometers and Monochromators in Microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittry, David B.; Barbi, Nicholas C.

    2001-03-01

    Castaing's successful implementation and application of the electron probe microanalyzer in 1950 stimulated a flurry of development activity around the world. The later versions of this instrument represented a truly international effort, with significant contributions by scientists from Europe, Asia, and North America. If the probe-forming system of the instrument was its heart, the X-ray wavelength spectrometer was its soul. This article reviews some of the history of spectrometer developments-through the "golden years" of microprobe development, namely the dozen or so years following the publication of Castaing's thesis, to the present. The basic physics of spectrometer and crystal design is reviewed. Early experimental devices, such as those developed by Castaing, Borovskii, Wittry, Duncumb, and Ogilvie are reported. Examples of commercial spectrometers such as those by ARL, MAC, Microspec, and Peak are described. Recent developments such as the combination of grazing-incidence optics with flat crystal spectrometers are noted, and the properties and uses of doubly curved crystals are discussed. Finally, the continued development of doubly curved crystal configurations, such as the "Wittry geometry" for scanning monochromators, and point-to-point focusing diffractors for producing small monochromatic X-ray probes to provide improved detection limits for microanalysis are considered.

  14. The Bragg solar x-ray spectrometer SolpeX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ścisłowski, D.; Sylwester, J.; Steślicki, M.; Płocieniak, S.; Bąkała, J.; Szaforz, Ż.; Kowaliński, M.; Podgórski, P.; Trzebiński, W.; Hernandez, J.; Barylak, J.; Barylak, A.; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-09-01

    Detection of polarization and spectra measurement of X-ray solar flare emission are indispensable in improving our understanding of the processes releasing energy of these most energetic phenomena in the solar system. We shall present some details of the construction of SolpeX - an innovative Bragg soft X-ray flare polarimeter and spectrometer. The instrument is a part of KORTES - Russian instrument complex to be mounted aboard the science module to be attached to the International Space Station (2017/2018). The SolpeX will be composed of three individual measuring units: the soft X-ray polarimeter with 1-2% linear polarization detection threshold, a fast-rotating flat crystal X-ray spectrometer with a very high time resolution (0.1 s) and a simple pinhole soft X-ray imager-spectrometer with a moderate spatial (~20 arcsec), spectral (0.5 keV) and high time resolution (0.1 s). Having a fast rotating unit to be served with power, telemetry and "intelligence" poses a challenge for the designer. Some of the solutions to this will be provided and described.

  15. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 AND V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 AND data set is a table of neutron data from the NS sub-system of the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer that have been...

  16. Progress in reflection grating spectrometers for X-ray astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.

    2017-08-01

    Soft X-ray spectroscopy can address future science goals pertaining to understanding the cycle of hot baryons in the universe. Detailing feedback processes in galaxies, mapping the distribution of baryons in the circum- and intergalactic medium, and unraveling unknowns in stellar life cycles places demanding requirements upon spectrometers. Here, we detail advancements in reflection grating technologies that can be used to help provide answers to these important questions. We also discuss possible applications including a configuration for the Lynx concept strategic mission.

  17. Neutron diagnostics using compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S. P.; Kang, B. S. [Lab. Of Radiation Convergence Science, Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. S.; Cheon, M. S.; Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Various neutron diagnostic systems such as a fission chamber, stilbene spectrometers, and a neutron activation system (NAS) have been installed at KSTAR for more accurate detection of neutron flux. Among the systems, the NAS is the most reliable and robust tool, and the measurement data of it generally are to be used for calibration of other systems. The Compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer which can suppress the expected background, noise signal and Compton scattering was used to measure the gamma-rays of neutron activated samples. In this study, the encapsulated indium samples which are installed and irradiated by the neutrons released from the nuclear fusion reactions in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) was used and measured using Compton suppressed gamma-ray spectrometer to minimize the measurement error. From the experimental results, the statistical error was decreased by Compton suppression system. the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the Compton suppressed system is estimated to be about 2.3 %, and the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the non-suppressed system was estimated to be about 4.9 %. It was found that the system can reduce the measurement error effectively. It is confirmed that this system can be applied to ITER TBM and future nuclear fusion devices.

  18. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  19. Handheld dual thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Tupitsyn, Yevgeniy

    2017-05-02

    A combined thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer system, including: a first detection medium including a lithium chalcopyrite crystal operable for detecting neutrons; a gamma ray shielding material disposed adjacent to the first detection medium; a second detection medium including one of a doped metal halide, an elpasolite, and a high Z semiconductor scintillator crystal operable for detecting gamma rays; a neutron shielding material disposed adjacent to the second detection medium; and a photodetector coupled to the second detection medium also operable for detecting the gamma rays; wherein the first detection medium and the second detection medium do not overlap in an orthogonal plane to a radiation flux. Optionally, the first detection medium includes a .sup.6LiInSe.sub.2 crystal. Optionally, the second detection medium includes a SrI.sub.2(Eu) scintillation crystal.

  20. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; 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Myagkov, A.G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nakatsuka, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N.R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S.K.; Neal, H.A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T.K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A.A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M.S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R.M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F.M.; Nickerson, R.B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozicka, M.; Nugent, I.M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D.C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F.G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S.H.; Ohm, C.C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olchevski, A.G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P.U.E.; Oram, C.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R.S.; Ortega, E.O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Ottersbach, J.P; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A; Ozcan, V.E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J.D.; Pan, Y.B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Park, S.J.; Park, W.; Parker, M.A.; Parker, S.I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pasztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J.R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L.S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M.I.; Peleganchuk, S.V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Perez Garcia-Estan, M.T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Petersen, B.A.; Petersen, T.C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A.W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pilkington, A.D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J.L.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommes, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B.G.; Popeneciu, G.A.; Popovic, D.S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G.E.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I.N.; Potter, C.J.; Potter, C.T.; Potter, K.P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L.E.; Prichard, P.M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D.R.; Quayle, W.B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A.M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A.L.; Rebuzzi, D.M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R.A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R.R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robertson, S.H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, JEM; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

  1. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  2. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  3. The Suzaku High Resolution X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Allen, Christine A.; Arsenovic, Petar; Audley, Michael D.; Bialas, Thomas G.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Boyle, Robert F.; Breon, Susan R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Cottam, Jean; Dipirro, Michael J.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Furusho, Tae; Gendreau, Keith C.; Gochar, Gene G.; Gonzalez, Oscar; Hirabayashi, Masayuki; Holt, Stephen S.; Inoue, Hajime; Ishida, Manabu; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Jones, Carol S.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; McCammon, Dan; Morita, Umeyo; Moseley, S. Harvey; Mott, Brent; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Ogawara, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Takaya; Ota, Naomi; Panek, John S.; Porter, F. Scott; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Takei, Yoh; Tveekrem, June L.; Volz, Stephen M.; Yamamoto, Mikio; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2007-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) has been designed to provide the Suzaku Observatory with non-dispersive, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. As designed, the instrument covers the energy range 0.3 to 12keV, which encompasses the most diagnostically rich part of the X-ray band. The sensor consists of a 32-channel array of X-ray microcalorimeters, each with an energy resolution of about 6eV. The very low temperature required for operation of the array (60mK) is provided by a four-stage cooling system containing a single-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, a superfluid-helium cryostat, a solid-neon dewar, and a single-stage, Stirling-cycle cooler. The Suzaku/XRS is the first orbiting X-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer and was designed to last more than three years in orbit. The early verification phase of the mission demonstrated that the instrument worked properly and that the cryogen consumption rate was low enough to ensure a mission lifetime exceeding 3 years. However, the liquid-He cryogen was completely vaporized two weeks after opening the dewar guard vacuum vent. The problem has been traced to inadequate venting of the dewar He and Ne gases out of the spacecraft and into space. In this paper we present the design and ground testing of the XRS instrument, and then describe the in-flight performance. An energy resolution of 6eV was achieved during pre-launch tests and a resolution of 7eV was obtained in orbit. The slight degradation is due to the effects of cosmic rays.

  4. The Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. Scott; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Ohashi, Takaya; Astro-H/SXS Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a high spectral resolution, cryogenic x-ray spectrometer that will fly on the Japan/U.S. Astro-H observatory in 2014. The SXS is composed of a 36 pixel, imaging, x-ray calorimeter array that will operate at 0.05 K utilizing a 2-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and a redundant pre-cooler design using both a 40 liter liquid helium tank and a 1.7 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Additional redundant Stirling cycle coolers provide pre-cooling for the (JT) and cool the outer thermal shields for the JT and the helium tank. The detector system, while similar to that flown on Suzaku, is composed of larger 0.81×0.81mm pixels, but has significantly better performance, currently predicted to be better than 4 eV FWHM at 6 keV with 95% quantum efficiency. This instrument is the result of a close collaboration between many institutions in the U.S. and Japan over the last 25 years. Here we will present an overview of the SXS instrument, the SXS cooling system, and recent laboratory improvements to the detector system.

  5. Development of a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    TXRF) spectrometer has been designed, constructed and realized. The spectrometer is capable of ultra-trace multielement analysis as well as performs surface characterization of thin films. The TXRF setup comprises of an X-ray generator, a slit-.

  6. Design and applications of an anticoincidence shielded low background gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    1997-03-01

    A low background gamma-ray spectrometer has been constructed for measuring artificial and natural radioative isotopes. The design of the spectrometer, its properties and the application to the determination of natural radioactivity of dental ceramics are described. (orig.)

  7. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Norman W [Sparks, NV; Goulding, Frederick S [Lafayette, CA; Asztalos, Stephen J [Oakland, CA

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  8. A mobile gamma ray spectrometer system for nuclear hazard mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Smethurst, M A

    2000-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway has developed a system for mobile gamma ray spectrometer surveying suitable for use in nuclear emergencies where potentially dangerous radioactive materials have been released into the environment. The measuring system has been designed for use with different kinds of transportation platforms. These include fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters and vans. The choice of transportation platform depends on the nature of the nuclear emergency. Widespread fallout from a distant source can be mapped quickly from the air while local sources of radiation can be delineated by a car-borne system. The measuring system processes gamma ray spectra in real time. The operator of the system is therefore able to guide surveying in accordance with meaningful data values and immediately report these values to decision making The operator is presented with a number of different displays suited to different kinds of nuclear emergencies that lead to more efficient surveying. Real time processing of data m...

  9. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  10. Pocket PC-based portable gamma-ray spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamontip Ploykrachang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A portable gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Pocket PC has been developed. A 12-bit pipeline analog-to-digitalconverter (ADC associated with an implemented pulse height histogram function on field programmable gate array (FPGAoperating at 15 MHz is employed for pulse height analysis from built-in pulse amplifier. The system, which interfaces withthe Pocket PC via an enhanced RS-232 serial port under the microcontroller facilitation, is utilized for spectrum acquisition,display and analysis. The pulse height analysis capability of the system was tested and it was found that the ADC integralnonlinearity of ±0.45% was obtained with the throughput rate at 160 kcps. The overall system performance was tested usinga PIN photodiode-CsI(Tl crystal coupled scintillation detector and gamma standard radioactive sources of Cs-137 andCo-60. Low cost and the compact system size as a result of the implemented logical function are also discussed.

  11. Stig Sundell at the bent crystal X-ray spectrometer for the X-ray shift experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The bent crystal X-ray spectrometer is being used to measure small shifts in the frequencies of X-rays emitted from the lower electron energy levels, in order to learn about the size of the nuclei concerned

  12. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 5 GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER DAP V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== The GRS experiment is a gamma-ray spectrometer designed to observe spectra of gamma rays emitted from Mercury's surface in the energy range from...

  13. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 2 EDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) Experiment Data Records (EDRs) are raw, uncalibrated spectra and ancillary data acquired by the Gamma Ray Subsystem -- the...

  14. A mobile gamma ray spectrometer system for nuclear hazard mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smethurst, Mark A

    2000-12-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway has developed a system for mobile gamma ray spectrometer surveying suitable for use in nuclear emergencies where potentially dangerous radioactive materials have been released into the environment. The measuring system has been designed for use with different kinds of transportation platforms. These include fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters and vans. The choice of transportation platform depends on the nature of the nuclear emergency. Widespread fallout from a distant source can be mapped quickly from the air while local sources of radiation can be delineated by a car-borne system. The measuring system processes gamma ray spectra in real time. The operator of the system is therefore able to guide surveying in accordance with meaningful data values and immediately report these values to decision making authorities. The operator is presented with a number of different displays suited to different kinds of nuclear emergencies that lead to more efficient surveying. Real time processing of data means that the results of a survey can be delivered to decision makers immediately upon return to base. It is also possible to deliver data via a live mobile telephone link while surveying is underway. The measuring system can be adjusted to make measurements lasting between 1 second and 5 seconds. The spatial density of measuring positions depends on the duration of each measurement and the speed of travel of the measuring system. Measuring with 1 s intervals while travelling at 50 km/h in a car results in a measurement every 14 m along the road. Measuring with 1 s intervals in an aeroplane travelling at 250 km/h produces a measurement for every 70 m travelled. Eight hours surveying can produce up to 30000 measurements over a region hundreds of kilometres across. (Author)

  15. Signal Processing Techniques for Silicon Drift Detector Based X-Ray Spectrometer for Planatary Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Shanmugam, M.; Ladiya, T.

    2016-10-01

    We are developing SDD based x-ray spectrometer using various pulse height analysis techniques. This study will help to identify the proper processing technique based on instrument specifications which can be used for future scientific missions.

  16. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 ELEMENT CONCENTRATION V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 ELEMENTS data set consists of a set of maps and underlying data products originally released to the public in March 2006. They...

  17. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 AHD V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) Averaged HEND Data (AHD) products are temporally and spatially binned neutron counting rates and fluxes that can be used to...

  18. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 4 CGS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is a suite of three instruments working together to collect data that will permit the mapping of elemental...

  19. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 SGS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 SGS (SGS) data set is a collection of data tables that contain a gamma spectrum and the associated engineering data that has...

  20. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 2 GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER RAW DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER GRS uncalibrated observations, also known as EDRs. The GRS experiment is a gamma ray spectrometer designed...

  1. First measurements using the ALS Soft X-ray Fourier Transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.; Hussain, Z.; Spring, J. [and others

    1997-08-01

    Commissioning of a Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) is under way at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution spectroscopy in the photon experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  2. Highly efficient angularly resolving x-ray spectrometer optimized for absorption measurements with collimated sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, M.; Gallardo González, I.; Ekerfelt, H.; Björklund Svensson, J.; Hansson, M.; Wood, J. C.; Persson, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Lundh, O.; Falk, K.

    2017-06-01

    Highly collimated betatron radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator is a promising tool for spectroscopic measurements. Therefore, there is a requirement to create spectrometers suited to the unique properties of such a source. We demonstrate a spectrometer which achieves an energy resolution of 1800 ) and is angularly resolving the x-ray emission allowing the reference and spectrum to be recorded at the same time. The single photon analysis is used to significantly reduce the background noise. Theoretical performance of various configurations of the spectrometer is calculated by a ray-tracing algorithm. The properties and performance of the spectrometer including the angular and spectral resolution are demonstrated experimentally on absorption above the K-edge of a Cu foil backlit by a laser-produced betatron radiation x-ray beam.

  3. Instrumental background in gamma-ray spectrometers flown in low earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    1992-01-01

    Techniques are presented for calculating the instrumental continuum background in gamma-ray spectrometers flown in low earth orbit (LEO), with special attention given to simple methods developed for scaling from the better-understood measurements and calculations of background in balloon-borne instruments to LEO (Gehrels, 1985). Results are presented in the form of predictions of the background and its components for spectrometers in LEO. These predictions are compared to the measured background for the HEAO 3 gamma-ray spectrometer (Mahoney et al., 1980), and predictions are made for the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory mission and the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (Matteson et al., 1990) spectrometers. A comparison is made of various orbit options. It is shown that a critical factor is the number of times the instrument passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (which is the region of enhanced trapped particle fluxes in LEO) and the depth of penetration on each pass.

  4. A practical superconducting-microcalorimeter X-ray spectrometer for beamline and laboratory science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriese, W. B.; Abbamonte, P.; Alpert, B. K.; Bennett, D. A.; Denison, E. V.; Fang, Y.; Fischer, D. A.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Jaye, C.; McChesney, J. L.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Morgan, K. M.; Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rodolakis, F.; Schmidt, D. R.; Tatsuno, H.; Uhlig, J.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a series of microcalorimeter X-ray spectrometers designed for a broad suite of measurement applications. The chief advantage of this type of spectrometer is that it can be orders of magnitude more efficient at collecting X-rays than more traditional high-resolution spectrometers that rely on wavelength-dispersive techniques. This advantage is most useful in applications that are traditionally photon-starved and/or involve radiation-sensitive samples. Each energy-dispersive spectrometer is built around an array of several hundred transition-edge sensors (TESs). TESs are superconducting thin films that are biased into their superconducting-to-normal-metal transitions. The spectrometers share a common readout architecture and many design elements, such as a compact, 65 mK detector package, 8-column time-division-multiplexed superconducting quantum-interference device readout, and a liquid-cryogen-free cryogenic system that is a two-stage adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator backed by a pulse-tube cryocooler. We have adapted this flexible architecture to mate to a variety of sample chambers and measurement systems that encompass a range of observing geometries. There are two different types of TES pixels employed. The first, designed for X-ray energies below 10 keV, has a best demonstrated energy resolution of 2.1 eV (full-width-at-half-maximum or FWHM) at 5.9 keV. The second, designed for X-ray energies below 2 keV, has a best demonstrated resolution of 1.0 eV (FWHM) at 500 eV. Our team has now deployed seven of these X-ray spectrometers to a variety of light sources, accelerator facilities, and laboratory-scale experiments; these seven spectrometers have already performed measurements related to their applications. Another five of these spectrometers will come online in the near future. We have applied our TES spectrometers to the following measurement applications: synchrotron-based absorption and emission spectroscopy and energy-resolved scattering

  5. A practical superconducting-microcalorimeter X-ray spectrometer for beamline and laboratory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriese, W B; Abbamonte, P; Alpert, B K; Bennett, D A; Denison, E V; Fang, Y; Fischer, D A; Fitzgerald, C P; Fowler, J W; Gard, J D; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Jaye, C; McChesney, J L; Miaja-Avila, L; Morgan, K M; Joe, Y I; O'Neil, G C; Reintsema, C D; Rodolakis, F; Schmidt, D R; Tatsuno, H; Uhlig, J; Vale, L R; Ullom, J N; Swetz, D S

    2017-05-01

    We describe a series of microcalorimeter X-ray spectrometers designed for a broad suite of measurement applications. The chief advantage of this type of spectrometer is that it can be orders of magnitude more efficient at collecting X-rays than more traditional high-resolution spectrometers that rely on wavelength-dispersive techniques. This advantage is most useful in applications that are traditionally photon-starved and/or involve radiation-sensitive samples. Each energy-dispersive spectrometer is built around an array of several hundred transition-edge sensors (TESs). TESs are superconducting thin films that are biased into their superconducting-to-normal-metal transitions. The spectrometers share a common readout architecture and many design elements, such as a compact, 65 mK detector package, 8-column time-division-multiplexed superconducting quantum-interference device readout, and a liquid-cryogen-free cryogenic system that is a two-stage adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator backed by a pulse-tube cryocooler. We have adapted this flexible architecture to mate to a variety of sample chambers and measurement systems that encompass a range of observing geometries. There are two different types of TES pixels employed. The first, designed for X-ray energies below 10 keV, has a best demonstrated energy resolution of 2.1 eV (full-width-at-half-maximum or FWHM) at 5.9 keV. The second, designed for X-ray energies below 2 keV, has a best demonstrated resolution of 1.0 eV (FWHM) at 500 eV. Our team has now deployed seven of these X-ray spectrometers to a variety of light sources, accelerator facilities, and laboratory-scale experiments; these seven spectrometers have already performed measurements related to their applications. Another five of these spectrometers will come online in the near future. We have applied our TES spectrometers to the following measurement applications: synchrotron-based absorption and emission spectroscopy and energy-resolved scattering

  6. Coupling of the recoil mass spectrometer CAMEL to the {gamma}-ray spectrometer GASP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spolaore, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Ackermann, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Bednarczyk, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; De Angelis, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Napoli, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Rossi Alvarez, C. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Bazzacco, D. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Burch, R. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Mueller, L. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Segato, G.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Scarlassara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    1995-05-15

    A project has been realized to link the CAMEL recoil mass spectrometer to the GASP {gamma}-spectrometer in order to perform high resolution and efficiency {gamma}-recoil coincidence measurements. To preserve high flexibility and autonomy in the operation of the two complex apparatus a rough factor two of reduction in the overall heavy ion transmission was accepted in designing the optics of the particle transport from the GASP center to the CAMEL focal plane. The coupled configuration has been tested with the fusion reaction {sup 58}Ni (E=212 MeV)+{sup 64}Ni, obtaining a mass resolution of 1/300 and efficiency between similar 11% and similar 15% for different evaporation products. (orig.).

  7. Modular soft x-ray spectrometer for applications in energy sciences and quantum materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yi-De; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Cruz, Alejandro; Hanzel, Kelly; Brown, Adam; Frano, Alex; Qiao, Ruimin; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Huang, Shih-Wen; Wray, L. Andrew; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Chiou, Jaw-Wern; Pong, Way-Faung; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric; Reininger, Ruben; Yang, Wanli; Guo, Jinghua; Duarte, Robert; Hussain, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the advances in grating-based soft X-ray spectrometers have revolutionized the soft X-ray spectroscopies in materials research. However, these novel spectrometers are mostly dedicated designs, which cannot be easily adopted for applications with diverging demands. Here we present a versatile spectrometer design concept based on the Hettrick-Underwood optical scheme that uses modular mechanical components. The spectrometer's optics chamber can be used with gratings operated in either inside or outside orders, and the detector assembly can be reconfigured accordingly. The spectrometer can be designed to have high spectral resolution, exceeding 10 000 resolving power when using small source (˜1 μ m) and detector pixels (˜5 μ m) with high line density gratings (˜3000 lines/mm), or high throughput at moderate resolution. We report two such spectrometers with slightly different design goals and optical parameters in this paper. We show that the spectrometer with high throughput and large energy window is particularly useful for studying the sustainable energy materials. We demonstrate that the extensive resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) map of battery cathode material LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 can be produced in few hours using such a spectrometer. Unlike analyzing only a handful of RIXS spectra taken at selected excitation photon energies across the elemental absorption edges to determine various spectral features like the localized dd excitations and non-resonant fluorescence emissions, these features can be easily identified in the RIXS maps. Studying such RIXS maps could reveal novel transition metal redox in battery compounds that are sometimes hard to be unambiguously identified in X-ray absorption and emission spectra. We propose that this modular spectrometer design can serve as the platform for further customization to meet specific scientific demands.

  8. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied fast ion–atom and electron–atom collision processes using a reconditioned high resolution X-ray spectrometer. The X-rays, generated by the collisions, are dispersed by a curved ADP crystal (Johansson geometry) and detected by a gas proportional counter. A self-written LabVIEW based program has ...

  9. Doubly curved imaging Bragg crystal spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrnak, B. P.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1985-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer which is sensitive in the 0.5-7-keV energy range and is intended for use onboard astronomical satellites has been studied. The Bragg reflected rays from a doubly bent crystal positioned downstream of the focal plane of a grazing-incidence concentrator are focused along the a...

  10. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, E. W.; Dunn, J.; Brown, G. V.; Cone, K. V.; Park, J.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2010-10-01

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10–50 Å waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources.

  11. A novel X-ray spectrometer for plasma hot spot diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Guo, Yongchao; Xiao, Shali; Yang, Zuhua; Qian, Feng; Cao, LeiFeng; Gu, Yuqiu

    2017-09-01

    A novel X-ray spectrometer is designed to diagnose the different conditions in plasmas. It can provide both X-ray spectroscopy and plasma image information simultaneously. Two pairs of elliptical crystal analyzers are used to measure the X-ray spectroscopy in the range of 2-20 keV. The pinhole imaging system coupled with gated micro-channel plate(MCP) detectors are developed, which allows 20 images to be collected in a single individual experiment. The experiments of measuring spectra were conducted at "Shenguang-II upgraded laser" in China Academy of Engineering Physics to demonstrate the utility of the spectrometer. The X-ray spectroscopy information was obtained by the image plate(IP). The hot spot imaging experiments were carried out at "Shenguang-III prototype facility". We have obtained the hot sport images with the spectrometer, and the signal to noise ratio of 30 ∼ 40 is observed.

  12. spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hedelius

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bruker™ EM27/SUN instruments are commercial mobile solar-viewing near-IR spectrometers. They show promise for expanding the global density of atmospheric column measurements of greenhouse gases and are being marketed for such applications. They have been shown to measure the same variations of atmospheric gases within a day as the high-resolution spectrometers of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. However, there is little known about the long-term precision and uncertainty budgets of EM27/SUN measurements. In this study, which includes a comparison of 186 measurement days spanning 11 months, we note that atmospheric variations of Xgas within a single day are well captured by these low-resolution instruments, but over several months, the measurements drift noticeably. We present comparisons between EM27/SUN instruments and the TCCON using GGG as the retrieval algorithm. In addition, we perform several tests to evaluate the robustness of the performance and determine the largest sources of errors from these spectrometers. We include comparisons of XCO2, XCH4, XCO, and XN2O. Specifically we note EM27/SUN biases for January 2015 of 0.03, 0.75, –0.12, and 2.43 % for XCO2, XCH4, XCO, and XN2O respectively, with 1σ running precisions of 0.08 and 0.06 % for XCO2 and XCH4 from measurements in Pasadena. We also identify significant error caused by nonlinear sensitivity when using an extended spectral range detector used to measure CO and N2O.

  13. TFTR horizontal high-resolution Bragg x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; Tavernier, M.; Diesso, M.; von Goeler, S.; Johnson, G.; Johnson, L.C.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Schechtman, N.; Sesnic, S.; Tenney, F.; Young, K.M.

    1984-11-01

    A bent quartz crystal spectrometer of the Johann type with a spectral resolution of lambda/..delta..lambda = 10,000 to 25,000 is used on TFTR to determine central plasma parameters from the spectra of heliumlike and lithiumlike metal impurity ions (Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni). The spectra are observed along a central radial chord and are recorded by a position sensitive multiwire proportional counter with a spatial resolution of 250. Standard delay-line time-difference readout is employed. The data are histogrammed and stored in 64k of memory providing 128 time groups of 512-channel spectra. The central ion temperature and the toroidal plasma rotation are inferred from the Doppler broadening and Doppler shift of the K lines. The central electron temperature, the distribution of ionization states, and dielectronic recombination rates are obtained from satellite-to-resonance line ratios. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measurements of the Ti XXI K radiation.

  14. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  15. A gamma-ray tracking algorithm for the GRETA spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, G J; Lee, I Y; Stephens, F S; Vetter, K; Clark, R M; Diamond, R M; Fallon, P; Macchiavelli, A O; MacLeod, R W

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a gamma-ray tracking algorithm that has been developed for the proposed gamma-ray energy tracking array (GRETA). This algorithm has been designed so as to maximize the resolving power for detecting high-multiplicity gamma-ray events. The conceptual basis for this algorithm will be presented. In addition, Monte Carlo simulated data will be used to assess performance over a large range of relevant parameters. A discussion of the potential gamma-ray polarimeter performance of GRETA is also presented.

  16. Modernization of multichannel gamma-ray spectrometer at the second horizontal channel of reactor WWR-M

    CERN Document Server

    Berko, V J; Lyibman, V A

    2003-01-01

    Fast anti coincidence scheme with one privileged entrance has been developed, made and adjusted for underestimation of background distribution under full absorption peaks of gamma-ray by transformation one track of multichannel pair gamma-ray spectrometer into anticompton spectrometer. Obtained suppression factor of background is from 1,5 to 4, depending on gamma-ray energy.

  17. Soft X-ray response of a CCD with a grating spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Shouho, M; Katayama, H; Kohmura, T; Tsunemi, H; Kitamoto, S; Hayashida, K; Miyata, E; Hashimotodani, K; Yoshita, K; Koyama, K; Ricker, G; Bautz, M W; Foster, R; Kissel, S

    1999-01-01

    We calibrate the X-ray imaging spectrometers, which are CCD cameras installed on the ASTRO-E satellite, by using dispersed continuous soft X-rays from a grating spectrometer. We obtained the signal-pulse height and energy-resolution as a function of X-ray energies continuously. However, the wings of the line spread function of the grating distorts the center of the signal-pulse height derived by a simple analysis. An estimation of this distortion is presented. We also describe two methods of extracting the pure signal-pulse-height distribution from the data using the spectrometer. A brief description of the low-energy tail is presented.

  18. Convex Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M; Heeter, R; Emig, J

    2004-04-15

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC. Work supported by U. S. DoE/UC LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48

  19. The Mapping X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (mapx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.; Downs, R. T.; Gailhanou, M.; Marchis, F.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Sole, V. A.; Thompson, K.; Walter, P.; Wilson, M.; Yen, A. S.; Webb, S.

    2016-12-01

    MapX will provide elemental imaging at ≤100 µm spatial resolution over 2.5 X 2.5 cm areas, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks. MapX is a full-frame spectroscopic imager positioned on soil or regolith with touch sensors. During an analysis, an X-ray source (tube or radioisotope) bombards the sample surface with X-rays or α-particles / γ-rays, resulting in sample X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Fluoresced X-rays pass through an X-ray lens (X-ray µ-Pore Optic, "MPO") that projects a spatially resolved image of the X-rays onto a CCD. The CCD is operated in single photon counting mode so that the positions and energies of individual photons are retained. In a single analysis, several thousand frames are stored and processed. A MapX experiment provides elemental maps having a spatial resolution of ≤100 µm and quantitative XRF spectra from Regions of Interest (ROI) 2 cm ≤ x ≤ 100 µm. ROI are compared with known rock and mineral compositions to extrapolate the data to rock types and putative mineralogies. The MapX geometry is being refined with ray-tracing simulations and with synchrotron experiments at SLAC. Source requirements are being determined through Monte Carlo modeling and experiment using XMIMSIM [1], GEANT4 [2] and PyMca [3] and a dedicated XRF test fixture. A flow-down of requirements for both tube and radioisotope sources is being developed from these experiments. In addition to Mars lander and rover missions, MapX could be used for landed science on other airless bodies (Phobos/Deimos, Comet nucleus, asteroids, the Earth's moon, and the icy satellites of the outer planets, including Europa. [1] Schoonjans, T. et al.(2012). Spectrachim. Acta Part B, 70, 10-23. [2] Agostinelli, S. et al. (2003). Nucl. Instr. and Methods in Phys. Research A, 506, 250-303. [3] V.A. Solé et al. (2007). Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 62, 63-68.

  20. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamaka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Shi, Y.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Lee, S. G.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B.

    2012-10-01

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called "poloidal" and "tangential" spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (Ti), electron temperature (Te) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  1. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B; Wang, F; Shi, Y; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Lee, S G; Fu, J; Li, Y; Wan, B

    2012-10-01

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called "poloidal" and "tangential" spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T(i)), electron temperature (T(e)) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  2. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelev, A. E.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Lashkul, S. I.; Rozhdestvensky, V. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Chugunov, I. N.; Doinikov, D. N.; Esipov, L. A.; Gin, D. B.; Iliasova, M. V.; Naidenov, V. O.; Nersesyan, N. S.; Polunovsky, I. A.; Sidorov, A. V.; Kiptily, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr3(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 107 s-1. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr3(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1-5 ms.

  3. Instrumentations in x-ray plasma polarization spectroscopy. Crystal spectrometer, polarimeter and detectors for astronomical observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baronova, Elena O.; Stepanenko, Mikhail M. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jakubowski, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Tsunemi, Hiroshi [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Science, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    This report discusses the various problems which are encountered when a crystal spectrometer is used for the purpose of observing polarized x-ray lines. A polarimeter is proposed based on the novel idea of using two series of equivalent atomic planes in a single crystal. The present status of the astronomical x-ray detection techniques are described with emphasis on two dimensional detectors which are polarization sensitive. (author)

  4. A versatile, highly-efficient, high-resolution von Hamos Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vane, C.R.; Smith, M.S.; Raman, S.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient, high-resolution, vertical-focusing, Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer has been specifically designed and constructed for use in measurements of x rays produced in collisions of energetic heavy ions. In this report the design and resulting operational characteristics of the final instrument are fully described. A wide variety of sample data is also included to illustrate the utility of this device in several areas of research. 14 refs., 38 figs.

  5. The spectrometer/telescope for imaging X-rays on board the ESA Solar Orbiter spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krucker, S. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Benz, A.O. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Hurford, G.J. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Arnold, N.G. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Orleański, P. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Research Center of Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Gröbelbauer, H.-P.; Casadei, D.; Kobler, S.; Iseli, L.; Wiehl, H.J.; Csillaghy, A.; Etesi, L.; Hochmuth, N.; Battaglia, M. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Bednarzik, M.; Resanovic, R. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Grimm, O., E-mail: oliver.grimm@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Viertel, G.; Commichau, V.; Howard, A. [ETH Zürich (Switzerland); and others

    2013-12-21

    Solar Orbiter is a Sun-observing mission led by the European Space Agency, addressing the interaction between the Sun and the heliosphere. It will carry ten instruments, among them the X-ray imaging spectrometer STIX. STIX will determine the intensity, spectrum, timing, and location of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their bremsstrahlung X-ray emission. This report gives a brief overview of the STIX scientific goals and covers in more detail the instrument design and challenges.

  6. Development of a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 25; Issue 5. Development of a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for ultra-trace element analysis. M K Tiwari B Gowrishankar V K Raghuvanshi R V Nandedkar K J S Sawhney. Instrumentation Volume 25 Issue 5 October 2002 pp 435-441 ...

  7. New Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Cosmic Ray Positron Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergström, L.; Bringmann, T.; Cholis, I.; Hooper, D.; Weniger, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with

  8. High energy X-γ ray spectrometer on the Chandrayaan-1 mission to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    correlation between K, U and Th. While the Apollo mission experiments used NaI scintillator as the detector, a Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintilla- tion detector having better energy resolution was used in the Lunar Prospector mission. The recent. Mars Odyssey mission had a γ-ray spectrometer that used a large germanium ...

  9. High energy X-ray spectrometer on the Chandrayaan-1 mission to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Chandrayaan-1 mission to the Moon scheduled for launch in late 2007 will include a high energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX) for detection of naturally occurring emissions from the lunar surface due to radioactive decay of ... Space Astronomy and Instrumentation Division, ISRO Satellite Center, Bangalore 560 017, India.

  10. Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) Mission – Low Energy Payload ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of 'Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)' mission, which was launched onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft on 08 May 2003 by GSLV-D2 rocket to study the solar flares. The SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload was designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory. (PRL) in collaboration with Space ...

  11. A Fundamental Parameter-Based Calibration Model for an Intrinsic Germanium X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Leif Højslet; Pind, Niels

    1982-01-01

    A matrix-independent fundamental parameter-based calibration model for an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has been developed. This model, which is part of a fundamental parameter approach quantification method, accounts for both the excitation and detection probability. For each...

  12. X-ray optics for liquid surface/interface spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkimäki, V; Reichert, H; Okasinski, J S; Dosch, H

    2006-11-01

    A new X-ray optics which enables precise structural investigations of liquid surfaces/interfaces is introduced. The new device is based on the use of high-energy microbeams and gives access to large momentum transfer values perpendicular to the liquid surface/interface. The performance of a prototype of this new optics, which has been constructed and implemented at the high-energy diffraction beamline ID15A at the European Synchrotron Radiation Source, is demonstrated.

  13. Single-Crystal Bismuth Iodide Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    band gap of 1.730 ± 0.005 eV.52-53 Jellison eta/. used two- modulator generalized ellipsometry to determine ordinary and extraordinary band gaps of 1.991...quality is not comparable to the commercial CdTe and CZT crystals. While the material was observed to be sensitive to radiation (alphas, gamma-rays, and...simulation of CdTe vertical Bridgman growth," J. Cryst. Growth, 173 [3-4] 352-366 (1997). 50 16.A. Bachran, P. Reinshaus, and W. Seifert, "Influence

  14. Investigation of cosmic-ray induced background of Germanium gamma spectrometer using GEANT4 simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Quoc; Hai, Vo Hong; Nomachi, Masaharu

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used to study the response of the cosmic-ray induced background on a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in the wide energy range, up to 100MeV. The natural radiation background measurements of the spectrometer were carried out in the energy region from 0.04 to 50MeV. The simulated cosmic-ray induced background of the Ge detector was evaluated in comparison with the measured data. The contribution of various cosmic-ray components including muons, neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons and photons was investigated. We also analyzed secondary particle showers induced by the muonic component. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Direction-Sensitive Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2012-10-04

    A novel, light-weight, hand-held gamma-ray detector with directional sensitivity is being designed. The detector uses a set of multiple rings around two cylindrical surfaces, which provides precise location of two interaction points on two concentric cylindrical planes, wherefrom the source location can be traced back by back projection and/or Compton imaging technique. The detectors are 2.0 × 2.0 mm europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu2+) crystals, whose light output has been measured to exceed 120,000 photons/MeV, making it one of the brightest scintillators in existence. The crystal’s energy resolution, less than 3% at 662 keV, is also excellent, and the response is highly linear over a wide range of gamma-ray energies. The emission of SrI2:Eu2+ is well matched to both photo-multiplier tubes and blue-enhanced silicon photodiodes. The solid-state photomultipliers used in this design (each 2.0 × 2.0 mm) are arrays of active pixel sensors (avalanche photodiodes driven beyond their breakdown voltage in reverse bias); each pixel acts as a binary photon detector, and their summed output is an analog representation of the total photon energy, while the individual pixel accurately defines the point of interaction. A simple back-projection algorithm involving cone-surface mapping is being modeled. The back projection for an event cone is a conical surface defining the possible location of the source. The cone axis is the straight line passing through the first and second interaction points.

  16. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E C; Ao, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Sinars, D B; Geissel, M; Rochau, G A; Smith, I C

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  17. Radioactivity observed in the sodium iodide gamma-ray spectrometer returned on the Apollo 17 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, C. S.; Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Eller, E.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Northcutt, K. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to obtain information on radioactive background induced in the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma-ray spectrometers (7 cm x 7 cm NaI) by particle irradiation during spaceflight, and identical detector was flown and returned to earth on the Apollo 17 mission. The induced radioactivity was monitored both internally and externally from one and a half hours after splashdown. When used in conjunction with a computation scheme for estimating induced activation from calculated trapped proton and cosmic-ray fluences, these results show an important contribution resulting from both thermal and energetic neutrons produced in the heavy spacecraft by cosmic-ray interactions.

  18. Coupling gamma-ray arrays to spectrometers: The way to better exploit radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de France, G.

    2008-10-01

    The coupling of very efficient gamma-ray arrays with large acceptance (or highly selective) spectrometers in the context of radioactive beams, has pushed away the limits for the exploration of the nuclear chart and opened up new possibilities in nuclear physics studies. At GANIL the EXOGAM array (a large efficiency gamma-ray array) has been coupled to VAMOS (a large acceptance spectrometer) and to SPEG (a highly selective spectrometer) to study many different aspects of nuclear structure and reactions covering the whole nuclear chart. Indeed, this combination has been used to study neutron-rich nuclei toward 54Ca, neutron deficient tin isotopes around A = 103, heavy elements around Md and No, reaction mechanism using the borromean light He isotopes, the nuclear structure in the island of inversion around 32Mg, and many other examples in various mass regions and energy regimes. This is also the case for the very efficient large BaF2 array Chateau de Cristal which is frequently coupled to SPEG to study nuclear structure far from stability. In this paper, the various possibilities offered at GANIL with such couplings will be given. In the future, AGATA will be installed at GANIL to exploit the beams produced by the SPIRAL2 facility. Again, it is anticipated that this new generation array will be coupled to spectrometers to better exploit the future beams.

  19. Ground Calibration of the Astro-H (Hitomi) Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Chiao, Meng P.; Fujimoto, R. J.; Haas, D.; Den Herder, J. W.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Astro-H (Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was a pioneering imaging x-ray spectrometer with 5 eV energy resolution at 6 keV. The instrument used a microcalorimeter array at the focus of a high-throughput soft x-ray telescope to enable high-resolution non-dispersive spectroscopy in the soft x-ray waveband (0.3-12 keV). We present the suite of ground calibration measurements acquired from 2012-2015, including characterization of the detector system, anti-coincidence detector, optical blocking filters, and filter-wheel filters. The calibration of the 36-pixel silicon thermistor microcalorimeter array includes parameterizations of the energy gain scale and line spread function for each event grade over a range of instrument operating conditions, as well as quantum efficiency measurements. The x-ray transmission of the set of five Al/polyimide thin-film optical blocking filters mounted inside the SXS dewar has been modeled based on measurements at synchrotron beamlines, including with high spectral resolution at the C, N, O, and Al K-edges. In addition, we present the x-ray transmission of the dewar gate valve and of the filters mounted on the SXS filter wheel (external to the dewar), including beryllium, polyimide, and neutral density filters.

  20. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  1. The C1XS X-ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Maddison, B. J.; Howe, C. J.; Kellett, B. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Crawford, I. A.; Duston, C. L.; Smith, D.; Anand, M.; Bhandari, N.; Cook, A.; Fernandes, V.; Foing, B.; Gasnaut, O.; Goswami, J. N.; Holland, A.; Joy, K. H.; Kochney, D.; Lawrence, D.; Maurice, S.; Okada, T.; Narendranath, S.; Pieters, C.; Rothery, D.; Russell, S. S.; Shrivastava, A.; Swinyard, B.; Wilding, M.; Wieczorek, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) is a compact X-ray spectrometer for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument on ESA's SMART-1 mission. As a result of detailed developments to all aspects of the design, its performance as measured in the laboratory greatly surpasses that of D-CIXS. In comparison with SMART-1, Chandrayaan-1 is a science-oriented rather than a technology mission, leading to far more favourable conditions for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure absolute and relative abundances of major rock-forming elements (principally Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe) in the lunar crust with spatial resolution ⩽25 FWHM km, and to achieve relative elemental abundances of better than 10%.

  2. A secondary graphite crystal spectrometer for anomalous X-ray diffraction experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Stachs, O; Himmel, B; Gerber, T

    1999-01-01

    A new design for implementation of anomalous X-ray diffraction experiments is proposed. The exploitation of a graphite crystal spectrometer with good energy resolution in combination with an acceptable counting rate opens new possibilities to carry out AWAXS experiments and calculate partial structure functions. The proof of this measurement principle is demonstrated by presentation of the partial structure factor and radial distribution function for rubidium germanate glasses around the germanium component. (author)

  3. Performance of soft X-ray emission spectrometer employing charge-coupled device detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, T A; Muramatsu, Y

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a soft X-ray emission spectrometer employing a charge-coupled device camera was examined in the energy range of 80-1250 eV. The spectra observed by low-energy electron irradiation for metal L, oxygen K and silicon L lines were in good agreement with the previous observations by conventional MCP detectors. The results suggest that the energy resolution is good enough for the resonant excitation spectroscopy by synchrotron radiation as well.

  4. Research on CdZnTe and Other Novel Room Temperature Gamma Ray Spectrometer Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold Burger; Michael gGoza; Yunlong Cui; Utpal N. Roy; M. Guo

    2007-05-05

    Room temperature gamma-ray spectrometers are being developed for a number of years for national security applications where high sensitivity, low operating power and compactness are indispensable. The technology has matured now to the point where large volume (several cubic centimeters) and high energy resolution (approximately 1% at 660 eV) of gamma photons, are becoming available for their incorporation into portable systems for remote sensing of signatures from nuclear materials.

  5. Modeling of possible localized electron flux in cosmic rays with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2017-10-01

    Discrete quantum Boltzmann model together with the introduction of an external-field-tuned orientation parameter as well as the acoustic analog are adopted to study the possible localization of electron (fermion) flux in cosmic rays considering the precision measurement with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Our approximate results match qualitatively with those data measured with the AMS on the ISS.

  6. Instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.; Strickman, M. S.; Letaw, J. R.; Chupp, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary identifications of instrumental and atmospheric background lines detected by the gamma-ray spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) are presented. The long-term and stable operation of this experiment has provided data of high quality for use in this analysis. Methods are described for identifying radioactive isotopes which use their different decay times. Temporal evolution of the features are revealed by spectral comparisons, subtractions, and fits. An understanding of these temporal variations has enabled the data to be used for detecting celestial gamma-ray sources.

  7. A carborne gamma-ray spectrometer system for natural radioactivity mapping and environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasty, R.L.; Cox, J.R. [Exploranium Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the experience gained in the use of a carborne gamma-ray spectrometer system for mapping both natural and man-made radiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the calibration of the system for converting the gamma-ray measurements to ground concentrations of potassium, uranium and thorium and the activity of {sup 137}Cs. During the Finnish Emergency Response Exercise (Resume95), the carborne system was shown to be effective in mapping both natural and man-made radiation from {sup 137}Cs fallout and in locating radioactive sources. The application of the carborne system for mineral exploration is also demonstrated. (au). 10 refs.

  8. A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Minowa, M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to p...

  9. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurement and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document serves as a user`s guide for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  10. In situ XRF and gamma ray spectrometer for Mars sample return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I. Yin; Trombka, Jacob I.; Evans, Larry G.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    A combined in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and passive gamma ray spectrometer instrument is proposed for the chemical elemental analysis of various Martian surfaces and samples. The combined instrument can be carried on board a rover. The passive gamma ray or the neutron excited gamma ray system would be used to determine the elemental composition of the Martian surface while the rover is in motion. The XRF system would be used to perform analysis either on the Martian surface or on collected samples when the rover is stationary. The latter function is important both in cataloging the collected samples and in the selection of samples to be returned to earth. For both systems, data accumulation time would be on the order of 30 minutes. No sample preparation would be necessary.

  11. Is Asteroid 433 Eros Compositionally Homogeneous? New Analyses of NEAR-Shoemaker X-Ray Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, L. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    We present new analysis techniques for NEAR-Shomaker X-ray spectrometer data to infer the compositional heterogeneity of asteroid 433 Eros. Preliminary results indicate a largely chondritic, homogeneous composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. A plastic miniature x-ray emission spectrometer based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, B. A.; Seidler, G. T.; Haave, M.; Pacold, J. I.; Gordon, R. A.; Planillo, J.; Quintana, J.; Rusthoven, B.

    2012-02-01

    We present a short working distance miniature x-ray emission spectrometer (miniXES) based on the cylindrical von Hamos geometry. We describe the general design principles for the spectrometer and detail a specific implementation that covers Kβ and valence level emission from Fe. Large spatial and angular access to the sample region provides compatibility with environmental chambers, microprobe, and pump/probe measurements. The primary spectrometer structure and optic is plastic, printed using a 3-dimensional rapid-prototype machine. The spectrometer is inexpensive to construct and is portable; it can be quickly set up at any focused beamline with a tunable narrow bandwidth monochromator. The sample clearance is over 27 mm, providing compatibility with a variety of environment chambers. An overview is also given of the calibration and data processing procedures, which are implemented by a multiplatform user-friendly software package. Finally, representative measurements are presented. Background levels are below the level of the Kβ2, 5 valence emission, the weakest diagram line in the system, and photometric analysis of count rates finds that the instrument is performing at the theoretical limit.

  13. LabVIEW control software for scanning micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Pawel; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Furman, Leszek; Kolasinski, Krzysztof; Lankosz, Marek; Mrenca, Alina; Samek, Lucyna; Wegrzynek, Dariusz

    2012-05-15

    Confocal micro-beam X-ray fluorescence microscope was constructed. The system was assembled from commercially available components - a low power X-ray tube source, polycapillary X-ray optics and silicon drift detector - controlled by an in-house developed LabVIEW software. A video camera coupled to optical microscope was utilized to display the area excited by X-ray beam. The camera image calibration and scan area definition software were also based entirely on LabVIEW code. Presently, the main area of application of the newly constructed spectrometer is 2-dimensional mapping of element distribution in environmental, biological and geological samples with micrometer spatial resolution. The hardware and the developed software can already handle volumetric 3-D confocal scans. In this work, a front panel graphical user interface as well as communication protocols between hardware components were described. Two applications of the spectrometer, to homogeneity testing of titanium layers and to imaging of various types of grains in air particulate matter collected on membrane filters, were presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Soft X-ray spectrometer design for warm dense plasma measurements on DARHT Axis-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, Nicholas Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, John Oliver [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-11

    A preliminary design study is being performed on a soft X-ray spectrometer to measure K-shell spectra emitted by a warm dense plasma generated on Axis-I of the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100-ns-long intense, relativistic electron pulse with a beam current of 1.7 kA and energy of 19.8 MeV deposits energy into a thin metal foil heating it to a warm dense plasma. The collisional ionization of the target by the electron beam produces an anisotropic angular distribution of K-shell radiation and a continuum of both scattered electrons and Bremsstrahlung up to the beam energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal goal of this project is to characterize these angular distributions to determine the optimal location to deploy the soft X-ray spectrometer. In addition, a proof-of-principle design will be presented. The ultimate goal of the spectrometer is to obtain measurements of the plasma temperature and density to benchmark equation-of-state models of the warm dense matter regime.

  15. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelev, A.E., E-mail: Shevelev@cycla.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Khilkevitch, E.M.; Lashkul, S.I.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Altukhov, A.B.; Chugunov, I.N.; Doinikov, D.N.; Esipov, L.A.; Gin, D.B.; Iliasova, M.V.; Naidenov, V.O.; Nersesyan, N.S.; Polunovsky, I.A.; Sidorov, A.V. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Kiptily, V.G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon X14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-11

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 10{sup 7} s{sup −1}. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1–5 ms.

  16. The SAGE spectrometer: A tool for combined in-beam γ-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Sorri, J.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D.; Cresswell, J. R.; Hauschild, K.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Parr, E.; Peura, P.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2011-09-01

    The SAGE spectrometer allows simultaneous in-beam γ-ray and internal conversion electron measurements, by combining a germanium detector array with a highly segmented silicon detector and an electron transport system. SAGE is coupled with the ritu gas-filled recoil separator and the great focal-plane spectrometer for recoil-decay tagging studies. Digital electronics are used both for the γ ray and the electron parts of the spectrometer. SAGE was commissioned in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä in the beginning of 2010.

  17. An inelastic X-ray spectrometer with 2.2 meV energy resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sinn, H; Alatas, A; Barraza, J; Bortel, G; Burkel, E; Shu, D; Sturhahn, W; Sutter, J P; Toellner, T S; Zhao, J

    2001-01-01

    We present a new spectrometer at the Advanced Photon Source for inelastic X-ray scattering with an energy resolution of 2.2 meV at an incident energy of 21.6 keV. For monochromatization, a nested structure of one silicon channel cut and one 'artificial' channel cut is used in forward-scattering geometry. The energy analysis is achieved by a two-dimensional focusing silicon analyzer in backscattering geometry. In the first demonstration experiments, elastic scattering from a Plexiglas sup T sup M sample and two dispersion curves in a beryllium single crystal were measured. Based on these data sets, the performance of the new spectrometer is discussed.

  18. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimäki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR – Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  19. The gamma-ray spectrometer HORUS and its applications for nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Netterdon, L; Endres, J; Fransen, C; Hennig, A; Mayer, J; Müller-Gatermann, C; Sauerwein, A; Scholz, P; Spieker, M; Zilges, A

    2014-01-01

    A dedicated setup for the in-beam measurement of absolute cross sections of astrophysically relevant charged-particle induced reactions is presented. These, usually very low, cross sections at energies of astrophysical interest are important to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis processes of heavy nuclei. Particular emphasis is put on the production of the $p$ nuclei during the astrophysical $\\gamma$ process. The recently developed setup utilizes the high-efficiency $\\gamma$-ray spectrometer HORUS, which is located at the 10 MV FN tandem ion accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Cologne. The design of this setup will be presented and results of the recently measured $^{89}$Y(p,$\\gamma$)$^{90}$Zr reaction will be discussed. The excellent agreement with existing data shows, that the HORUS spectrometer is a powerful tool to determine total and partial cross sections using the in-beam method with high-purity germanium detectors.

  20. Ultrahigh resolution soft x-ray emission spectrometer at BL07LSU in SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Yoshihisa [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masaki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Niwa, Hideharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tokushima, Takashi; Horikawa, Yuka [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shin, Shik [RIKEN/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Oshima, Masaharu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, University of Tokyo, Koto, Shingu-cho, Tatsuno, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    An extremely high resolution flat field type slit less soft x-ray emission spectrometer has been designed and constructed for the long undulator beamline BL07LSU in SPring-8. By optimizing the ruling parameters of two cylindrical gratings, a high energy resolution {Delta}E < 100 meV and/or an E/{Delta}E{approx} 10 000 are expected for the energy range of 350 eV - 750 eV taking into account the broadening by the spatial resolution (25 {mu}m) of a CCD detector. A coma-free operation mode proposed by Strocov et al., is also applied to eliminate both defocus and coma aberrations. The spectrometer demonstrated experimentally that E/{Delta}E= 10 050 and 8046 for N 1s (402.1 eV) and Mn 2p (641.8 eV) edges, respectively.

  1. Argon impurity transport studies at Wendelstein 7-X using x-ray imaging spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenberg, A.; Pablant, N. A.; Marchuk, O.; Zhang, D.; Alonso, J. A.; Burhenn, R.; Svensson, J.; Valson, P.; Gates, D.; Beurskens, M.; Wolf, R. C.; the W7-X Team

    2017-08-01

    In the first operational phase of the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) system has been commissioned for measuring radial profiles of ion and electron temperature, T i and T e, plasma rotation velocities, v P, and selected impurity densities, n Z . This paper shows the first measurements of the spectrometer and gives an initial calculation of impurity transport parameters derived from an Ar impurity transport study. Using Bayesian analysis, the temporal evolution of Ar impurity density profiles after an Ar gas puff could be observed with a time resolution of up to 5 ms, yielding a maximum value for the diffusion coefficient of D  =  1.5 m2 s-1 at ρ ~ 0.5 and small pinch velocities in the inner plasma region.

  2. Monitoring of Natural Soil Radioactivity with Portable Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Løvborg, Leif; Kirkegaard, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Two portable NaI(Tl) spectrometers with four energy windows were used for the recording of gamma-ray counts over soil and rock of differing natural radioactivity. The exposure rates at the field sites were simultaneously measured with a high-pressure argon ionization chamber. Background...... concrete calibration pads with known radioelement concentrations were used to determine the stripping ratios and the sensitivity constants required for this conversion. The calibration pads also made it possible to determine the response in the total-count window produced by an exposure rate of 1 μRh-1....... The theoretical exposure rates deducible from the experimental radioelement concentrations at the field sites were in good agreement both with the ionization-chamber readings (corrected for cosmic-ray background) and with the exposure rates measured by total gamma-ray counting. From this and other results...

  3. Thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing a single material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley; Burger, Arnold; Lukosi, Eric

    2017-05-02

    A combined thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer system, including: a detection medium including a lithium chalcopyrite crystal operable for detecting thermal neutrons in a semiconductor mode and gamma-rays in a scintillator mode; and a photodetector coupled to the detection medium also operable for detecting the gamma rays. Optionally, the detection medium includes a .sup.6LiInSe.sub.2 crystal. Optionally, the detection medium comprises a compound formed by the process of: melting a Group III element; adding a Group I element to the melted Group III element at a rate that allows the Group I and Group III elements to react thereby providing a single phase I-III compound; and adding a Group VI element to the single phase I-III compound and heating; wherein the Group I element includes lithium.

  4. Soft x-ray blazed transmission grating spectrometer with high resolving power and extended bandpass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert; Schattenburg, Mark

    2016-04-01

    A number of high priority questions in astrophysics can be addressed by a state-of-the-art soft x-ray grating spectrometer, such as the role of Active Galactic Nuclei in galaxy and star formation, characterization of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium and the “missing baryon” problem, characterization of halos around the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, as well as stellar coronae and surrounding winds and disks. An Explorer-scale, large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer is highly feasible based on Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) grating technology. Still significantly higher performance can be provided by a CAT grating spectrometer on an X-ray-Surveyor-type mission. CAT gratings combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies) with minimal mission resource requirements. They are high-efficiency blazed transmission gratings that consist of freestanding, ultra-high aspect-ratio grating bars fabricated from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using advanced anisotropic dry and wet etch techniques. Blazing is achieved through grazing-incidence reflection off the smooth grating bar sidewalls. The reflection properties of silicon are well matched to the soft x-ray band. Nevertheless, CAT gratings with sidewalls made of higher atomic number elements allow extension of the CAT grating principle to higher energies and larger dispersion angles. We show x-ray data from metal-coated CAT gratings and demonstrate efficient blazing to higher energies and larger blaze angles than possible with silicon alone. We also report on measurements of the resolving power of a breadboard CAT grating spectrometer consisting of a Wolter-I slumped-glass focusing mirror pair from Goddard Space Flight Center and CAT gratings, to be

  5. X-ray spectrometer having 12 000 resolving power at 8 keV energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, John F.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, Uri

    2017-10-01

    An x-ray spectrometer employing a thin (50 μm) silicon transmission crystal was used to record high-resolution Cu Kα spectra from a laboratory x-ray source. The diffraction was from the (331) planes that were at an angle of 13.26° to the crystal surface. The components of the spectral lines resulting from single-vacancy (1s) and double-vacancy (1s and 3d) transitions were observed. After accounting for the natural lifetime widths from reference double-crystal spectra and the spatial resolution of the image plate detector, the intrinsic broadening of the transmission crystal was measured to be as small as 0.67 eV and the resolving power 12 000, the highest resolving power achieved by a compact (0.5 m long) spectrometer employing a single transmission crystal operating in the hard x-ray region. By recording spectra with variable source-to-crystal distances and comparing to the calculated widths from various geometrical broadening mechanisms, the primary contributions to the intrinsic crystal broadening were found to be the source height at small distances and the crystal apertured height at large distances. By reducing these two effects, using a smaller source size and vignetting the crystal height, the intrinsic crystal broadening is then limited by the crystal thickness and the rocking curve width and would be 0.4 eV at 8 keV energy (20 000 resolving power).

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Radar, Gamma Ray Spectrometer, and Cratering Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars: Radar, Gamma Ray Spectrometer, and Cratering Mineralogy" contained the following reports:The Dielectric Properties of Martian Soil Simulant JSC Mars-1 in the Range from 20Hz to 10kHz; Eastern Sahara Geology from Orbital Radar: Potential Analog to Mars On the Dielectric Properties of the Martian-like Surface Sediments; Radar Observations of Recent Mars Landing Sites; Sounding of Subsurface Water Through Conductive Media in Mars Analog Environments Using Transient Electromagnetics and Low Frequency Ground-penetrating Radar; Burial Depth of the Reservoirs of Hydrogen at the Equatorial Latitudes on Mars; Elemental Composition Variations for Large Dusty and Rocky Regions on Mars Using Gamma-Ray Data from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer; The Distribution of Non-Volatile Elements on Mars: Mars Odyssey GRS Results; Using Mars Odyssey GRS Data to Assess Models for the Bulk Composition of Mars; Mars: The Terra Arabia Low Epithermal Neutron Flux Anomaly; The Isidis Basin of Mars: New Results from MOLA, MOC, and THEMIS; Remote Sensing of the Haughton Impact Structure (HIS): A Terrestrial Proof of Concept for Using the Remote Sensing of Martian Craters as a Probe of Subsurface Composition;and Thermal Emission Spectra of Impact Glass and Shocked Deccan Basalt from Lonar Crater, India and Implications for Remote Sensing of Mars.

  7. Design and fabrication of an active polynomial grating for soft-X-ray monochromators and spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, S J; Perng, S Y; Kuan, C K; Tseng, T C; Wang, D J

    2001-01-01

    An active polynomial grating has been designed for use in synchrotron radiation soft-X-ray monochromators and spectrometers. The grating can be dynamically adjusted to obtain the third-order-polynomial surface needed to eliminate the defocus and coma aberrations at any photon energy. Ray-tracing results confirm that a monochromator or spectrometer based on this active grating has nearly no aberration limit to the overall spectral resolution in the entire soft-X-ray region. The grating substrate is made of a precisely milled 17-4 PH stainless steel parallel plate, which is joined to a flexure-hinge bender shaped by wire electrical discharge machining. The substrate is grounded into a concave cylindrical shape with a nominal radius and then polished to achieve a roughness of 0.45 nm and a slope error of 1.2 mu rad rms. The long trace profiler measurements show that the active grating can reach the desired third-order polynomial with a high degree of figure accuracy.

  8. The instrumental blank of the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The alpha particle X-ray spectrometers on the Mars exploration rovers Spirit and Opportunity accomplished extensive elemental analysis of the Martian surface through a combination of XRF and PIXE. An advanced APXS is now part of the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. APXS spectra contain contributions which enhance elemental peak areas but which do not arise from these elements within the sample under study, thereby introducing error into derived concentrations. A detailed examination of these effects in the MSL APXS enables us to test two schemes for making the necessary corrections.

  9. A second-generation low-background gamma-ray spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Richard M

    2017-08-01

    For the ultimate sensitivity in trace radiochemical analysis, the radiation detector must have high efficiency and low background. A low-background gamma-ray spectrometer in regular use at NIST for over twenty years is being supplemented by a new system, improved in several ways. The new detector is much larger, a shield of iron reduces cosmic neutron background compared with lead, large plastic scintillators reduce the muon continuum background, and a digital data acquisition system gives new opportunities for optimization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Future Development Trajectories for Imaging X-rays Spectrometers Based on Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Bandler, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    Future development trajectories for imaging x-ray spectrometers based on microcalorimeters. Since their invention 30 years ago, the capability of X-ray microcalorimeters has increased steadily, with continual improvements in energy resolution, speed, and array size. Arrays of up to 1024 pixels have been produced, and resolution better than 1 eV at 1.5 keV has been achieved. These detectors can be optimized for the highest priority science, such as designing for the highest resolving power at low energies at the expense of dynamic range, or the greatest focal-plane coverage at the expense of speed. Three types of X-ray microcalorimeters presently dominate the field, each characterized by the thermometer technology. The first two types use temperature-sensitive resistors: semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a magnetically coupled thermometer, and is at an earlier stage of development than the other two. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2015, will use an array of silicon thermistors with HgTe X-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays. Kilopixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are being produced, and much larger arrays may require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetically coupled thermometers. I will project the development trajectories of these detectors and their read-out technologies and assess what their capabilities and limitations will be 10 - 20 years from now.

  11. Downsizing of Johansson spectrometer for X-ray fluorescence trace analysis with brilliant undulator source

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, K; Inoue, K; Yagi, N

    2001-01-01

    The downsizing of a Johansson-type X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer has been examined as a way of enhancing detection efficiency with a tolerable loss of energy resolution. A compact spectrometer equipped with a Ge(2 2 0) analyzing crystal with a Rowland radius of 120 mm has been tested with a highly brilliant helical undulator source at BL40XU, SPring-8. The energy resolution obtained for cobalt K alpha sub 1 (6930.32 eV) was 8.8 eV, which is 10-20 times better than that obtained using a Si(Li) detector, and effectively improved the signal-to-background ratio for XRF spectra. The combination of the present spectrometer and a third generation synchrotron source could provide new opportunities for trace analytical applications, which have been difficult so far by conventional synchrotron XRF experiments based on a Si(Li) detector system. The detection limit obtained for solid bulk samples has reached a level of several tens of ppb.

  12. Diffraction gratings metrology and ray-tracing results for an XUV Raman spectrometer at FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Siewert, Frank; Sokolov, Andrey; Gwalt, Grzegorz; Seliger, Tino; Rübhausen, Michael; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Günter

    2018-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet double-stage imaging Raman spectrometer is a permanent experimental endstation at the plane-grating monochromator beamline branch PG1 at FLASH at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. This unique instrument covers the photon energy range from 20 to 200 eV with high energy resolution of about 2 to 20 meV (design values) featuring an efficient elastic line suppression as well as effective stray light rejection. Such a design enables studies of low-energy excitations like, for example, phonons in solids close to the vicinity of the elastic line. The Raman spectrometer effectively operates with four reflective off-axial parabolic mirrors and two plane-grating units. The optics quality and their precise alignment are crucial to guarantee best performance of the instrument. Here, results on a comprehensive investigation of the quality of the spectrometer diffraction gratings are presented. The gratings have been characterized by ex situ metrology at the BESSY-II Optics Laboratory, employing slope measuring deflectometry and interferometry as well as atomic force microscopy studies. The efficiency of these key optical elements has been measured at the at-wavelength metrology laboratory using the reflectometer at the BESSY-II Optics beamline. Also, the metrology results are discussed with respect to the expected resolving power of the instrument by including them in ray-tracing studies of the instrument.

  13. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: The synthesis design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, XingZhu; Peng, Wenxi; Wang, Huanyu; Liang, XiaoHua

    the Active Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) was designed to deduce the elemental abundances of samples on the moon. Similar to the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers onboard MSL and MER , the APXS was also an instrument took the advantage of X-ray fluorescence mechanism to determine elemental abundances, it determines the chemical compositions of both soil and rocks along the traverse of the rover. To provide a sound instrument working on the lunar surface,Four components were integrated in the APXS, the performances of the components were described in this paper.

  14. Advancing the technology of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Amato, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff has been engaged in a multi year effort to advance the technology of monolithic back-thinned CMOS detectors for use as X-ray imaging spectrometers. The long term goal of this campaign is to produce X-ray Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors with Fano limited performance over the 0.1-10keV band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Such devices would be ideal for candidate post 2020 decadal missions such as LYNX and for smaller more immediate applications such as CubeX. Devices from a recent fabrication have been back-thinned, packaged and tested for soft X-ray response. These devices have 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels with ˜135μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel signal chain. These new detectors are fabricated on 10μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. We present details of our camera design and device performance with particular emphasis on those aspects of interest to single photon counting X-ray astronomy. These features include read noise, X-ray spectral response and quantum efficiency.

  15. CdWO sub 4 scintillator as a compact gamma ray spectrometer for planetary lander missions

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Y; Starr, R; Trombka, J I

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) suitable for use on planetary rover missions. The main characteristics of this detector are low weight, small volume low power and resistance to cosmic ray radiation over a long period of time. We describe a 3 cm diameter by 3 cm thick CdWO sub 4 cylindrical scintillator coupled to a PMT as a GRS for the energy region 0.662-7.64 MeV. Its spectral performance and efficiency are compared to that of a CsI(Tl) scintillator 2.5 cm diameter by 6 cm thick coupled to a 28 mmx28 mm PIN photodiode. The comparison is made experimentally using sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, sup 6 sup 0 Co, 6.13 MeV gamma rays from a sup 1 sup 3 C(alpha,gamma n)O sup 1 sup 6 * source, 7.64 MeV thermal neutron capture gamma rays emitted from iron bars using a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron source, and natural radioactivity 1.46 MeV sup 4 sup 0 K and 2.61 MeV sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th gamma rays. We use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the total peak efficiency of these detectors and ...

  16. The Astro-H High Resolution Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Azzarell, Phillip; Bialas, Tom; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Canavan, Edgar; Chiao, Meng P.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the overall design and performance of the Astro-H (Hitomi) Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). The instrument uses a 36-pixel array of x-ray microcalorimeters at the focus of a grazing-incidence x-ray mirror Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) for high-resolution spectroscopy of celestial x-ray sources. The instrument was designed to achieve an energy resolution better than 7 eV over the 0.3-12 keV energy range and operate for more than 3 years in orbit. The actual energy resolution of the instrument is 4-5 eV as demonstrated during extensive ground testing prior to launch and in orbit. The measured mass flow rate of the liquid helium cryogen and initial fill level at launch predict a lifetime of more than 4 years assuming steady mechanical cooler performance. Cryogen-free operation was successfully demonstrated prior to launch. The successful operation of the SXS in orbit, including the first observations of the velocity structure of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, demonstrates the viability and power of this technology as a tool for astrophysics.

  17. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  18. Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Ions using X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorn, Daniel Bristol [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2008-11-19

    Spectroscopy of K-shell transitions in highly charged heavy ions, like hydrogen-like uranium, has the potential to yield information about quantum electrodynamics (QED) in extremely strong nuclear fields as well as tests of the standard model, specifically parity violation in atomic systems. These measurements would represent the 'holy grail' in high-Z atomic spectroscopy. However, the current state-of-the-art detection schemes used for recording the K-shell spectra from highly charged heavy ions does not yet have the resolving power to be able to attain this goal. As such, to push the field of high-Z spectroscopy forward, new detectors must be found. Recently, x-ray calorimeter spectrometers have been developed that promise to make such measurements. In an effort to make the first steps towards attaining the 'holy grail', measurements have been performed with two x-ray calorimeter spectrometers (the XRS/EBIT and the ECS) designed and built at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The calorimeter spectrometers have been used to record the K-shell spectra of highly charged ions produced in the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. Measurements performed with the XRS/EBIT calorimeter array found that the theoretical description of well-above threshold electron-impact excitation cross sections for hydrogen-like iron and nickel ions are correct. Furthermore, the first high-resolution spectrum of hydrogen-like through carbon-like praseodymium ions was recorded with a calorimeter. In addition, the new high-energy array on the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) was used to resolve the K-shell x-ray emission spectrum of highly charged xenon ions, where a 40 ppm measurement of the energy of the K-shell resonance transition in helium-like xenon was achieved. This is the highest precision result, ever, for an element with such high atomic number. In addition, a first-of-its-kind measurement of

  19. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Efthimion, P C; Ellis, R; Gao, L; Maddox, J; Pablant, N A; Schneider, M B; Chen, H; Ayers, S; Kauffman, R L; MacPhee, A G; Beiersdorfer, P; Bettencourt, R; Ma, T; Nora, R C; Scott, H A; Thorn, D B; Kilkenny, J D; Nelson, D; Shoup, M; Maron, Y

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s 2 -1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s 2 -1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  20. Search for the light dark matter with an X-ray spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarsky, A; Neronov, A; Ruchayskiy, O; Boyarsky, Alexey; Herder, Jan Willem den; Neronov, Andrey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Sterile neutrinos with the mass in the keV range are interesting warm dark matter (WDM) candidates. The restrictions on their parameters (mass and mixing angle) obtained by current X-ray missions (XMM-Newton or Chandra) can only be improved by less than an order of magnitude in the near future. Therefore the new strategy of search is needed. We compare the sensitivities of existing and planned X-ray missions for the detection of WDM particles with the mass ~1-20 keV. We show that existing technology allows an improvement in sensitivity by a factor of 100. Namely, two different designs can achieve such an improvement: [A] a spectrometer with the high spectral resolving power of 0.1%, wide (steradian) field of view, with small effective area of about cm^2 (which can be achieved without focusing optics) or [B] the same type of spectrometer with a smaller (degree) field of view but with a much larger effective area of 10^3 cm^2 (achieved with the help of focusing optics). To illustrate the use of the "type A" des...

  1. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30°~67.5°, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4°~134°. The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional microadjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  2. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Kevin; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Tortorella, Daniele; Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo

    2017-02-01

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  3. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ellis, R.; Gao, L.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, S.; Kauffman, R. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bettencourt, R.; Ma, T.; Nora, R. C.; Scott, H. A.; Thorn, D. B.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nelson, D.; Shoup, M.; Maron, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s2-1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s2-1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  4. Image Evaluation of the High Resolution VUV Spectrometer at SURF II by Ray Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, N C; Madden, R P; Seyoum, H M

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution VUV spectroscopic facility has been in use for several years at SURF II, the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland. At this facility, a combination of three cylindrical mirrors is utilized to focus the light originating in the storage ring onto the horizontal entrance slit of the spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a 6.65 m concave grating having a groove density of 4800 lines/mm in the off-plane Eagle mounting. In preparation for the installation of an array detector in the exit image plane, a ray tracing program has been formulated and spot diagrams have been constructed by plotting the coordinates of the points of intersection of the diffracted rays with the image plane, which is tangent to the Rowland circle. In creating the spot diagrams, we have considered both parallel and tilted configurations of the entrance slit with respect to the grating grooves. It is shown that the line widths of the spectral images can be reduced when the entrance slit is properly tilted. Finally, we have estimated the spectral widths of the images when they are recorded on an array detector placed tangent to the Rowland circle. We conclude that an image spectral width of 0.41 pm to 0.88 pm in first order can be achieved over the wavelength region of 40 nm to 120 nm.

  5. Precision mechanical structure of an ultra-high-resolution spectrometer for inelastic X-ray scattering instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Shvydko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav A.; Khachatryan, Ruben; Goetze, Kurt A.; Roberts, Timothy

    2015-04-14

    A method and an ultrahigh-resolution spectrometer including a precision mechanical structure for positioning inelastic X-ray scattering optics are provided. The spectrometer includes an X-ray monochromator and an X-ray analyzer, each including X-ray optics of a collimating (C) crystal, a pair of dispersing (D) element crystals, anomalous transmission filter (F) and a wavelength (W) selector crystal. A respective precision mechanical structure is provided with the X-ray monochromator and the X-ray analyzer. The precision mechanical structure includes a base plate, such as an aluminum base plate; positioning stages for D-crystal alignment; positioning stages with an incline sensor for C/F/W-crystal alignment, and the positioning stages including flexure-based high-stiffness structure.

  6. Experimental results from an X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer utilizing multi-wire proportional counter for KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. G., E-mail: sglee@nfri.re.kr; Kim, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, J. W. [Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nam, U. W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, M. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The inconsistency of the first experimental results from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device utilizing a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) is clarified after improving the photon-count rate of the data acquisition system for the MWPC and ground loop isolator for the whole spectrometer system. The improved MWPC is successfully applied to pure Ohmic plasmas as well as plasmas with high confinement modes.

  7. Experimental results from an X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer utilizing multi-wire proportional counter for KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. G.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Nam, U. W.; Moon, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    The inconsistency of the first experimental results from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device utilizing a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) is clarified after improving the photon-count rate of the data acquisition system for the MWPC and ground loop isolator for the whole spectrometer system. The improved MWPC is successfully applied to pure Ohmic plasmas as well as plasmas with high confinement modes.

  8. Hybrid X-ray and {gamma}-ray spectrometer for in-situ planetary science missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.uk; Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Simon, H. [Eurorad, 2, rue Ettore Bugatti, 67201 Eckbolsheim (France)

    2009-06-11

    {gamma}-Ray spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and {gamma}-ray backscatter densitometry for planetary science applications are three complementary analytical techniques that can be used to determine surface and sub-surface composition, constrain heat flow through a planetary regolith and hence understand more about the processes that formed planetary bodies. Evaluating different detector types and configurations in order to achieve these scientific objectives is a key enabling step for a successful flight instrument development programme. In this study, we evaluate and compare different detector solutions and configurations including: planar and hemispherical CdTe, a CsI(Tl) scintillator, a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator and a HPGe detector. The LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) detector was chosen as the most suitable detector for an in-situ planetary science mission due to its high-radiation tolerance, low mass compared with HPGe detector systems, its comparable resolution ({approx}3.4% at 662 keV) to compound semiconductors (planar CdTe {approx}2.4% at 662 keV) and high efficiency.

  9. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  10. Advancing the Technology of Monolithic CMOS detectors for their use as X-ray Imaging Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) proposes a two year program to further advance the scientific capabilities of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers. This proposal will build upon the progress achieved with funding from a previous APRA proposal that ended in 2013. As part of that previous proposal, x- ray optimized, highly versatile, monolithic CMOS imaging detectors and technology were developed and tested. The performance and capabilities of these devices were then demonstrated, with an emphasis on the performance advantages these devices have over CCDs and other technologies. The developed SAO/SRI-Sarnoff CMOS devices incorporate: Low noise, high sensitivity ("gain") pixels; Highly parallel on-chip signal chains; Standard and very high resistivity (30,000Ohm-cm) Si; Back-Side thinning and passivation. SAO demonstrated the performance benefits of each of these features in these devices. This new proposal high-lights the performance of this previous generation of devices, and segues into new technology and capability. The high sensitivity ( 135uV/e) 6 Transistor (6T) Pinned Photo Diode (PPD) pixels provided a large charge to voltage conversion gain to the detect and resolve even small numbers of photo electrons produced by x-rays. The on-chip, parallel signal chain processed an entire row of pixels in the same time that a CCD requires to processes a single pixel. The resulting high speed operation ( 1000 times faster than CCD) provide temporal resolution while mitigating dark current and allowed room temperature operation. The high resistivity Si provided full (over) depletion for thicker devices which increased QE for higher energy x-rays. In this proposal, SAO will investigate existing NMOS and existing PMOS devices as xray imaging spectrometers. Conventional CMOS imagers are NMOS. NMOS devices collect and measure photo-electrons. In contrast, PMOS devices collect and measure photo-holes. PMOS devices have various

  11. X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

  12. Progress report on the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-04-01

    We describe the initial in-orbit operations and performance of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). Astro-H, JAXA's sixth X-ray observatory, is scheduled for launch on February 12, 2016, from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan abord an H-IIA rocket. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of microcalorimeters designed for high resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror. The instrument is the result of a joint collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and many partners in Japan, and the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and collaborators in the US. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, a low-temperature anticoincidence detector, a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to maintain 50 mK operation under both cryogen and cryogen-free operation, a hybrid liquid helium/cryogen-free dewar with both Stirling and Joule-Thomson coolers, electronics for reading out the array, processing the x-ray data for spectroscopy, and operating the ADR and cryocoolers. The dewar is closed out by an aperture system with five thin-film filters designed to provide high x-ray transmission with low heat loads to the dewar and detector system, and prevent contamination from condensing on the filters. The instrument was designed to have better than 7 eV energy resolution, and was demonstrated to achieve 4-5 eV resolution across the array at the full spacecraft level of integration during extensive ground testing prior to launch. The overall cooling chain has been designed to provide a lifetime of at least 3 years in orbit, and continue to operate without liquid helium to provide redundancy and the longest operational lifetime for the instrument. In this presentation, we will describe the early phases of the SXS instrument in orbit and provide a sense of the astronomical results that can be expected. This presentation is

  13. Development of a High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Kraus, B.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, J.; Liedahl, D.; Macphee, A. G.; Le, H. P.; Thorn, D.; Nelson, D.

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer has been designed, calibrated, and deployed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure plasma parameters for a Kr-doped surrogate capsule imploded at NIF conditions. Two conical crystals, each diffracting the He α and He β complexes respectively, focus the spectra onto a steak camera photocathode for time-resolved measurements with a temporal resolution of NIF experimental results will also be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. A study of radioactive elements of various rocks in Pattani Province with gamma ray spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaewtubtim, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The radioactivity of the three elements, potassium, uranium and thorium, in rocks of various types in Pattani Province was investigated by using a gamma ray spectrometer. It was found that potassium contents in igneous rocks, sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks were 6.29 %, 2.21% and 1.54 % respectively. Uranium equivalent contents in igneous rock, sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks were found to be 22.51 ppm, 11.25 ppm and 14.13 ppm, while thorium contents in these rocks were 21.78 ppm, 18.88 ppm and 18.15 ppm respectively. The results obtained were similar to those reported by Pungtip Ranglek (1995 for igneous rock at Liwong Pluton site in Thepha, Na Thawi, Chana and Saba Yoi Districts, Songkhla Province, and were about six times higher than those reported by Kittichai Wattananikorn (1994 for igneous rock in the northern part of Thailand.

  15. Towards 10 meV resolution: The design of an ultrahigh resolution soft X-ray RIXS spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Joseph; Jarrige, Ignace; Bisogni, Valentina; Coburn, Scott; Leonhardt, William

    2016-11-01

    We present the optical design of the Centurion soft X-ray resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectrometer to be located on the SIX beamline at NSLS-II. The spectrometer is designed to reach a resolving power of 100 000 at 1000 eV at its best resolution. It is also designed to have continuously variable 2θ motion over a range of 112° using a custom triple rotating flange. We have analyzed several possible spectrometer designs capable of reaching the target resolution. After careful analysis, we have adopted a Hettrick-Underwood spectrometer design, with an additional plane mirror to maintain a fixed direction for the outgoing beam. The spectrometer can cancel defocus and coma aberrations at all energies, has an erect focal plane, and minimizes mechanical motions of the detector. When the beamline resolution is accounted for, the net spectral resolution will be 14 meV at 1000 eV. This will open up many low energy excitations to study and will expand greatly the power of soft X-ray RIXS.

  16. The SPEDE Spectrometer: Combined In-Beam γ-ray and Conversion Electron Spectroscopy with Radioactive Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Philippos; Pakarinen, Janne; Butler, Peter A.; Cox, Daniel M.; Davies, Paul; Greenlees, Paul; Herzberg, Rolf-Dietmar; Huyse, Mark; Jenkins, David G.; Konki, Joonas; O'Neill, George G.; Rahkila, Panu; Ranttila, Kimmo; Saarela, Ville-Peka; Thornhill, Jim; Van Duppen, Piet; Wells, David

    The SPEDE conversion electron spectrometer will be combined with the Miniball germanium detector array for combined in-beam electron and γ-ray spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams. SPEDE will be primarily employed in Coulomb excitation experiments at HIE-ISOLDE, CERN.

  17. A wide-acceptance Compton spectrometer for spectral characterization of a medical x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, Michelle A.; Gehring, A.; Belian, A.; Haines, T.; Hunter, J.; James, M.; Klasky, M.; Mendez, J.; Moir, D.; Sedillo, R.; Shurter, R.; Stearns, J.; Van Syoc, K.; Volegov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra used in medical treatment and radiography is important for dose calculations and material decomposition analysis. Indirect measurements via transmission through materials are possible. However, such spectra are challenging to measure directly due to the high photon fluxes. One method of direct measurement is via a Compton spectrometer (CS) method. In this approach, the x-rays are converted to a much lower flux of electrons via Compton scattering on a converter foil (typically beryllium or aluminum). The electrons are then momentum selected by bending in a magnetic field. With tight angular acceptance of electrons into the magnet of ~ 1 deg, there is a linear correlation between incident photon energy and electron position recorded on an image plate. Here we present measurements of Bremsstrahlung spectrum from a medical therapy machine, a Scanditronix M22 Microtron. Spectra with energy endpoints from 6 to 20 MeV are directly measured, using a CS with a wide energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. We discuss the sensitivity of the device and the effects of converter material and collimation on the accuracy of the reconstructed spectra. Approaches toward improving the sensitivity, including the use of coded apertures, and potential future applications to characterization of spectra are also discussed.

  18. Thermal Design and Performance of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer for the MESSENGER Spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, M; Cork, C P; Eckels, D; Hull, E; Madden, N W; Miller, W; Goldsten, J; Rhodes, E; Williams, B

    2004-10-13

    A gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) has been built and delivered to the Mercury MESSENGER spacecraft which launched on August 3, 2004, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The GRS, a part of seven scientific instruments on board MESSENGER, is based on a coaxial high-purity germanium detector. Gamma-ray detectors based on germanium have the advantage of providing excellent energy resolution, which is critical to achieving the science goals of the mission. However, germanium has the disadvantage that it must operate at cryogenic temperatures (typically {approx}80 K). This requirement is easy to satisfy in the laboratory but difficult near Mercury, which has an extremely hot thermal radiation environment. To cool the detector, a Stirling cycle mechanical cooler is employed. In addition, radiation and conduction techniques a are used to reduce the GRS heat load. Before delivering the flight sensor, a complete thermal prototype was built and tested. The results of these test, including thermal design, radiative and conductive heat loads, and cooler performance are described.

  19. Initial Results from the C1XS X-Ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Kellett, B. J.; Maddison, B.. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Howe, C. J.; Crawford, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission, which was successfully launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on 22 October, carried as part of its payload the C1XS Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spec-trometer [1]. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument [2] on ESA's SMART-1 mission. Whereas SMART-1 was a technology mission, Chandrayaan-1 is science oriented, with a far more favourable orbit for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure abundances of major rock-forming elements (princi-pally Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe). The instrument has been commissioned, and is operating nominally. The Sun continues to show X-ray emission charac-teristic of the Solar minimum. As has been commented by [7], the onset of this solar maximum is significantly delayed. However, C1XS has been able to observe the Moon even in these very low illumination conditions. Figure 3 shows the result of an integration during an A class flare on the 12th Dec. 2008. Characteristic energy lines at Mg, Al and Si are clearly seen and resolved from the average extreme quiet time data background. This performance shows that the instrument is easily meeting its design requirements, and in the higher illumination conditions expected during the rest of the mission will be capable of meeting its science goals.

  20. X-MIME: An Imaging X-ray Spectrometer for Detailed Study of Jupiter's Icy Moons and the Planet's X-ray Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Such maps would provide important constraints on formation and evolution scenarios for the surfaces of these moons. Here we describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  1. A doubly curved elliptical crystal spectrometer for the study of localized x-ray absorption in hot plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Adam D; Hoyt, Cad L; Pikuz, Sergei A; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David A

    2014-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plasmas over a wide range of both temperature and density. However, such a measurement is often limited to probing plasmas with temperatures well below that of the x-ray source in order to avoid object plasma emission lines from obscuring important features of the absorption spectrum. This has excluded many plasmas from being investigated by this technique. We have developed an x-ray spectrometer that provides the ability to record absorption spectra from higher temperature plasmas than the usual approach allows without the risk of data contamination by line radiation emitted by the plasma under study. This is accomplished using a doubly curved mica crystal which is bent both elliptically and cylindrically. We present here the foundational work in the design and development of this spectrometer along with initial results obtained with an aluminum x-pinch as the object plasma.

  2. A doubly curved elliptical crystal spectrometer for the study of localized x-ray absorption in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, Adam D., E-mail: adc87@cornell.edu; Hoyt, Cad L.; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David A. [Cornell University, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of plasmas over a wide range of both temperature and density. However, such a measurement is often limited to probing plasmas with temperatures well below that of the x-ray source in order to avoid object plasma emission lines from obscuring important features of the absorption spectrum. This has excluded many plasmas from being investigated by this technique. We have developed an x-ray spectrometer that provides the ability to record absorption spectra from higher temperature plasmas than the usual approach allows without the risk of data contamination by line radiation emitted by the plasma under study. This is accomplished using a doubly curved mica crystal which is bent both elliptically and cylindrically. We present here the foundational work in the design and development of this spectrometer along with initial results obtained with an aluminum x-pinch as the object plasma.

  3. High-sensitivity, portable, tunable imaging X-ray spectrometer based on a spherical crystal and MCP

    CERN Document Server

    Monot, P; Dobosz, S; D'Oliveira, P; Hulin, S; Bougeard, M; Faenov, A Y; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Y

    2002-01-01

    A portable (200x100x100 mm sup 3), high-luminosity, spherically bent crystal spectrometer was designed to measure very low emissivity X-ray spectra of different elements with spatial resolution in a wide spectral range (1.2-19.6 A). A large (50x15 mm sup 2) open aperture mica spherically bent crystal with R=150 mm was used as dispersive and focusing element. This spectrometer was associated with a large sensitive area (phi=40 mm) micro-channel plates assembly. This apparatus provides simultaneously high spectral (lambda/delta lambda approx 1800) and spatial (100-200 mu m) resolutions. Its large tunability allowed, without any adjustment of the spectrometer set-up, to record spectra in the 1.38-17.5 A wavelength range. We used the X-ray emission of femtosecond laser-produced plasmas from different materials ((CF sub 2) sub n , CaF sub 2 , Cu, Al) to test the spectrometer. Thanks to the high sensitivity (high collection efficiency) of the system, high quality space-resolved X-ray spectra of Fluorine and Aluminu...

  4. Objectives and Layout of a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Monticello, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-07-29

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for LHD. This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of < 2 cm and ≥ 10 ms. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD.

  5. Objectives and layout of a high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for the large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; Gates, D.; Monticello, D.; Neilson, H.; Reiman, A.; Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Rice, J. E. [Plasma Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for the large helical device (LHD). This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar{sup 16+} and will provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of <2 cm and {>=}10 ms, respectively. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data.

  6. Novel handheld x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for routine testing for the presence of lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Squillante, Michael R.

    2011-06-01

    RMD is developing a safe, inexpensive, and easy to operate lead detector for retailers and consumers that can reliably detect dangerous levels of lead in toys and other household products. Lead and its compounds have been rated as top chemicals that pose a great threat to human health. However, widespread testing for environmental lead is rarely undertaken until lead poisoning has already been diagnosed. The problem is not due to the accuracy or sensitivity of existing lead detection technology, but rather to the high expense, safety and licensing barriers of available test equipment. An inexpensive and easy to use lead detector would enable the identification of highly contaminated objects and areas and allow for timely and cost effective remediation. The military has similar needs for testing for lead and other heavy elements such as mercury, primarily in the decontamination of former military properties prior to their return to civilian use. RMD's research and development efforts are abased on advanced solid-state detectors combined with recently patented lead detection techniques to develop a consumer oriented lead detector that will be widely available and easy and inexpensive to use. These efforts will result in an instrument that offers: (1) high sensitivity, to identify objects containing dangerous amounts of lead, (2) low cost to encourage widespread testing by consumers and other end users and (3) convenient operation requiring no training or licensing. In contrast, current handheld x-ray fluorescence spectrometers either use a radioactive source requiring licensing and operating training, or use an electronic x-ray source that limits their sensitivity to surface lead.

  7. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Huron map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1459 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  8. Hazardous metals in vintage plastic toys measured by a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gillian Zaharias; Harris, Zoe E

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 plastic toys from the 1970s and 1980s, both polyvinyl chloride ("vinyl") and nonvinyl, were analyzed in the study described here using a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to quantify hazardous metal content. A sampling of recent vinyl toys was also tested. The majority of nonvinyl samples were Fisher Price brand toys. The vinyl toys consisted largely of Barbie dolls and other dolls. Overall, lead or cadmium was found in 67% of vintage plastic toys, frequently at concentrations exceeding current U.S. and European limits. Arsenic was detected at levels of concern in 16% of the samples. In the nonvinyl toys, heavy metal content was found to correlate with certain colors of plastic. The likely sources of the detected metals are discussed. None of the contemporary vinyl toys contained detectable cadmium, lead, or arsenic. Given that vintage toys remain in widespread use by children in homes and other locations, the results illuminate a potential source of heavy metal exposure for children.

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  10. Chemical Heterogeneity on Mercury's Surface Revealed by the MESSENGER X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weider, Shoshana Z.; Nittler, Larry R.; Starr, Richard D.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Byrne, Paul K.; Denevi, Brett W.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the analysis of 205 spatially resolved measurements of the surfacecomposition of Mercury from MESSENGERs X-Ray Spectrometer. The surfacefootprints of these measurements are categorized according to geological terrain. Northernsmooth plains deposits and the plains interior to the Caloris basin differ compositionallyfrom older terrain on Mercury. The older terrain generally has higher MgSi, SSi, andCaSi ratios, and a lower AlSi ratio than the smooth plains. Mercurys surface mineralogyis likely dominated by high-Mg mafic minerals (e.g., enstatite), plagioclase feldspar, andlesser amounts of Ca, Mg, andor Fe sulfides (e.g., oldhamite). The compositionaldifference between the volcanic smooth plains and the older terrain reflects differentabundances of these minerals and points to the crystallization of the smooth plains from amore chemically evolved magma source. High-degree partial melts of enstatite chondritematerial provide a generally good compositional and mineralogical match for much ofthe surface of Mercury. An exception is Fe, for which the low surface abundance onMercury is still higher than that of melts from enstatite chondrites and may indicate anexogenous contribution from meteoroid impacts.

  11. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  12. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Alturas quadrangle, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Alturas, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1631.6 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Chico quadrangle, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Chico, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 3026.4 line miles are in the quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  14. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Eureka quadrangle, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Eureka/Crescent City, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were aquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 349.5 line miles are in this area. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  15. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Ukiah quadrangle, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Ukiah, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1517 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  16. Micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with x-ray single bounce metallic capillary optics for light element analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczka, Robert; Żukociński, Grzegorz; Łopucki, Rafał

    2017-05-01

    In the last 20 years, , due to the rapid development of X-ray optics, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) has become a powerful tool to determine the spatial distribution of major, minor, and trace elements within a sample. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) spectrometers for light element analysis (6 European Union as part of the Operational Programme Development of Eastern Poland for 2007-2013, Priority I Innovative Economy, Measure I.3. Support for Innovations and The National Centre for Research and Development, Project no. TANGO1,267102/NCBR/2015

  17. Elemental Composition Variations for Large Dusty and Rocky Regions on Mars Using Gamma-Ray Data from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Reedy, R. C.; Boynton, W. V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft has been mapping the elemental composition of the surface materials since June 2002. To study elemental composition variations on the martian surface, seven large regions of Mars were selected: three very dusty ones and four mainly rocky ones. Large regions were used to get good counting statistics on as many gamma-ray peaks as possible from spectrum accumulated by the GRS experiment on Mars Odyssey, including elements with poor counting statistics. Data from TES were used to help select these regions. Gamma-ray peaks for several elements were analyzed. Some results and trends are reported.

  18. The CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS) Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Amir; Shih, Albert Y.; Warren, Harry; DeForest, Craig; Laurent, Glenn Thomas; Schwartz, Richard A.; Woods, Thomas N.; Mason, James; Palo, Scott; Steslicki, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Gburek, Szymon; Mrozek, Tomasz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Torre, Gabriele; Crowley, Geoffrey; Schattenburg, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Solar soft X-ray (SXR) observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating, during solar flares and quiescent times. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding the dynamics, origins, and evolution of these energetic processes, providing probes both into the temperature distributions and elemental compositions of hot plasmas; spatially-resolved measurements are critical for understanding energy transport and mass flow. A better understanding of the thermal plasma improves our understanding of the relationships between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and the underlying release of magnetic energy during reconnection. We introduce a new proposed small satellite mission, the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS), to measure spectrally- and spatially-resolved SXRs from the quiescent and flaring Sun from a 6U CubeSat platform in low-Earth orbit during a nominal 1-year mission. CubIXSS includes the Amptek X123-FastSDD silicon drift detector, a low-noise, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrument enabling solar SXR spectroscopy from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution with low power, mass, and volume requirements. Multiple detectors and tailored apertures provide sensitivity to a wide range of solar conditions, optimized for a launch during solar minimum. The precise spectra from these instruments will provide detailed measurements of the coronal temperature distribution and elemental abundances from the quiet Sun to active regions and flares. CubIXSS also includes a novel spectro-spatial imager -- the first ever solar imager on a CubeSat -- utilizing a custom pinhole camera and Chandra-heritage X-ray transmission diffraction grating to provide spatially- resolved, full-Sun imaging spectroscopy from ~0.1 to ~10 keV, with ~25 arcsec and ~0.1 Å FWHM spatial and spectral resolutions, respectively. MOXSI’s unique capabilities enable SXR spectroscopy and temperature diagnostics of individual

  19. Measurement of material uniformity using 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z; Knoll, G F; Wehe, D K; Stahle, C M

    2000-01-01

    We present results from two 1 cm sup 3 CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers with full 3-D position sensitivity. To our knowledge, these are the first reported semiconductor spectrometers that provide independent spectral data for each of over 2000 volume elements. Energy resolutions of 1.5-1.6% FWHM and position resolutions of 0.7x0.7x0.5 mm were obtained at 662 keV gamma-ray energy from the central region of both detectors for single-pixel events. With the 3-D position sensing capability, variations in spectral response over the detector volume were recorded using a sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source. These measurements allow a study of full-energy peak efficiency, mean ionization energy and electron trapping as a function of 3-D position. The effects of material non-uniformity on detector spectroscopic performance are discussed.

  20. Comment on "A doubly curved elliptical crystal spectrometer for the study of localized x-ray absorption in hot plasmas" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 103114 (2014)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, A D; Hammer, D A; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A

    2016-10-01

    The elliptical spectrometer described by Cahill et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 103114 (2014)] is designed to enable absorption X-ray spectroscopy under circumstances in which the object plasma is, itself, a relatively bright X-ray emitter. An implementation of this design was developed using a doubly curved mica crystal for X-ray dispersion. The geometry of the spectrometer was verified by ray tracing calculations assuming Bragg reflection from mica in the second order. Control of X-ray reflections from other orders was an anticipated challenge and has been attempted by means of filtering and control of the source spectrum. These efforts have been found to be insufficient to allow the spectrometer to operate as designed because of the strong fifth order reflection of source radiation by the mica crystal. Potential solutions are presented that may enable a successful implementation of this novel crystal spectrometer design.

  1. Performance of 20 Ci 137Cs γ-ray Compton spectrometer for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... than the conventional 241Am Compton spectrometers. The in-house 137Cs spectrometer is very useful for the measurement of momentum densities of heavy materials. The performance of the machine is assessed using aluminum, terbium and mercury samples and the experimental data from comparable apparatus.

  2. System Design and Implementation of the Detector Assembly of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, M. P.; Adams, J.; Goodwin, P.; Hobson, C.W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammom, D.; McGuinness, D. S.; Moseley, S. J.; Porter, F. S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) onboard Astro-H presents to the science community unprecedented capability (less than 7 eV at 6 keV) for high-resolution spectral measurements in the range of 0.5-12 keV to study extended celestial sources. At the heart of this SXS is the x-ray calorimeter spectrometer (XCS) where detectors (calorimeter array and anticoincidence detector) operate at 50 mK, the bias circuit operates at nominal 1.3 K, and the first stage amplifiers operateat 130 K, all within a nominal 20 cm envelope. The design of the detector assembly in this XCS originates from the Astro-E x-ray spectrometer (XRS) and lessons learned from Astro-E and Suzaku. After the production of our engineering model, additional changes were made in order to improve our flight assembly process for better reliability and overall performance. In this poster, we present the final design and implementation of the flight detector assembly, show comparison of parameters and performance to Suzakus XRS, and list susceptibilities to other subsystems as well as our lessons learned.

  3. Effects of thermal expansion of the crystal lattice on x-ray crystal spectrometers used for fusion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bitter, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J.; Burke, W.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.; Feder, R.; Gao, C.; Hill, K.; Johnson, D.; Lee, S. G.; Marmar, E.; Pablant, N.; Reinke, M. L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, R.

    2013-12-01

    X-ray imaging crystal spectrometers with high spectral and spatial resolution are currently being used on magnetically confined fusion devices to infer the time history profiles of ion and electron temperatures as well as plasma flow velocities. The absolute measurement of flow velocities is important for optimizing various discharge scenarios and evaluating the radial electric field in tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Recent studies indicate that the crystal temperature must be kept constant to within a fraction of a degree to avoid changes of the interplanar 2d-spacing by thermal expansion that cause changes in the Bragg angle, which could be misinterpreted as Doppler shifts. For the instrumental parameters of the x-ray crystal spectrometer on Alcator C-Mod, where those thermal effects were investigated, a change of the crystal temperature by 1 °C causes a change of the lattice spacing of the order of Δd = 1 × 10-5 Å introducing a fictitious velocity drift of the order of ˜3 km s-1. This effect must be considered for x-ray imaging crystals spectrometers installed on LHD, KSTAR, EAST, J-TEXT, NSTX and, in the future, W7-X and ITER.

  4. A portable Compton spectrometer for clinical X-ray beams in the energy range 20-150 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, A.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), Rua Marques de Paranagua, 111-01303-050 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Linke, A. [Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 187-Travessa R-05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Yoshimura, E.M., E-mail: e.yoshimura@dfn.if.usp.b [Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 187-Travessa R-05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Terini, R.A., E-mail: rterini@pucsp.b [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), Rua Marques de Paranagua, 111-01303-050 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Eletrotecnica e Energia-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, 1289-05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Herdade, S.B., E-mail: sherdade@iee.usp.b [Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 187-Travessa R-05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Eletrotecnica e Energia-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, 1289-05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    Primary beam spectra were obtained for an X-ray industrial equipment (40-150 kV), and for a clinical mammography apparatus (25-35 kV) from beams scattered at angles close to 90{sup o}, measured with a CdTe Compton spectrometer. Actual scattering angles were determined from the Compton energy shift of characteristic X-rays or spectra end-point energy. Evaluated contribution of coherent scattering amounts to more than 15% of fluence in mammographic beams. This technique can be used in clinical environments.

  5. Educational Testing of an Auditory Display of Mars Gamma Ray Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. M.; Pompea, S. M.; Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Boynton, W. V.; Enos, H. L.; Quinn, M.

    2003-12-01

    A unique, alternative educational and public outreach product was created to investigate the use and effectiveness of auditory displays in science education. The product, which allows students to both visualize and hear seasonal variations in data detected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) aboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, consists of an animation of false-color maps of hydrogen concentrations on Mars along with a musical presentation, or sonification, of the same data. Learners can access this data using the visual false-color animation, the auditory false-pitch sonification, or both. Central to the development of this product is the question of its educational effectiveness and implementation. During the spring 2003 semester, three sections of an introductory astronomy course, each with ˜100 non-science undergraduates, were presented with one of three different exposures to GRS hydrogen data: one auditory, one visual, and one both auditory and visual. Student achievement data was collected through use of multiple-choice and open-ended surveys administered before, immediately following, and three and six weeks following the experiment. It was found that the three student groups performed equally well in their ability to perceive and interpret the data presented. Additionally, student groups exposed to the auditory display reported a higher interest and engagement level than the student group exposed to the visual data alone. Based upon this preliminary testing,we have made improvements to both the educational product and our evaluation protocol. This fall, we will conduct further testing with ˜100 additional students, half receiving auditory data and half receiving visual data, and we will conduct interviews with individual students as they interface with the auditory display. Through this process, we hope to further assess both learning and engagement gains associated with alternative and multi-modal representations of scientific data that extend beyond

  6. Automated Grouping of Opportunity Rover Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Compositional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBommel, S. J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schroder, C.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) conducts high-precision in situ measurements of rocks and soils on both active NASA Mars rovers. Since 2004 the rover Opportunity has acquired around 440 unique APXS measurements, including a wide variety of compositions, during its 42+ kilometers traverse across several geological formations. Here we discuss an analytical comparison algorithm providing a means to cluster samples due to compositional similarity and the resulting automated classification scheme. Due to the inherent variance of elements in the APXS data set, each element has an associated weight that is inversely proportional to the variance. Thus, the more consistent the abundance of an element in the data set, the more it contributes to the classification. All 16 elements standard to the APXS data set are considered. Careful attention is also given to the errors associated with the composition measured by the APXS - larger uncertainties reduce the weighting of the element accordingly. The comparison of two targets, i and j, generates a similarity score, S(sub ij). This score is immediately comparable to an average ratio across all elements if one assumes standard weighted uncertainty. The algorithm facilitates the classification of APXS targets by chemistry alone - independent of target appearance and geological context which can be added later as a consistency check. For the N targets considered, a N by N hollow matrix, S, is generated where S = S(sup T). The average relation score, S(sub av), for target N(sub i) is simply the average of column i of S. A large S(sub av) is indicative of a unique sample. In such an instance any targets with a low comparison score can be classified alike. The threshold between classes requires careful consideration. Applying the algorithm to recent Marathon Valley targets indicates similarities with Burns formation and average-Mars-like rocks encountered earlier at Endeavour Crater as well as a new class of felsic rocks.

  7. Hard X-ray polarimetry with Caliste, a high performance CdTe based imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antier, S.; Ferrando, P.; Limousin, O.; Caroli, E.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Blondel, C.; Chipaux, R.; Honkimaki, V.; Horeau, B.; Laurent, P.; Maia, J. M.; Meuris, A.; Del Sordo, S.; Stephen, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    Since the initial exploration of the X- and soft γ-ray sky in the 60's, high-energy celestial sources have been mainly characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Despite tremendous progress in the field, the radiation mechanisms at work in sources such as neutrons stars, black holes, and Active Galactic Nuclei are still unclear. The polarization state of the radiation is an observational parameter which brings key additional information about the physical processes in these high energy sources, allowing the discrimination between competing models which may otherwise all be consistent with other types of measurement. This is why most of the projects for the next generation of space missions covering the few tens of keV to the MeV region require a polarization measurement capability. A key element enabling this capability, in this energy range, is a detector system allowing the identification and characterization of Compton interactions as they are the main process at play. The compact hard X-ray imaging spectrometer module, developed in CEA with the generic name of "Caliste" module, is such a detector. In this paper, we present experimental results for two types of Caliste-256 modules, one based on a CdTe crystal, the other one on a CdZnTe crystal, which have been exposed to linearly polarized beams at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). These results, obtained at 200 and 300 keV, demonstrate the capability of these modules to detect Compton events and to give an accurate determination of the polarization parameters (polarization angle and fraction) of the incoming beam. For example, applying an optimized selection to our data set, equivalent to select 90° Compton scattered interactions in the detector plane, we find a modulation factor Q of 0.78 ± 0.06 in the 200-300 keV range. The polarization angle and fraction are derived with accuracies of approximately 1° and 5 % respectively for both CdZnTe and CdTe crystals. The

  8. Performance of the prototype LaBr{sub 3} spectrometer developed for the JET gamma-ray camera upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigamonti, D., E-mail: davide.rigamonti@mib.infn.it; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Muraro, A.; Giacomelli, L.; Cippo, E. P.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Mianowski, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badań Jądrowych (NCBJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Fernandes, A.; Pereira, R. C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Figueiredo, J. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Kiptily, V. [Culham Science Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Universita’ di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    In this work, we describe the solution developed by the gamma ray camera upgrade enhancement project to improve the spectroscopic properties of the existing JET γ-ray camera. Aim of the project is to enable gamma-ray spectroscopy in JET deuterium-tritium plasmas. A dedicated pilot spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} crystal coupled to a silicon photo-multiplier has been developed. A proper pole zero cancellation network able to shorten the output signal to a length of 120 ns has been implemented allowing for spectroscopy at MHz count rates. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and shows an energy resolution of 5.5% at E{sub γ} = 0.662 MeV, which extrapolates favorably in the energy range of interest for gamma-ray emission from fast ions in fusion plasmas.

  9. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF SIX NEW/MODIFIED PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETERS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN CHARACTERIZED PAINT FILMS AND RESEARCH MATERIAL BOARDS (APPENDICES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was performed in 1994-1995 to identify and estimate the influence of key characteristics for evaluating the performance of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers. Six new/modified spectrometers, including HNU SEFA-Pb, Metorex X-MET, Niton X-L, Radiat...

  10. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF SIX NEW/MODIFIED PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETERS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN CHARACTERIZED PAINT FILMS AND RESEARCH MATERIAL BOARDS (TECHNICAL REPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was performed in 1994-1995 to identify and estimate the influence of key characteristics for evaluating the performance of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometers. Six new/modified spectrometers, including HNU SEFA-Pb, Metorex X-MET, Niton X-L, Radiat...

  11. Image Evaluation of the High Resolution VUV Spectrometer at SURF II by Ray Tracing

    OpenAIRE

    Das, N. C.; Madden, R. P.; Seyoum, H. M.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution VUV spectroscopic facility has been in use for several years at SURF II, the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland. At this facility, a combination of three cylindrical mirrors is utilized to focus the light originating in the storage ring onto the horizontal entrance slit of the spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a 6.65 m concave grating having a groove density of 4800 lines/mm in the off-...

  12. Calibration of a High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer for High-Energy-Density Plasmas on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, B.; Gao, L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Liedahl, D.; Macphee, A. G.; Thorn, D. B.; Bettencourt, R.; Kauffman, R.; Le, H.; Nelson, D.

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution, DIM-based (Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator) x-ray crystal spectrometer has been calibrated for and deployed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to diagnose plasma conditions and mix in ignition capsules near stagnation times. Two conical crystals in the Hall geometry focus rays from the Kr He- α, Ly- α, and He- β complexes onto a streak camera for time-resolved spectra, in order to measure electron density and temperature by observing Stark broadening and relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Signals from these two crystals are correlated with a third crystal that time-integrates the intervening energy range. The spectrometer has been absolutely calibrated using a microfocus x-ray source, an array of CCD and single-photon-counting detectors, and K- and L-absorption edge filters. Measurements of the integrated reflectivity, energy range, and energy resolution for each crystal will be presented. The implications of the calibration on signal levels from NIF implosions and x-ray filter choices will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Spatially Resolved Spectra from a new X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurements of Ion and Electron Temperature Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Stratton, B; Roquemore, A; Mastrovito, D; Lee, S; Bak, J; Moon, M; Nam, U; Smith, G; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Fraenkel, B

    2004-08-10

    A new type of high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is being developed to measure ion and electron temperature profiles in tokamak plasmas. The instrument is particularly valuable for diagnosing plasmas with purely Ohmic heating and rf heating, since it does not require the injection of a neutral beam - although it can also be used for the diagnosis of neutral-beam heated plasmas. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. It records spectra of helium-like argon (or krypton) from multiple sightlines through the plasma and projects a de-magnified image of a large plasma cross-section onto the detector. The spatial resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the height of the crystal, its radius of curvature, and the Bragg angle. This new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer may also be of interest for the diagnosis of ion temperature profiles in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER, where the application of the presently used charge-exchange spectroscopy will be difficult, if the neutral beams do not penetrate to the plasma center. The paper presents the results from proof-of-principle experiments performed with a prototype instrument at Alcator C-Mod.

  14. Vibration Isolation System for Cryocoolers of Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS) Onboard ASTRO-H (Hitomi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoh; Yasuda, Susumu; Ishimura, Kosei; Iwata, Naoko; Okamoto, Atsushi; Sato, Yoichi; Ogawa, Mina; Sawada, Makoto; Kawano, Taro; Obara, Shingo; hide

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard ASTRO-H (named Hitomi after launch) is a micro-calorimeter-type spectrometer, installed in a dewar to be cooled at 50 mK. The energy resolution of the SXS engineering model suffered from micro-vibration from cryocoolers mounted on the dewar. This is mitigated for the flight model by introducing vibration isolation systems between the cryocoolers and the dewar. The detector performance of the flight model was verified before launch of the spacecraft in both ambient condition and thermal-vac condition, showing no detectable degradation in energy resolution. The in-orbit performance was also consistent with that on ground, indicating that the cryocoolers were not damaged by launch environment. The design and performance of the vibration isolation system along with the mechanism of how the micro-vibration could degrade the cryogenic detector is shown.

  15. Conceptual design of magnetic spectrometer for inverse-Compton X-ray source in MeV region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjian Tan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel magnetic spectrometer for Inverse-Compton X-ray source is proposed. Compton recoil electrons are generated by a lithium converter, and then confined by a complex collimator and spectrally resolved by a sector-shaped double-focusing magnet. A method of optimization for the converter is investigated, and the dependence of the best energy resolution on converting efficiency is quantitatively revealed. The configuration of the magnet is specially designed to cover a wide range of electron energy and to achieve a large collecting solid angle. The efficiency and relative energy resolution of the designed spectrometer, according to Monte-Carlo simulation using Geant4, are 10-4 e/p and about 5% respectively for 3 MeV photons.

  16. Integrated X-ray testing of the electro-optical breadboard model for the XMM reflection grating spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bixler, J.V.; Craig, W.; Decker, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Aarts, H.; Boggende, T. den; Brinkman, A.C. [Space Research Organization Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); Burkert, W.; Brauninger, H. [Max-Planck Institute fur Extraterrestische Physik, Testanlage (Germany); Branduardi-Raymont, G. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Dubbeldam, L. [Space Research Organization Netherlands, Leiden (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-07-12

    X-ray calibration of the Electro-Optical Breadboard Model (EOBB) of the XXM Reflection Grating Spectrometer has been carried out at the Panter test facility in Germany. The EOBB prototype optics consisted of a four-shell grazing incidence mirror module followed by an array of eight reflection gratings. The dispersed x-rays were detected by an array of three CCDs. Line profile and efficiency measurements where made at several energies, orders, and geometric configurations for individual gratings and for the grating array as a whole. The x-ray measurements verified that the grating mounting method would meet the stringent tolerances necessary for the flight instrument. Post EOBB metrology of the individual gratings and their mountings confirmed the precision of the grating boxes fabrication. Examination of the individual grating surface`s at micron resolution revealed the cause of anomalously wide line profiles to be scattering due to the crazing of the replica`s surface.

  17. A FPGA-based digital readout system for a multi-channel X and gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, R.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Amati, L.; Baldazzi, G.; Fiorini, M.; Rignanese, L. P.; Uslenghi, M.

    The XGS project aims to develop a multi-channel broadband X and gamma -ray spectrometer for space applications. The experiment envisages the use of solid-state Silicon Drift Detectors coupled to inorganic scintillator bars. A prototype is under development in the framework of an INAF funded project, in which the detector signal will be digitized by a fast ADC and further digitally processed. An overview of the system architecture and the test equipment currently under development based on low-cost commercial system-on-chip FPGA boards will be given.

  18. Measurement of the electron and ion temperatures by the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610200 (China); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been developed on joint Texas experimental tokamak for the measurement of electron and ion temperatures from the K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. A two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter has been applied to detect the spectra. The electron and ion temperatures have been obtained from the Voigt fitting with the spectra of helium-like argon ions. The profiles of electron and ion temperatures show the dependence on electron density in ohmic plasmas.

  19. A vacuum double-crystal spectrometer for reference-free highly charged ions X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro, P; Schlesser, S; Gumberidze, Alexandre; Kessler, Ernest G; Henins, Albert; Bigot, E -O Le; Trassinelli, M; Isac, Jean-Michel; Travers, Pascal; Guerra, Mauro; Santos, J P; Indelicato, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We have built a vacuum double crystal spectrometer, which coupled to an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source, allows to measure low-energy x-ray transitions in highly-charged ions with accuracies of the order of a few parts per million. We describe in detail the instrument and its performances. Furthermore, we present a few spectra of transitions in Ar$^{14+}$, Ar$^{15+}$ and Ar$^{16+}$. We have developed an \\emph{ab initio} simulation code that allows us to obtain accurate line profiles. It can reproduce experimental spectra with unprecedented accuracy. The quality of the profiles allows the direct determination of line width.

  20. Performance of 20 Ci 137Cs γ-ray Compton spectrometer for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The in-house 137Cs spectrometer is very useful for the measurement of momentum densities of heavy materials. The performance of the machine is assessed using aluminum, terbium and mercury samples and the exper- imental data from comparable apparatus. Keywords. Compton scattering; electron momentum density; ...

  1. Borehole X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRFS): User’s Manual, Software Description, and Performance Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Description ...................................................................................................29 X-ray Tube Control ( XTC ...LABORATORY_________________ TR 0703 29 Software Description X-ray Tube Control ( XTC ) Description This module has two main purposes: to display and

  2. MER 2 MARS ALPHA PARTICLE X-RAY SPECTROMETER 2 XRAYSPEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains Mars Exploration Rover x-ray data products from the APXS instrument and ancillary files. The APXS x-ray products archived on this volume were...

  3. Laboratory Tests of a Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer: A Tool for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. E.; Evans, C. A.; Hodges, K.

    2011-12-01

    Maximizing the science return from a mission to another planetary surface involves the integration of science objectives with deployable technologies that enable the collection of data and samples. For long duration manned missions, it is likely that more samples will be collected than can be returned to Earth due to mass limits. A niche exists for technologies that help prioritize samples for return, provide data for future sample handling and curation, and characterization for samples that are not returned to Earth. To fill this niche, hardware and protocols for field instruments are currently being developed and evaluated at NASA Johnson Space Center and Arizona State University. Our goal is to develop an easily used, environmentally isolated facility as part of the astronaut surface habitat for preliminary sample characterization and down-selection. NASA has constructed a prototype, GeoLab, as a testbed for evaluating the scientific applicability and operational considerations of various analytical instruments. One instrument under evaluation is a small, portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer that can be also be used by astronaut explorers as part of their field gear while on scientific sorties, or on robotic field assistants. We report on preliminary usability tests for commercially available handheld XRF instruments. These instruments collect data by contacting the surface of a rock or sediment sample with an 8 mm-wide sensor window. Within 60 seconds, the devices can provide relatively precise data on the abundance of major and trace elements heavier than Na. Lab-based handheld XRF analyses of terrestrial and lunar samples, compared with those made with full-scale laboratory XRF systems, show good correlation, but we continue to investigate potential sources of error and the need for careful calibration with standards of known composition. Specifically, we use a suite of five terrestrial and five lunar basalts, all well characterized by conventional

  4. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  5. Conceptual design of the Radial Gamma Ray Spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nocente, Massimo; Tardocchi, Marco; Barnsley, Robin

    2017-01-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines...... space and high energy resolution in a single device. The RGRS system as designed can provide information on α particles on a time scale of 1/10 of the slowing down time for the ITER 500 MW full power DT scenario. Spectral observations of the 3.21 and 4.44 MeV peaks from the 9Be (α, nϒ) 12C reaction make...

  6. X-ray emitting hot plasma in solar active regions observed by the SphinX spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, M.; Reale, F.; Gburek, S.; Terzo, S.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Podgorski, P.; Gryciuk, M.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The detection of very hot plasma in the quiescent corona is important for diagnosing heating mechanisms. The presence and the amount of such hot plasma is currently debated. The SphinX instrument on-board the CORONAS-PHOTON mission is sensitive to X-ray emission of energies well above 1 keV and provides the opportunity to detect the hot plasma component. Methods: We analysed the X-ray spectra of the solar corona collected by the SphinX spectrometer in May 2009 (when two active regions were present). We modelled the spectrum extracted from the whole Sun over a time window of 17 days in the 1.34-7 keV energy band by adopting the latest release of the APED database. Results: The SphinX broadband spectrum cannot be modelled by a single isothermal component of optically thin plasma and two components are necessary. In particular, the high statistical significance of the count rates and the accurate calibration of the spectrometer allowed us to detect a very hot component at ~7 million K with an emission measure of ~2.7 × 1044 cm-3. The X-ray emission from the hot plasma dominates the solar X-ray spectrum above 4 keV. We checked that this hot component is invariably present in both the high and low emission regimes, i.e. even excluding resolvable microflares. We also present and discuss the possibility of a non-thermal origin (which would be compatible with a weak contribution from thick-target bremsstrahlung) for this hard emission component. Conclusions: Our results support the nanoflare scenario and might confirm that a minor flaring activity is ever-present in the quiescent corona, as also inferred for the coronae of other stars.

  7. Dispersion-compensating scanning X-ray spectrometer for Compton profile measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Suortti, P; Dimichiel, M; Honkimaeki, V; Lienert, U; McCarthy, J E; Merino, J M; Shukla, A

    2001-01-01

    A new type of Compton spectrometer is introduced for use at energies of 100 keV. Synchrotron radiation beam of a well-defined energy gradient is reflected on the sample by a cylindrically bent Laue-type monochromator, and the scattered radiation is analyzed by another bent Laue-type crystal. It is shown that nearly exact dispersion compensation is achieved over the entire energy spectrum. Due to the increased reflecting power of asymmetrically cut bent crystals the average count rate of Compton scattering is of the order of 10 sup 4 cps, while the momentum resolution of the spectrometer is 0.1 a.u. or better. Results of the first test measurements are presented.

  8. Imaging of Gamma-ray Scatter from a Polymethyl-methacrylate Phantom Using a Compton Imaging Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Samuel J; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2017-08-01

    Commercially available gamma-ray imaging spectrometers have been introduced recently and are currently undergoing investigations for various applications in nuclear power plants, environmental management, and medical environments. A Compton imaging gamma-ray spectrometer uses an array of detectors or a single position-sensitive crystal to create planar images of radionuclide distributions. The typical software included with these devices creates images of specific radionuclides using only the counts under their known gamma emission photopeaks. This approach prevents the direct imaging of scattered radiation, which is of interest for many radiation protection applications. In this paper, a technique for imaging radiation scatter or portions of the scatter spectrum is implemented. This involves the creation of a virtual radionuclide in software with peaks placed throughout the backscatter continuum of interest and then imaging that virtual radionuclide in the post-processing software. This technique is used to image the Compton scatter successfully from a polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) phantom placed in a Cs irradiator beam. Measured scatter energies were found to be within 15% of the expected values, sufficient to predict scatter behavior and individually measure separate sources of scatter at different angles.

  9. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    satellite lines of Al have been studied in collision with 3–12 keV electrons and 40 MeV. C. 4+ ions. In ion collisions as large as ... bilities to resolve complex multiplet structures in the atomic spectra. Following the first crystal spectrometer .... The Bragg's equation (nλ = 2d sin θ) and slope of the straight line (nrot vs. sin θ, not ...

  10. Computer-controlled data-acquisition system for an x-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, J. M.; Cardinaud, C.; Chargelegue, P.; Marcelet, F.; Sénémaud, C.

    1986-12-01

    A data-acquisition system, controlled by an Apple IIe microcomputer, designed for a bent crystal, vacuum spectrometer is described. A specific interface performing the photon counting via a programmable counter timer and the detector position encoding through a 12-bit analog-to-digital converter is coupled to the microcomputer bus by an 8-bit parallel interface. An outline of the software in advanced and machine language is given.

  11. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu 610200, Sichuan (China); Huang, D.W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  12. Development status of the mechanical cryocoolers for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer on board Astro-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Kenichiro; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Goto, Ken; Nakagawa, Takao; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Murakami, Masahide; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Ootsuka, Kiyomi; Kanao, Kenichi; Narasaki, Katsuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Astro-H is the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite to be launched in 2015. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on board Astro-H is a high energy resolution spectrometer utilizing an X-ray micro-calorimeter array, which is operated at 50 mK by the ADR with the 30 liter superfluid liquid helium. The mechanical cryocoolers, 4 K-class Joule Thomson (JT) cooler and 20 K-class double-staged Stirling (2ST) cooler, are key components of the SXS cooling system to extend the lifetime of LHe cryogen beyond 3 years as required. Higher reliability was therefore investigated with higher cooling capability based on the heritage of existing cryocoolers. As the task of assessing further reliability dealt with the pipe-choking phenomena by contaminant solidification of the on-orbit SMILES JT cryocooler, outgassing from materials and component parts used in the cryocoolers was measured quantitatively to verify the suppression of carbon dioxide gas by their storage process and predict the total accumulated carbon dioxide for long-term operation. A continuous running test to verify lifetime using the engineering model (EM) of the 4 K-JT cooler is underway, having operated for a total of 720 days as of June 2013 and showing no remarkable change in cooling performance. During the current development phase, prototype models (PM) of the cryocoolers were installed to the test SXS dewar (EM) to verify the overall cooling performance from room temperature to 50 mK. During the EM dewar test, the requirement to reduce the transmitted vibration from the 2ST cooler compressor was recognized as mitigating the thermal instability of the SXS microcalorimeter at 50 mK.

  13. The Instruments and Capabilities of the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Dennis, Brian R.; Jones, Andrew R.; Mason, James P.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2018-02-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is the first solar science oriented CubeSat mission flown for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, with the main objective of measuring the solar soft X-ray (SXR) flux and a science goal of determining its influence on Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. These observations can also be used to investigate solar quiescent, active region, and flare properties. The MinXSS X-ray instruments consist of a spectrometer, called X123, with a nominal 0.15 keV full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) resolution at 5.9 keV and a broadband X-ray photometer, called XP. Both instruments are designed to obtain measurements from 0.5 - 30 keV at a nominal time cadence of 10 s. A description of the MinXSS instruments, performance capabilities, and relation to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 0.1 - 0.8 nm flux is given in this article. Early MinXSS results demonstrate the capability of measuring variations of the solar spectral soft X-ray (SXR) flux between 0.8 - 12 keV from at least GOES A5-M5 (5 × 10^{-8} - 5 ×10^{-5} W m^{-2}) levels and of inferring physical properties (temperature and emission measure) from the MinXSS data alone. Moreover, coronal elemental abundances can be inferred, specifically for Fe, Ca, Si, Mg, S, Ar, and Ni, when the count rate is sufficiently high at each elemental spectral feature. Additionally, temperature response curves and emission measure loci demonstrate the MinXSS sensitivity to plasma emission at different temperatures. MinXSS observations coupled with those from other solar observatories can help address some of the most compelling questions in solar coronal physics. Finally, simultaneous observations by MinXSS and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) can provide the most spectrally complete soft X-ray solar flare photon flux measurements to date.

  14. Detecting Metallic Primary Explosives with a Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hewitt, Alan D

    1997-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) analysis is a practical means of performing in-situ screening to establish the presence of high concentrations (>0.1% or 1000 ppm) of lead (Pb) and/or mercury (Hg...

  15. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 3 GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER CALIBDATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER GRS calibrated observations (CDRs) and the reduced data product (RDR). The GRS experiment is a gamma ray...

  16. MER 1 MARS ALPHA PARTICLE X-RAY SPECTROMETER 2 XRAYSPEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains Mars Exploration Rover x-ray data products from the APXS instrument and ancillary files. Each product has a detached PDS label that describes...

  17. Design of Time-Resolved Shifted Dual Transmission Grating Spectrometer for the X-Ray Spectrum Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoqing; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Tingshuai; Li, Jin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-07-01

    A new time-resolved shifted dual transmission grating spectrometer (SDTGS) is designed and fabricated in this work. This SDTGS uses a new shifted dual transmission grating (SDTG) as its dispersive component, which has two sub transmission gratings with different line densities, of 2000 lines/mm and 5000 lines/mm. The axes of the two sub transmission gratings in SDTG are horizontally and vertically shifted a certain distance to measure a broad range of 0.1-5 keV time-resolved X-ray spectra. The SDTG has been calibrated with a soft X-ray beam of the synchrotron radiation facility and its diffraction efficiency is also measured. The designed SDTGS can take full use of the space on a record panel and improve the precision for measuring spatial and temporal spectrum simultaneously. It will be a promising application for accurate diagnosis of the soft X-ray spectrum in inertial confinement fusion. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405158 and 11435011) and Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Nos. 2014B0102011 and 2014B0102012)

  18. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Carini, Gabriella A.; Wei, Chen; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kramer, Georgiana; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Zheng, Li; Ramsey, Brian D.; Rehak, Pavel; hide

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (<150 eV at 5.9 keV) and an order of magnitude lower power requirement, making much higher sensitivities possible. Furthermore, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  19. Ground tests with prototype of CeBr{sub 3} active gamma ray spectrometer proposed for future venus surface missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvak, M.L., E-mail: litvak@mx.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Sanin, A.B.; Golovin, D.V. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Jun, I. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Mitrofanov, I.G. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Shvetsov, V.N.; Timoshenko, G.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Vostrukhin, A.A. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-11

    The results of a series of ground tests with a prototype of an active gamma-ray spectrometer based on a new generation of scintillation crystal (CeBr{sub 3}) are presented together with a consideration to its applicability to future Venus landing missions. We evaluated the instrument's capability to distinguish the subsurface elemental composition of primary rock forming elements such as O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K and Fe. Our study uses heritage from previous ground and field tests and applies to the analysis of gamma lines from activation reaction products generated by a pulsed neutron generator. We have estimated that the expected accuracies achieved in this approach could be as high as 1–10% for the particular chemical element being studied.

  20. SACI--a 4{pi} plastic phoswich array ancillary detector system of a {gamma}-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara-Nunez, J.A. E-mail: juan.alcantara@dfn.if.usp.br; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Cybulska, E.W.; Medina, N.H.; Rao, M.N.; Ribas, R.V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Seale, W.A.; Falla-Sotelo, F.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Tenreiro, C

    2003-02-01

    A large solid angle low-Z charged particle detector system was built in order to improve the quality of the identification and selection of evaporation channels for in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy measurements. The array consists of 11 plastic phoswich telescopes closely packed in a 4{pi} arrangement and to be used as an ancillary system for the Pelletron Laboratory {gamma}-ray spectrometer. The new system was tested in {gamma}-particle and {gamma}-{gamma}-particle coincidence measurements using the {sup 27}Al+{sup 16}O and {sup 100}Mo+{sup 11}B reactions, at 53 and 43 MeV incident beam energies, respectively. The values for the particle detection efficiency and improvement in the peak to background ratios are considered acceptable for the usefulness of the system.

  1. Thermodynamic Performance of the 3-Stage ADR for the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore; DiPirro, Michael J.; Bialas, Thomas G.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Kelley, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument[1] on Astro-H[2] will use a 3-stage ADR[3] to cool the microcalorimeter array to 50 mK. In the primary operating mode, two stages of the ADR cool the detectors using superfluid helium at =1.20 K as the heat sink[4]. In the secondary mode, which is activated when the liquid helium is depleted, the ADR uses a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson cooler as its heat sink. In this mode, all three stages operate together to continuously cool the (empty) helium tank and singleshot cool the detectors. The flight instrument - dewar, ADR, detectors and electronics - were integrated in 2014 and have since undergone extensive performance testing. This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the ADR's operation, including cooling capacity, heat rejection to the heat sinks, and various measures of efficiency.

  2. Probing the electron beam induced reduction of graphite oxide by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Yeping; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    The graphite oxide (GO) was reduced successfully by electron-beam irradiation without solution chemistry and high temperature, where the chemical structural changes and gaseous species released during the exposure was monitored directly by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/mass spectrometer. The degree of reduction of GO can be tuned effectively by way of electron beam intensity and irradiation time, resulting a high C/O ratio of 5.27. The evolution of C 1s spectra with irradiation time was also investigated. The CO, CO2, H2 molecules and several organic species were detected during the irradiation, confirmed that the electron beam induced the photoreduction of GO. The combined chemical structure evolution and gas species analysis make the XPS-MS highly desirable as a powerful in situ analytical instrument for tracking the reaction process. The electron-beam-induced reduction described in detail here provides potential way to fabricate graphene device from GO in one step.

  3. In-Flight Performance of the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Detector System on ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Frederick S.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Chiao, Meng P.; Eckart, Megan E.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Carolina A.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; hide

    2016-01-01

    The SXS instrument was launched aboard the Astro-H observatory on February 17, 2016. The SXS spectrometer is based on a high sensitivity x-ray calorimeter detector system that has been successfully deployed in many ground and sub-orbital spectrometers. The instrument was to provide essential diagnostics for nearly every class of x-ray emitting objects from the atmosphere of Jupiter to the outskirts of galaxy clusters, without degradation for spatially extended objects. The SXS detector system consisted of a 36-pixel cryogenic microcalorimeter array operated at a heat sink temperature of 50 mK. In pre-flight testing, the detector system demonstrated a resolving power of better than 1300 at 6 keV with a simultaneous band-pass from below 0.3 keV to above 12 keV with a timing precision better than 100 microsecond. In addition, a solid-state anti-coincidence detector was placed directly behind the detector array for background suppression. The detector error budget included the measured interference from the SXS cooling system and the spacecraft. Additional margin for on-orbit gain-stability, and on-orbit spacecraft interference were also included predicting an on-orbit performance that meets or exceeds the 7 eV FWHM at 6 keV requirement. The actual on-orbit spectral resolution was better than 5 eV FWHM at 6 keV, easily satisfying the instrument requirement. Here we discuss the actual on-orbit performance of the SXS detector system and compare this to performance in pre-flight testing and the on-orbit predictions. We will also discuss the on-orbit gain stability, additional on-orbit interference, and measurements of the on-orbit background.

  4. Non-destructive in situ study of "Mad Meg" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Van Pevenage, Jolien; De Langhe, Kaat; De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Vandenabeele, Peter; Martens, Maximiliaan P. J.

    2014-07-01

    "Mad Meg", a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO2 + 15% K2O + 10% CoO + 5% Al2O3) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel.

  5. In-flight verification of the calibration and performance of the ASTRO-H (Hitomi) Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Audard, Marc; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Chiao, Meng P.; Eckart, Megan E.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haas, Daniel; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Hayashi, Takayuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishida, Manabu; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kelley, Richard L.; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Koyama, Shu; Kurashima, Sho; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Markevitch, Maxim; McCammon, Dan; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mori, Hideyuki; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Okajima, Takashi; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Takei, Yoh; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; de Vries, Cor P.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko

    2016-07-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Astro-H (Hitomi) orbiting x-ray observatory featured an array of 36 silicon thermistor x-ray calorimeters optimized to perform high spectral resolution x-ray imaging spectroscopy of astrophysical sources in the 0.3-12 keV band. Extensive pre- flight calibration measurements are the basis for our modeling of the pulse-height-energy relation and energy resolution for each pixel and event grade, telescope collecting area, detector efficiency, and pulse arrival time. Because of the early termination of mission operations, we needed to extract the maximum information from observations performed only days into the mission when the onboard calibration sources had not yet been commissioned and the dewar was still coming into thermal equilibrium, so our technique for reconstructing the per-pixel time-dependent pulse-height-energy relation had to be modified. The gain scale was reconstructed using a combination of an absolute energy scale calibration at a single time using a fiducial from an onboard radioactive source, and calibration of a dominant time-dependent gain drift component using a dedicated calibration pixel, as well as a residual time-dependent variation using spectra from the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The energy resolution was also measured using the onboard radioactive sources. It is consistent with instrument-level measurements accounting for the modest increase in noise due to spacecraft systems interference. We use observations of two pulsars to validate our models of the telescope area and detector efficiency, and to derive a more accurate value for the thickness of the gate valve Be window, which had not been opened by the time mission operations ceased. We use observations of the Crab pulsar to refine the pixel-to-pixel timing and validate the absolute timing.

  6. The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) for the Argentinian, Scout-launched satelite de Aplicaciones Cienficas-1 (SAC-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Crannell, Carol JO; Desai, Upendra D.; Orwig, Larry E.; Kiplinger, Alan L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Machado, Marcos; Wood, Kent

    1988-01-01

    The Fourier Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (FIXS) is one of four instruments on SAC-1, the Argentinian satellite being proposed for launch by NASA on a Scout rocket in 1992/3. The FIXS is designed to provide solar flare images at X-ray energies between 5 and 35 keV. Observations will be made on arcsecond size scales and subsecond time scales of the processes that modify the electron spectrum and the thermal distribution in flaring magnetic structures.

  7. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  8. Simulation of CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometer response

    CERN Document Server

    Gliere, A; Verger, L

    2000-01-01

    A model of a semiconductor gamma-ray planar detector is presented. The model takes into account the physical phenomena involved in the detection process, namely the gamma-ray's interaction with the crystal, the physics of the semiconductor's charge collection and the electric field distribution. Its outputs are conventional pulse-height spectra and biparametric (rise time versus pulse height) spectra. Some of the model's capabilities are demonstrated by comparison with spectra obtained for CdZnTe detectors. The comparison between simulated and experimental pulse-height spectra shows a good agreement when the measured electric field profile is used in the simulation. (Electric field is measured via the Pockels effect). A better modeling of the electronics will improve the current quantitative agreement between model and experiment for biparametric spectra.

  9. Status of the Micro-X Sounding Rocket X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, D. C.; Adams, J. S.; Baker, R.; Bandler, S. R.; Danowski, M. E.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubbard, A. J. F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket borne X-ray telescope that utilizes transition edge sensors to perform imaging spectroscopy with a high level of energy resolution. Its 2.1m focal length X-ray optic has an effective area of 300 sq cm, a field of view of 11.8 arcmin, and a bandpass of 0.12.5 keV. The detector array has 128 pixels and an intrinsic energy resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM. The integration of the system has progressed with functional tests of the detectors and electronics complete, and performance characterization of the detectors is underway. We present an update of ongoing progress in preparation for the upcoming launch of the instrument.

  10. The mirror module design for the cryogenic x-ray imaging spectrometer on-board ORIGIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbera, Marco; Mineo, Teresa; Basso, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    ORIGIN is a medium size high-energy mission concept submitted to ESA in response to the Cosmic Vision call issued on July 2010. The mission will investigate the evolution of the Universe by performing soft X-ray high resolution spectroscopic measurements of metals formed in different astrophysical...... environments, from the first population III stars at z > 7 to the present large scale structures. The main instrument on-board ORIGIN will be a large format array of TES X-ray micro-calorimeters covering a FOV of 30' at the focal plane of a grazing incidence optical module with a focal length of 2.5 m...... and an angular resolution of 30" HEW at 1 keV. We present the optical module design which is based on hybrid technologies, namely Silicon Pore Optics for the outer section and Ni electro-forming for the inner section, and we present the expected performances based on test measurements and ray-tracing simulations....

  11. Toward Large FOV High-Resolution X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer: Microwave Multiplexed Readout of 32 TES Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Wonsik; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Miniussi, Antoine R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We performed a small-scale demonstration at GSFC of high-resolution x-ray TES microcalorimeters read out using a microwave SQUID multiplexer. This work is part of our effort to develop detector and readout technologies for future space based x-ray instruments such as the microcalorimeter spectrometer envisaged for Lynx, a large mission concept under development for the Astro 2020 Decadal Survey. In this paper we describe our experiment, including details of a recently designed, microwave-optimized low-temperature setup that is thermally anchored to the 50 mK stage of our laboratory ADR. Using a ROACH2 FPGA at room temperature, we simultaneously read out 32 pixels of a GSFC-built detector array via a NIST-built multiplexer chip with Nb coplanar waveguide resonators coupled to RF SQUIDs. The resonators are spaced 6 MHz apart (at approx. 5.9 GHz) and have quality factors of approximately 15,000. Using flux-ramp modulation frequencies of 160 kHz we have achieved spectral resolutions of 3 eV FWHM on each pixel at 6 keV. We will present the measured system-level noise and maximum slew rates, and briefly describe the implications for future detector and readout design.

  12. Effects of charge sharing in 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z; Knoll, G F; Wehe, D K; Du, Y F

    2000-01-01

    Two 3-D position-sensitive semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers operable at room temperature, have been fabricated using 1 cm sup 3 cubic CdZnTe crystals. gamma-Ray spectra have been obtained from 11(x)x11(y)x20(z) voxels, each corresponding to approx 0.7x0.7x0.5 mm in the detector volume. Individual spectra from each of the 2420 voxels were corrected for electron trapping, differences in weighting potentials, and the gain variation of the readout circuitry. Energy resolutions of 1.70% (11.3 keV) FWHM and 1.84% (12.2 keV) FWHM were obtained at 662 keV from the combined output of the entire volume for single-pixel events. Charge sharing between neighboring pixels has been observed and the sizes of electron clouds are estimated from these experimental data. An understanding of electron cloud dimensions is important for the design of future detectors using pixellated electrodes.

  13. Science Goals and First Light Analysis from the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Mason, James; McTiernan, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat with deployment from the ISS planned in Q2 2016. Its goal is to measure the solar soft X-ray (SXR) spectral irradiance, an observational signature of hot plasma in the solar corona. Over the last few decades, there have been very few spectrally resolved observations from ~0.2 to ~4 keV (~0.3-6 nm). This range is sensitive to high-temperature plasma and contains many spectral lines (e.g., Mg, Si, Fe, S, Ar), the abundances of which probe plasma transport and provide valuable constraints on plasma heating mechanisms during both flares and quiescence. This solar SXR emission is primarily absorbed in the E-region of Earth's ionosphere, and the subsequently driven dynamical processes are still poorly understood, in large part because the energy distribution of the incident SXRs is not yet well characterized.MinXSS flies a miniature commercial off-the-shelf soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD. The silicon drift detector has 0.5 mm fully depleted thickness and a 25 mm^2 physical area, with a ~16 micron Be entrance window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar SXRs from ~0.5 to 30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. MinXSS also includes a broadband SXR photometer, providing an integrated intensity over a similar energy range for comparison, cross-calibration, and additional data, especially useful during more intense flares at the upper end of the X123 dynamic range.We present the MinXSS science goals for studying hot plasma in the solar corona, including impulsive flare heating and quiescent coronal heating, and the impact of the resultant SXR emission on Earth's ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. We present analysis of MinXSS first light results (depending on deployment date from the ISS), as well as modeling and predictions of future observations over the MinXSS 6-12 month mission lifetime.

  14. Critical-angle transmission grating technology development for high resolving power soft x-ray spectrometers on Arcus and Lynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Song, Jungki; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Gaskin, Jessica A.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Cheimetz, Peter; Hertz, Edward; Smith, Randall K.; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; La Caria, Marlis-Madeleine; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2017-08-01

    Soft x-ray spectroscopy with high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ) and large effective area (A) addresses numerous unanswered science questions about the physical laws that lead to the structure of our universe. In the soft x-ray band R > 1000 can currently only be achieved with diffraction grating-based spectroscopy. Criticalangle transmission (CAT) gratings combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies, low mass), resulting in minimal mission resource requirements, while greatly improving figures of merit. Diffraction efficiency > 33% and R > 10, 000 have been demonstrated for CAT gratings. Last year the technology has been certified at Technology Readiness Level 4 based on a probe class mission concept. The Explorer-scale (A > 450 cm2 , R > 2500) grating spectroscopy Arcus mission can be built with today's CAT grating technology and has been selected in the current Explorer round for a Phase A concept study. Its figure of merit for the detection of weak absorption lines will be an order of magnitude larger than current instruments on Chandra and XMM-Newton. Further CAT grating technology development and improvements in the angular resolution of x-ray optics can provide another order of magnitude improvement in performance, as is envisioned for the X-ray Surveyor/Lynx mission concept currently under development for input into the 2020 Decadal Survey. For Arcus we have tested CAT gratings in a spectrometer setup in combination with silicon pore optics (SPO) and obtained resolving power results that exceed Arcus requirements before and after environmental testing of the gratings. We have recently fabricated the largest (32 mm x 32 mm) CAT gratings to date, and plan to increase grating size further. We mounted two of these large gratings to frames and aligned them in the

  15. A Spectrometer for X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffraction using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun Olsen, Janus; Buras, B; Gerward, Leif

    1981-01-01

    Describes a white-beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometer built for Hasylab in Hamburg, FRG, using the synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring DORIS. The following features of the instrument are discussed: horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment......, remote control of the goniometer, data acquisition, energy-sensitive detectors using small-area and large-area detector crystals, modes of operation, powder and single crystal diffraction. An example is given from a high-pressure study of YbH2 using a diamond anvil cell....

  16. A curved crystal spectrometer for energy calibration and spectral characterization of mammographic x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, L T; Deslattes, R D; Henins, A; Chantler, C T; Kessler, E G; Schweppe, J E

    1996-10-01

    Clinical efficacy of diagnostic radiology for mammographic examinations is critically dependent on source characteristics, detection efficiency, image resolution and applied high voltage. In this report we focus on means for evaluation of source-dependent issues including noninvasive determination of the applied high voltage, and characterization of intrinsic spectral distributions which in turn reflect the effects of added filtration and target and window contamination. It is shown that a particular form of x-ray curved crystal spectrometry with electronic imaging can serve to determine all relevant parameters within the confines of a standard clinical exposure.

  17. Wide field imaging spectrometer for ESA's future X-ray mission: XEUS

    CERN Document Server

    Strüder, L

    1999-01-01

    An active pixel sensor (APS) based on the DEpleted P-channel junction Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) concept will be described as a potential wide field imager for ESA's high resolution, high throughput mission: 'X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy' (XEUS). It comprises a parallel multichannel readout, low noise at high speed readout, backside illumination and a fill factor of 100% over the whole field of view. The depleted thickness will be 500 microns. These design parameters match the scientific requirements of the mission. The fabrication techniques of the DEPFET arrays are related to the high resistivity process of the X-ray pn-CCDs. Potential extensions of the already realized DEPFET structures are a non-destructive repetitive readout of the signal charges. This concept will be presented. As an alternative solution, frame store pn-CCDs are considered having the same format and pixel sizes as the proposed DEPFET arrays. Their development is a low risk, straightforward continuation of the XMM devices. ...

  18. Conception of broadband stigmatic high-resolution spectrometers for the soft X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnyakov, E A; Shatokhin, A N; Ragozin, E N [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    We formulate an approach to the development of stigmatic high-resolution spectral instruments for the soft X-ray range (λ ≤ 300 Å), which is based on the combined operation of normalincidence multilayer mirrors (including broadband aperiodic ones) and grazing-incidence reflection gratings with nonequidistant grooves (so-called VLS gratings). A concave multilayer mirror serves to produce a slightly astigmatic image of the radiation source (for instance, an entrance slit), and the diffraction grating produces a set of its dispersed stigmatic spectral images. The width of the operating spectral region is determined by the aperiodic structure of the multilayer mirror and may range up to an octave in wavelength. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Studies of the $\\beta$-decay of Kr and Sr nuclei on and near the N=Z line with a Total Absorption $\\gamma$-ray Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    It is proposed to measure the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the decays of $^{71-75}$Kr and $^{75,76}$Sr using a Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) based on a large NaI(TI) detector. The $\\gamma$-rays emitted in these decays will be detected in the TAGS in coincidence with positrons and X-rays from electron capture. Measurements of $\\beta$-delayed particles will also be performed in coincidence with the TAGS. Comparison with theoretical calculations based on the mean field approach, Tamm-Dancoff and QRPA method should allow a determination of the shapes of the ground states of these nuclei.

  20. Multilayer x-ray mirrors for the objective crystal spectrometer on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louis, E.; Spiller, E.; Abdali, S.

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments to determine the optimum parameters for the production of multilayer x-ray mirrors for the lambda equals 4.4 - 7.1 nm range using electron beam evaporation and ion-polishing. We report on the deposition of Co/C and Ni/C coatings, of which we polished the metal layers...... with Kr+- and Ar+- ions of 300, 500, and 1000 eV. We examined the effect of different polishing parameters on the smoothening of the Co- and Ni-layers. The in-situ reflectivity of lambda equals 3.16 nm during deposition and the ex-situ grazing incidence reflectivity of Cu-K(alpha ) radiation (lambda...... equals 0.154 nm) were used to analyze the coatings. We found optimum performance of the mirrors when applying polishing for 40 s with 500 eV Kr+-ions at an angle of 20 degrees and an ion beam current of 20 mA. Using these parameters, we produced Co/C multilayer coatings on forty flat super-polished 6...

  1. X-ray observations of EX Hydrae with the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jyoti; Swank, Jean

    1993-01-01

    Einstein SSS X-ray observations of the eclipsing intermediate polar EX Hya are presented. The SSS data have a better resolution at energies extending below 2 keV than do the EXOSAT data. These data reveal the presence of a soft component with a temperature of about 0.74 keV. The phase-resolved data can be fitted to a model of two-temperature thermal plasma with a single absorber, with the result that only the normalization varies with phase. This suggests that part of the soft component might become occulted at minimum. If we assume that the reduction in the flux occurs due to the photoelectric absorption, we find that a high-density material covering only about 40 percent of the emission can fit the data equally well. The EXOSAT and Ginga data of this source favor the accretion curtain model rather than the occultation model. We modify the accretion curtain model by assuming that the modulation is caused by an absorber which partially covers the accreting column at the minimum of the 67-min pulse. An emission line at 1.72 keV is present in the data. The equivalent width of this line varies in phase with the continuum. We associate this line with Si fluorescence.

  2. Design of a 3-Stage ADR for the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument on the Astro-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Wegel, Donald C.; Canavan, Edgar R.; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Astro-H mission will include the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument, whose 36-pixel detector array of ultra-sensitive x-ray microcalorimeters requires cooling to 50 mK. This will be accomplished using a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design is dictated by the need to operate with full redundancy with both a superfluid helium dewar at 1.3 K or below, and with a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cooler. The ADR is configured as a 2-stage unit that is located in a well in the helium tank, and a third stage that is mounted to the top of the helium tank. The third stage is directly connected through two heat switches to the JT cooler and the helium tank, and manages heat flow between the two. When liquid helium is present, the 2-stage ADR operates in a single-shot manner using the superfluid helium as a heat sink. The third stage may be used independently to reduce the time-average heat load on the liquid to extend its lifetime. When the liquid is depleted, the 2nd and 3rd stages operate as a continuous ADR to maintain the helium tank at as low a temperature as possible - expected to be 1.2 K - and the 1st stage cools from that temperature as a single-stage, single-shot ADR. The ADR s design and operating modes are discussed, along with test results of the prototype 3-stage ADR.

  3. Rapid and accurate analyses of silicon and phosphorus in plants using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidinger, Stefan; Ramsey, Michael H; Hartley, Susan E

    2012-08-01

    The elemental analysis of plant material is a frequently employed tool across biological disciplines, yet accurate, convenient and economical methods for the determination of some important elements are currently lacking. For instance, digestion-based techniques are often hazardous and time-consuming and, particularly in the case of silicon (Si), can suffer from low accuracy due to incomplete solubilization and potential volatilization, whilst other methods may require large, expensive and specialised equipment. Here, we present a rapid, safe and accurate procedure for the simultaneous, nonconsumptive analysis of Si and phosphorus (P) in as little as 0.1 g dried and ground plant material using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (P-XRF). We used certified reference materials from different plant species to test the analytical performance of P-XRF and show that the analysis suffers from very little bias and that the repeatability precision of the measurements is as good as or better than that of other methods. Using this technique we were able to process and analyse 200 ground samples a day, so P-XRF could provide a particularly valuable tool for plant biologists requiring the simultaneous nonconsumptive analysis of multiple elements, including those known to be difficult to measure such as Si, in large numbers of samples. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Thermodynamic Analysis of the 3-Stage ADR for the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; DiPirro, Michael; Bialas, Tom; Sneiderman, Gary; Porter, Scott; Kelley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument on Astro-H will use a 3-stage ADR to cool the microcalorimeter array to 50 mK. In the primary operating mode, two stages of the ADR cool the detectors using superfluid helium at 1.20 K as the heat sink. In the secondary mode, which is activated when the liquid helium is depleted, two of the stages continuously cool the (empty) helium tank using a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson cooler as the heat sink, and the third stage cools the detectors. In the design phase, a high-fidelity model of the ADR was developed in order to predict both the cooling capacity and heat rejection rates in both operating modes. The primary sources of heat flow are from the salt pills, hysteresis heat from the magnets and magnetic shields, and power dissipated by the heat switches. The flight instrument dewar, ADR, detectors and electronics were integrated in mid-2014 and have since undergone extensive performance testing, in part to validate the performance model. This paper will present the thermodynamic performance of the ADR, including cooling capacity, heat rejection to the heat sinks, and various measures of efficiency.

  5. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary and can be chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the L β1- and L β2-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature R of 500 mm. These experimental results will be presented. Work supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Por que incluir el analisis fenomenologico en un curso de metodos de investigacion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delgado, Ana R

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: las lineas orientadoras de los planes de estudio de Psicologia incluyen el descriptor metodos cuantitativos y cualitativos, pero estos ultimos aun se encuentran mal representados. Metodo...

  7. Construction of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and its application to pulse duration measurement of X-ray laser using a pump-probe method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Namba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the temporal evolution of ultrashort X-ray pulses emitted by laser plasmas using a pump-probe method, a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer is constructed. The design is determined by numerical calculations of a mirror magnetic field and of the electron trajectory in a flight tube. The performance of the spectrometer is characterized by measuring the electron spectra of xenon atoms irradiated with a laser-driven plasma X-ray pulse. In addition, two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI experiment is conducted for measurement of the X-ray laser pulse duration, in which xenon atoms are simultaneously irradiated with an X-ray laser pump and an IR laser probe. The correlation in the intensity of the sideband spectra of the 4d inner-shell photoelectrons and in the time delay of the two laser pulses yields an X-ray pulse width of 5.7 ps, in good agreement with the value obtained using an X-ray streak camera.

  8. Einstein Observatory SSS and MPC observations of the complex X-ray spectra of Seyfert galaxies. [Solid State Spectrometer and Monitor Proportional Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. J.; Weaver, K. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.; Madejski, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of 25 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer on the Einstein Observatory have been investigated. This new investigation utilizes simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter, and automatic correction for systematic effects in the Solid State Spectrometer which were previously handled subjectively. It is found that the best-fit single-power-law indices generally agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses of some form are inferred for about 48 percent of the sources. One possible explanation of the soft excess emission is a blend of soft X-ray lines, centered around 0.8 keV. The implications of these results for accretion disk models are discussed.

  9. Monte-Carlo simulation of noise in hard X-ray Transmission Crystal Spectrometers: Identification of contributors to the background noise and shielding optimizationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thfoin, I.; Reverdin, C.; Hulin, S.; Szabo, C. I.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Batani, D.; Brambrink, E.; Koenig, M.; Duval, A.; Leboeuf, X.; Lecherbourg, L.; Rossé, B.; Morace, A.; Santos, J. J.; Vaisseau, X.; Fourment, C.; Giuffrida, L.; Nakatsutsumi, M.

    2014-11-01

    Transmission crystal spectrometers (TCS) are used on many laser facilities to record hard X-ray spectra. During experiments, signal recorded on imaging plates is often degraded by a background noise. Monte-Carlo simulations made with the code GEANT4 show that this background noise is mainly generated by diffusion of MeV electrons and very hard X-rays. An experiment, carried out at LULI2000, confirmed that the use of magnets in front of the diagnostic, that bent the electron trajectories, reduces significantly this background. The new spectrometer SPECTIX (Spectromètre PETAL à Cristal en TransmIssion X), built for the LMJ/PETAL facility, will include this optimized shielding.

  10. Monte-Carlo simulation of noise in hard X-ray Transmission Crystal Spectrometers: identification of contributors to the background noise and shielding optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thfoin, I; Reverdin, C; Hulin, S; Szabo, C I; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Batani, D; Brambrink, E; Koenig, M; Duval, A; Leboeuf, X; Lecherbourg, L; Rossé, B; Morace, A; Santos, J J; Vaisseau, X; Fourment, C; Giuffrida, L; Nakatsutsumi, M

    2014-11-01

    Transmission crystal spectrometers (TCS) are used on many laser facilities to record hard X-ray spectra. During experiments, signal recorded on imaging plates is often degraded by a background noise. Monte-Carlo simulations made with the code GEANT4 show that this background noise is mainly generated by diffusion of MeV electrons and very hard X-rays. An experiment, carried out at LULI2000, confirmed that the use of magnets in front of the diagnostic, that bent the electron trajectories, reduces significantly this background. The new spectrometer SPECTIX (Spectromètre PETAL à Cristal en TransmIssion X), built for the LMJ/PETAL facility, will include this optimized shielding.

  11. Monte-Carlo simulation of noise in hard X-ray Transmission Crystal Spectrometers: Identification of contributors to the background noise and shielding optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thfoin, I., E-mail: isabelle.lantuejoul@cea.fr; Reverdin, C.; Duval, A.; Leboeuf, X.; Lecherbourg, L.; Rossé, B. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hulin, S.; Batani, D.; Santos, J. J.; Vaisseau, X.; Fourment, C.; Giuffrida, L. [CELIA, Université de Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33405 Talence (France); Szabo, C. I. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, CNRS, UPMC, 75005 Paris Cedex (France); Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Brambrink, E.; Koenig, M.; Nakatsutsumi, M. [LULI Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Morace, A. [University of Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Transmission crystal spectrometers (TCS) are used on many laser facilities to record hard X-ray spectra. During experiments, signal recorded on imaging plates is often degraded by a background noise. Monte-Carlo simulations made with the code GEANT4 show that this background noise is mainly generated by diffusion of MeV electrons and very hard X-rays. An experiment, carried out at LULI2000, confirmed that the use of magnets in front of the diagnostic, that bent the electron trajectories, reduces significantly this background. The new spectrometer SPECTIX (Spectromètre PETAL à Cristal en TransmIssion X), built for the LMJ/PETAL facility, will include this optimized shielding.

  12. Gamma-ray impurities of {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc determined by means of a HPGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinas, Marina F.; Almeida, Jamille da Silveira; Moreira, Denise Simões; Semmler, Renato; Dias, Mauro da Silva, E-mail: koskinas@ipen.br, E-mail: jamillealmeida@gmail.com, E-mail: denise.moreira@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.br, E-mail: msdias@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This work aims to present the radioactive impurities gamma rays emitters detected in some radiopharmaceuticals widely applied to diagnosis and therapy purposes, supplied to nuclear medicine services in Brazil by the Radiopharmaceutical Center(CR) of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN, in São Paulo. The analysis was undertaken by means of an HPGe gamma spectrometer. The radiopharmaceuticals analyzed were: {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc. (author)

  13. Combined in-beam gamma-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams. Simulations of a silicon detector for the SPEDE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konki, J.; Papadakis, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Davies, P.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R. D.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Julin, R.; O'Neill, G.; Page, R. D.; Rahkila, P.; Ranttila, K.; Thornhill, J.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-12-01

    In-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy have been widely used as tools to study the broad variety of phenomena in nuclear structure. The SPEDE spectrometer is a new device to be used in conjunction with the MINIBALL germanium detector array to enable the detection of internal conversion electrons in coincidence with gamma rays from de-exciting nuclei in radioactive ion beam experiments at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN, Switzerland. Geant4 simulations were carried out in order to optimise the design and segmentation of the silicon detector to achieve good energy resolution and performance.

  14. In-house development of an FPGA-based MCA8K for gamma-ray spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanh, Dang; Son, Pham Ngoc; Son, Nguyen An

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is domestic development of electronics instruments. It used for measuring ionization radiation and practical training at Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Dalat, Vietnam. The aim of this work is to study and develop a novel MCA8k for Gamma-ray spectrometer concerning experimental nuclear physics. An approach for design and construction of the aforementioned instrument is to apply logic integrating techniques via Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) under Max + PlusII, Altera. The instrument allows interfacing to PC with self-developed application software. Scientific significance of this work is partly to contribute to opening a research direction in the field of nuclear electronics science for design and construction of radiation measurement instruments with the advanced IC technology in Vietnam. Practical significance of this work is partly to contribute to enhancement of capabilities in developing radiation measurement instruments for experimental research as well as practical training in nuclear physics. The advantages of FPGA: overcoming ballistic deficit, decrement of serial and parallel noise, flexible in programming, control of the system by software without an interfere of hardware. The disadvantages of FPGA: requirement of good knowledge of VHDL and professional tools for development of a expected project. A new electronics module of MCA8k has been achieved. Some main results obtained from the experimental testing are as follows: differential nonlinearity (DNL) of FPGA-MCA8k approximately 1.27%, integral nonlinearity (INL) = 0.607%, time conversion ≈ 2.2 μs, deadtime (DT) is 0.75%. Data Acquisition Program MCANRI written in VC (+ +)6.0, self-executed under Windows XP environment.

  15. A comparative study of LaBr3(Ce(3+)) and CeBr3 based gamma-ray spectrometers for planetary remote sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, A; Mitrofanov, I; Owens, A; Quarati, F; Benkhoff, J; Bakhtin, B; Fedosov, F; Golovin, D; Litvak, M; Malakhov, A; Mokrousov, M; Nuzhdin, I; Sanin, A; Tretyakov, V; Vostrukhin, A; Timoshenko, G; Shvetsov, V; Granja, C; Slavicek, T; Pospisil, S

    2016-08-01

    The recent availability of large volume cerium bromide crystals raises the possibility of substantially improving gamma-ray spectrometer limiting flux sensitivities over current systems based on the lanthanum tri-halides, e.g., lanthanum bromide and lanthanum chloride, especially for remote sensing, low-level counting applications or any type of measurement characterized by poor signal to noise ratios. The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured a highly sensitive gamma-ray spectrometer for remote sensing observations of the planet Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which forms part of ESA's BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) gamma-ray spectrometer is based on a 3-in. single crystal of LaBr3(Ce(3+)) produced in a separate crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the spectrometers development, manufacturing, and qualification phases, large crystals of CeBr3 became available in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) gamma-ray spectrometer was retrofitted with a 3-in. CeBr3 crystal and qualified for space. Except for the crystals, the two systems are essentially identical. In this paper, we report on a comparative assessment of the two systems, in terms of their respective spectral properties, as well as their suitability for use in planetary mission with respect to radiation tolerance and their propensity for activation. We also contrast their performance with a Ge detector representative of that flown on MESSENGER and show that: (a) both LaBr3(Ce(3+)) and CeBr3 provide superior detection systems over HPGe in the context of minimally resourced spacecraft and (b) CeBr3 is a more attractive system than LaBr3(Ce(3+)) in terms of sensitivities at lower gamma fluxes. Based on the tests, the FM has now been replaced by the FSM on the BepiColombo spacecraft. Thus, CeBr3 now forms the central gamma-ray detection element on the MPO spacecraft.

  16. The SAGE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Sorri, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Greenlees, P. T.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D. M.; Cresswell, J. R.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Mistry, A.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of -rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and -rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method.

  17. The SAGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Herzberg, R.D.; Butler, P.A.; Cox, D.M.; Cresswell, J.R.; Mistry, A.; Page, R.D.; Parr, E.; Sampson, J.; Seddon, D.A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P.J.; Lazarus, I.H.; Letts, S.C.; Pucknell, V.F.E.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of γ-rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and γ-rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method. (orig.)

  18. Simulation of the SAGE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. M.; Konki, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sorri, J.

    2015-06-01

    The SAGE spectrometer combines a Ge-detector array with a Si detector to allow simultaneous detection of γ-rays and electrons. A comprehensive GEANT4 simulation package of the SAGE spectrometer has been developed with the ability to simulate the expected datasets based on user input files. The measured performance of the spectrometer is compared to the results obtained from the simulations.

  19. Design Parameters and Objectives of a High-­Resolution X-­ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-05-19

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose instrumental concept was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is presently being designed for LHD. The instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of 1 cm and > 10 ms which are obtained by a tomographic inversion of the spectral data, using the stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES. Since the spectrometer will be equipped with radiation hardened, high count rate, PILATUS detectors,, it is expected to be operational for all experimental conditions on LHD, which include plasmas of high density and plasmas with auxiliary RF and neutral beam heating. The special design features required by the magnetic field structure at LHD will be described.

  20. Dual-array valence emission spectrometer (DAVES): A new approach for hard x-ray photon-in photon-out spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, K. D., E-mail: kdf1@cornell.edu; Lyndaker, A.; Krawcyk, T.; Conrad, J. [CHESS Wilson Lab, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Pollock, C. J. [Dept. of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    CHESS has developed and successfully deployed a novel Dual Array Valence Emission Spectrometer (DAVES) for high energy resolution, hard x-ray spectroscopy. DAVES employs the simplest method for scanning multiple spherical crystals along a Rowland Circle. The new design achieves unique 2-color collection capability and is built to take special advantage of pixel array detectors. Our initial results show why these detectors greatly improve data quality. The presentation emphasizes flexibility of experimental design offered by DAVES. Prospects and benefits of 2-color spectroscopy are illustrated and discussed.

  1. MINIBALL The first $\\gamma$-ray spectrometer using segmented, encapsulated germanium detectors for studies with radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Warr, N; Pascovici, G; Thomas, H G; Weisshaar, D

    2004-01-01

    MINIBALL is a new spectrometer of position-sensitive Ge detectors designed for nuclear-structure studies at the REX-ISOLDE (D. Habs et al., Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 38, 111 (1997)) radioactive-beam facility at CERN. It combines high efficiency and high granularity, using pulse-shape analysis and 6-fold segmented Ge detectors. (5 refs).

  2. Liulin silicon semiconductor spectrometers as cosmic ray monitors at the high mountain observatories Jungfraujoch and Lomnicky stit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubančák, Ján; Ambrožová, Iva; Butikofer, R.; Kudela, K.; Langer, R.; Davídková, Marie; Ploc, Ondřej; Malušek, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, JUL (2014), P07018 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : dosimetry concepts and apparatus * spectrometers * analysis and statistical methods Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.399, year: 2014

  3. Operating Modes and Cooling Capabilities of the 3-Stage ADR Developed for the Soft-X-Ray Spectrometer Instrument on Astro-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theo; DiPirro, Michael J.; Letmate, Richard V.; Sampson, Michael A.; Bialas, Tom G.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Porter, Frederick S.; hide

    2015-01-01

    A 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is used on the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on Astro-H to cool a 6x6 array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 50 mK. The ADR is supported by a cryogenic system consisting of a superfluid helium tank, a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler, and additional 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers that pre-cool the JT cooler and cool radiation shields within the cryostat. The ADR is configured so that it can use either the liquid helium or the JT cryocooler as its heat sink, giving the instrument an unusual degree of tolerance for component failures or degradation in the cryogenic system. The flight detector assembly, ADR and dewar were integrated into the flight dewar in early 2014, and have since been extensively characterized and calibrated. This paper summarizes the operation and performance of the ADR in all of its operating modes

  4. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobrauschek, P; Prost, J; Ingerle, D; Kregsamer, P; Misra, N L; Streli, C

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm(2) active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  5. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobrauschek, P., E-mail: wobi@ati.ac.at; Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Misra, N. L. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-08-15

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm{sup 2} active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  6. Combination of grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence with x-ray reflectivity in one table-top spectrometer for improved characterization of thin layer and implants on/in silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerle, D; Schiebl, M; Streli, C; Wobrauschek, P

    2014-08-01

    As Grazing Incidence X-ray Fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis does not provide unambiguous results for the characterization of nanometre layers as well as nanometre depth profiles of implants in silicon wafers by its own, the approach of providing additional information using the signal from X-ray Reflectivity (XRR) was tested. As GIXRF already uses an X-ray beam impinging under grazing incidence and the variation of the angle of incidence, a GIXRF spectrometer was adapted with an XRR unit to obtain data from the angle dependent fluorescence radiation as well as data from the reflected beam. A θ-2θ goniometer was simulated by combining a translation and tilt movement of a Silicon Drift detector, which allows detecting the reflected beam over 5 orders of magnitude. HfO2 layers as well as As implants in Silicon wafers in the nanometre range were characterized using this new setup. A just recently published combined evaluation approach was used for data evaluation.

  7. Development status of a CZT spectrometer prototype with 3D spatial resolution for hand x-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, N.; Caroli, E.; Basili, A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of new focusing optics based on wide band Laue lenses operating from ~60 keV up to several hundred keV is particularly challenging. This type of hard X-ray or gamma ray optics requires a high performance focal plane detector in order to exploit to the best their intrinsic capabili...

  8. Observation of a VHE Cosmic-Ray Flare-Signal with the L3+C Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Aziz, T; Bähr, J; Banerjee, S; Becattini, F; Bellucci, L; Betev, B L; Blaising, J J; Bobbink, G J; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Cartacci, A; Chemarin, M; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chiarusi, T; Coignet, G; Ding, L K; Duran, I; Eline, A; El Mamouni, H; Faber, G; Fay, J; Filthaut, F; Ganguli, S N; Gong, Z F; Grabosch, H J; Groenstege, H; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S; Gurtu, A; Haller, Ch; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herve, A; Hofer, H; Hoferjun, H; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; Kantserov, V; Kawakami, S; Kittel, W; König, A C; Kok, E; Kuang, H H; Kuijpers, J; Ladron de Guevara, P; Le Coultre, P; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Li, L; Li, Z C; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Lu, Y S; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Nowak, H; Parriaud, J -F; Pauss, F; Petersen, B; Pieri, M; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Qing, C R; Ramelli, R; Ranieri, R; Ravindran, K C; Rewiersma, P; Riemann, S; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Schmitt, V; Schoeneich, B; Schotanus, D J; Shen, C Q; Spillantini, P; Sulanke, H; Tang, X W; Timmermans, C; Tonwar, S C; Trowitzsch, G; Unger, M; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vogt, H; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Wijk, R van; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yang, C G; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yu, Z Q; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, Q Q; Zhuang, H L; Zwart, A N M

    2010-01-01

    The data collected by the L3+C muon spectrometer at the CERN Large Electron-Positron collider, LEP, have been used to search for short duration signals emitted by cosmic point sources. A sky survey performed from July to November 1999 and from April to November 2000 has revealed one single flux enhancement (chance probability = 2.6X10^{-3}) between the 17th and 20th of August 2000 from a direction with a galactic longitude of (265.02+-0.42)^° and latitude of (55.58+-0.24)^°. The energy of the detected muons was above 15 GeV.

  9. Cosmic gamma ray detection and discovery potential with the AMS-2 spectrometer; Detection de rayons {gamma} cosmiques et potentiel de decouvertes avec le spectrometre AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, L

    2004-12-15

    Yet designed to measure charged component of the cosmic rays, the foreseen Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) could also release {gamma}-ray studies, in the energy range from GeV to TeV, using the tracker system, for {gamma}-rays converted in e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, and the electromagnetic calorimeter. In the first part of the thesis are described the calibrations and the performances of the engineering model of the calorimeter, obtained from the analysis of data taken during a test-beam performed at CERN in July 2002. In the second part of the thesis, the AMS-02 discovery potential for {gamma}-astrophysics is presented. While exposure maps of the {gamma}--sky are computed for one year of data taking with the {gamma}--detectors, the acceptance of the calorimeter is obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. The AMS-02 potential is then estimated for signals from the Vela pulsar and for some supersymmetric signals from the Galactic Center. (author)

  10. Final report of the environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer system technology demonstration at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Williams, C.V.

    1997-08-01

    The environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The EMWD-GRS technology was demonstrated at Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration consisted of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation-producing contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes passed near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels of cesium had been measured. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRs system during drilling are compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  11. Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R.D. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  12. Innovative instrumentation for mineralogical and elemental analyses of solid extraterrestrial surfaces: The Backscatter Moessbauer Spectrometer/X Ray Fluorescence analyzer (BaMS/XRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelfer, T. D.; Morris, Richard V.; Nguyen, T.; Agresti, D. G.; Wills, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a four-detector research-grade backscatter Moessbauer spectrometer (BaMS) instrument with low resolution x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) capability. A flight-qualified instrument based on this design would be suitable for use on missions to the surfaces of solid solar-system objects (Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.). Target specifications for the flight instrument are as follows: mass less than 500 g; volumes less than 300 cu cm; and power less than 2 W. The BaMS/XRF instrument would provide data on the oxidation state of iron and its distribution among iron-bearing mineralogies and elemental composition information. This data is a primary concern for the characterization of extraterrestrial surface materials.

  13. Simulation of the SAGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.M.; Herzberg, R.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Konki, J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sorri, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hauschild, K. [Universite Paris-Sud, CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay (France)

    2015-06-15

    The SAGE spectrometer combines a Ge-detector array with a Si detector to allow simultaneous detection of γ-rays and electrons. A comprehensive GEANT4 simulation package of the SAGE spectrometer has been developed with the ability to simulate the expected datasets based on user input files. The measured performance of the spectrometer is compared to the results obtained from the simulations. (orig.)

  14. Elementary Analysis of a Cometary Surface - the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmanke, Dirk; Economou, Thanasis; Brueckner, Johannes; Gellert, Ralf; Rodionov, Daniel; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Uston, Lionel D.

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe will reach its final target in the middle of this year, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote examination of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface. It will start immediately examining the landing site with its scientific payload. A part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), it will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and its changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. It will irradiate the cometary surface with Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle/X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload were performed at regular intervals. In recent 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away from the sun. After the successful wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has to be performed, including the APXS. After the landing on the comet an intense long measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS), determined by periodical changes between measurements and forced breaks

  15. Correlation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michael B [Albuquerque, NM; Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb H [Albuquerque, NM; Jones, Gary D [Tijeras, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  16. The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays on Solar Orbiter: Flight design, challenges and trade-offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krucker, S. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Bednarzik, M. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Grimm, O., E-mail: oliver.grimm@phys.ethz.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Hurford, G.J. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Limousin, O.; Meuris, A. [CEA Saclay (France); Orleański, P. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences (CBK PAN), Warsaw (Poland); Seweryn, K.; Skup, K.R. [Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences (CBK PAN), Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-07-11

    STIX is the X-ray spectral imaging instrument on-board the Solar Orbiter space mission of the European Space Agency, and together with nine other instruments will address questions of the interaction between the Sun and the heliosphere. STIX will study the properties of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission, addressing in particular the emission from flaring regions on the Sun. The design phase of STIX has been concluded. This paper reports the final flight design of the instrument, focusing on design challenges that were faced recently and how they were addressed.

  17. A search for flaring Very-High-Energy cosmic-ray sources with the L3+C muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiarusi, T; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Dglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, H; Grabosch, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberría, M I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, i; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M; Kuang, H H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmitt, V; Schöneich, B; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R F; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J

    2006-01-01

    The L3+C muon detector at the Cern electron-position collider, LEP, is used for the detection of very-high-energy cosmic \\gamma-ray sources through the observation of muons of energies above 20, 30, 50 and 100 GeV. Daily or monthly excesses in the rate of single-muon events pointing to some particular direction in the sky are searched for. The periods from mid July to November 1999, and April to November 2000 are considered. Special attention is also given to a selection of known \\gamma-ray sources. No statistically significant excess is observed for any direction or any particular source.

  18. Performance verification and system integration tests of the pulse shape processor for the soft x-ray spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sawako; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Seta, Hiromi; Shimoda, Yuya; Yamaguchi, Sunao; Uehara, Sho; Terada, Yukikatsu; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2014-07-01

    The soft X-ray spectrometer (SXS) aboard ASTRO-H is equipped with dedicated digital signal processing units called pulse shape processors (PSPs). The X-ray microcalorimeter system SXS has 36 sensor pixels, which are operated at 50 mK to measure heat input of X-ray photons and realize an energy resolution of 7 eV FWHM in the range 0.3-12.0 keV. Front-end signal processing electronics are used to filter and amplify the electrical pulse output from the sensor and for analog-to-digital conversion. The digitized pulses from the 36 pixels are multiplexed and are sent to the PSP over low-voltage differential signaling lines. Each of two identical PSP units consists of an FPGA board, which assists the hardware logic, and two CPU boards, which assist the onboard software. The FPGA board triggers at every pixel event and stores the triggering information as a pulse waveform in the installed memory. The CPU boards read the event data to evaluate pulse heights by an optimal filtering algorithm. The evaluated X-ray photon data (including the pixel ID, energy, and arrival time information) are transferred to the satellite data recorder along with event quality information. The PSP units have been developed and tested with the engineering model (EM) and the flight model. Utilizing the EM PSP, we successfully verified the entire hardware system and the basic software design of the PSPs, including their communication capability and signal processing performance. In this paper, we show the key metrics of the EM test, such as accuracy and synchronicity of sampling clocks, event grading capability, and resultant energy resolution.

  19. Progress Report on the Measurement of the Carbon Flux in Cosmic Rays from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; collaboration, for the AMS

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the carbon flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. The current status of the measurement of the carbon flux in cosmic rays with rigidity from 1.9 GV to 2.6 TV, based on 8.3 million events collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer during the first 5 years of operation, is presented.

  20. Charge collection efficiency characterization of a HgI 2 Frisch collar spectrometer with collimated high energy gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, A.; Ariesanti, E.; James, S.; McGregor, D. S.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a 2.1×2.1×4.1 mm 3 HgI 2 Frisch collar device was characterized through probing the device with a highly collimated 662 keV gamma rays ( 137Cs check source) along the length and width of the device. In a systematic series of experiments, the detector was probed along its central line under different operating voltages of 1600, 1300, 1000, 800, 600 and 500 V. The experimental results were confirmed through a simulation of the charge collection for a device with the same size and operating conditions. It is shown that the HgI 2 Frisch collar device has a uniform response to gamma rays over two-thirds of the detector volume. The HgI 2 crystals and the Frisch collar detectors were grown and fabricated within the S.M.A.R.T Laboratory at Kansas State University.

  1. Focal Plane Array Concept and Technologies for the X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer on the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopic Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Simon; Adams, J. D.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kilbourne, C.; Lee, S.; Porter, F. S.; Porst, J.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ullom, J. N.

    2013-04-01

    We are developing large-format arrays of x-ray microcalorimeters to enable high-resolution, imaging X-ray imaging spectroscopy that meet the needs of the AXSIO mission. This mission requires microcalorimeter focal plane with an overall field of view of of 4x4 arcmin and an energy resolution of better then 3 eV (or, a spectral resolving power of > 2000 at 6 keV) over part of the array. To achieve this, we are developing technologies to implement an overall array that consists of three components: a small, central inner array with very small pixels to purposely over-sample the x-ray beam to provide high spectral resolution (strategy to use these technologies to design the microcalorimeter instrument for AXSIO with optimal performance and engineering margin.

  2. Applications of a table-top time-resolved luminescence spectrometer with nanosecond soft X-ray pulse excitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Fidler, V.; Benedikt, P.; Čuba, V.; Gbur, T.; Boháček, Pavel; Nikl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2014), s. 448-451 ISSN 0018-9499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : LiCaAlF 6 * luminescence * scintillators * soft x-ray * SrHfO 3 * time-resolved spectroscopy * ZnO :Ga Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2014

  3. Pigment particles analysis with a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer: study of influence of instrumental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coccato, Alessia; Vandenabeele, Peter [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Ghent (Belgium); Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Moens, Luc [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is an excellent tool to determine major, minor and trace elements in minuscule amounts of samples, making this technique very suitable for pigment analysis. Collecting minuscule amounts of pigment material from precious works of art by means of a cotton swab is a well-accepted sampling method, but poses specific challenges when TXRF is to be used for the characterization of the unknown material. (orig.)

  4. X-ray spectrophotometer SphinX and particle spectrometer STEP-F of the satellite experiment CORONAS-PHOTON. Preliminary results of the joint data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, O. V.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Kowalinski, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Plocieniak, S.; Bakala, J.

    2012-04-01

    A joint analysis is carried out of data obtained with the help of the solar X-ray SphinX spectrophotometer and the electron and proton satellite telescope STEP-F in May 2009 in the course of the scientific space experiment CORONAS-PHOTON. In order to determine the energies and particle types, in the analysis of spectrophotometer records data are used on the intensities of electrons, protons, and secondary γ-radiation, obtained by the STEP-F telescope, which was located in close proximity to the SphinX spectrophotometer. The identical reaction of both instruments is noted at the intersection of regions of the Brazilian magnetic anomaly and the Earth's radiation belts. It is shown that large area photodiodes, serving as sensors of the X-ray spectrometer, reliably record electron fluxes of low and intermediate energies, as well as fluxes of the secondary gamma radiation from construction materials of detector modules, the TESIS instrument complex, and the spacecraft itself. The dynamics of electron fluxes, recorded by the SphinX spectrophotometer in the vicinity of a weak geomagnetic storm, supplements the information about the processes of radial diffusion of electrons, which was studied using the STEP-F telescope.

  5. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-15

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover’s alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  6. Refinement of the Compton–Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Perrett, G.M. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Maxwell, J.A. [3A 47 Surrey St. East, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3P6 (Canada); Nield, E.; Gellert, R. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); King, P.L. [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Lee, M.; O’Meara, J.M.; Pradler, I. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2013-05-01

    Spectra from the Mars rover alpha particle X-ray spectrometers contain the elastic and inelastic scatter peaks of the plutonium L X-rays emitted by the instrument’s {sup 244}Cm source. Various spectrum fitting approaches are tested using the terrestrial twin of the APXS instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, in order to provide accurate extraction of the Lα and Lβ Compton/Rayleigh intensity ratios, which can provide information about light “invisible” constituents such as water in geological samples. A well-defined dependence of C/R ratios upon mean sample atomic number is established using a large and varied set of geochemical reference materials, and the accuracy of this calibration is examined. Detailed attention is paid to the influence of the rubidium and strontium peaks which overlap the Lα scatter peaks. Our Monte Carlo simulation code for prediction of C/R ratios from element concentrations is updated. The ratio between measured and simulated C/R ratios provides a second means of calibration.

  7. Development and Applications of a Laboratory Micro X-ray Fluorescence (μXRF) Spectrometer Using Monochromatic Excitation for Quantitative Elemental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Bauters, Stephen; Demey, Arne; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-07-07

    The analytical characterization and an application example of a novel laboratory X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) microprobe is presented, which combines monochromatic, focused X-ray beam excitation with a high-performance silicon drift detector (SDD) and two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) scanning capability. Because of the monochromatic excitation, below the (multiple) Compton/Rayleigh scattering peak region, the XRF spectra obtained by this laboratory spectrometer has similarly high peak-to-background ratios as those which can be obtained at synchrotron sources. However, the flux density difference between the proposed laboratory instrument and current synchrotron end stations is on the order of several orders of magnitude. As a result, sub-ppm minimum detection limits (MDL) for transition metals are obtained for a variety of sample matrices. The monochromatic excitation also allows for the efficient use of an iterative Monte Carlo simulation algorithm to obtain quantitative information on the analyzed samples. The analytical characteristics of this instrument and quantitative results, in combination with an iterative reverse Monte Carlo simulation algorithm, will be demonstrated using measurements conducted on an iron-containing meteorite.

  8. On-Orbit Operation of the Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator on the Astro-H/Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter; Kimball, Mark; James, Bryan; Muench, Theodore; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Bialas, Thomas; Sneiderman, Gary; Boyce, Kevin; Kilbourne, Caroline; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Astro-H observatory contains a 6x6 array of x-ray microcalorimeters, which is cooled to 50 mK by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR consists of three stages in order to provide stable detector cooling using either a 1.2 K superfluid helium bath or a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler as its heat sink. When liquid helium is present, two of the ADRs stages are used to single-shot cool the detectors while rejecting heat to the helium. After the helium is depleted, all three stages are used to cool both the helium tank (to about 1.5 K) and the detectors (to 50 mK) using the JT cryocooler as its heat sink. The Astro-H observatory, renamed Hitomi after its successful launch in February 2016, carried approximately 36 liters of helium into orbit. On day 5, the helium had cooled sufficiently (1.4 K) to allow operation of the ADR. This paper describes the design, operation and on-orbit performance of the ADR.

  9. Operating Modes and Cooling Capabilities of the 3-Stage ADR Developed for the Soft-X-ray Spectrometer Instrument on Astro-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J; Kimball, Mark O; James, Bryan L; Muench, Theo; DiPirro, Michael J; Letmate, Richard V; Sampson, Michael A; Bialas, Tom G; Sneiderman, Gary A; Porter, Frederick S; Kelley, Richard L

    2016-03-01

    A 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)[1] is used on the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument[2] on Astro-H[3] to cool a 6×6 array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 50 mK. The ADR is supported by a cryogenic system[4] consisting of a superfluid helium tank, a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler, and additional 2-stage Stirling cryocoolers that pre-cool the JT cooler and cool radiation shields within the cryostat. The ADR is configured so that it can use either the liquid helium or the JT cryocooler as its heat sink, giving the instrument an unusual degree of tolerance for component failures or degradation in the cryogenic system. The flight detector assembly, ADR and dewar were integrated into the flight dewar in early 2014, and have since been extensively characterized and calibrated. This paper summarizes the operation and performance of the ADR in all of its operating modes.

  10. Non-destructive in situ study of “Mad Meg” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, Lien, E-mail: lien.vandevoorde@ugent.be [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Pevenage, Jolien [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Raman Spectroscopy Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); De Langhe, Kaat [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Archaeometry Research Group, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vandenabeele, Peter [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Archaeometry Research Group, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Martens, Maximiliaan P.J. [Ghent University, Department of Art, Music and Theatre Sciences, Blandijnberg 2, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    “Mad Meg”, a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO{sub 2} + 15% K{sub 2}O + 10% CoO + 5% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel. - Highlights: • In situ, non-destructive investigation of a famous painting by Pieter Bruegel. • Use of a new, commercial available, portable XRF/XRD instrumentation. • Multi-methodological approach: make also use of a mobile Raman spectrometer. • Used pigments and different preparation layers of the painting are characterized. • The verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses are performed.

  11. Caliste-SO: the x-ray spectrometer unit of the STIX instrument onboard the Solar Orbiter space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris, Aline; Limousin, Olivier; Gevin, Olivier; Vassal, Marie-Cécile; Soufflet, Fabrice; Fiant, Nicolas; Bednarzik, Martin; Wild, Christopher; Stutz, Stefan; Birrer, Guy; Blondel, Claire; Le Mer, Isabelle; Huynh, Duc-Dat; Donati, Modeste; Grimm, Oliver; Commichau, Volker; Hurford, Gordon; Krucker, Säm.; Gonzalez, François; Billot, Marc

    2014-07-01

    Caliste-SO is a hybrid detector integrating in a volume of 12 × 14 × 18 mm3 a 1 mm-thick CdTe pixel detector, a frontend IDeF-X HD ASIC and passive parts to perform high resolution spectroscopy in the 4-200 keV energy range with high count rate capability (104-105 photons/s/cm2). The detector hybridization concept was designed by CEA and 3DPlus to realize CdTe cameras for space astronomy missions with various pixel patterns. For the STIX instrument onboard the Solar Orbiter mission, the imaging system is made by 32 collimators that sample the visibilities of the spatial Fourier transform and doesn't require fine pitch pixels. The Al-Schottky CdTe detectors produced by Acrorad are then patterned and tested by the Paul Scherrer Institute to produce 12 pixels surrounded by a guard ring within 1 cm2. Electrical and spectroscopic performance tests of the Caliste-SO samples are performed in France at key manufacturing steps, before sending the samples to the principal investigator to mount them in the Detector Electronics Module of STIX in front of each collimator. Four samples were produced in 2013 to be part of the STIX engineering model. Best pixels show an energy resolution of 0.7 keV FWHM at 6 keV (1 keV resolution requirement for STIX) and a low-level detection threshold below 3 keV (4 keV requirement for STIX). The paper describes the design and the production of Caliste-SO and focuses on main performance tests performed so far to characterize the spectrometer unit.

  12. Monte Carlo calculation of the total probability for gamma-Ray interaction in toluene; Aplicacion del metodo de Monte Carlo al calcu lo de la probabilidad de interaccion fotonica en tolueno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1983-07-01

    Interaction and absorption probabilities for gamma-rays with energies between 1 and 1000 KeV have been computed and tabulated. Toluene based scintillator solution has been assumed in the computation. Both, point sources and homogeneously dispersed radioactive material have been assumed. These tables may be applied to cylinders with radii between 1.25 cm and 0.25 cm and heights between 4.07 cm and 0.20 cm. (Author) 26 refs.

  13. Stima dell’effetto delle esternalità localizzative sui valori immobiliari tramite il metodo Delphi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Barzilay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Il metodo Delphi è un metodo per raccogliere e strutturare indicazioni provenienti da un gruppo di esperti, utilizzando un questionario combinato con un feedback controllato delle opinioni. Il presente contributo esamina i principi fondamentali del metodo Delphi e tenta di convalidare i suoi risultati, utilizzando dati ottenuti mediante le normali tecniche econometriche di valutazione immobiliare, come, ad esempio, il metodo del prezzo edonico. Il metodo Delphi, come sosteniamo, può diventare uno strumento utile per la valutazione immobiliare in casi particolari, come i piccoli comuni con vendite di abitazioni relativamente scarse ed economie di transizione caratterizzate da mercati immobiliari in via di sviluppo.

  14. The high-precision x-ray tomograph for quality control of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Drakoulakos, D G; Maugain, J M; Rohrbach, F; Sedykh, Yu

    1997-01-01

    For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the next millennium, a large general-purpose high-energy physics experiment, the ATLAS project, is being designed by a world-wide collaboration. One of its detectors, the ATLAS muon tracking detector, the MDT project, is on the scale of a very large industrial project: the design, the construction and assembly of twelve hundred large muon drift chambers are aimed at producing an exceptional quality in terms of accuracy, material reliability, assembly, and monitoring. This detector, based on the concept of very high mechanical precision required by the physics goals, will use tomography as a quality control platform. An X-ray tomograph prototype, monitored by a set of interferometers, has been developed at CERN to provide high-quality control of the MDT chambers which will be built in the collaborating institutes of the ATLAS project. First results have been obtained on MDT prototypes showing the validity of the X-ray tomograph approach for mechanical control of the detec...

  15. Performance of the AGATA γ-ray spectrometer in the PreSPEC set-up at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalović, N.; Louchart, C.; Michelagnoli, C.; Perez-Vidal, R. M.; Ralet, D.; Gerl, J.; Rudolph, D.; Arici, T.; Bazzacco, D.; Clément, E.; Gadea, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Korichi, A.; Labiche, M.; Ljungvall, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Nyberg, J.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Stezowski, O.

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary nuclear physics, the European Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) represents a crucial detection system for cutting-edge nuclear structure studies. AGATA consists of highly segmented high-purity germanium crystals and uses the pulse-shape analysis technique to determine both the position and the energy of the γ-ray interaction points in the crystals. It is the tracking algorithms that deploy this information and enable insight into the sequence of interactions, providing information on the full or partial absorption of the γ ray. A series of dedicated performance measurements for an AGATA set-up comprising 21 crystals is described. This set-up was used within the recent PreSPEC-AGATA experimental campaign at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Using the radioactive sources 56Co, 60Co and 152Eu, absolute and normalized efficiencies and the peak-to-total of the array were measured. These quantities are discussed using different data analysis procedures. The quality of the pulse-shape analysis and the tracking algorithm are evaluated. The agreement between the experimental data and the Geant4 simulations is also investigated.

  16. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSats: instrument capabilities and early science analysis on the quiet Sun, active regions, and flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Woods, Tom; Caspi, Amir; Dennis, Brian R.; MinXSS Instrument Team, NIST-SURF Measurement Team

    2018-01-01

    Detection of soft X-rays (sxr) from the Sun provide direct information on coronal plasma at temperatures in excess of ~1 MK, but there have been relatively few solar spectrally resolved measurements from 0.5 – 10. keV. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is the first solar science oriented CubeSat mission flown for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, and has provided measurements from 0.8 -12 keV, with resolving power ~40 at 5.9 keV, at a nominal ~10 second time cadence. MinXSS design and development has involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Instrument radiometric calibration was performed at the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) and spectral resolution determined from radioactive X-ray sources. The MinXSS spectra allow for determining coronal abundance variations for Fe, Mg, Ni, Ca, Si, S, and Ar in active regions and during flares. Measurements from the first of the twin CubeSats, MinXSS-1, have proven to be consistent with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 0.1 – 0.8 nm energy flux. Simultaneous MinXSS-1 and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations have provided the most complete sxr spectral coverage of flares in recent years. These combined measurements are vital in estimating the heating flare loops by non-thermal accelerated electrons. MinXSS-1 measurements have been combined with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO-AIA) to further constrain the coronal temperature distribution during quiescent times. The structure of the temperature distribution (especially for T > 5 MK) is important for deducing heating processes in the solar atmosphere. MinXSS-1 observations yield some of the tightest constraints on the high temperature component of the coronal plasma, in the

  17. Lessons learned with the SAGE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorri, J.; Papadakis, P.; Cox, D. M.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R. D.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Uusitalo, J.

    2012-05-01

    The SAGE spectrometer combines a high-efficiency γ-ray detection system with an electron spectrometer. Some of the design features have been known to be problematic and surprises have come up during the early implementation of the spectrometer. Tests related to bismuth germanate Compton-suppression shields, electron detection efficiency and an improved cooling system are discussed in the paper.

  18. Reconstruction of X-rays spectra of clinical linear accelerators using the generalized simulated annealing method; Reconstrucao de espectros de raios-X de aceleradores lineares clinicos usando o metodo de recozimento simulado generalizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, John Peter O.; Costa, Alessandro M., E-mail: johnp067@usp.br, E-mail: amcosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distribution of megavoltage X-rays used in radiotherapy departments is a fundamental quantity from which, in principle, all relevant information required for radiotherapy treatments can be determined. To calculate the dose delivered to the patient who make radiation therapy, are used treatment planning systems (TPS), which make use of convolution and superposition algorithms and which requires prior knowledge of the photon fluence spectrum to perform the calculation of three-dimensional doses and thus ensure better accuracy in the tumor control probabilities preserving the normal tissue complication probabilities low. In this work we have obtained the photon fluence spectrum of X-ray of the SIEMENS ONCOR linear accelerator of 6 MV, using an character-inverse method to the reconstruction of the spectra of photons from transmission curves measured for different thicknesses of aluminum; the method used for reconstruction of the spectra is a stochastic technique known as generalized simulated annealing (GSA), based on the work of quasi-equilibrium statistic of Tsallis. For the validation of the reconstructed spectra we calculated the curve of percentage depth dose (PDD) for energy of 6 MV, using Monte Carlo simulation with Penelope code, and from the PDD then calculate the beam quality index TPR{sub 20/10}. (author)

  19. Benchmarking charge exchange theory in the dawning era of space-born high-resolution X-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele

    2017-08-01

    Charge Exchange (CX) is a process in which a highly charged ion captures one or more electrons from a neutral atom or molecule into an excited state during a close interaction. The electron's subsequent radiative cascade to the ground state produces diagnostic line emission in the X-ray band. CX with solar wind ions occurs frequently in the solar system, and CX may also occur astrophysically. In order to properly identify CX in astrophysical spectra and make use of its diagnostic properties, we must be able to model the emission. Theoretical treatments of CX are often computationally expensive, experimental benchmarks at high resolution are fairly scarce, and there is often poor agreement between the two. This dissertation seeks to build a better understanding of the mechanics and spectral signatures of CX through high-resolution experimental data paired with theoretical calculations of CX. Chapter 1 outlines the necessary ingredients for modeling and identifying CX spectra, describes several astrophysical environments in which CX has been observed or postulated to occur, and presents some of the challenges we are facing in identifying and understanding this emission. Chapter 2 describes the theoretical and computational tools used in this work. Chapter 3 discusses the experimental tools and facilities we use, namely an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and an X-ray microcalorimeter. Chapter 4 presents experimental K-shell data that highlights both the subtle nature of the CX interaction and the difficulty in including those nuances in spectral synthesis codes. Chapter 5 presents the first high-resolution L-shell CX spectra of Ne-like Ni and describes what we can learn from these results. In Chapter 6, we take these data a step further and present a pipeline to calculate relative state-selective capture cross sections, previously only available from theoretical modeling. We then compare some of our results to theory. In Chapter 7, we discuss several future steps for

  20. Optimization of statistical methods for HpGe gamma-ray spectrometer used in wide count rate ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervino, G., E-mail: gervino@to.infn.it [UNITO - Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Torino, Turin (Italy); Mana, G. [INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Turin (Italy); Palmisano, C. [UNITO - Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Turin (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The need to perform γ-ray measurements with HpGe detectors is a common technique in many fields such as nuclear physics, radiochemistry, nuclear medicine and neutron activation analysis. The use of HpGe detectors is chosen in situations where isotope identification is needed because of their excellent resolution. Our challenge is to obtain the “best” spectroscopy data possible in every measurement situation. “Best” is a combination of statistical (number of counts) and spectral quality (peak, width and position) over a wide range of counting rates. In this framework, we applied Bayesian methods and the Ellipsoidal Nested Sampling (a multidimensional integration technique) to study the most likely distribution for the shape of HpGe spectra. In treating these experiments, the prior information suggests to model the likelihood function with a product of Poisson distributions. We present the efforts that have been done in order to optimize the statistical methods to HpGe detector outputs with the aim to evaluate to a better order of precision the detector efficiency, the absolute measured activity and the spectra background. Reaching a more precise knowledge of statistical and systematic uncertainties for the measured physical observables is the final goal of this research project.

  1. Soft X-ray Calibration of the Co/C Multilayer Mirrors for the Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the Spectrum Röntgen-Gamma Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Tarrio, C.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1996-01-01

    , the reflectivity performance as a function of energy and angle of incidence of all crystals has been measured using line radiation from an x-ray tube which provides 1.487 keV and 0.277 keV and using synchrotron radiation from 0.16 keV to 0.28 keV at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation electron storage ring a t......The objective crystal spectrometer (OXS) on the forthcoming Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite is designed to carry three kinds of crystals: LiF(220), Si(111) and RAP(001), placed in front of the SODART telescope. Thirty six super polished (RMS roughness ... with 65-80 periods of Co/C multilayers using electron beam evaporation deposition combined with ion polishing for the metal layers. These crystals are to be used in the energy band immediately below the C-K absorption edge of 0.284 keV. Because the crystals are to be assembled as one crystal on the OXS...

  2. Layout And Results From The Initial Operation Of The High-resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer On The Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablant, N A [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Delgado-Apricio, L [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Goto, M [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu, Japan; Hill, K W [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Lzerson, S [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Morita, S [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu, Japan; Roquemore, A L [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Gates, D [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Monticello, D [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Neilson, H [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Reiman, A [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Reinke, M [Plasma Science Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Rice, J E [Plasma Science Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-04-05

    First results of ion and electron temperature pro le measurements from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) diagnostic on the Large Helical Device (LHD) are presented. This diagnostic system has been operational since the beginning of the 2011 LHD experimental campaign and is the rst application of the XICS diagnostic technique to helical plasma geometry. The XICS diagnostic provides measurements of ion and electron temperature pro les in LHD with a spatial resolution of 2cm and a time resolution of ≥ 10ms. Ion temperature pro les from the XICS diagnostic are possible under conditions where charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) is not possible (high density) or is perturbative to the plasma (low density or radio frequency heated plasmas). Measurements are made by using a spherically bent crystal to provide a spectrally resolved 1D image of the plasma from line integrated emission of helium-like Ar16+. The nal hardware design and con guration are detailed along with the calibration procedures. Line-integrated ion and electron temperature measurements are presented, and the measurement accuracy is discussed. Finally central temperature measurements from the XICS system are compared to measurements from the Thomson scattering and CXRS systems, showing excellent agreement.

  3. Layout and results from the initial operation of the high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Gates, D.; Monticello, D.; Nielson, H.; Reiman, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E. [Plasma Science Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    First results of ion and electron temperature profile measurements from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) diagnostic on the Large Helical Device (LHD) are presented. This diagnostic system has been operational since the beginning of the 2011 LHD experimental campaign and is the first application of the XICS diagnostic technique to helical plasma geometry. The XICS diagnostic provides measurements of ion and electron temperature profiles in LHD with a spatial resolution of 2 cm and a maximum time resolution of 5 ms (typically 20 ms). Ion temperature profiles from the XICS diagnostic are possible under conditions where charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) is not possible (high density) or is perturbative to the plasma (low density or radio frequency heated plasmas). Measurements are made by using a spherically bent crystal to provide a spectrally resolved 1D image of the plasma from line integrated emission of helium-like Ar{sup 16+}. The final hardware design and configuration are detailed along with the calibration procedures. Line-integrated ion and electron temperature measurements are presented, and the measurement accuracy is discussed. Finally central temperature measurements from the XICS system are compared to measurements from the Thomson scattering and CXRS systems, showing excellent agreement.

  4. The uniform K distribution of the mare deposits in the Orientale Basin: Insights from Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Hua; Chang, Jin; Xie, Minggang; Fritz, Jörg; Fernandes, Vera A.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Ma, Tao; Xu, Aoao

    2015-05-01

    The composition of mare basalt units in the Orientale Basin are investigated by using the potassium (K) map derived from Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer (CE-2 GRS) and FeO map derived from Clementine UV-Vis data set. Together with crater retention ages of the mare basalts from literature data, we aim to investigate possible magma sources underneath the Orientale Basin and their chemical evolution over time. Analyses of the chemical composition of the resurfaced mare basalts together with the reported eruption ages suggest a unique magma generating process for the resurfaced mare deposits. The early mare basalts in the central Mare Orientale and the later resurfaced mare deposits probably derived from magma generated by heat release due to high radioactive element concentrations. Based on forward modeling, the similar K abundances observed in the small mare deposits of the SW polygon area, Lacus Veris, and Lacus Autumni and those in the central Mare Orientale imply the same heat source for these lava eruptions. The chemical similarities (e.g., K, FeO, and TiO2) of these regions suggest that mare basalts within the Orientale Basin are a result of multiple eruptions from a relatively homogeneous source underneath the Basin.

  5. A new life for the wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS): incorporation of a silicon drift detector into the WDS for improved quantification and X-ray mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhrer, R.; Moran, K.

    2018-01-01

    The wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) has been around for a long time and the design has not changed much since its original development. The electron microprobe operator using WDS has to be meticulous in monitoring items such as gas flow, gas purity, gas pressure, noise levels of baseline and window, gas flow proportional counter (GFPC) voltage levels, count rate suppression, anode wire contamination and other detector parameters. Recent development and improvements of silicon drift detectors (SDD’s) has allowed the incorporation of a SDD as the X-ray detector in place of the proportional counter (PC) and/or gas flow proportional counter (GFPC). This allows minimal mechanical alteration and no loss of movement range. The superiority of a WDS with a SDD, referred to as SD-WDS, is easily seen once in operation. The SD-WDS removes many artefacts including the worse of all high order diffraction, thus allowing more accurate analysis. The incorporation of the SDD has been found to improve the light and mid element range and consequently improving the detection limit for these elements. It is also possible to obtain much more reliable results at high count rates with almost no change in resolution, gain and zero-peak characteristics of the energy spectrum.

  6. Determination of heavy metals concentrations in airborne particulates matter (APM) from Manjung district, Perak using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Nursyairah; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Airborne particulates trace metals are considered as public health concern as it can enter human lungs through respiratory system. Generally, any substance that has been introduced to the atmosphere that can cause severe effects to living things and the environment is considered air pollution. Manjung, Perak is one of the development districts that is active with industrial activities. There are many industrial activities surrounding Manjung District area such as coal fired power plant, quarries and iron smelting which may contribute to the air pollution into the environment. This study was done to measure the concentrations of Hg, U, Th, K, Cu, Fe, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Pb and Cd in the Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) collected at nine locations in Manjung District area within 15 km radius towards three directions (North, North-East and South-East) in 5 km intervals. The samples were collected using mini volume air sampler with cellulose filter through total suspended particulate (TSP). The sampler was set up for eight hours with the flow rate of 5 L/min. The filter was weighed before and after sample collection using microbalance, to get the amount of APM and kept in desiccator before analyzing. The measurement was done using calibrated Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The air particulate concentrations were found below the Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for TSP (260 µg/m3). All of the metals concentrations were also lower than the guidelines set by World Health Organization (WHO), Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Argonne National Laboratory, USA NCRP (1975). From the concentrations, the enrichment factor were calculated.

  7. Abiotic versus biotic iron mineral transformation studied by a miniaturized backscattering Mössbauer spectrometer (MIMOS II), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovski, C.; Byrne, J. M.; Lalla, E.; Lozano-Gorrín, A. D.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Rull, F.; Kappler, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Schröder, C.

    2017-11-01

    Searching for biomarkers or signatures of microbial transformations of minerals is a critical aspect for determining how life evolved on Earth, and whether or not life may have existed in other planets, including Mars. In order to solve such questions, several missions to Mars have sought to determine the geochemistry and mineralogy on the Martian surface. This research includes the two miniaturized Mössbauer spectrometers (MIMOS II) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, which have detected a variety of iron minerals on Mars, including magnetite (Fe2+Fe3+2O4) and goethite (α-FeO(OH)). On Earth, both minerals can derive from microbiological activity (e.g. through dissimilatory iron reduction of ferrihydrite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria). Here we used a lab based MIMOS II to characterize the mineral products of biogenic transformations of ferrihydrite to magnetite by the Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens. In combination with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), we observed the formation of magnetite, goethite and siderite. We compared the material produced by biogenic transformations to abiotic samples in order to distinguish abiotic and biotic iron minerals by techniques that are or will be available onboard Martian based laboratories. The results showed the possibility to distinguish the abiotic and biotic origin of the minerals. Mossbauer was able to distinguish the biotic/abiotic magnetite with the interpretation of the geological context (Fe content mineral assemblages and accompanying minerals) and the estimation of the particle size in a non-destructive way. The Raman was able to confirm the biotic/abiotic principal peaks of the magnetite, as well as the organic principal vibration bands attributed to the bacteria. Finally, the XRD confirmed the particle size and mineralogy.

  8. MERITEV PROSTANOIDOV V KRVNI PLAZMI Z METODO GC/MS

    OpenAIRE

    Lisac, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    V seminarju obravnavamo biosintezo, kemijsko zgradbo in pomen eikozanoidov v človeškem organizmu. Preučimo metodo priprave vzorca krvne plazme, postopke meritev ter kvalitativne in kvantitativne analize prostanoidov z uporabo plinskega kromatografa in masnega spektrometra. Na podlagi analize masnih spektrov z uporabo internih standardov določimo koncentracijo prisotnih prostanoidov v vzorcu.

  9. A comparative study of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) and CeBr{sub 3} based gamma-ray spectrometers for planetary remote sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyrev, A., E-mail: kozyrev@mx.iki.rssi.ru; Mitrofanov, I.; Bakhtin, B.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M.; Malakhov, A.; Mokrousov, M.; Nuzhdin, I.; Sanin, A.; Tretyakov, V.; Vostrukhin, A. [Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IKI), 84/32 Profsoyuznaya St., Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Owens, A.; Benkhoff, J. [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Quarati, F. [AP, RST, FAME, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Gonitec BV, J. Bildersstraat 60, 2596 EJ Den Haag (Netherlands); Timoshenko, G.; Shvetsov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Granja, C.; Slavicek, T.; Pospisil, S. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2016-08-15

    The recent availability of large volume cerium bromide crystals raises the possibility of substantially improving gamma-ray spectrometer limiting flux sensitivities over current systems based on the lanthanum tri-halides, e.g., lanthanum bromide and lanthanum chloride, especially for remote sensing, low-level counting applications or any type of measurement characterized by poor signal to noise ratios. The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured a highly sensitive gamma-ray spectrometer for remote sensing observations of the planet Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which forms part of ESA’s BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) gamma-ray spectrometer is based on a 3-in. single crystal of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) produced in a separate crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the spectrometers development, manufacturing, and qualification phases, large crystals of CeBr{sub 3} became available in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) gamma-ray spectrometer was retrofitted with a 3-in. CeBr{sub 3} crystal and qualified for space. Except for the crystals, the two systems are essentially identical. In this paper, we report on a comparative assessment of the two systems, in terms of their respective spectral properties, as well as their suitability for use in planetary mission with respect to radiation tolerance and their propensity for activation. We also contrast their performance with a Ge detector representative of that flown on MESSENGER and show that: (a) both LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) and CeBr{sub 3} provide superior detection systems over HPGe in the context of minimally resourced spacecraft and (b) CeBr{sub 3} is a more attractive system than LaBr{sub 3}(Ce{sup 3+}) in terms of sensitivities at lower gamma fluxes. Based on the tests, the FM has now been replaced by the FSM on the BepiColombo spacecraft. Thus, CeBr{sub 3} now forms

  10. The Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  11. A tandem time–of–flight spectrometer for negative–ion/positive–ion coincidence measurements with soft x-ray excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stråhlman, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Strahlman@maxlab.lu.se; Sankari, Rami; Nyholm, Ralf [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Kivimäki, Antti [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Richter, Robert [Elettra–Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto di Struttura della Materia, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    We present a newly constructed spectrometer for negative–ion/positive–ion coincidence spectroscopy of gaseous samples. The instrument consists of two time–of–flight ion spectrometers and a magnetic momentum filter for deflection of electrons. The instrument can measure double and triple coincidences between mass–resolved negative and positive ions with high detection efficiency. First results include identification of several negative–ion/positive–ion coincidence channels following inner-shell photoexcitation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6})

  12. The GREAT spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Page, R D; Appelbe, D E; Butler, P A; Freeman, S J; Greenlees, P T; Herzberg, R D; Jenkins, D G; Jones, G D; Jones, P; Joss, D T; Julin, R; Kettunen, H; Leino, M; Rahkila, P; Regan, P H; Simpson, J; Uusitalo, J; Vincent, S M; Wadsworth, R

    2003-01-01

    The GREAT spectrometer is designed to measure the decay properties of reaction products transported to the focal plane of a recoil separator. GREAT comprises a system of silicon, germanium and gas detectors optimised for detecting the arrival of the reaction products and correlating with any subsequent radioactive decay involving the emission of protons, alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X-rays or conversion electrons. GREAT can either be employed as a sensitive stand-alone device for decay measurements at the focal plane, or used to provide a selective tag for prompt conversion electrons or gamma rays measured with arrays of detectors deployed at the target position. A new concept of triggerless data acquisition (total data readout) has also been developed as part of the GREAT project, which circumvents the problems and limitations of common dead time in conventional data acquisition systems.

  13. The SPEDE spectrometer arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Papadakis, P.; O'Neill, G.G.; Borge, M.J.G.; Butler, P.A.; Gaffney, L.P.; Greenlees, P.T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Illana, A.; Joss, D.T.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Ojala, J.; Page, R.D.; Rahkila, P.; Ranttila, K.; Thornhill, J.; Tuunanen, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.; Pakarinen, J.

    The electron spectrometer, SPEDE, has been developed and will be employed in conjunction with the Miniball spectrometer at the HIE-ISOLDE facility, CERN. SPEDE allows for direct measurement of internal conversion electrons emitted in-flight, without employing magnetic fields to transport or momentum filter the electrons. Together with the Miniball spectrometer, it enables simultaneous observation of {\\gamma} rays and conversion electrons in Coulomb-excitation experiments using radioactive ion beams.

  14. Computer Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2017-06-01

    Ideally, the cataloguing of spectroscopic linelists would not demand laborious and expensive experiments. Whatever an experiment might achieve, the same information would be attainable by running a calculation on a computer. Kolos and Wolniewicz were the first to demonstrate that calculations on a computer can outperform even the most sophisticated molecular spectroscopic experiments of the time, when their 1964 calculations of the dissociation energies of H_2 and D_{2} were found to be more than 1 cm^{-1} larger than the best experiments by Gerhard Herzberg, suggesting the experiment violated a strict variational principle. As explained in his Nobel Lecture, it took 5 more years for Herzberg to perform an experiment which caught up to the accuracy of the 1964 calculations. Today, numerical solutions to the Schrödinger equation, supplemented with relativistic and higher-order quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections can provide ro-vibrational spectra for molecules that we strongly believe to be correct, even in the absence of experimental data. Why do we believe these calculated spectra are correct if we do not have experiments against which to test them? All evidence seen so far suggests that corrections due to gravity or other forces are not needed for a computer simulated QED spectrum of ro-vibrational energy transitions to be correct at the precision of typical spectrometers. Therefore a computer-generated spectrum can be considered to be as good as one coming from a more conventional spectrometer, and this has been shown to be true not just for the H_2 energies back in 1964, but now also for several other molecules. So are we at the stage where we can launch an array of calculations, each with just the atomic number changed in the input file, to reproduce the NIST energy level databases? Not quite. But I will show that for the 6e^- molecule Li_2, we have reproduced the vibrational spacings to within 0.001 cm^{-1} of the experimental spectrum, and I will

  15. Evaluacion de la estabilidad de Trichoderma sp. y Azotobacter sp. conservados por diferentes metodos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarmiento Rangel, Yvonne; Hazel Vergel, Ariadna; Cardenas Caro, Diana Maria

    2013-01-01

    ... y permiten garantizar la idoneidad y reproducibilidad de la experimentacion (Pinzon et al., 2009). Existen diferentes metodos para la preservacion de los microorganismos y es importante mencionar que ninguno de ellos es universal, por lo que se debe elegir el metodo que mas se ajuste a las necesidades de la coleccion, teniendo en cuenta los medios tecnicos, l...

  16. Laboratory EXAFS Spectrometer, Principles and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Kampers, F.W.H.; Duivenvoorden, F.B.M.; Zon, J.B.A.D. van; Brinkgreve, P.; Viegers, M.P.A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to be independent of poor availability of synchrotron beamtime a laboratory EXAFS spectrometer has been developed. The X-ray source is a rotating anode generator (max. voltage 60 kV, max. current 300 mA). Monochromatisation and focusing is done with a linear spectrometer, based upon the

  17. Monte Carlo evaluation of a CZT 3D spectrometer suitable for a Hard X- and soft-γ rays polarimetry balloon borne experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, E.; De Cesare, G.; Curado da Silva, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    will be to provide high sensitivity for polarimetric measurements. In this framework, we have presented the concept of a small high-performance imaging spectrometer optimized for polarimetry between 100 and 600 keV suitable for a stratospheric balloon-borne payload and as a pathfinder for a future satellite mission...

  18. Representative composition of the Murray Formation, Gale Crater, Mars, as refined through modeling utilizing Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBommel, Scott; Gellert, Ralf; Berger, Jeff; Desouza, Elstan; O'Connell-Cooper, Catherine; Thompson, Lucy; Boyd, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    The Murray formation[1] in Gale Crater is distinctly characterized by depleted MgO and CaO, an elevated Fe/Mn ratio, and enrichments in SiO2, K2O, and Ge, compared to average Mars. Supported by observations with Curiosity's Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer[2], this pattern is consistent over several kilometers. However, intermixed dust, Ca-, and Mg-sulfates introduce chemical heterogeneities into the APXS field of view. Better constraints on the composition of what is characteristic of the Murray formation is achieved by applying a least-squares deconvolution[3] to a selection of APXS Murray targets. We subtract the composition of known additions (dust[4], MgSO4, CaSO4) to derive a more-representative Murray composition. Slight variations within Murray are then probed by modeling each target as a mixture of dust, sulfates and the derived representative Murray. The derived composition for what is representative of Murray has several key deviations from the straightforward average of Murray targets. The subtraction of known dust, Mg-, and Ca-sulfate additions suggests further depletion in MgO and CaO in Murray and also suggests a significant decrease in SO3 concentration compared to the average of Murray targets. While veins and concretions are contaminants when considering the composition of the bulk rock, the subtraction of Mg- or Ca-sulfate is independent of sulfate form. Sulfates within the bulk rock (detrital or cements) have been observed in the Murray formation. These sulfates are important and discussed further in [5]. Modeling APXS Murray targets as a mixture of dust, MgSO4, CaSO4, and representative Murray, provides insight into potential subtle variations within the surprisingly consistent Murray formation. For example, the high SiO2 in Buckskin, (sol 1057-1091) is not simply a mixture of representative Murray with sulfates and dust. The elevated Ni (and MgSO4) of Morrison (sol ˜775), the elevated Al2O3 of Mojave (sol ˜800-900), and the gradually

  19. Smartphone Spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J.S. McGonigle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are playing an increasing role in the sciences, owing to the ubiquitous proliferation of these devices, their relatively low cost, increasing processing power and their suitability for integrated data acquisition and processing in a ‘lab in a phone’ capacity. There is furthermore the potential to deploy these units as nodes within Internet of Things architectures, enabling massive networked data capture. Hitherto, considerable attention has been focused on imaging applications of these devices. However, within just the last few years, another possibility has emerged: to use smartphones as a means of capturing spectra, mostly by coupling various classes of fore-optics to these units with data capture achieved using the smartphone camera. These highly novel approaches have the potential to become widely adopted across a broad range of scientific e.g., biomedical, chemical and agricultural application areas. In this review, we detail the exciting recent development of smartphone spectrometer hardware, in addition to covering applications to which these units have been deployed, hitherto. The paper also points forward to the potentially highly influential impacts that such units could have on the sciences in the coming decades.

  20. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers using Bulk Absorbers Coupled to Mo/Cu Multilayer Superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, D.T.; Loshak, A.; Van Den Berg, M.L.; Frank, M.; Barbee Jr., T.W.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-07-04

    In x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy, it is desirable to have detectors with high energy resolution and high absorption efficiency. At LLNL, we have developed superconducting tunnel junction-based single photon x-ray detectors with thin film absorbers that have achieved these goals for photon energies up to 1 keV. However, for energies above 1 keV, the absorption efficiency of these thin-film detectors decreases drastically. We are developing the use of high-purity superconducting bulk materials as microcalorimeter absorbers for high-energy x-rays and gamma rays. The increase in absorber temperature due to incident photons is sensed by a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) composed of a Mo/Cu multilayer thin film. Films of Mo and Cu are mutually insoluble and therefore very stable and can be annealed. The multilayer structure allows scaling in thickness to optimize heat capacity and normal state resistance. We measured an energy resolution of 70 eV for 60 keV incident gamma-rays with a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber. We present x-ray and gamma-ray results from this detector design with a Sn absorber. We also propose the use of an active negative feedback voltage bias to improve the performance of our detector and show preliminary results.

  1. Calibration and testing of a portable NaI(Tl gamma-ray spectrometer-dosimeter for evaluation of terrestrial radionuclides and 137Cs contributions to ambient dose equivalent rate outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercially available NaI(Tl based spectrometer-dosimeter has been used to separate contributions of the terrestrial radionuclides (238U series, 232Th series and 40K and 137Cs to the total ambient dose equivalent rate (ADER, Ḣ*(10 , outdoors. The device had been initially calibrated by the manufacturer to measure: 1 the total ADER; 2 activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and ‘effective’ activity concentration of the terrestrial radionuclides, ACeff, in soil, agricultural raw materials, forestry products and construction materials; and 3 ground contamination density by 137Cs. In order to derive a conversion coefficient from ACeff to the ADER stipulated by the terrestrial radionuclides (ADERTRN, two series of additional calibration measurements were performed. The calibration measurements were conducted at 27 outdoor locations in the center of St.-Petersburg and in the Leningradskaya region  (background areas. The conversion coefficient from ACeff to ADERTRN of 0.51 (nSv h–1/(Bq kg–1 has been obtained using a regression analysis of experimental data. The intrinsic noise of the spectrometer and its response to cosmic radiation at sea level has been estimated to 7 nSv h–1. The calibration factors must be used with caution and only for detectors similar to the one employed in this study (assembly based on a NaI(Tl single crystal, 63 mm in diameter and 63 mm in length. The spectrometer-dosimeter and experimentally derived calibration coefficients have been tested in field at seven sites in the south-western districts of the Bryansk region that had been heavily contaminated by Chernobyl fallout. The contribution of 137Cs to the total ADER varies between 40% and 95%. The preliminary results of the measurements confirm the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry for assaying natural and artificial components of the ambient dose equivalent rate outdoors.

  2. Refinement of the Compton–Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II – Extraction of invisible element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrett, Glynis M. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Campbell, John L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Gellert, Ralf [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); King, Penelope L. [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Nield, Emily; O’Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as ‘unknowns’ in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  3. Metodos para promediar coeficientes alfa en los estudios de generalizacion de la fiabilidad

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lopez-Pina, Jose A; Sanchez-Meca, Julio; Lopez-Lopez, Jose A

    2012-01-01

    ... que factores de los estudios pueden explicar su variabilidad. Se han propuesto en la literatura diferentes procedimientos para promediar un conjunto de coeficientes alfa independientes y no existe un consenso actual sobre que metodos son los mejores...

  4. Metodo de identificacion-medicion-evaluacion de riesgos para la direccion estrategica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolano-Rodriguez, Yuniel; Alfonso-Robaina, Daniel; Ramirez-Moro, Aliec; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Arturo Abel

    2011-01-01

    En este trabajo se presenta un Metodo de Identificacion-Medicion y Evaluacion de riesgos para la Direccion Estrategica, utilizando el enfoque a procesos y aportando como valor cientifico la medicion...

  5. Valoracion de dos metodos de tincion en ensayos de citotoxicidad sobre lineas celulares tumorales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Escobar M., Linamaria; Alfonso R., Paola A; Aristizabal G., Fabio A

    2009-01-01

    En la estimacion de la posible citotoxicidad de extractos o compuestos en proceso de prospeccion se emplean metodos de tincion celular como aproximacion indirecta para la medicion masa celular viable...

  6. Gestion de la validacion de metodos analiticos de control de calidad del centro de inmunologia molecular

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramos Diaz, Frank; Fontanet Tamayo, Lizette; Delgado Fernandez, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Este articulo propone un Procedimiento que permite planificar, ejecutar y controlar la validacion de los metodos analiticos en el Departamento de Control de Calidad del Centro de Inmunologia Molecular...

  7. Evaluacion de dos metodos de extraccion de ADN a partir de biopsias fijadas en formalina y embebidas en parafina en condiciones no optimas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bustamante, Javier Andres; Astudillo, Miryam; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    .... Existen multiples metodos de extraccion de ADN a partir de este tipo de muestras. No obstante, la mayoria de metodos toman mucho tiempo y los reactivos empleados contribuyen a la fragmentacion del ADN...

  8. Evaluacion de la friccion en arcos ortodoncicos de acero inoxidable con y sin recubrimiento vitreo aplicado por el metodo Sol-Gel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valencia Alvarez, Jose A; Garcia Garcia, Claudia; Jaramillo Vallejo, Pedro M; Montoya Goez, Yesid; Pelaez Vargas, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Introduccion: el proposito de este estudio in vitro fue comparar la fuerza de friccion estatica y dinamica generada entre brackets y alambres de acero inoxidable con y sin recubrimiento vitreo aplicado por el metodo Sol-Gel. Metodos...

  9. The cost-savings of implementing kangaroo mother care in Nicaragua/Reduccion de costos mediante la implantacion del metodo madre canguro en Nicaragua

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broughton, Edward I; Gomez, Ivonne; Sanchez, Nieves; Vindell, Concepcion

    2013-01-01

    Metodos. Tras recibir capacitacion clinica en el metodo, los miembros del equipo encargado de su implantacion capacitaron a sus colegas, elaboraron directrices para los medicos y material educativo para...

  10. Comparacion de metodos para el diseno arquitectonico del software que consideran las orientaciones de metas y aspectos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guzman, Jean Carlos; Losavio, Francisca; Matteo, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Se presenta como objetivo realizar un marco de comparacion aplicado a metodos de diseno arquitectonico del software que incorporen metas, aspectos o estandares de calidad para especificar Requisitos...

  11. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  12. Imaging Grating Spectrometer (I-GRASP) for Solar Soft X-Ray Spectral Measurements in Critically Under-Observed 0.5 - 7 nm Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkovsky, L. V.; Wieman, S. R.; Chao, W.; Woods, T. N.; Jones, A. R.; Thiemann, E.; Mason, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We discuss science and technology advantages of the Imaging Grating Spectrometer (I-GRASP) based on a novel transmission diffracting grating (TDG) made possible by technology for fabricating Fresnel zone plates (ZPs) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Older version TDGs with 200 nm period available in the 1990s became a proven technology for providing 21 years of regular measurements of solar EUV irradiance. I-GRASP incorporates an advanced TDG with a grating period of 50 nm providing four times better diffraction dispersion than the 200 nm period gratings used in the SOHO/CELIAS/SEM, the SDO/EVE/ESP flight spectrophotometers, and the EVE/SAM sounding rocket channel. Such new technology for the TDG combined with a back-illuminated 2000 x 1504 CMOS image sensor with 7 micron pixels, will provide spatially-and-spectrally resolved images and spectra from individual Active Regions (ARs) and solar flares with high (0.15 nm) spectral resolution. Such measurements are not available in the spectral band from about 2 to 6 nm from existing or planned spectrographs and will be significantly important to study ARs and solar flare temperatures and dynamics, to improve existing spectral models, e.g. CHIANTI, and to better understand processes in the Earth's atmosphere processes. To test this novel technology, we have proposed to the NASA LCAS program an I-GRASP version for a sounding rocket flight to increase the TDG TRL to a level appropriate for future CubeSat projects.

  13. Parametric normalization for full-energy peak efficiency of HPGe γ-ray spectrometers at different counting positions for bulky sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nie; Bang-Fa, Ni; Wei-Zhi, Tian

    2013-02-01

    Application of effective interaction depth (EID) principle for parametric normalization of full energy peak efficiencies at different counting positions, originally for quasi-point sources, has been extended to bulky sources (within ∅30 mm×40 mm) with arbitrary matrices. It is also proved that the EID function for quasi-point source can be directly used for cylindrical bulky sources (within ∅30 mm×40 mm) with the geometric center as effective point source for low atomic number (Z) and low density (D) media and high energy γ-rays. It is also found that in general EID for bulky sources is dependent upon Z and D of the medium and the energy of the γ-rays in question. In addition, the EID principle was theoretically verified by MCNP calculations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stabilization of spectra provided by a gamma-ray spectrometer. Application to the construction of a stabilizer; Stabilisation des spectres fournis par un spectrometre a rayons gamma. Application a la realisation d'un stabilisateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detourne, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    This research is concerned with the stabilization of spectra provided by a gamma-ray spectrometer. It is required to hold the calibration straight line of the spectrometer in a position which is fixed initially to better than 5x10{sup -5} channel. A prototype numerical stabilizer has been constructed : the SPECTROSTAB; it is made up of two independent control loops; one of these makes the spectrometer gain depend on the derivatives of a reference peak at high energies; the other makes the origin of the energy scale depend on the derivatives of a second reference peak at low energies A theoretical study of the behaviour of a control loop shows that a direct action stabilizer gives the most accurate stabilization; the loss in resolving power on the theoretical peaks of the spectra attains about 1 % with a scintillation detector, and 10 % with a semi-conductor detector. Various tests show that the expected results are obtained and that the displacement of the spectral peaks produced by the derivatives are hidden by errors in the calculation of the peak abscissae. (author) [French] Cette etude a pour objet la stabilisation des spectres fournis par un spectrometre a rayons gamma. On veut maintenir la droite d'etalonnage du spectrometre dans une position fixee initialement a mieux de 6.10{sup -5} canal pres. On realise un prototype de stabilisateur numerique, le SPECTROSTAB; il comprend deux boucles d'asservissement independantes; l'une d'elles asservit le gain du spectrometre aux derives d'un pic de reference aux hautes energies; l'autre asservit l'origine de l'echelle des energies aux derives d'un second pic de reference aux basses energies. Une etude theorique du comportement d'une boucle d'asservissement montre qu'un stabilisateur a action directe permet la stabilisation la plus precise; la perte en resolution sur les pics theoriques des spectres atteint environ 1 % avec un detecteur a scintillateur et 10

  15. Development of a pixelated CdTe detector module for a hard-x and gamma-ray imaging spectrometer application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvèz, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-07-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of novae and supernovae in X and gamma-rays, with the use of space missions. We have also been involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae and Classical Novae. In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Two kinds of CdTe pixel detectors with different contacts have been tested: ohmic and Schottky. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout VATAGP7.1 ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. The study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the detector design. We will report on the spectroscopy characterisation of the CdTe detector module as well as the study of charge sharing.

  16. (60)Co in cast steel matrix: A European interlaboratory comparison for the characterisation of new activity standards for calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers in metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, Faidra; Burda, Oleksiy; Hult, Mikael; Arnold, Dirk; Marroyo, Belén Caro; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Ferreux, Laurent; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Javornik, Andrej; Klemola, Seppo; Luca, Aurelian; Moser, Hannah; Nečemer, Marijan; Peyrés, Virginia; Reis, Mario; Silva, Lidia; Šolc, Jaroslav; Svec, Anton; Tyminski, Zbigniew; Vodenik, Branko; Wätjen, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Two series of activity standards of (60)Co in cast steel matrix, developed for the calibration of gamma-ray spectrometry systems in the metallurgical sector, were characterised using a European interlaboratory comparison among twelve National Metrology Institutes and one international organisation. The first standard, consisting of 14 disc shaped samples, was cast from steel contaminated during production ("originally"), and the second, consisting of 15 similar discs, from artificially-contaminated ("spiked") steel. The reference activity concentrations of (60)Co in the cast steel standards were (1.077±0.019) Bqg(-1) on 1 January 2013 12h00 UT and (1.483±0.022) Bqg(-1) on 1 June 2013 12h00 UT, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a Spatially Resolving X-Ray Crystal Spectrometer (XCS) for Measurement of Ion-Temperature (Ti) and Rotation-Velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aprico, L; Johnson, D; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer,; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O' Mullane, M; Lee, S G

    2010-05-21

    Imaging XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, Fe) with ~7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a PPPL-MIT instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2d x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. Measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod will be presented.

  18. Determination of trace elements in mine soil samples using portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer: A comparative study with ICP-OES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Sahraoui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb, Zinc (Zn and Cadmium (Cd levels on soils surrounding of Lakhouat mine (North-West of Tunisia were measured. The total concentration of these elements in the soil samples was determined by portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF in situ and compared to the traditional digestion method using inductively coupled-plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES. Statistical analyses were performed to determine if significant differences existed between the instrumental techniques, which included simple correlations by the regression lines and t-test for mean comparison. The statistical analysis demonstrated that no statistically significant differences were observed for the Pb concentrations; however, for the Zn and Cd concentrations, t-test showed significant differences between the inst

  19. Spherical grating spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  20. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cecchi, C; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, J P D; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; Dantone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, P; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu, H T; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mourao, A; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postolache, V; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Sartorelli, G; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Gunten, H V; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m sup 2) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  1. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Azzarello, P.; Babucci, E.; Baldini, L.; Basile, M.; Barancourt, D.; Barao, F.; Barbier, G.; Barreira, G.; Battiston, R.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bene, P.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Biland, A.; Bizzaglia, S.; Blasko, S.; Boella, G.; Boschini, M.; Bourquin, M.; Brocco, L.; Bruni, G.; Buenerd, M.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Camps, C.; Cannarsa, P.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cecchi, C.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, Z.G.; Chernoplekov, N.A.; Chiueh, T.H.; Chuang, Y.L.; Cindolo, F.; Commichau, V.; Contin, A. E-mail: contin@bo.infn.it; Crespo, P.; Cristinziani, M.; Cunha, J.P. da; Dai, T.S.; Deus, J.D.; Dinu, N.; Djambazov, L.; DAntone, I.; Dong, Z.R.; Emonet, P.; Engelberg, J.; Eppling, F.J.; Eronen, T.; Esposito, G.; Extermann, P.; Favier, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fisher, P.H.; Fluegge, G.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gervasi, M.; Giusti, P.; Grandi, D.; Grimm, O.; Gu, W.Q.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hermel, V.; Hofer, H.; Huang, M.A.; Hungerford, W.; Ionica, M.; Ionica, R.; Jongmanns, M.; Karlamaa, K.; Karpinski, W.; Kenney, G.; Kenny, J.; Kim, W.; Klimentov, A.; Kossakowski, R.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraeber, M.; Laborie, G.; Laitinen, T.; Lamanna, G.; Laurenti, G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.C.; Levi, G.; Levtchenko, P.; Liu, C.L.; Liu, H.T.; Lopes, I.; Lu, G.; Lu, Y.S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luckey, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mana, C.; Margotti, A.; Mayet, F.; McNeil, R.R.; Meillon, B.; Menichelli, M.; Mihul, A.; Mourao, A.; Mujunen, A.; Palmonari, F.; Papi, A.; Park, I.H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, E.; Pesci, A.; Pevsner, A.; Pimenta, M.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Postolache, V.; Produit, N.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rapin, D.; Raupach, F.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Ribordy, M.; Richeux, J.P.; Riihonen, E.; Ritakari, J.; Roeser, U.; Roissin, C.; Sagdeev, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E.S.; Shoutko, V.

    2002-02-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a large acceptance (0.65 sr m{sup 2}) detector designed to operate in the International Space Station (ISS) for three years. The purposes of the experiment are to search for cosmic antimatter and dark matter and to study the composition and energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays. A 'scaled-down' version has been flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery for 10 days in June 1998. The complete AMS is programmed for installation on the ISS in October 2003 for an operational period of 3 yr. This contribution reports on the experimental configuration that will be installed on the ISS.

  2. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Am γ-ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design. The measured profile is in good agreement with the existing theoretical data ...

  3. The Omicron Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Allardyce, B W

    1976-01-01

    It is intended to build a spectrometer with a large solid angle and a large momentum acceptance at the reconstructed synchrocyclotron at CERN. This spectrometer will have an energy resolution of about 1 MeV for particles with momenta up to about 400 MeV/c.

  4. Development and Building of Radioactive Concrete Pads for calibration of the airborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometers, used in mineral exploration and hydrocarbons; Desenvolvimento e construcao de blocos de concreto radioativo para calibracao de espectrometros gama portateis e aerotransportados, utilizados em exploracao mineral e de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos, Dionisio Uendro

    2006-07-01

    Eight transportable calibration pads were built in to be used as concentration standards for portable and airborne gamma-ray spectrometers calibrations. The pads construction procedure is described in full detail. The pads, with dimensions of 1 m x 1 m x 0,30 m and masses between 593 kg and 673 kg were made radioactive by the addition of different amounts of k-feldspar, caldasite and monazitic sand to the concrete masses. The potassium, uranium and thorium concentration vary significantly in the pads, reaching maximum values of 5,7% of K, 45,6 ppm eU and 137 ppm eTh. The distribution of the gamma radiation flux from the pads surfaces and the heterogeneity magnitudes of the radioactive elements concentration were experimentally established. An example of gamma-ray spectrometer calibration is presented. (author)

  5. Transmission Efficiency of the Sage Spectrometer Using GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. M.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Papadakis, P.; Ali, F.; Butler, P. A.; Cresswell, J. R.; Mistry, A.; Sampson, J.; Seddon, D. A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; Konki, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Rahkila, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Sorri, J.; Julin, R.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Simpson, J.; Pucknell, V. F. E.

    2014-09-01

    The new SAGE spectrometer allows simultaneous electron and γ-ray in-beam studies of heavy nuclei. A comprehensive GEANT4 simulation suite has been created for the SAGE spectrometer. This includes both the silicon detectors for electron detection and the germanium detectors for γ-ray detection. The simulation can be used for a wide variety of tests with the aim of better understanding the behaviour of SAGE. A number of aspects of electron transmission are presented here.

  6. GIUSEPPE DE ROSA, Metodo per pianisti accompagnatori della danza, Milano, Suvini Zerboni, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Sintoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Il volume di Giuseppe De Rosa è al contempo un agile metodo teorico-pratico per la formazione del pianista accompagnatore della danza classica e un sussidio didattico per la sua attività in situazione. Frutto dell’esperienza pluriennale dell’autore, colma un vuoto nella pubblicistica italiana dedicata all’argomento.

  7. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  8. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Oldaker, Mark E [Pleasanton, CA

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  9. Method of Automated Dynamic Assessment of reading literacy for Secondary Education (EdilLEC)/'Metodo de evaluacion dinamica automatizado' de competencias lectoras para educacion secundaria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perez, Ramiro Gilabert; Lloria, Amelia Mana; Pelluch, Laura Gil; Tatay, Ana C. Llorens; Clemente, Vicenta Avila; Gamez, Eduardo Vidal-Abarca

    2016-01-01

    .... Keywords reading literacy; PISA; dynamic assessment; Secondary Education Se presenta un nuevo metodo de evaluacion dinamica de la competencia lectora automatizado para educacion secundaria (EdiLEC...

  10. Part I. Development of a concept inventory addressing students' beliefs and reasoning difficulties regarding the greenhouse effect, Part II. Distribution of chlorine measured by the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John Michael

    chlorine on Mars measured by the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). The distribution of chlorine is heterogeneous across the surface, with a concentration of high chlorine centered over the Medusa Fossae Formation. The distribution of chlorine correlates positively with hydrogen and negatively with silicon and thermal inertia. Four mechanisms (aeolian, volcanic, aqueous, and hydrothermal) are discussed as possible factors influencing the distribution of chlorine measured within the upper few tens of centimeters of the surface.

  11. Study of an X-ray fluorescence thin film method for the determination of uranium in low activity solutions; Estudio de un metodo de fluorescencia de rayos X en capa delgada para la determinacion del uranio en soluciones de baja actividad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1980-07-01

    The application of the X-ray fluorescence thin film technique to the uranium determination in nitric solutions for a concentration range from 1 g/l to 100 g/l and activity levels under 5 mCi/ml is studied. The most suited excitation and measurement conditions are also studied and the uranium matrix effect correction, which is performed through the double dilution, {alpha}{sub U}U interaction coefficient calculation and internal standard methods, is discussed. The specimen preparation is satisfactorily accomplished by using P.V.C. filters fixed on aluminium supports. (Author) 18 refs.

  12. The μmRIXS spectrometer at BESSY II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Pietzsch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The μmRIXS confocal plane grating spectrometer offers high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS spectroscopy in the soft x-ray range between 50 eV and 1000 eV. The small focus of its dedicated beamline allows for spectroscopical imaging at selected sample sites with a spatial resolution of 1 micrometer.

  13. Implementation of the method air-kerma product area in KAP camera calibration with reference qualities of X-ray series at the SSDL RQR of Mexico; Implementacion del metodo producto kerma en aire-area en la calibracion de camaras KAP con calidades de referencia de rayos X de la serie RQR en el LSCD de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejudo, Jesus; Tovar, Victor M., E-mail: jesus.cejudo@ini.gob.mx, E-mail: victor.tovar@inin.gob.mx [lnstituto Nacional de lnvestigaciones Nucleares (DMRI/LSDC/lNlN), Ocoyoacac (Mexico). Centro Nuclear Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores. Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica

    2013-10-01

    The X-Ray machines, at a reference laboratory for the instrument calibration in diagnostic radiology, should compliance with the ISO requirements. Sometimes there is not available as much laboratories as needed in Latin American countries. So this project shows the KAP ionization chamber implementation method using the TRS-457 radiation quality from the IAEA at the SSDL of Mexico. The KAP instruments calibration method consists in doing a substitution comparison using a standard reference with traceability to a primary laboratory and a transmission-monitoring chamber that measures the number of photons of the X-ray primary beam. A KAP chamber calibration requires a special array that consists in collocating the chamber in two different positions of its calibration process. Then, with air kerma-area product coefficient together with a corrected electrometer measure at referential conditions, the patient dosimetry magnitudes are calculated. The dosimetry necessity at hospitals always will be in function of possessing a highly reliable calibration coefficient chamber for making these measures. That dosimetry results will help in reducing the total or partial irradiation emitted to the human body of the patient. This is how stochastic risks will be lessened due to diagnostic studies. The purpose of this project is to have a synergy with calibration for making known that the SSDL of Mexico has the technical capacity to act as a link between primary standard dosimetry laboratories and the ionizing radiation equipment users who require that their KAP chamber have traceability from the primary standard to the user. (author)

  14. Comparative study of two methods of analysis crystallinity, x-ray and DSC, using a linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) injected, irradiated by gamma radiation; Estudo comparativo de dois metodos de analise de cristalinidade, raios-x e DSC, usando o polietileno linear de baixa densidade (PEBDL) injetado, irradiados por radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ana C.F. de; Ferreto, Helio F.R.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente

    2015-07-01

    The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) is a linear polymer chain with short chain branching. In this work, the LLDPE was irradiated in {sup 60}Co gamma source with 2000 kCi of activity, in presence of air, with doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy, at about 5 kGy.h-1 dose rate, at room temperature. After irradiation, the samples were heated for 60 min at 100 deg C to promote recombination and annihilation of residual radicals. LLDPE injected and irradiated samples were characterized to identity the effects of terminal degradation, scission and crosslinking occurred in each dose. In the radiation process has changes in the crystallization and thus it is possible to compare the methods to obtain the percentage of crystallization of PELDB by DSC and X-ray. (author)

  15. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The Omega spectrometer which came into action during the year. An array of optical spark chambers can be seen withdrawn from the magnet aperture. In the 'igloo' above the magnet is located the Plumbicon camera system which collects information from the spark chambers.

  16. Frequency-modulation spectrometer for Mössbauer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reittinger, P. W.; Sinor, T. W.; Wagal, S. S.; Collins, C. B.

    1988-02-01

    A nuclear frequency-modulation spectrometer (NFMS) for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is described in this article. As the name implies, this device operates by modulating the cross section for gamma-ray absorption. The automation of this spectrometer required the development of an interface to an Apple computer which provides a real-time data display. This interface also enables the Apple computer to control up to two Mössbauer spectrometers at once, with a real-time data display for each. A nuclear frequency-modulation spectrometer makes it possible to observe directly the phenomenon known as ``rf sidebands'' in Mössbauer spectroscopy, without interference from the ``parent transitions.'' The high resolution of NFMS makes it possible to examine the ``rf sidebands'' for any fine structure.

  17. Analysis of X-ray diffraction of the titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) synthesized by the Pechini Method for application in heterogeneous photocatalysis processes; Analise de difracao de raios X do dioxido de titanio (TiO{sub 2}) sintetizado pelo metodo Pechini para aplicacao em processos de fotocatalise heterogenea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, P.L.; Araujo, D.S.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Oliveira, L.S.C., E-mail: palomalima_eq@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is a polymorph commonly applied to heterogeneous photocatalysis processes for being relatively inexpensive and photo - stable. It is usually found in three different crystalline phases (anatase, rutile and brookite), which directly interfere in their photocatalytic efficiency. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the obtainment of TiO{sub 2} by Pechini method in different conditions for application in the heterogeneous photocatalysis process. For this purpose, it was evaluated by analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD ) the behavior of TiO{sub 2} materials synthesized in proportions of 2:1 and 3:1 (titanium isopropoxide/citric acid), pyrolyzed at 300°C/3h and 400°C /h and calcined at 400°C and 500°C/1h. The results revealed that the TiO{sub 2} samples produced in the ratio of 2:1 and 3:1 isopropoxide/citric acid and calcined at 500°C/h presented the best results. (author)

  18. Smartphone spectrometer for colorimetric biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Peng; Tran, Nhung Thi; Zhang, Jinling; Chia, Wei Sheng; Boujday, Souhir; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-05-23

    We report on a smartphone spectrometer for colorimetric biosensing applications. The spectrometer relies on a sample cell with an integrated grating substrate, and the smartphone's built-in light-emitting diode flash and camera. The feasibility of the smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated for detection of glucose and human cardiac troponin I, the latter in conjunction with peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

  19. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  20. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, William J (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250 degrees Centigrade, and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  1. Development of a Bragg spectrometer for experiments with highly charged ions at storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, D.; Jagodzinski, P.; Pajek, M.; Stöhlker, Th; Trassinelli, M.; Beyer, H. F.; Reuschl, R.; Spillmann, U.

    2007-03-01

    The construction and results of the Monte-Carlo ray-tracing simulations for a low energy x-ray crystal spectrometer designed for future experiments at the ESR storage ring with fast highly charged ions are presented. The spectrometer has a radius of the Rowland circle R = 0.5 m and operates in the Johann geometry. The x-rays emitted from a source are di.racted by spherically bent silicon Si(111) crystal and registered by two-dimensional deep depleted back-illuminated CCD camera. The estimated spectrometer e.ciency, calculated according to a dynamical theory of x-ray di.raction is about 10-6. The energy resolution of the spectrometer obtained from the simulations is about 0.5 eV. influence of the source size and Doppler broadening on the spectrometer resolution is discussed.

  2. The SPEDE electron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, George

    This thesis presents SPEDE (SPectrometer for Electron DEtection) and documents its construction, testing and performance during commissioning at Jyvaskyla, Finland, before deployment at the HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN coupled with the MINIBALL array to perform in-beam electron-gamma spectroscopy using post-accelerated radioactive ion beams. Commissioning experiments took place in two two-day stints during spring 2015, coupled with several JUROGAMII gamma-detectors. This spectrometer will help aid in fully understanding exotic regions of the nuclear chart such as regions with a high degree of octupole deformation, and in those nuclei exhibiting shape coexistence. For the rst time, electron spectroscopy has been performed at the target position from states populated in accelerated nuclei via Coulomb excitation. The FWHM of SPEDE is approximately 7 keV at 320 keV, and Doppler correction was possible to improve Doppler broadened peaks. The results are intended to give the reader a full understanding of the dete...

  3. The LEP Energy Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Prochnow, J

    2000-01-01

    The energy of the circulating particles in the LEP storage ring is predicted by a model based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes measuring the bending magnetic field. This model is calibrated by the method of resonant depolarisation. Since the latter technique is limited in energy range an independent method to confirm the NMR based model is applied. The spectrometer has been installed to determine the beam energy with a relative accuracy of 1 ×10 -4 . It consists of a precisely calibrated bending magnet flanked by six beam position monitors. The beam energy is determined by measuring the deflection angle of the particles and the integrated bending field. In the 1999 LEP operation period the spectrometer was commissioned and the first energy measure-ments in the regime of 90 GeV were performed. A relative scatter of 1 .5 ×10 -4 was observed with no systematic deviation from the energy model. The scatter is expected to be reduced in the 2000 LEP run by minimising several systematic effects of the mea...

  4. Conceptual design of a Disk Chopper Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copley, J.R.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We describe methods that we have used for the conceptual design of the Disk Chopper Spectrometer at the Cold Neutron Research Facility, National Institute of Standards and Technology. Most of the discussion concerns the multiple chopper system. No single design method is best in every situation. We believe that an analytical approach is preferable, whenever possible. Graphical methods of expressing problems have been very instructive. We have also found it useful, and occasionally invaluable, to cross-check results obtained using different methods, such as analytical integration and ray-tracing.

  5. M\\'etodos Estoc\\'asticos em Turbul\\^encia Desenvolvida

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, J. P. V.

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis, we use some methods of theory of stochastic process to approach turbulence in fluid dynamics. We discuss the Kolmogorov model for fully developed homogeneous turbulence, some recent analytical results to the 1-D Burgers' equation approach turbulence. Nesta disserta\\c c\\~ao, utilizamos m\\'etodos da teoria de processos estoc\\'asticos para a compreens\\~ao da turbul\\^encia em fluidos. Discutimos o modelo de Kolmogorov para turbul\\^encia homog\\^enea desenvolvida, resultados anal\\'\\...

  6. BNL multiparticle spectrometer software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saulys, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses some solutions to problems common to the design, management and maintenance of a large high energy physics spectrometer software system. The experience of dealing with a large, complex program and the necessity of having the program controlled by various people at different levels of computer experience has led us to design a program control structure of mnemonic and self-explanatory nature. The use of this control language in both on-line and off-line operation of the program will be discussed. The solution of structuring a large program for modularity so that substantial changes to the program can be made easily for a wide variety of high energy physics experiments is discussed. Specialized tools for this type of large program management are also discussed.

  7. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time.

  8. Neutron Detection with a Cryogenic Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Z.W.; Lamberti, V.E.; Carpenter, D.A.; Cristy, S.S.

    2003-06-23

    Cryogenic calorimeters are used for x-ray detection because of their exquisite energy resolution and have found application in x-ray astronomy, and the search for dark matter. These devices operate by detecting the heat pulse produced by ionization in an absorber cooled to temperatures below 1 K. Such temperatures are needed to lower the absorber's heat capacity to the point that the deposition of even a few eV results in a measurable temperature excursion. Typical absorbers for dark matter measurements are massive Si or Ge crystals, and, with Ge, have achieved a resolution of 650 eV at 10 keV. Chow, et al., report the measurement of the 60 keV emission from {sup 241}Am with 230 eV resolution using a superconducting tin absorber. Cunningham, et al., also using a superconducting tin absorber, have recently reported a four-fold improvement over Chow. With such results being reported from the x- and gamma-ray world it is natural to examine the possibilities for cryogenic neutron spectroscopy. Such a detector would operate by detecting the heat pulses caused by neutron capture and scattering. To date, {sup 6}LiF has been the absorber of choice because relatively large crystals can be grown, and it is an insulating material with low heat capacity. Silver reports the fabrication of a {sup 6}LiF spectrometer operating at 328 mK and achieving a resolution of 39 keV. De Marcillac reports the fabrication of a spectrometer operating at 80 mK and achieving 16 keV resolution when bombarded with 5 MeV alpha particles. In this paper, we report preliminary results with a TiB{sub 2} absorber exposed to thermal neutrons. In contrast to lithium, whose chemistry selects for LiF as the absorber, boron offers a rich chemistry from which to select materials with high boron content. We will discuss the considerations governing the choice of absorber material as well as the basic considerations needed to understand a cryogenic spectrometer. The capture and scattering reactions in boron and

  9. Use of microcontroller in gamma-ray spectrometer construction using NaI(Tl) sensor, with emphasis in multichannel analyzer, to applications in nuclear and environmental geophysics; Uso de microcontrolador na construcao de espectrometro gama com sensor de NaI(Tl), com enfase em analisador multicanal, para aplicacao em geofisica nuclear e ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Nilton

    2005-07-01

    In this work of nuclear geophysical instrumentation the main purpose was the development of a gamma-ray spectrometer prototype with multi channel analyzer, since the spectroscopic amplifier until your firmware. The heart of the digital part was an ATMEL 8 bits microcontroller (AT89S8252). All circuits were made and assembled in the Laboratory of Applied Geophysical Instrumentation (LIGA) of IAG-USP. A microcontroller software was completely developed in C ANSI language using the Small Device C Compiler version 2.4.8, that is a free software distributed under General Public License (GPL). At first, microcontroller was used to change all digital circuit of one classic SCINTREX GAD-6 differential gamma-ray spectrometer. Measurement times with order of 2 days became possible, and it could work in non climate ambient. Then, after this stage, had been started the development of a multichannel analyzer (MCA) working in pulse height analyzer mode with 4096 channels capacity, to use in many kinds of nuclear detection. Besides it, was developed an automatic gain system for photopeak stabilization, by the use of one radioactive source ({sup 133}Ba). This automatic gain system is very important in the case of NaI(Tl) scintillometric detectors, due PMT sensitivity with temperature and aging of some laboratory electronic circuits. Two power supplies with high stability, using pulse width modulation (PWM) techniques were developed, in order to all system became free of electrical line break off. One PWM power polarizes a photo multiplier tube (PMT) with high voltage and another supplies remaining developed circuits. Calibration in energy using standards sources {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co showed that gamma detector developed has a good linearity and low thermal drift, even working in absent of air-conditioned. Concentrations measurements of K, U and Th were made in samples of soils, vegetables, etc. (author)'

  10. Imaging transmission grating spectrometer for magnetic fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, B.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2003-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating based imaging spectrometer for the ultrasoft x-ray [(USXR), 10-300 Å] range. The spectrometer will be integrated into an impurity diagnostic package for magnetic fusion experiments, which provides time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles, and particle transport. The spectrometer has a simple layout, consisting of collimating and space resolving slits, a transmission grating, and a two-dimensional imaging USXR detector. We tested two types of detectors, a CsI coated multichannel plate and a phosphor P45 coated fiber optic plate, both with intensified charge-coupled-device image readout. The performance of the 5000 1/mm, 3:1 bar to open area ratio transmission grating has been evaluated in the laboratory using Kα lines from a Manson source and the emission from a Penning discharge. A prototype spectrometer equiped with the first type detector and optimized for 6 Å spectral resolution has been tested successfully on the CDX-U tokamak at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A spectrometer using the second detector version has been developed for the NSTX spherical torus at Princeton. Spatially resolved spectra have been recorded with 25-250 ms time integration with both spectrometers. In both experiments, spectra are dominated by low-Z impurities, C, N, and O.

  11. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  12. Migration of iron and manganese into CCA-treated wood in soil contact and the resulting error in leaching results when using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor P. Schultz; Darrel D. Nicholas; Stan Lebow

    2003-01-01

    In a laboratory leaching study, we found that chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood, which had been exposed to one of five soils examined, unexpectedly appeared to gain significant Cr (47%) when measured with an energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument (American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA) Method A9-01 2001). Analysis of some of the leached...

  13. Long-term radiation damage to a spaceborne germanium spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, P; Hull, E L; Palmer, D; Harris, M J; Seifert, H; Teegarden, B J; Gehrels, N; Cline, T L; Ramaty, R; Sheppard, D; Madden, N W; Luke, P N; Cork, C P; Landis, D A; Malone, D F; Hurley, K

    1999-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer aboard the Wind spacecraft in deep space has observed gamma-ray bursts and solar events for four years. The germanium detector in the instrument has gradually deteriorated from exposure to the approx 10 sup 8 p/cm sup 2 /yr(>100 MeV) cosmic-ray flux. Low-energy tailing and loss of efficiency, attributed to hole trapping and conversion of the germanium from n- to p-type as a result of crystal damage, were observed. Raising the detector bias voltage ameliorated both difficulties and restored the spectrometer to working operation. Together, these observations extend our understanding of the effects of radiation damage to include the previously unsuccessfully studied regime of long-term operation in space. (author)

  14. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can "instantaneously"...

  15. Calibration of the microcalorimeter spectrometer on-board the Hitomi (Astro-H) observatory (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, M. E.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Chiao, M. P.; Fujimoto, R.; Haas, D.; den Herder, J.-W.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Porter, F. S.; Sawada, M.; Sneiderman, G. A.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; de Vries, C. P.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2016-11-01

    The Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was a pioneering non-dispersive imaging x-ray spectrometer with 5 eV FWHM energy resolution, consisting of an array of 36 silicon-thermistor microcalorimeters at the focus of a high-throughput soft x-ray telescope. The instrument enabled astrophysical plasma diagnostics in the 0.3-12 keV band. We introduce the SXS calibration strategy and corresponding ground calibration measurements that took place from 2012-2015, including both the characterization of the microcalorimeter array and measurements of the x-ray transmission of optical blocking filters.

  16. Response function and count rates with the SODART Bragg-Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halm, I.; Wiebicke, H.J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1998-01-01

    The SODART X-ray telescope includes an Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OCS) providing an energy resolving power around 1000 by Bragg reflection upon crystals. The SODART-OCS response function is used within the XSPEC package for the calculation of count rates for X-ray line and continuum registra......The SODART X-ray telescope includes an Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OCS) providing an energy resolving power around 1000 by Bragg reflection upon crystals. The SODART-OCS response function is used within the XSPEC package for the calculation of count rates for X-ray line and continuum...

  17. Calibration of the Microcalorimeter Spectrometer On-Board the Hitomi (Astro-H) Observatory (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, M. E.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Chiao, M. P.; Fujimoto, R.; Haas, D.; Den Herder, J.-W.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was a pioneering non-dispersive imaging x-ray spectrometer with 5 eV FWHM energy resolution, consisting of an array of 36 silicon-thermistor microcalorimeters at the focus of a high-throughput soft x-ray telescope. The instrument enabled astrophysical plasma diagnostics in the 0.3-12 keV band. We introduce the SXS calibration strategy and corresponding ground calibration measurements that took place from 2012-2015, including both the characterization of the microcalorimeter array and measurements of the x-ray transmission of optical blocking filters.

  18. A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filters with image plate dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C D; King, J A; Key, M H; Akli, K U; Beg, F N; Chen, H; Freeman, R R; Link, A; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Porkolab, M; Stephens, R B; Van Woerkom, L D

    2008-10-01

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with image plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code INTEGRATED TIGER SERIES 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. An electron distribution with a slope temperature of 1.3 MeV is inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  19. A Bremsstrahlung Spectrometer using k-edge and Differential Filters with Image plate dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Mackinnon, A; Beg, F; Chen, H; Key, M; King, J A; Link, A; MacPhee, A; Patel, P; Porkolab, M; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Akli, K; Freeman, R

    2008-05-02

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with Image Plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. Electron distributions with slope temperatures in the MeV range are inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  20. An antimatter spectrometer in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlen, S. (Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)); Balebanov, V.M. (Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Battiston, R. (Perugia University and INFN Sezione di Bologna, 06100 Perugia (Italy)); Becker, U. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)); Burger, J. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)); Capell, M. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)); Chen, H.F. (Chinese University of Science and Technology, Hefei, Anhui, 230029 (China)); Chen, H.S. (Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China)); Chen, M. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)); Chernoplekov, N. (Kurchatov Atomic Institute, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)); Clare, R. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)); Dai, T.S. (Massachu; Antimatter Study Group

    1994-10-15

    We discuss a simple magnetic spectrometer to be installed on a satellite or space station. The purpose of this spectrometer is to search for primordial antimatter to the level of antimatter/matter [approx]10[sup -9], improving the existing limits obtained with balloon flights by a factor of 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 5]. The design of the spectrometer is based on an iron-free, Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet, scintillation counters, drift tubes, and silicon or time projection chambers. Different design options are discussed. Typically, the spectrometer has a weight of about 2 tons and an acceptance of about 1.0 m[sup 2] sr. The availability of the new Nd-Fe-B material makes it possible for the first time to put a magnet into space economically and reliably. ((orig.))

  1. The GRAVITY spectrometers: optical qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Senol; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Wank, Imke; Fischer, Sebastian; Horrobin, Matthew; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY1 is a 2nd generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) operated in the astronomical K-band. In the Beam Combiner Instrument2 (BCI) four Fiber Couplers3 (FC) will feed the light coming from each telescope into two fibers, a reference channel for the fringe tracking spectrometer4 (FT) and a science channel for the science spectrometer4 (SC). The differential Optical Path Difference (dOPD) between the two channels will be corrected using a novel metrology concept.5 The metrology laser will keep control of the dOPD of the two channels. It is injected into the spectrometers and detected at the telescope level. Piezo-actuated fiber stretchers correct the dOPD accordingly. Fiber-fed Integrated Optics6 (IO) combine coherently the light of all six baselines and feed both spectrometers. Assisted by Infrared Wavefront Sensors7 (IWS) at each Unit Telescope (UT) and correcting the path difference between the channels with an accuracy of up to 5 nm, GRAVITY will push the limits of astrometrical accuracy to the order of 10 μas and provide phase-referenced interferometric imaging with a resolution of 4 mas. The University of Cologne developed, constructed and tested both spectrometers of the camera system. Both units are designed for the near infrared (1.95 - 2.45 μm) and are operated in a cryogenic environment. The Fringe Tracker is optimized for highest transmission with fixed spectral resolution (R = 22) realized by a double-prism.8 The Science spectrometer is more diverse and allows to choose from three different spectral resolutions8 (R = [22, 500, 4000]), where the lowest resolution is achieved with a prism and the higher resolutions are realized with grisms. A Wollaston prism in each spectrometer allows for polarimetric splitting of the light. The goal for the spectrometers is to concentrate at least 90% of the ux in 2 × 2 pixel (36 × 36 μm2) for the Science channel and in 1 pixel (24 × 24 μm) in the Fringe Tracking channel. In Section 1, we present

  2. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Accardo, L; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  3. Automated Nuclear Quadruple Resonance Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANCHUK, M.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of an autodyne Nuclear quadruple resonance spectrometer is offered. The change of frequency of oscillatory LC circuit of the spectrometer is carried out in two ways: by varicap and variable capacitor. A processor module for the capacitor and varicap control is developed. The unit allows to scan and measure the level and frequency of the NQR-signal. The unit is controlled by the personal computer.

  4. Correlacion entre metodos de analisis de Zn disponible en cuatro ordenes de suelos de Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Molina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realizo una comparación entre métodos analisis del Zn disponible en 4 ordenes de sue- Analytilos de Costa Rica (Ultisoles, Vertisoles, Andisoles Inceptisoles, 25 de c/u, utilizando las siguientes soluciones extractoras: Olsen Modificado, Meh- lich 3, Morgan Modificado, DTPA y HC1. Las cantidades de Zn extrafdas dependieron de la natu- raleza qufmica de la solucion extractora. El HCl presento los contenidos mas altos de Zn en los chasuelos, excepto en Vertisoles. Las soluciones que hicontienen el agente quelante EDTA (Olsen Modi- ficado y Mehlich`3, extrajeron niveles interme- Modidios de Zn, en tanto que los metodos que contie- Den el quelato DTPA (Morgan Modificado y DT - PA, obtuvieron los valores mas bajos. Las corre- laciones de Zn extrafble entre los 5 metodos fue- signifirOD significativas en la mayona de los casos, tanto nivel de orden de suelos como en el conjunto de indivilos 100 suelos analizados. Los coeficientes de co- rrelacion mas altos, se presentaron entre Mehlich Morgan Modificado y DTPA. Las correlaciones Modifueron consistentes en los 4 ordenes, 10 que indica que estas soluciones poseen un amplio margen de adaptacion a diferentes tipos de suelo, siendo una caractenstica ventajosa para la selección de un metodo de analisis. El Olsen Modificado fue mas slighteficiente para la extraccion de Zn en suelos de pH ligeramente acido 0 neutro (Vertisoles e Inceptiso- les, que en suelos acidos (Ultisoles y Andisoles. EI HCI extrajo cantidades muy aItas de Zn que Moraparentementestan relacionadas con formas no disponibles para lag plantas. Se concluye que lag soluciones Mehlich 3, Morgan Modificado y DT - PA son semejantes en la forma de extraer Zn dispo- Dible, y podrian seT una altemativa para sustituir el metoda tradicional de Olsen Modificado utilizado en Costa Rica. Sin embargo,la eficiencia de ellas no puede seT establecida sino a traves de log estudios de correlacion contra rendimiento en invernadero y campo.

  5. Precision Measurement of the ($e^+ + e^−$) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray ($e^+ + e^−$) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million ($e^+ + e^−$) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=−3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

  6. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  7. Fast techniques for the evaluation of reservoirs capacity; Metodos de evaluacion rapida de capacidad de yacimentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Armenta, Magaly del Carmen [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico)

    1995-05-01

    Fast techniques for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs allow us to have an approach of its electrical potential. Based on the laws of conservation of mass and energy, considering infinite permeability, this paper presents techniques for fast reservoir evaluation. These techniques let us calculate in a very practical way, the electric power that can be obtained from a geothermal field. These techniques can be an important tool to solve practical problems, and are useful during the preliminary development of geothermal sources. [Espanol] Los metodos de evaluacion rapida de yacimientos permiten estimar de manera aproximada la potencia electrica maxima y minima de los mismos. Se presentan tecnicas de evaluacion basadas en las leyes de conservacion de masa y energia, considerando permeabilidad infinita. Las tecnicas utilizadas pueden ser una herramienta importante para la solucion de problemas practicos y para la toma de decisiones en etapas de prefactibilidad.

  8. Commissioning the EMMA spectrometer at TRIUMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esker, Nicholas; Davids, Barry; Alcorta, Martin; Hudson, Kevan; Williams, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    The ElectroMagnetic Mass Analyser (EMMA) is a new experimental facility at TRIUMF. Located after the ISAC-II accelerator, EMMA is a symmetric QQEDEQQ-type mass spectrometer capable of separating the recoiling nuclear reaction products from the beam. With the low emittance radioactive beams delivered from ISAC-II at energies up to at least 6.5 A MeV, EMMA is designed for fusion evaporation and transfer reactions of interest in nuclear structure and astrophysics studies. A vacuum mode separator, EMMA disperses ions according to mass/charge in the focal plane. During a successful commissioning run in Dec. 2016, the dispersion and resolving power were measured and found to agree with ion optical calculations. In the future, cross section measurements and decay spectroscopy studies will be performed using a parallel grid avalanche counter, Si implantation detectors, and external high purity Ge detectors at the focal plane. When coupled with the TIGRESS γ-ray detector array, in-beam spectroscopy at the target will also be available. Today, we present the current status of the EMMA mass spectrometer as it continues to undergo commissioning and begin its experimental life.

  9. The Polaris-H imaging spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Christopher G., E-mail: chris@h3dgamma.com; Kaye, Willy R.; Wang, Weiyi; Zhang, Feng; Jaworski, Jason M.; King, Alexis; Boucher, Y. Andy; He, Zhong

    2015-06-01

    Recently, H3D has designed and introduced a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer system named Polaris-H. Polaris-H was designed to perform gamma spectroscopy and imaging throughout nuclear power plants. It integrates a 3D-position-sensitive pixelated CZT detector (20 mm×20 mm×15 mm), associated readout electronics, an embedded computer, a 5-h battery, and an optical camera in a portable water-proof enclosure. The total mass is about 4 kg, and the system startup time is 2 min. Additionally, it has a connection for a tablet, which displays a gamma-ray spectrum and isotope-specific images of the gamma-ray distribution in all directions in real time. List-mode data is saved to an external USB memory stick. Based on pixelated depth-sensing technology, spectroscopy is routinely better than 1.1% FWHM at 662 keV, and imaging efficiency at 662 keV varies less than a factor of two for all directions, except through the battery. Measurements have been performed in contaminated environments, in high radiation fields, and in cramped quarters.

  10. Osservazioni sul principio di legalità come idea e come metodo nell’esperienza giuridica della Chiesa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Serra

    2012-10-01

    SOMMARIO: 1. Introduzione - 2. – La struttura essenziale del concetto di legalità e la sua realizzazione radicale nel diritto della Chiesa. - 3. L’idea di legalità come “regola che sta prima” nel ius commune e la sua coesistenza con un approccio empirico, essenzialmente giurisprudenziale e dottrinale, di costruzione del diritto. Il principio di legalità come metodo di produzione del diritto nel pensiero giuridico moderno- 4. Il legame storico-concettuale fra il principio di legalità e i Codici moderni - 5. Il Codex iuris canonici del 1917 e il principio di legalità come metodo di costruzione del ius ecclesiae in funzione della certezza del diritto - 6. (segueUlteriori riflessi della prima codificazione canonica sul principio di legalità.:

  11. IN-BEAM BENT-CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR STUDIES OF MULTIPLE INNER SHELL IONIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUDZIEJEWSKI, T; HOSZOWSKA, J; RYMUZA, P; SUJKOWSKI, Z; ANAGNOSTOPOULOS, D; BORCHERT, G; CARLEN, M; DOUSSE, JC; RHEME, C; DRENTJE, AG

    A diffraction spectrometer with a quartz crystal bent to the radius of 4.64 m has been installed at the beam line of KVI variable energy cyclotron. The instrument is intended for a detailed study of KX-rays from multiply ionized atoms with Z > 56. The KX-ray spectra of Tb bombarded with 15 MeV/amu

  12. Exotic nuclei studied with the 8pi spectrometer at TRIUMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnsworthy, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    The 8pi gamma-ray spectrometer has performed decay spectroscopy experiments at TRIUMF-ISAC between 2000 and 2013. A series of ancillary detector subsystems have been developed to enable or enhance particular aspects of decay spectroscopy. This facility allows a broad range of research in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and fundamental symmetries. In this contribution, an overview is given of the detector systems and the research performed with the device during its operation at ISAC.

  13. A second-order focusing electrostatic toroidal electron spectrometer with 2pi radian collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khursheed, Anjam; Hoang, Hung Quang

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a toroidal electron energy spectrometer designed to capture electrons in the full 2pi azimuthal angular direction while at the same time having second-order focusing optics. Simulation results based upon direct ray tracing predict that the relative energy resolution of the spectrometer will be 0.146% and 0.0188% at input angular spreads of +/- 6 degrees and +/- 3 degrees, respectively, comparable to the theoretically best resolution of the cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA), and an order of magnitude better than existing toroidal spectrometers. Also predicted for the spectrometer is a parallel energy acquisition mode of operation, where the energy bandwidth is expected to be > +/- 10% (20% total) of the pass energy. The spectrometer is designed to allow for retardation of the pass energy without the need to incorporate auxiliary lenses.

  14. Inside the ETH spectrometer magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The ETH spectrometer magnet being prepared for experiment S134, which uses a frozen spin polarized target to study the associated production of a kaon and a lambda by negative pions interacting with protons (CERN-ETH, Zurich-Helsinki-Imperial College, London-Southampton Collaboration). (See Photo Archive 7406316)

  15. High-resolution Laue-type DuMond curved crystal spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachetko, M; Berset, M; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Szlachetko, J

    2013-09-01

    We report on a high-resolution transmission-type curved crystal spectrometer based on the modified DuMond slit geometry. The spectrometer was developed at the University of Fribourg for the study of photoinduced X-ray spectra. K and L X-ray transitions with energies above about 10 keV can be measured with an instrumental resolution comparable to their natural linewidths. Construction details and operational characteristics of the spectrometer are presented. The variation of the energy resolution as a function of the focal distance and diffraction order is discussed. The high sensitivity of the spectrometer is demonstrated via the 2s-1s dipole-forbidden X-ray transition of Gd which could be observed despite its extremely low intensity. The precision of the instrument is illustrated by comparing the sum of the energies of the Au K-L2 and L2-M3 cascading transitions with the energy of the crossover K-M3 transition as well as by considering the energy differences of the Gd Kα1 X-ray line measured at five different diffraction orders. Finally, to demonstrate the versatility of the spectrometer, it is shown that the latter can also be used for in-house extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

  16. Gamma ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschel, M.; Günther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape γ ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E2, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E2 extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  17. Nuclei Measurements with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heil Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact behavior of nuclei fluxes in cosmic rays and how they relate to each other is important for understanding the production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of charged cosmic rays. Precise measurements with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of light nuclei fluxes and their ratios in primary cosmic rays with rigidities from GV to TV are presented. The high statistics of the measurements require detailed studies and in depth understanding of associated systematic uncertainties.

  18. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  19. Acquisition of HPLC-Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    31-Jan-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Acquisition of HPLC -Mass Spectrometer The views, opinions and/or findings...published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Acquisition of HPLC -Mass Spectrometer Report Title The acquisition of the mass spectrometer has been a

  20. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  1. LANL/Green Star spectrometer tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, T.E.; Cremers, T.L.; Vo, D.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Seldiakov, Y.P.; Dorin, A.B.; Kondrashov, M.V. [Green Star, Moscow (Russian Federation); Timoshin, V.I. [VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-01

    The US and Russia have agreed to the joint development of a nondestructive assay system for use to support the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in Russia. This nondestructive assay system will be used to measure plutonium produced by the conversion of Russian nuclear weapons. The NDA system for Russia will be patterned after the ARIES NDA system being constructed at Los Alamos. One goal of the program is to produce an NDA system for use in Russia that maximizes the use of Russian resources to facilitate maintenance and future upgrades. The Green Star SBS50 Single Board Spectrometer system (Green Star Ltd., Moscow, Russia) has been suggested for use as the data acquisition component for gamma ray instruments in the system. Possible uses are for plutonium isotopic analysis and also segmented gamma scanning. Green Star has also developed analysis software for the SBS50. This software, both plutonium isotopic analysis and uranium enrichment analysis, was developed specifically for customs/border inspection applications (low counting rate applications and identification as opposed to quantification) and was not intended for MC and A applications. Because of the relative immaturity of the Green Star plutonium isotopic analysis software (it has been under development for only one year and is patterned after US development circa 1980), it was tentatively agreed, before the tests, that the Russian NDA system would use the Los Alamos PC/FRAM software for plutonium isotopic analysis. However, it was also decided to include the Green Star plutonium isotopic software in the testing, both to quantify its performance for MC and A applications and also to provide additional data to Green Star for further development of their software. The main purpose of the testing was to evaluate the SBS-50 spectrometer as a data acquisition device for use with LANL software.

  2. Estudio numerico y experimental del proceso de soldeo MIG sobre la aleacion 6063--T5 utilizando el metodo de Taguchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer Valdenebro, Jose Luis

    improvement on mechanical properties in aluminum metal joint. Los procesos de soldadura por arco electrico representan unas de las tecnicas mas utilizadas en los procesos de fabricacion de componentes mecanicos en la industria moderna. Los procesos de soldeo por arco se han adaptado a las necesidades actuales, haciendose un modo de fabricacion flexible y versatil. Los resultados obtenidos numericamente en el proceso de soldadura son validados experimentalmente. Los principales metodos numericos mas empleados en la actualidad son tres, metodo por diferencias finitas, metodos por elementos finitos y metodo por volumenes finitos. El metodo numerico mas empleado para el modelado de uniones soldadas, es el metodo por elementos finitos, debido a que presenta una buena adaptacion a las condiciones geometricas y de contorno ademas de que existe una diversidad de programas comerciales que utilizan el metodo por elementos finitos como base de calculo. Este trabajo de investigacion presenta un estudio experimental de una union soldada mediante el proceso MIG de la aleacion de aluminio 6063-T5. El metodo numerico se valida experimentalmente aplicando el metodo de los elementos finitos con el programa de calculo ANSYS. Los resultados experimentales obtenidos son: las curvas de enfriamiento, el tiempo critico de enfriamiento t4/3, geometria del cordon, microdurezas obtenidas en la union soldada, zona afectada termicamente y metal base, dilucion del proceso, areas criticas intersecadas entre las curvas de enfriamiento y la curva TTP. Los resultados numericos son: las curvas del ciclo termico, que representan tanto el calentamiento hasta alcanzar la temperatura maxima y un posterior enfriamiento. Se calculan el tiempo critico de enfriamiento t4/3, el rendimiento termico y se representa la geometria del cordon obtenida experimentalmente. La zona afectada termicamente se obtiene diferenciando las zonas que se encuentran a diferentes temperaturas, las areas criticas intersecadas entre las

  3. Present status of the Cauchois-type Compton Scattering Spectrometer at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Itou, M; Ohata, T; Mizumaki, M; Deb, A; Sakurai, Y; Sakai, N

    2001-01-01

    A new X-ray spectrometer has been installed in the BL08W beamline at SPring-8 for high-resolution Compton scattering measurements using 90-120 keV X-rays. The spectrometer consists of a Cauchois-type triple-crystal analyzer and a quasi position sensitive detector with four slits. The detector works not only as a position-sensitive detector but also as an energy sensitive detector, which allows for low background noise measurements. An overall resolution of 0.10 atomic units in momentum space has been achieved at the incident X-ray energy of 115 keV. Compton profiles of niobium have been measured along the [1 0 0] and [1 1 0] directions in order to demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer.

  4. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  5. Calibration of a Multipurpose Bragg-Crystal Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aybar, Nicholas; Marley, Ed; Emig, Jim; Schneider, Marilyn

    2017-10-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an important diagnostic tool in understanding key parameters in high energy density science. The radiative properties of material in ICF implosions carries important information about the temperature and density of the generated plasma. To obtain absolute measurements of x-ray flux, a measurement of the energy-dependent response of the diagnostic is necessary. The calibration of a multipurpose Bragg-crystal spectrometer (MSPEC) is presented. This spectrometer was designed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab and utilizes a variety of elliptical geometries to record x-ray spectra in the 1.0 - 9.0 keV range. A laboratory x-ray source is measured at two symmetric locations: the MSPEC and a Si detector. The resolved spectrum from the MSPEC is recorded onto a CCD and compared to the signal recorded with the Si detector to give the energy dependent response of the MSPEC. The response of different crystals (PET, KAP, CsAP) and different elliptical geometries is measured and discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Atlas de aves: Un metodo para documentar distribucion y seguir poblaciones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.; Dawson, D.K.; Alvarez-Lopez, Humberto; Kattan, Gustavo; Murcia, Carolina

    1988-01-01

    Los Atlas de Aves son proyectos nacionales o regionalies para trazar en mapas la distribucion en reproduccion de cada especie de ave. Ese procedimiento se esta usando en Europa, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Norteamerica, y partes de Africa. El tama?o de los cuadrados varia de medio grado de latitud y Iongitud hasta 5 x 5 km. El trabajo de campo de cada proyecto exige aproxlmadamente cinco a?os, pero los aficionados pueden llevar a cabo la mayor parte del trabajo. Es posible almacenar los resultados en un computador personal. Hay muchos beneficios: (I) se presenta la distribucion corriente de las aves de la nacion, del estado, o de la Iocalidad; (2) se desarrolla nueva informacion especialmente sobre especies raras o en peligro; (3) se descubren areas que tienen una avlfauna sobresaliente o habitats raros y ayuda a su proteccion, (4) se documentan cambios de dlstribucion; (5) se pueden usar para documentar cambios de poblacion, especialmente en los tropicos donde otros metodos son mas dificiles de usar porque hay muchas especies y no hay muchos observadores calificados en la identificacion de sonidos de las aves; (6) son proyectos buenos de investigacion para estudiantes graduados; (7) los turistas y los jefes de excursiones de historia natural pueden contribuir con muchas informaciones

  7. Soft X-ray focusing Telescope aboard AstroSat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K. P.; Dewangan, G. C.; Chandra, S.

    2017-01-01

    The Soft X-ray focusing Telescope (SXT) is a moderateresolution X-ray imaging spectrometer supplementing the ultraviolet and hard X-ray payloads for broadband studies of cosmic sources with AstroSat. Well suited for observing bright X-ray sources, SXT observations of nearby active galactic nuclei...

  8. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  10. SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons (SPICE) at TRIUMF-ISAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallcombe, J.; Moukaddam, M.; Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hallam, S.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bolton, C.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Constable, M.; Cross, D. S.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Kruecken, R.; Kurchaninov, L.; Park, J.; Pore, J. L.; Rand, E. T.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Smith, J. K.; Svensson, C. E.; Williams, M.

    2016-09-01

    A new ancillary detector, SPICE (SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons) has been constructed and recently commissioned for use with radioactive ion beams at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility. SPICE is designed to be operated in conjunction with the TIGRESS High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer to perform combined in-beam γ-ray and internal-conversion-electron spectroscopy. The main feature of SPICE is high effciency over a wide range of electron energies from 100 to 3500 keV, with an effective reduction of beam-induced backgrounds. SPICE will be a powerful tool to measure conversion coeffcients and E0 transitions in atomic nuclei. A recent in-beam commissioning experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of the basic design concept of SPICE in background suppression.

  11. Streamlined Calibration of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Precision Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, DS; The ATLAS collaboration; Dai, T; Diehl, EB; Ferretti, C; Hindes, JM; Zhou, B

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer is comprised of nearly 1200 optically Monitored Drifttube Chambers (MDTs) containing 354,000 aluminum drift tubes. The chambers are configured in barrel and endcap regions. The momentum resolution required for the LHC physics reach (dp/p = 3% and 10% at 100 GeV and 1 TeV) demands rigorous MDT drift tube calibration with frequent updates. These calibrations (RT functions) convert the measured drift times to drift radii and are a critical component to the spectrometer performance. They are sensitive to the MDT gas composition: Ar 93%, CO2 7% at 3 bar, flowing through the detector at arate of 100,000 l hr−1. We report on the generation and application of Universal RT calibrations derived from an inline gas system monitor chamber. Results from ATLAS cosmic ray commissioning data are included. These Universal RTs are intended for muon track reconstuction in LHC startup phase.

  12. Hipoterapijos kaip alternatyvaus socialinio darbo metodo veiksmingumas vaikams su fizine negalia socialinės izoliacijos įveikimo procese

    OpenAIRE

    Večkienė, Nijolė Petronėlė; Anužienė, Ieva

    2011-01-01

    Straipsnyje aptariamas hipoterapijos kaip alternatyvaus socialinio darbo metodo taikymas. Lietuvoje apie hipoterapiją kaip socialinio darbo metodą kalbama mažai. Hipoterapija padeda ne tik koreguoti raidos sutrikimus, ji palaiko emocinę ir socialinę raidą, stiprina vaiko pasitikėjimą savimi, skatina jį bendrauti su aplinka, gerina vaiko ir šeimos gyvenimo kokybę. Tai patvirtino straipsnyje pristatomos tėvų, auginančių neįgalų vaiką, apklausos rezultatai. Article examines hippotherapy as an...

  13. Lingua per se notata. Una annotazione sul metodo Ørberg alla luce dell’Ipotesi del Noticing di Schmidt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ricucci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available L’istruzione classica sta attraversando una crisi mondiale per molteplici motivi:, mentre il greco antico e il latino sono stati eliminati dalle scuole superiori, persino in Italia. Questo articolo è un breve esame in cui la modalità di apprendimento della grammatica nel metodo induttivo-contestuale, approntato da Hans Ørberg, viene analizzata alla luce dell’ Ipotesi del Noticing di Richard Schmidt, linguista applicato statunitense: essa è una teoria cognitiva che spiega l’acquisizione di una lingua seconda.

  14. Ion Mobility Spectrometer Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nicholas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; McLain, Derek [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Steeb, Jennifer [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-12-20

    The Morpho Saffran Itemizer 4DX Ion Mobility Spectrometer previously used to detect uranium signatures in FY16 was used at the former New Brunswick Facility, a past uranium facility located on site at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was chosen in an attempt to detect safeguards relevant signatures and has a history of processing uranium at various enrichments, chemical forms, and purities; various chemicals such as nitric acid, uranium fluorides, phosphates and metals are present at various levels. Several laboratories were sampled for signatures of nuclear activities around the laboratory. All of the surfaces that were surveyed were below background levels of the radioanalytical instrumentation and determined to be radiologically clean.

  15. The Montessori System of Education: An Examination of Characteristic Features Set Forth in Il Metodo Della Pedagogica Scientifica. Bulletin, 1912, No. 17. Whole Number 489

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anna Tolman

    1912-01-01

    The publication of "Il metodo della pedagogica scientifica," by Dr. Maria Montessori, docent in the University of Rome, giving a full account of the inception and development of the system of education of which she is the author and the simultaneous translation of the work into English and German are events so unusual as to challenge attention.…

  16. The Brillouin spectrometer BRISP at the ILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Babucci, E.; Barocchi, F.; Cunsolo, A.; D'Anca, F.; De Francesco, A.; Formisano, F.; Gahl, T.; Guarini, E.; Jahn, S.; Laloni, A.; Mutka, H.; Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Piluso, A.; Sacchetti, F.; Suck, J.-B.; Venturi, G.

    2006-11-01

    In recent years several experiments carried out by means of inelastic X-ray and neutron scattering on liquid and amorphous systems have shown that collective modes exist in the low-momentum region well beyond the hydrodynamic limit. To expand the potentialities of the neutron technique in this field, a small-angle inelastic spectrometer operated at thermal neutron energies has been designed, built and installed at the high-flux reactor of the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble (France). The instrument is designed to take advantage of the high neutron flux available at the thermal source of the reactor thus enabling experiments at incoming neutron energies from 20 up to 120 meV and scattering angles as low as 0.5∘. A hybrid configuration which couples a crystal monochromator and a time of flight final energy analysis is exploited. Preliminary tests obtained with the large-area (≃1.5 m2) position-sensitive detector are presented.

  17. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  18. THz spectrometer calibration at FELIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koevener, Toke; Wunderlich, Steffen; Peier, Peter; Hass, Eugen; Schmidt, Bernhard [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Coherent radiation spectroscopy is a suitable method for longitudinal electron bunch diagnostics at femtosecond bunch lengths. The absolute value of the longitudinal form factor, that is connected to the longitudinal profile, can be retrieved by measuring the intensity spectrum of a coherent transition radiation source at FLASH. The response function of the used spectrometer has to be well known in absolute values in order to perform accurate measurements. Until now, the response was predicted by calculations. As the free-electron lasers at the FELIX facility in Nijmegen (NL) provide quasi-monochromatic beams that can be tuned in a wide spectral range at micrometer wavelengths, a calibration campaign for two THz spectrometers was performed at this facility with the goal to deduce their response function. Here we present the setup at FELIX that was used for the calibration scans, the achieved scan ranges and the collected data. Furthermore, the analysis of the measured data is discussed. The results are then compared to the previous calculations of the response functions.

  19. Desarrollo y validacion de un metodo rapido por cromatografia liquida de alta resolucion con inyeccion directa de la muestra para la determinacion de atenolol, propranolol y carvedilol en plasma humano

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    del Rosario Brunetto, Maria; Clavijo, Sabrina; Delgado, Yelitza; Orozco, Wendy; Ayala, Carlos; Gallignani, Maximo; Calderon-Gonzalez, Laura

    2011-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se desarrollo un metodo automatizado y robusto para la determinacion simultanea de atenolol, propranolol y carvedilol en muestras de plasma humano por cromatografia liquida de alta resolucion (CLAR...

  20. Digital Spectrometers for Interplanetary Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnot, Robert F.; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Raffanti, Richard; Richards, Brian; Stek, Paul; Werthimer, Dan; Nikolic, Borivoje

    2010-01-01

    A fully digital polyphase spectrometer recently developed by the University of California Berkeley Wireless Research Center in conjunction with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory provides a low mass, power, and cost implementation of a spectrum channelizer for submillimeter spectrometers for future missions to the Inner and Outer Solar System. The digital polyphase filter bank spectrometer (PFB) offers broad bandwidth with high spectral resolution, minimal channel-to-channel overlap, and high out-of-band rejection.

  1. Single reflector interference spectrometer and drive system therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, R. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    In a Fourier interference spectrometer of the doublepass retroreflector type, a single mirror is employed in the path of both split beams of an incoming ray to cause them to double back through separate retroreflectors. Changes in optical path length are achieved by linear displacement of both retroreflectors using a motor driven lead screw on one for large, low frequency changes, a moving-coil actuator on the other for smaller, mid-frequency changes and a piezoelectric actuator on one of these two for small, high frequency changes.

  2. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landron, C.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baldwin, G.T. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  3. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  4. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  5. Construction of monitored drift tube chambers for ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer at IHEP (Protvino)

    CERN Document Server

    Bensinger, J; Borisov, A; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Goryatchev, S; Goryachev, V N; Gushchin, V; Hashemi, K S; Kojine, A; Kononov, A I; Larionov, A; Paramoshkina, E; Pilaev, A; Skvorodnev, N; Tchougouev, A; Wellenstein, H

    2002-01-01

    Trapezoidal-shaped Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will be used in end-caps of ATLAS muon spectrometer. Design and construction technology of such chambers in IHEP (Protvino) is presented. X-ray tomography results confirm desirable 20 mum precision of wire location in the chamber.

  6. Calibration and modelling of the SODART-OXS Bragg spectrometer onboard the SRG satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halm, Ingolf; Wiebicke, Hans-Joachim; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1998-01-01

    The SODART X-ray telescope includes an Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) providing a high energy resolving power by Bragg reflection upon crystals. To cover a wide energy range, 3 types of natural crystals (LiF, Si, RAP) and a Co/C multilayer structure upon Si are used in the ranges 5-11 keV, ...

  7. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Manatt, Ken; Rider, David; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for a geostationary orbit (GEO) earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. GEO allows GeoFTS to continuously stare at a region of the earth for frequent sampling to capture the variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental spatial scales and temporal scales from diurnal, synoptic, seasonal to interannual. The measurement strategy provides a process based understanding of the carbon cycle from contiguous maps of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) collected many times per day at high spatial resolution (2.7kmx2.7km at nadir). The CO2/CH4/CO/CF measurement suite in the near infrared spectral region provides the information needed to disentangle natural and anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric carbon concentrations and to minimize uncertainties in the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and surface. The half meter cube size GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design that uses all high TRL components in a modular configuration to reduce complexity and cost. It is self-contained and as independent of the spacecraft as possible with simple spacecraft interfaces, making it ideal to be a "hosted" payload on a commercial communications satellite mission. The hosted payload approach for measuring the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere from the geostationary vantage point will affordably advance the scientific understating of carbon cycle processes and climate change.

  8. Fundamentals of energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Russ, John C; Kiessling, R; Charles, J

    1984-01-01

    Fundamentals of Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of dispersive X-ray analysis. It presents descriptions, equations, and graphs to enable the users of these techniques to develop an intuitive and conceptual image of the physical processes involved in the generation and detection of X-rays. The book begins with a discussion of X-ray detection and measurement, which is accomplished by one of two types of X-ray spectrometer: energy dispersive or wavelength dispersive. The emphasis is on energy dispersive spectrometers, given their rather wid

  9. High resolution spectrometer concepts for high temperature EXAFS measurements and 1D imaging of ignition capsules on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Gao, L.; Kraus, B.; Efthimion, P. C.; Schneider, M. B.; Thorn, D. B.; Coppari, F.; Ping, Y.; Killebrew, K. L.; Macphee, A. G.; Kauffman, R. L.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2017-10-01

    X-ray spectrometer concepts for two applications on NIF are being studied. An Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectrometer will determine temperature at high pressure of dynamically compressed materials, by measuring K and L3 absorption edges at energies from 7112 to 18000 eV. A Johann geometry with spherically or toroidally bent crystals will avoid source-size broadening for spectral resolving power (E/ ΔE) of 6000. Energy-range selection is by crystal choice. The second is a 1D imaging spectrometer to measure the spatial distribution of plasma parameters to study stagnation of ignition capsules, based on either spherical or conical crystals with large spatial magnification. The desired spatial resolution is 5 μm. Predicted performance and prototype spectrometer measurements will be presented.

  10. Compact, rugged in-chamber transmission spectrometers (7-28 keV) for the Sandia Z facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinars, D B; Wenger, D F; Pikuz, S A; Jones, B; Geissel, M; Hansen, S B; Coverdale, C A; Ampleford, D J; Cuneo, M E; McPherson, L A; Rochau, G A

    2011-06-01

    We describe a pair of time-integrated transmission spectrometers that are designed to survey 7-28 keV (1.9 to 0.43 Å) x-ray photons produced by experiments on the Sandia Z pulsed power facility. Each spectrometer uses a quartz 10-11 crystal in a Cauchois geometry with a slit to provide spatial resolution along one dimension. The spectrometers are located in the harsh environment of the Z vacuum chamber, which necessitates that their design be compact and rugged. Example data from calibration tests and Z experiments are shown that illustrate the utility of the instruments. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. High-resolution XES and RIXS studies with a von Hamos Bragg crystal spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hoszowska, J; 10.1016/j.elspec.2004.02.005

    2004-01-01

    The high-resolution von Hamos Bragg crystal spectrometer was constructed for the study of K X-ray emission from low-Z elements and L and M X-ray spectra of medium to high Z elements. Recently, this instrument was applied to high-resolution XES and RIXS studies using X-ray synchrotron radiation at the ID21 and BM5 beamlines at the ESRF. An outline of the spectrometer design and performance characteristics will be given. The studies deal with the energy dependent KL double photoexcitation of argon, the L3 and M1 atomic- level widths of elements 54

  12. The high sensitivity double beta spectrometer TGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briancon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Janout, Z.; Koníček, J.; Kovalík, A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kubašta, J.; Pospíšil, S.; Revenko, A. V.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Sandukovsky, V. G.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V. V.; Vorobel, V.; Vylov, Ts.

    1996-02-01

    A high sensitivity double beta spectrometer TGV (Telescope Germanium Vertical) has been developed. It is based on 16 HPGe detectors of volume 1200 × 6 mm 3 each in the same cryostat. The TGV spectrometer was proposed for the study of ultrarare nuclear processes (e.g. 2νββ, 0νββ, 2νEC/EC). Details of the TGV spectrometer construction are described, the principles of background suppression, the results of Monte Carlo simulations and the results of test background measurements (in Dubna and Modane underground laboratory) are provided.

  13. Symmetric analog positron lifetime spectrometer utilizing charge-to-digital converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djourelov, N.; Charvin, N.; Bas, C.; Viret, J.; Samoylenko, V.; Sillou, D.

    2007-11-01

    A symmetric positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectrometer using a charge-to-digital converters was designed. It is based on a coincidence circuit for the trigger and recording of the timing and the charge of the pulses of two scintillation detectors. The off-line data processing allows a detailed study of the spectrometer performance in function of the width of the digital charge discriminator windows for acceptance of the pulses as starts and stops. Some technical problems when working with BaF2 scintillators were solved. The parasitic effect of the pileup and backscattered γ-rays on the PAL spectrum is discussed.

  14. A method for the optimal design of networks of drinking water distribution; Un metodo para el diseno optimo de redes de distribucion de agua potable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes Mariles, O. A.; Carrillo Sosa, J.J. [Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-01

    A method to select, among several commercial diameter options, the most economic combination of pipeline networks is presented. These networks comply with the discharge conditions in the pipes and pressure in the knots. It is applied a static method for the hydraulics analysis of the Engineering Institute of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) and an optimization technique to reduce the number of calculations. [Spanish] Se presenta un metodo para seleccionar, de entre varias opciones de diametros comerciales, la combinacion que forma la red de tuberias mas economica que satisface las condiciones de gasto en los tubos y de presion en los nudos de la misma. Para el analisis hidraulico se emplea un metodo estatico del Instituto de Ingenieria de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) y se aplica una tecnica de optimacion para reducir el numero de calculos y alcanzar la solucion.

  15. First Successes and Modifications of the NIF Opacity Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. A.; Huffman, E. J.; Knight, R. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Emig, J. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Martin, M. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Thompson, N. B.; Dodd, E. S.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Lopez, F. E.; Archuleta, T. N.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-10-01

    The NIF Opacity Spectrometer (OpSpec) began returning X-ray spectra on its first NIF shot in September 2016. In May 2017, OpSpec recorded the first X-ray transmission data for iron-magnesium plasmas on NIF, at ``Anchor 1'' sample conditions (150 eV and 7E21 e-/cc). OpSpec diffracts X-rays in the 540-2100 eV range off a KAP or RbAP crystal onto either image plate or X-ray film. Modifications to further improve OpSpec's performance are underway, with the largest improvements expected in resolving power (E/dE up to 1000) and reduction of background levels. Implementation is planned for NIF shots in August and December 2017. This presentation will discuss the OpSpec data and design improvements, and also future goals. This work was performed by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2891.

  16. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  17. Monitoraggio e screening delle prime fasi d’apprendimento della lettura: contributo per la validazione italiana del metodo CBM (curriculum based measurement)

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Petra

    2012-01-01

    La tesi della dott.ssa Petra Colombo si focalizza sullo studio del CBM (curriculum-based measurement), una nuova proposta specifica sul tema della misurazione e della valutazione dell’apprendimento. Questo metodo trova il suo fondamento teorico-metodologico nella psicologia comportamentale dell’educazione, in un approccio evidence-based, e segna il passaggio, nella valutazione del rendimento e della performance degli studenti, da un approccio tradizionale che valuta il rendimento in base all’...

  18. Method to allow the estimation of heat transfer coefficients in solar stills; Metodo para determinar coeficientes locales de transferencia de calor en destiladores solares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio Cerda, Eduardo; Porta Gandara, Miguel A [CIBNOR, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Fernandez Zayas, Jose Luis [UNAM Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    This work reports an experimental method that allows to estimate the heat transfer coefficients in the neighborhood of walls or flat plates subject to convective transport phenomena. This method can be applied to a great variety of thermal systems since it is based on the knowledge of the border condition for the temperature at the surface of the plate, and the temperature profile that characterize the dimensionless coefficient of heat transfer in the fluid, according to its definition given by the Nusselt number. The approach of this work are the foundations of the method and the system that has been developed to apply it, that incorporates automatic acquisition equipment for continuos monitoring of the information and elements to control the parameters of interest. In addition, the experimental cavities on which the method will be evaluated are discussed, considering two different scales, as well as experiments in cavities filled with air, and with a mixture of air and steam water, as is the case for solar distillation. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un metodo que permite determinar de manera experimental coeficientes de transferencia de calor por conveccion. Este metodo puede ser aplicado a una gran variedad de sistemas termicos ya que se fundamenta en el conocimiento de la condicion de frontera para la temperatura en la superficie de la placa, y del perfil de temperaturas que caracteriza el coeficiente adimensional de transferencia de calor en el fluido, de acuerdo a la definicion de este, dada por el numero de Nusselt. El trabajo que aqui se reporta esta enfocado a la fundamentacion del metodo y al equipamiento que se ha desarrollado para instrumentarlo, que incorpora equipos automaticos de adquisicion continua de informacion y elementos de control para los parametros de interes. Se presentan ademas, las cavidades experimentales sobre las que sera evaluado el metodo, que considera dos escalas diferentes, asi como experimentos en cavidades llenas de aire

  19. Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an UV-NIR (350nm to 1050 nm) portable remote imaging spectrometer (PRISM) for flight on a variety of airborne platforms with high SNR and response...

  20. Low Power Mass Spectrometer employing TOF Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A low power Mass Spectrometer employing multiple time of flight circuits for parallel processing is possible with a new innovation in design of the Time of flight...

  1. MGS SAMPLER THERMAL EMISSION SPECTROMETER GLOBAL TEMPERATURE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) 25-micron global surface temperature data, collected during the ANS portion of the Mars Global Surveyor...

  2. Low Power FPGA Based Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a general purpose reconfigurable wide bandwidth spectrometer for use in NASA's passive microwave missions, deep space network and radio...

  3. TRISP: Three axes spin echo spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Keller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available TRISP, operated by the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, is a high-resolution neutron spectrometer combining the three axes and neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE techniques.

  4. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  5. A simple X-ray emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Ono, Ryoichi; Hirai, Atsuhiko; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    A compact X-ray emission instrument is made, and the X-ray spectra are measured by changing the applied electric potential. Strong soft X-rays are observed when evacuating roughly and applying a high voltage to an insulator settled in this device. The X-ray intensity is higher as the applied voltage is increased. A light-emitting phenomenon is observed when this device emits X-rays. The present X-ray emitter is made of a small cylinder with a radius of 20 mm and a height of 50 mm. This X-ray generator has a potential to be used as an X-ray source in an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

  6. Design and construction of a NIR spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Barcala-Riveira, J M; Fernandez-Marron, J L; Molero-Menendez, F; Navarrete-Marin, J J; Oller-Gonzalez, J C

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the design and construction of a NIR spectrometer based on an acoustic-optic tunable filter. The spectrometer will be used for automatic identification of plastics in domestic waste. The system works between 1200 and 1800 nm. Instrument is controlled by a personal computer. Computer receives and analyses data. A software package has been developed to do these tasks. (Author) 27 refs.

  7. A digital control system for neutron spectrometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Knud Bent; Skaarup, Per

    1968-01-01

    A description is given of the principles of a digital system used to control neutron spectrometers. The system is composed of independent functional units with the control programme stored on punched paper tape or in a computer.......A description is given of the principles of a digital system used to control neutron spectrometers. The system is composed of independent functional units with the control programme stored on punched paper tape or in a computer....

  8. Study of neutron spectrometers for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellne, Jan

    2005-11-15

    A review is presented of the developments in the field of neutron emission spectrometry (NES) which is of relevance for identifying the role of NES diagnostics on ITER and selecting suitable instrumentation. Neutron spectrometers will be part of the ITER neutron diagnostic complement and this study makes a special effort to examine which performance characteristics the spectrometers should possess to provide the best burning plasma diagnostic information together with neutron cameras and neutron yield monitors. The performance of NES diagnostics is coupled to how much interface space can be provided which has lead to an interest to find compact instruments and their NES capabilities. This study assesses all known spectrometer types of potential interest for ITER and makes a ranking of their performance (as demonstrated or projected), which, in turn, are compared with ITER measurement requirements as a reference; the ratio of diagnostic performance to interface cost for different spectrometers is also discussed for different spectrometer types. The overall result of the study is an assessment of which diagnostic functions neutron measurements can provide in burning plasma fusion experiments on ITER and the role that NES can play depending on the category of instrument installed. Of special note is the result that much higher quality diagnostic information can be obtained from neutron measurements with total yield monitors, profile flux cameras and spectrometers when the synergy in the data is considered in the analysis and interpretation.

  9. Microscale adaptation of the potentiometric method with ion-selective electrode for the quantification of fluoride; Adaptacion a microescala del metodo potenciometrico con electrodo ion selectivo para la cuantificacion de fluoruro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara Ruiz, Paulina; Ortiz Perez, Maria Deogracias [Laboratorio de Bioquimica, Facultad de de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, (Mexico)]. E-mail: mdortiz@uaslp.mx

    2009-05-15

    Similarly to other countries, ground water from Mexico is naturally polluted by fluoride. The main effects of fluoride at typical ground water concentrations are dental fluorosis, neurological deficits and reproductive disorders. In order to verify that the fluoride concentration is within the allowed guideline in Mexico (NOM 127 and 201), it is important to monitor fluoride levels in water and commercial beverages. The aim of this work is to develop a modification of the standard potentiometric method for fluoride determination in water, in order to reduce costs and amount of potentially toxic waste substances. Both methods were validated, the standard potentiometric method with the ion selective electrode and the microscale modification proposed in this paper. The methods were compared using statistic tests and graphics, followed by the comparison of 125 samples of commercial bottled water sold in the city of San Luis Potosi. Optimal results were obtained for the validation of both methods, and the microscale modification showed statistically identical results to those obtained with the standard method in all samples of bottled water. The microscale modification is a good alternative for fluoride assessment in water and beverages, and it represents a 95 % reduction of costs and chemical waste. [Spanish] En varios paises, incluido Mexico se presenta una contaminacion natural con fluoruro en agua subterranea; los principales efectos en la salud observados en poblacion expuesta a concentraciones mayores al valor permisible (que en Mexico es de 1.5 mg/L) son la fluorosis dental y esqueletica, asi como dano reproductivo y neurologico. En varios estados de la republica Mexicana, este problema es aun desconocido, de ahi la necesidad de evaluar las concentraciones de fluoruro en agua de consumo en varias comunidades. Asi, el objetivo de este trabajo es desarrollar un metodo a microescala para la determinacion de fluoruro en agua, que al reducir la cantidad de reactivo y

  10. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F. [Joint Ultrafast Dynamics Lab in Solutions and at Interfaces (JULiq), Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (HZB), Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany) and Freie Universitaet Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  11. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  12. THOR Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) onboard THOR will provide the first high-time resolution measurements of mass-resolved ions in near-Earth space, focusing on hot ions in the foreshock, shock and magnetosheath turbulent regions. These measurements are required to study how kinetic-scale turbulent fluctuations heat and accelerate different ion species. IMS will measure the full three-dimensional distribution functions of main ion species (H+, He++, O+) in the energy range 10 eV/q to 30 keV/q with energy resolution DE/E down to 10% and angular resolution down to 11.25˚ . The time resolution will be 150 ms for O+, 300 ms for He++ and ˜ 1s for O+, which correspond to ion scales in the the foreshock, shock and magnetosheath regions. Such high time resolution is achieved by mounting four identical IMS units phased by 90˚ in the spacecraft spin plane. Each IMS unit combines a top-hat electrostatic analyzer with deflectors at the entrance together with a time-of-flight section to perform mass selection. Adequate mass-per-charge resolution (M/q)/(ΔM/q) (≥ 8 for He++ and ≥ 3 for O+) is obtained through a 6 cm long Time-of-Flight (TOF) section. IMS electronics includes a fast sweeping high voltage board that is required to make measurements at high cadence. Ion detection includes Micro Channel Plates (MCPs) combined with Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for charge amplification and discrimination and a discrete Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) to determine the ion time of flight. A processor board will be used to for ion events formatting and will interface with the Particle Processing Unit (PPU), which will perform data processing for THOR particle detectors. The IMS instrument is being designed and will be built and calibrated by an international consortium of scientific institutes from France, USA, Germany and Japan and Switzerland.

  13. EXIST OIRT Camera and Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Moseley, S. H.; Golisano, C.; Gong, Q.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Woodgate, B.; EXIST Team

    2009-01-01

    The EXIST mission includes a 1.1m infrared and visible telescope which provides the capability to locate, identify, and obtain spectra of GRB afterglows at redshifts up to z 20. To allow rapid identification and spectroscopic follow up, the instruments will provide wide band imaging, covering the full error circle of the Gamma Ray Telescope (GRT), low spectral resolution slitless spectroscopy, and high resolution integral field spectroscopy. The integral field unit will have a small field of view of 2" x 2" to study diffuse objects, e.g. GRB host galaxies. The instrumentation capabilities will allow this telescope quickly identify the afterglow, measure its brightness curves, redshift, measure spectral characteristics of the GRBs, and measure absorption spectra of the intervening intergalactic medium. With this instrument, high redshift GRBs become important tools for observing the processes through which the universe is ionized.

  14. Torque calculation in the induction motor with the finite element method; Calculo del par en el motor de induccion con el metodo del elemento finito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo Diaz, Ramon

    2002-06-15

    In this work the method of the finite element is applied to the bi-dimensional analysis of the induction motor in operation in steady state, excited by sine sources of laminar currents and sine sources of voltage. The analysis is focused mainly in the calculation of the electromagnetic torque. The topics of electromagnetic theory are covered and in an idealized model of the induction motor, analytically and numerically with the method of the finite element, in the variant method of Galerkin, the vectorial potential and the torque are calculated. The results obtained with the analytical and numerical methods are compared. Three formulations are developed to calculate the torque with the method of the finite element, using triangular elements of first order, based in the equation of force of Lorentz, the Maxwell tensor and the principle of the virtual work. Finally, a motor of induction of real characteristics is simulated, assuming it is connected to a three-phase voltage source. In this motor it is analyzed the convergence and the evolution in the results obtained of the torque with different discretions, and the torque-velocity performance curve is calculated. [Spanish] En este trabajo se aplica el metodo del elemento finito al analisis bidimensional del motor de induccion en operacion en estado estable, excitado por fuentes de corriente laminar senoidales y fuentes de voltaje senoidales. El analisis se enfoca principalmente en el calculo del par electromagnetico. Se tratan los topicos de teoria electromagnetica involucrados y en un modelo idealizado del motor de induccion, se calculan analitica y numericamente con el metodo del elemento finito, en la variante metodo de Galerkin, el potencial vectorial y el par. Se comparan resultados obtenidos con los metodos analiticos y numericos. Se desarrollan tres formulaciones para calcular el par con el metodo del elemento finito, utilizando elementos triangulares de primer orden, basadas en la ecuacion de fuerza de

  15. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  16. On-board aircrew dosimetry using a semiconductor spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Spurny, F

    2002-01-01

    Radiation fields on board aircraft contain particles with energies up to a few hundred MeV. Many instruments have been tested to characterise these fields. This paper presents the results of studies on the use of an Si diode spectrometer to characterise these fields. The spectrometer has been in use since spring 2000 on more than 130 return flights to monitor and characterise the on-board field. During a Czech Airlines flight from Prague to New York it was possible to register the effects of an intense solar flare, (ground level event, GLE 60), which occurred on 15 April 2001. It was found that the number of deposition events registered was increased by about 70% and the dose in Si by a factor of 2.0 when compared with the presence of galactic cosmic rays alone. Directly measured data are interpreted with respect to on-earth reference field calibration (photons, CERN high-energy particles); it was found that this approach leads to encouraging results and should be followed up. (7 refs).

  17. Comparison of two confocal micro-XRF spectrometers with different design aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolek, S; Nakazawa, T; Tabe, A; Nakano, K; Tsuji, K; Streli, C; Wobrauschek, P

    2014-03-01

    Two different confocal micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometers have been developed and installed at Osaka City University and the Vienna University of Technology Atominstitut. The Osaka City University system is a high resolution spectrometer operating in air. The Vienna University of Technology Atominstitut spectrometer has a lower spatial resolution but is optimized for light element detection and operates under vacuum condition. The performance of both spectrometers was compared. In order to characterize the spatial resolution, a set of nine specially prepared single element thin film reference samples (500 nm in thickness, Al, Ti, Cr, Fe Ni, Cu, Zr, Mo, and Au) was used. Lower limits of detection were determined using the National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material glass standard 1412. A paint layer sample (cultural heritage application) and paint on automotive steel samples were analyzed with both instruments. The depth profile information was acquired by scanning the sample perpendicular to the surface. © 2013 The Authors. X-Ray Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Comparison of two confocal micro-XRF spectrometers with different design aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolek, S; Nakazawa, T; Tabe, A; Nakano, K; Tsuji, K; Streli, C; Wobrauschek, P

    2014-01-01

    Two different confocal micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometers have been developed and installed at Osaka City University and the Vienna University of Technology Atominstitut. The Osaka City University system is a high resolution spectrometer operating in air. The Vienna University of Technology Atominstitut spectrometer has a lower spatial resolution but is optimized for light element detection and operates under vacuum condition. The performance of both spectrometers was compared. In order to characterize the spatial resolution, a set of nine specially prepared single element thin film reference samples (500 nm in thickness, Al, Ti, Cr, Fe Ni, Cu, Zr, Mo, and Au) was used. Lower limits of detection were determined using the National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material glass standard 1412. A paint layer sample (cultural heritage application) and paint on automotive steel samples were analyzed with both instruments. The depth profile information was acquired by scanning the sample perpendicular to the surface. © 2013 The Authors. X-Ray Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26430286

  19. Photon Throughput Calculations for a Spherical Crystal Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, C. J.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hill, K.; Kraus, B.; Gao, L.; Pablant, N.

    2017-10-01

    X-ray imaging crystal spectrometers of the type described in Refs. have become a standard diagnostic for Doppler measurements of profiles of the ion temperature and the plasma flow velocities in magnetically confined, hot fusion plasmas. These instruments have by now been implemented on major tokamak and stellarator experiments in Korea, China, Japan, and Germany and are currently also being designed by PPPL for ITER. A still missing part in the present data analysis is an efficient code for photon throughput calculations to evaluate the chord-integrated spectral data. The existing ray tracing codes cannot be used for a data analysis between shots, since they require extensive and time consuming numerical calculations. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the geometrical properties of the ray pattern. This method allows us to minimize the extent of numerical calculations and to create a more efficient code. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. The application of x-ray fluorescence analysis with total external reflection for determining the microelements in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnolutskii, V.P.; Losev, N.F.; Poluyanova, G.I. [Rostov Don State University, Rostov na Donu (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The results of studying the metrological parameters of a small-size energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer with total external reflection of primary radiation are presented. The results of direct x-ray fluorescence measurement of spectral intensities from coal powder sample 1 mg in mass using the spectrometer are in agreement with the data of neutron activation and atomic emission analysis.

  1. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Paniccia, M

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to measure charged cosmic rays spectra up to TV region, with high energy photon detection capability up to few hundred GeV. With the large acceptance, the long duration (3 years) and the state of the art particle identification techniques, AMS will provide the most sensitive search for the existence of antimatter nuclei and for the origin of dark matter. The detector is being constructed with an eight layers Silicon Tracker inside a large superconducting magnet, providing a ~ 0.8 Tm2 bending power and an acceptance of ~ 0.5 m2sr. A Transition Radiation Detector and a 3D Electromagnetic Calorimeter allow for electron, positron and photon identification, while independent velocity measurements are performed by a Time of Flight scintillating system and a Ring Image Cherenkov detector. The overall construction is due to be completed by 2008.

  2. Recent improvements to a transportable neutron spectrometer (TNS)

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, J A; Peyton, A J; Roskell, J

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the design, operation and future development of a transportable neutron spectrometer (TNS). Analogue signal processing techniques are used to condition the signals from an array of radiation sensors, comprising five gas-filled sensors and a hydrogenous oil-filled scintillator. This high reliance on analogue signal processing techniques is because of the nano-second rise time of the pulses produced from the sensor array. The analogue circuitry requires a high degree of expertise from the operator and frequent instrument calibration. An overview of the present instrument will be given together with a description of how the raw data from the individual sensor channels are combined to give a continuous neutron energy spectrum. Digital processing techniques are now being applied to the TNS to handle some of the more complex analogue functions, particularly neutron/gamma-ray pulse-shape discrimination for the photo-scintillator column. Potential advantages of this approach are on qualities such a...

  3. Integration and Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ishino, Masaya

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a characteristic muon spectrometer with toroidal magnetic-field for the purpose of stand-alone precision tracking and momentum selective trigger. By the combination of four types of detector technologies, the pseudo-rapidity range of | η | < 2.7 is covered by tracking chambers and | η | < 2.4 by trigger chambers. The tracking system is designed to achieve momentum resolution of better than 10% up to transverse momenta of 1 TeV. Based on the matrix-coincidence logic, the trigger system generates level-1 trigger signal and sends it to global DAQ system. Up to now, most of the system has been installed into the ATLAS pit, and all the system will be completed by the end of 2007. In the mean time, detector commissioning is intensively performed with cosmic-rays. We present the results from this activity.

  4. Physics Results From Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 1998 Shuttle Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ming-Huey A.

    2001-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle detector designed to detect antimatter. During the 10-day test flight on the space shuttle in June 1998, AMS detected $10^8$ events. Upon analysis, no antimatter was found and the antimatter limit was reduced to $1.1\\times10^{-6}$. The proton spectrum shows some differences with the cosmic ray flux used in atmospheric neutrino simulation. A large amount of protons, positrons, and electrons were found below the geomagnetic rigidity cutoff. The energy of these particles are as high as several GeV, one order of magnitude higher than any previously measured energy in radiation belts. These particles also exhibit many interesting features. This paper reviews the results in the four published papers of the AMS collaboration and provides explanation for some features of the albedo particles.

  5. Landsat-Swath Imaging Spectrometer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Green, Robert O.; Van Gorp, Byron; Moore, Lori; Wilson, Daniel W.; Bender, Holly A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the design of a high-throughput pushbroom imaging spectrometer and telescope system that is capable of Landsat swath and resolution while providing better than 10 nm per pixel spectral resolution. The design is based on a 3200 x 480 element x 18 µm pixel size focal plane array, two of which are utilized to cover the full swath. At an optical speed of F/1.8, the system is the fastest proposed to date to our knowledge. The utilization of only two spectrometer modules fed from the same telescope reduces system complexity while providing a solution within achievable detector technology. Predictions of complete system response are shown. Also, it is shown that detailed ghost analysis is a requirement for this type of spectrometer and forms an essential part of a complete design.

  6. Adaptive Tunable Laser Spectrometer for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Gregory; Keymeulen, Didier

    2010-01-01

    An architecture and process for the rapid prototyping and subsequent development of an adaptive tunable laser absorption spectrometer (TLS) are described. Our digital hardware/firmware/software platform is both reconfigurable at design time as well as autonomously adaptive in real-time for both post-integration and post-launch situations. The design expands the range of viable target environments and enhances tunable laser spectrometer performance in extreme and even unpredictable environments. Through rapid prototyping with a commercial RTOS/FPGA platform, we have implemented a fully operational tunable laser spectrometer (using a highly sensitive second harmonic technique). With this prototype, we have demonstrated autonomous real-time adaptivity in the lab with simulated extreme environments.

  7. Gas-dust-impact mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Semkin, N D; Myasnikov, S V; Pomelnikov, R A

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes design of a mass spectrometer to study element composition of micro meteorite and man-made particles in space. Paper describes a way to improve resolution of mass spectrometer based on variation of parameters of accelerating electric field in time. The advantage of the given design of mass spectrometer in comparison with similar ones is its large operating area and higher resolution at the comparable weight and dimensions. Application of a combined design both for particles and for gas enables to remove space vehicle degassing products from the spectrum and, thus, to improve reliability of the acquired information, as well as, to acquire information on a gas component of the external atmosphere of a space vehicle

  8. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T{sub e} < 100 eV are achieved by a 2971 l/mm VPH grating and measurements T{sub e} > 100 eV by a 2072 l/mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated ({approx}2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides {approx}45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  9. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbeck, N L; Schlossberg, D J; Dowd, A S; Fonck, R J; Winz, G R

    2012-10-01

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T(e) VPH grating and measurements T(e) > 100 eV by a 2072 l∕mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated (~2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides ~45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  10. A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scatteringa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of Te VPH grating and measurements Te > 100 eV by a 2072 l/mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated (˜2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides ˜45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

  11. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonova, M. [Fermilab

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  12. Software Polarization Spectrometer "PolariS"

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuno, Izumi; Kameno, Seiji; Kano, Amane; Kuroo, Makoto; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Kuji, Seisuke; Kuno, Nario

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a software-based polarization spectrometer, PolariS, to acquire full-Stokes spectra with a very high spectral resolution of 61 Hz. The primary aim of PolariS is to measure the magnetic fields in dense star-forming cores by detecting the Zeeman splitting of molecular emission lines. The spectrometer consists of a commercially available digital sampler and a Linux computer. The computer is equipped with a graphics processing unit (GPU) to process FFT and cross-correlation usin...

  13. Performance of the LNL recoil mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorini, C. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Beghini, S. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Dal Bello, A. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Montagnoli, G. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Scarlassara, F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Segato, G.F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Soramel, F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Ackermann, D. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Corradi, L. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Facco, A. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Moreno, H. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Mueller, L. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Napoli, D.R. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Prete, G.F. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro

    1994-02-01

    The LNL recoil mass spectrometer, in operation for some years on line with the LNL XTU Tandem accelerator has been used primarily for the study of reaction products emitted at 0 to the beam direction. In agreement with the design goal this instrument has a good mass resolution, in the range of 1/300, even with large energy ([+-] 20%) and solid angle (> 7.5 msr) acceptances; the mass dynamic range is around [+-]6% of the central mass. The beam rejection factor at 0 ranges from 10[sup +6] to 10[sup +11] according to various experimental parameters. Advantages and limitations of the spectrometer are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Upgrade of an old Raman Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Improvement of a conventional Jeol Raman spectrometer with a single channel photo multiplier detector is described. New optical components (fibres, mirror, lens and CCD detector) have been chosen to design a high quality and easy-to-use instrument. Tests have shown that with this modified...... spectrometer Raman spectra can be acquired of a quality comparable to the spectra obtained previously, but the time needed to obtain a spectrum is markedly reduced. Selected test spectra and a simple calibration procedure to obtain the wavenumber values from the band CCD pixel position are presented....

  15. Compact Imaging Spectrometer Utilizing Immersed Gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Lerner, Scott A. (Corvallis, OR); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-21

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through an optical element to the detector array.

  16. The alpha magnetic spectrometer silicon tracker: Performance results with protons and helium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Azzarello, Ph. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Battiston, R.; Bertucci, B. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Bolmont, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Astroparticules, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Bourquin, M. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Burger, W.J. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: william.burger@cern.ch; Capell, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cardano, F. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Chang, Y.H. [National Central University, Jhungli 320, Taiwan (China); Choutko, V. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cortina, E. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Dinu, N. [Institute for Space Science (ISS), R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Esposito, G.; Fiandrini, E. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Haas, D. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Haino, S. [INFN Sezione di Perugia and Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Hakobyan, H. [Universite de Geneve, CH-1211, Geneve 4 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2008-08-11

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is designed for a long duration measurement of the cosmic-ray spectra at an altitude of 400 km. The particle rigidity and specific energy loss are measured by a silicon tracker located in a 0.8 T field. Ground results for the position resolution, detection efficiency and charge determination for singly and doubly charged relativistic particles are presented and discussed in the context of the spaceborne detector.

  17. Construction of the inner layer barrel drift chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Livan, M; Barisonzi, M; Bini, C; Calabro, D; Caloi, R; Cambiaghi, M; Capradossi, G; Cavallari, A; Cecconi, V; Ciapetti, G; Daly, C H; De Salvo, A; De Zorzi, G; Di Domenico, A; Di Mattia, A; Ferrari, R; Fraternali, M; Freddi, A; Gaudio, G; Gauzzi, P; Gentile, S; Iannone, M; Iuvino, G; Lacava, F; Lanza, A; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Mattei, A; Nardoni, C; Negri, A; Pelosi, A; Piscitelli, C; Pontecorvo, L; Rebuzzi, D; Scagliotti, C; Scannicchio, D A; Valente, P; Vercellati, F; Zanello, L

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and built the facilities to assemble the inner layer of the precision tracking chambers (Monitored Drift Tubes, MDT) for the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC. This article describes in detail the tooling, the procedures and the quality control equipment used in the chambers assembly. Data are presented from the X-ray tomograph at CERN showing that the required chamber mechanical precision has been achieved.

  18. Use of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry to Determine Trace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with application of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the detection of trace elements in graphic. An X-ray spectrometer was constructed and used to carry out measurements on graphite spheres impregnated with different chemical elements. The intensities of the lines of these trace elements, as function of ...

  19. Broadband Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C G; Cunningham, C T; Tringe, J W

    2010-12-16

    This report summarizes the most important results of our effort to develop a new class of infrared spectrometers based on a novel broadband heterodyne design. Our results indicate that this approach could lead to a near-room temperature operation with performance limited only by quantum noise carried by the incoming signal. Using a model quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), we demonstrated key performance features of our approach. For example, we directly measured the beat frequency signal generated by superimposing local oscillator (LO) light of one frequency and signal light of another through a spectrograph, by injecting the LO light at a laterally displaced input location. In parallel with the development of this novel spectrometer, we modeled a new approach to reducing detector volume though plasmonic resonance effects. Since dark current scales directly with detector volume, this ''photon compression'' can directly lead to lower currents. Our calculations indicate that dark current can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude in an optimized ''superlens'' structure. Taken together, our spectrometer and dark current reduction strategies provide a promising path toward room temperature operation of a mid-wave and possibly long-wave infrared spectrometer.

  20. Bonner sphere spectrometers--a critical review

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D J

    2002-01-01

    The basic characteristics of Bonner sphere spectrometry systems are first described, followed by a review of the different types of system which have been built, and of how their response functions have been determined. Spectrum unfolding and recent developments are covered briefly. The practical considerations for users are emphasised wherever possible, and the advantages, disadvantages, and problems of using this spectrometer are discussed.

  1. Triple-axis spectrometer DruechaL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrer, W.; Keller, P. [Lab. for Neutron Scattering ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    DruechaL is a triple-axis spectrometer located at a cold guide. The characteristics of guide and instrument allow the use of a broad spectral range of neutrons. The resolution in momentum and energy transfer can be tuned to match the experimental requirements by using either collimators or focusing systems (monochromator, antitrumpet, analyser). (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  2. Flow measurement in a 170-MW hydraulic turbine using the Gibson method; Medicion del flujo de una turbina hidraulica de 170 MW utilizando el metodo Gibson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquiza, Gustavo [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (Mexico); Adamkowski, Adam [The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery (Poland); Kubiak, Janusz; Sierra, Fernando [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (Mexico); Janicki, Waldemar [The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery (Poland); Fernandez, J. Manuel [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    2007-07-15

    This paper describes the methodology applied for measuring water flow through a 170-MW hydraulic turbine. The flow rate was measured using the pressure-time method, also known as the Gibson method. This method uses the well-known water hammer phenomenon in pipelines; in turbine penstocks, for instance. The version of this method used here is based on measuring, during total stop of the water stream, the time-history of pressure change in one section of the turbine penstock and relate it to the pressure in the upper reservoir to which the penstock is connected. The volumetric flow rate is determined from the relevant integration of the measured temporary pressure rise. Flow measurement was possible this way because the influence of the penstock inlet was negligible as far as an error of the measurement is concerned. The length of the penstock was 300 m. Previous experience and a standard IEC-41-1991 were the criteria adopted and applied. A fast and efficient acquisition system, including a 16 bit card, was used. The flow rate was calculated using a computer program developed and tested on several cases. The results obtained with the Gibson method were used for calibration of the on-line flow measuring system based on the Winter-Kennedy method as one of the index methods. This method is very often used for continuous monitoring of the flow rate through hydraulic turbines, when the calibration has been done on site by using the results of measurements obtained by the absolute method. Having measured the flow rate and output power, the efficiency was calculated for any operating conditions. A curve showing the best operating conditions based on the highest efficiency is presented and discussed. The details of the instrumentation, its installation, and the results obtained are discussed in the paper. [Spanish] Este articulo describe la metodologia aplicada para la medicion del flujo en una turbina hidraulica de 170 MW. El flujo se midio utilizando el metodo de presion

  3. Flow in potential cascades by means of the finite element method; Flujo en cascadas potenciales mediante el metodo del elemento finito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Cordero, Rodolfo; Fernandez Valencia, Gonzalo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1986-12-31

    This article presents a mathematical model and its solution by means of the finite element method with approximate Garlekin formulation, for the flow analysis in a circular cascade, in a surface of revolution current of a turbo- machine, that can be axial, mixed or radial. To the revolution surface an agreed transformation is applied to obtain a plane, eliminating in this form one term in the equation succeeding in avoiding an iterative solution. Likewise, the finite element method allows to solve the equation in partial derivatives of the elliptical type in its quasi-harmonic form. Additionally, the method followed to introduce the contour conditions is presented; specially, the Kutta-Joukowsky conditions and the one of periodicity, which distinguishes this problem from the classical problems of ideal flows evaluated in the contour. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta un modelo matematico y su solucion mediante el empleo del metodo del elemento finito con formulacion aproximada de Galerkin, para el analisis del flujo en una cascada circular, en una superficie de corriente de revolucion de una turbomaquina, que puede ser axial, mixta o radial. A la superficie de revolucion se le aplica una transformacion conforme para obtener un plano, eliminando de esta forma un termino en la ecuacion logrando evitar la solucion iterativa. Asimismo, el metodo del elemento finito permite resolver la ecuacion en derivadas parciales del tipo eliptico en su forma cuasiarmonica. Se presenta, ademas, el metodo seguido para introducir las condiciones de contorno; en especial, las condiciones de Kutta-Joukowsky y la de periodicidad, que distinguen a este problema de los problemas clasicos de flujos ideales valuados en el contorno.

  4. Low-Power Wideband Digital Spectrometer for Planetary Science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to develop a wideband digital spectrometer to support space-born measurements of planetary atmospheric composition. The spectrometer...

  5. METODO, a prospective observational study to assess the efficacy and tolerability of methadone in heroin-addicted patients undergoing a methadone maintenance treatment: preliminary results at baseline evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Egidio, Pietro Fausto; Bignamini, Emanuele; De Vivo, Enrico; Leonardi, Claudio; Pieri, Maria Chiara; González-Saiz, Francisco; Lucchini, Alfio

    2013-12-01

    METODO (methadone efficacy therapy optimization dosage on-going) is a prospective observational study to assess the efficacy and tolerability of methadone in 500 heroin-addicted patients taking a methadone maintenance treatment, enrolled through 2010 to 2011 in five Italian sites, observed over 2 years. The Opiate Dosage Adequacy Scale has been used for the evaluation of the "adequacy" of the methadone dosage and to stratify patients in adequate and not adequate groups. The treatment efficacy has been evaluated in correlation to the dosage adequacy during the visits. Moreover, patients have been evaluated according to the retention rate and duration of retention in treatment and a series of questionnaires.

  6. Method of identifying the friction of rotors using the wavelet transform; Metodo para identificar el rozamiento de rotores utilizado la transformada wavelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui Correa, Juan Carlos; Rubio Cerda, Eduardo; Gonzalez Brambila, Oscar [CIATEQ, A.C., Queretaro (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    The modern processes of signal analysis that measure mechanical vibrations are based on the fast transform of Fourier (FFT), nevertheless, this method is not able to identify transient phenomena nor of nonlinear nature. Although many efforts have been made to try to identify these phenomena in the frequency spectra, it is not possible to correlate the spectra with the physical characteristics of this type of phenomena. Within these phenomena on the rubbing of a rotor against the housing or trunnion of a bearing, this phenomenon has a nonlinear behavior, as it is demonstrated in this paper. In the first part a method based on the of signal analysis type wavelets is presented and how this technique can be used to predict transient and nonlinear phenomena. Once defined the method, its application in the identification of the friction of rotors is demonstrated. With this, one demonstrates that the method presented in this paper allows to also identifying in real time the rubbing phenomenon and also that it can be used as an of analysis technique in the preventive maintenance systems. [Spanish] Los procesos modernos de analisis de senales que miden vibraciones mecanicas se basan en la transformada rapida de Fourier (FFT por sus siglas en ingles), sin embargo, este metodo no es capaz de identificar fenomenos transitorios ni de naturaleza no lineal. A pesar de que se han hecho muchos esfuerzos para tratar de identificar estos fenomenos en los espectros de frecuencia, no es posible correlacionar el espectro con las caracteristicas fisicas de este tipo de fenomenos. Dentro de estos fenomenos sobre el rozamiento de un rotor contra la carcasa o munon de una chumacera, este fenomeno tiene un comportamiento no lineal, como se demuestra en este trabajo. En la primera parte se presenta un metodo basado en el analisis de senales tipo wavelets y como esta tecnica puede utilizarse para predecir fenomenos transitorios y no lineales. Una vez definido el metodo, se demuestra su

  7. Status of the LEP2 Spectrometer Project

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, Bernd; Bovet, Claude; Coosemans, Williame; Cornuet, D; Hidalgo, A; Hilleret, Noël; Hublin, M; Kalbreier, Willi; Leclère, P; Matheson, J; Mugnai, G; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Occelli, B; Palacios, J; Perret, R; Placidi, Massimo; Prochnow, J; Rühl, I; Sassowsky, M; Schmickler, Hermann; Valbuena, R; Wells, P S; Wenninger, J; Wilkinson, G R; Hildreth, M D; Roncarolo, F; Torrence, E

    2000-01-01

    The LEP spectrometer has been conceived to provide a determination of the beam energy with a relative accuracy of 10-4 in the LEP2 physics region where insufficient polarisation levels prevent the application of the resonant depolarisation method. The setup consists of a steel bending magnet flanked by a triplet of Beam Position Monitors (BPM) at each side providing a measurement of changes in the bending angle when the beams are accelerated to physics energies. The goal for a 100 ppm relative precision on the beam energy involves a ± 1 micron BPM resolution and the calibration of the dipole bending strength to a 30 ppm accuracy. This paper reports on the results of the commissioning of the Spectrometer during the 1999 LEP Run and on the experience acquired on the behaviour of the several sub-systems with circulating beams.

  8. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; /Fermilab; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  9. MEMS tunable grating micro-spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormen, Maurizio; Lockhart, R.; Niedermann, P.; Overstolz, T.; Hoogerwerf, A.; Mayor, J.-M.; Pierer, J.; Bosshard, C.; Ischer, R.; Voirin, G.; Stanley, R. P.

    2017-11-01

    The interest in MEMS based Micro-Spectrometers is increasing due to their potential in terms of flexibility as well as cost, low mass, small volume and power savings. This interest, especially in the Near-Infrared and Mid- Infrared, ranges from planetary exploration missions to astronomy, e.g. the search for extra solar planets, as well as to many other terrestrial fields of application such as, industrial quality and surface control, chemical analysis of soil and water, detection of chemical pollutants, exhausted gas analysis, food quality control, process control in pharmaceuticals, to name a few. A compact MEMS-based Spectrometer for Near- Infrared and Mid-InfraRed operation have been conceived, designed and demonstrated. The design based on tunable MEMS blazed grating, developed in the past at CSEM [1], achieves state of the art results in terms of spectral resolution, operational wavelength range, light throughput, overall dimensions, and power consumption.

  10. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  11. Cryogenic system for a superconducting spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, J.

    1983-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4K heat load of 150 watts; the LN/sub 2/ circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations.

  12. Cryogenic System for a Superconducting Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John

    1983-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4K heat load of 150 watts; the LN2 circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations.

  13. Cryogenic system for a superconducting spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, J.

    1983-03-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4 K heat load of 150 watts; the LN/sub 2/ circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations.

  14. The Canadian Penning Trap spectrometer at Argonne

    CERN Document Server

    Savard, G; Boudreau, C; Buchinger, F; Caggiano, J; Clark, J; Crawford, J E; Fukutani, H; Gulick, S; Hardy, J C; Heinz, A; Lee, J K P; Moore, R B; Sharma, K S; Schwartz, J; Seweryniak, D; Sprouse, G D; Vaz, J

    2001-01-01

    The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer is a device used for high-precision mass measurements on short-lived isotopes. It is located at the ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac facility where a novel injection system, the RF gas cooler, allows fast reaction products to be decelerated, thermalized and bunched for rapid and efficient injection into the CPT. The CPT spectrometer and its injection system will be described in detail and its unique capabilities with respect to its initial physics program, concentrating on isotopes around the N=Z line with particular emphasis on isotopes of interest to low-energy tests of the electroweak interaction and the rp-process, will be highlighted. (6 refs).

  15. Compact imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Lerner, Scott A. (Corvallis, OR); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-03

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, means for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the means for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the means for receiving the light and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light to the means for receiving the light, and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the detector array.

  16. The SeaQuest Spectrometer at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidala, C.A.; et al.

    2017-06-29

    The SeaQuest spectrometer at Fermilab was designed to detect oppositely-charged pairs of muons (dimuons) produced by interactions between a 120 GeV proton beam and liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium and solid nuclear targets. The primary physics program uses the Drell-Yan process to probe antiquark distributions in the target nucleon. The spectrometer consists of a target system, two dipole magnets and four detector stations. The upstream magnet is a closed-aperture solid iron magnet which also serves as the beam dump, while the second magnet is an open aperture magnet. Each of the detector stations consists of scintillator hodoscopes and a high-resolution tracking device. The FPGA-based trigger compares the hodoscope signals to a set of pre-programmed roads to determine if the event contains oppositely-signed, high-mass muon pairs.

  17. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  18. Wavelenght-Dispersive X-Ray Flourescence Accuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Widyatmoko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available X-Fuorescence spectrometry is a method, which is increasingly applied in the geochemical analysis. X-Fuorescence spectrometry is classified under two categories -WDXRF (wavelenght - dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and EDXRF (energy-dispersive X - ray fluorescence spectrometer. WDXRF can be configured as a sequential spectrometer , a simultaneous spectrometer or a hibrid instrument, which combines the advantages of the simultaneous and sequential spectrometers into one instrument. Each instrument is different in some characteristics, and each has applications for which it is specifically suited. In this investigation sequential spectrometer PW 1450 was used to analyze the major, minor and trace elements in the samples. The standards used in calibrating the PW 1450 for the analysis of all samples are materials of known composition (30 internatioanal standards and 66 standards from Institut für Mineralogie der Uni. Köln, Germany. Interelement and matrix effects are treated by matrix matching of samples and standards, dilution, preconcentration of the element of interest, and mathematic corrections during data analysis. The examination of two samples and the statistic description using standard deviation and coefficient of variant show that the XFA is accurate enaugh for many elements, especially for the major elements, but for Mg, Ca, K, Na, P, S, Co, Rb, Zn, Ni, Ba, Pb in comparison with Atomic Absorpsion Spectrometry (AAS, Flame Emission Spectrometer (FES, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP and photometer it is less sensitive. It is posible to devaluate the errors by using coefficient of variant and standard deviation.

  19. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...... on the aircraft. By using simple assumptions on the build-up of contamination it has been possible to separate the signals from contamination and from plume. The analysis further showed that even a detector/spectrometer with low energy resolution is able to identify a contamination with iodine....

  20. Coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    events are recorded in a list mode file with their timestamp and energy, enabling coincidence identification and spectrum manipulation in post-processing. When coincidence gamma-spectrometry is used for cascade emitting nuclides, coincident signals can be extracted thus significantly reducing......Gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is often the technique of choice in an environmental radioactivity laboratory. When measuring environmental samples associated activities are usually low so an important parameter that describes the performance of the spectrometer...... for a nuclide of interest is the minimum detectable activity (MDA). There are many ways for lowering the MDAs in gamma spectrometry. Recently, developments of fast and compact digital acquisition systems have led to growing number of multiple HPGe detector spectrometers. In these applications all detected...

  1. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...

  2. Superconducting RF separator for Omega Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows an Nb-deflector for the superconducting RF separator ready for installation in its cryostat (visible at the back). Each deflector was about 3 m long. L. Husson and P. Skacel (Karlsruhe) stand on the left, A. Scharding (CERN) stands on the right. This particle separator, the result of a collaboration between the Gesellshaft für Kernforschung, Karlsruhe, and CERN was installed in the S1 beam line to Omega spectrometer. (See Annual Report 1977.)

  3. The heavy-ion magnetic spectrometer PRISMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanini, A.M. E-mail: alberto.stefanini@lnl.infn.it; Corradi, L.; Maron, G.; Pisent, A.; Trotta, M.; Vinodkumar, A.M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; De Rosa, A.; Inglima, G.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Pollarolo, G.; Latina, A

    2002-04-22

    PRISMA is a magnetic spectrometer for heavy ions under construction at Legnaro, with very large solid angle (80 msr), wide momentum acceptance ({+-} 10%) and good mass resolution via TOF measurement; it will be dedicated to the study of nuclear dynamics and nuclear structure with stable and exotic ion beams. This is a review of its main features and of the present status of the project.

  4. Mobile environment for an emission spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziak, Kamil; Litwin, Dariusz; Galas, Jacek; Tyburska-Staniewska, Anna; Ramsza, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes a mobile application to be used in a chemical analytical laboratory. The program running under the control of Android operating system allows for preview of measurements recorded by the emission spectrometer. Another part of the application monitors operational and configuration parameters of the device in real time. The first part of this paper includes an overview of the atomic spectrometry. The second part contains a description of the application and its further potential development direction.

  5. VAMOS: a VAriable MOde high acceptance Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Savajols, H

    1999-01-01

    The study of reactions induced by the future SPIRAL beams at GANIL requires new techniques: the low intensity of secondary beams implies the need of a very high efficiency detection system ; the study of nearly or completely unknown nuclei, over a wide range of masses and energies, needs a very efficient method for attributing a reaction product to a nucleus. The VAriable MOde high acceptance Spectrometer VAMOS is being designed and built especially for this purpose.

  6. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  7. Effective mass spectrometer. [History and accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, D.

    1979-10-12

    The history and major accomplishments of the Effective Mass Spectrometer (EMS) are described. In the eight years since the EMS turned on, 21 experiments have been completed by groups from nine institutions in 32 months of operation. Over 400 million triggers have been recorded on magnetic tape, resulting in 29 journal publications to date. A list of experimental proposals for the EMS and a sampling of results are presented. 12 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  9. The Herschel/SPIRE Spectrometer Useful Scripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polehampton, E.; Hopwood, R.; Valtchanov, I.; Lu, N.; Marchili, N.; Naylor, D.; van der Wiel, M.; Fulton, T.

    2015-09-01

    In most cases, the Standard Product Generation (SPG) processing pipelines for the Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) produce well-calibrated spectra of high quality. However, some Astronomical sources, such as those with a faint continuum, require additional processing to achieve more meaningful spectra. In consultation with the astronomical community, a set of scripts were developed to assist in the post-pipeline analysis of the spectra.

  10. Performance of the ALICE photon spectrometer PHOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa, G. [IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain) and SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines-CNRS-Universite de Nantes, Nantes (France)]. E-mail: gustavo.conesa@ific.uv.es; Delagrange, H. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines-CNRS-Universite de Nantes, Nantes (France); Diaz, J. [IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Ippolitov, M. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kharlov, Y.V. [Institute for High-Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Peressounko, D. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schutz, Y. [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines-CNRS-Universite de Nantes, Nantes (France); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2005-01-21

    We present in this paper the measured characteristics of a 64 lead-tungstate crystal array designed to detect high-energy photons and neutral mesons with the ALICE photon spectrometer PHOS. The array has been tested with electron and charged pion secondary beams delivered by the CERN PS and SPS synchrotrons. Photon energy and {pi}0 invariant mass resolutions are presented. The PHOS particle identification performance for data simulated with the AliRoot package is studied.

  11. Development of online quasimonochromatic X-ray backlighter for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gold plasma produces continuous X-ray spectrum (M band) in this range. The spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions of the system measured are 30 mÅ, 50 μm and 1.5 ns respectively. The spectral width of the X-ray pulse is 2 Å ( E = 0.39 keV). Keywords. X-ray backlighter; quasimonochromatic; crystal spectrometer.

  12. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  13. Various experiments with the omicron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Allardyce, Brian W; Bailey, J; Bos, K; Bressani, Tullio; Chiavassa, E; Costa, S; Davies, J D; Dellacasa, G; Frame, D; Gallio, M; Kernel, G; Michaelis, E G; Musso, A; Panighini, M; Stanovnik, A; Tanner, N W; Van Dantzig, R; Van Doesburg, W

    1977-01-01

    A series of experiments are to be performed using a spectrometer with both a large solid angle and a large momentum acceptance; it will have an energy resolution of about 1 MeV for particles with momenta up to about 400 MeV/c. Pion scattering from light nuclei will be the prime use of the spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a large magnet with a usable field volume of 1 m*2 m*0.85 m. The magnetic field is homogeneous to within about 10% over this volume, in which it is intended to place planes of multiwire chambers in front of a target, followed by arrays of multiwire and draft chambers and thin scintillators. Various geometries are possible, but the intention is to detect inside the magnet both the incident particle and the one(s) leaving the target over a large angular range. The information from the various detectors will be handled on-line by an HP computer system, which also performs some preliminary analysis.

  14. MERTIS: a highly integrated IR imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, I.; Hirsch, H.; Jahn, H.; Knollenberg, J.; Venus, H.

    2006-08-01

    With a background of several instrument developments in the past the German Aerospace Center in Berlin proposed for ESA's deep space mission BepiColombo an imaging spectrometer which meets the challenges of limited technical resources and a very special operational environment. An 80-channel push broom-type spectrometer has been drafted and it s development has been started under the name MERTIS (MErcury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer). The instrument is dedicated to the mineralogy surface science and thermal characteristics studies of the innermost planet. It is based on modern un-cooled micro-bolometer technology and all-reflective optics design. The operation concept principle is characterised by intermediate scanning of the planet, deep space and black bodies as calibration targets. A miniaturised radiometer is included for low level temperature measurements. Altogether the system shall fit into a CD-package sized cube and weigh less than 3 kg. The paper will present the instrument architecture of MERTIS, its design status and will show the results of first components being built.

  15. Composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D E; Flasar, F M; Kunde, V G; Nixon, C A; Segura, M E; Romani, P N; Gorius, N; Albright, S; Brasunas, J C; Carlson, R C; Mamoutkine, A A; Guandique, E; Kaelberer, M S; Aslam, S; Achterberg, R K; Bjoraker, G L; Anderson, C M; Cottini, V; Pearl, J C; Smith, M D; Hesman, B E; Barney, R D; Calcutt, S; Vellacott, T J; Spilker, L J; Edgington, S G; Brooks, S M; Ade, P; Schinder, P J; Coustenis, A; Courtin, R; Michel, G; Fettig, R; Pilorz, S; Ferrari, C

    2017-06-20

    The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn carries the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) designed to study thermal emission from Saturn and its rings and moons. CIRS, a Fourier transform spectrometer, is an indispensable part of the payload providing unique measurements and important synergies with the other instruments. It takes full advantage of Cassini's 13-year-long mission and surpasses the capabilities of previous spectrometers on Voyager 1 and 2. The instrument, consisting of two interferometers sharing a telescope and a scan mechanism, covers over a factor of 100 in wavelength in the mid and far infrared. It is used to study temperature, composition, structure, and dynamics of the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan, the rings of Saturn, and surfaces of the icy moons. CIRS has returned a large volume of scientific results, the culmination of over 30 years of instrument development, operation, data calibration, and analysis. As Cassini and CIRS reach the end of their mission in 2017, we expect that archived spectra will be used by scientists for many years to come.

  16. Advances in miniature spectrometer and sensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Jouko; Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Karioja, Pentti; Karppinen, Mikko; Aalto, Timo; Tukkiniemi, Kari

    2014-05-01

    Miniaturization and cost reduction of spectrometer and sensor technologies has great potential to open up new applications areas and business opportunities for analytical technology in hand held, mobile and on-line applications. Advances in microfabrication have resulted in high-performance MEMS and MOEMS devices for spectrometer applications. Many other enabling technologies are useful for miniature analytical solutions, such as silicon photonics, nanoimprint lithography (NIL), system-on-chip, system-on-package techniques for integration of electronics and photonics, 3D printing, powerful embedded computing platforms, networked solutions as well as advances in chemometrics modeling. This paper will summarize recent work on spectrometer and sensor miniaturization at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tunable filter technology has been developed in two technical versions: Piezoactuated FPIs have been applied in miniature hyperspectral imaging needs in light weight UAV and nanosatellite applications, chemical imaging as well as medical applications. Microfabricated MOEMS FPIs have been developed as cost-effective sensor platforms for visible, NIR and IR applications. Further examples of sensor miniaturization will be discussed, including system-on-package sensor head for mid-IR gas analyzer, roll-to-roll printed Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technology as well as UV imprinted waveguide sensor for formaldehyde detection.

  17. VERITAS: Versatile Triple-Axis Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Il

    2006-04-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is planning to build a cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at HANARO, the 30 MW research reactor. The spectrometer is expected to be completed in 2008 with the following configuration from the upstream to the downstream. Guide Supermirror m = 2, In-pile Straight Section, {approx} 5 m Curved Guide, {approx} 26 m w/ R 1500 m Straight Guide before the Instrument, {approx} 40 m Filters PG and Be Neutron Velocity Selector (Future) Monochromators Vertically Focusing Monochromators PG(002) and Heusler(111) Doubly Focusing Monochromators (Future) Monochromator-Sample Distance 2 m Collimation C1 Soller Collimators, 20', 40' 80'Beam Height at the Sample Table 1.5 m Sample-Analyzer Distance 1.0 m Collimation C2 Soller Collimators, 20', 40', 80' Radial Collimator Analyzers Horizontally Focusing Analyzers w/ Fixed Vertical Focusing PG(002) and Heusler(111) Analyzer-Detector Distance 0.5 m Detectors 5 cm Tube Detector 25 cm wide Position Sensitive Detector Once completed, the neutron flux at sample is expected to surpass that of SPINS at NCNR, making this instrument one of the most powerful 2nd generation cold neutron triple-axis spectrometers in the world.

  18. Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Nixon, C. A.; Segura, M. E.; Romani, P. N.; Gorius, N.; Albright, S.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn carries the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) designed to study thermal emission from Saturn and its rings and moons. CIRS, a Fourier transform spectrometer, is an indispensable part of the payload providing unique measurements and important synergies with the other instruments. It takes full advantage of Cassini's 13-year-long mission and surpasses the capabilities of previous spectrometers on Voyager 1 and 2. The instrument, consisting of two interferometers sharing a telescope and a scan mechanism, covers over a factor of 100 in wavelength in the mid and far infrared. It is used to study temperature, composition, structure, and dynamics of the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan, the rings of Saturn, and surfaces of the icy moons. CIRS has returned a large volume of scientific results, the culmination of over 30 years of instrument development, operation, data calibration, and analysis. As Cassini and CIRS reach the end of their mission in 2017, we expect that archived spectra will be used by scientists for many years to come.

  19. The NA60 silicon vertex spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Banicz, K; Floris, M; Heuser, J M; Keil, M; Lourenço, C; Ohnishi, H; Radermacher, E; Shahoyan, R; Usai, G

    2005-01-01

    The NA60 experiment studies the production of open charm and prompt dimuons in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. To access the kinematics of charged particles already at the vertex level, a radiation tolerant silicon pixel detector has been placed in a 2.5T magnetic field near the target. This vertex spectrometer was built from 96 ALICE1LHCB pixel chips arranged in 12 tracking planes. The vertex spectrometer was successfully operated in a run with a 158GeV/nucleon indium ion beam incident on indium targets in October-November 2003. During the five-week-long run it was exposed to high levels of radiation distributed inhomogeneously over the detector. The most exposed regions of the silicon sensors underwent type inversion. With only a fraction of the total statistics analysed, the vertex spectrometer can already be seen to have dramatically enhanced the physics performance of NA60 with respect to that of its predecessors1).

  20. APOLLO 15 XRFS LUNAR SURFACE X-RAY COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains two tables of time-ordered, raw event count rates acquired by the Apollo 15 X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer from 30 July to 4 August 1971...