WorldWideScience

Sample records for ray propagation calculations

  1. Methode des Rayons avec Calcul d’Intensite Appliquee a la Propagation Anormale (Method of Ray Intensity Calculation as Applied to Anomalous Propagation),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    plus rapproch~es. Cette question, qui constitue en elle-mgme un domaine de recherche, d~ borde du cadre du present rapport. * Il est possible d’gtendre...par la commande JCL "PROPEX:T.’ qui produit le module ex~cutable "PROPAG:EX". TABLEAU I Bloc principal PROPAK *NOM DES ROUTINES FONCTION PROPAG...alise la r &mission des rayons r~fl~chis e77 SANS CLASSIFICATION 22 TABLEAU II Bloc utilitaire UTILPAK NOM DES ROUTINES FONCTION H - Calcule r la

  2. A database of fragmentation cross section measurements applicable to cosmic ray propagation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.; Jones, F.C.

    1989-08-01

    A database of single particle inclusive fragment production cross section measurements has been established and is accessible over common computer networks. These measurements have been obtained from both published literature and direct communication with experimenters and include cross sections for nuclear beams on H, He, and heavier targets, and for H and He beams on nuclear targets, for energies >30 MeV/nucleon. These cross sections are directly applicable to calculations involving cosmic ray nuclear interactions with matter. The data base includes projectile, target, and fragment specifications, beam energy, cross section with uncertainty, literature reference, and comment code. It is continuously updated to assure accuracy and completeness. Also available are widely used semi-empirical formulations for calculating production cross sections and excitation functions. In this paper we discuss the database in detail and describe how it can be accessed. We compare the measurements with semi-empirical calculations and point out areas where improved calculations and further cross section measurements are required. 5 refs., 2 figs

  3. Methodologies of Uncertainty Propagation Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnacki, Eric

    2002-01-01

    After recalling the theoretical principle and the practical difficulties of the methodologies of uncertainty propagation calculation, the author discussed how to propagate input uncertainties. He said there were two kinds of input uncertainty: - variability: uncertainty due to heterogeneity, - lack of knowledge: uncertainty due to ignorance. It was therefore necessary to use two different propagation methods. He demonstrated this in a simple example which he generalised, treating the variability uncertainty by the probability theory and the lack of knowledge uncertainty by the fuzzy theory. He cautioned, however, against the systematic use of probability theory which may lead to unjustifiable and illegitimate precise answers. Mr Chojnacki's conclusions were that the importance of distinguishing variability and lack of knowledge increased as the problem was getting more and more complex in terms of number of parameters or time steps, and that it was necessary to develop uncertainty propagation methodologies combining probability theory and fuzzy theory

  4. Propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)], E-mail: stanev@bartol.udel.edu

    2009-06-15

    We briefly describe the energy loss processes of ultrahigh-energy protons, heavier nuclei and {gamma}-rays in interactions with the universal photon fields of the Universe. We then discuss the modification of the accelerated cosmic-ray energy spectrum in propagation by the energy loss processes and the charged cosmic-ray scattering in the extragalactic magnetic fields. The energy lost by the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays goes into {gamma}-rays and neutrinos that carry additional information about the sources of highest energy particles. The new experimental results of the HiRes and the Auger collaborations are discussed in view of the predictions from propagation calculations.

  5. Propagation calculation for reactor cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yanhua [School of Power and Energy Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Moriyama, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Hashimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    The propagation of steam explosion for real reactor geometry and conditions are investigated by using the computer code JASMINE-pro. The ex-vessel steam explosion is considered, which is described as follow: during the accident of reactor core meltdown, the molten core melts a hole at the bottom of reactor vessel and causes the higher temperature core fuel being leaked into the water pool below reactor vessel. During the melt-water mixing interaction process, the high temperature melt evaporates the cool water at an extreme high rate and might induce a steam explosion. A steam explosion could experience first the premixing phase and then the propagation explosion phase. For a propagation calculation, we should know the information about the initial fragmentation time, the total melt mass, premixing region size, initial void fraction and distribution of the melt volume fraction, and so on. All the initial conditions used in this calculation are based on analyses from some simple assumptions and the observation from the experiments. The results show that the most important parameter for the initial condition of this phase is the total mass and its initial distribution. This gives the requirement for a premixing calculation. On the other hand, for higher melt volume fraction case, the fragmentation is strong so that the local pressure can exceed over the EOS maximum pressure of the code, which lead to the incorrect calculation or divergence of the calculation. (Suetake, M.)

  6. Interstellar propagation of low energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Wave particles interactions prevent low energy cosmic rays from propagating at velocities much faster than the Alfven velocity, reducing their range by a factor of order 50. Therefore, supernovae remnants cannot fill the neutral portions of the interstellar medium with 2 MeV cosmic rays [fr

  7. A formalism for cosmic ray propagation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, R.L.; Badhwar, G.D.; Stephens, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The continuity equation for cosmic ray propagation is used to derive a set of linear equations interrelating the fluxes of multiply charged nuclei as observed at any particular part of the galaxy. The derivation leads to model indepent definitions for cosmic ray storage time, mean density of target nuclei and effective mass traversed. The set of equations form a common framework for comparisons of theories and observations. As an illustration, it is shown that there exists a large class of propagation models which give the same result as the exponential path length model. (orig./BJ) [de

  8. Calculating Quench Propagation with ANSYS(regsign)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hinkins, R.; Lietzke, A.F.; Prestemon, S.

    2002-01-01

    A commercial Finite-Element-Analysis program, ANSYS(reg s ign), is widely used in structural and thermal analysis. With the program's ability to include non-linear material properties and import complex CAD files, one can generate coil geometries and simulate quench propagation in superconducting magnets. A 'proof-of-principle' finite element model was developed assuming a resistivity that increases linearly from zero to its normal value at a temperature consistent with the assumed B magnetic field. More sophisticated models could easily include finer-grained coil, cable, structural, and circuit details. A quench is provoked by raising the temperature of an arbitrary superconducting element above its T c . The time response to this perturbation is calculated using small time-steps to allow convergence between steps. Snapshots of the temperature and voltage distributions allow examination of longitudinal and turn-to-turn quench propagation, quench-front annihilation, and cryo-stability. Modeling details are discussed, and a computed voltage history was compared with measurements from a recent magnet test.

  9. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, R Alves; Evoli, C; Sigl, G; Van Vliet, A; Erdmann, M; Kuempel, D; Mueller, G; Walz, D; Kampert, K-H; Winchen, T

    2015-01-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 10 17 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python. (paper)

  10. Application of propagation calculations in air quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuelske, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a methodics of propagation calculation since the foundation of the 'Landesanstalt fuer Immissionsschutz' in 1963, and its practical use in air quality control. In this context, it deals with methods for calculating stack heights and the Gaussian propagation model adopted by the Technical Code on Clean Air, the propagation of flue gas emitted via cooling towers, the propagation of accidentally released substances, odours and automobile emissions, and with flow and propagation calculation for the proximity zone of buildings as well as for meteorological fields with space and time variations and topographically varied terrain. (orig.) [de

  11. Calculation of sound propagation in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements.......Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements....

  12. The propagation of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    Large scale (approximately 15 pc) turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) causes the firehose and mirror instabilities to occur. These produce small scale (approximately 10 -7 pc) magnetic irregularities, which scatter cosmic rays. We use pulsar scintillation data, and a model of the origin of these scintillations, to construct a slab model of the turbulent ISM. Then we find the amplitudes and wavelengths of the magnetic irregularities that arise, and we calculate the coefficients for the diffusion of cosmic rays along the interstellar magnetic fields. We incorporate this diffusion into our model of the turbulent ISM, and show that it can account naturally for both the lifetime of low energy cosmic rays, and the variation of their mean pathlength with energy. Our model has no galactic halo, and contains no scattering by Alfven waves. (author)

  13. A two-zone cosmic ray propagation model and its implication of the surviving fraction of radioactive cosmic ray isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, M.; Scherzer, R.; Enge, W.

    1977-01-01

    In cosmic ray propagation calculations one can usually assume a homogeneous distribution of interstellar matter. The crucial astrophysical parameters in these models are: The path length distribution, the age of the cosmic ray particles and the interstellar matter density. These values are interrelated. The surviving fraction of radioactive cosmic ray isotopes is often used to determine a mean matter density of that region, where the cosmic ray particles may mainly reside. Using a Monte Carlo Propagation Program we calculated the change in the surviving fraction quantitatively assuming a region around the sources with higher matter density. (author)

  14. Propagation of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putze, Antje

    2006-06-01

    Cosmic rays are composed of charged particles, which arrive after a long travel through the Galaxy on Earth. Supernova explosions are considered to be galactic sources, which accelerate these particles up to energies around 10 18 eV. Beyond this energy, one supposes that the extragalactic sources, like active galaxy nuclei (AGN), gamma ray bursts or pulsars, are the origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays. The spectral index of the elemental energy distributions of cosmic rays reflects the dynamic of its propagation, particularly the conjugation of the effects connected to the cosmic ray source spectrum and those connected to its propagation (acceleration, absorption and escape). The evolution of the spectral index with the cosmic-ray particle energy constitutes a sensitive test of the components, which determine this evolution. The precise index measurement of individual elemental spectra of the cosmic rays by AMS up to TeV and by the experiment CREAM beyond it, from TeV to PeV, will permit to proceed in this problematic. One of the difficulties on this measurement is to take well into account the systematic errors. During the data analysis we have to take into account in particular the interaction (diffusion and fragmentation) of the ions while their travel through the Earth's atmosphere. The study of the interaction and the fragmentation of these ions in the atmosphere is hence indispensable and described in this work. The study is based on a matrix calculation, which had been successfully implemented and tested and which has permitted to analyse the effects, caused by the experimental uncertainties on the cross sections, on the spectral index measurement. (author)

  15. Calculation of nuclear electromagnetic pulse propagation along the earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Rui; Zheng Yi; Song Lijun; Zhang Xueqin; Lip Peng

    2010-01-01

    It calculates the LF/VLF wave of NEMP propagation along the earth's surface. The earth-wave and the sky-wave are taken into account in the calculation. With the distance increase, the earth wave attenuates fast than the sky wave, and the time difference between the earth wave and the sky wave is reduced. (authors)

  16. Origin and propagation of galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarsky, Catherine J.; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    1987-01-01

    The study of systematic trends in elemental abundances is important for unfolding the nuclear and/or atomic effects that should govern the shaping of source abundances and in constraining the parameters of cosmic ray acceleration models. In principle, much can be learned about the large-scale distributions of cosmic rays in the galaxy from all-sky gamma ray surveys such as COS-B and SAS-2. Because of the uncertainties in the matter distribution which come from the inability to measure the abundance of molecular hydrogen, the results are somewhat controversial. The leaky-box model accounts for a surprising amount of the data on heavy nuclei. However, a growing body of data indicates that the simple picture may have to be abandoned in favor of more complex models which contain additional parameters. Future experiments on the Spacelab and space station will hopefully be made of the spectra of individual nuclei at high energy. Antiprotons must be studied in the background free environment above the atmosphere with much higher reliability and presion to obtain spectral information.

  17. The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U., Theor. Phys.; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

  18. Advanced simulations of x-ray beam propagation through CRL transfocators using ray-tracing and wavefront propagation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltser, Jana; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Vickery, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses (CRL) are widely used to manipulate synchrotron radiation beams. Accurate modelling of X-ray beam propagation through individual lenses and through "transfocators" composed of a large number of CRLs is of high importance, since it allows for comprehensive optimization...

  19. Nuclear structure calculations in the dynamic-interaction propagator approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, C.A.; Hahne, F.J.W.; Heiss, W.D.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamic-interaction propagator approach provides a natural method for the handling of energy-dependent effective two-body interactions induced by collective excitations of a many-body system. In this work this technique is applied to the calculation of energy spectra and two-particle strengths in mass-18 nuclei. The energy dependence is induced by the dynamic exchange of the lowest 3 - octupole phonon in O 16 , which is described within a normal static particle-hole RPA. This leads to poles in the two-body self-energy, which can be calculated if other fermion lines are restricted to particle states. The two-body interaction parameters are chosen to provide the correct phonon energy and reasonable negative-parity mass-17 and positive-parity mass-18 spectra. The fermion lines must be dressed consistently with the same exchange phonon to avoid redundant solutions or ghosts. The negative-parity states are then calculated in a parameter-free way which gives good agreement with the observed spectra [af

  20. X-ray amplifier energy deposition scaling with channeled propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial control of the energy deposited for excitation of an x-ray amplifier plays an important role in the fundamental scaling relationship between the required energy, the gain and the wavelength. New results concerning the ability to establish confined modes of propagation of sort pulse radiation of sufficiently high intensity in plasmas lead to a sharply reduced need for the total energy deposited, since the concentration of deposited power can be very efficiently organized

  1. Propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays and Dark Matter indirect Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delahaye, Timur

    2010-07-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of propagation of cosmic electrons and positrons in the Milky Way and to the indirect detection of dark matter. The existence of dark matter is a hypothesis considered as reasonable from the point of view of cosmology, astrophysics and even particle physics. Nevertheless its detection still eludes us and it is not possible to verify this hypothesis by other means than gravitational one. A possible way to detect dark matter is to look for its annihilation or decay products among Galactic cosmic rays. During the last three years, data concerning cosmic ray electrons and positrons have been accumulated and have reached a remarkable precision. Such a precision requires from us to refine the theoretical models and to quantify the errors. This thesis addresses the study of all the sources of uncertainties affecting predictions of cosmic electrons and positron fluxes, primary and secondary, classical or from exotic origin. The greatest care has been dedicated to the sources and the propagation in the Galactic halo. Moreover a study of gamma and radio emissions associated to these cosmic rays is presented, again with the will of sizing uncertainties. Finally a status of the research for detection of annihilation or decay of Galactic dark matter is presented. (author)

  2. Modeling of SQS propagation induced by alpha ray in gas counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohtomi, A.; Narita, K.; Sakae, T.; Uozumi, Y.; Matoba, M.

    1995-01-01

    With reference to optical images of the self-quenching streamer (SQS), the authors have already proposed a possible mechanism of SQSs induced by α-rays. To check the validity of the mechanism, they have been designing a model for the computer simulation of the SQS propagation based on the newly proposed mechanism. In the present modeling, in order to calculate the growth of the discharge, a set of continuity equations for electrons and ions is numerically solved in a two-dimensional space. An electron supply process from the α-ray ionization track is assumed to be the dominant process for the streamer development instead of the conventional electron-supply process which is based on the photoionization in the gas media. The streamer propagation is simulated under the concept of two-region model. A first comparison between computed and experimental results shows a good agreement

  3. Synthesis of ideas on cosmic ray origin and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfendale, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made, based largely on ideas reported at this Advanced Studies Institute, to synthesise ideas which have been put forward on cosmic ray origin and propagation. The conclusions drawn are as follows. The bulk of cosmic rays detected at earth appear to be of Galactic origin, many probably having come from supernova remnants, at least at the lowest energies. Only above 10/sup 19/ eV does an extragalactic origin appear likely and here the VIRGO cluster at the centre of our Supercluster is a likely source. Although extragalactic cosmic rays are not present to a large extent their energy density could well be significant and the case is made for its being about 10/sup -4/ eV cm/sup -3/. Concerning the controversy about continuous or ''quick'' particle acceleration, it appears necessary to separate origin and acceleration. The interesting model put forward by Schlickeiser involving what might be called pseudo-continuous acceleration appears to require that the bulk of the particle acceleration occurs in a very large Galactic halo, the secondaries being produced only in the gas disk. Problems are likely, however, with the expected fluxes of X-rays and radio synchrotron radiation

  4. Towards a Unified Source-Propagation Model of Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M.; Molla, M.

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that the cosmic ray energy spectrum is multifractal with the analysis of cosmic ray fluxes as a function of energy revealing a first “knee” slightly below 1016 eV, a second knee slightly below 1018 eV and an “ankle” close to 1019 eV. The behaviour of the highest energy cosmic rays around and above the ankle is still a mystery and precludes the development of a unified source-propagation model of cosmic rays from their source origin to Earth. A variety of acceleration and propagation mechanisms have been proposed to explain different parts of the spectrum the most famous of course being Fermi acceleration in magnetised turbulent plasmas (Fermi 1949). Many others have been proposd for energies at and below the first knee (Peters & Cimento (1961); Lagage & Cesarsky (1983); Drury et al. (1984); Wdowczyk & Wolfendale (1984); Ptuskin et al. (1993); Dova et al. (0000); Horandel et al. (2002); Axford (1991)) as well as at higher energies between the first knee and the ankle (Nagano & Watson (2000); Bhattacharjee & Sigl (2000); Malkov & Drury (2001)). The recent fit of most of the cosmic ray spectrum up to the ankle using non-extensive statistical mechanics (NESM) (Tsallis et al. (2003)) provides what may be the strongest evidence for a source-propagation system deviating significantly from Boltmann statistics. As Tsallis has shown (Tsallis et al. (2003)), the knees appear as crossovers between two fractal-like thermal regimes. In this work, we have developed a generalisation of the second order NESM model (Tsallis et al. (2003)) to higher orders and we have fit the complete spectrum including the ankle with third order NESM. We find that, towards the GDZ limit, a new mechanism comes into play. Surprisingly it also presents as a modulation akin to that in our own local neighbourhood of cosmic rays emitted by the sun. We propose that this is due to modulation at the source and is possibly due to processes in the shell of the originating supernova. We

  5. Effect of error propagation of nuclide number densities on Monte Carlo burn-up calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohjoh, Masayuki; Endo, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Masato; Yamamoto, Akio

    2006-01-01

    As a result of improvements in computer technology, the continuous energy Monte Carlo burn-up calculation has received attention as a good candidate for an assembly calculation method. However, the results of Monte Carlo calculations contain the statistical errors. The results of Monte Carlo burn-up calculations, in particular, include propagated statistical errors through the variance of the nuclide number densities. Therefore, if statistical error alone is evaluated, the errors in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations may be underestimated. To make clear this effect of error propagation on Monte Carlo burn-up calculations, we here proposed an equation that can predict the variance of nuclide number densities after burn-up calculations, and we verified this equation using enormous numbers of the Monte Carlo burn-up calculations by changing only the initial random numbers. We also verified the effect of the number of burn-up calculation points on Monte Carlo burn-up calculations. From these verifications, we estimated the errors in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations including both statistical and propagated errors. Finally, we made clear the effects of error propagation on Monte Carlo burn-up calculations by comparing statistical errors alone versus both statistical and propagated errors. The results revealed that the effects of error propagation on the Monte Carlo burn-up calculations of 8 x 8 BWR fuel assembly are low up to 60 GWd/t

  6. Probabilistic viability calculations for cryopreserving vegetatively propagated collections in genebanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetatively propagated plant collections within genebanks are vulnerable to threats when they are maintained in field or greenhouse conditions. International genebanking standards recommend that these collections be securely backed-up at either secondary locations or by using in vitro culture or cr...

  7. The calculation of Feshbach resonances using coupled propagator equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Hongbin; Zhang, Yinchun; Winkler, P.

    1994-01-01

    A coupled channel theory of resonances has been formulated within the propagator approach of man-body theory and applied to the 1s3s 2 resonance of e-helium scattering. This system has previously been studied both experimentally and theoretically. These results for the width of the resonance agree well with these earlier findings

  8. Propagation of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putze, Antje [LPSC-CNRS-IN2P3, 53, avenue des Martyrs, 38021 Grenoble cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    Cosmic rays are composed of charged particles, which arrive after a long travel through the Galaxy on Earth. Supernova explosions are considered to be galactic sources, which accelerate these particles up to energies around 10{sup 18} eV. Beyond this energy, one supposes that the extragalactic sources, like active galaxy nuclei (AGN), gamma ray bursts or pulsars, are the origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays. The spectral index of the elemental energy distributions of cosmic rays reflects the dynamic of its propagation, particularly the conjugation of the effects connected to the cosmic ray source spectrum and those connected to its propagation (acceleration, absorption and escape). The evolution of the spectral index with the cosmic-ray particle energy constitutes a sensitive test of the components, which determine this evolution. The precise index measurement of individual elemental spectra of the cosmic rays by AMS up to TeV and by the experiment CREAM beyond it, from TeV to PeV, will permit to proceed in this problematic. One of the difficulties on this measurement is to take well into account the systematic errors. During the data analysis we have to take into account in particular the interaction (diffusion and fragmentation) of the ions while their travel through the Earth's atmosphere. The study of the interaction and the fragmentation of these ions in the atmosphere is hence indispensable and described in this work. The study is based on a matrix calculation, which had been successfully implemented and tested and which has permitted to analyse the effects, caused by the experimental uncertainties on the cross sections, on the spectral index measurement. (author)

  9. Acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. Production, oscillation and detection of neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to studies on cosmic rays and neutrinos, particles astrophysically relevant. In recent years, the old problem of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation has become alive again, with the discovery of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, and with the first measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux, which appears to be higher than expected. I have shown that the new acceleration mechanism was slow and I have calculated the maximum energy that can be reached by particles accelerated in various astrophysical sites. I have also studied in detail a cosmic-ray propagation model which takes into account the antiproton measurements. Neutrino astronomy is a field much more recent and in rapid expansion, thanks to a convergence of interests between astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Several large neutrino detectors already exist; really huge ones are in project. I have studied the possible impact of the high energy (> 1 TeV) neutrino astronomy on models of cosmic-ray sources such as Cygnus X3. Comparing the low energy (∼ 10 MeV) cosmic-ray antineutrinos with other sources of neutrinos and antineutrinos (sun, supernova, earth ...), I have pointed out that the antineutrino background resulting from all the nuclear power-stations of the planet was sizeable. This background is a nuisance for some astrophysical applications but could be useful for studies on vacuum or matter neutrino oscillations (MSW effect). I have also examined the MSW effect in another context: the travel through the earth of neutrinos from the supernova explosion SN1987a [fr

  10. Ray convergence in a flux-like propagation formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Chris H

    2013-06-01

    The energy flux formulation of waveguide propagation is closely related to the incoherent mode sum, and its simplicity has led to development of efficient computational algorithms for reverberation and target echo strength, but it lacks the effects of convergence or modal interference. By starting with the coherent mode sum and rejecting the most rapid interference but retaining beats on a scale of a ray cycle distance it is shown that convergence can be included in a hybrid formulation requiring minimal extra computation. Three solutions are offered by evaluating the modal intensity cross terms using Taylor expansions. In the most efficient approach the double summation of the cross terms is reduced to a single numerical sum by solving the other summation analytically. The other two solutions are a local range average and a local depth average. Favorable comparisons are made between these three solutions and the wave model Orca with, and without, spatial averaging in an upward refracting duct. As a by-product, it is shown that the running range average is very close to the mode solution excluding its fringes, given a relation between averaging window size and effective number of modes which, in turn, is related to the waveguide invariant.

  11. On the computation of momentum distributions within wavepacket propagation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method to extract momentum distributions from time-dependent wavepacket calculations. In contrast to established Fourier transformation of the spatial wavepacket at a fixed time, the proposed 'virtual detector' method examines the time dependence of the wavepacket at a fixed position. In first applications to the ionization of model atoms and the dissociation of H 2 + , we find a significant reduction of computing time and are able to extract reliable fragment momentum distributions by using a comparatively small spatial numerical grid for the time-dependent wavefunction

  12. Calculation of cosmic ray induced single event upsets: Program CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, P.

    1983-09-01

    This report documents PROGRAM CRUP, COSMIC RAY UPSET PROGRAM. The computer program calculates cosmic ray induced single-event error rates in microelectronic circuits exposed to several representative cosmic-ray environments.

  13. A model expansion criterion for treating surface topography in ray path calculations using the eikonal equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ting; Zhang, Zhongjie

    2014-01-01

    Irregular surface topography has revolutionized how seismic traveltime is calculated and the data are processed. There are two main schemes for dealing with an irregular surface in the seismic first-arrival traveltime calculation: (1) expanding the model and (2) flattening the surface irregularities. In the first scheme, a notional infill medium is added above the surface to expand the physical space into a regular space, as required by the eikonal equation solver. Here, we evaluate the chosen propagation velocity in the infill medium through ray path tracking with the eikonal equation-solved traveltime field, and observe that the ray paths will be physically unrealistic for some values of this propagation velocity. The choice of a suitable propagation velocity in the infill medium is crucial for seismic processing of irregular topography. Our model expansion criterion for dealing with surface topography in the calculation of traveltime and ray paths using the eikonal equation highlights the importance of both the propagation velocity of the infill physical medium and the topography gradient. (paper)

  14. Propagation of cosmic rays through the atmosphere in the quark-gluon strings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Krutikova, N. P.; Shabelski, Y. M.

    1985-01-01

    The quark-gluon strings model succeeds in the description of multiple hadron production in the central rapidity region of nucleon-nucleon interctions. This model was developed for hadron-nucleus interactions and used for calculation of the cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. It is shown that at energies 10 to the 11th power to the 12th power eV, this model gives a satisfactory description of experimental data. But with the increase of the energy up to approximately 10 to the 14th power eV, results of calculations and of experiments begin to differ and this difference rises with the energy. It may indicate that the scaling violation in the fragmentation region of inclusive spectra for hadron-nucleus interactions is stronger than in the quark-gluon strings model.

  15. Error Propagation dynamics: from PIV-based pressure reconstruction to vorticity field calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Whitehead, Jared; Richards, Geordie; Truscott, Tadd; USU Team; BYU Team

    2017-11-01

    Noninvasive data from velocimetry experiments (e.g., PIV) have been used to calculate vorticity and pressure fields. However, the noise, error, or uncertainties in the PIV measurements would eventually propagate to the calculated pressure or vorticity field through reconstruction schemes. Despite the vast applications of pressure and/or vorticity field calculated from PIV measurements, studies on the error propagation from the velocity field to the reconstructed fields (PIV-pressure and PIV-vorticity are few. In the current study, we break down the inherent connections between PIV-based pressure reconstruction and PIV-based vorticity calculation. The similar error propagation dynamics, which involve competition between physical properties of the flow and numerical errors from reconstruction schemes, are found in both PIV-pressure and PIV-vorticity reconstructions.

  16. Crack Propagation Calculations for Optical Fibers under Static Bending and Tensile Loads Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxia; Cui, Yuxuan; Gong, Wenjun

    2017-01-01

    Static fatigue behavior is the main failure mode of optical fibers applied in sensors. In this paper, a computational framework based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) is presented to calculate the crack propagation process and failure time of optical fibers subjected to static bending and tensile loads. For this purpose, the static fatigue crack propagation in the glass core of the optical fiber is studied. Combining a finite element method (FEM), we use the continuum damage mechanics for the glass core to calculate the crack propagation path and corresponding failure time. In addition, three factors including bending radius, tensile force and optical fiber diameter are investigated to find their impacts on the crack propagation process and failure time of the optical fiber under concerned situations. Finally, experiments are conducted and the results verify the correctness of the simulation calculation. It is believed that the proposed method could give a straightforward description of the crack propagation path in the inner glass core. Additionally, the predicted crack propagation time of the optical fiber with different factors can provide effective suggestions for improving the long-term usage of optical fibers. PMID:29140284

  17. Investigation of propagation algorithms for ray-tracing simulation of polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Tranum-Rømer, A.; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Ray-tracing of polarized neutrons faces a challenge when the neutron propagates through an inhomogeneous magnetic field. This affects simulations of novel instruments using encoding of energy or angle into the neutron spin. We here present a new implementation of propagation of polarized neutrons...

  18. Perturbative versus Schwinger-propagator method for the calculation of amplitudes in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, Jose F.; Pal, Palash B.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the calculation of amplitudes for processes that take place in a constant background magnetic field, first using the standard method for the calculation of an amplitude in an external field, and second utilizing the Schwinger propagator for charged particles in a magnetic field. We show that there are processes for which the Schwinger-propagator method does not yield the total amplitude. We explain why the two methods yield equivalent results in some cases and indicate when we can expect the equivalence to hold. We show these results in fairly general terms and illustrate them with specific examples as well

  19. SimProp: a simulation code for ultra high energy cosmic ray propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloisio, R.; Grillo, A.F.; Boncioli, D.; Petrera, S.; Salamida, F.

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation code for the propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays is presented. The results of this simulation scheme are tested by comparison with results of another Monte Carlo computation as well as with the results obtained by directly solving the kinetic equation for the propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays. A short comparison with the latest flux published by the Pierre Auger collaboration is also presented

  20. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. I: spectrum and chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. In particular, at high energies we assume that D(E)∝E δ , with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars, with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. We find that the stochastic fluctuations induced by the spatial and temporal distribution of supernovae, together with the effect of spallation of nuclei, lead to mild but sensible violations of the simple, leaky-box-inspired rule that the spectrum observed at Earth is N(E)∝E −α with α = γ+δ, where γ is the slope of the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the sources. Spallation of nuclei, even with the small rates appropriate for He, may account for small differences in spectral slopes between different nuclei, possibly providing an explanation for the recent CREAM observations. For δ = 1/3 we find that the slope of the proton and helium spectra are ∼ 2.67 and ∼ 2.6 respectively (with fluctuations depending on the realization of source distribution) at energies around ∼ 1 TeV (to be compared with the measured values of 2.66±0.02 and 2.58±0.02). For δ = 0.6 the hardening of the He spectra is not observed. The stochastic effects discussed above cannot be found in ordinary propagation calculations, such as GALPROP, where these effects and the point like nature of the sources are not taken into account. We also comment on the effect of time dependence of the escape of cosmic rays from supernova remnants, and of a possible clustering of the sources in superbubbles. In a second paper we will discuss the implications of

  1. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. I: spectrum and chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena, E-mail: blasi@arcetri.astro.it, E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5 — 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. In particular, at high energies we assume that D(E)∝E{sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars, with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. We find that the stochastic fluctuations induced by the spatial and temporal distribution of supernovae, together with the effect of spallation of nuclei, lead to mild but sensible violations of the simple, leaky-box-inspired rule that the spectrum observed at Earth is N(E)∝E{sup −α} with α = γ+δ, where γ is the slope of the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the sources. Spallation of nuclei, even with the small rates appropriate for He, may account for small differences in spectral slopes between different nuclei, possibly providing an explanation for the recent CREAM observations. For δ = 1/3 we find that the slope of the proton and helium spectra are ∼ 2.67 and ∼ 2.6 respectively (with fluctuations depending on the realization of source distribution) at energies around ∼ 1 TeV (to be compared with the measured values of 2.66±0.02 and 2.58±0.02). For δ = 0.6 the hardening of the He spectra is not observed. The stochastic effects discussed above cannot be found in ordinary propagation calculations, such as GALPROP, where these effects and the point like nature of the sources are not taken into account. We also comment on the effect of time dependence of the escape of cosmic rays from supernova remnants, and of a possible clustering of the sources in superbubbles. In a second paper we will discuss the

  2. Calculation models of pressure wave propagation within the WWER-440 primary circulating loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamik, V.; Tkach, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computer codes SHOCK, LOVE, BAREL are described that can be used for the study of pressure wave propagation within the reactor and pipeline system during a LOCA as well as for mechanical loads identification in various parts of the system. SHOCK code is applicable to one-dimensional pressure wave propagation analysis in any hydraulic network containing a compressible nonviscous liquid with a constant (within the considered transient process period) density. LOVE code allows to calculate non-symmetrical mechanical loads on the WWER shaft in case of the main circulation pipeline cold branch rupture. BAREL code is an advanced modification of SHOCK code. It is fitted for two-dimensional pressure wave propagation analysing in the downstream section of a pressurised water reactor in case of the main circulation pipeline cold branch rupture. The calculation results for B-213 type WWER-440 reactor are presented that have been obtained under the assumption of perfect structure rigidity [ru

  3. Valence photoelectron spectra of alkali bromides calculated within the propagator theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpenko, Alexander; Iablonskyi, Denys; Aksela, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The valence ionization spectra covering the binding energy range 0-45 eV of alkali bromide XBr (X = Li, Na, K, Rb) vapors are studied within the framework of the propagator theory. Relativistic Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction calculations have been carried out in order to investigate photoion...... photoionization processes and to describe molecular electronic structure. Theoretical results are compared with available experimental data....

  4. Use of integral experiments to improve neutron propagation and gamma heating calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oceraies, Y.; Caumette, P.; Devillers, C.; Bussac, J.

    1979-01-01

    1) The studies to define and improve the accuracies of neutron propagation and gamma heating calculations from integral experiments are encompassed in the field of the fast reactor physics program at CEA. 2) A systematic analysis of neutron propagation in Fe-Na clean media, with variable volumic composition between 0 and 100% in sodium, has been performed on the HARMONIE source reactor. Gamma heating traverses in the core, the blankets and several control rods, have been measured in the R Z core program at MASURCA. The experimental techniques, the accuracies and the results obtained are given. The approximations of the calculational methods used to analyse these experiments and to predict the corresponding design parameters are also described. 3) Particular emphasis is given to the methods planned to improve fundamental data used in neutron propagation calculations, using the discrepancies observed between measured and calculated results in clean integral experiments. One of these approaches, similar to the techniques used in core physics, relies upon sensitivity studies and eventually on adjustment techniques applied to neutron propagation. (author)

  5. A contribution to the study of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. A calculation with propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payen, R.; Vigoureux, J.-M.

    1977-01-01

    Although polarizers and detectors take an important part in discussions and experimental tests about E.P.R. paradox, they are not explicitly present in usual calculations. A calculation is presented using propagators of the correlation in linear polarization of two photons emitted in a 0→1→0 atomic cascade, by quantum field theory, for a diagram including two polarized atoms taking place of polarizers and detectors. (author)

  6. Contribution to gamma ray transport calculation in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdet, L.

    1985-04-01

    This thesis presents the development of gamma transport calculation codes in three dimension heterogeneous geometries. These codes allow us to define the protection against gamma-rays or verify their efficiency. The laws that govern the interactions of gamma-rays with matters are briefly revised. A library with the all necessary constants for these codes is created. TRIPOLI-2, a code that treats in exact way the neutron transport in matters using Monte-Carlo method, has been adapted to deal with the transport of gamma-rays in matters as well. TRINISHI, a code which considers only one collision, has been realized to treat heterogeneous geometries containing voids. Elaborating a formula that calculates the albedo for gamma-ray reflection (the code ALBANE) allows us to solve the problem of gamma-ray reflection on plane surfaces. NARCISSE-2 deals with gamma-rays that suffer only one reflection on the inner walls of any closed volume (rooms, halls...) [fr

  7. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, M.; Nishimura, H.; Fujioka, S.; Nagai, K.; Iwamae, A.; Ohnishi, N.; Fournier, K.B.; Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Tobin, M.; Mima, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have observed supersonic heat wave propagation in a low-density aerogel target (ρ ∼ 3.2 mg/cc) irradiated at the intensity of 4 x 10 14 W/cm 2 . The heat wave propagation was measured with a time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics, and the results were compared with simulations made with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code, RAICHO. Propagation velocity of the ionization front gradually decreased as the wave propagates into the target. The reason of decrease is due to increase of laser absorption region as the front propagates and interplay of hydrodynamic motion and reflection of laser propagation. These features are well reported with the simulation

  8. Propagation of nuclear data uncertainties in fuel cycle calculations using Monte-Carlo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Martinez, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the knowledge of uncertainty propagation in depletion calculations is a critical issue because of the safety and economical performance of fuel cycles. Response magnitudes such as decay heat, radiotoxicity and isotopic inventory and their uncertainties should be known to handle spent fuel in present fuel cycles (e.g. high burnup fuel programme) and furthermore in new fuel cycles designs (e.g. fast breeder reactors and ADS). To deal with this task, there are different error propagation techniques, deterministic (adjoint/forward sensitivity analysis) and stochastic (Monte-Carlo technique) to evaluate the error in response magnitudes due to nuclear data uncertainties. In our previous works, cross-section uncertainties were propagated using a Monte-Carlo technique to calculate the uncertainty of response magnitudes such as decay heat and neutron emission. Also, the propagation of decay data, fission yield and cross-section uncertainties was performed, but only isotopic composition was the response magnitude calculated. Following the previous technique, the nuclear data uncertainties are taken into account and propagated to response magnitudes, decay heat and radiotoxicity. These uncertainties are assessed during cooling time. To evaluate this Monte-Carlo technique, two different applications are performed. First, a fission pulse decay heat calculation is carried out to check the Monte-Carlo technique, using decay data and fission yields uncertainties. Then, the results, experimental data and reference calculation (JEFF Report20), are compared. Second, we assess the impact of basic nuclear data (activation cross-section, decay data and fission yields) uncertainties on relevant fuel cycle parameters (decay heat and radiotoxicity) for a conceptual design of a modular European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT) fuel cycle. After identifying which time steps have higher uncertainties, an assessment of which uncertainties have more relevance is performed

  9. Calculation of characteristics of X-ray devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orobinskyi A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of this work is related to human radiation safety during tuning and regulation of X-ray devices in the process of their development and production. The more precise the calculations for the device are, the less time is required for its tuning and regulation, and thus people are less exposed to radiation. When developing an X-ray device, it is necessary to choose an X-ray tube and filters taking into account the application domain of the device. In order to do this, one should know anode voltage, X-ray tube anode current, material and thickness of filters, i.e. to calculate these characteristics at the set quality of X-ray radiation. The known published studies do not give any solution to this problem. The scientific novelty of this work is that it establishes the interdependence between main characteristics of the X-ray device: the function of the device defines the quality of X-ray radiation (mean photon energy and air kerma power; mean photon energy depends on the X-ray anode tube voltage and spectral resolution; air kerma power depends on anode tube voltage, current of X-ray tube anode, spectral resolution, thicknesses of the filters and their materials; spectral resolution depends on thicknesses of filters and their materials; thickness of filters depends on the material of the filter (the linear coefficient of weakening of X-ray radiation. Knowledge of interdependence of basic characteristics of the X-ray devices allowes developing simple algorithm for their calculation at the values of homogeneity coefficient from 0,8 to 1, which makes it possible to choose an X-ray tube and filters with the purpose of obtaining X-ray radiation of the set quality.

  10. An efficient ray tracing method for propagation prediction along a mobile route in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S.; Brennan, C.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an efficient ray tracing algorithm for propagation prediction in urban environments. The work presented in this paper builds upon previous work in which the maximum coverage area where rays can propagate after interaction with a wall or vertical edge is described by a lit polygon. The shadow regions formed by buildings within the lit polygon are described by shadow polygons. In this paper, the lit polygons of images are mapped to a coarse grid superimposed over the coverage area. This mapping reduces the active image tree significantly for a given receiver point to accelerate the ray finding process. The algorithm also presents an efficient method of quickly determining the valid ray segments for a mobile receiver moving along a linear trajectory. The validation results show considerable computation time reduction with good agreement between the simulated and measured data for propagation prediction in large urban environments.

  11. A versatile ray-tracing code for studying rf wave propagation in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y; Decker, J; Morini, L

    2012-01-01

    A new ray-tracing code named C3PO has been developed to study the propagation of arbitrary electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) waves in magnetized toroidal plasmas. Its structure is designed for maximum flexibility regarding the choice of coordinate system and dielectric model. The versatility of this code makes it particularly suitable for integrated modeling systems. Using a coordinate system that reflects the nested structure of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks, fast and accurate calculations inside the plasma separatrix can be performed using analytical derivatives of a spline-Fourier interpolation of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium. Applications to reverse field pinch magnetic configuration are also included. The effects of 3D perturbations of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium, due to the discreteness of the magnetic coil system or plasma fluctuations in an original quasi-optical approach, are also studied. Using a Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method for solving the set of ordinary differential equations, the ray-tracing code is extensively benchmarked against analytical models and other codes for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves. (paper)

  12. A time-averaged cosmic ray propagation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimas, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    An argument is presented, which casts doubt on our ability to choose an appropriate magnetic field ensemble for computing the average behavior of cosmic ray particles. An alternate procedure, using time-averages rather than ensemble-averages, is presented. (orig.) [de

  13. Bulk density calculations from prompt gamma ray yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Nagadi, M.M.; Al-Amoudi, O.S.B.; Maslehuddin, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The gamma ray yield from a Prompt Gamma ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup is a linear function of element concentration and neutron flux in a the sample with constant bulk density. If the sample bulk density varies as well, then the element concentration and the neutron flux has a nonlinear correlation with the gamma ray yield [1]. The measurement of gamma ray yield non-linearity from samples and a standard can be used to estimate the bulk density of the samples. In this study the prompt gamma ray yield from Blast Furnace Slag, Fly Ash, Silica Fumes and Superpozz cements samples have been measured as a function of their calcium and silicon concentration using KFUPM accelerator-based PGNAA setup [2]. Due to different bulk densities of the blended cement samples, the measured gamma ray yields have nonlinear correlation with calcium and silicon concentration of the samples. The non-linearity in the yield was observed to increase with gamma rays energy and element concentration. The bulk densities of the cement samples were calculated from ratio of gamma ray yield from blended cement and that from a Portland cement standard. The calculated bulk densities have good agreement with the published data. The result of this study will be presented

  14. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  15. Acceleration and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays represents one of the most conspicuous enigmas of modern astrophysics, in spite of gigantic experimental efforts in the past fifty years, and of active theoretical research. The past decade has known exciting experimental results, most particularly the detection of a cut-off at the expected position for the long sought Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin suppression as well as evidence for large scale anisotropies. This paper summarizes and discusses recent achievements in this field.

  16. Acceleration and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Martin

    2013-02-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays represents one of the most conspicuous enigmas of modern astrophysics, in spite of gigantic experimental efforts in the past fifty years, and of active theoretical research. The past decade has known exciting experimental results, most particularly the detection of a cut-off at the expected position for the long sought Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin suppression as well as evidence for large scale anisotropies. This paper summarizes and discusses recent achievements in this field.

  17. Fundamentals for cost calculations of X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossard, F.

    1985-01-01

    Economic implications of running an X-ray departement in Switzerland will be illustrated by comparing operating costs of private radiological institutes with and without CT to the operating costs of large radiological departments in hospitals with and without CT and to the operating costs of simple X-ray equipment in general practicioners' offices. - These costs calculations form the basis for cost-benefit analyses. (orig.) [de

  18. Phenomenology and numerical calculations of lean hydrogen-air premixed flame propagation in a turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faix-Gantier, A.

    2001-12-01

    This thesis concerns the study of flame propagation in a turbulent flow of lean hydrogen-air mixtures. The aim is to precise the characteristics of propagation as well as combustion and turbulence models able to take into account the peculiarities of these mixtures. This research work is related to the prevention of fire hazards associated with accidental release of hydrogen within the reactor of a nuclear power plant. In a first part, the scales (the flame velocity and thickness) associated with the laminar flame propagation in hydrogen-air mixtures are studied. A specific attention is devoted to the intrinsic instability properties of such flames. Then, the turbulence scales potentially present within a reactor are estimated in order to allow for the determination of the regimes of combustion that might be present within the reactor and among which the flamelet regime appears to be conceivable. In a second part, starting with the analysis of the propagation properties of a mean reaction zone calculated with a flamelet model, we show that, with an adequate tuning of the parameter appearing in the mean reaction rate expression, it is possible to predict numerically the turbulent flame speeds available with the literature. (author)

  19. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ∼0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach

  20. Shieldings for X-ray radiotherapy facilities calculated by computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Paulo S.; Farias, Marcos S.; Gavazza, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for calculation of X-ray shielding in facilities of radiotherapy with help of computer. Even today, in Brazil, the calculation of shielding for X-ray radiotherapy is done based on NCRP-49 recommendation establishing a methodology for calculating required to the elaboration of a project of shielding. With regard to high energies, where is necessary the construction of a labyrinth, the NCRP-49 is not very clear, so that in this field, studies were made resulting in an article that proposes a solution to the problem. It was developed a friendly program in Delphi programming language that, through the manual data entry of a basic design of architecture and some parameters, interprets the geometry and calculates the shields of the walls, ceiling and floor of on X-ray radiation therapy facility. As the final product, this program provides a graphical screen on the computer with all the input data and the calculation of shieldings and the calculation memory. The program can be applied in practical implementation of shielding projects for radiotherapy facilities and can be used in a didactic way compared to NCRP-49.

  1. Calculation of {beta}-ray spectra. Odd-odd nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Research Center for Science and Engineering

    1996-05-01

    In order to study {beta}-ray of atomic nucleus, it is natural to consider {beta}-ray data fundamental and important. In a recent experiment, Rudstam measured {beta}-ray spectra from short term nuclear fission product species in 1990. It is an important check point in theoretical study on {beta}-ray to investigate if these experimental data can be reproduced by any theoretical calculation. As there are several spectrum studies of {beta}-ray through decay heat for its various properties due to the general theory of the {beta}-decay, little descriptions can be found. In even such studies, spectra under high excitation state of daughter species difficult to measure and apt to short experimental results were treated with combination spectra composed of experimental and calculated values such as substitution of a part of the general theory with calculated value. In this paper, the {beta} spectra supposed by only the general theory was reported without using such data combination in order to confirm effectiveness of the theory. In particular, this report was described mainly on the results using recent modification of odd-odd nucleus species. (G.K.)

  2. Calculation of β-ray spectra. Odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Takahiro

    1996-01-01

    In order to study β-ray of atomic nucleus, it is natural to consider β-ray data fundamental and important. In a recent experiment, Rudstam measured β-ray spectra from short term nuclear fission product species in 1990. It is an important check point in theoretical study on β-ray to investigate if these experimental data can be reproduced by any theoretical calculation. As there are several spectrum studies of β-ray through decay heat for its various properties due to the general theory of the β-decay, little descriptions can be found. In even such studies, spectra under high excitation state of daughter species difficult to measure and apt to short experimental results were treated with combination spectra composed of experimental and calculated values such as substitution of a part of the general theory with calculated value. In this paper, the β spectra supposed by only the general theory was reported without using such data combination in order to confirm effectiveness of the theory. In particular, this report was described mainly on the results using recent modification of odd-odd nucleus species. (G.K.)

  3. Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties in Integral Measurements by Monte-Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; De Saint-Jean, C. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The generation of Multi-group cross sections together with relevant uncertainties is fundamental to assess the quality of integral data. The key information that are needed to propagate the microscopic experimental uncertainties to macroscopic reactor calculations are (1) the experimental covariance matrices, (2) the correlations between the parameters of the model and (3) the covariance matrices for the multi-group cross sections. The propagation of microscopic errors by Monte-Carlo technique was applied to determine the accuracy of the integral trends provided by the OSMOSE experiment carried out in the MINERVE reactor of the CEA Cadarache. The technique consists in coupling resonance shape analysis and deterministic codes. The integral trend and its accuracy obtained on the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) reaction will be presented. (author)

  4. Influence of boundary geometry in domain wall propagation in magnetic films with asymmetric holes: Micromagnetic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alija, A; Sobrado, I; Rodriguez-RodrIguez, G; Velez, M; Alameda, J M; MartIn, J I; Parrondo, J M R

    2010-01-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed in uniaxial magnetic films with 2D array of asymmetric arrow shape holes. In order to understand the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes, different boundary geometries conditions are used on the simulations. The depinning fields for forward and backward domain wall propagation have been calculated by the analysis of the energy landscapes as a function of the domain wall position. Domain wall depinning occurs preferentially at the free ends of the domain wall at the film boundaries. We have found that the domain wall propagation is different at the top/bottom boundaries of the simulated film which can be understood in terms of the magnetostatic energy and the chirality of the domain wall.

  5. On the calculation of crack propagation behavior in disks and plates using a mixed finite method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    1991-01-01

    According to the linear theory of elasticity, infinitely high stresses occur in the crack tips of cracked components. Plastic flow initiation or previous damage, however, will limit these stress singularities to an upper maximum stress for all real materials. To permit acquisition of this highly localized material behavior, while avoiding a very high physical nonlinear calculation effort for the evaluation of crack propagation behavior in disks and plates, models essentially based on Dugdale and Barenblatt are used. This involves determining the stress and displacement conditions required for the simulation of crack propagation by means of a mixed finite method introducing the disk cutting forces and plate curvatures or moments as unknown quantities. In addition to pure disk and plate problems, also coupled disk-plate problems are covered, where the coupling, on one hand, is due to the consideration of high deformations. (orig.) With 66 figs., 8 tabs [de

  6. Three-dimensional propagation in near-field tomographic X-ray phase retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhlandt, Aike; Salditt, Tim

    2016-01-01

    An extension of phase retrieval algorithms for near-field X-ray (propagation) imaging to three dimensions is presented, enhancing the quality of the reconstruction by exploiting previously unused three-dimensional consistency constraints. This paper presents an extension of phase retrieval algorithms for near-field X-ray (propagation) imaging to three dimensions, enhancing the quality of the reconstruction by exploiting previously unused three-dimensional consistency constraints. The approach is based on a novel three-dimensional propagator and is derived for the case of optically weak objects. It can be easily implemented in current phase retrieval architectures, is computationally efficient and reduces the need for restrictive prior assumptions, resulting in superior reconstruction quality

  7. A Monte Carlo approach for simulating the propagation of partially coherent x-ray beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prodi, A.; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2011-01-01

    Advances at SR sources in the generation of nanofocused beams with a high degree of transverse coherence call for effective techniques to simulate the propagation of partially coherent X-ray beams through complex optical systems in order to characterize how coherence properties such as the mutual...

  8. X-ray propagation through a quasi-ordered multilayered structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigate the propagation of short wavelength transverse electric x-rays through a quasiordered (Fibonacci) atomically commensurate multilayered structure using a transfer matrix model which treats each atomic plane as a diffraction unit. The reflectance spectrum has a rich structure being dominated by peaks ...

  9. Calculation of Dose Gamma Ray Build up Factor in Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gamma ray buildup factor was calculated by analyzing the narrow- beam and broad-beam geometry equations using Taylor's formula for isotropic sources and homogeneous materials. The buildup factor was programmed using MATLAB software to operate with any radiation energy (E), atomic number (Z) and the ...

  10. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. II: anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena, E-mail: blasi@arcetri.astro.it, E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5 — 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the anisotropy of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. The propagation and spallation of nuclei (with charge 1 ≤ Z ≤ 26) are taken into account. At high energies (E > 1 TeV) we assume that D(E)∝(E/Z){sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. Our calculations allow us to determine the contribution to anisotropy resulting from both the large scale distribution of SNRs in the Galaxy and the random distribution of the nearest remnants. The naive expectation that the anisotropy amplitude scales as δ{sub A}∝D(E) is shown to be a wild oversimplification of reality which does not reflect in the predicted anisotropy for any realistic distribution of the sources. The fluctuations in the anisotropy pattern are dominated by nearby sources, so that predicting or explaining the observed anisotropy amplitude and phase becomes close to impossible. Nevertheless, the results of our calculations, when compared to the data, allow us to draw interesting conclusions in terms of the propagation scenario to be preferred both in terms of the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient and of the size of the halo. We find that the very weak energy dependence of the anisotropy amplitude below 10{sup 5} GeV, as observed by numerous experiments, as well as the rise at higher energies, can best be explained if the diffusion coefficient is D(E)∝E{sup 1/3}. Faster diffusion, for instance with δ = 0.6, leads in general to an exceedingly large anisotropy amplitude. The spiral structure introduces interesting trends in

  11. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. II: anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the anisotropy of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. The propagation and spallation of nuclei (with charge 1 ≤ Z ≤ 26) are taken into account. At high energies (E > 1 TeV) we assume that D(E)∝(E/Z) δ , with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. Our calculations allow us to determine the contribution to anisotropy resulting from both the large scale distribution of SNRs in the Galaxy and the random distribution of the nearest remnants. The naive expectation that the anisotropy amplitude scales as δ A ∝D(E) is shown to be a wild oversimplification of reality which does not reflect in the predicted anisotropy for any realistic distribution of the sources. The fluctuations in the anisotropy pattern are dominated by nearby sources, so that predicting or explaining the observed anisotropy amplitude and phase becomes close to impossible. Nevertheless, the results of our calculations, when compared to the data, allow us to draw interesting conclusions in terms of the propagation scenario to be preferred both in terms of the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient and of the size of the halo. We find that the very weak energy dependence of the anisotropy amplitude below 10 5 GeV, as observed by numerous experiments, as well as the rise at higher energies, can best be explained if the diffusion coefficient is D(E)∝E 1/3 . Faster diffusion, for instance with δ = 0.6, leads in general to an exceedingly large anisotropy amplitude. The spiral structure introduces interesting trends in the energy

  12. Code system BCG for gamma-ray skyshine calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryufuku, Hiroshi; Numakunai, Takao; Miyasaka, Shun-ichi; Minami, Kazuyoshi.

    1979-03-01

    A code system BCG has been developed for calculating conveniently and efficiently gamma-ray skyshine doses using the transport calculation codes ANISN and DOT and the point-kernel calculation codes G-33 and SPAN. To simplify the input forms to the system, the forms for these codes are unified, twelve geometric patterns are introduced to give material regions, and standard data are available as a library. To treat complex arrangements of source and shield, it is further possible to use successively the code such that the results from one code may be used as input data to the same or other code. (author)

  13. Ab initio theory and calculations of X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehr, J.J.; Kas, J.J.; Prange, M.P.; Sorini, A.P.; Takimoto, Y.; Vila, F.

    2009-01-01

    There has been dramatic progress in recent years both in the calculation and interpretation of various x-ray spectroscopies. However, current theoretical calculations often use a number of simplified models to account for many-body effects, in lieu of first principles calculations. In an effort to overcome these limitations we describe in this article a number of recent advances in theory and in theoretical codes which offer the prospect of parameter free calculations that include the dominant many-body effects. These advances are based on ab initio calculations of the dielectric and vibrational response of a system. Calculations of the dielectric function over a broad spectrum yield system dependent self-energies and mean-free paths, as well as intrinsic losses due to multielectron excitations. Calculations of the dynamical matrix yield vibrational damping in terms of multiple-scattering Debye-Waller factors. Our ab initio methods for determining these many-body effects have led to new, improved, and broadly applicable x-ray and electron spectroscopy codes. (authors)

  14. Propagation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and their secondaries with CRPropa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, Arjen Rene van

    2015-04-01

    Due to experiments like the Pierre Auger Observatory (Auger) and the Telescope Array (TA), high-statistics data is becoming available on the energy spectrum, the composition and the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs, cosmic rays with energies above ∝ 10 17 eV). To interpret this data in terms of actual astrophysical parameters, or to test astrophysical models against the measured data, dedicated simulations of the propagation of UHECRs from their sources to Earth are needed. To this end, the UHECR propagation code called CRPropa has been developed. It can take into account all relevant interactions with ambient photon backgrounds (pair production, photodisintegration and photopion production) as well as nuclear decay, cosmological evolution effects and deflections in extragalactic and galactic magnetic fields. CRPropa, including its newest features, is described in this thesis. When considering the propagation of ultra-high-energy nuclei, the dominant interaction for most isotopes and energies is photodisintegration. Photodisintegration has been implemented in CRPropa for all relevant isotopes (up to iron) and all relevant photodisintegration channels using cross-section calculations with the publicly-available code called TALYS, including extensions for the low mass numbers. This photodisintegration setup is compared here extensively with the photodisintegration scheme developed by Puget, Stecker and Bredekamp, leading to several improvements on the cross sections implemented in CRPropa. In the interactions of UHECRs with background photon fields, secondary neutrinos and photons, so-called cosmogenic neutrinos and photons, can be created. CRPropa can simulate the production and propagation of these secondary particles as well. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory (IceCube) has recently reported the first observation of extraterrestrial neutrinos in the PeV energy range. In this work is investigated whether these neutrinos could have

  15. Calculation of Si(Li) x-ray detector efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.; Holton, R.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation of detector efficiency functions is an important step in the quantitative analysis of x-ray spectra when approached by a standardless technique. In this regard, it becomes essential that the analyst not only model the physical aspects of the absorption and transmission of the various windows present, but also use the most accurate data available for the mass absorption coefficients required in these calculations. The topic of modeling the size and shape of the windows present is beyond the scope of this paper and the authors instead concentrate on the mass absorption coefficients used in the calculations and their implications to efficiency calculations. For the purposes of this paper, the authors consider that the relative detector efficiency function of a conventional Si(Li) detector can be modeled by a simple expression

  16. Notch fatigue crack propagation - A consistent concept for calculating flawed service life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dankert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The research report presents a consistent concept of elastic-plastic fatigue fracture mechanics, to be used for numerical description of crack initiation and propagation behaviour within and out of notched areas of circular notched specimens for Woehler tests, two-phase fatigue tests and tests under service conditions. It is shown that a fracture-mechanics approach yields results capable of describing the load history over the whole service life of a structural member. A J-integral-related crack propagation model is derived that takes into account the crack opening and closure behaviour. The model is based on specially developed formulas, algorithms and approximation formulas required for description of crack opening and closure behaviour as well as calculation of the stress intensity factor K and the J-integral of cracks at notches. The values relating to crack opening were compared with experimental data, and those describing the stress intensity factor K and the J-integrals with 2D and 3D elastic-plastic FE calculations. Good and very good agreement of results was achieved. (orig./CB) [de

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION MODELS FROM A GLOBAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotta, R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Porter, T. A.; Ruiz de Austri, R.; Strong, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in many areas of modern physics such as, e.g., indirect searches for dark matter and particle acceleration in supernova remnant shocks rely heavily on studies of cosmic rays (CRs) and associated diffuse emissions (radio, microwave, X-rays, γ-rays). While very detailed numerical models of CR propagation exist, a quantitative statistical analysis of such models has been so far hampered by the large computational effort that those models require. Although statistical analyses have been carried out before using semi-analytical models (where the computation is much faster), the evaluation of the results obtained from such models is difficult, as they necessarily suffer from many simplifying assumptions. The main objective of this paper is to present a working method for a full Bayesian parameter estimation for a numerical CR propagation model. For this study, we use the GALPROP code, the most advanced of its kind, which uses astrophysical information, and nuclear and particle data as inputs to self-consistently predict CRs, γ-rays, synchrotron, and other observables. We demonstrate that a full Bayesian analysis is possible using nested sampling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods (implemented in the SuperBayeS code) despite the heavy computational demands of a numerical propagation code. The best-fit values of parameters found in this analysis are in agreement with previous, significantly simpler, studies also based on GALPROP.

  18. Dose calculation of X-ray in medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanmei; Xue Dingyu; Xu Xinhe; Chen Zhen; Dong Zaili

    2006-01-01

    The photon transportation in radiotherapy is studied based on Monte Carlo method. The dose calculation based on the MC simulation package DPM has been carried out, and the results have been visualized using MEX technology of Matlab. The dose results of X-ray in homogeneity and inhomogeneity medium have been compared with experimental data and those of other MC simulation package, and these results all agree. The calculation method we proposed has the advantage of high speed and good accuracy, therefore, is applicable in practice. (authors)

  19. Calculation of gamma ray exposure rates from uranium ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.; Wilson, O.J.

    1980-02-01

    The planning of operations associated with uranium mines often requires that estimates be made of the exposure rates from various ore bodies. A straight-forward method of calculating the exposure rate from an arbitrarily shaped body is presented. Parameters for the calculation are evaluated under the assumption of secular equilibrium of uranium with its daughters and that the uranium is uniformly distributed throughout an average soil mixture. The spectral distribution of the emitted gamma rays and the effect of air attenuation are discussed. Worked examples are given of typical situations encountered in uranium mines

  20. Nuclear-data uncertainty propagations in burnup calculation for the PWR assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Chenghui; Cao, Liangzhi; Wu, Hongchun; Shen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The DRAGON 5.0 and NECP-CACTI have been implemented in UNICORN. • The effects of different neutronics methods on S&U results were quantified. • Uncertainty analysis has been applied to burnup calculation of PWR assembly. • The uncertainties of eigenvalue and few-group constants have been quantified. - Abstract: In this paper, our home-developed lattice code NECP-CACTI has been implemented into our UNICORN code to perform sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for the lattice calculations. The verified multigroup cross-section perturbation model and methods of the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis are established and applied to different lattice codes in UNICORN. As DRAGON5.0 and NECP-CACTI are available for the lattice calculations in UNICORN now, the effects of different neutronics methods (including methods for the neutron-transport and resonance self-shielding calculations) on the results of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis were studied in this paper. Based on NECP-CACTI, uncertainty analysis using the statistical sampling method has been performed to the burnup calculation for the fresh-fueled TMI-1 assembly, propagating the nuclear-data uncertainties to k_∞ and two-group constants of the lattice calculation with depletions. As results shown, for different neutronics methods, it can be observed that different methods of the neutron-transport calculation introduce no differences to the results of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, while different methods of the resonance self-shielding calculation would impact the results. With depletions of the TMI-1 assembly, for k_∞, the relative uncertainty varies between 0.45% and 0.60%; for two-group constants, the largest variation is between 0.35% and 2.56% for vΣ_f_,_2. Moreover, the most significant contributors to the uncertainty of k_∞ and two-group constants varied with depletions are determined.

  1. It's About Time: Interpreting AMS Antimatter Data in Terms of Cosmic Ray Propagation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    If cosmic ray positrons come from a secondary origin, then their production spectrum is correlated with the production spectrum of other secondary particles such as boron and antiprotons through scattering cross sections measured in the laboratory. This allows to define a first-principle upper bound on the positron flux at the Earth, independent of propagation model assumptions. Using currently available B/C and antiproton/proton data, we show that the positron flux reported by AMS is consistent with the bound and saturates it at high energies. This coincidence is a compelling indication for a secondary source. We explain how improved AMS measurements of the high energy boron, antiproton, and secondary radioactive nuclei fluxes can corroborate or falsify the secondary source hypothesis. Assuming that the positrons are secondary, we show that AMS data imply a propagation time in the Galaxy of order 1Myr or less for cosmic rays with magnetic rigidity > 300 GV. This corresponds to an average traversed interstel...

  2. A Temporal Millimeter Wave Propagation Model for Tunnels Using Ray Frustum Techniques and FFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyen Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A temporal millimeter wave propagation model for tunnels is presented using ray frustum techniques and fast Fourier transform (FFT. To directly estimate or simulate effects of millimeter wave channel properties on the performance of communication services, time domain impulse responses of demodulated signals should be obtained, which needs rather large computation time. To mitigate the computational burden, ray frustum techniques are used to obtain frequency domain transfer function of millimeter wave propagation environment and FFT of equivalent low pass signals are used to retrieve demodulated waveforms. This approach is numerically efficient and helps to directly estimate impact of tunnel structures and surfaces roughness on the performance of millimeter wave communication services.

  3. Static multiresolution grids with inline hierarchy information for cosmic ray propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Gero, E-mail: gero.mueller@physik.rwth-aachen.de [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    For numerical simulations of cosmic-ray propagation fast access to static magnetic field data is required. We present a data structure for multiresolution vector grids which is optimized for fast access, low overhead and shared memory use. The hierarchy information is encoded into the grid itself, reducing the memory overhead. Benchmarks show that in certain scenarios the differences in deflections introduced by sampling the magnetic field model can be significantly reduced when using the multiresolution approach.

  4. Propagation of statistical and nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos, Oscar; Sanz, Javier; Juan, Jesus; Kuijper, Jim C.

    2008-01-01

    Two methodologies to propagate the uncertainties on the nuclide inventory in combined Monte Carlo-spectrum and burn-up calculations are presented, based on sensitivity/uncertainty and random sampling techniques (uncertainty Monte Carlo method). Both enable the assessment of the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear data as well as uncertainties due to the statistical nature of the Monte Carlo neutron transport calculation. The methodologies are implemented in our MCNP-ACAB system, which combines the neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB. A high burn-up benchmark problem is used to test the MCNP-ACAB performance in inventory predictions, with no uncertainties. A good agreement is found with the results of other participants. This benchmark problem is also used to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties and statistical flux errors in high burn-up applications. A detailed calculation is performed to evaluate the effect of cross-section uncertainties in the inventory prediction, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron flux level and spectrum. Very large uncertainties are found at the unusually high burn-up of this exercise (800 MWd/kgHM). To compare the impact of the statistical errors in the calculated flux with respect to the cross uncertainties, a simplified problem is considered, taking a constant neutron flux level and spectrum. It is shown that, provided that the flux statistical deviations in the Monte Carlo transport calculation do not exceed a given value, the effect of the flux errors in the calculated isotopic inventory are negligible (even at very high burn-up) compared to the effect of the large cross-section uncertainties available at present in the data files

  5. Propagation of statistical and nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain)], E-mail: nuria@din.upm.es; Cabellos, Oscar [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, UNED (Spain); Juan, Jesus [Laboratorio de Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Kuijper, Jim C. [NRG - Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes Group, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    Two methodologies to propagate the uncertainties on the nuclide inventory in combined Monte Carlo-spectrum and burn-up calculations are presented, based on sensitivity/uncertainty and random sampling techniques (uncertainty Monte Carlo method). Both enable the assessment of the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear data as well as uncertainties due to the statistical nature of the Monte Carlo neutron transport calculation. The methodologies are implemented in our MCNP-ACAB system, which combines the neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB. A high burn-up benchmark problem is used to test the MCNP-ACAB performance in inventory predictions, with no uncertainties. A good agreement is found with the results of other participants. This benchmark problem is also used to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties and statistical flux errors in high burn-up applications. A detailed calculation is performed to evaluate the effect of cross-section uncertainties in the inventory prediction, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron flux level and spectrum. Very large uncertainties are found at the unusually high burn-up of this exercise (800 MWd/kgHM). To compare the impact of the statistical errors in the calculated flux with respect to the cross uncertainties, a simplified problem is considered, taking a constant neutron flux level and spectrum. It is shown that, provided that the flux statistical deviations in the Monte Carlo transport calculation do not exceed a given value, the effect of the flux errors in the calculated isotopic inventory are negligible (even at very high burn-up) compared to the effect of the large cross-section uncertainties available at present in the data files.

  6. Light propagation and transmission in hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal cells: Geometrical optics calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I.; Reyes, J. Adrian

    2006-08-01

    The authors present a geometrical approach to calculate the transmission of light in a hybrid-aligned nematic cell under the influence of an applied electric field. Using the framework of geometrical optics they present results for the ray tracing as well as the transmission of light as a function of the applied low frequency voltage. Dispersion effects are included through a wavelength dependent dielectric function. Their results for the transmittance as a function of the applied voltage show oscillations that are in good qualitative agreement with previously obtained experimental measurements.

  7. Comparison and Extension of Existing 3D Propagation Models with Real-World Effects Based on Ray-tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kifle, Dereje W.; Gimenez, Lucas Chavarria; Wegmann, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    antenna beam orientation like antenna tilting or when users are distributed in the third dimension (height) in multi-floor scenarios. Ray tracing based generated propagation maps that show the realistic propagation effect are used as 3D real world reference for investigation and model approval....

  8. Partially coherent X-ray wavefront propagation simulations including grazing-incidence focusing optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestrari, Niccolo; Chubar, Oleg; Reininger, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    X-ray beamlines in modern synchrotron radiation sources make extensive use of grazing-incidence reflective optics, in particular Kirkpatrick-Baez elliptical mirror systems. These systems can focus the incoming X-rays down to nanometer-scale spot sizes while maintaining relatively large acceptance apertures and high flux in the focused radiation spots. In low-emittance storage rings and in free-electron lasers such systems are used with partially or even nearly fully coherent X-ray beams and often target diffraction-limited resolution. Therefore, their accurate simulation and modeling has to be performed within the framework of wave optics. Here the implementation and benchmarking of a wave-optics method for the simulation of grazing-incidence mirrors based on the local stationary-phase approximation or, in other words, the local propagation of the radiation electric field along geometrical rays, is described. The proposed method is CPU-efficient and fully compatible with the numerical methods of Fourier optics. It has been implemented in the Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) computer code and extensively tested against the geometrical ray-tracing code SHADOW. The test simulations have been performed for cases without and with diffraction at mirror apertures, including cases where the grazing-incidence mirrors can be hardly approximated by ideal lenses. Good agreement between the SRW and SHADOW simulation results is observed in the cases without diffraction. The differences between the simulation results obtained by the two codes in diffraction-dominated cases for illumination with fully or partially coherent radiation are analyzed and interpreted. The application of the new method for the simulation of wavefront propagation through a high-resolution X-ray microspectroscopy beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA) is demonstrated.

  9. Cosmic-Ray Propagation in Turbulent Spiral Magnetic Fields Associated with Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Adams, Fred C.

    2018-04-01

    External cosmic rays impinging upon circumstellar disks associated with young stellar objects provide an important source of ionization, and, as such, play an important role in disk evolution and planet formation. However, these incoming cosmic rays are affected by a variety of physical processes internal to stellar/disk systems, including modulation by turbulent magnetic fields. Globally, these fields naturally provide both a funneling effect, where cosmic rays from larger volumes are focused into the disk region, and a magnetic mirroring effect, where cosmic rays are repelled due to the increasing field strength. This paper considers cosmic-ray propagation in the presence of a turbulent spiral magnetic field, analogous to that produced by the solar wind. The interaction of this wind with the interstellar medium defines a transition radius, analogous to the heliopause, which provides the outer boundary to this problem. We construct a new coordinate system where one coordinate follows the spiral magnetic field lines and consider magnetic perturbations to the field in the perpendicular directions. The presence of magnetic turbulence replaces the mirroring points with a distribution of values and moves the mean location outward. Our results thus help quantify the degree to which cosmic-ray fluxes are reduced in circumstellar disks by the presence of magnetic field structures that are shaped by stellar winds. The new coordinate system constructed herein should also be useful in other astronomical applications.

  10. DAMPING OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN PARTIALLY IONIZED PLASMA: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAY PROPAGATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Siyao; Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the damping processes of both incompressible and compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a partially ionized medium. We start from the linear analysis of MHD waves, applying both single-fluid and two-fluid treatments. The damping rates derived from the linear analysis are then used in determining the damping scales of MHD turbulence. The physical connection between the damping scale of MHD turbulence and the cutoff boundary of linear MHD waves is investigated. We find two branches of slow modes propagating in ions and neutrals, respectively, below the damping scale of slow MHD turbulence, and offer a thorough discussion of their propagation and dissipation behavior. Our analytical results are shown to be applicable in a variety of partially ionized interstellar medium (ISM) phases and the solar chromosphere. The importance of neutral viscosity in damping the Alfvenic turbulence in the interstellar warm neutral medium and the solar chromosphere is demonstrated. As a significant astrophysical utility, we introduce damping effects to the propagation of cosmic rays in partially ionized ISM. The important role of turbulence damping in both transit-time damping and gyroresonance is identified.

  11. Propagation of whistler-mode chorus to low altitudes: divergent ray trajectories and ground accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chum

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ray trajectories of nonductedly propagating lower-band chorus waves with respect to their initial angle θ0, between the wave vector and ambient magnetic field. Although we consider a wide range of initial angles θ0, in order to be consistent with recent satellite observations, we pay special attention to the intervals of initial angles θ0, for which the waves propagate along the field lines in the source region, i.e. we mainly focus on waves generated with &theta0 within an interval close to 0° and on waves generated within an interval close to the Gendrin angle. We demonstrate that the ray trajectories of waves generated within an interval close to the Gendrin angle with a wave vector directed towards the lower L-shells (to the Earth significantly diverge at the frequencies typical for the lower-band chorus. Some of these diverging trajectories reach the topside ionosphere having θ close to 0°; thus, a part of the energy may leak to the ground at higher altitudes where the field lines have a nearly vertical direction. The waves generated with different initial angles are reflected. A small variation of the initial wave normal angle thus very dramatically changes the behaviour of the resulting ray. Although our approach is rather theoretical, based on the ray tracing simulation, we show that the initial angle θ0 of the waves reaching the ionosphere (possibly ground is surprisingly close - differs just by several degrees from the initial angles which fits the observation of magnetospherically reflected chorus revealed by CLUSTER satellites. We also mention observations of diverging trajectories on low altitude satellites.

  12. Error Propagation Dynamics of PIV-based Pressure Field Calculations: How well does the pressure Poisson solver perform inherently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Whitehead, Jared; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-08-01

    Obtaining pressure field data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) is an attractive technique in fluid dynamics due to its noninvasive nature. The application of this technique generally involves integrating the pressure gradient or solving the pressure Poisson equation using a velocity field measured with PIV. However, very little research has been done to investigate the dynamics of error propagation from PIV-based velocity measurements to the pressure field calculation. Rather than measure the error through experiment, we investigate the dynamics of the error propagation by examining the Poisson equation directly. We analytically quantify the error bound in the pressure field, and are able to illustrate the mathematical roots of why and how the Poisson equation based pressure calculation propagates error from the PIV data. The results show that the error depends on the shape and type of boundary conditions, the dimensions of the flow domain, and the flow type.

  13. Error propagation dynamics of PIV-based pressure field calculations: How well does the pressure Poisson solver perform inherently?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Zhao; Thomson, Scott; Whitehead, Jared; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining pressure field data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) is an attractive technique in fluid dynamics due to its noninvasive nature. The application of this technique generally involves integrating the pressure gradient or solving the pressure Poisson equation using a velocity field measured with PIV. However, very little research has been done to investigate the dynamics of error propagation from PIV-based velocity measurements to the pressure field calculation. Rather than measure the error through experiment, we investigate the dynamics of the error propagation by examining the Poisson equation directly. We analytically quantify the error bound in the pressure field, and are able to illustrate the mathematical roots of why and how the Poisson equation based pressure calculation propagates error from the PIV data. The results show that the error depends on the shape and type of boundary conditions, the dimensions of the flow domain, and the flow type. (paper)

  14. Error Propagation Dynamics of PIV-based Pressure Field Calculations: How well does the pressure Poisson solver perform inherently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Whitehead, Jared; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining pressure field data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) is an attractive technique in fluid dynamics due to its noninvasive nature. The application of this technique generally involves integrating the pressure gradient or solving the pressure Poisson equation using a velocity field measured with PIV. However, very little research has been done to investigate the dynamics of error propagation from PIV-based velocity measurements to the pressure field calculation. Rather than measure the error through experiment, we investigate the dynamics of the error propagation by examining the Poisson equation directly. We analytically quantify the error bound in the pressure field, and are able to illustrate the mathematical roots of why and how the Poisson equation based pressure calculation propagates error from the PIV data. The results show that the error depends on the shape and type of boundary conditions, the dimensions of the flow domain, and the flow type. PMID:27499587

  15. Sound Propagation Around Off-Shore Wind Turbines. Long-Range Parabolic Equation Calculations for Baltic Sea Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Lisa

    2003-07-01

    Low-frequency, long-range sound propagation over a sea surface has been calculated using a wide-angel Cranck-Nicholson Parabolic Equation method. The model is developed to investigate noise from off-shore wind turbines. The calculations are made using normal meteorological conditions of the Baltic Sea. Special consideration has been made to a wind phenomenon called low level jet with strong winds on rather low altitude. The effects of water waves on sound propagation have been incorporated in the ground boundary condition using a boss model. This way of including roughness in sound propagation models is valid for water wave heights that are small compared to the wave length of the sound. Nevertheless, since only low frequency sound is considered, waves up to the mean wave height of the Baltic Sea can be included in this manner. The calculation model has been tested against benchmark cases and agrees well with measurements. The calculations show that channelling of sound occurs at downwind conditions and that the sound propagation tends towards cylindrical spreading. The effects of the water waves are found to be fairly small.

  16. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  17. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3440 S. Dearborn Street, E1-116, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  18. Computer code for shielding calculations of x-rays rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, R.R.W.; Borges, D. da S.; Lava, D.D.; Moreira, M. de L.; Guimarães, A.C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The building an effective barrier against ionizing radiation present in radiographic rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for thickness specification of primary and secondary, barrier of a traditional radiographic room, considers the following factors: Use Factor, Occupational Factor, distance between the source and the wall, Workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the source. With these data it was possible to develop a computer code, which aims to identify and use variables in functions obtained through graphics regressions provided by NCRP-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) report, for shielding calculation of room walls, and the walls of the dark room and adjacent areas. With the implemented methodology, it was made a code validation by comparison of results with a study case provided by the report. The obtained values for thickness comprise different materials such as concrete, lead and glass. After validation it was made a case study of an arbitrary radiographic room.The development of the code resulted in a user-friendly tool for planning radiographic rooms to comply with the limits established by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in september/2011. (authors)

  19. Simultaneous X-ray imaging and diffraction study of shock propagation and phase transition in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Eric

    2017-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging technique using a free electron laser have observed the propagation of laser-driven shock waves directly inside materials. While providing images with few hundred nanometers spatial resolution, access to more quantitative information like the material density and the various shock front speeds remain challenging due to imperfections in the images limiting the convergence in the reconstruction algorithm. Alternatively, pump-probe X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a robust technique to extract atomic crystalline structure of compressed matter, providing insight into the kinetics of phase transformation and material response to stress. However, XRD by itself is not sufficient to extract the equation of state of the material under study. Here we report on the use of the LCLS free electron laser as a source of a high-resolution X-ray microscopy enabling the direct imaging of shock waves and phase transitions in optically opaque silicon. In this configuration, no algorithm is necessary to extract the material density and the position of the shock fronts. Simultaneously, we probed the crystalline structure via XRD of the various phases in laser compressed silicon. E. Galtier, B. Nagler, H. J. Lee, S. Brown, E. Granados, A. Hashim, E. McBride, A. Mackinnon, I. Nam, J. Zimmerman (SLAC) A. Gleason (Stanford, LANL) A. Higginbotham (University of York) A. Schropp, F. Seiboth (DESY).

  20. Accurate calculation of the differential cross section of compton scattering with electron mixed chain propagator in SM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuewen; Fang Zhenyun; Shi Chengye

    2012-01-01

    By using the electroweak standard model (SM), we analyzed the framework of electron mixed chain propagator which composed of serious of different physical loops participating in electroweak interaction and completed the relevant analytical calculation. Then, we obtained the analytical result of electron mixed chain propagator. By applying our result to Compton scattering, the differential cross section of Compton scattering dσ SM (chain) /dcosθ is counted accurately. This result is compared with the lowest order differential cross section dσ (tree) /dcosθ and the electronic chain propagator Compton scattering differential cross section dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ in quantum electrodynamics (QED). It can be seen that dσ SM (chain ) /dcosθ can show the radiation correction more subtly than dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ. (authors)

  1. Software for X-Ray Images Calculation of Hydrogen Compression Device in Megabar Pressure Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Nikolay; Bykov, Alexander; Pavlov, Valery

    2007-06-01

    Software for x-ray images simulation is described. The software is a part of x-ray method used for investigation of an equation of state of hydrogen in a megabar pressure range. A graphical interface that clearly and simply allows users to input data for x-ray image calculation: properties of the studied device, parameters of the x-ray radiation source, parameters of the x-ray radiation recorder, the experiment geometry; to represent the calculation results and efficiently transmit them to other software for processing. The calculation time is minimized. This makes it possible to perform calculations in a dialogue regime. The software is written in ``MATLAB'' system.

  2. Modelling of waves propagation on irregular surfaces using ray tracing and GTD approaches: Application to head waves simulation in TOFD inspections for NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrand, Adrien; Darmon, Michel; Chatillon, Sylvain; Deschamps, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is a classical ultrasonic method used in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation, which allows a precise positioning and a quantitative size evaluation of cracks in the inspected material. Among the typical phenomena arising in the current TOFD inspection, the so-called 'head wave' is the first contribution reaching the receiver. The head wave propagation on a planar interface is well known and identified as a critical refraction taking place on the material surface. On irregular surfaces, it has been shown that the head wave results from the melting of surface and bulk waves mechanisms and that surface irregularities are responsible for numerous diffractions of the incident head wave. To simulate such behaviour, a model has been developed using a ray tracing technique based on time of flight minimization (generalized Fermat's principle). It enables the calculation of the ray path and the corresponding time of flight of all waves propagating in the material, including the head wave. To obtain a complete propagation model for these waves (both trajectory and amplitude), the integration of Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) models is currently performed by coupling them with the ray-based approach discussed above.

  3. Modelling of waves propagation on irregular surfaces using ray tracing and GTD approaches: Application to head waves simulation in TOFD inspections for NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Adrien; Darmon, Michel; Chatillon, Sylvain; Deschamps, Marc

    2014-04-01

    The Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is a classical ultrasonic method used in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation, which allows a precise positioning and a quantitative size evaluation of cracks in the inspected material. Among the typical phenomena arising in the current TOFD inspection, the so-called "head wave" is the first contribution reaching the receiver. The head wave propagation on a planar interface is well known and identified as a critical refraction taking place on the material surface. On irregular surfaces, it has been shown that the head wave results from the melting of surface and bulk waves mechanisms and that surface irregularities are responsible for numerous diffractions of the incident head wave. To simulate such behaviour, a model has been developed using a ray tracing technique based on time of flight minimization (generalized Fermat's principle). It enables the calculation of the ray path and the corresponding time of flight of all waves propagating in the material, including the head wave. To obtain a complete propagation model for these waves (both trajectory and amplitude), the integration of Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) models is currently performed by coupling them with the ray-based approach discussed above.

  4. Noise propagation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2014-01-01

    Three phase-retrieval algorithms, based on the transport-of-intensity equation and on the contrast transfer function for propagation-based imaging, and on the linearized geometrical optics approximation for analyser-based imaging, are investigated. The algorithms are compared in terms of their effect on propagation of noise from projection images to the corresponding phase-retrieved images and further to the computed tomography (CT) images/slices of a monomorphous object reconstructed using filtered backprojection algorithm. The comparison is carried out in terms of an integral noise characteristic, the variance, as well as in terms of a simple figure-of-merit, i.e. signal-to-noise ratio per unit dose. A gain factor is introduced that quantitatively characterizes the effect of phase retrieval on the variance of noise in the reconstructed projection images and in the axial slices of the object. Simple analytical expressions are derived for the gain factor and the signal-to-noise ratio, which indicate that the application of phase-retrieval algorithms can increase these parameters by up to two orders of magnitude compared to raw projection images and conventional CT, thus allowing significant improvement in the image quality and/or reduction of the x-ray dose delivered to the patient. (paper)

  5. Solution of Heliospheric Propagation: Unveiling the Local Interstellar Spectra of Cosmic-ray Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, M. J.; Torre, S. Della; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; Vacca, G. La; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M. [INFN, Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Jóhannesson, G. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Kachelriess, M. [Institutt for fysikk, NTNU, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Masi, N.; Quadrani, L. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Moskalenko, I. V.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T. A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ostapchenko, S. S. [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-05-10

    Local interstellar spectra (LIS) for protons, helium, and antiprotons are built using the most recent experimental results combined with state-of-the-art models for propagation in the Galaxy and heliosphere. Two propagation packages, GALPROP and HelMod, are combined to provide a single framework that is run to reproduce direct measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species at different modulation levels and at both polarities of the solar magnetic field. To do so in a self-consistent way, an iterative procedure was developed, where the GALPROP LIS output is fed into HelMod, providing modulated spectra for specific time periods of selected experiments to compare with the data; the HelMod parameter optimization is performed at this stage and looped back to adjust the LIS using the new GALPROP run. The parameters were tuned with the maximum likelihood procedure using an extensive data set of proton spectra from 1997 to 2015. The proposed LIS accommodate both the low-energy interstellar CR spectra measured by Voyager 1 and the high-energy observations by BESS, Pamela, AMS-01, and AMS-02 made from the balloons and near-Earth payloads; it also accounts for Ulysses counting rate features measured out of the ecliptic plane. The found solution is in a good agreement with proton, helium, and antiproton data by AMS-02, BESS, and PAMELA in the whole energy range.

  6. Non-parametric order statistics method applied to uncertainty propagation in fuel rod calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimescu, V.E.; Heins, L.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in modeling fuel rod behavior and accumulations of adequate experimental data have made possible the introduction of quantitative methods to estimate the uncertainty of predictions made with best-estimate fuel rod codes. The uncertainty range of the input variables is characterized by a truncated distribution which is typically a normal, lognormal, or uniform distribution. While the distribution for fabrication parameters is defined to cover the design or fabrication tolerances, the distribution of modeling parameters is inferred from the experimental database consisting of separate effects tests and global tests. The final step of the methodology uses a Monte Carlo type of random sampling of all relevant input variables and performs best-estimate code calculations to propagate these uncertainties in order to evaluate the uncertainty range of outputs of interest for design analysis, such as internal rod pressure and fuel centerline temperature. The statistical method underlying this Monte Carlo sampling is non-parametric order statistics, which is perfectly suited to evaluate quantiles of populations with unknown distribution. The application of this method is straightforward in the case of one single fuel rod, when a 95/95 statement is applicable: 'with a probability of 95% and confidence level of 95% the values of output of interest are below a certain value'. Therefore, the 0.95-quantile is estimated for the distribution of all possible values of one fuel rod with a statistical confidence of 95%. On the other hand, a more elaborate procedure is required if all the fuel rods in the core are being analyzed. In this case, the aim is to evaluate the following global statement: with 95% confidence level, the expected number of fuel rods which are not exceeding a certain value is all the fuel rods in the core except only a few fuel rods. In both cases, the thresholds determined by the analysis should be below the safety acceptable design limit. An indirect

  7. Development of numerical methods to calculate the propagation and the absorption of the hybrid wave in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebelin, E.

    1997-01-01

    Full-wave calculations based on trial functions are carried out for solving the lower hybrid current drive problem in tokamaks. A variational method is developed and provides an efficient system to describe in a global manner both the propagation and the absorption of the electromagnetic waves in plasmas. The calculation is fully carried out in the case of circular and concentric flux surfaces. The existence and uniqueness of the solution of the wave propagation equation is mathematically proved. The first realistic simulations are performed for the high aspect ratio tokamak TRIAM-1M. It is checked that the main features of the lower-hybrid wave dynamics are well described numerically. (A.C.)

  8. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers

  9. Probing cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation with H{sub 3}{sup +} observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indriolo, Nick; Fields, Brian D.; McCall, Benjamin J. [3D University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    As cosmic rays traverse the interstellar medium (ISM) they interact with the ambient gas in various ways. These include ionization of atoms and molecules, spallation of nuclei, excitation of nuclear states, and production of pions among others. All of these interactions produce potential observables which may be used to trace the flux of cosmic rays. One such observable is the molecular ion H{sub 3}{sup +}-produced via the ionization of an H{sub 2} molecule and its subsequent collision with another H{sub 2}-which can be identified by absorption lines in the 3.5-4 μm spectral region. We have detected H{sub 3}{sup +} in several Galactic diffuse cloud sight lines and used the derived column densities to infer ζ{sub 2}, the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2}. Ionization rates determined in this way vary from about 7×10{sup −17} s{sup −1} to about 8×10{sup −16} s{sup −1}, and suggest the possibility of discrete sources producing high local fluxes of low-energy cosmic rays. Theoretical calculations of the ionization rate from postulated cosmic-ray spectra also support this possibility. Our recent observations of H{sub 3}{sup +} near the supernova remnant IC 443 (a likely site of cosmic-ray acceleration) point to even higher ionization rates, on the order of 10{sup −15} s{sup −1}. Together, all of these results can further our understanding of the cosmic-ray spectrum both near the acceleration source and in the general Galactic ISM.

  10. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Kawasaki, Nobuo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kume, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  11. Topics in quantum chromodynamics: two loop Feynman gauge calculation of the meson nonsinglet evolution potential and fourier acceleration of the calculation of the fermion propagator in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    Part I of this thesis is a perturbative QCD calculation to two loops of the meson nonsinglet evolution potential in the Feynman gauge. The evolution potential describes the momentum dependence of the distribution amplitude. This amplitude is needed for the calculation to beyond leading order of exclusive amplitudes and form factors. Techniques are presented that greatly simplify the calculation. The results agree with an independent light-cone gauge calculation and disagree with predictions made using conformal symmetry. In Part II the author presents a Fourier acceleration method that is effective in accelerating the computation of the fermion propagator in lattice QCD. The conventional computation suffers from critical slowing down: the long distance structure converges much slower than the short distance structure. by evaluating the fermion propagator in momentum space using fast Fourier transforms, it is possible to make different length scales converge at a more equal rate. From numerical experiments made on a 8 4 lattice, the author obtained savings of a factor of 3 to 4 by using Fourier acceleration. He also discusses the important of gauge fixing when using Fourier acceleration

  12. Electron propagator calculations on the ionization energies of CrH -, MnH - and FeH -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jyh-Shing; Ortiz, J. V.

    1990-08-01

    Electron propagator calculations with unrestricted Hartree-Fock reference states yield the ionization energies of the title anions. Spin contamination in the anionic reference state is small, enabling the use of second-and third-order self-energies in the Dyson equation. Feynman-Dyson amplitudes for these ionizations are essentially identical to canonical spin-orbitals. For most of the final states, these consist of an antibonding combination of an sp metal hybrid, polarized away from the hydrogen, and hydroegen s functions. In one case, the Feynman-Dyson amplitude consists of nonbonding d functions. Calculated ionization energies are within 0.5 eV of experiment.

  13. Measurements of the propagation speed of 511 KeV {gamma}-rays in air and other material media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovitch, Henrique [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: thadeu@cbpf.br; prjs@cbpf.br; henrique@cbpf.br

    2007-07-01

    The propagation speeds of the 511 KeV {gamma}-rays were measured in several material media, based in a fast-slow coincidence method. The time-resolution of the instrumental system used to perform the experiments allows to get reliable results in covered distances of {approx} 40 cm. (author)

  14. Analytical calculations of intense Gaussian laser beam propagating in plasmas with relativistic collision correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Gao Ruilin; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of a Gaussian laser beam propagating in relativistic plasmas have been performed with the WKB method and complex eikonal function. We consider the relativistic nonlinearity induced by intense laser beam, and present the relativistically generalized forms of the plasma frequency and electron collision frequency in plasmas. The coupled differential equations describing the propagation variations of laser beam are derived and numerically solved. The obtained simulation results present the similar variation tendency with experiments. By changing the plasma density, we theoretically analyze the feasibility of using a plasmas slab of a fixed thickness to compress the laser beam-width and acquire the focused laser intensity. The present work complements the relativistic correction of the electron collision frequency with reasonable derivations, promotes the theoretical approaching to experiments and provides effective instructions to the practical laser-plasma interactions.

  15. Fatigue crack propagation: In situ visualization using X-ray microtomography and 3D simulation using the extended finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrie, Emilie; Buffiere, Jean-Yves; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Gravouil, Anthony; Edwards, Lyndon

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of a semi-elliptical crack in the bulk of an ultrafine-grained Al-Li alloy has been investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography. In this material, the studied crack, despite its small dimension, can be considered as 'microstructurally long' and described in the frame of the linear elastic fracture mechanics. The extended finite element method is used to calculate the stress intensity factors along the crack front taking into account the three-dimensional geometry extracted from the tomographic images. For the same nominal value of the stress intensity factor range, crack propagation is faster in the bulk than at the surface. The observed anisotropy is attributed to the variation of the closure stress along the crack front between surface and bulk. The experimentally observed fatigue crack propagation is compared to numerical simulations. Good agreement is found when a linear variation of closure stress along the crack front is taken into account in the '3D crack propagation law' used for the simulation

  16. Inventory calculation and nuclear data uncertainty propagation on light water reactor fuel using ALEPH-2 and SCALE 6.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Piedra, D.; Cabellos, O.; Diez, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We performed burnup calculations of PWR and BWR benchmarks using ALEPH and SCALE. • We propagated nuclear data uncertainty and correlations using different procedures and code. • Decay data uncertainties have negligible impact on nuclide densities. • Uncorrelated fission yields play a major role on the uncertainties of fission products. • Fission yields impact is strongly reduced by the introduction of correlations. - Abstract: Two fuel assemblies, one belonging to the Takahama-3 PWR and the other to the Fukushima-Daini-2 BWR, were modelled and the fuel irradiation was simulated with the TRITON module of SCALE 6.2 and with the ALEPH-2 code. Our results were compared to the experimental measurements of four samples: SF95-4 and SF96-4 were taken from the Takahama-3 reactor, while samples SF98-6 and SF99-6 belonged to the Fukushima-Daini-2. Then, we propagated the uncertainties coming from the nuclear data to the isotopic inventory of sample SF95-4. We used the ALEPH-2 adjoint procedure to propagate the decay constant uncertainties. The impact was inappreciable. The cross-section covariance information was propagated with the SAMPLER module of the beta3 version of SCALE 6.2. This contribution mostly affected the uncertainties of the actinides. Finally, the uncertainties of the fission yields were propagated both through ALEPH-2 and TRITON with a Monte Carlo sampling approach and appeared to have the largest impact on the uncertainties of the fission products. However, the lack of fission yield correlations results is a serious overestimation of the response uncertainties

  17. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díez, C.J., E-mail: cj.diez@upm.es [Dpto. de Ingeníera Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cabellos, O. [Dpto. de Ingeníera Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez, J.S. [Dpto. de Ingeníera Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  18. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties

  19. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, C. J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  20. Calculation of contraction stresses in dental composites by analysis of crack propagation in the matrix surrounding a cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Swain, Michael V

    2009-04-01

    Polymerization contraction of dental composite produces a stress field in the bonded surrounding substrate that may be capable of propagating cracks from pre-existing flaws. The objectives of this study were to assess the extent of crack propagation from flaws in the surrounding ceramic substrate caused by composite contraction stresses, and to propose a method to calculate the contraction stress in the ceramic using indentation fracture. Initial cracks were introduced with a Vickers indenter near a cylindrical hole drilled into a glass-ceramic simulating enamel. Lengths of the radial indentation cracks were measured. Three composites having different contraction stresses were cured within the hole using one- or two-step light-activation methods and the crack lengths were measured. The contraction stress in the ceramic was calculated from the crack length and the fracture toughness of the glass-ceramic. Interfacial gaps between the composite and the ceramic were expressed as the ratio of the gap length to the hole perimeter, as well as the maximum gap width. All groups revealed crack propagation and the formation of contraction gaps. The calculated contraction stresses ranged from 4.2 MPa to 7.0 MPa. There was no correlation between the stress values and the contraction gaps. This method for calculating the stresses produced by composites is a relatively simple technique requiring a conventional hardness tester. The method can investigate two clinical phenomena that may occur during the placement of composite restorations, i.e. simulated enamel cracking near the margins and the formation of contraction gaps.

  1. Power requirements for cosmic ray propagation models involving diffusive reacceleration; estimates and implications for the damping of interstellar turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Luke O.'C.; Strong, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    We make quantitative estimates of the power supplied to the Galactic cosmic ray population by second-order Fermi acceleration in the interstellar medium, or as it is usually termed in cosmic ray propagation studies, diffusive reacceleration. Using recent results on the local interstellar spectrum, following Voyager 1's crossing of the heliopause, we show that for parameter values, in particular the Alfvén speed, typically used in propagation codes such as GALPROP to fit the B/C ratio, the power contributed by diffusive reacceleration is significant and can be of order 50% of the total Galactic cosmic ray power. The implications for the damping of interstellar turbulence are briefly considered.

  2. A rapid calculation system for tsunami propagation in Japan by using the AQUA-MT/CMT solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, W.; Yamamoto, N.; Kimura, H.; Takahashi, N.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a rapid calculation system of geodetic deformations and tsunami propagation in and around Japan. The system automatically conducts their forward calculations by using point source parameters estimated by the AQUA system (Matsumura et al., 2006), which analyze magnitude, hypocenter, and moment tensors for an event occurring in Japan in 3 minutes of the origin time at the earliest. An optimized calculation code developed by Nakamura and Baba (2016) is employed for the calculations on our computer server with 12 core processors of Intel Xeon 2.60 GHz. Assuming a homogeneous fault slip in the single fault plane as the source fault, the developed system calculates each geodetic deformation and tsunami propagation by numerically solving the 2D linear long-wave equations for the grid interval of 1 arc-min from two fault orientations simultaneously; i.e., one fault and its conjugate fault plane. Because fault models based on moment tensor analyses of event data are used, the system appropriately evaluate tsunami propagation even for unexpected events such as normal faulting in the subduction zone, which differs with the evaluation of tsunami arrivals and heights from a pre-calculated database by using fault models assuming typical types of faulting in anticipated source areas (e.g., Tatehata, 1998; Titov et al., 2005; Yamamoto et al., 2016). By the complete automation from event detection to output graphical figures, the calculation results can be available via e-mail and web site in 4 minutes of the origin time at the earliest. For moderate-sized events such as M5 to 6 events, the system helps us to rapidly investigate whether amplitudes of tsunamis at nearshore and offshore stations exceed a noise level or not, and easily identify actual tsunamis at the stations by comparing with obtained synthetic waveforms. In the case of using source models investigated from GNSS data, such evaluations may be difficult because of the low resolution of sources due to a low

  3. Sonic Boom Pressure Signature Uncertainty Calculation and Propagation to Ground Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Thomas K., IV; Bretl, Katherine N.; Walker, Eric L.; Pinier, Jeremy T.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to outline an approach for the quantification of uncertainty in sonic boom measurements and to investigate the effect of various near-field uncertainty representation approaches on ground noise predictions. These approaches included a symmetric versus asymmetric uncertainty band representation and a dispersion technique based on a partial sum Fourier series that allows for the inclusion of random error sources in the uncertainty. The near-field uncertainty was propagated to the ground level, along with additional uncertainty in the propagation modeling. Estimates of perceived loudness were obtained for the various types of uncertainty representation in the near-field. Analyses were performed on three configurations of interest to the sonic boom community: the SEEB-ALR, the 69o DeltaWing, and the LM 1021-01. Results showed that representation of the near-field uncertainty plays a key role in ground noise predictions. Using a Fourier series based dispersion approach can double the amount of uncertainty in the ground noise compared to a pure bias representation. Compared to previous computational fluid dynamics results, uncertainty in ground noise predictions were greater when considering the near-field experimental uncertainty.

  4. Electron-capture Isotopes Could Constrain Cosmic-Ray Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamin, David; Shaviv, Nir J.; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-12-01

    Electron capture (EC) isotopes are known to provide constraints on the low-energy behavior of cosmic rays (CRs), such as reacceleration. Here, we study the EC isotopes within the framework of the dynamic spiral-arms CR propagation model in which most of the CR sources reside in the galactic spiral arms. The model was previously used to explain the B/C and sub-Fe/Fe ratios. We show that the known inconsistency between the 49Ti/49V and 51V/51Cr ratios remains also in the spiral-arms model. On the other hand, unlike the general wisdom that says the isotope ratios depend primarily on reacceleration, we find here that the ratio also depends on the halo size (Z h) and, in spiral-arms models, also on the time since the last spiral-arm passage ({τ }{arm}). Namely, EC isotopes can, in principle, provide interesting constraints on the diffusion geometry. However, with the present uncertainties in the lab measurements of both the electron attachment rate and the fragmentation cross sections, no meaningful constraint can be placed.

  5. Ray-Based Statistical Propagation Modeling for Indoor Corridor Scenarios at 15 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the demands for fifth-generation (5G communication systems, high frequency bands (above 6 GHz need to be adopted to provide additional spectrum. This paper investigates the characteristics of indoor corridor channels at 15 GHz. Channel measurements with a vector network analyzer in two corridors were conducted. Based on a ray-optical approach, a deterministic channel model covering both antenna and propagation characteristic is presented. The channel model is evaluated by comparing simulated results of received power and root mean square delay spread with the corresponding measurements. By removing the impact of directional antennas from the transmitter and receiver, a path loss model as well as small-scale fading properties for typical corridors is presented based on the generated samples from the deterministic model. Results show that the standard deviation of path loss variation is related to the Tx height, and placing the Tx closer to the ceiling leads to a smaller fluctuation of path loss.

  6. Optimisation of a propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast micro-CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov I.; Gureyev, Timur E.; Dimmock, Matthew R.

    2018-03-01

    Micro-CT scanners find applications in many areas ranging from biomedical research to material sciences. In order to provide spatial resolution on a micron scale, these scanners are usually equipped with micro-focus, low-power x-ray sources and hence require long scanning times to produce high resolution 3D images of the object with acceptable contrast-to-noise. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography (PB-PCT) has the potential to significantly improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) or, alternatively, reduce the image acquisition time while preserving the CNR and the spatial resolution. We propose a general approach for the optimisation of the PB-PCT imaging system. When applied to an imaging system with fixed parameters of the source and detector this approach requires optimisation of only two independent geometrical parameters of the imaging system, i.e. the source-to-object distance R 1 and geometrical magnification M, in order to produce the best spatial resolution and CNR. If, in addition to R 1 and M, the system parameter space also includes the source size and the anode potential this approach allows one to find a unique configuration of the imaging system that produces the required spatial resolution and the best CNR.

  7. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurin, D.

    2001-02-01

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  8. High performance dosimetry calculations using adapted ray-tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, Lancelot; Saupin, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    When preparing interventions on nuclear sites, it is interesting to study different scenarios, to identify the most appropriate one for the operator(s). Using virtual reality tools is a good way to simulate the potential scenarios. Thus, taking advantage of very efficient computation times can help the user studying different complex scenarios, by immediately evaluating the impact of any changes. In the field of radiation protection, people often use computation codes based on the straight line attenuation method with build-up factors. As for other approaches, geometrical computations (finding all the interactions between radiation rays and the scene objects) remain the bottleneck of the simulation. We present in this paper several optimizations used to speed up these geometrical computations, using innovative GPU ray-tracing algorithms. For instance, we manage to compute every intersection between 600 000 rays and a huge 3D industrial scene in a fraction of second. Moreover, our algorithm works the same way for both static and dynamic scenes, allowing easier study of complex intervention scenarios (where everything moves: the operator(s), the shielding objects, the radiation sources).

  9. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinak, M.

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing χ e from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. χ e is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred χ e is a local value, not an average value of the radial χ e profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Correlated calculations of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using second-order polarization propagator approximations: SOPPA and SOPPA(CCSD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Thomas; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    1998-01-01

    We present correlated calculations of the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of HD, HF, H2O, CH4, C2H2, BH, AlH, CO and N2 at the level of the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) and the second-order polarization propagator approximation with coupled-cluster sing...

  11. Monte Carlo neutron and gamma-ray calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, Edgar

    1987-01-01

    Kerma in tissue and the activation produced in sulfur and cobalt due to prompt neutrons from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs were calculated out to 2000 m from the hypocenter in 100 m increments. As neutron sources weapon output spectra calculated by investigators from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were used. Other parameters, such as burst height and air and ground densities and compositions, were obtained from recent sources. The LLNL Monte Carlo transport code TART was used for these calculations. TART accesses the well-established 1985 ENDL cross-section library, which has built-in reaction cross sections. The zoning for this problem was a full two-dimensional geometry with a ceiling height of 1100 m and a ground thickness of 30 cm. For the Hiroshima calculations (including sulfur activation) and untilted source was used. However, a special sulfur activation problem using a source tilted 15 deg was run for which the ratios to the untilted case are reported. The TART code uses a technique for solving the transport equation that is different from that of the ORNL DOT code; it also draws on a specially evaluated cross-section library (ENDL) and uses a larger group structure than DOT. One of the purposes of this work was to instill confidence in the DOT calculations that will be used directly in the dose reassessment of A-bomb survivors. The TART results were compared with values calculated with the DOT code by investigators from ORNL and found to be in good agreement for the most part. However, the sulfur activation comparison is disappointing. Because the sulfur activation is caused by higher energy neutrons (which should have experienced fewer collisions than those causing cobalt activation, for example), better agreement than what is reported here would be expected

  12. Propagation of cross section uncertainties in combined Monte Carlo neutronics and burnup calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Oppe, J.; Klein Meulekamp, R.; Koning, H. [NRG - Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes group, Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    Some years ago a methodology was developed at NRG for the calculation of 'density-to-density' and 'one-group cross section-to-density' sensitivity matrices and covariance matrices for final nuclide densities for burnup schemes consisting of multiple sets of flux/spectrum and burnup calculations. The applicability of the methodology was then demonstrated by calculations of BR3 MOX pin irradiation experiments employing multi-group cross section uncertainty data from the EAF4 data library. A recent development is the extension of this methodology to enable its application in combination with the OCTOPUS-MCNP-FISPACT/ORIGEN Monte Carlo burnup scheme. This required some extensions to the sensitivity matrix calculation tool CASEMATE. The extended methodology was applied on the 'HTR Plutonium Cell Burnup Benchmark' to calculate the uncertainties (covariances) in the final densities, as far as these uncertainties are caused by uncertainties in cross sections. Up to 600 MWd/kg these uncertainties are larger than the differences between the code systems. However, it should be kept in mind that the calculated uncertainties are based on EAF4 uncertainty data. It is not exactly clear on beforehand what a proper set of associated (MCNP) cross sections and covariances would yield in terms of final uncertainties in calculated densities. This will be investigated, by the same formalism, once these data becomes available. It should be noted that the studies performed up till the present date are mainly concerned with the influence of uncertainties in cross sections. The influence of uncertainties in the decay constants, although included in the formalism, is not considered further. Also the influence of other uncertainties (such as -geometrical- modelling approximations) has been left out of consideration for the time being. (authors)

  13. Propagation of cross section uncertainties in combined Monte Carlo neutronics and burnup calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Oppe, J.; Klein Meulekamp, R.; Koning, H.

    2005-01-01

    Some years ago a methodology was developed at NRG for the calculation of 'density-to-density' and 'one-group cross section-to-density' sensitivity matrices and covariance matrices for final nuclide densities for burnup schemes consisting of multiple sets of flux/spectrum and burnup calculations. The applicability of the methodology was then demonstrated by calculations of BR3 MOX pin irradiation experiments employing multi-group cross section uncertainty data from the EAF4 data library. A recent development is the extension of this methodology to enable its application in combination with the OCTOPUS-MCNP-FISPACT/ORIGEN Monte Carlo burnup scheme. This required some extensions to the sensitivity matrix calculation tool CASEMATE. The extended methodology was applied on the 'HTR Plutonium Cell Burnup Benchmark' to calculate the uncertainties (covariances) in the final densities, as far as these uncertainties are caused by uncertainties in cross sections. Up to 600 MWd/kg these uncertainties are larger than the differences between the code systems. However, it should be kept in mind that the calculated uncertainties are based on EAF4 uncertainty data. It is not exactly clear on beforehand what a proper set of associated (MCNP) cross sections and covariances would yield in terms of final uncertainties in calculated densities. This will be investigated, by the same formalism, once these data becomes available. It should be noted that the studies performed up till the present date are mainly concerned with the influence of uncertainties in cross sections. The influence of uncertainties in the decay constants, although included in the formalism, is not considered further. Also the influence of other uncertainties (such as -geometrical- modelling approximations) has been left out of consideration for the time being. (authors)

  14. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Er, Ali Oguz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States); Tang, Jau, E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Research Center for Applied Sciences Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rentzepis, Peter M., E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267 nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ω, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  15. Using MCBEND for neutron or gamma-ray deterministic calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Dobson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MCBEND 11 is the latest version of the general radiation transport Monte Carlo code from AMEC Foster Wheeler’s ANSWERS® Software Service. MCBEND is well established in the UK shielding community for radiation shielding and dosimetry assessments. MCBEND supports a number of acceleration techniques, for example the use of an importance map in conjunction with Splitting/Russian Roulette. MCBEND has a well established automated tool to generate this importance map, commonly referred to as the MAGIC module using a diffusion adjoint solution. This method is fully integrated with the MCBEND geometry and material specification, and can easily be run as part of a normal MCBEND calculation. An often overlooked feature of MCBEND is the ability to use this method for forward scoping calculations, which can be run as a very quick deterministic method. Additionally, the development of the Visual Workshop environment for results display provides new capabilities for the use of the forward calculation as a productivity tool. In this paper, we illustrate the use of the combination of the old and new in order to provide an enhanced analysis capability. We also explore the use of more advanced deterministic methods for scoping calculations used in conjunction with MCBEND, with a view to providing a suite of methods to accompany the main Monte Carlo solver.

  16. Using MCBEND for neutron or gamma-ray deterministic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoff, Dobson; Adam, Bird; Brendan, Tollit; Paul, Smith

    2017-09-01

    MCBEND 11 is the latest version of the general radiation transport Monte Carlo code from AMEC Foster Wheeler's ANSWERS® Software Service. MCBEND is well established in the UK shielding community for radiation shielding and dosimetry assessments. MCBEND supports a number of acceleration techniques, for example the use of an importance map in conjunction with Splitting/Russian Roulette. MCBEND has a well established automated tool to generate this importance map, commonly referred to as the MAGIC module using a diffusion adjoint solution. This method is fully integrated with the MCBEND geometry and material specification, and can easily be run as part of a normal MCBEND calculation. An often overlooked feature of MCBEND is the ability to use this method for forward scoping calculations, which can be run as a very quick deterministic method. Additionally, the development of the Visual Workshop environment for results display provides new capabilities for the use of the forward calculation as a productivity tool. In this paper, we illustrate the use of the combination of the old and new in order to provide an enhanced analysis capability. We also explore the use of more advanced deterministic methods for scoping calculations used in conjunction with MCBEND, with a view to providing a suite of methods to accompany the main Monte Carlo solver.

  17. Neutron and gamma ray transport calculations in shielding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In the shields for radiation in nuclear facilities, the penetrating holes of various kinds and irregular shapes are made for the reasons of operation, control and others. These penetrating holes and gaps are filled with air or the substances with relatively small shielding performance, and radiation flows out through them, which is called streaming. As the calculation techniques for the shielding design or analysis related to the streaming problem, there are the calculations by simplified evaluation, transport calculation and Monte Carlo method. In this report, the example of calculation by Monte Carlo method which is represented by MCNP code is discussed. A number of variance reduction techniques which seem effective for the analysis of streaming problem were tried. As to the investigation of the applicability of MCNP code to streaming analysis, the object of analysis which are the concrete walls without hole and with horizontal hole, oblique hole and bent oblique hole, the analysis procedure, the composition of concrete, and the conversion coefficient of dose equivalent, and the results of analysis are reported. As for variance reduction technique, cell importance was adopted. (K.I.)

  18. An efficient Matlab script to calculate heterogeneous anisotropically elastic wave propagation in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, O.S.

    2006-01-01

    We have created a second-order finite-difference solution to the anisotropic elastic wave equation in three dimensions and implemented the solution as an efficient Matlab script. This program allows the user to generate synthetic seismograms for three-dimensional anisotropic earth structure. The code was written for teleseismic wave propagation in the 1-0.1 Hz frequency range but is of general utility and can be used at all scales of space and time. This program was created to help distinguish among various types of lithospheric structure given the uneven distribution of sources and receivers commonly utilized in passive source seismology. Several successful implementations have resulted in a better appreciation for subduction zone structure, the fate of a transform fault with depth, lithospheric delamination, and the effects of wavefield focusing and defocusing on attenuation. Companion scripts are provided which help the user prepare input to the finite-difference solution. Boundary conditions including specification of the initial wavefield, absorption and two types of reflection are available. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  20. Propagation and scattering of high-intensity X-ray pulses in dense atomic gases and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weninger, Clemens

    2015-10-01

    scattering signal can thus be amplified by several orders of magnitude. To study stimulated X-ray emission a generalized one-dimensional Maxwell-Bloch model is developed. The radiation is propagated through the medium with the help of the Maxwell equations and the radiation is coupled to the atomic system via the polarization. The atomic system is treated in the density matrix formalism and the time evolution of the coherences determine the polarization of the medium.

  1. Application of the particle-in-cell method in propagation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, E.

    1979-01-01

    The Particle-in-Cell-Method that is capable of calculating the spreading of a plume in the atmosphere under instationary and inhomogeneous conditions, has a systematical advantage over the steady state Gaussian plume model usually used. Especially the fixed-point concentration time integral is calculated realistically instead of the locally integrated concentration at a constant time as is done in the plume model. Inaccuracies due to the computational techniques may be avoided in this way. On the other hand, at first the turbulent diffusion coefficients that describe the diffusion in the particle-in-cell method, must be prepared for all diffusion types. Thereby the diffusion coefficients can be seen to be mainly deduced in the steady state. This is one reason why they cannot be used in an optimal sense in a model that actually works instationary. (orig.) [de

  2. Calculations of the hurricane eye motion based on singularity propagation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Danilov

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility of using calculating singularities to forecast the dynamics of hurricanes. Our basic model is the shallow-water system. By treating the hurricane eye as a vortex type singularity and truncating the corresponding sequence of Hugoniot type conditions, we carry out many numerical experiments. The comparison of our results with the tracks of three actual hurricanes shows that our approach is rather fruitful.

  3. Calculation of Ground Shock Motion Produced by Airburst Explosions Using Cagniard Elastic Propagation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    de.tona1Uted1 over a mass;ive Kayenta sandstone formation. Thes- e.ventsl- provi ic data for checking, the calculations for motion in :1 s;trong1...53 ~ l Z Kayenta ;andst-ne depOsit similar to thit, of CUNSf 1. The thickness of the soil was v,ried from 0 to 6 ft. Measurements of vertical and

  4. Capturing sunlight into a photobioreactor: Ray tracing simulations of the propagation of light from capture to distribution into the reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijffers, J.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Salim, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Green Solar Collector (GSC), a photobioreactor designed for area efficient outdoor cultivation of microalgae uses Fresnel lenses and light guides to focus, transport and distribute direct light into the algae suspension. Calculating the path of rays of light, so-called ray tracing, is used to

  5. Calculation of the flux density of gamma rays above the surface of Venus and the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this article the authors present the results of calculating the flux density of unscattered gamma rays as a function of height above the surfaces of Venus and the Earth. At each height they calculate the areas which will collect a certain fraction of the gamma rays. The authors calculate the spectra of scattered gamma rays, as well as their integrated fluxes at various heights above the surface of Venus. They consider how the atmosphere will affect the recording of gamma rays. Their results enable them to evaluate the optimal conditions for measuring the gamma-ray fields above the surfaces of Venus and the Earth and to determine the area of the planet which can be investigated in this way. These results are also necessary if they are to determine the elemental composition of the rock from the characteristic recorded spectrum of gamma radiation

  6. ICRF wave propagation and absorption in tokamak and mirror magnetic fields: a full-wave calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.; Weitzner, H.; Whealton, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Global solutions for the ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) wave fields in a straight tokamak with rotational transform and a poloidally symmetric mirror are calculated in the cold plasma limit. The component of the wave electric field parallel to vector Bis assumed zero. Symmetry in each problem allows Fourier decomposition in one ignorable coordinate, and the remaining set of two coupled, two-dimensional partial differential equations is solved by finite differencing. Energy absorption and antenna impedance are calculated using a simple collisional absorption model. When large gradients in vertical barBvertical bar along vectorB are present in either geometry, ICRF heating at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance is observed. For the mirror, such gradients are always present. But for the tokamak, the rotational transform must be large enough that vectorB . delB greater than or equal to 0(1). For smaller transforms more typical of real tokamaks, only heating at the two-ion hybird resonance is observed. This suggests that direct resonant absorption at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance may be possible in stellarators where vectorB . delB approx. 0(1) + 11

  7. ICRF wave propagation and absorption in tokamak and mirror magnetic fields: a full-wave calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.; Weitzner, H.; Whealton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Global solutions for the ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) wave fields in a straight tokamak with rotational transform and in a poloidally symmetric mirror are calculated in the cold plasma limit. The component of the wave electric field parallel to B vector is assumed zero. Symmetry in each problem allows Fourier decomposition in one ignorable coordinate, and the remaining set of two coupled, two-dimensional partial differential equations is solved by finite differencing. Energy absorption and antenna impedance are calculated using a simple collisional absorption model. When large gradients in absolute value B along B vector are present in either geometry, ICRF heating at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance is observed. For the mirror, such gradients are always present. But for the tokamak, the rotational transform must be large enough that B vector . delB greater than or equal to 0(1). For smaller transforms more typical of real tokamaks, only heating at the two-ion hybrid resonance is observed. This suggests that direct resonant absorption at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance may be possible in stellarators where B vector . delB approx. 0(1) naturally. 13 refs., 23 figs

  8. Propagation of modulated electron and X-ray beams through matter and interactions with radio-frequency structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. R.; Miller, R. B.

    2018-02-01

    The generation and evolution of modulated particle beams and their interactions with resonant radiofrequency (RF) structures are of fundamental interest for both particle accelerator and vacuum electronic systems. When the constraint of propagation in a vacuum is removed, the evolution of such beams can be greatly affected by interactions with matter including scattering, absorption, generation of atmospheric plasma, and the production of multiple generations of secondary particles. Here, we study the propagation of 21 MeV and 25 MeV electron beams produced in S-band and L-band linear accelerators, and their interaction with resonant RF structures, under a number of combinations of geometry, including transmission through both air and metal. Both resonant and nonresonant interactions were observed, with the resonant interactions indicating that the RF modulation on the electron beam is at least partially preserved as the beam propagates through air and metal. When significant thicknesses of metal are placed upstream of a resonant structure, preventing any primary beam electrons from reaching the structure, RF signals could still be induced in the structures. This indicated that the RF modulation present on the electron beam was also impressed onto the x-rays generated when the primary electrons were stopped in the metal, and that this RF modulation was also present on the secondary electrons generated when the x-rays struck the resonant structures. The nature of these interactions and their sensitivities to changes in system configurations will be discussed.

  9. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  10. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation

  11. Laser--plasma calculations with refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.L.; Shay, H.D.

    1974-01-01

    Computer calculations of light propagation in a medium with a quadratic density gradient transverse to the direction of propagation are presented. Test results for positive and negative values of the sinusoidal oscillation are described. Another problem considered was the propagation of light rays inside a spherical plasma with a density profile which increases with r. (U.S.)

  12. Line shape and ray trace calculations in saturated X-ray lasers: Application to Ni-like silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benredjem, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Moeller, C.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Dubau, J.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal coherence length in X-ray lasers depends strongly on the shape of the amplified line. We have modelled an experiment performed at the LULI facility of Ecole Polytechnique. The experiment was devoted to the study of the temporal (longitudinal) coherence of the transient Ni-like silver 4d-4p transition X-ray laser at 13.9 nm. Accurate line shape calculations using PPP, a spectral line shape code, confirm that the Voigt profile is a good approximation for this X-ray laser line. This allows us to extensively use the Voigt shape in conditions where the amplifier, i.e. the plasma produced by the interaction of a high intensity laser with a slab target, is neither stationary nor homogeneous. Our calculations involve a ray trace code which is a post-processor to the hydrodynamic simulation EHYBRID. As the effect of saturation is important for the level populations and gains we include the interaction between the amplified beam and the medium using the Maxwell-Bloch formalism. While the FWHM of the spontaneous emission profile is ∼10 mA, the amplified X-ray line exhibits gain narrowing leading to the smaller width ∼3 mA. Comparison with experiment is discussed

  13. Method for calculating required shielding in medical x-ray rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karppinen, J.

    1997-10-01

    The new annual radiation dose limits - 20 mSv (previously 50 mSv) for radiation workers and 1 mSv (previously 5 mSv) for other persons - implies that the adequacy of existing radiation shielding must be re-evaluated. In principle, one could assume that the thicknesses of old radiation shields should be increased by about one or two half-value layers in order to comply with the new dose limits. However, the assumptions made in the earlier shielding calculations are highly conservative; the required shielding was often determined by applying the maximum high-voltage of the x-ray tube for the whole workload. A more realistic calculation shows that increased shielding is typically not necessary if more practical x-ray tube voltages are used in the evaluation. We have developed a PC-based calculation method for calculating the x-ray shielding which is more realistic than the highly conservative method formerly used. The method may be used to evaluate an existing shield for compliance with new regulations. As examples of these calculations, typical x-ray rooms are considered. The lead and concrete thickness requirements as a function of x-ray tube voltage and workload are also given in tables. (author)

  14. Analysis of the propagation of neutrons and gamma-rays from the fast neutron source reactor YAYOI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeo, E-mail: neutron@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Murata, Isao [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Saito, Isao [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    The skyshine effect is crucial for designing appropriate shielding. To investigate the skyshine effect, the propagation of neutrons was measured and analyzed at the fast neutron source reactor YAYOI. Pulse height spectra and dose distributions of neutron and secondary gamma-ray were measured outside YAYOI, and analyzed with MCNP-5 and JENDL-3.3. Comparison with the experimental results showed good agreement. Also, a semi-empirical formula was successfully derived to describe the dose distribution. The formulae can be used to predict the skyshine effect at YAYOI, and will be useful for estimating the skyshine effect and designing the shield structure for fusion facilities.

  15. 3D Mapping Of Density And Crack Propagation Through Sintering Of Catalysis Tablets By X-Ray Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest; Puig-Molina, A.; Dalskov, N.

    2016-01-01

    sintering of the rejected tabletized support material are studied by 3D X-ray tomography. This is a powerful technique, which due to its nondestructive nature is suitable to study the development of internal cracks in the tablets during sintering. Cracks could be identified in the green tablet (before...... properly, cracks may arise and propagate during the sintering of the tablets. This can lead to weak sintered tablets that get rejected in the quality control. For this work, crack-containing samples of rejected tabletized support were provided. The formation, growth and closure of internal cracks during...

  16. CRPropa 2.0. A public framework for propagating high energy nuclei, secondary gamma rays and neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz; Kulbartz, Joerg; Schiffer, Peter; Sigl, Guenter; Vliet, Arjen Rene van; Nierstenhoefer, Nils; Hamburg Univ.

    2012-06-01

    Version 2.0 of CRPropa is public software to model the extra-galactic propagation of ultra-high energy nuclei of atomic number Z≤26 through structured magnetic fields and ambient photon backgrounds taking into account all relevant particle interactions. CRPropa covers the energy range 6 x 10 16 22 where A is the nuclear mass number. CRPropa can also be used to track secondary γ-rays and neutrinos which allows the study of their link with the charged primary nuclei - the so called multi-messenger connection. After a general introduction we present several sample applications of current interest concerning the physics of extragalactic ultra-high energy radiation.

  17. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  18. Choosing of mode and calculation of multiple regression equation parameters in X-ray radiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamikonyan, S.V.; Berezkin, V.V.; Lyubimova, S.V.; Svetajlo, Yu.N.; Shchekin, K.I.

    1978-01-01

    A method to derive multiple regression equations for X-ray radiometric analysis is described. Te method is realized in the form of the REGRA program in an algorithmic language. The subprograms included in the program are describe. In analyzing cement for Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe contents as an example, the obtainment of working equations in the course of calculations by the program is shown to simpliy the realization of computing devices in instruments for X-ray radiometric analysis

  19. Calculation Analysis of Calibration Factors of Airborne Gamma-ray Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Zhu Jinhui; Xie Honggang; He Qinglin

    2009-01-01

    To determine the calibration factors of an airborne gamma-ray spectrometer measuring large area gamma-ray emitting source at deferent flying height, a series of Monte Carlo simulations were drawn. Response energy spectrums of NaI crystals in airplane caused by nature-decay-series calibration-pads, and calibration factors on different heights above Cs-137 plane source, were obtained. The calculated results agreed with the experimental data well. (authors)

  20. Wavefield back-propagation in high-resolution X-ray holography with a movable field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehrs, Erik; Günther, Christian M; Pfau, Bastian; Rander, Torbjörn; Schaffert, Stefan; Schlotter, William F; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2010-08-30

    Mask-based Fourier transform holography is used to record images of biological objects with 2.2 nm X-ray wavelength. The holography mask and the object are decoupled from each other which allows us to move the field of view over a large area over the sample. Due to the separation of the mask and the sample on different X-ray windows, a gap between both windows in the micrometer range typically exists. Using standard Fourier transform holography, focussed images of the sample can directly be reconstructed only for gap distances within the setup's depth of field. Here, we image diatoms as function of the gap distance and demonstrate the possibility to recover focussed images via a wavefield back-propagation technique. The limitations of our approach with respect to large separations are mainly associated with deviations from flat-field illumination of the object.

  1. Comparison of a semi-empirical method with some model codes for gamma-ray spectrum calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Fan; Zhixiang, Zhao [Chinese Nuclear Data Center, Beijing, BJ (China)

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-ray spectra calculated by a semi-empirical method are compared with those calculated by the model codes such as GNASH, TNG, UNF and NDCP-1. The results of the calculations are discussed. (2 tabs., 3 figs.).

  2. A calculation model for primary intensity distributions from cylindrically symmetric x-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Maltz, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    A calculation model for the quantitative prediction of primary intensity fluence distributions obtained by the Bragg diffraction focusing of kilovoltage radiation by cylindrical x-ray lenses is presented. The mathematical formalism describes primary intensity distributions from cylindrically-symmetric x-ray lenses, with a planar isotropic radiation source located in a plane perpendicular to the lens axis. The presence of attenuating medium inserted between the lens and the lens focus is accounted for by energy-dependent attenuation. The influence of radiation scattered within the media is ignored. Intensity patterns are modeled under the assumption that photons that are not interacting with the lens are blocked out at any point of interest. The main characteristics of the proposed calculation procedure are that (i) the application of vector formalism allows universal treatment of all cylindrical lenses without the need of explicit geometric constructs; (ii) intensity distributions resulting from x-ray diffraction are described by a 3D generalization of the mosaic spread concept; (iii) the calculation model can be immediately coupled to x-ray diffraction simulation packages such as XOP and Shadow. Numerical simulations based on this model are to facilitate the design of focused orthovoltage treatment (FOT) systems employing cylindrical x-ray lenses, by providing insight about the influence of the x-ray source and lens parameters on quantities of dosimetric interest to radiation therapy

  3. Study of Propagation Mechanisms in Dynamical Railway Environment to Reduce Computation Time of 3D Ray Tracing Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Hairoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to better assess the behaviours of the propagation channel in a confined environment such as a railway tunnel for subway application, we present an optimization method for a deterministic channel simulator based on 3D ray tracing associated to the geometrical optics laws and the uniform theory of diffraction. This tool requires a detailed description of the environment. Thus, the complexity of this model is directly bound to the complexity of the environment and specifically to the number of facets that compose it. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to identify facets that have no significant impact on the wave propagation. This allows us to simplify the description of the geometry of the modelled environment by removing them and by this way, to reduce the complexity of our model and therefore its computation time. A comparative study between full and simplified environment is led and shows the impact of this proposed method on the characteristic parameters of the propagation channel. Thus computation time obtained from the simplified environment is 6 times lower than the one of the full model without significant degradation of simulation accuracy.

  4. First Principles Calculations for X-ray Resonant Spectra and Elastic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yongbin Lee

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss applications of first principles methods to x-ray resonant spectra and elastic properties calculation. We start with brief reviews about theoretical background of first principles methods, such as density functional theory, local density approximation (LDA), LDA+U, and the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method to solve Kohn-Sham equations. After that we discuss x-ray resonant scattering (XRMS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and the branching problem in the heavy rare earths Ledges. In the last chapter we discuss the elastic properties of the second hardest material AlMgB 14

  5. Calculated and measured dose distribution in electron and X-ray irradiated water phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaie, F; Bulka, S; Afarideh, H; Hadji-Saeid, S M

    2002-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung yields produced by incident electrons on a tantalum converter have been calculated by using a Monte-Carlo computer code. The tantalum thickness as an X-ray converter was optimized for 2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 MeV electron beams. The dose distribution in scanning and conveyor direction for both 2 MeV electron and X-ray converted from 2 MeV electron beam have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The economical aspects of low energy electron conversion were discussed as well.

  6. Wavefront propagation simulations for a UV/soft x-ray beamline: Electron Spectro-Microscopy beamline at NSLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestrari, N.; Bisogni, V.; Walter, A.; Zhu, Y.; Dvorak, J.; Vescovo, E.; Chubar, O.

    2014-09-01

    A "source-to-sample" wavefront propagation analysis of the Electron Spectro-Microscopy (ESM) UV / soft X-ray beamline, which is under construction at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) in the Brookhaven National Laboratory, has been conducted. All elements of the beamline - insertion device, mirrors, variable-line-spacing gratings and slits - are included in the simulations. Radiation intensity distributions at the sample position are displayed for representative photon energies in the UV range (20 - 100 eV) where diffraction effects are strong. The finite acceptance of the refocusing mirrors is the dominating factor limiting the spatial resolution at the sample (by ~3 μm at 20 eV). Absolute estimates of the radiation flux and energy resolution at the sample are also obtained from the electromagnetic calculations. The analysis of the propagated UV range undulator radiation at different deflection parameter values demonstrates that within the beamline angular acceptance a slightly "red-shifted" radiation provides higher flux at the sample and better energy resolution compared to the on-axis resonant radiation of the fundamental harmonic.

  7. Propagation of high power electromagnetic beam in relativistic magnetoplasma: Higher order paraxial ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tarsem Singh; Kaur, Ravinder; Mahajan, Ranju

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of self-consistent, steady-state, theoretical model, which explains the ring formation in a Gaussian electromagnetic beam propagating in a magnetoplasma, characterized by relativistic nonlinearity. Higher order terms (up to r4) in the expansion of the dielectric function and the eikonal have been taken into account. The condition for the formation of a dark and bright ring derived earlier by Misra and Mishra [J. Plasma Phys. 75, 769 (2009)] has been used to study focusing/defocusing of the beam. It is seen that inclusion of higher order terms does significantly affect the dependence of the beam width on the distance of propagation. Further, the effect of the magnetic field and the nature of nonlinearity on the ring formation and self-focusing of the beam have been explored.

  8. Propagation of high power electromagnetic beam in relativistic magnetoplasma: Higher order paraxial ray theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Tarsem Singh; Kaur, Ravinder; Mahajan, Ranju

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of self-consistent, steady-state, theoretical model, which explains the ring formation in a Gaussian electromagnetic beam propagating in a magnetoplasma, characterized by relativistic nonlinearity. Higher order terms (up to r 4 ) in the expansion of the dielectric function and the eikonal have been taken into account. The condition for the formation of a dark and bright ring derived earlier by Misra and Mishra [J. Plasma Phys. 75, 769 (2009)] has been used to study focusing/defocusing of the beam. It is seen that inclusion of higher order terms does significantly affect the dependence of the beam width on the distance of propagation. Further, the effect of the magnetic field and the nature of nonlinearity on the ring formation and self-focusing of the beam have been explored.

  9. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray, Neutrino, and Photon Propagation and the Multi-Messenger Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Andrew; De Castro, Alexandra; Castillo-Ruiz, Edith

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of UHECR nuclei for A = 1(protons) to A = 56(iron) from cosmological sources through extragalactic space is discussed in the first lecture. This is followed in the second and third lectures by a consideration of the generation and propagation of secondary particles produced via the UHECR loss interactions. In the second lecture we focus on the generation of the diffuse cosmogenic UHE-neutrino flux. In the third lecture we investigate the arriving flux of UHE-photon flux at Earth. In the final lecture the results of the previous lectures are put together in order to provide new insights into UHECR sources. The first of these providing a means with which to investigate the local population of UHECR sources through the measurement of the UHECR spectrum and their photon fraction at Earth. The second of these providing contraints on the UHECR source radiation fields through the possible observation at Earth of UHECR nuclei.

  10. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  11. Theoretical calculation of rapid x-ray transients and radius expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.; Sparks, W.; Truran, J.; Kenyon, S.

    1984-01-01

    We present the results of a calculation of a thermonuclear runaway on a 10 km neutron star which produced a precursor, radius expansion, and after the envelope had begun to shrink, a seconds x-ray burst about 2500 second later. Although such an event has not yet been observed, decreasing the initial envelope mass should bring the calculations into better agreement with the observations

  12. MCNP calculation for calibration curve of X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chunming; Wu Zhifang; Guo Xiaojing; Xing Guilai; Wang Zhentao

    2011-01-01

    Due to the compositional variation of the sample, linear relationship between the element concentration and fluorescent intensity will not be well maintained in most X-ray fluorescence analysis. To overcome this, we use MCNP program to simulate fluorescent intensity of Fe (0∼100% concentration range) within binary mixture of Cr and O which represent typical strong absorption and weak absorption conditions respectively. The theoretic calculation shows that the relationship can be described as a curve determined by parameter p and value of p can be obtained with given absorption coefficient of substrate elements and element under detection. MCNP simulation results are consistent with theoretic calculation. Our research reveals that MCNP program can calculate the Calibration Curve of X-ray fluorescence very well. (authors)

  13. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method

  14. Configuration interaction calculations and excitation rates of X-ray and EUV transitions in sulfurlike manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maaref, A.A., E-mail: ahmed.maaref@azhar.edu.eg; Saddeek, Y.B.; Abou halaka, M.M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Fine-structure calculations of sulfurlike Mn have been performed using configuration interaction technique, CI. • The relativistic effects, Breit-Pauli Hameltonian, have been correlated to the CI calculations. • Excitation rates by electron impact of the Mn X ion have been evaluated up to ionization potential. - Abstract: Fine-structure calculations of energies and transition parameters have been performed using the configuration interaction technique (CI) as implemented in CIV3 code for sulfurlike manganese, Mn X. The calculations are executed in an intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. As well as, energy levels and oscillator strengths are calculated using LANL code, where the calculations by LANL have been used to estimate the accuracy of the present CI calculations. The calculated energy levels, oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are in reasonable agreement with the published experimental and theoretical values. Electron impact excitation rates of the transitions emit soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths have been evaluated. The level population densities are calculated using the collisional radiative model (CRM), as well. The collisional excitation rates and collision strengths have been calculated in the electron temperature range ≤ the ionization potential, ∼1–250 eV.

  15. Development of numerical methods to calculate the propagation and the absorption of the hybrid wave in tokamaks; Developpement des methodes numeriques pour la resolution de la propagation et de l`absorption de l`onde hybride dans les tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebelin, E

    1997-12-15

    Full-wave calculations based on trial functions are carried out for solving the lower hybrid current drive problem in tokamaks. A variational method is developed and provides an efficient system to describe in a global manner both the propagation and the absorption of the electromagnetic waves in plasmas. The calculation is fully carried out in the case of circular and concentric flux surfaces. The existence and uniqueness of the solution of the wave propagation equation is mathematically proved. The first realistic simulations are performed for the high aspect ratio tokamak TRIAM-1M. It is checked that the main features of the lower-hybrid wave dynamics are well described numerically. (A.C.) 81 refs.

  16. Uncertainty calculations for the measurement of in vivo bone lead by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Meara, J M; Fleming, D E B

    2009-01-01

    In order to quantify the bone lead concentration from an in vivo x-ray fluorescence measurement, typically two estimates of the lead concentration are determined by comparing the normalized x-ray peak amplitudes from the Kα 1 and Kβ 1 features to those of the calibration phantoms. In each case, the normalization consists of taking the ratio of the x-ray peak amplitude to the amplitude of the coherently scattered photon peak in the spectrum. These two Pb concentration estimates are then used to determine the weighted mean lead concentration of that sample. In calculating the uncertainties of these measurements, it is important to include any covariance terms where appropriate. When determining the uncertainty of the lead concentrations from each x-ray peak, the standard approach does not include covariance between the x-ray peaks and the coherently scattered feature. These spectral features originate from two distinct physical processes, and therefore no covariance between these features can exist. Through experimental and simulated data, we confirm that there is no observed covariance between the detected Pb x-ray peaks and the coherently scattered photon signal, as expected. This is in direct contrast to recent work published by Brito (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6125-39). There is, however, covariance introduced in the calculation of the weighted mean lead concentration due to the common coherent normalization. This must be accounted for in calculating the uncertainty of the weighted mean lead concentration, as is currently the case. We propose here an alternative approach to calculating the weighted mean lead concentration in such a way as to eliminate the covariance introduced by the common coherent normalization. It should be emphasized that this alternative approach will only apply in situations in which the calibration line intercept is not included in the calculation of the Pb concentration from the spectral data: when the source of the intercept is well

  17. The accurate calculation about p(p-bar)→p(p-bar)' differential cross-section of the renormalized π0 chain propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zaifu; Jingchu Univ. of Technology, Jingmen; Fang Zhenyun; Chen Wensuo; Xu Jin; Yi Junmei

    2008-01-01

    In the Lorentz coupling model of strong interaction between neutral meson π 0 and N-N-bar, we have strictly analytic calculated the scattering differential cross-section of p-(p-bar) about the π 0 renormalized chained propagator and obtained accurate theoretical outcome. Moreover, after comparing with the differential cross- section of π 0 tree propagator, we have obtained related radiation correction outcome. All these, we have done, can be reference for further researching p-(p-bar) elastic collision at high, middle or low ergo region and description Lorentz invariant coupling model theory with strong interaction. (authors)

  18. The Up-Link Problem: Using RytovProp for Beam Propagation Calculations--Conference Proceedings (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fried, David L

    2008-01-01

    ...(s) of the effect of turbulence on optical propagation. This method has been applied to the evaluation of Up-Link performance delivery of laser power from a simple ground transmitter to a satellite...

  19. Summary of daily observational results of solar phenomena, cosmic ray, geomagnetic variation, ionosphere, radio wave propagation and airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The diagrams in this section of the publication illustrate the summary of daily observational results of solar phenomena, cosmic ray, geomagnetic variation, ionosphere, radio wave propagation and airglow observed in Japan. For convenience, the observational results are arranged by the solar rotation number. The aim of this illustration is to disseminate an outline of daily events observed in Japan for the benefit of active research workers who plan to make detailed study of the specific solar and terrestrial events. Therefore, the illustrations do not show all observational results in Japan but only representative ones at some key stations in Japan. They will suffice for the present purpose. The method of illustration shown in the instruction on the next page is still a preliminary one, and it is subject to change resulting from the kind advice of the users of this part of the publication. We welcome any advice for making the data arrangement and expression better and more convenient. (auth.)

  20. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-04-21

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis.

  1. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B III; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis. (note)

  2. CRPropa 2.0. A public framework for propagating high energy nuclei, secondary gamma rays and neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz [Wuppertal Univ. (Germany); Kulbartz, Joerg; Schiffer, Peter; Sigl, Guenter; Vliet, Arjen Rene van [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Maccione, Luca [Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Nierstenhoefer, Nils [Wuppertal Univ. (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-06-15

    Version 2.0 of CRPropa is public software to model the extra-galactic propagation of ultra-high energy nuclei of atomic number Z{<=}26 through structured magnetic fields and ambient photon backgrounds taking into account all relevant particle interactions. CRPropa covers the energy range 6 x 10{sup 16} < E/eV < A x 10{sup 22} where A is the nuclear mass number. CRPropa can also be used to track secondary {gamma}-rays and neutrinos which allows the study of their link with the charged primary nuclei - the so called multi-messenger connection. After a general introduction we present several sample applications of current interest concerning the physics of extragalactic ultra-high energy radiation.

  3. Preparation of lead oxide nanoparticles from cathode-ray tube funnel glass by self-propagating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Jianxin

    2012-05-15

    This paper presents a novel process of extracting lead oxide nanoparticles from cathode-ray tube (CRT) funnel glass using self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The impacts of added amount of funnel glass on the extraction ratio of lead, the lead extraction velocity and the micromorphology, as well as particle size of extracted nanoparticles were investigated. We found that self-propagating reaction in the presence of Mg and Fe(2)O(3) could separate lead preferentially and superfine lead oxide nanoparticles were obtained from a collecting chamber. The separation ratio was related closely to the amount of funnel glass added in the original mixture. At funnel glass addition of no more than 40wt.%, over 90wt.% of lead was recovered from funnel glass. High extraction yield reveals that the network structure of funnel glass was fractured due to the dramatic energy generated during the SHS melting process. The PbO nanoparticles collected show good dispersion and morphology with a mean grain size of 40-50nm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The galactic magnetic field and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prouza, Michael; Šmída, Radomír

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 410, - (2003), s. 1-10 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010928; GA MŠk LN00A006; GA MŠk LA 134 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : cosmic rays * magnetic fields * Galaxy Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.843, year: 2003

  5. Origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernadotte, Stephan; Atkins, Andrew J.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2012-01-01

    For electronic excitations in the ultraviolet and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, the intensities are usually calculated within the dipole approximation, which assumes that the oscillating electric field is constant over the length scale of the transition. For the short wavelengths used in hard X-ray spectroscopy, the dipole approximation may not be adequate. In particular, for metal K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), it becomes necessary to include higher-order contributions. In quantum-chemical approaches to X-ray spectroscopy, these so-called quadrupole intensities have so far been calculated by including contributions depending on the square of the electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transition moments. However, the resulting quadrupole intensities depend on the choice of the origin of the coordinate system. Here, we show that for obtaining an origin-independent theory, one has to include all contributions that are of the same order in the wave vector consistently. This leads to two additional contributions depending on products of the electric-dipole and electric-octupole and of the electric-dipole and magnetic-quadrupole transition moments, respectively. We have implemented such an origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in XAS within time-dependent density-functional theory, and demonstrate its usefulness for the calculation of metal and ligand K-edge XAS spectra of transition metal complexes.

  6. Modeling of Cosmic-Ray Propagation and Galactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission in Support of Current and Future NASA Missions, Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Igor

    This is a "Phase 3" successor proposal that is a continuation of work funded by the Astrophysics Research and Analysis (APRA) Program through the sub-topic "Particle Astrophysics": Considerable advances in astrophysics of cosmic rays in recent years have become possible due to superior instrumentation launched into space and to the top of the atmosphere. The ACE-CRIS, AMS-02, Fermi-LAT, HAWC, PAMELA, SuperTIGER, Voyager 1,2, WMAP, and many other missions made a lot of breakthroughs and more is expected in the following years. Other high-expectations missions are recently launched (CALET) or are awaiting for launch (ISS-CREAM). The claimed precision of the AMS- 02 data reaches 1-3%. Taking full advantage of the high quality data requires numerical models of comparable accuracy. The current state-of-the-art cosmic ray propagation model is GALPROP, which has become a standard analysis tool in astrophysics of cosmic rays, studies of the diffuse emissions, and related fields. It provides a unified framework for the interpretation of data collected by many different kinds of experiments and emphasizes the inter-relationship between different types of data. We are proposing considerable improvements of the GALPROP model and tool that include generalization of the description of the components of the Galactic interstellar medium to the full 3D and extensive application of the Bayesian tools in building such data-sets, development of a heliospheric propagation tool fully compatible with GALPROP, development of a reliable diffuse emission model in the keV-TeV energy range, generalization of the nuclear reaction network and cross section routines to include trans-iron nuclides, improvements in the description of the production of secondary particles in cosmic ray interactions, various speed and memory optimizations. We will continue to support a dedicated website which hosts GALPROP WebRun, a user-friendly interface for running the GALPROP code on a dedicated cluster

  7. Calculating patient specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampinen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. When estimating the radiation dose of an individual patient, patient specific calculation methods must be used. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3 % with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients

  8. Dose Measurement and Calculation of Asymmetric X-Ray Fields from Therapeutic Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Attar, A. L.; Abdel-Wanees, M. E.; Hashem, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Linear accelerators with x-ray collimators that move independently are becoming increasingly common for treatment with asymmetric fields. In this paper we present a simplified approach to the calculation of dose for asymmetric fields. A method is described for calculating the beam profiles, depth doses and output factors for asymmetric fields of radiation produced by linear accelerators (siemens mevatron M2) with independent jaws. Values are calculated from data measured for symmetric fields. Symmetric field data are modified using opened off-axis factors (OAFs) and primary off-centre ratios (POCRs) which are obtained from in air measurements of the largest possible opened field. Beam hardening occurring within the flattening filter is taken into account using of attenuation coefficients for opened field and used to generate the opened POCR at different depths. A full investigation to compare measured and calculated profiles demonstrates favorable agreement.

  9. JULIA: calculation projection software for primary barriers shielding to X-Rays using barite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Júlia R.A.S. da; Vieira, José W.; Lima, Fernando R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to program a software to calculate the required thicknesses to attenuate X-rays in kilovoltage of 60 kV, 80 kV, 110 kV and 150 kV. The conventional methodological parameters for structural shield calculations established by the NCRP (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements) were presented. The descriptive and exploratory methods allowed the construction of the JULIA. In this sense and based on the result obtained, the tool presented is useful for professionals who wish to design structural shielding in radiodiagnostic and/or therapy. The development of calculations in the computational tool corresponds to the accessibility, optimization of time and estimation close to the real. Such heuristic exercise represents improvement of calculations for the estimation of primary barriers with barite

  10. Nonlocal relativistic diffusion (NoRD) model of cosmic ray propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T

    2017-01-01

    The problem of physical interpretation of the nonlocal relativistic diffusion (NoRD model) for cosmic ray transport in the Galaxy is discussed. The model accounts for the turbulent character of the interstellar medium and the relativistic principle of the speed limitation. Involving fractional calculus and non-Gaussian Lévy statistics yields numerical results compatible with observation data. A special attention is paid to the knee problem. The relativistic speed limit requirement steepens theoretical background spectrum at certain energies, and the position of the break, its sharpness and slopes of asymptotes depend on D α ( E ) and α . (paper)

  11. Voids as alternatives to dark energy and the propagation of γ rays through the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLavallaz, Arnaud; Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2012-04-27

    We test the opacity of a void universe to TeV energy γ rays having obtained the extragalactic background light in that universe using a simple model and the observed constraints on the star formation rate history. We find that the void universe has significantly more opacity than a Λ cold dark matter universe, putting it at odds with observations of BL-Lac objects. We argue that while this method of distinguishing between the two cosmologies contains uncertainties, it circumvents any debates over fine-tuning.

  12. Calculation of point isotropic buildup factors of gamma rays for water and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. H.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available   Exposure buildup factors for water and lead have been calculated by the Monte-Carlo method for an isotropic point source in an infinite homogeneous medium, using the latest cross secions available on the Internet. The types of interactions considered are ,photoelectric effect, incoherent (or bound-electron Compton. Scattering, coherent (or Rayleigh scattering and pair production. Fluorescence radiations have also been taken into acount for lead. For each material, calculations were made at 10 gamma ray energies in the 40 keV to 10 MeV range and up to penetration depths of 10 mean free paths at each energy point. The results presented in this paper can be considered as modified gamma ray exposure buildup factors and be used in radiation shielding designs.

  13. XOP: A graphical user interface for spectral calculations and x-ray optics utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejus, R.J.; Sanchez del Rio, M.

    1996-01-01

    A graphical user interface, using the Interactive Data Language (IDL) widget toolkit, for calculation of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation sources and for interaction of x-rays with optical elements has been developed. The interface runs presently on three different computer architectures under the Unix operating system endash the Sun-OS, the HP-UX, and the DEC-Unix operating systems. The point-and-click interface is used as a driver program for a variety of codes from different authors written in different computer languages. The execution of codes for calculating synchrotron radiation from undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets is summarized. The computation of optical properties of materials and the x-ray diffraction profiles from crystals in different geometries are also discussed. The interface largely simplifies the use of these codes and may be used without prior knowledge of how to run a particular program. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. First and second collision source for mitigating ray effects in discrete ordinate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, L.T.; Stevens, P.N.

    1991-01-01

    This work revisits the problem of ray effects in discrete ordinates calculations that frequently occurs in two- and three-dimensional systems which contain isolated sources within a highly absorbing medium. The effectiveness of using a first collision source or a second collision source are analyzed as possible remedies to mitigate this problem. The first collision and second collision sources are generated by three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations that enables its application to a variety of source configurations, and the results can be coupled to a two- or three-dimensional discrete ordinates transport code. (author)

  15. The effect of magnetic field models on cosmic ray cutoff calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfitzer, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inaccuracies in the 1974 Olson-Pfitzer model appeared to be the probable cause for discrepancies between the observed and calculated cosmic ray cutoff values. An improved version of the Olson-Pfitzer model is now available which includes the effects of the tilt of the earth's dipole axis and which has removed most of the problems encountered in the earlier model. The paper demonstrates that when this new accurate magnetic field model is used, the calculated and observed cutoff values agree with the experimental error without the need for invoking anomalous diffusion mechanisms. This tilt-dependent model also permits a study of cutoffs versus the tilt of the dipole axis

  16. Propagation and sky distribution of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Propagation et distribution sur le ciel des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie dans le cadre de l'Observatoire Pierre Auger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armengaud, E

    2006-05-15

    The origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays remains an enigma of modern physics, which the Pierre Auger Observatory, a detector with a hybrid detection mode and an unprecedented size, will try to solve. The direct observation of the sources of those particles, or of large-scale structures in the sky associated to the sources, is one of the main goals of the observatory. Such observations should also allow to constrain cosmic ray propagation between their sources and the Earth, which is complicated by interactions with low-energy photon backgrounds and deflections in astrophysical magnetic fields. This thesis is made of two parts, in order to observe and simulate the sources of cosmic rays within the Auger Observatory. We begin with an extensive description of the Pierre Auger Observatory, and study the acceptance of its surface detector in order to build accurate sky exposure maps, an essential tool in order to study anisotropies. Then we present methods to search for anisotropies in the sky, and analyze the first two years of Auger data. After a description of the phenomena that can influence the propagation and observation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray sources, we present numerical simulations aiming at predicting observables such as the spectrum, anisotropies and composition measurable by Auger as a function of various astrophysical models. We show that extragalactic magnetic fields can play a crucial role in particular if cosmic rays are partly heavy nuclei. Finally, we show that the propagation of these particles from a nearby source generates secondary fluxes of gamma-rays that could be detected by TeV gamma-ray telescopes. (author)

  17. SpekCalc: a program to calculate photon spectra from tungsten anode x-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poludniowski, G; Evans, P M; Landry, G; DeBlois, F; Verhaegen, F

    2009-01-01

    A software program, SpekCalc, is presented for the calculation of x-ray spectra from tungsten anode x-ray tubes. SpekCalc was designed primarily for use in a medical physics context, for both research and education purposes, but may also be of interest to those working with x-ray tubes in industry. Noteworthy is the particularly wide range of tube potentials (40-300 kVp) and anode angles (recommended: 6-30 deg.) that can be modelled: the program is therefore potentially of use to those working in superficial/orthovoltage radiotherapy, as well as diagnostic radiology. The utility is free to download and is based on a deterministic model of x-ray spectrum generation (Poludniowski 2007 Med. Phys. 34 2175). Filtration can be applied for seven materials (air, water, Be, Al, Cu, Sn and W). In this note SpekCalc is described and illustrative examples are shown. Predictions are compared to those of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo code (BEAMnrc) and, where possible, to an alternative, widely-used, spectrum calculation program (IPEM78). (note)

  18. Global multiresolution models of surface wave propagation: comparing equivalently regularized Born and ray theoretical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Lapo

    2006-10-01

    I invert a large set of teleseismic phase-anomaly observations, to derive tomographic maps of fundamental-mode surface wave phase velocity, first via ray theory, then accounting for finite-frequency effects through scattering theory, in the far-field approximation and neglecting mode coupling. I make use of a multiple-resolution pixel parametrization which, in the assumption of sufficient data coverage, should be adequate to represent strongly oscillatory Fréchet kernels. The parametrization is finer over North America, a region particularly well covered by the data. For each surface-wave mode where phase-anomaly observations are available, I derive a wide spectrum of plausible, differently damped solutions; I then conduct a trade-off analysis, and select as optimal solution model the one associated with the point of maximum curvature on the trade-off curve. I repeat this exercise in both theoretical frameworks, to find that selected scattering and ray theoretical phase-velocity maps are coincident in pattern, and differ only slightly in amplitude.

  19. Analytic models for beam propagation and far-field patterns in slab and bow-tie x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, E.A.

    1994-06-01

    Simplified analytic models for beam propagation in slab and bow-tie x-ray lasers yield convenient expressions that provide both a framework for guidance in computer modeling and useful approximates for experimenters. In unrefracted bow-tie lasers, the laser shape in conjunction with the nearly-exponential weighting of rays according to their length produces a small effective aperture for the signal. We develop an analytic expression for the aperture and the properties of the far-field signal. Similarly, we develop the view that the far-field pattern of refractive slab lasers is the result of effective apertures that are created by the interplay of refraction and exponential amplification. We present expressions for the size of this aperture as a function of laser parameters as well as for the intensity and position of the far-field lineout. This analysis also yields conditions for the refraction limit in slab lasers and an estimate for the signal loss due to refraction

  20. Impact of the total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy on FP decay heat calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tachibana, Takahiro; Katakura, Jun-ichi

    2004-01-01

    We calculated the average β- and γ-ray energies, E β and E γ , for 44 short-lived isotopes of Rb, Sr, Y, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm and Eu from the data by Greenwood et al, who measured the β-feed in the decay of these nuclides using the total absorption γ-ray spectrometer. These E β and E γ were incorporated into the decay files from JENDL, JEF2.2 and ENDF-B/VI, and the decay heats were calculated. The results were compared with the integral measurements by the University of Tokyo, ORNL and Lowell. In the case of JENDL, where the correction for the so-called Pandemonium effect is applied on the basis of the gross theory, the very good agreement is no longer maintained. The γ-ray component is overestimated in the cooling time range from 3 to 300 seconds, suggesting a kind of an over-correction as for the Pandemonium effect. We have to evaluate both the applicability of the TAGS results and the correction method itself in order to generate a more consistent data basis for decay heat summation calculations. (author)

  1. Monte Carlo method for dose calculation due to oral X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    1998-06-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, especially in youngsters and children, calls for the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, a Monte Carlo code was adapted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM.FOR developed at the GSF-Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO.PAS). Good agreement between results obtained with both codes was observed. Irradiations of the incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone narrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the larger the field area, the higher the dose in assessed organs and tissues. The variation of the source-skin distance does not change the conversion coefficients. On the other hand, the increase in the voltage applied to the X-ray tube causes an increase in the calculated conversion coefficients. (author)

  2. Simulating an extreme over-the-horizon optical propagation event over Lake Michigan using a coupled mesoscale modeling and ray tracing framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and forecasting of over-the-horizon propagation events are essential for various civilian and defense applications. We demonstrate the prowess of a newly proposed coupled mesoscale modeling and ray tracing framework in reproducing such an event. Wherever possible, routinely

  3. A new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, A.; Chiron, M.; Nimal, J.C.; Diop, C.M.; Ridoux, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study proposes a new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields. The formula combines the buildup factors of single-layer shields with products and quotients. The feasibility of the formula for reproducing the buildup factors was tested by using point isotropic buildup factors calculated with the SN1D discrete ordinates code as reference data. The dose buildup factors of single-, double-, and multilayer shields composed of water, aluminum, iron, and lead were calculated for a spherical geometry in the energy range between 10 MeV and 40 keV and for total thicknesses of up to 30 mean free paths. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the bound electron effect of Compton scattering (incoherent scattering), the coherent scattering, the pair production, and the secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. The tests have shown that the approximating formula reproduces the reference data of double-layer shields very well for most cases. With the same parameters and with a new physical consideration that takes into account in a global way the degradation of the gamma-ray energy spectrum, the buildup factors of three- and five-layer shields were also very well reproduced

  4. The role of plasma instabilities in the propagation of gamma-rays from distant Blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saveliev, A.; Evoli, C.; Sigl, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-11-15

    The observation in the GeV band of distant blazars has been recently used to put constraints on the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) and Extragalactic Magnetic Fields (EGMF). To support such claims one has to assume that the leptonic component of the electromagnetic cascade initiated by blazar gamma-rays is deflected away by strong enough EGMF, suppressing the signal in the Fermi window. Apart from magnetic fields, the development of such a cascade might be affected by plasma instabilities due to interactions with the ionized component of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). In this paper we model the electromagnetic cascade through a Monte Carlo simulation in which both effects are taken into account separately, and we derive constraints on these scenarios from the combined Fermi-HESS data set. In the specific case of 1ES 0229+200 observations, we show that both explanations of the GeV flux suppression are compatible with the available data, specifically by assuming a magnetic field of B >or similar 10{sup -16} G or an IGM temperature of T

  5. The application of semianalytic method for calculating the thickness of biological shields of nuclear reactors. Part 2. Attenuation of gamma rays. An example of shield's thickness calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszek, W.; Kucypera, S.

    1982-01-01

    The semianalytic method was used for calculating the attenuation of gamma rays and the thickness of biological shield of graphite moderated reactor. A short description of computer code as well as the exemplary results of calculations are given. (A.S.)

  6. Dose calculation method with 60-cobalt gamma rays in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaff, Luiz Alberto Malaguti

    2001-01-01

    Physical factors associated to total body irradiation using 60 Co gamma rays beams, were studied in order to develop a calculation method of the dose distribution that could be reproduced in any radiotherapy center with good precision. The method is based on considering total body irradiation as a large and irregular field with heterogeneities. To calculate doses, or doses rates, of each area of interest (head, thorax, thigh, etc.), scattered radiation is determined. It was observed that if dismagnified fields were considered to calculate the scattered radiation, the resulting values could be applied on a projection to the real size to obtain the values for dose rate calculations. In a parallel work it was determined the variation of the dose rate in the air, for the distance of treatment, and for points out of the central axis. This confirm that the use of the inverse square law is not valid. An attenuation curve for a broad beam was also determined in order to allow the use of absorbers. In this work all the adapted formulas for dose rate calculations in several areas of the body are described, as well time/dose templates sheets for total body irradiation. The in vivo dosimetry, proved that either experimental or calculated dose rate values (achieved by the proposed method), did not have significant discrepancies. (author)

  7. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.G.; Lee, S.Y.; Yook, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for neutrons and gamma rays based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N666. These data are used to calculate the dose rate distribution of neutron and gamma ray in radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are presented; the corresponding energy range for gamma rays is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors were calculated, under the assumption that radiation energy distribution has nonlinearity in the phantom, have different meaning from those values obtained by monoenergetic radiation. Especially, these values were determined with the cross section library. The flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors obtained in this work were in a good agreement to the values presented by ANSI. Those data will be useful for the radiation shielding analysis and the radiation dosimetry in the case of continuous energy distributions. (author)

  8. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; Beddar, S [M D Anderson Cancer Center, Univeristy of Texas, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Trache, L [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: jcpolf@mdanderson.org

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. (note)

  9. Development of a computer code for shielding calculation in X-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Lava, Deise D.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of an effective barrier against the interaction of ionizing radiation present in X-ray rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for specifying the thickness of primary and secondary shielding of an traditional X-ray room considers the following factors: factor of use, occupational factor, distance between the source and the wall, workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the receptor. With these data it was possible the development of a computer program in order to identify and use variables in functions obtained through graphics regressions offered by NCRP Report-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) for the calculation of shielding of the room walls as well as the wall of the darkroom and adjacent areas. With the built methodology, a program validation is done through comparing results with a base case provided by that report. The thickness of the obtained values comprise various materials such as steel, wood and concrete. After validation is made an application in a real case of radiographic room. His visual construction is done with the help of software used in modeling of indoor and outdoor. The construction of barriers for calculating program resulted in a user-friendly tool for planning radiographic rooms to comply with the limits established by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in September / 2011

  10. Improved forward wave propagation and adjoint-based sensitivity kernel calculations using a numerically stable finite-element PML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Zhinan; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland

    2014-01-01

    with perfectly matched absorbing layers we introduce a computationally efficient boundary storage strategy by saving information along the interface between the CFS-UPML and the main domain only, thus avoiding the need to solve a backward wave propagation problem inside the CFS-UPML, which is known to be highly......In recent years, the application of time-domain adjoint methods to improve large, complex underground tomographic models at the regional scale has led to new challenges for the numerical simulation of forward or adjoint elastic wave propagation problems. An important challenge is to design...... convolution formulation of the complex-frequency-shifted unsplit-field perfectly matched layer (CFS-UPML) derived in previous work more flexible by providing a new treatment to analytically remove singular parameters in the formulation. We also extend this new formulation to 3-D. Furthermore, we derive...

  11. Calculation of reasonable exemption levels for surface contamination by measuring overall gamma ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Haruyuki; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2008-01-01

    The present regulation on surface contamination [Bq/cm 2 ] is determined from a simple radiological model for the most hazardous radionuclides (Pu-239 for alpha emitters and Sr-90 for beta emitters) and its extremely conservative model is applied for all other alpha and beta emitters. In this study, reasonable exemption levels for surface contamination are calculated for each radionuclide by adopting an original radiological dose evaluation method for surface contamination that can be applied in radiation safety, transport safety and waste safety. Furthermore, a new concept of judging the exemption by estimating the overall contamination [Bq] on the objects from the measurement of gamma ray has been designed and a reasonable value was derived. We conclude that the overall exemption levels obtained by gamma ray measurement can be one order smaller than those obtained by the conventional method for some radionuclides, such as Mn-54, Co-60, Nb-94, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-152 and Eu-154. (author)

  12. Study of lower hybrid wave propagation and absorption in a tokamak plasma using hard X-Ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbeaux, F.

    1999-01-01

    Control of the current density profile is a critical issue in view to obtain high fusion performances in tokamak plasmas? It is therefore important to be able to control the power deposition profile of the lower hybrid wave, which has the highest current drive efficiency among all other non-inductive additional methods. Propagation and absorption of this wave are investigated in the Tore Supra tokamak using a new hard x-ray tomographic system and a new ray-tracing/Fokker-Planck code. These tools are described in detail and allow to analyse the lower hybrid power deposition profile dependence as a function of various plasma parameters (density, magnetic field, current) and of the injected wave spectrum. A good agreement between the code and the measurements found when the central electron temperature is greater than about 3 keV, that is in regimes where the wave undergoes only a few reflections before being absorbed. The simulations are then used to interpret the experimental trends. The lower hybrid power deposition profile is in nearly all discharges localised at a normalised minor radius of 0.2-0.3, and is weakly sensitive to variations of plasma parameters. It is hence difficult to perform an efficient control of the current profile generated by the lower hybrid wave in Tore Supra. This goal may nevertheless be reached by using an original method, which uses an auxiliary lower hybrid wave injected by a vertical port of the torus. This method is investigated by means of the simulation code. (author)

  13. Calculating additional shielding requirements in diagnostics X-ray departments by computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, A.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides an extension of an existing method for the calculation of the barrier thickness required to reduce the three types of radiation exposure emitted from the source, the primary, secondary and leakage radiation, to a specified weekly design limit (MPD). Since each of these three types of radiation are of different beam quality, having different shielding requirements, NCRP 49 has provided means to calculate the necessary protective barrier thickness for each type of radiation individually. Additionally, barrier requirements specified using the techniques stated at NCRP 49, show enormous variations among users. Part of the variations is due to different assumptions made regarding the use of the examined room and the characteristics of adjoining space. Many of the differences result from the difficulty of accurately relating information from the calculations to graphs and tables involved in the calculation process specified by this report. Moreover, the latest technological developments such as mammography are not addressed and attenuation data for three-phase generators, that are most widely used today, is not provided. The design of shielding barriers in diagnostic X-ray departments generally follow the ALARA principle. That means that, in practice, the exposure levels are kept 'as low as reasonably achievable', taking into account economical and technical factors. Additionally, the calculation of barrier requirements includes many uncertainties (e.g. the workload, the actual kVp used etc.). (author)

  14. Electronic structure of polycrystalline cadmium dichloride studied by X-ray spectroscopies and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demchenko, I.N.; Chernyshova, M.; Stolte, W.C.; Speaks, D.T.; Derkachova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure of cadmium dichloride has been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and, for the first time, by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cl K edge. Good agreement was obtained between the non-resonant X-ray emission (XES) along with XANES experimental spectra and the calculated Cl 3p local partial density of states (DOS). The calculations were performed using the full-potential linearized-augmented-plane-wave with the local orbitals (FP-(L)APW l o) method utilized in the WIEN2k code. It was shown that the position of the RIXS band in CdCl 2 follows a linear dispersion according to the Raman–Stokes law if the excitation energy is tuned below the absorption threshold. The situation changes for core excitation above the photoabsorption threshold where the dispersion relation is split into two branches. The position of the resonant contribution does not depend on the excitation energy, while the excitonic sideband follows the Raman–Stoke law. Combined XANES and RIXS measurements compared to calculated band structure allowed us to determine the direct band gap of CdCl 2 to be at 5.7 ± 0.05 eV. -- Highlights: ► XANES at the K edge of Cl and related emission KV band interpreted within the ab initio DFT formalism. ► Two dominant contributions observed in RIXS data: the resonant and the excitonic ones. ► The dispersion relation below the absorption threshold follows Raman–Stokes law. ► Dispersion above the threshold splits into two qualitatively different relations. ► Overlapping of XAS spectrum with RIXS one makes possible to estimate direct band gap value to be 5.7 eV.

  15. The effect of gamma-ray transport on afterheat calculations for accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J.F.; Sanz, J.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive afterheat is an important source term for the release of radionuclides in fusion systems under accident conditions. Heat transfer calculations are used to determine time-temperature histories in regions of interest, but the true source term needs to be the effective afterheat, which considers the transport of penetrating gamma rays. Without consideration of photon transport, accident temperatures may be overestimated in others. The importance of this effect is demonstrated for a simple, one-dimensional problem. The significance of this effect depends strongly on the accident scenario being analyzed

  16. X-Ray Absorption Spectra of Water from First Principles Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prendergast, David; Galli, Giulia

    2006-01-01

    We present a series of ab initio calculations of the x-ray absorption cross section (XAS) of ice and liquid water at ambient conditions. Our results show that all available experimental data and theoretical results are consistent with the standard model of the liquid as comprising molecules with approximately four hydrogen bonds. Our simulations of ice XAS including the lowest lying excitonic state are in excellent agreement with experiment and those of a quasitetrahedral model of water are in reasonable agreement with recent measurements. Hence we propose that the standard, quasitetrahedral model of water, although approximate, represents a reasonably accurate description of the local structure of the liquid

  17. Approximate techniques for calculating gamma ray dose rates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    Although today's computers have made three-dimensional discrete ordinates transport codes a virtual reality, there is still a need for approximate techniques for estimating radiation environments. This paper discusses techniques for calculating gamma ray dose rates in nuclear power plants where Compton scattering is the dominant attenuation mechanism. The buildup factor method is reviewed; its use and misuse are discussed. Several useful rules-of-thumb are developed. The paper emphasizes the need for understanding the fundamental physics and draws heavily on the old, classic references

  18. Calculation of electron contamination doses produced using blocking trays for 6 MV X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    Calculation of electron contamination doses whilst using blocking trays in radiotherapy is achieved by comparison of measured absorbed dose within the first few centimeters of a water phantom. Electron contamination of up to 28% of maximum dose is produced at the central axis of the beam whilst using a 6 mm Perspex blocking tray for a 30 cmx30 cm field. The electron contamination is spread over the entire field reducing slightly towards the edge of the beam. Electron contamination from block trays is also present outside the primary collimated X-ray beam with more than 20% of the maximum dose deposited at the surface, 5 cm outside the primary collimated beam at a field size of 40 cmx40 cm. The electron contamination spectrum has been calculated from measured results.

  19. Atmospheric gamma-ray observation with the BETS detectorfor calibrating atmospheric neutrino flux calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kasahara, K.; Torii, S.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Yoshida, K.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Nishimura, J.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Honda, M.; Ohuchi, T.; Midorikawa, S.; Yuda, T.

    2002-01-01

    We observed atmospheric gamma-rays around 10 GeV at balloon altitudes (15~25 km) and at a mountain (2770 m a.s.l). The observed results were compared with Monte Carlo calculations to find that an interaction model (Lund Fritiof1.6) used in an old neutrino flux calculation was not good enough for describing the observed values. In stead, we found that two other nuclear interaction models, Lund Fritiof7.02 and dpmjet3.03, gave much better agreement with the observations. Our data will serve for examining nuclear interaction models and for deriving a reliable absolute atmospheric neutrino flux in the GeV region.

  20. Calculation of “LS-curves” for coincidence summing corrections in gamma ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Tim; Korun, Matjaž

    2006-01-01

    When coincidence summing correction factors for extended samples are calculated in gamma-ray spectrometry from full-energy-peak and total efficiencies, their variation over the sample volume needs to be considered. In other words, the correction factors cannot be computed as if the sample were a point source. A method developed by Blaauw and Gelsema takes the variation of the efficiencies over the sample volume into account. It introduces the so-called LS-curve in the calibration procedure and only requires the preparation of a single standard for each sample geometry. We propose to replace the standard preparation by calculation and we show that the LS-curves resulting from our method yield coincidence summing correction factors that are consistent with the LS values obtained from experimental data.

  1. The two-wave X-ray field calculated by means of integral-equation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, J.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of calculating the two-wave X-ray field on the basis of the Takagi-Taupin equations is discussed for the general case of curved lattice planes. A two-dimensional integral equation which incorporates the nature of the incoming radiation, the form of the crystal/vacuum boundary, and the curvature of the structure, is deduced. Analytical solutions for the symmetrical Laue case with incoming plane waves are obtained directly for perfect crystals by means of iteration. The same method permits a simple derivation of the narrow-wave Laue and Bragg cases. Modulated wave fronts are discussed, and it is shown that a cut-off in the width of an incoming plane wave leads to lateral oscillations which are superimposed on the Pendelloesung fringes. Bragg and Laue shadow fields are obtained. The influence of a non-zero kernel is discussed and a numerical procedure for calculating wave amplitudes in curved crystals is presented. (Auth.)

  2. Neutron and gamma ray streaming calculations for the ETF neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.

    1981-02-01

    Two-dimensional radiation transport methods have been used to estimate the effects of neutron and gamma ray streaming on the performance of the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) neutral beam injectors. The calculations take into account the spatial, angular, and spectral distributions of the radiation entering the injector duct. The instantaneous nuclear heating rate averaged over the length of the cryopumping panel in the injector is 7.5 x 10 -3 MW/m 3 which implies a total heat load of 2.2 x 10 -4 MW. The instantaneous dose rate to the ion gun insulators was estimated to be 3200 rad/s. The radial dependence of the instantaneous dose equivalent rate in the neutral beam injector duct shield was also calculated

  3. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams. Either the Klein-Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source-surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  4. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 γ-ray beams. Either the Klein--Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source--surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  5. Neutron and gamma ray calculation for Hiroshima-type atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Endo, Satoru; Takada, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Shoichiro; Hasai, Hiromi

    1998-03-01

    We looked at the radiation dose of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb again in 1986. We gave it the name of ``Dosimetry System 1986`` (DS86). We and other groups have measured the expose dose since 1986. Now, the difference between data of {sup 152}Eu and the calculation result on the basis of DS86 was found. To investigate the reason, we carried out the calculations of neutron transport and neutron absorption gamma ray for Hiroshima atomic bomb by MCNP3A and MCNP4A code. The problems caused by fast neutron {sup 32}P from sulfur in insulator of pole. To correct the difference, we investigated many models and found agreement of all data within 1 km. (S.Y.)

  6. Dose Distribution Calculation Using MCNPX Code in the Gamma-ray Irradiation Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    1991-02-01

    60 Co-gamma irradiators have long been used for foods sterilization, plant mutation and development of radio-protective agents, radio-sensitizers and other purposes. The Applied Radiological Science Research Institute of Cheju National University has a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility loaded with a MDS Nordin standard 60 Co source (C188), of which the initial activity was 400 TBq (10,800 Ci) on February 19, 2004. This panoramic gamma irradiator is designed to irradiate in all directions various samples such as plants, cultured cells and mice to administer given radiation doses. In order to give accurate doses to irradiation samples, appropriate methods of evaluating, both by calculation and measurement, the radiation doses delivered to the samples should be set up. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the radiation dose distributions inside the irradiation chamber and the radiation doses delivered to typical biolological samples which are frequently irradiated in the facility. The computational models are based on using the MCNPX code. The horizontal and vertical dose distributions has been calculated inside the irradiation chamber and compared the calculated results with measured data obtained with radiation dosimeters to verify the computational models. The radiation dosimeters employed are a Famer's type ion chamber and MOSFET dosimeters. Radiation doses were calculated by computational models, which were delivered to cultured cell samples contained in test tubes and to a mouse fixed in a irradiation cage, and compared the calculated results with the measured data. The computation models are also tested to see if they can accurately simulate the case where a thick lead shield is placed between the source and detector. Three tally options of the MCNPX code, F4, F5 and F6, are alternately used to see which option produces optimum results. The computation models are also used to calculate gamma ray energy spectra of a BGO scintillator at

  7. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, R. G.; Lozano, E.; Valente, M.

    2013-01-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  8. Finite difference method calculations of X-ray absorption fine structure for copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, J.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia); Chantler, C.T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)]. E-mail: chantler@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Witte, C. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    The finite difference method is extended to calculate X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) for solid state copper. These extensions include the incorporation of a Monte Carlo frozen phonon technique to simulate the effect of thermal vibrations under a correlated Debye-Waller model, and the inclusion of broadening effects from inelastic processes. Spectra are obtained over an energy range in excess of 300 eV above the K absorption edge-more than twice the greatest energy range previously reported for a solid state calculation using this method. We find this method is highly sensitive to values of the photoelectron inelastic mean free path, allowing us to probe the accuracy of current models of this parameter, particularly at low energies. We therefore find that experimental data for the photoelectron inelastic mean free path can be obtained by this method. Our results compare favourably with high precision measurements of the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient for copper, reaching agreement to within 3%, and improving previous results using the finite difference method by an order of magnitude.

  9. Calculation of x-ray spectra emerging from an x-ray tube. Part I. Electron penetration characteristics in x-ray targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poludniowski, Gavin G.; Evans, Philip M.

    2007-01-01

    The penetration characteristics of electron beams into x-ray targets are investigated for incident electron kinetic energies in the range 50-150 keV. The frequency densities of electrons penetrating to a depth x in a target, with a fraction of initial kinetic energy, u, are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for beam energies of 50, 80, 100, 120 and 150 keV in a tungsten target. The frequency densities for 100 keV electrons in Al, Mo and Re targets are also calculated. A mixture of simple modeling with equations and interpolation from data is used to generalize the calculations in tungsten. Where possible, parameters derived from the Monte Carlo data are compared to experimental measurements. Previous electron transport approximations in the semiempirical models of other authors are discussed and related to this work. In particular, the crudity of the use of the Thomson-Whiddington law to describe electron penetration and energy loss is highlighted. The results presented here may be used towards calculating the target self-attenuation correction for bremsstrahlung photons emitted within a tungsten target

  10. Investigations of mode I crack propagation in fibre-reinforced plastics with real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, A.; Nordstrom, R.; Flueeler, P.

    1992-01-01

    The described investigation of crack formation and crack propagation in mode I (tensile stress) in fibre-reinforced plastic samples, especially uni-directional carbon fibre reinforced polyether-ether ketone (PEEK) has several aims. On the one hand, the phenomena of crack formation and crack propagation in these materials are to be studied, and on the other hand, the draft standards for these tests are to be checked. It was found that the combination of real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis is excellently suited for the basic examination of crack formation and crack propagation in DCB samples. With the aid of picture processing and analysis of the video representation, consistent crack lengths and resulting G IC values can be determined. (orig./RHM) [de

  11. Calculations of magnetic x-ray dichroism in the 3d absorption spectra of rare-earth compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GOEDKOOP, JB; THOLE, BT; VANDERLAAN, G; SAWATZKY, GA; DEGROOT, FMF; FUGGLE, JC; de Groot, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X

    1988-01-01

    We present atomic calculations for the recently discovered magnetic x-ray dichroism (MXD) displayed by the 3d x-ray-absorption spectra of rare-earth compounds. The spectral shapes expected at T=0 K for linear polarization parallel and normal to the local magnetic field is given, together with the

  12. Space-time analysis of the Seismic Waves propagation and World Wide Lightning Location Network data association with the Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, L.

    2017-01-01

    The natural high intensity sub-millisecond electromagnetic pulses associated with seismic waves from earthquakes can trigger +CG, -CG and IC lightning discharges, transient luminous events (TLEs) and non luminous events as TGFS. The lightning discharges with higher peak currents are more probable during the moments when seismic waves from earthquakes pass through a place of lightning. Huge charge transfer of triggered +CG, -CG and IC lightning discharges can radiate powerful electromagnetic emission. Space-time analysis of the seismic wave’s propagation and WWLLN data was done together with the second Fermi GBM Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGF) Catalog. A total number of 1203 events from the WWLLN associations table were associated with the entrance the exact seismic waves from earthquakes in the place of lightning. Only 11 events from 1214 associations were rejected. After that the full list of 1049 TGFs has been checked out. As the result the 1038 TGFS has been associated with earthquakes. Among them 42 events with time difference exceeding ±100 sec were found. As the result 996 events get inside the time interval for the space-time analysis ±100 sec, they correspond to 95% from the total number of 1049 TGFS. The probability density function for the Time difference data was calculated and more preferably can be explained by the probability density functions of Cauchy distribution. The Phases of Seismic Waves and earthquakes magnitude associated with selected 996 TGFS from WWLLN associations table were studied. (author)

  13. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stovgaard Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects have expanded the gap between the amount of known protein sequences and structures. The limitations of current high resolution structure determination methods make it unlikely that this gap will disappear in the near future. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established low resolution method for routinely determining the structure of proteins in solution. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. Such a method can for example be used to construct a likelihood function, which is paramount for structure determination based on statistical inference. Results We present a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves based on the Debye formula and a set of scattering form factors for dummy atom representations of amino acids. Such a method avoids the computationally costly iteration over all atoms. We estimated the form factors using generated data from a set of high quality protein structures. No ad hoc scaling or correction factors are applied in the calculation of the curves. Two coarse-grained representations of protein structure were investigated; two scattering bodies per amino acid led to significantly better results than a single scattering body. Conclusion We show that the obtained point estimates allow the calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. The resulting curves are on par with the current state-of-the-art program CRYSOL, which requires full atomic detail. Our method was also comparable to CRYSOL in recognizing native structures among native-like decoys. As a proof-of-concept, we combined the coarse-grained Debye calculation with a previously described probabilistic model of protein structure, TorusDBN. This resulted in a significant improvement in the decoy recognition performance. In conclusion, the presented method shows great promise for

  14. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and gamm-ray energy spectra for fusion-reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra resulting from the interactions of approx. 14-MeV neutrons in laminated slabs of stainless steel type-304 and borated polyethylene have been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculated spectra are compared with measured data as a function of slab thickness and material composition and as a function of detector location behind the slabs. Comparisons of the differential energy spectra are made for neutrons with energies above 850 keV and for gamma rays with energies above 750 keV. The measured neutron spectra and those calculated using Monte Carlo methods agree within 5% to 50% depending on the slab thickness and composition and neutron energy. The agreement between the measured and calculated gamma-ray energy spectra is also within this range. The MCNP data are also in favorable agreement with attenuated data calculated previously by discrete ordinates transport methods and the Monte Carlo code SAM-CE

  15. Calculation of the TeV prompt muon component in very high energy cosmic ray showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bloise, C.; Forti, C.; Tanzini, A.

    1995-07-01

    HEMAS-DPM is a Monte Carlo for the simulation of very high energy cosmic ray showers, which includes the DPMJET-II code based on the two component Dual Parton Model. DPMJET-II provides also charm production in agreement with data and, for p exceeding 5 GeV/c, with perturbative QCD results in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. In this respect, a new scheme has been considered for the inclusive production of D mesons at large p in hadronic collisions in the frame work of perturbative fragmentation functions, allowing an analysis at the NLO (next to leading order) level which goes beyond the fixed O(α s 3 ) perturbative theory of open charm production. HEMAS-DPM has been applied to the calculation of the prompt muon component for E μ ≥1 TeV in air showers considering the two extreme cases of primary protons and Fe nuclei

  16. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and theoretical calculations of antileishmanial neolignan analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Josenaide P. do; Santos, Lourivaldo S.; Carmo, Maria Carolina L. do; Brasil, Davi S.B.; Alves, Claudio N., E-mail: nahum@ufpa.b [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e Naturais; Santos, Regina Helena A.; Tozzo, Erica; Ferreira, Janaina G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The synthesis and X-ray crystal diffraction structure of two analogues of neolignans, 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-phenylethanone (20) and 2-[(4-chlorophenyl)thio]-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) propan-1-one (12) is described. The compound 12 presents activity against intracellular Leishmania donovani and Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes that cause cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP hybrid functional was employed to calculate a set of molecular descriptors for nineteen synthetic analogues of neolignans with antileishmanial activities. Afterwards, the stepwise discriminant analysis was performed to investigate possible relationship between the molecular descriptors and biological activities. Through this analysis the compounds were classified into two groups active and inactive according to their degree of biological activities, and the more important properties were charges on some key atoms, electronic affinity and ClogP. (author)

  17. Survivor dosimetry. Part D. Graphical comparisons of measurements and calculations for neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    An important part of validating the DS02 dosimetry system is the comparison of calculated initial neutron and gamma-ray radiation activation from the atomic bombs with all measurements that have been made, both before and during this current dosimetry reevaluation. All measurements that were made before the year 2002 are listed in Table 5 of Chapter 4. Many of these measurements have been compared to previous versions of the dosimetry systems for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In this section the measurements are compared to the new dosimetry system DS02. For the purposes of showing historical context, they are also compared to the previous dosimetry system DS86. References for these measurements are found in Chapter 4. (J.P.N.)

  18. GAMSOURCE - WRS system module number 38474 for calculating gamma-ray sources produced by neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.

    1978-06-01

    The WRS Modular Programming System has been developed as a means by which programmes may be more efficiently constructed, maintained and modified. In this system a module is a self-contained unit typically composed of one or more Fortran routines, and a programme is constructed from a number of such modules. This report describes one WRS module, the function of which is to calculate the source strength of gamma-rays arising from neutron capture in a system represented in one-dimensional geometry. The information given in this manual is of use both to the programmer wishing to incorporate the module in a programme, and to the user of such a programme. (author)

  19. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure and theoretical calculations of antileishmanial neolignan analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Josenaide P. do; Santos, Lourivaldo S.; Carmo, Maria Carolina L. do; Brasil, Davi S.B.; Alves, Claudio N.; Santos, Regina Helena A.; Tozzo, Erica; Ferreira, Janaina G.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis and X-ray crystal diffraction structure of two analogues of neolignans, 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-phenylethanone (20) and 2-[(4-chlorophenyl)thio]-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) propan-1-one (12) is described. The compound 12 presents activity against intracellular Leishmania donovani and Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes that cause cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP hybrid functional was employed to calculate a set of molecular descriptors for nineteen synthetic analogues of neolignans with antileishmanial activities. Afterwards, the stepwise discriminant analysis was performed to investigate possible relationship between the molecular descriptors and biological activities. Through this analysis the compounds were classified into two groups active and inactive according to their degree of biological activities, and the more important properties were charges on some key atoms, electronic affinity and ClogP. (author)

  20. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  1. Calculation of gamma-rays and fast neutrons fluxes with the program Mercure-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Dupont, C.; Totth, B.

    1978-01-01

    The program MERCURE-4 evaluates gamma ray or fast neutron attenuation, through laminated or bulky three-dimensionnal shields. The method used is that of line of sight point attenuation kernel, the scattered rays being taken into account by means of build-up factors for γ and removal cross sections for fast neutrons. The integration of the point kernel over the range of sources distributed in space and energy, is performed by the Monte-Carlo method, with an automatic adjustment of the importance functions. Since it is operationnal the program MERCURE-4 has been intensively used for many various problems, for example: - the calculation of gamma heating in reactor cores, control rods and shielding screens, as well as in experimental devices and irradiation loops; - the evaluation of fast neutron fluxes and corresponding damage in structural materials of reactors (vessel steels...); - the estimation of gamma dose rates on nuclear instrumentation in the reactors, around the reactor circuits and around spent fuel shipping casks

  2. Comparison of the uncertainties calculated for the results of radiochemical determinations using the law of propagation of uncertainty and a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, A.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative determinations of many radioactive analytes in environmental samples are based on a process in which several independent measurements of different properties are taken. The final results that are calculated using the data have to be evaluated for accuracy and precision. The estimate of the standard deviation, s, also called the combined standard uncertainty (CSU) associated with the result of this combined measurement can be used to evaluate the precision of the result. The CSU can be calculated by applying the law of propagation of uncertainty, which is based on the Taylor series expansion of the equation used to calculate the analytical result. The estimate of s can also be obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation. The data used in this simulation includes the values resulting from the individual measurements, the estimate of the variance of each value, including the type of distribution, and the equation used to calculate the analytical result. A comparison is made between these two methods of estimating the uncertainty of the calculated result. (author)

  3. Calculated L-shell x-ray line intensities for proton and helium ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Harrigan, M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical L-shell X-ray line intensities have been calculated for proton and helium bombardment of atoms from nickel (Z 2 = 28) to curium (Z 2 = 96). The ionization cross sections for the three L subshells were obtained from the recent calculations by Cohen and Harrigan in the ECPSSR theory, which uses the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA) with corrections for energy loss (E), Coulomb deflection (C), perturbed-stationary-state (PSS), and relativistic (R) effects. The fluorescence yields and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities were taken from M. O. Krause (Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, 307 (1979)) and the L-subshell emission rates from S. I. Salem, S. L. Panosian, and R. A. Krause (Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 14, 91 (1974)). The line intensities Ll, Lα, Leta, Lβ 1 to Lβ 6 , Lβ/sub 9,10/, and Lγ 1 to Lgg 6 are tabulated for selected ion energies from 0.2 to 10 MeV

  4. X-Ray Absorption Spectra of Amorphous Ices from GW Quasiparticle Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingzhu; Car, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    We use a GW approach[2] to compute the x-ray absorption spectra of model low- and high-density amorphous ice structures(LDA and HDA)[3]. We include the structural effects of quantum zero point motion using colored-noise Langevin molecular dynamics[4]. The calculated spectra differences in the main and post edge region between LDA and HDA agree well with experimental observations. We attribute these differences to the presence of interstitial molecules within the first coordination shell range in HDA. This assignment is further supported by a calculation of the spectrum of ice VIII, a high-pressure structure that maximizes the number of interstitial molecules and, accordingly, shows a much weaker post-edge feature. We further rationalize the spectral similarity between HDA and liquid water, and between LDA and ice Ih in terms of the respective similarities in the H-bond network topology and bond angle distributions. Supported by grants DOE-DE-SC0005180, DOE DE-SC0008626 and NSF-CHE-0956500.

  5. Accurate quasiparticle calculation of x-ray photoelectron spectra of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Tsubasa; Ohno, Kaoru

    2018-05-31

    It has been highly desired to provide an accurate and reliable method to calculate core electron binding energies (CEBEs) of crystals and to understand the final state screening effect on a core hole in high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), because the ΔSCF method cannot be simply used for bulk systems. We propose to use the quasiparticle calculation based on many-body perturbation theory for this problem. In this study, CEBEs of band-gapped crystals, silicon, diamond, β-SiC, BN, and AlP, are investigated by means of the GW approximation (GWA) using the full ω integration and compared with the preexisting XPS data. The screening effect on a deep core hole is also investigated in detail by evaluating the relaxation energy (RE) from the core and valence contributions separately. Calculated results show that not only the valence electrons but also the core electrons have an important contribution to the RE, and the GWA have a tendency to underestimate CEBEs due to the excess RE. This underestimation can be improved by introducing the self-screening correction to the GWA. The resulting C1s, B1s, N1s, Si2p, and Al2p CEBEs are in excellent agreement with the experiments within 1 eV absolute error range. The present self-screening corrected GW approach has the capability to achieve the highly accurate prediction of CEBEs without any empirical parameter for band-gapped crystals, and provide a more reliable theoretical approach than the conventional ΔSCF-DFT method.

  6. Accurate quasiparticle calculation of x-ray photoelectron spectra of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Tsubasa; Ohno, Kaoru

    2018-05-01

    It has been highly desired to provide an accurate and reliable method to calculate core electron binding energies (CEBEs) of crystals and to understand the final state screening effect on a core hole in high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), because the ΔSCF method cannot be simply used for bulk systems. We propose to use the quasiparticle calculation based on many-body perturbation theory for this problem. In this study, CEBEs of band-gapped crystals, silicon, diamond, β-SiC, BN, and AlP, are investigated by means of the GW approximation (GWA) using the full ω integration and compared with the preexisting XPS data. The screening effect on a deep core hole is also investigated in detail by evaluating the relaxation energy (RE) from the core and valence contributions separately. Calculated results show that not only the valence electrons but also the core electrons have an important contribution to the RE, and the GWA have a tendency to underestimate CEBEs due to the excess RE. This underestimation can be improved by introducing the self-screening correction to the GWA. The resulting C1s, B1s, N1s, Si2p, and Al2p CEBEs are in excellent agreement with the experiments within 1 eV absolute error range. The present self-screening corrected GW approach has the capability to achieve the highly accurate prediction of CEBEs without any empirical parameter for band-gapped crystals, and provide a more reliable theoretical approach than the conventional ΔSCF-DFT method.

  7. Application of Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution for improving image quality of free space propagation x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongxing; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-11-21

    New x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques without using synchrotron radiation confront a common problem from the negative effects of finite source size and limited spatial resolution. These negative effects swamp the fine phase contrast fringes and make them almost undetectable. In order to alleviate this problem, deconvolution procedures should be applied to the blurred x-ray phase contrast images. In this study, three different deconvolution techniques, including Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization and Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution (ForWaRD), were applied to the simulated and experimental free space propagation x-ray phase contrast images of simple geometric phantoms. These algorithms were evaluated in terms of phase contrast improvement and signal-to-noise ratio. The results demonstrate that the ForWaRD algorithm is most appropriate for phase contrast image restoration among above-mentioned methods; it can effectively restore the lost information of phase contrast fringes while reduce the amplified noise during Fourier regularization.

  8. Heat propagation in and around the deep repository. Thermal calculations applied to three hypothetical sites: Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageskog, L.; Jansson, Patrik

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the modelling of the thermal process in and around the deep repository for spent fuel. The model was developed in the general finite element program ANSYS and applied to the three hypothetical sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg included in the SR 97 analyse system. The canister emplacement in the repository was analysed based on certain criteria regarding the temperature on the canister surface. This was done with consideration to natural deviations in various thermal parameters as well as to the risk of a gap opening up between the canister surface and the bentonite buffer. The consequence of the latter was analysed separately as part of the study. The heat load in the model was applied stepwise, following an assumed time schedule for the actual deposition work. The calculations were extended to 1,000 years after the commencement of the deposition work. The outcome of the calculation is presented as coloured prints of isotherms in and around the repository at certain time intervals

  9. Impact of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose calculated with Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanqun; Li Jie; Wu Liping; Wang Pei; Lang Jinyi; Wu Dake; Xiao Mingyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To calculate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose. Methods: The BEAMnrc Monte Carlo Code system, designed especially for computer simulation of radioactive sources, was performed to evaluate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose.Thermoplastic mask came from our center with a material density of 1.12 g/cm 2 . The masks without holes, with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm, and with holes size of 0. 1 cm x 0.2 cm, and masks with different depth (0.12 cm and 0.24 cm) were evaluated separately. For those with holes, the material width between adjacent holes was 0.1 cm. Virtual masks with a material density of 1.38 g/cm 3 without holes with two different depths were also evaluated. Results: Thermoplastic mask affected X-rays surface dose. When using a thermoplastic mask with the depth of 0.24 cm without holes, the surface dose was 74. 9% and 57.0% for those with the density of 1.38 g/cm 3 and 1.12 g/cm 3 respectively. When focusing on the masks with the density of 1.12 g/cm 3 , the surface dose was 41.2% for those with 0.12 cm depth without holes; 57.0% for those with 0. 24 cm depth without holes; 44.5% for those with 0.24 cm depth with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.2 cm;and 54.1% for those with 0.24 cm depths with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm.Conclusions: Using thermoplastic mask during the radiation increases patient surface dose. The severity is relative to the hole size and the depth of thermoplastic mask. The surface dose change should be considered in radiation planning to avoid severe skin reaction. (authors)

  10. Shielding requirements for constant-potential diagnostic x-ray beams determined by a Monte Carlo calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkin, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation has been performed to determine the transmission of broad constant-potential x-ray beams through Pb, concrete, gypsum wallboard, steel and plate glass. The EGS4 code system was used with a simple broad-beam geometric model to generate exposure transmission curves for published 70, 100, 120 and 140-kVcp x-ray spectra. These curves are compared to measured three-phase generated x-ray transmission data in the literature and found to be reasonable. For calculation ease the data are fit to an equation previously shown to describe such curves quite well. These calculated transmission data are then used to create three-phase shielding tables for Pb and concrete, as well as other materials not available in Report No. 49 of the NCRP

  11. Shielding requirements for constant-potential diagnostic x-ray beams determined by a Monte Carlo calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkin, D J

    1989-02-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation has been performed to determine the transmission of broad constant-potential x-ray beams through Pb, concrete, gypsum wallboard, steel and plate glass. The EGS4 code system was used with a simple broad-beam geometric model to generate exposure transmission curves for published 70, 100, 120 and 140-kVcp x-ray spectra. These curves are compared to measured three-phase generated x-ray transmission data in the literature and found to be reasonable. For calculation ease the data are fit to an equation previously shown to describe such curves quite well. These calculated transmission data are then used to create three-phase shielding tables for Pb and concrete, as well as other materials not available in Report No. 49 of the NCRP.

  12. First-principles calculations of K-shell X-ray absorption spectra for warm dense nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zi; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectrum is a powerful tool for atomic structure detection on warm dense matter. Here, we perform first-principles molecular dynamics and X-ray absorption spectrum calculations on warm dense nitrogen along a Hugoniot curve. From the molecular dynamics trajectory, the detailed atomic structures are examined for each thermodynamical condition. The K-shell X-ray absorption spectrum is calculated, and its changes with temperature and pressure along the Hugoniot curve are discussed. The warm dense nitrogen systems may contain isolated nitrogen atoms, N 2 molecules, and nitrogen clusters, which show quite different contributions to the total X-ray spectrum due to their different electron density of states. The changes of X-ray spectrum along the Hugoniot curve are caused by the different nitrogen structures induced by the temperature and the pressure. Some clear signatures on X-ray spectrum for different thermodynamical conditions are pointed out, which may provide useful data for future X-ray experiments.

  13. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, J. M.; Saleh, H.

    2015-05-01

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05-3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style.

  14. A COMPARISON OF MEASURED AND CALCULATED GAMMA RAY ATTENUATION FOR A COMMON COUNTING GEOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaylord, R F

    2004-01-01

    In order to perform quantitative gamma spectroscopy, it is necessary to know the sample-specific detection efficiency for photons as a function of energy. The detection efficiency, along with the branching ratio for the isotope and gamma ray of interest, is used to convert observed counts/second to actual disintegrations/second, and, hence, has a large effect on the accuracy of the measurement. In cases where the geometry of the source is simple and reproducible, such as a point source, small vial of solid, or jar of liquid, geometry-specific standards may be counted to determine the detection efficiency. In cases where the samples are large, irregular, or unique, this method generally cannot be used. For example, it is impossible to obtain a NIST-traceable standard glovebox or 55-gallon drum. In these cases, a combination of measured absolute detector efficiency and calculated sample-specific correction factors is commonly used. The correction factors may be calculated via Monte Carlo simulation of the item (the method used by Canberra's ISOCS system), or via semi-empirical calculation of matrix and container attenuations based on the thickness and composition of the container and radioactive matrix (ISOTOPIC by EG and G Ortec uses this method). The accuracy of these correction factors for specific geometries is often of vital interest when assessing the quality of gamma spectroscopy data. During the Building 251 Risk-Reduction Project, over 100 samples of high activity actinides will be characterized via gamma spectroscopy, typically without removing the material from the current storage containers. Most of the radioactive materials in B-251 are stored in cylindrical stainless steel canisters (called USV containers, after the Underground Storage Vaults they are commonly stored in), 13 cm in diameter, by 28 cm high, with walls that are 1.8 mm thick. While the actual samples have a variety of configurations inside the USV container, a very common configuration is

  15. Fast Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of the X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Large Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, Nicholas A

    2016-10-11

    The computational cost of calculations of K-edge X-ray absorption spectra using time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation is significantly reduced through the introduction of a severe integral screening procedure that includes only integrals that involve the core s basis function of the absorbing atom(s) coupled with a reduced quality numerical quadrature for integrals associated with the exchange and correlation functionals. The memory required for the calculations is reduced through construction of the TDDFT matrix within the absorbing core orbitals excitation space and exploiting further truncation of the virtual orbital space. The resulting method, denoted fTDDFTs, leads to much faster calculations and makes the study of large systems tractable. The capability of the method is demonstrated through calculations of the X-ray absorption spectra at the carbon K-edge of chlorophyll a, C 60 and C 70 .

  16. Modelling the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    Scaling of the Landau gauge gluon propagator calculated at {beta} = 6.0 and at {beta} = 6.2 is demonstrated. A variety of functional forms for the gluon propagator calculated on a large (32{sup 3} x 64) lattice at {beta} = 6.0 are investigated.

  17. A point-kernel shielding code for calculations of neutron and secondary gamma-ray 1cm dose equivalents: PKN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotegawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1991-09-01

    A point-kernel integral technique code, PKN, and the related data library have been developed to calculate neutron and secondary gamma-ray dose equivalents in water, concrete and iron shields for neutron sources in 3-dimensional geometry. The comparison between calculational results of the present code and those of the 1-dimensional transport code ANISN = JR, and the 2-dimensional transport code DOT4.2 showed a sufficient accuracy, and the availability of the PKN code has been confirmed. (author)

  18. Implementing displacement damage calculations for electrons and gamma rays in the Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the Monte Carlo displacement damage calculation method in the Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) was improved to calculate displacements per atom (DPA) values due to irradiation by electrons (or positrons) and gamma rays. For the damage due to electrons and gamma rays, PHITS simulates electromagnetic cascades using the Electron Gamma Shower version 5 (EGS5) algorithm and calculates DPA values using the recoil energies and the McKinley-Feshbach cross section. A comparison of DPA values calculated by PHITS and the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method (MCCM) reveals that they were in good agreement for gamma-ray irradiations of silicon and iron at energies that were less than 10 MeV. Above 10 MeV, PHITS can calculate DPA values not only for electrons but also for charged particles produced by photonuclear reactions. In DPA depth distributions under electron and gamma-ray irradiations, build-up effects can be observed near the target's surface. For irradiation of 90-cm-thick carbon by protons with energies of more than 30 GeV, the ratio of the secondary electron DPA values to the total DPA values is more than 10% and increases with an increase in incident energy. In summary, PHITS can calculate DPA values for all particles and materials over a wide energy range between 1 keV and 1 TeV for electrons, gamma rays, and charged particles and between 10-5 eV and 1 TeV for neutrons.

  19. A final report to the Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee on Project 93-ERP-075: ''X-ray laser propagation and coherence: Diagnosing fast-evolving, high-density laser plasmas using X-ray lasers''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, A.S.; Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Libby, S.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Exploratory Research Project (ERP) entitled ''X-ray Laser Propagation and Coherence: Diagnosing Fast-evolving, High-density Laser Plasmas Using X-ray Lasers,'' tracking code 93-ERP-075. The most significant accomplishment of this project is the demonstration of a new laser plasma diagnostic: a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser at 155 angstrom as the probe source. Detailed comparisons of absolute two-dimensional electron density profiles obtained from soft x-ray laser interferograms and profiles obtained from radiation hydrodynamics codes, such as LASNEX, will allow us to validate and benchmark complex numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Thus the development of soft x-ray interferometry technique provides a mechanism to probe the deficiencies of the numerical models and is an important tool for, the high-energy density physics and science-based stockpile stewardship programs. The authors have used the soft x-ray interferometer to study a number of high-density, fast evolving, laser-produced plasmas, such as the dynamics of exploding foils and colliding plasmas. They are pursuing the application of the soft x-ray interferometer to study ICF-relevant plasmas, such as capsules and hohlraums, on the Nova 10-beam facility. They have also studied the development of enhanced-coherence, shorter-pulse-duration, and high-brightness x-ray lasers. The utilization of improved x-ray laser sources can ultimately enable them to obtain three-dimensional holographic images of laser-produced plasmas

  20. Use of the Green function method for calculation of cross section of x-ray photoabsorption for solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhakhmetov, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    Possibility of Green formalism use for calculation of photoabsorption of high-energy x-ray radiation is shown. Analytical expression for photoabsorption cross section is carried out. It does not contains wave functions in explicit form responding to finite states of photoelectron. 5 refs

  1. Development of a computer model using the EGS4 simulation code to calculate scattered X-rays through some materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghorabie, F.H.H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a computer model based on the use of the well-known Monte Carlo simulation code EGS4 was developed to simulate the scattering of polyenergetic X-ray beams through some materials. These materials are: lucite, polyethylene, polypropylene and aluminium. In particular, the ratio of the scattered to total X-ray fluence (scatter fraction) has been calculated for X-ray beams in the energy region 30-120 keV. In addition scatter fractions have been determined experimentally using a polyenergetic superficial X-ray unit. Comparison of the measured and the calculated results has been performed. The Monte Carlo calculations have also been carried out for water, bakelite and bone to examine the dependence of scatter fraction on the density of the scatterer. Good agreement (estimated statistical error < 5%) was obtained between the measured and the calculated values of the scatter fractions for materials with Z < 20 that were studied in this paper. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  2. Analytical calculations and properties of gamma-rays polymerization of novel acrylates copolymer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, S.M., E-mail: smelsayed@hotmail.co [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Madani, M.; El-Bayoumi, A.S. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-11-15

    A detailed study of some physical properties of pure PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) film and MMA/Ani (methyl methacrylate/aniline) films is presented. Films of thicknesses ranged from 0.04 to 0.72 mm for MMA/Ani were prepared while it is 0.68 mm for PMMA. The structure of the sample is analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique and is found to be amorphous (PMMA) and partially crystalline (MMA/Ani). Ultra violet-visible electronic absorption spectra measurements were analyzed to obtain some important parameters such as molar extrication coefficient, oscillator strength, dipole strength and having good thermal stability (T{sub d} >300 deg. C) was also reported. TGA studies revealed that the thermal stability of polymethyl methacrylate, prepared by radiation polymerization of methyl methacrylate, improved after copolymerization with aniline. Also, optical behavior of film samples was analyzed by obtaining transmission spectra, in the wavelength range of 200-1100 nm. It was found that all studied samples lead to the appearance of a second edge at lower photon energy due to the formation of the induced energy states. From the intensity of absorption interband transitions (B and Q) which are assigned as type pi-pi* for both PMMA and MMA/Ani films, the energy gaps E{sub g1} and E{sub g2} were calculated respectively. The optical conductivity (sigma) was determined and it was found that with the increase of thicknesses optical energy gap decreases monotonically and the refractive index increases.

  3. Calculations and measurements of β-ray attenuation for determining density in an inhomogenous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.; Mackinnon, J.G.; Frisch, A.F.; Jenkins, R.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the distribution of tobacco strands in a cigarette is proposed to explain the discrepancy between density as measured by weight and volume and that as measured by β-ray attenuation and to explain the large deviation of the β-ray measurements from the mean value. The parameters which contribute to this uncertainty are slope of the β-ray attenuation curve, the mean path length through the mass element, and the material volume fraction. (author)

  4. Propagation loss model comparisons on selected scenarios from the Weston memorial workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sertlek, H.O.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate and stable calculation of underwater acoustic propagation is needed for applications such as sonar performance prediction, noise mapping and acoustic communication. In this work, some widely used acoustic propagation models, based on different methods such as normal mode, ray tracing,

  5. A proposal of predictive methods of crack propagation life and remaining life of structural metal under creep-fatigue interacted conditions by use of X-ray profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnami, M.; Sakane, M.; Nishino, S.

    1987-01-01

    The following two series of studies are described: One is crack propagation life prediction in high-temperature low-cycle fatigue tests under triangular and trapezoidal strain or stress waves for austenitic stainless steel by X-ray fractography. Another is remaining life prediction of the steel under creep-fatigue interacted conditions by applying the concept of the remaining life diagram and X-ray profile analysis. Particle size and microstrain obtained by X-ray profile analysis were effective nondestructive parameters for estimating crack propagation life and remaining life in creep-fatigue interaction

  6. ParShield: A computer program for calculating attenuation parameters of the gamma rays and the fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmahroug, Y.; Tellili, B.; Souga, C.; Manai, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Description of the theoretical method used by the ParShield program. • Description of the ParShield program. • Test and validation the ParShield program. - Abstract: This study aims to present a new computer program called ParShield which determines the neutron and gamma-ray shielding parameters. This program can calculate the total mass attenuation coefficients (μ t ), the effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and the effective electron densities (N eff ) for gamma rays and it can also calculate the effective removal cross-sections (Σ R ) for fast neutrons for mixtures and compounds. The results obtained for the gamma rays by using ParShield were compared with the results calculated by the WinXcom program and the measured results. The obtained values of (Σ R ) were tested by comparing them with the measured results,the manually calculated results and with the results obtained by using MERCSFN program and an excellent agreement was found between them. The ParShield program can be used as a fast and effective tool to choose and compare the shielding materials, especially for the determination of (Z eff ) and (N eff ), there is no other programs in the literature which can calculate

  7. The relationship between X-ray residual stress near the crack and crack opening/closing behavior controlling fatigue crack propagation in Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Tashiyuki; Toi, Norihiko; Nakano, Kohji; Honda, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    Using the X-ray method of stress measurement for Ti-6Al-4V alloys, the residual stress near the crack was measured for annealed (AN) and solution treated and aged (STA) titanium alloys, under the condition that the measured X-ray stress was in satisfactory agreement with the applied stress under tension. The residual stress measured in the wake of the propagating fatigue crack, σ r , was compressive, resulting in a smaller crack opening displacement, COD, than theorized. The measured σ r and COD-values let us understand the fatigue crack propagation rate da/dN in terms of the effective stress intensity factor K eff . As a result, the da/dN under the same K eff -value was smaller in the AN specimen with zigzag crack growth than in the STA specimen with straight crack growth, although the da/dN-K eff relationship under various stress amplitudes was represented by a straight line in a log-log scale separately for the AN and STA specimens. (author)

  8. The integral first collision kernel method for gamma-ray skyshine analysis[Skyshine; Gamma-ray; First collision kernel; Monte Carlo calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, R.-D.; Chui, C.-S.; Jiang, S.-H. E-mail: shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2003-12-01

    A simplified method, based on the integral of the first collision kernel, is presented for performing gamma-ray skyshine calculations for the collimated sources. The first collision kernels were calculated in air for a reference air density by use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. These kernels can be applied to other air densities by applying density corrections. The integral first collision kernel (IFCK) method has been used to calculate two of the ANSI/ANS skyshine benchmark problems and the results were compared with a number of other commonly used codes. Our results were generally in good agreement with others but only spend a small fraction of the computation time required by the Monte Carlo calculations. The scheme of the IFCK method for dealing with lots of source collimation geometry is also presented in this study.

  9. Calculation of Buildup Factor for Gamma-ray Exposure in Two Layered Shields Made of Water and Lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saadi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The buildup factor for gamma ray exposure is most useful in calculations for biological protective shields.The buildup factors for gamma ray exposure were calculated in tow layered shields consist of water-lead and lead-water up to optical Thickness 20 mean free path (mfp) at gamma ray energies 1, 2 and 6MeV by using kalos's formula.The program has been designed to work at any atomic number of the attenuating medium, photon energy, slab thickness and and the arrangement of materials.The results obtained in this search leading to the buildup factor for gamma ray exposure at energies (1and2MeV) in lead-water were higher than the reverse case,while at energy 6 MeV the effect was opposite.The calculated data were parameterized by an empirical formula as a function of optical thickness of tow materials.The results obtained were in reasonable agreement with a previous work

  10. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic welds and dissimilar welds are extensively used in primary circuit pipes and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants, chemical industries and fossil fuelled power plants because of their high fracture toughness, resistance to corrosion and creep at elevated temperatures. However, cracks may initiate in these weld materials during fabrication process or stress operations in service. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the structural integrity of these materials using highly reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. Ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components is complicated because of anisotropic columnar grain structure leading to beam splitting and beam deflection. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques and optimizing experimental parameters for inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components. The main aim of the thesis is to develop a 3D ray tracing model for quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic weld material. Inhomogenity in the anisotropic weld material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The influence of anisotropy on ultrasonic reflection and transmission behaviour in an anisotropic austenitic weld material are quantitatively analyzed in three dimensions. The ultrasonic beam directivity in columnar grained austenitic steel material is determined three dimensionally using Lamb's reciprocity theorem. The developed ray tracing model evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase

  11. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic welds and dissimilar welds are extensively used in primary circuit pipes and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants, chemical industries and fossil fuelled power plants because of their high fracture toughness, resistance to corrosion and creep at elevated temperatures. However, cracks may initiate in these weld materials during fabrication process or stress operations in service. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the structural integrity of these materials using highly reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. Ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components is complicated because of anisotropic columnar grain structure leading to beam splitting and beam deflection. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques and optimizing experimental parameters for inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components. The main aim of the thesis is to develop a 3D ray tracing model for quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic weld material. Inhomogenity in the anisotropic weld material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The influence of anisotropy on ultrasonic reflection and transmission behaviour in an anisotropic austenitic weld material are quantitatively analyzed in three dimensions. The ultrasonic beam directivity in columnar grained austenitic steel material is determined three dimensionally using Lamb's reciprocity theorem. The developed ray tracing model evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase

  12. Calculation of Absorbed Glandular Dose using a FORTRAN Program Based on Monte Carlo X-ray Spectra in Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Average glandular dose calculation in mammography with Mo-Rh target-filter and dose calculation for different situations is accurate and fast. Material and Methods: In this research, first of all, x-ray spectra of a Mo target bombarded by a 28 keV electron beam with and without a Rh filter were calculated using the MCNP code. Then, we used the Sobol-Wu parameters to write a FORTRAN code to calculate average glandular dose. Results: Average glandular dose variation was calculated against the voltage of the mammographic x-ray tube for d = 5 cm, HVL= 0.35 mm Al, and different value of g. Also, the results related to average glandular absorbed dose variation per unit roentgen radiation against the glandular fraction of breast tissue for kV = 28 and HVL = 0.400 mmAl and different values of d are presented. Finally, average glandular dose against d for g = 60% and three values of kV (23, 27, 35 kV with corresponding HVLs have been calculated. Discussion and Conclusion: The absorbed dose computational program is accurate, complete, fast and user friendly. This program can be used for optimization of exposure dose in mammography. Also, the results of this research are in good agreement with the computational results of others.

  13. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and γ ray spectrum. FPGS90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting γ ray and β ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted γ ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library 'JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -', which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author)

  14. A computer code for calculation of radioactive nuclide generation and depletion, decay heat and {gamma} ray spectrum. FPGS90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Katakura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    In a nuclear reactor radioactive nuclides are generated and depleted with burning up of nuclear fuel. The radioactive nuclides, emitting {gamma} ray and {beta} ray, play role of radioactive source of decay heat in a reactor and radiation exposure. In safety evaluation of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle, it is needed to estimate the number of nuclides generated in nuclear fuel under various burn-up condition of many kinds of nuclear fuel used in a nuclear reactor. FPGS90 is a code calculating the number of nuclides, decay heat and spectrum of emitted {gamma} ray from fission products produced in a nuclear fuel under the various kinds of burn-up condition. The nuclear data library used in FPGS90 code is the library `JNDC Nuclear Data Library of Fission Products - second version -`, which is compiled by working group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for evaluating decay heat in a reactor. The code has a function of processing a so-called evaluated nuclear data file such as ENDF/B, JENDL, ENSDF and so on. It also has a function of making figures of calculated results. Using FPGS90 code it is possible to do all works from making library, calculating nuclide generation and decay heat through making figures of the calculated results. (author).

  15. Calculation of concrete shielding wall thickness for 450kVp X-ray tube with MCNP simulation and result comparison with half value layer method calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Lee, Eun Joong; Kim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Sam Suk [Sam Yong Inspection Engineering Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Radiation generating devices must be properly shielded for their safe application. Although institutes such as US National Bureau of Standards and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have provided guidelines for shielding X-ray tube of various purposes, industry people tend to rely on 'Half Value Layer (HVL) method' which requires relatively simple calculation compared to the case of those guidelines. The method is based on the fact that the intensity, dose, and air kerma of narrow beam incident on shielding wall decreases by about half as the beam penetrates the HVL thickness of the wall. One can adjust shielding wall thickness to satisfy outside wall dose or air kerma requirements with this calculation. However, this may not always be the case because 1) The strict definition of HVL deals with only Intensity, 2) The situation is different when the beam is not 'narrow'; the beam quality inside the wall is distorted and related changes on outside wall dose or air kerma such as buildup effect occurs. Therefore, sometimes more careful research should be done in order to verify the effect of shielding specific radiation generating device. High energy X-ray tubes which is operated at the voltage above 400 kV that are used for 'heavy' nondestructive inspection is an example. People have less experience in running and shielding such device than in the case of widely-used low energy X-ray tubes operated at the voltage below 300 kV. In this study, Air Kerma value per week, outside concrete shielding wall of various thickness surrounding 450 kVp X-ray tube were calculated using MCNP simulation with the aid of Geometry Splitting method which is a famous Variance Reduction technique. The comparison between simulated result, HVL method result, and NCRP Report 147 safety goal 0.02 mGy wk-1 on Air Kerma for the place where the public are free to pass showed that concrete wall of thickness 80 cm is needed to achieve the

  16. Calculation of concrete shielding wall thickness for 450kVp X-ray tube with MCNP simulation and result comparison with half value layer method calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Lee, Eun Joong; Kim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong; Hur, Sam Suk

    2016-01-01

    Radiation generating devices must be properly shielded for their safe application. Although institutes such as US National Bureau of Standards and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have provided guidelines for shielding X-ray tube of various purposes, industry people tend to rely on 'Half Value Layer (HVL) method' which requires relatively simple calculation compared to the case of those guidelines. The method is based on the fact that the intensity, dose, and air kerma of narrow beam incident on shielding wall decreases by about half as the beam penetrates the HVL thickness of the wall. One can adjust shielding wall thickness to satisfy outside wall dose or air kerma requirements with this calculation. However, this may not always be the case because 1) The strict definition of HVL deals with only Intensity, 2) The situation is different when the beam is not 'narrow'; the beam quality inside the wall is distorted and related changes on outside wall dose or air kerma such as buildup effect occurs. Therefore, sometimes more careful research should be done in order to verify the effect of shielding specific radiation generating device. High energy X-ray tubes which is operated at the voltage above 400 kV that are used for 'heavy' nondestructive inspection is an example. People have less experience in running and shielding such device than in the case of widely-used low energy X-ray tubes operated at the voltage below 300 kV. In this study, Air Kerma value per week, outside concrete shielding wall of various thickness surrounding 450 kVp X-ray tube were calculated using MCNP simulation with the aid of Geometry Splitting method which is a famous Variance Reduction technique. The comparison between simulated result, HVL method result, and NCRP Report 147 safety goal 0.02 mGy wk-1 on Air Kerma for the place where the public are free to pass showed that concrete wall of thickness 80 cm is needed to achieve the safety goal

  17. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  18. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  19. FIST - a suite of X-ray powder crystallography programs for use with a HP-65 calculator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.; Turek, M.

    1977-12-01

    Programs for X-ray powder crystallography are defined for use with a Hewlett Packard HP-65 (programmable) pocket calculator. These include the prediction of all Bragg reflections for defined P-, F-, I-cubic, tetragonal, hexagonal and orthorhombic cells; the calculation of the position of a specific Bragg reflection from defined unit cells with all symmetries except triclinic; interconversion of theta, 2theta, sin 2 theta and d, as well as the calculation of the Nelson-Riley function; the computation of crystal densities; the interconversion of rhombohedral and hexagonal unit cells, lsub(c) determinations for graphite, the calculation of a and c for boron carbide; and Miller index transformations between various unit cells. (author)

  20. Development of an X-ray installation for the study of secondary electrons: preliminary measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baguena, A.; Shaw, M.; Williart, A.; Baguena, A.; Garcia, G.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the calculations and preliminary measures made for the installation of a X-ray generator tube. This device is going to be used for the secondary electron production from photonic primary radiation of up to 125 keV. With this experimental system, we will study the energetic and space distribution of produced secondary electrons by obtaining its spectrum of energies and its angular distribution. This method of measurement is going to be applied in different targets of radiological, environmental and biological interest. Calculations in the present article include: theoretical yield of X-rays production of the designed equipment, necessary shielding for the radiological safety of the installation staff, and an estimated dose due to their use. Characteristics of the installation and the equipment are described with this purpose. (author)

  1. The calculation of external gamma-ray doses from airborne and deposited radionuclides in the environmental code NECTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    A computer program has been developed for the rapid evaluation of external gamma-ray doses from airborne and deposited radionuclide mixtures. Based on a gaussian dispersion model, the program calculates the dose at any position, including points high above ground level or upwind of the source. Meteorological frequency data for wind speed, direction, atmospheric stability and rainfall are fully taken into account. The calculational model assumes that the ground surface is perfectly flat and that gamma-ray paths are entirely in air; the possible errors caused by these and other assumptions are discussed, with suggested correction factors. The program applies various criteria to determine the best approximation or numerical integration method for each target point; execution times (on an IBM 370 machine) thus vary from less than 0.01s to about 0.3s per target point for a single weather category. The program has been incorporated in the environmental release program NECTAR. (author)

  2. Calculation of the energy spectrum of atmospheric gamma-rays between 1 and 1000 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.M.; Dutra, S.L.G.; Palmeira, R.A.R.

    The energy spectrum of atmospheric gamma-rays at 4 g/cm 2 has been calculated for cut-off rigidities of 4.5, 10 and 16 GV. The considered processes for the production of these gamma-rays were the π 0 decay plus the bremsstrahlung from primary, secondary like splash and re-entrant albedo electrons. The calculations indicated that the spectrum could be fitted to a power law in energy, with the exponential index varying from 1.1 in the energy range 1 - 10 MeV, to 1.4 in the energy range 10 - 200 MeV and 1.8 in the energy range 200 - 1000 MeV. These results are discussed [pt

  3. Development of an X-ray installation for the study of secondary electrons: preliminary measurements and calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baguena, A.; Shaw, M.; Williart, A. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Dpto. Fisica de los Materiales, Madrid (Spain); Baguena, A. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    We describe the calculations and preliminary measures made for the installation of a X-ray generator tube. This device is going to be used for the secondary electron production from photonic primary radiation of up to 125 keV. With this experimental system, we will study the energetic and space distribution of produced secondary electrons by obtaining its spectrum of energies and its angular distribution. This method of measurement is going to be applied in different targets of radiological, environmental and biological interest. Calculations in the present article include: theoretical yield of X-rays production of the designed equipment, necessary shielding for the radiological safety of the installation staff, and an estimated dose due to their use. Characteristics of the installation and the equipment are described with this purpose. (author)

  4. Calculation of organ doses from environmental gamma rays using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1990-01-01

    Organ doses from environmental γ-rays (U-238, Th-232, K-40) were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for three typical sources of a semi-infinite volume source in the air, an infinite plane source in the ground and a volume source in the ground. γ-ray fields in the natural environment were simulated rigourously without approximations or simplifications in the intermediate steps except for the disturbance of the radiation field by the human body which was neglected. Organ doses were calculated for four anthropomorphic phantoms representing a baby, a child, a female and a male adult. The dose of a fetus is given by the dose to the uterus of the adult female. Air kerma and dose conversion factors normalised to air kerma and to source intensity are given for monoenergetic sources and for the natural radionuclides. (orig./HP)

  5. Soft X-ray imaging techniques for calculating the Earth's dayside boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Hyunju; Kuntz, Kip; Sibeck, David; Collier, Michael; Aryan, Homayon; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Collado-Vega, Yaireska; Porter, Frederick; Purucker, Michael; Snowden, Steven; Raeder, Joachim; Thomas, Nicholas; Walsh, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Charged particles and neutral atoms exchange electrons in many space plasma venues. Soft X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions, such as C6+. O7+, and Fe13+, interact with Hydrogen and Helium atoms. Soft X-ray images can be a powerful technique to remotely probe the plasma and neutral density structures created when the solar wind interacts with planetary exospheres, such as those at the Earth, Moon, Mars, Venus, and comets. The recently selected ESA-China joint spacecraft mission, "Solar wind - Magnetosphere - Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE)" will have a soft X-ray imager on board and provide pictures of the Earth's dayside system after its launch in 2021. In preparation for this future mission, we simulate soft X-ray images of the Earth's dayside system, using the OpenGGCM global magnetosphere MHD model and the Hodges model of the Earth's exosphere. Then, we discuss techniques to determine the location of the Earth's dayside boundaries (bow shock and magnetopause) from the soft X-ray images.

  6. New possibilities for improving the accuracy of parameter calculations for cascade gamma-ray decay of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.; Grigor'ev, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    The level density and radiative strength functions which accurately reproduce the experimental intensity of two- step cascades after thermal neutron capture and the total radiative widths of the compound states were applied to calculate the total γ-ray spectra from the (n,γ) reaction. In some cases, analysis showed far better agreement with experiment and gave insight into possible ways in which these parameters need to be corrected for further improvement of calculation accuracy for the cascade γ-decay of heavy nuclei. (author)

  7. PCXMC. A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Lakkisto, M.; Servomaa, A.

    1997-02-01

    The report describes PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and the effective dose in medical x-ray examinations. The organs considered are: the active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), gall bladder, heats, kidneys, liver, lungs, muscle, oesophagus, ovaries, pancreas, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testes, thymes, thyroid, urinary bladder, and uterus. (42 refs.)

  8. Scintillating plastic fibers as light pipes for a cosmic ray hodoscope: Feasibility calculations and measured attenuation characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A candidate hodoscope uses arrays of scintillator fibers, followed by an image intensifier and imaging system such as that proposed for the X-ray shadowgraph. A literature search was performed to ascertain the experience of other workers with hodoscopes using this or similar principles. Calculations were performed to determine the feasibility of candidate systems and some laboratory experiments were performed to attempt to check these numbers.

  9. Computer model for calculating gamma-ray pulse-height spectra for logging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A generalized computer model has been devised to simulate the emission, transport, and detection of natural gamma radiation from various logging environments. The model yields high-resolution gamma-ray pulse-height spectra that can be used to correct both gross gamma and spectral gamma-ray logs. The technique can help provide corrections to airborne and surface radiometric survey logs for the effects of varying altitude, formation composition, and overburden. Applied to borehole logging, the model can yield estimates of the effects of varying borehole fluid and casing attenuations, as well as varying formation porosity and saturation

  10. Calculation of X-ray emission produced by a quasi-monoenergetic electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanaei, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. By using an intense ultrafast laser interaction with plasma, generation of accelerated relativistic electrons with quasi monoenergetic spectrum has been possible. Analytic expressions for spectra and emission efficiencies of x-rays bremsstrahlung and characteristic line emission produced by a quasi-monoenergetic electron distribution from several targets are investigated. In this work, a Gaussian profile is assumed for the quasi-monoenergetic electron spectrum. The produced x-ray radiations are compared with the previous achieved results for a Maxwellian electron profile. These results and achievements are discussed in detail. Also, the outcomes can be evaluated with the experimental and simulated results.

  11. Summary of daily observational results of solar phenomena, cosmic ray, geomagnetic variation, ionosphere, radio wave propagation and airglow. During October 1973 through September 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    The diagrams in this section of the publication illustrate the summary of daily observational results of solar phenomena, cosmic ray, geomagnetic variation, ionosphere, radio wave propagation and airglow observed in Japan. For convenience, the observational results are arranged by the solar rotation number. The aim of this illustration is to disseminate an outline of daily events observed in Japan for the benefit of active research workers who plan to make detailed study of the specific solar and terrestrial events. Therefore, the illustrations do not show all observational results in Japan but only representative ones at some key stations in Japan. They will suffice for the present purpose. The method of illustration shown in the instruction on the next page is still a preliminary one, and it is subject to change resulting from the kind advice of the users of this part of the publication.

  12. Application of Gaussian beam ray-equivalent model and back-propagation artificial neural network in laser diode fast axis collimator assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Rossi, Giammarco; Braglia, Andrea; Perrone, Guido

    2016-08-10

    The paper presents the development of a tool based on a back-propagation artificial neural network to assist in the accurate positioning of the lenses used to collimate the beam from semiconductor laser diodes along the so-called fast axis. After training using a Gaussian beam ray-equivalent model, the network is capable of indicating the tilt, decenter, and defocus of such lenses from the measured field distribution, so the operator can determine the errors with respect to the actual lens position and optimize the diode assembly procedure. An experimental validation using a typical configuration exploited in multi-emitter diode module assembly and fast axis collimating lenses with different focal lengths and numerical apertures is reported.

  13. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods.

  14. The x-ray structure and MNDO calculations of a-terthienyl: a model for polythiophenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, van F.; Wynberg, H.; Havinga, E.E.; Meijer, E.W.; Staring, E.G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The x-ray structure of a-terthienyl reveals 2 identical, crystallog.-independent mols. in the unit cell. Neighboring thiophene moieties in a-terthienyl are placed antiparallel, while the mol. is almost planar, with torsional angles between the rings of about 6-9 Deg. MNDO calcns. of a-terthienyl

  15. Analytical formulas for calculation of K X-ray production cross sections by alpha ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellatif, A.; Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Nekkab, M.; Medjadi, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, different procedures are followed to deduce the semi-empirical and the empirical K X-rayX-ray production cross sections induced by alpha ions from the available experimental data and the theoretical results of the ECPSSR model for elements with 20≤Z≤30. The deduced K X-ray production cross sections are compared with predictions from ECPSSR model and with other earlier works. Generally, the deduced K X-ray production cross sections obtained by fitting the available experimental data for each element separately give the most reliable values than those obtained by a global fit. - Highlights: ► The results were presented for elements with atomic numbers 20≤Z≤30 by alpha impact. ► The present semi-empirical formulas were derived from both theoretical and experimental values. ► The available experimental data are directly fitted to deduce the empirical one. ► The results obtained for each element separately give the most reliable values than those obtained by a global fit. ► This procedure is proposed as a black-box way to quickly estimate the cross section.

  16. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and DFT calculations of a novel phosphoramide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shariatinia, Z.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 640, č. 14 (2014), 2945-2955 ISSN 0044-2313 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phosphoramide * x-ray structure * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.160, year: 2014

  17. Radiative transfer calculations of the diffuse ionized gas in disc galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert; Wood, Kenneth; Girichidis, Philipp; Hill, Alex S.; Peters, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    The large vertical scale heights of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in disc galaxies are challenging to model, as hydrodynamical models including only thermal feedback seem to be unable to support gas at these heights. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transfer code to post-process disc simulations of the Simulating the Life-Cycle of Molecular Clouds project that include feedback by cosmic rays. We show that the more extended discs in simulations including cosmic ray feedback naturally lead to larger scale heights for the DIG which are more in line with observed scale heights. We also show that including a fiducial cosmic ray heating term in our model can help to increase the temperature as a function of disc scale height, but fails to reproduce observed DIG nitrogen and sulphur forbidden line intensities. We show that, to reproduce these line emissions, we require a heating mechanism that affects gas over a larger density range than is achieved by cosmic ray heating, which can be achieved by fine tuning the total luminosity of ionizing sources to get an appropriate ionizing spectrum as a function of scale height. This result sheds a new light on the relation between forbidden line emissions and temperature profiles for realistic DIG gas distributions.

  18. On the calculation of x-ray scattering signals from pairwise radial distribution functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Biasin, Elisa; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    We derive a formulation for evaluating (time-resolved) x-ray scattering signals of solvated chemical systems, based on pairwise radial distribution functions, with the aim of this formulation to accompany molecular dynamics simulations. The derivation is described in detail to eliminate any possi...

  19. Calculation of organ doses in X-ray examinations of premature babies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, K.

    2009-01-01

    As ionizing radiation has enabled great progress in the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of medicine, its use is in most cases easily justifiable. General radiation protection principles require additionally that radiation doses of the patients should be as low as reasonably achievable within the medical purposes. In Europe this is stipulated in the directive 97/43/Euratom. This directive also requires that special attention should be given to the patient doses in pediatric examinations, of which premature babies constitute an important sub-group. All babies born before 37 weeks of gestation are defined as being prematurely born. Newborn and prematurely born babies are particularly sensitive to the detrimental effects of X-rays. Risk of cancer induction is believed to be 2 to 3 times higher than that of the average population and 6 to 9 times higher than the risk from an exposure at 60 years of age, for equal dose. A premature born child may be exposed to a large number of diagnostic X-ray examinations. Several of these infants may have underdeveloped lungs, which may lead directly to the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or to (lethal) lunghypoplasia/hypertension. Diagnosis and follow-up of the respiratory distress syndrome by means of chest radiography is justified. Risks associated with X-ray examinations are low compared to the other medical risks that these patients face, but even in this case the radiation dose should be kept as low as possible. Knowledge of the radiation dose is a first step in the optimization process. A recent study on 255 premature children in the University Hospital of Gasthuisberg found that they undergo 10 X-ray examinations, on the average. In this sample, the maximum was 78 X-ray examinations

  20. Metric approach for sound propagation in nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, E.; Fumeron, S.; Moraes, F.

    2013-02-01

    In the eikonal approach, we describe sound propagation near topological defects of nematic liquid crystals as geodesics of a non-Euclidian manifold endowed with an effective metric tensor. The relation between the acoustics of the medium and this geometrical description is given by Fermat's principle. We calculate the ray trajectories and propose a diffraction experiment to retrieve information about the elastic constants.

  1. Calculation of the correlation coefficients between the numbers of counts (peak areas and backgrounds) obtained from gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korun, M.; Vodenik, B.; Zorko, B.

    2016-01-01

    Two simple methods for calculating the correlations between peaks appearing in gamma-ray spectra are described. We show how the areas are correlated when the peaks do not overlap, but the spectral regions used for the calculation of the background below the peaks do. When the peaks overlap, the correlation can be stronger than in the case of the non-overlapping peaks. The methods presented are simplified to the extent of allowing their implementation with manual calculations. They are intended for practitioners as additional tools to be used when the correlations between the areas of the peaks in the gamma-ray spectra are to be calculated. Also, the correlation coefficient between the number of counts in the peak and the number of counts in the continuous background below the peak is derived. - Highlights: • The correlation coefficients between areas of closely spaced peaks are assessed. • For isolated peaks the correlation arises from the common continuous background. • If peaks overlap the correlation coefficient depends on how much they overlap. • If peaks overlap also the background height affects the correlation coefficient. • The correlation coefficient between the peak area and its background is −1.

  2. Effective dose calculations in conventional diagnostic X-ray examinations for adult and paediatric patients in a large Italian hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compagnone, G.; Pagan, L.; Bergamini, C.

    2005-01-01

    The effective dose E is an efficient and powerful parameter to study the radioprotection of the patient. In our hospital, eight radiological departments and more than 100 radiological X-ray tubes are present. The effective doses were calculated for adults and paediatric patients in 10 standard projections. To calculate E, first the entrance skin dose (ESD) was evaluated by a mathematical model that was validated by >400 direct measurements taken with an ionisation chamber on four different phantoms: the overall accuracy of the model was better than 12%. Second, to relate ESD to E, conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo techniques were used. The E-values obtained were of the same order as those presented in the literature. Finally, we analysed how the study of E distributions among the various radiological departments can help to optimise the procedures, by identifying the most critical examinations or sub-optimal clinical protocols. (authors)

  3. A new calculation of the carcinogenic risk of obstetric X-raying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bithell, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The association between obstetric X-raying and childhood cancer was first identified by the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers in 1956. The present re-analysis exploits the case-control matching of the study while incorporating the effects of important risk determinants, notably year of birth, trimester of exposure and number of films exposed. The decline in risk over time is closely mirrored by the estimated decline in dose per film and, by constraining these two relationships to be parallel, time-invariant estimates of the extra risk per mGy are obtained. For example, it is now estimated that irradiating 10 6 foetuses with 1 mGy of X-rays would, in the absence of other causes of death, yield 175 extra cases of cancer and leukaemia in the first 15 years of life. (author)

  4. Calculated powder x-ray diffraction data for three tantalum tungstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    A study was made of computer-simulated powder x-ray diffraction data for Ta 22 W 4 O 67 , Ta 2 WO 8 , and Ta 16 W 18 O 94 --the three compounds in the Ta 2 O 5 --WO 3 system from 27 to 69 mole percent WO 3 . The crystal structures of Ta 2 WO 8 and one form of Ta 16 W 18 O 94 (Type B) were deduced from reported data. 8 tables

  5. Monte Carlo calculation of the total probability for gamma-Ray interaction in toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1983-01-01

    Interaction and absorption probabilities for gamma-rays with energies between 1 and 1000 KeV have been computed and tabulated. Toluene based scintillator solution has been assumed in the computation. Both, point sources and homogeneously dispersed radioactive material have been assumed. These tables may be applied to cylinders with radii between 1.25 cm and 0.25 cm and heights between 4.07 cm and 0.20 cm. (Author) 26 refs

  6. Restricted active space calculations of L-edge X-ray absorption spectra: from molecular orbitals to multiplet states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2014-09-28

    The metal L-edge (2p → 3d) X-ray absorption spectra are affected by a number of different interactions: electron-electron repulsion, spin-orbit coupling, and charge transfer between metal and ligands, which makes the simulation of spectra challenging. The core restricted active space (RAS) method is an accurate and flexible approach that can be used to calculate X-ray spectra of a wide range of medium-sized systems without any symmetry constraints. Here, the applicability of the method is tested in detail by simulating three ferric (3d(5)) model systems with well-known electronic structure, viz., atomic Fe(3+), high-spin [FeCl6](3-) with ligand donor bonding, and low-spin [Fe(CN)6](3-) that also has metal backbonding. For these systems, the performance of the core RAS method, which does not require any system-dependent parameters, is comparable to that of the commonly used semi-empirical charge-transfer multiplet model. It handles orbitally degenerate ground states, accurately describes metal-ligand interactions, and includes both single and multiple excitations. The results are sensitive to the choice of orbitals in the active space and this sensitivity can be used to assign spectral features. A method has also been developed to analyze the calculated X-ray spectra using a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture.

  7. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra in liquid air and liquid nitrogen due to 14-MeV neutron and californium-252 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straker, E.A.; Gritzner, M.L.; Harris, L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations of neutron and gamma-ray fluences from 14-MeV neutron and 252 Cf sources in liquid air and liquid nitrogen have been performed. These calculations were made specifically for comparison with experimental data measured at Stohl, Federal Republic of Germany. The discrete-ordinates method was utilized with neutron and gamma-ray cross sections from ENDF/B-IV. One-dimensional calculational models were developed for the sources and tank. Limited comparisons are made with experimental data

  8. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  9. The simple analytical method for scattered radiation calculation in contrast X-ray diagnostic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, S; Pavlovic, R [Inst. of Nuclear Science Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Radiation and Environmental Protection Lab.; Boreli, F [Fac. of Electrical Engineering, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    In realization of radiation protection measures for medical staff present during diagnostic procedures, the necessary condition is knowledge of the space - energy distributions of the scattered radiation from the patient. In this paper, the simple calculation procedure for the scattered radiation field of the actual diagnostic energies is presented. Starting from the single Compton scattering model and using the justified transformations the final equations in elementary form are derived. For numerical calculations the computer code ANGIO was created. The calculated results were confirmed by detailed dosimetric measurements of the scattered field around patient (the water phantom) in SSDL in the Institute of nuclear sciences `Vinca`, Belgrade. These results are good base for assessment of irradiation. The main irradiation source for the physician and the other members of the medical team is the back scattered radiation from patient - albedo. (author). 3 figs., 3 refs.

  10. A new shielding calculation method for X-ray computed tomography regarding scattered radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Noto, Kimiya; Shohji, Tomokazu; Ogawa, Yasuyoshi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Kida, Tetsuo; Sasanuma, Kazutoshi; Katsunuma, Yasushi; Nakano, Takurou; Horitsugi, Genki; Hosono, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a more appropriate shielding calculation method for computed tomography (CT) in comparison with the Japanese conventional (JC) method and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP)-dose length product (DLP) method. Scattered dose distributions were measured in a CT room with 18 scanners (16 scanners in the case of the JC method) for one week during routine clinical use. The radiation doses were calculated for the same period using the JC and NCRP-DLP methods. The mean (NCRP-DLP-calculated dose)/(measured dose) ratios in each direction ranged from 1.7 ± 0.6 to 55 ± 24 (mean ± standard deviation). The NCRP-DLP method underestimated the dose at 3.4% in fewer shielding directions without the gantry and a subject, and the minimum (NCRP-DLP-calculated dose)/(measured dose) ratio was 0.6. The reduction factors were 0.036 ± 0.014 and 0.24 ± 0.061 for the gantry and couch directions, respectively. The (JC-calculated dose)/(measured dose) ratios ranged from 11 ± 8.7 to 404 ± 340. The air kerma scatter factor κ is expected to be twice as high as that calculated with the NCRP-DLP method and the reduction factors are expected to be 0.1 and 0.4 for the gantry and couch directions, respectively. We, therefore, propose a more appropriate method, the Japanese-DLP method, which resolves the issues of possible underestimation of the scattered radiation and overestimation of the reduction factors in the gantry and couch directions.

  11. Experimental verification of photon: A program for use in x-ray shielding calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, E.; Thomlinson, W.

    1987-01-01

    At the National Synchrotron Light Source, a computer program named PHOTON has been developed to calculate radiation dose values around a beam line. The output from the program must be an accurate guide to beam line shielding. To test the program, a series of measurements of radiation dose were carried out using existing beam lines; the results were compared to the theoretical calculations of PHOTON. Several different scattering geometries, scattering materials, and sets of walls and shielding materials were studied. Results of the measurements allowed many advances to be made in the program, ultimately resulting in good agreement between the theory and experiment. 3 refs., 6 figs

  12. Reconstruction of blood propagation in three-dimensional rotational X-ray angiography (3D-RA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Holger; Grass, Michael; Suurmond, Rolf; Köhler, Thomas; Rasche, Volker; Hähnel, Stefan; Heiland, Sabine

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a framework of non-interactive algorithms for the mapping of blood flow information to vessels in 3D-RA images. With the presented method, mapping of flow information to 3D-RA images is done automatically without user interaction. So far, radiologists had to perform this task by extensive image comparisons and did not obtain visualizations of the results. In our approach, flow information is reconstructed by forward projection of vessel pieces in a 3D-RA image to a two-dimensional projection series capturing the propagation of a short additional contrast agent bolus. For accurate 2D-3D image registration, an efficient patient motion compensation technique is introduced. As an exemplary flow-related quantity, bolus arrival times are reconstructed for the vessel pieces by matching of intensity-time curves. A plausibility check framework was developed which handles projection ambiguities and corrects for noisy flow reconstruction results. It is based on a linear programming approach to model the feeding structure of the vessel. The flow reconstruction method was applied to 12 cases of cerebral stenoses, AVMs and aneurysms, and it proved to be feasible in the clinical environment. The propagation of the injected contrast agent was reconstructed and visualized in three-dimensional images. The flow reconstruction method was able to visualize different types of useful information. In cases of stenosis of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), flow reconstruction can reveal impeded blood flow depending on the severeness of the stenosis. With cases of AVMs, flow reconstruction can clarify the feeding structure. The presented methods handle the problems imposed by clinical demands such as non-interactive algorithms, patient motion compensation, short reconstruction times, and technical requirements such as correction of noisy bolus arrival times and handling of overlapping vessel pieces. Problems occurred mainly in the reconstruction and segmentation of 3D

  13. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. (topical review)

  14. Improvement of gamma-ray Sn transport calculations including coherent and incoherent scatterings and secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence: Determination of gamma-ray buildup factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, S.; Diop, C.M.; Assad, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Ridoux, P.

    1996-01-01

    Improvements of gamma-ray transport calculations in S n codes aim at taking into account the bound-electron effect of Compton scattering (incoherent), coherent scattering (Rayleigh), and secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. A computation scheme was developed to take into account these phenomena by modifying the angular and energy transfer matrices, and no modification in the transport code has been made. The incoherent and coherent scatterings as well as the fluorescence sources can be strictly treated by the transfer matrix change. For bremsstrahlung sources, this is possible if one can neglect the charged particles path as they pass through the matter (electrons and positrons) and is applicable for the energy range of interest for us (below 10 MeV). These improvements have been reported on the kernel attenuation codes by the calculation of new buildup factors. The gamma-ray buildup factors have been carried out for 25 natural elements up to 30 mean free paths in the energy range between 15 keV and 10 MeV

  15. First-principles X-ray absorption dose calculation for time-dependent mass and optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Rubinstein, Boris; Melo, Lis G A; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2018-05-01

    A dose integral of time-dependent X-ray absorption under conditions of variable photon energy and changing sample mass is derived from first principles starting with the Beer-Lambert (BL) absorption model. For a given photon energy the BL dose integral D(e, t) reduces to the product of an effective time integral T(t) and a dose rate R(e). Two approximations of the time-dependent optical density, i.e. exponential A(t) = c + aexp(-bt) for first-order kinetics and hyperbolic A(t) = c + a/(b + t) for second-order kinetics, were considered for BL dose evaluation. For both models three methods of evaluating the effective time integral are considered: analytical integration, approximation by a function, and calculation of the asymptotic behaviour at large times. Data for poly(methyl methacrylate) and perfluorosulfonic acid polymers measured by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy were used to test the BL dose calculation. It was found that a previous method to calculate time-dependent dose underestimates the dose in mass loss situations, depending on the applied exposure time. All these methods here show that the BL dose is proportional to the exposure time D(e, t) ≃ K(e)t.

  16. Analysis of the KROTOS KFC test by coupling X-Ray image analysis and MC3D calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brayer, C.; Charton, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Fouquart, P.; Bullado, Y.; Compagnon, F.; Correggio, P.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Piluso, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA Cadarache, DEN, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Les-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01

    During a hypothetical severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the hot molten materials (corium) issuing from the degraded reactor core may generate a steam explosion if they come in contact with water and may damage the structures and threaten the reactor integrity. The SERENA program is an international OECD project that aims at helping the understanding of this phenomenon also called Fuel Coolant Interaction (FCI) by providing data. CEA takes part in this program by performing tests in its KROTOS facility where steam explosions using prototypic corium can be triggered. Data about the different phases in the premixing are extracted from the KROTOS X-Ray radioscopy images by using KIWI software (KROTOS Image analysis of Water-corium Interaction) currently developed by CEA. The MC3D code, developed by IRSN, is a thermal-hydraulic multiphase code mainly dedicated to FCI studies. It is composed of two applications: premixing and explosion. An overall FCI calculation with MC3D requires a premixing calculation followed by an explosion calculation. The present paper proposes an alternative approach in which all the features of the premixing are extracted from the X-Ray pictures using the KIWI software and transferred to an MC3D dataset for a direct simulation of the explosion. The main hypothesis are discussed as well as the first explosion results obtained with MC3D for the KROTOS KFC test. These results are rather encouraging and are analyzed on the basis of comparisons with the experimental data. (authors)

  17. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: an electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mark J; Davis, Stephen D; DeWerd, Larry A; Rusch, Thomas W; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-11-01

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, S700 Source exhibited depth dose behavior similar to low-energy photon-emitting low dose rate sources 125I and l03Pd, yet with capability for variable and much higher dose rates and subsequently adjustable penetration capabilities. This paper presents the calculated and measured in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for the model S700 Source at the aforementioned three operating voltages.

  18. Analysis of the KROTOS KFC test by coupling X-Ray image analysis and MC3D calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brayer, C.; Charton, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Fouquart, P.; Bullado, Y.; Compagnon, F.; Correggio, P.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Piluso, P.

    2012-01-01

    During a hypothetical severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the hot molten materials (corium) issuing from the degraded reactor core may generate a steam explosion if they come in contact with water and may damage the structures and threaten the reactor integrity. The SERENA program is an international OECD project that aims at helping the understanding of this phenomenon also called Fuel Coolant Interaction (FCI) by providing data. CEA takes part in this program by performing tests in its KROTOS facility where steam explosions using prototypic corium can be triggered. Data about the different phases in the premixing are extracted from the KROTOS X-Ray radioscopy images by using KIWI software (KROTOS Image analysis of Water-corium Interaction) currently developed by CEA. The MC3D code, developed by IRSN, is a thermal-hydraulic multiphase code mainly dedicated to FCI studies. It is composed of two applications: premixing and explosion. An overall FCI calculation with MC3D requires a premixing calculation followed by an explosion calculation. The present paper proposes an alternative approach in which all the features of the premixing are extracted from the X-Ray pictures using the KIWI software and transferred to an MC3D dataset for a direct simulation of the explosion. The main hypothesis are discussed as well as the first explosion results obtained with MC3D for the KROTOS KFC test. These results are rather encouraging and are analyzed on the basis of comparisons with the experimental data. (authors)

  19. KKR-CPA calculations of density of states and soft X-ray emission from disordered Li-Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, S.S.; Singru, R.M.; Prasad, R.

    1994-01-01

    The density of states (DOS) and soft X-ray spectra from disordered Li 1-x Mg x alloys have been calculated by using the charge self-consistent KKR-CPA method. We find that the DOS at the Fermi energy (E F ) shows an interesting behaviour as a function of x; it first increases in the range x=0.0 to 0.14, then shows a flat behaviour in the range x approx. 0.14 to 0.20 and finally decreases smoothly from x=0.20 to 0.60. We show that this behaviour of the DOS is related to the development of a neck in the Fermi surface and its smearing due to disorder scattering. Theoretical results for the soft X-ray emission spectra are compared with experimental results and are found to be in good accord. (author). 14 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. A program for calculating and plotting soft x-ray optical interaction coefficients for molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.M.; Davis, J.C.; Jacobsen, C.J.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1989-08-01

    Comprehensive tables for atomic scattering factor components, f1 and f2, were compiled by Henke et al. for the extended photon region 50 - 10000 eV. Accurate calculations of optical interaction coefficients for absorption, reflection and scattering by material systems (e.g. filters, multi-layers, etc...), which have widespread application, can be based simply upon the atomic scattering factors for the elements comprising the material, except near the absorption threshold energies. These calculations based upon the weighted sum of f1 and f2 for each atomic species present can be very tedious if done by hand. This led us to develop a user friendly program to perform these calculations on an IBM PC or compatible computer. By entering the chemical formula, density and thickness of up to six molecules, values of the f1, f2, mass absorption transmission efficiencies, attenuation lengths, mirror reflectivities and complex indices of refraction can be calculated and plotted as a function of energy or wavelength. This program will be available distribution. 7 refs., 1 fig

  1. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubec, Adam; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi_2/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi_2 forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  2. Calculation of gamma-ray flux density above the Venus and Earth surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    Calculational results of dependence of flux density of nonscattered gamma-quanta on the height above the Venus and Earth planet surfaces are presented in the paper. Areas, where a certain part of gamma quanta is accumulated, are calaculted for each height. Spectra of scattered gamma quanta and their integral fluxes at different heights above the Venera planet surface are calculated. Effect of the atmosphere on gamma radiation recorded is considered. The results obtained allow to estimate optimal conditions for measuring gamma-fields above the Venus and Earth planet surfaces, to determine the area of the planet surface investigated. They are also necessary to determine the elementary composition of the rock according to the characteristic gamma radiation spectrum recorded

  3. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovgaard, Kasper; Andreetta, Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    , which is paramount for structure determination based on statistical inference. Results: We present a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves based on the Debye formula and a set of scattering form factors for dummy atom representations of amino acids. Such a method avoids......DBN. This resulted in a significant improvement in the decoy recognition performance. In conclusion, the presented method shows great promise for use in statistical inference of protein structures from SAXS data....

  4. Study of cosmic ray interaction model based on atmospheric muons for the neutrino flux calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, T.; Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the hadronic interaction for the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by summarizing the accurately measured atmospheric muon flux data and comparing with simulations. We find the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes respond to errors in the π-production of the hadronic interaction similarly, and compare the atmospheric muon flux calculated using the HKKM04 [M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 70, 043008 (2004).] code with experimental measurements. The μ + +μ - data show good agreement in the 1∼30 GeV/c range, but a large disagreement above 30 GeV/c. The μ + /μ - ratio shows sizable differences at lower and higher momenta for opposite directions. As the disagreements are considered to be due to assumptions in the hadronic interaction model, we try to improve it phenomenologically based on the quark parton model. The improved interaction model reproduces the observed muon flux data well. The calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux will be reported in the following paper [M. Honda et al., Phys. Rev. D 75, 043006 (2007).

  5. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model

  6. Calculation on cosmic-ray muon exposure rate in non-walled concrete buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitaka, Kazunobu; Abe, Siro

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations on the exposure indoors from cosmic ray muons were practiced in the framework of non-scattering and non-cascade assumptions. The model buildings were two-dimensional, rectangular, and were made of a normal concrete. A stratified structure was assumed in each building, where no mezzanine was considered. Walls were not taken into account yet. The distributions of the exposure rates in 26-story buildings were illustrated in contour maps for various sets of parameters. All of them gave basically archlike patterns. Analyses of the results showed that the exposure rate is affected most largely by the floor board thickness. The ceiling height would be an insignificant factor for short buildings. The min/max ratio of the muon exposure rate in a moderate size building was estimated to be more than 0.7. (author)

  7. A comparison of X-ray and calculated structures of the enzyme MTH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Hannah; Carter, Megan; Stenmark, Pål; Stewart, James J P; Braun-Sand, Sonja B

    2016-07-01

    Modern computational chemistry methods provide a powerful tool for use in refining the geometry of proteins determined by X-ray crystallography. Specifically, computational methods can be used to correctly place hydrogen atoms unresolved by this experimental method and improve bond geometry accuracy. Using the semiempirical method PM7, the structure of the nucleotide-sanitizing enzyme MTH1, complete with hydrolyzed substrate 8-oxo-dGMP, was optimized and the resulting geometry compared with the original X-ray structure of MTH1. After determining hydrogen atom placement and the identification of ionized sites, the charge distribution in the binding site was explored. Where comparison was possible, all the theoretical predictions were in good agreement with experimental observations. However, when these were combined with additional predictions for which experimental observations were not available, the result was a new and alternative description of the substrate-binding site interaction. An estimate was made of the strengths and weaknesses of the PM7 method for modeling proteins on varying scales, ranging from overall structure to individual interatomic distances. An attempt to correct a known fault in PM7, the under-estimation of steric repulsion, is also described. This work sheds light on the specificity of the enzyme MTH1 toward the substrate 8-oxo-dGTP; information that would facilitate drug development involving MTH1. Graphical Abstract Overlay of the backbone traces of the two MTH1 protein chains (green and orange respectively) in PDB 3ZR0 and the equivalent PM7 structures (magenta and cyan respectively) each optimized separately.

  8. Local versus global electronic properties of chalcopyrite alloys: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Botti, Silvana, E-mail: silvana.botti@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière and ETSF, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Schnohr, Claudia S., E-mail: c.schnohr@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Lauermann, Iver [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Rubio, Angel [Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group and ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC-MPC and DIPC, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Avenida de Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Johnson, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.johnson@alumni.tu-berlin.de [Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-07

    Element-specific unoccupied electronic states of Cu(In, Ga)S{sub 2} were studied as a function of the In/Ga ratio by combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory calculations. The S absorption edge shifts with changing In/Ga ratio as expected from the variation of the band gap. In contrast, the cation edge positions are largely independent of composition despite the changing band gap. This unexpected behavior is well reproduced by our calculations and originates from the dependence of the electronic states on the local atomic environment. The changing band gap arises from a changing spatial average of these localized states with changing alloy composition.

  9. Damage localisation and fracture propagation in granite: 4D synchrotron x-ray microtomographic observations from an in-situ triaxial deformation experiment at SOLEIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Fusseis, Florian; Butler, Ian; Flynn, Michael; King, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    To date, most studies of damage localisation and failure have utilised indirect techniques to visualise the pathway to failure. The advent of synchrotron tomography and x-ray transparent experimental cells provides for the first time the opportunity to image localisation and fracture propagation in-situ, in real time with spatial resolutions of a few microns. We present 4D x-ray microtomographic data collected during a triaxial deformation experiment carried out at the imaging beamline PSICHE at the French Synchrotron SOLEIL. The data document damage localisation and fracture propagation in a microgranite. The sample was deformed at 15 MPa confining pressure and 3x10-5 s-1 strain rate, in a novel, miniature, x-ray transparent, triaxial deformation apparatus, designed and built at the University of Edinburgh. We used a 2.97 mm diameter x 9.46 mm long cylindrical sample of Ailsa Craig microgranite, heat treated to 600 ˚ C to introduce flaws in the form of pervasive crack damage. As the sample was loaded to failure, 21 microtomographic volumes were acquired in intervals of 5-20 MPa (decreasing as failure approached), including one scan at peak differential stress of 200 MPa (1.4 kN end load) and three post-failure scans. The scan at peak stress contained the incipient fault, and the sample failed immediately when loading continued afterwards. During scanning, a constant stress level was maintained. Individual datasets were collected in ˜10 minutes using a white beam with an energy maximum at 66 keV in a spiral configuration. Reconstructions yielded image stacks with a dimension of 1700x1700x4102 voxels with a voxel size of 2.7 μm. We analysed damage localisation and fracture propagation in the time series data. Fractures were segmented from the image data using a Multiscale Hessian fracture filter [1] and analysed for their orientations, dimensions and spatial distributions and changes in these properties during loading. Local changes in volumetric and shear

  10. Internal dynamics in helical molecules studied by X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Storch, Jan; Církva, Vladimír; Císařová, I.; Sýkora, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2017), s. 2900-2907 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S; GA ČR GA15-12719S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : helicene * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Physical chemistry (UCHP-M) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2013/cp/c6cp07552e

  11. Simulation of X-ray topographs: a new method to calculate the diffracted field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, C.A.M.; Epelboin, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The precision of the numerical algorithms used to integrate the Takagi-Taupin equations has been in the past a severe limitation for the simulation of accurate topographs. The intensity, especially in the direct image of the defect, is underestimated. This has forbidden the use of the reciprocity theorem for the simulation of traverse and white-beam synchrotron topographs. A new algorithm is described, based on two different methods of expressing the partial-derivative equations, which permits a faster and more accurate calculation. (orig.)

  12. BUCKL: a program for rapid calculation of x-ray deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, R.K. Jr.

    1970-07-01

    A computer program is described which has the fast execution time of exponential codes but also evaluates the effects of fluorescence and scattering. The program makes use of diffusion calculations with a buckling correction included to approximate the effects of finite transverse geometry. Theory and derivations necessary for the BUCKL code are presented, and the code results are compared with those of earlier codes for a variety of problems. Inputs and outputs of the program are described, and a FORTRAN listing is provided. Shortcomings of the program are discussed and suggestions are provided for possible future improvement. (U.S.)

  13. Dose distributions of a proton beam for eye tumor therapy: Hybrid pencil-beam ray-tracing calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethfeldt, Ch.; Fuchs, H.; Gardey, K.-U.

    2006-01-01

    For the case of eye tumor therapy with protons, improvements are introduced compared to the standard dose calculation which implies straight-line optics and the constant-density assumption for the eye and its surrounding. The progress consists of (i) taking account of the lateral scattering of the protons in tissue by folding the entrance fluence distribution with the pencil beam distribution widening with growing depth in the tissue, (ii) rescaling the spread-out Bragg peak dose distribution in water with the radiological path length calculated voxel by voxel on ray traces through a realistic density matrix for the treatment geometry, yielding a trajectory dependence of the geometrical range. Distributions calculated for some specific situations are compared to measurements and/or standard calculations, and differences to the latter are discussed with respect to the requirements of therapy planning. The most pronounced changes appear for wedges placed in front of the eye, causing additional widening of the lateral falloff. The more accurate prediction of the dose dependence at the field borders is of interest with respect to side effects in the risk organs of the eye

  14. Electronic Structure of the Organic Semiconductor Alq3 (aluminum tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) from Soft X-ray Spectroscopies and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMasi, A.; Piper, L; Zhang, Y; Reid, I; Wang, S; Smith, K; Downes, J; Pelkekis, N; McGuinness, C; Matsuura, A

    2008-01-01

    The element-specific electronic structure of the organic semiconductor aluminum tris-8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq3) has been studied using a combination of resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Resonant and nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy were used to measure directly the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen 2p partial densities of states in Alq3, and good agreement was found with the results of DFT calculations. Furthermore, resonant x-ray emission at the carbon K-edge is shown to be able to measure the partial density of states associated with individual C sites. Finally, comparison of previous x-ray emission studies and the present data reveal the presence of clear photon-induced damage in the former.

  15. Electronic structure of the organic semiconductor Alq3 (aluminum tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) from soft x-ray spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMasi, A; Piper, L F J; Zhang, Y; Reid, I; Wang, S; Smith, K E; Downes, J E; Peltekis, N; McGuinness, C; Matsuura, A

    2008-12-14

    The element-specific electronic structure of the organic semiconductor aluminum tris-8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq(3)) has been studied using a combination of resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Resonant and nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy were used to measure directly the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen 2p partial densities of states in Alq(3), and good agreement was found with the results of DFT calculations. Furthermore, resonant x-ray emission at the carbon K-edge is shown to be able to measure the partial density of states associated with individual C sites. Finally, comparison of previous x-ray emission studies and the present data reveal the presence of clear photon-induced damage in the former.

  16. Fast neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique in mixed samples. MCNP calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, N.; Padron, I.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the moisture in sand and also the sulfur content in toluene have been described by using the simultaneous fast neutron/gamma transmission technique (FNGT). Monte Carlo calculations show that it is possible to apply this technique with accelerator-based and isotopic neutron sources in the on-line analysis to perform the product quality control, specifically in the building materials industry and the petroleum one. It has been used particles from a 14MeV neutron generator and also from an Am-Be neutron source. The estimation of optimal system parameters like the efficiency, detection time, hazards and costs were performed in order to compare both neutron sources

  17. Calculation of the dose distribution in water from {sup 71}Ge K-shell x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang H.; Reece, Warren D.; Poston, John W. Sr. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The dose distribution in water from {sup 71}Ge K-shell x-rays (E{sub ave}=9.44 eV) was calculated for various source configurations using both analytic and GS4 Monte Carlo calculations. The point source kernel and the buildup factor are presented. The buildup factor for a point source in water has been found to increase up to about 1.1 as radial distance approaches 1 cm. Comparison between {sup 71}Ge and {sup 90}Sr/Y shows a similarity between their relative dose distribution in water. The dose distribution from a disc source was calculated using the EGS4 code and compared with the results from analytic calculation. Excellent agreement was observed, confirming the validity of analytic calculations. The dose rate at 0.01 cm from a {sup 71}Ge disc source was calculated to be about 1.3x10{sup -5} Gy MBq{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Based on the results from his study, {sup 71}Ge activity of the order of 3.7x10{sup 10} Bq({approx}1 Ci) might be necessary to obtain dose rates typical of {sup 90}Sr/Y ophthalmic applicators. The possibility of using {sup 71}Ge as a source of radioactive stents was also investigated. A {sup 71}Ge stent was modelled as a cylindrical shell source and the dose rates were determined by Monte Carlo calculations. Some calculated results are compared with published values for a {sup 32}P-coated stent. The dose rate at 0.01 cm from a {sup 71}Ge stent has been calculated to be about .5x10{sup -3} Gy MBq{sup -1}h{sup -1}, which is much lower than the reported dose rate at the same distance from a {sup 32}P-coated stent. However, an initial source activity of the order of 3.7x10{sup 7} Bq ({approx}1 mCi) would easily result in a typical target dose ({approx}24 Gy) needed for intravascular stent applications. In conclusion, {sup 71}Ge sources could be used as alternatives to beta sources and, unlike high-energy ({approx}MeV) beta sources, may provide easily predictable dose distributions in heterogeneous media and low dose rates, which might be beneficial for

  18. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties

  19. An imitative calculation of W/C, Mo/Si articifial multilayered films' structures and properties as X-ray monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wen; Liu Wenhan; Wu Ziqin

    1989-01-01

    An imitative calculation on W/C and Mo/Si artificial multilayered films have been made. The influences of total period numbers and deviation of period thickness on X-ray diffraction peak were given. Two difference diviations, random fluctuation and system linear deviation have been imitated, their influences on X-ray energy distinguish power have been compared

  20. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: An electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Davis, Stephen D.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Rusch, Thomas W.; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-01-01

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent trade mark sign X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, P (5) were 0.20, 0.24, and 0.29 for the 40, 45, and 50 kV voltage settings, respectively. For 1 125 I and 103 Pd, yet with capability for variable and much higher dose rates and subsequently adjustable penetration capabilities. This paper presents the calculated and measured in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for the model S700 Source at the aforementioned three operating voltages

  1. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  2. Two loop calculations for the propagators of gluonic currents jsub(PG)=αGsub(μγ)sup(a)[Gsub(a)sup(μγ)(mean)] and jsub(SG)=[β(α)/α]Gsub(μγ)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataev, A.L.; Krasnikov, N.V.; Pivovarov, A.A.

    1981-10-01

    The authors calculate two loop corrections to the propagators of gluonic currents jsub(PG)=αGsub(μγ)sup(a)[Gsub(a)sup(μγ)(mean)] and jsub(SG)=[β(α)/α]Gsub(μγ) 2 . The results of the calculations are used for finding the connection between the characteristic scales of quark and gluonic worlds in perturbative QCD and estimate of the mass of the first radial excitation of eta'-meson (the authors obtain (msub(eta') = 1.45 GeV)). (Auth.)

  3. A simple calculation for the determination of organ or tissue dose from medical x-ray diagnosis for stomach and chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kanae

    1984-01-01

    A simple calculation method has been developed to determine the organ or tissue doses of patients for typical X-ray diagnoses. The absorbed doses related to radiation-induced stochastic effects were calculated based on the dosimetric parameters experimentally determined and technical parameters for X-ray diagnostic examinations. The present method is principally based on the TRA method for the beam therapy. The dosimetric parameters such as percentage depth-dose curves and isodose curves were measured with ionization chambers in the MixDP phantom. The distance from the incident surface of X-ray beams to the organ or tissue of interest was determined with a mathematical phantom, which was the modified version of the MIRD phantom for the average Japanese adult. The absorbed doses were determined with a simple table look-up method using a computer. The calculated doses were tabulated for various technical parameters of stomach and chest X-ray examinations. The present calculation was applied to the Rando woman phantom to compare with the phantom measurements. The calculated values agree with the experimental doses within 20% discrepancy. It was concluded that the present calculation method can determine organ or tissue doses very simply for various X-ray examinations and that it was valuable for the estimation of population doses and risks from X-ray diagnoses. (author)

  4. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux; Propagation des rayons cosmiques dans un modele de diffusion: une nouvelle estimation des parametres de diffusion et du flux d'antiprotons secondaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurin, D

    2001-02-01

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  5. Propagation into an unstable state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dee, G.

    1985-01-01

    We describe propagating front solutions of the equations of motion of pattern-forming systems. We make a number of conjectures concerning the properties of such fronts in connection with pattern selection in these systems. We describe a calculation which can be used to calculate the velocity and state selected by certain types of propagating fronts. We investigate the propagating front solutions of the amplitude equation which provides a valid dynamical description of many pattern-forming systems near onset

  6. Calculation of the detection limits for radionuclides identified in gamma-ray spectra based on post-processing peak analysis results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2018-03-01

    A new method for calculating the detection limits of gamma-ray spectrometry measurements is presented. The method is applicable for gamma-ray emitters, irrespective of the influences of the peaked background, the origin of the background and the overlap with other peaks. It offers the opportunity for multi-gamma-ray emitters to calculate the common detection limit, corresponding to more peaks. The detection limit is calculated by approximating the dependence of the uncertainty in the indication on its value with a second-order polynomial. In this approach the relation between the input quantities and the detection limit are described by an explicit expression and can be easy investigated. The detection limit is calculated from the data usually provided by the reports of peak-analyzing programs: the peak areas and their uncertainties. As a result, the need to use individual channel contents for calculating the detection limit is bypassed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The measurement and calculation of the X-ray spatial resolution obtained in the analytical electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, J.R.; Williams, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The X-ray microanalytical spatial resolution is determined experimentally in various analytical electron microscopes by measuring the degradation of an atomically discrete composition profile across an interphase interface in a thin-foil of Ni-Cr-Fe. The experimental spatial resolutions are then compared with calculated values. The calculated spatial resolutions are obtained by the mathematical convolution of the electron probe size with an assumed beam-broadening distribution and the single-scattering model of beam broadening. The probe size is measured directly from an image of the probe in a TEM/SETEM and indirectly from dark-field signal changes resulting from scanning the probe across the edge of an MgO crystal in a dedicated STEM. This study demonstrates the applicability of the convolution technique to the calculation of the microanalytical spatial resolution obtained in the analytical electron microscope. It is demonstrated that, contrary to popular opinion, the electron probe size has a major impact on the measured spatial resolution in foils < 150 nm thick. (author)

  8. MANGO PROPAGATION

    OpenAIRE

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO; VICTOR GALÁN SAÚCO; SISIR KUMAR MITRA; FRANCISCO RICARDO FERREIRA

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud) as well as the main asexual propagation methods...

  9. An analytical calculation of the peak efficiency for cylindrical sources perpendicular to the detector axis in gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Julio C. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Laboratorio de Espectrometria Gamma-CTBTO, Av. Del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: jaguiar@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2008-08-15

    An analytical expression for the so-called full-energy peak efficiency {epsilon}(E) for cylindrical source with perpendicular axis to an HPGe detector is derived, using point-source measurements. The formula covers different measuring distances, matrix compositions, densities and gamma-ray energies; the only assumption is that the radioactivity is homogeneously distributed within the source. The term for the photon self-attenuation is included in the calculation. Measurements were made using three different sized cylindrical sources of {sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 60}Co with corresponding peaks of 59.5, 122, 662, 835, 1173, and 1332 keV, respectively, and one measurement of radioactive waste drum for 662, 1173, and 1332 keV.

  10. MANGO PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud as well as the main asexual propagation methods their uses and practices. Finally, pattern and quality of graft mangos and their commercialization aspects will be discussed in this Chapter.

  11. A track length estimator method for dose calculations in low-energy X-ray irradiations. Implementation, properties and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacci, F.; Delaire, F.; Letang, J.M.; Sarrut, D.; Smekens, F.; Freud, N. [Lyon-1 Univ. - CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Centre Leon Berard (France); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [LMU Munich (Germany). Dept. of Physics; LMU Munich (Germany). Faculty of Medicine; Bravin, A.; Ferrero, C. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Gasilov, S. [LMU Munich (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    2015-05-01

    The track length estimator (TLE) method, an 'on-the-fly' fluence tally in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, recently implemented in GATE 6.2, is known as a powerful tool to accelerate dose calculations in the domain of low-energy X-ray irradiations using the kerma approximation. Overall efficiency gains of the TLE with respect to analogous MC were reported in the literature for regions of interest in various applications (photon beam radiation therapy, X-ray imaging). The behaviour of the TLE method in terms of statistical properties, dose deposition patterns, and computational efficiency compared to analogous MC simulations was investigated. The statistical properties of the dose deposition were first assessed. Derivations of the variance reduction factor of TLE versus analogous MC were carried out, starting from the expression of the dose estimate variance in the TLE and analogous MC schemes. Two test cases were chosen to benchmark the TLE performance in comparison with analogous MC: (i) a small animal irradiation under stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy conditions and (ii) the irradiation of a human pelvis during a cone beam computed tomography acquisition. Dose distribution patterns and efficiency gain maps were analysed. The efficiency gain exhibits strong variations within a given irradiation case, depending on the geometrical (voxel size, ballistics) and physical (material and beam properties) parameters on the voxel scale. Typical values lie between 10 and 103, with lower levels in dense regions (bone) outside the irradiated channels (scattered dose only), and higher levels in soft tissues directly exposed to the beams.

  12. On the isomers of pyridine-4-carboxaldoxime and its nitrate salt, X-ray crystal structure and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Saied M.; Albering, Jörg; Abu-Youssef, Morsy A. M.

    2017-07-01

    The reaction between nitric acid and pyridine-4-carboxaldoxime (P4A) afford the corresponding pyridinum nitrate salt (P4AN). Its X-ray structure is measured and compared with the related P4A salts. The DFT/B3LYP results showed that both the P4A and P4AN favored the Syn-I form which has the lowest energy among the other possible isomers. Transition state calculations predicted that the Syn-I form is the thermodynamically and kinetically most stable form. The X-ray solid state structure of the new nitrate salt (P4AN) indicated that the labile proton favored the N-atom of the pyridine ring. DFT studies showed that the same is true for its solution in polar solvents. In contrast, the pyridinium cation is not favored either in the gas phase or solution of P4AN in nonpolar solvent. In these cases, the proton favored to bond with one O-atom from the nitrate group. Second order interaction energies and Mayer bond order values revealed these results. The bond order of the Nsbnd H bond is higher in polar solvents as well as at the experimental structure than either in the gas phase or non polar solvents. The topology parameters obtained from the atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis were used to describe the nature of the Nsbnd H and Osbnd H bonds. The bond critical points (BCP) were found to be close to the H-atoms in case of stronger interaction.

  13. Thermodynamic and lattice parameter calculation of TiC x produced from Al-Ti-C powders by laser igniting self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.X.; Hu, J.D.; Wang, H.Y.; Guo, Z.X.; Chumakov, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    TiC x has been formed by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) from elemental powder mixtures with a range of C/Ti ratios. The combusting behavior of the powder mixtures was investigated. The effect of the processing variables on the lattice parameter and the composition of TiC were examined. The results show that lattice parameters of TiC x increase with the increase of C/Ti ratio. The variation of Gibbs free energy in Al-Ti-C system was studied based on the thermodynamics theory. The results show that TiC and Al 3 Ti phases are easier to form than Al 4 C 3 phase

  14. Calculation of X-ray scattering curves and electron distance distribution functions of biological macromolecules in solution using the PROTEIN DATA BANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Friedrichowicz, E.; Nothnagel, A.; Wunderlich, T.; Ziehlsdorf, E.; Damaschun, G.

    1983-01-01

    The wide angle X-ray scattering curve, the electron distance distribution function and the solvent excluded volume of a macromolecule in solution are calculated from the atomic coordinates contained in the PROTEIN DATA BANK. The structures and the projections of the excluded volumes are depicted using molecule graphic routines. The described computer programs are used to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules in solution from wide angle X-ray scattering data. (author)

  15. Measurement and calculation of secondary gamma rays resulting from exposure of Fe, Pb, and H/sub 2/O to the ARERR-1 spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarious, A.S.; Ford, W.E. III; Turnbull, K.R.

    1977-08-01

    Integral experiments were performed to measure the angular distribution of secondary gamma rays produced when various thicknesses of Fe, Pb, and H/sub 2/O samples were exposed to bare and to B/sub 4/C-filtered neutron beams from the Research Reactor of Egypt. For selected experiments, multigroup coupled neutron-gamma cross sections and a discrete ordinates transport theory code (DOT4PI-M) were used to calculate the secondary gamma rays and the transport of primary gamma rays. Integral comparisons between the calculated and measured spectra were favorable. Graphical comparisons of the measured flux for various angles of incidence of the neutron beams on the samples, for various angles of exit on the transmitted side of the samples, and for various sample thicknesses are shown. The comparisons show that the angular distribution of secondary gamma rays for the three materials changes slightly with a change in the angle of beam incident on the sample, but increasing the angle between the normal to the sample and the detector by 60/sup 0/ decreases the measured secondary gamma-ray flux up to a factor of two. An investigation was made to determine the consequences of using single scatter Compton theory versus using discrete ordinates transport calculations to estimate the primary gamma-ray contribution to the measured photon spectra.

  16. FPGA Implementation of an Efficient Algorithm for the Calculation of Charged Particle Trajectories in Cosmic Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Xabier; Piso, Daniel; Bruguera, Javier D.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an FPGA implementation of an algorithm, previously published, for the the reconstruction of cosmic rays' trajectories and the determination of the time of arrival and velocity of the particles. The accuracy and precision issues of the algorithm have been analyzed to propose a suitable implementation. Thus, a 32-bit fixed-point format has been used for the representation of the data values. Moreover, the dependencies among the different operations have been taken into account to obtain a highly parallel and efficient hardware implementation. The final hardware architecture requires 18 cycles to process every particle, and has been exhaustively simulated to validate all the design decisions. The architecture has been mapped over different commercial FPGAs, with a frequency of operation ranging from 300 MHz to 1.3 GHz, depending on the FPGA being used. Consequently, the number of particle trajectories processed per second is between 16 million and 72 million. The high number of particle trajectories calculated per second shows that the proposed FPGA implementation might be used also in high rate environments such as those found in particle and nuclear physics experiments.

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, DFT calculations, DNA binding and molecular docking of a propargyl arms containing Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, C; Subha, L; Neelakantan, M A; Mariappan, S S

    2015-11-05

    A propargyl arms containing Schiff base (L) was synthesized by the condensation of 1-[2-hydroxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)phenyl]ethanone with trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane. The structure of L was characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy and by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The UV-Visible spectral behavior of L in different solvents exhibits positive solvatochromism. Density functional calculation of the L in gas phase was performed by using DFT (B3LYP) method with 6-31G basis set. The computed vibrational frequencies and NMR signals of L were compared with the experimental data. Tautomeric stability study inferred that the enolimine is more stable than the ketoamine form. The charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Electronic absorption and emission spectral studies were used to study the binding of L with CT-DNA. The molecular docking was done to identify the interaction of L with A-DNA and B-DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost and sensitivity of restricted active-space calculations of metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-02-15

    The restricted active-space (RAS) approach can accurately simulate metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of first-row transition metal complexes without the use of any fitting parameters. These characteristics provide a unique capability to identify unknown chemical species and to analyze their electronic structure. To find the best balance between cost and accuracy, the sensitivity of the simulated spectra with respect to the method variables has been tested for two models, [FeCl6 ](3-) and [Fe(CN)6 ](3-) . For these systems, the reference calculations give deviations, when compared with experiment, of ≤1 eV in peak positions, ≤30% for the relative intensity of major peaks, and ≤50% for minor peaks. When compared with these deviations, the simulated spectra are sensitive to the number of final states, the inclusion of dynamical correlation, and the ionization potential electron affinity shift, in addition to the selection of the active space. The spectra are less sensitive to the quality of the basis set and even a double-ζ basis gives reasonable results. The inclusion of dynamical correlation through second-order perturbation theory can be done efficiently using the state-specific formalism without correlating the core orbitals. Although these observations are not directly transferable to other systems, they can, together with a cost analysis, aid in the design of RAS models and help to extend the use of this powerful approach to a wider range of transition metal systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Correction factors for the NMi free-air ionization chamber for medium-energy x-rays calculated with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimbergen, T.W.M.; Dijk, E. van; Vries, W. de

    1998-01-01

    A new method is described for the determination of x-ray quality dependent correction factors for free-air ionization chambers. The method is based on weighting correction factors for mono-energetic photons, which are calculated using the Monte Carlo method, with measured air kerma spectra. With this method, correction factors for electron loss, scatter inside the chamber and transmission through the diaphragm and front wall have been calculated for the NMi free-air chamber for medium-energy x-rays for a wide range of x-ray qualities in use at NMi. The newly obtained correction factors were compared with the values in use at present, which are based on interpolation of experimental data for a specific set of x-ray qualities. For x-ray qualities which are similar to this specific set, the agreement between the correction factors determined with the new method and those based on the experimental data is better than 0.1%, except for heavily filtered x-rays generated at 250 kV. For x-ray qualities dissimilar to the specific set, differences up to 0.4% exist, which can be explained by uncertainties in the interpolation procedure of the experimental data. Since the new method does not depend on experimental data for a specific set of x-ray qualities, the new method allows for a more flexible use of the free-air chamber as a primary standard for air kerma for any x-ray quality in the medium-energy x-ray range. (author)

  20. X-ray diffraction analysis and MO calculations of 1H-tetrazole; 1H-tetorazoru no Xsen kessho kozo kaiseki to bunshi kido keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yoshio.; Akutsu, Yoshiaki.; Arai, Mitsuru.; Tamura, Masamitsu. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). School of Engineering; Matsunaga, Takehiro. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-02-28

    The X-ray diffraction analysis and the MO calculations of 1H-tetrazole were carried out, in order to explain its high stability. From the X-ray diffraction analysis, five bonds in the ring have intermediate lengths between single and double bond lengths. Therefore, 1H-tetrazole is quite stable because of its aromaticity. The N1-C5 distance of 1.315A is significantly short. The molecular structure which was calculated by the ab initio MO calculation of one 1H-tetrazole molecule at MP2/6-31G* level, showed a good agreement with our experimental one, except for the abnormal short N1-C5 distance. From the calculations of dimers and trimers, 1H-tetrazole is shown to be stabilized by a strong intermolecular electrostatic interaction between the protons and the delocalized electrons over the ring. (author)

  1. Perfecting of shielding calculation technique against the gamma rays arising from a Tokamak with the TFR experience. Application to the conceptual design Tokamak TORE 2 SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, Cheikh M'Backe.

    1980-09-01

    The conception of the necessary shielding around a conceptual design Tokamak requires to execute an estimated calculation of the doses due to the different radiation sources arising from the machine: the thermonuclear neutron source and the gamma ray source emitted during the interaction of the runaway electrons with the diaphragm. In this study, we propose a theorical method to calculate this gamma source. We tackle also the shielding problem of the conceptual design Tokamak: TORE 2 SUPRA [fr

  2. Collision probability in two-dimensional lattice by ray-trace method and its applications to cell calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro

    1985-03-01

    A series of formulations to evaluate collision probability for multi-region cells expressed by either of three one-dimensional coordinate systems (plane, sphere and cylinder) or by the general two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system is presented. They are expressed in a suitable form to have a common numerical process named ''Ray-Trace'' method. Applications of the collision probability method to two optional treatments for the resonance absorption are presented. One is a modified table-look-up method based on the intermediate resonance approximation, and the other is a rigorous method to calculate the resonance absorption in a multi-region cell in which nearly continuous energy spectra of the resonance neutron range can be solved and interaction effect between different resonance nuclides can be evaluated. Two works on resonance absorption in a doubly heterogeneous system with grain structure are presented. First, the effect of a random distribution of particles embedded in graphite diluent on the resonance integral is studied. Next, the ''Accretion'' method proposed by Leslie and Jonsson to define the collision probability in a doubly heterogeneous system is applied to evaluate the resonance absorption in coated particles dispersed in fuel pellet of the HTGR. Several optional models are proposed to define the collision rates in the medium with the microscopic heterogeneity. By making use of the collision probability method developed by the present study, the JAERI thermal reactor standard nuclear design code system SRAC has been developed. Results of several benchmark tests for the SRAC are presented. The analyses of critical experiments of the SHE, DCA, and FNR show good agreement of critical masses with their experimental values. (J.P.N.)

  3. When combined X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data challenge high-level calculations: spin-resolved electron density of an organic radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voufack, Ariste Bolivard; Claiser, Nicolas; Lecomte, Claude; Pillet, Sébastien; Pontillon, Yves; Gillon, Béatrice; Yan, Zeyin; Gillet, Jean Michel; Marazzi, Marco; Genoni, Alessandro; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Joint refinement of X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data has been carried out in order to determine charge and spin density distributions simultaneously in the nitronyl nitroxide (NN) free radical Nit(SMe)Ph. For comparison purposes, density functional theory (DFT) and complete active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) theoretical calculations were also performed. Experimentally derived charge and spin densities show significant differences between the two NO groups of the NN function that are not observed from DFT theoretical calculations. On the contrary, CASSCF calculations exhibit the same fine details as observed in spin-resolved joint refinement and a clear asymmetry between the two NO groups.

  4. Wave propagation and absorption in the electron cyclotron frequency range for TCA and TCV machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinali, A.

    1990-01-01

    The main theoretical aspects of the propagation and absorption of electron cyclotron frequency waves are reviewed and applied to TCA and TCV tokamak plasmas. In particular the electromagnetic cold dispersion relation is solved analytically and numerically in order to recall the basic properties of mode propagation and to calculate the ray-trajectories by means of geometric optics. A numerical code which integrates the coupled first order differential ray-equations, has been developed and applied to the cases of interest. (author) 4 figs., 23 refs

  5. Biofilm imaging in porous media by laboratory X-Ray tomography: Combining a non-destructive contrast agent with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Maxence; Beltran, Mario A; Morales, Verónica L; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaufmann, Rolf; Holzner, Markus

    2017-01-01

    X-ray tomography is a powerful tool giving access to the morphology of biofilms, in 3D porous media, at the mesoscale. Due to the high water content of biofilms, the attenuation coefficient of biofilms and water are very close, hindering the distinction between biofilms and water without the use of contrast agents. Until now, the use of contrast agents such as barium sulfate, silver-coated micro-particles or 1-chloronaphtalene added to the liquid phase allowed imaging the biofilm 3D morphology. However, these contrast agents are not passive and potentially interact with the biofilm when injected into the sample. Here, we use a natural inorganic compound, namely iron sulfate, as a contrast agent progressively bounded in dilute or colloidal form into the EPS matrix during biofilm growth. By combining a very long source-to-detector distance on a X-ray laboratory source with a Lorentzian filter implemented prior to tomographic reconstruction, we substantially increase the contrast between the biofilm and the surrounding liquid, which allows revealing the 3D biofilm morphology. A comparison of this new method with the method proposed by Davit et al (Davit et al., 2011), which uses barium sulfate as a contrast agent to mark the liquid phase was performed. Quantitative evaluations between the methods revealed substantial differences for the volumetric fractions obtained from both methods. Namely, contrast agent-biofilm interactions (e.g. biofilm detachment) occurring during barium sulfate injection caused a reduction of the biofilm volumetric fraction of more than 50% and displacement of biofilm patches elsewhere in the column. Two key advantages of the newly proposed method are that passive addition of iron sulfate maintains the integrity of the biofilm prior to imaging, and that the biofilm itself is marked by the contrast agent, rather than the liquid phase as in other available methods. The iron sulfate method presented can be applied to understand biofilm development

  6. Calculation of gamma ray dose buildup factors in water for isotropic point, plane mono directional and line sources using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atak, H.; Celikten, O. S.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma ray dose buildup factors in water for isotropic point, plane mono directional and infinite/finite line sources were calculated using the MCNP code. The buildup factors are determined for gamma ray energies of 1, 2, 3 and 4 Mev and for shield thicknesses of 1, 2, 4 and 7 mean free paths. The calculated buildup factors were then fitted in the Taylor and Berger forms. For the line sources a buildup factor table was also constructed using the Sievert function and the constants in Taylor form derived in this study to compare with the Monte Carlo results. All buildup factors were compared with the tabulated data given in literature. In order to reduce the statistical errors on buildup factors, 'forced collision' option was used in the MCNP calculations.

  7. Use of the VIP-Man model to calculate energy imparted and effective dose for x-ray examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Mark; Huda, Walter; Xu, X George; Chao, T C; Shi, C Y; Ogden, Kent M; Scalzetti, Ernest M

    2004-02-01

    A male human tomographic model was used to calculate values of energy imparted (epsilon) and effective dose (E) for monoenergetic photons (30-150 keV) in radiographic examinations. Energy deposition in the organs and tissues of the human phantom were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. Values of E/epsilon were obtained for three common projections [anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), and lateral (LAT)] of the head, cervical spine, chest, and abdomen, respectively. For head radiographs, all three projections yielded similar E/epsilon values. At 30 keV, the value of E/epsilon was approximately 1.6 mSv J(-1), which is increased to approximately 7 mSv J(-1) for 150 keV photons. The AP cervical spine was the only projection investigated where the value of E/epsilon decreased with increasing photon energy. Above 70 keV, cervical spine E/epsilon values showed little energy dependence and ranged between approximately 8.5 mSv J(-1) for PA projections and approximately 17 mSv J(-1) for AP projections. The values of E/epsilon for AP chest examinations showed very little variation with photon energy, and had values of approximately 23 mSv J(-1). Values of E/epsilon for PA and LAT chest projections were substantially lower than the AP projections and increased with increasing photon energy. For abdominal radiographs, differences between the PA and LAT projections were very small. All abdomen projections showed an increase in the E/epsilon ratio with increasing photon energy, and reached a maximum value of approximately 13.5 mSv J(-1) for AP projections, and approximately 9.5 mSv J(-1) for PA/lateral projections. These monoenergetic E/epsilon values can generate values of E/epsilon for any x-ray spectrum, and can be used to convert values of energy imparted into effective dose for patients undergoing common head and body radiological examinations.

  8. Uncertainty Propagation in OMFIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sterling; Meneghini, Orso; Sung, Choongki

    2017-10-01

    A rigorous comparison of power balance fluxes and turbulent model fluxes requires the propagation of uncertainties in the kinetic profiles and their derivatives. Making extensive use of the python uncertainties package, the OMFIT framework has been used to propagate covariant uncertainties to provide an uncertainty in the power balance calculation from the ONETWO code, as well as through the turbulent fluxes calculated by the TGLF code. The covariant uncertainties arise from fitting 1D (constant on flux surface) density and temperature profiles and associated random errors with parameterized functions such as a modified tanh. The power balance and model fluxes can then be compared with quantification of the uncertainties. No effort is made at propagating systematic errors. A case study will be shown for the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations on the kinetic profiles and fluxes at the top of the pedestal. A separate attempt at modeling the random errors with Monte Carlo sampling will be compared to the method of propagating the fitting function parameter covariant uncertainties. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG2-95ER-54309, DE-SC 0012656.

  9. Assessment of the pseudo-tracking approach for the calculation of material acceleration and pressure fields from time-resolved PIV: part I. Error propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, P. L.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2018-04-01

    Pseudo-tracking refers to the construction of imaginary particle paths from PIV velocity fields and the subsequent estimation of the particle (material) acceleration. In view of the variety of existing and possible alternative ways to perform the pseudo-tracking method, it is not straightforward to select a suitable combination of numerical procedures for its implementation. To address this situation, this paper extends the theoretical framework for the approach. The developed theory is verified by applying various implementations of pseudo-tracking to a simulated PIV experiment. The findings of the investigations allow us to formulate the following insights and practical recommendations: (1) the velocity errors along the imaginary particle track are primarily a function of velocity measurement errors and spatial velocity gradients; (2) the particle path may best be calculated with second-order accurate numerical procedures while ensuring that the CFL condition is met; (3) least-square fitting of a first-order polynomial is a suitable method to estimate the material acceleration from the track; and (4) a suitable track length may be selected on the basis of the variation in material acceleration with track length.

  10. Theoretical calculations of L alpha one x-ray emission intensity ratios for uranium in various matrices: a comparison with experimental values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The U L/sub α1/ x-ray emission intensity ratios (I/sub lambda/sub L//I sub lambda/sub L/, sub 100 percent/sub UO 2 /) in various matrices were calculated using the fundamental parameters formula of Criss and Birks and mass absorption coefficients calculated from a formula developed by Dewey. The use of the intensity ratio made it unnecessary to know the fluorescence yield for the U L/sub III/ level, the probability of emission of the U L/sub α1/ line, and the jump ratios for the three absorption edges of uranium. Also, since an intensity ratio was used, the results are independent of the x-ray tube current and the spectral distribution of the x-ray tube. A method is presented to calculate the intensity ratios for x-ray tube voltages other than the value (45 kV) used in the calculations. The theoretical results are calculated and compared with the experimental results obtained for 141 matrices. Difficulties due to oxidation of some of the metal powders used in the sample preparation, to small concentrations of uranium, and to an excessively large number of elements present in some of the samples resulted in the invalidation of the experimental results for 91 of the matrices. For the remaining 50 matrices, the theoretical and experimental values agreed to within +-5 percent relative error for 36 matrices; to within +-5 percent to +- 10 percent for 7 matrices; to within +-10 percent to +-20 percent for 6 matrices; and was greater than +-20 percent for 1 matrix

  11. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Datte, P.; Moody, J.; Divol, L.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause “blanking” (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ∼8 J cm{sup −2}. This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of “blanking” effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate “blanking.” Estimates suggest that an areal density of 10{sup 19} cm{sup −2} Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  12. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, G F; Ross, J S; Datte, P; Moody, J; Divol, L; Jones, O; Landen, O

    2016-11-01

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause "blanking" (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ∼8 J cm -2 . This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of "blanking" effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate "blanking." Estimates suggest that an areal density of 10 19 cm -2 Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  13. Unit cell structure of the wurtzite phase of GaP nanowires : X-ray diffraction studies and density functional theory calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegner, D.; Assali, S.; Belabbes, A.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Holy, V.; Schülli, T.U.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Bauer, G.; Stangl, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present structural characterization of the wurtzite crystal structure of GaP nanowires, which were recently shown to have a direct electronic band gap. The structural parameters of the wurtzite phase do consist of two lattice parameters and one internal degree of freedom, determining the Ga-P bond length along the c direction. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the influence of the internal degree of freedom on the band structure. By synchrotron x-ray diffraction studie...

  14. DiSCaMB: a software library for aspherical atom model X-ray scattering factor calculations with CPUs and GPUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Michał L; Migacz, Szymon; Rudnicki, Witold; Makal, Anna; Kalinowski, Jarosław A; Moriarty, Nigel W; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Afonine, Pavel V; Adams, Paul D; Dominiak, Paulina Maria

    2018-02-01

    It has been recently established that the accuracy of structural parameters from X-ray refinement of crystal structures can be improved by using a bank of aspherical pseudoatoms instead of the classical spherical model of atomic form factors. This comes, however, at the cost of increased complexity of the underlying calculations. In order to facilitate the adoption of this more advanced electron density model by the broader community of crystallographers, a new software implementation called DiSCaMB , 'densities in structural chemistry and molecular biology', has been developed. It addresses the challenge of providing for high performance on modern computing architectures. With parallelization options for both multi-core processors and graphics processing units (using CUDA), the library features calculation of X-ray scattering factors and their derivatives with respect to structural parameters, gives access to intermediate steps of the scattering factor calculations (thus allowing for experimentation with modifications of the underlying electron density model), and provides tools for basic structural crystallographic operations. Permissively (MIT) licensed, DiSCaMB is an open-source C++ library that can be embedded in both academic and commercial tools for X-ray structure refinement.

  15. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  16. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification.

  17. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification

  18. Beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The main part of this thesis consists of 15 published papers, in which the numerical Beam Propagating Method (BPM) is investigated, verified and used in a number of applications. In the introduction a derivation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is presented to connect the beginning of the soliton papers with Maxwell's equations including a nonlinear polarization. This thesis focuses on the wide use of the BPM for numerical simulations of propagating light and particle beams through different types of structures such as waveguides, fibers, tapers, Y-junctions, laser arrays and crystalline solids. We verify the BPM in the above listed problems against other numerical methods for example the Finite-element Method, perturbation methods and Runge-Kutta integration. Further, the BPM is shown to be a simple and effective way to numerically set up the Green's function in matrix form for periodic structures. The Green's function matrix can then be diagonalized with matrix methods yielding the eigensolutions of the structure. The BPM inherent transverse periodicity can be untied, if desired, by for example including an absorptive refractive index at the computational window edges. The interaction of two first-order soliton pulses is strongly dependent on the phase relationship between the individual solitons. When optical phase shift keying is used in coherent one-carrier wavelength communication, the fiber attenuation will suppress or delay the nonlinear instability. (orig.)

  19. A semianalytical method for calculating the parameters of the electromagnetic halos around extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kel'ner, [No Value; Khangulyan, DV; Aharonian, FA

    2004-01-01

    The ultrahigh-energy (>20 TeV) gamma rays emitted by active galactic nuclei can be absorbed in intergalactic space through the production of electron-positron pairs during their interaction with extragalactic background photon fields. The electrons and positrons produced by this interaction form an

  20. A comparison of calculated and measured background noise rates in hard X-ray telescopes at balloon altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, A. J.; Dipper, N. A.; Lewis, R. A.; Perotti, F.

    1985-01-01

    An actively shielded hard X-ray astronomical telescope has been flown on stratospheric balloons. An attempt is made to compare the measured spectral distribution of the background noise counting rates over the energy loss range 20-300 keV with the contributions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo and other computations. The relative contributions of individual particle interactions are assessed.

  1. In situ observation of self-propagating high temperature syntheses of Ta5Si3, Ti5Si3 and TiB2 by proton and X-ray radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernert, T.; Winkler, B.; Haussühl, E.; Trouw, F.; Vogel, S. C.; Hurd, A. J.; Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Saunders, A.; Juarez-Arellano, E. A.

    2013-08-01

    Self-propagating high temperature reactions of tantalum and titanium with silicon and titanium with boron were studied using proton and X-ray radiography, small-angle neutron scattering, neutron time-of-flight, X-ray and neutron diffraction, dilatometry and video recording. We show that radiography allows the observation of the propagation of the flame front in all investigated systems and the determination of the widths of the burning zones. X-ray and neutron diffraction showed that the reaction products consisted of ≈90 wt% of the main phase and one or two secondary phases. For the reaction 5Ti + 3Si → Ti5Si3 flame front velocities of 7.1(3)-34.2(4) mm/s were determined depending on the concentration of a retardant added to the starting material, the geometry and the green density of the samples. The flame front width was determined to be 1.17(4)-1.82(8) mm and depends exponentially on the flame front velocity. Similarly, for the reaction Ti + 2B → TiB2 flame front velocities of 15(2)-26.6(4) mm/s were determined, while for a 5Ta + 3Si → Ta5Si3 reaction the flame front velocity was 7.05(4) mm/s. The micro structure of the product phase Ta5Si3 shows no texture. From SANS measurements the dependence of the specific surface of the product phase on the particle sizes of the starting materials was studied.

  2. Calculated energy dependence of CaSO4:Dy TL phosphor and phosphor embedded Teflon for X and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.-K.; Nam, Y.-M.; Kim, J.-L.; Chang, S.-Y.; Kim, B.-H.

    2001-01-01

    The energy dependence of a CaSO 4 :Dy TL phosphor for 21 monoenergetic photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 3 MeV was calculated by using MCNP4A code. The calculation results show good agreement with those of other authors within ± 5% relative error. Calculations and experiments are also performed to determine the energy dependence of CaSO 4 : Dy phosphor with Dy concentrations from 0.01 to 1.5 mol %, and with the compositions of TL-Teflon from 10 to 90 wt %. The calculated energy responses show good agreement with the experiment results within ± 20% relative error except for a concentration lower than 0.1 mol % Dy and the low energy regions of M30 (Eave.=20 keV) and M60 (Eave.=34 keV). For the TL-Teflon mixture, the energy dependence shows an decreasing trend with the increase of Teflon concentration in MCNP calculation but shows no dependence for TL-Teflon mixture proportions in experiment. These differences are due to the non-homogeneous distribution of Dy concentration and the effect of large grain size in the phosphors. The energy dependence of the 30 wt/o CaSO 4 (0.1 mol%;Dy) and 70 wt/o Teflon that is placed behind the filters of plastic, aluminum, copper, tin and lead with a thickness from 0.1 to 2 mm were calculated, respectively

  3. Presentation of a semiempirical method for the calculation of doses due to neutrons and capture gamma rays inside high energy accelerators rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, A.M.; Bonet Duran, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Medical electron accelerators operating above 10 MeV produce radiation beams that are contaminated with neutrons. Therefore, shielding design for high energy accelerator rooms must consider the neutron component of the radiation field. In this paper a semiempirical method is presented to calculate doses due to neutrons and capture gamma rays inside the room and the maze. The calculation method is based on the knowledge of the neutron yield Q (neutrons/Gy of photons at isocenter) and the average energy of the primary beam of neutrons Eo (MeV). The method constitutes an appropriate tool for shielding facilities evaluation. The accuracy of the method has been contrasted with data obtained from the literature and an excellent correlation among the calculations and the measured values was achieved. In addition, the method has been used in the verification of experimental data corresponding to a 15 MeV linear accelerator installed in the country with similar results. (author) [es

  4. Finite difference method calculations of long-range X-ray absorption fine structure for copper over k{approx}20A{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, J.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia); Chantler, C.T., E-mail: chantler@physics.unimelb.edu.a [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-07-21

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is calculated for copper using the cluster based Finite Difference Method for Near-Edge Structure (FDMNES). This approach is conventionally used to produce high accuracy XAFS theory in the near edge region, however, we demonstrate that it can be readily extended to encompass an energy range of more than 1.5 keV (k{approx}20A{sup -1}) from the K absorption edge. Such calculations require extensions to FDMNES to account for thermal effects, in addition to broadening effects due to inelastic processes. Extended calculations beyond the range of near-edge structure also require consideration of technical constraints such as cluster sizes and densities. We find that with our approach, we are able to produce accurate theory ranging from the absorption edge to the smooth atom-like region at high energies, with a single consistent model that is free from any fitting parameters.

  5. Finite difference method calculations of long-range X-ray absorption fine structure for copper over k∼20A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, J.D.; Chantler, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is calculated for copper using the cluster based Finite Difference Method for Near-Edge Structure (FDMNES). This approach is conventionally used to produce high accuracy XAFS theory in the near edge region, however, we demonstrate that it can be readily extended to encompass an energy range of more than 1.5 keV (k∼20A -1 ) from the K absorption edge. Such calculations require extensions to FDMNES to account for thermal effects, in addition to broadening effects due to inelastic processes. Extended calculations beyond the range of near-edge structure also require consideration of technical constraints such as cluster sizes and densities. We find that with our approach, we are able to produce accurate theory ranging from the absorption edge to the smooth atom-like region at high energies, with a single consistent model that is free from any fitting parameters.

  6. Accurate calculations of the WIMP halo around the Sun and prospects for its gamma-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsson, Sofia; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2010-01-01

    Galactic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) may scatter off solar nuclei to orbits gravitationally bound to the Sun. Once bound, the WIMPs continue to lose energy by repeated scatters in the Sun, eventually leading to complete entrapment in the solar interior. While the density of the bound population is highest at the center of the Sun, the only observable signature of WIMP annihilations inside the Sun is neutrinos. It has been previously suggested that although the density of WIMPs just outside the Sun is lower than deep inside, gamma rays from WIMP annihilation just outside the surface of the Sun, in the so-called WIMP halo around the Sun, may be more easily detected. We here revisit this problem using detailed Monte Carlo simulations and detailed composition and structure information about the Sun to estimate the size of the gamma-ray flux. Compared to earlier simpler estimates, we find that the gamma-ray flux from WIMP annihilations in the solar WIMP halo would be negligible; no current or planned detectors would be able to detect this flux.

  7. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, John Leonard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haight, Robert Cameron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jandel, Marian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Donnell, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vieira, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Becker, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, Ching-Yen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krticka, Milan [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  8. Core Flooding Experiments Combined with X-rays and Micro-PET Imaging as a Tool to Calculate Fluid Saturations in a Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, M.; Zahasky, C.; Garing, C.; Pollyea, R. M.; Benson, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    One way to reduce CO2 emissions is to capture CO2 generated in power plants and other industrial sources to inject it into a geological formation. Sedimentary basins are the ones traditionally used to store CO2 but the emission sources are not always close to these type of basins. In this case, basalt rocks present a good storage alternative due their extent and also their potential for mineral trapping. Flow through basaltic rocks is governed by the permeable paths provided by rock fractures. Hence, knowing the behavior of the multiphase flow in these fractures becomes crucial. With the aim to describe how aperture and liquid-gas interface changes in the fracture affect relative permeability and what are the implications of permeability stress dependency, a series of core experiments were conducted. To calculate fracture apertures and fluid saturations, core flooding experiments combined with medical X-Ray CT scanner and micro-PET imaging (Micro Positron Emission Tomography) were performed. Capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves were simultaneously measured in a fractured basalt core under typical storage reservoir pressures and temperatures. The X-Ray scanner allows fracture apertures to be measured quite accurately even for fractures as small as 30 µ, but obtaining fluid saturations is not straightforward. The micro-PET imaging provides dynamic measurements of tracer distributions which can be used to calculate saturation. Here new experimental data is presented and the challenges associated with measuring fluid saturations using both X-Rays and micro-PET are discussed.

  9. Cosmic Rays in Intermittent Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukurov, Anvar; Seta, Amit; Bushby, Paul J.; Wood, Toby S.; Snodin, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic-ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead adopting Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we calculate cosmic-ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic-ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.

  10. Cosmic Rays in Intermittent Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukurov, Anvar; Seta, Amit; Bushby, Paul J.; Wood, Toby S. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Snodin, Andrew P., E-mail: a.seta1@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: amitseta90@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand)

    2017-04-10

    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic-ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead adopting Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we calculate cosmic-ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic-ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.

  11. ECP measurements under neutron and gamma ray in in-pile loop and their data evaluation by water radiolysis calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawa, S.; Nakamura, T.; Uchida, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Kus, P.; Vsolak, R.; Kysela, J. [Nuclear Research Inst. Rez plc, Husinec - Rez (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-01

    In order to establish reliable electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) sensors for applying in reactor core peripherals of power plants, performance tests of sensors under irradiation were carried out in the in-pile loop of the experimental reactor, LVR-15, at the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) in Czech Republic. Responses of different kinds of sensors under neutron and gamma irradiation conditions have been compared each other. Corrosive conditions along the in-pile loop were calculated by water radiolysis calculation code, WRAC-J and calculated corrosive conditions were compared with the measured results. As a result of the evaluation, it was confirmed that the ECP sensors could be applied to irradiation conditions of reactor peripherals, while the water radiolysis model could be also applied for evaluation of corrosive conditions of reactor peripherals. (author)

  12. Modeling of the propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the Earth’s magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, N. V.; Rudenko, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical algorithm for solving the set of differential equations describing the propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the magnetospheric plasma, including in the presence of geomagnetic waveguides in the form of large-scale plasma density inhomogeneities stretched along the Earth’s magnetic field, has been developed. Calculations of three-dimensional ray trajectories in the magnetosphere and geomagnetic waveguide with allowance for radiation polarization have revealed characteristic tendencies in the behavior of electromagnetic parameters along the ray trajectory. The results of calculations can be used for magnetospheric plasma diagnostics

  13. Development of the neutron-transport code TransRay and studies on the two- and three-dimensional calculation of effective group cross sections; Entwicklung des Neutronentransportcodes TransRay und Untersuchungen zur zwei- und dreidimensionalen Berechnung effektiver Gruppenwirkungsquerschnitte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, C.

    2007-12-19

    Conventionally the data preparation of the neutron cross sections for reactor-core calculations pursues with 2D cell codes. Aim of this thesis was, to develop a 3D cell code, to study with this code 3D effects, and to evaluate the necessarity of a 3D data preparation of the neutron cross sections. For the calculation of the neutron transport the method of the first-collision probabilities, which are calculated with the ray-tracing method, was chosen. The mathematical algorithms were implemented in the 2D/3D cell code TransRay. For the geometry part of the program the geometry module of a Monte Carlo code was used.The ray tracing in 3D was parallelized because of the high computational time. The program TransRay was verified on 2D test problems. For a reference pressured-water reactor following 3D problems were studied: A partly immersed control rod and void (vacuum or steam) around a fuel rod as model of a steam void. All problems were for comparison calculated also with the programs HELIOS(2D) and MCNP(3D). The dependence of the multiplication factor and the averaged two-group cross section on the immersion depth of the control rod respectively of the height of the steam void were studied. The 3D-calculated two-group cross sections were compared with three conventional approximations: Linear interpolation, interpolation with flux weighting, and homogenization, At the 3D problem of the control rod it was shown that the interpolation with flux weighting is a good approximation. Therefore here a 3D data preparation is not necessary. At the test case of the single control rod, which is surrounded by the void, the three approximation for the two-group cross sections were proved as unsufficient. Therefore a 3D data preparation is necessary. The single fuel-rod cell with void can be considered as the limiting case of a reactor, in which a phase interface has been formed. [German] Standardmaessig erfolgt die Datenaufbereitung der Neutronenwirkungsquerschnitte fuer

  14. Calculation of the X-Ray Spectrum of a Mammography System with Various Voltages and Different Anode-Filter Combinations Using MCNP Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Gholamkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the best methods in the diagnosis and control of breast cancer is mammography. The importance of mammography is directly related to its value in the detection of breast cancer in the early stages, which leads to a more effective treatment. The purpose of this article was to calculate the X-ray spectrum in a mammography system with Monte Carlo codes, including MCNPX and MCNP5. Materials and Methods The device, simulated using the MCNP code, was Planmed Nuance digital mammography device (Planmed Oy, Finland, equipped with an amorphous selenium detector. Different anode/filter materials, such as molybdenum-rhodium (Mo-Rh, molybdenum-molybdenum (Mo-Mo, tungsten-tin (W-Sn, tungsten-silver (W-Ag, tungsten-palladium (W-Pd, tungsten-aluminum (W-Al, tungsten-molybdenum (W-Mo, molybdenum-aluminum (Mo-Al, tungsten-rhodium (W-Rh, rhodium-aluminum (Rh-Al, and rhodium-rhodium (Rh-Rh, were simulated in this study. The voltage range of the X-ray tube was between 24 and 34 kV with a 2 kV interval. Results The charts of changing photon flux versus energy were plotted for different types of anode-filter combinations. The comparison with the findings reported by others indicated acceptable consistency. Also, the X-ray spectra, obtained from MCNP5 and MCNPX codes for W-Ag and W-Rh combinations, were compared. We compared the present results with the reported data of MCNP4C and IPEM report No. 78 for Mo-Mo, Mo-Rh, and W-Al combinations. Conclusion The MCNPX calculation outcomes showed acceptable results in a low-energy X-ray beam range (10-35 keV. The obtained simulated spectra for different anode/filter combinations were in good conformity with the finding of previous research.

  15. Calculated Performance Of The Variable-Polarization Undulator Upgrade To The Daresbury SRS Soft X-Ray Undulator Beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, Mark D.; Bird, Daniel T.

    2004-01-01

    The soft x-ray beamline 5U1 on the Daresbury Laboratory SRS currently uses a planar undulator, producing linearly polarized radiation in the range 100 to 1000 eV. The undulator is soon to be replaced by a variable-polarization device of the Apple II design. The aim is to produce circularly polarized light in the energy range 265 to 1000 eV, covering the K-edges of C, N and O, and the first row transition element L-edges. This will greatly enhance the provision of circularly polarized soft-x-rays on the SRS and open up new opportunities for experimenters. The device will also produce linear polarization with a selectable angle of polarization with respect to the orbit plane, which is currently unavailable on the SRS. In order to provide the coverage over this energy range, we are exploiting the relatively large emittance of the SRS to allow us to use the second and third harmonics even in circular polarization mode. This paper presents the expected beamline output in various polarization modes and the predicted degree of polarization

  16. Build-up and surface dose measurements on phantoms using micro-MOSFET in 6 and 10 MV x-ray beams and comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Hong F.; Song, Jun S.; Chin, David W. H.; Cormack, Robert A.; Tishler, Roy B.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Court, Laurence E.; Chin, Lee M.

    2007-01-01

    This work is intended to investigate the application and accuracy of micro-MOSFET for superficial dose measurement under clinically used MV x-ray beams. Dose response of micro-MOSFET in the build-up region and on surface under MV x-ray beams were measured and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. First, percentage-depth-doses were measured with micro-MOSFET under 6 and 10 MV beams of normal incidence onto a flat solid water phantom. Micro-MOSFET data were compared with the measurements from a parallel plate ionization chamber and Monte Carlo dose calculation in the build-up region. Then, percentage-depth-doses were measured for oblique beams at 0 deg. - 80 deg. onto the flat solid water phantom with micro-MOSFET placed at depths of 2 cm, 1 cm, and 2 mm below the surface. Measurements were compared to Monte Carlo calculations under these settings. Finally, measurements were performed with micro-MOSFET embedded in the first 1 mm layer of bolus placed on a flat phantom and a curved phantom of semi-cylindrical shape. Results were compared to superficial dose calculated from Monte Carlo for a 2 mm thin layer that extends from the surface to a depth of 2 mm. Results were (1) Comparison of measurements with MC calculation in the build-up region showed that micro-MOSFET has a water-equivalence thickness (WET) of 0.87 mm for 6 MV beam and 0.99 mm for 10 MV beam from the flat side, and a WET of 0.72 mm for 6 MV beam and 0.76 mm for 10 MV beam from the epoxy side. (2) For normal beam incidences, percentage depth dose agree within 3%-5% among micro-MOSFET measurements, parallel-plate ionization chamber measurements, and MC calculations. (3) For oblique incidence on the flat phantom with micro-MOSFET placed at depths of 2 cm, 1 cm, and 2 mm, measurements were consistent with MC calculations within a typical uncertainty of 3%-5%. (4) For oblique incidence on the flat phantom and a curved-surface phantom, measurements with micro-MOSFET placed at 1.0 mm agrees with the MC

  17. SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueso-Gonzalez, F [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); Vijande, J [University of Valencia, Burjassot and IFIC (CSIC-UV) (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, and Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Siebert, F [Clinic of Radiotherapy (Radiooncology), Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tissue heterogeneities and calcifications have significant impact on the dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy (BT). RayStretch is an analytical algorithm developed in our institution to incorporate heterogeneity corrections in LDR prostate brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to study its application in clinical cases by comparing its predictions with the results obtained with TG-43 and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: A clinical implant (71 I-125 seeds, 15 needles) from a real patient was considered. On this patient, different volumes with calcifications were considered. Its properties were evaluated in three ways by i) the Treatment planning system (TPS) (TG-43), ii) a MC study using the Penelope2009 code, and iii) RayStretch. To analyse the performance of RayStretch, calcifications located in the prostate lobules covering 11% of the total prostate volume and larger calcifications located in the lobules and underneath the urethra for a total occupied volume of 30% were considered. Three mass densities (1.05, 1.20, and 1.35 g/cm3) were explored for the calcifications. Therefore, 6 different scenarios ranging from small low density calcifications to large high density ones have been discussed. Results: DVH and D90 results given by RayStretch agree within 1% with the full MC simulations. Although no effort has been done to improve RayStretch numerical performance, its present implementation is able to evaluate a clinical implant in a few seconds to the same level of accuracy as a detailed MC calculation. Conclusion: RayStretch is a robust method for heterogeneity corrections in prostate BT supported on TG-43 data. Its compatibility with commercial TPSs and its high calculation speed makes it feasible for use in clinical settings for improving treatment quality. It will allow in a second phase of this project, its use during intraoperative ultrasound planning. This study was partly supported by a fellowship grant from the Spanish Ministry of

  18. Condensed, solution and gas phase behaviour of mono- and dinuclear 2,6-diacetylpyridine (dap) hydrazone copper complexes probed by X-ray, mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Brenno A D; Viana, Barbara F L; Rodrigues, Thyago S; Lalli, Priscila M; Eberlin, Marcos N; da Silva, Wender A; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Gatto, Claudia C

    2013-08-28

    We describe the synthesis of novel mononuclear and dinuclear copper complexes and an investigation of their behaviour in solution using mass spectrometry (ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS) and in the solid state using X-ray crystallography. The complexes were synthesized from two widely used diacetylpryridine (dap) ligands, i.e. 2,6-diacetylpyridinebis(benzoic acid hydrazone) and 2,6-diacetylpyridinebis(2-aminobenzoic acid hydrazone). Theoretical calculations (DFT) were used to predict the complex geometries of these new structures, their equilibrium in solution and energies associated with the transformations.

  19. Calculation of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure at finite temperatures: Spectral signatures of hydrogen bond breaking in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetenyi, Balazs; De Angelis, Filippo; Giannozzi, Paolo; Car, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure of H 2 O in the gas, hexagonal ice, and liquid phases using heuristic density-functional based methods. We present a detailed comparison of our results with experiment. The differences between the ice and water spectra can be rationalized in terms of the breaking of hydrogen bonds around the absorbing molecule. In particular the increase in the pre-edge absorption feature from ice to water is shown to be due to the breaking of a donor hydrogen bond. We also find that in water approximately 19% of hydrogen bonds are broken

  20. State-dependent electron delocalization dynamics at the solute-solvent interface: soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokarev, Sergey I; Dantz, Marcus; Suljoti, Edlira; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-08-23

    Nonradiative decay channels in the L-edge fluorescence yield spectra from transition-metal-aqueous solutions give rise to spectral distortions with respect to x-ray transmission spectra. Their origin is unraveled here using partial and inverse partial fluorescence yields on the microjet combined with multireference ab initio electronic structure calculations. Comparing Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ systems we demonstrate and quantify unequivocally the state-dependent electron delocalization within the manifold of d orbitals as one origin of this observation.

  1. The effectiveness of thermoluminescent crystals for calculation of required barrier against radiation at the diagnostic X-ray units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Seyed Ali

    2008-01-01

    Concerning the importance of radiography techniques for diagnosis of disease and considering daily application and emerging new techniques in radiography from one hand and potential misuse of radiation and exposure to patients and personnel from other, it seems necessary the measure the amount of received radiation in current radiography procedures. The aim of this research is to determine the surface dose to patients in chest and skull radiography procedures in the hospitals of Mazandaran medical science university and compare those to given standards for such examinations from national and international recommendations. The study was based on the procedures, performed at six X-ray machines in six hospitals of the medical science university. Totally 120 patients with normal BMI, undergoing prescribed chest and skull examinations were involved. The exposure parameters, such as kVp - mAs product, film-screen combination and overall procedure setup at the all 6 X-ray machines were similar, thus provided unbiased evaluation of the surface dose. Surface dose was measured, using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). TLD after calibration was attached to the back and front skin surface of patients and after exposure TLD5 radiance was read with TLD reader. The average surface dose, measured for patients undergoing examinations of posterior - anterior view for pectoral, profile view for chest and posterior - anterior or anterior - posterior view of skull and profile view of skull where 0.51 , 3.36 , 7.25 and 7.59 mGy, respectively. These figures exceed recommended standards. To decrease patient surface dose, such measures, as periodic and continuous on-the-job education as well as supervision could increase technical and technological knowledge and rise awareness about radiation protection issues, thus improving the situation in hospitals. (author)

  2. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Ekmann, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code xillver that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic data base. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Gamma of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter zeta at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A(sub Fe) relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are: 1.2 <= Gamma <= 3.4, 1 <= zeta <= 104, and 0.5 <= A(sub Fe) <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in xspec. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of xillver.

  3. Propagation engineering in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles for understanding radio wave propagation for common frequency bands used in radio-communications. This includes achievements and developments in propagation models for wireless communication. This book is intended to bridge the gap between the theoretical calculations and approaches to the applied procedures needed for radio links design in a proper manner. The authors emphasize propagation engineering by giving fundamental information and explain the use of basic principles together with technical achievements. This new edition includes additional information on radio wave propagation in guided media and technical issues for fiber optics cable networks with several examples and problems. This book also includes a solution manual - with 90 solved examples distributed throughout the chapters - and 158 problems including practical values and assumptions.

  4. Charge mechanism analysis of lithium ion secondary battery. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubobuchi, Kei; Imai, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    Redox reaction behaviors of a lithium ion secondary battery were investigated by K-edge in-situ XANES and L-edge XANES measurements combined with ab initio XANES simulation. During the charge process, the shape of K-edge XANES spectra was found to change, suggesting contribution of Mn 3d electron to charge and discharge. The detailed analysis based on first-principles electronic structure calculation and ab initio XANES simulation, however, indicated that valence change of Mn is little and rather O largely contribute to the reaction. (author)

  5. EGS-Ray, a program for the visualization of Monte-Carlo calculations in the radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, C.

    2001-01-01

    A Windows program is introduced which allows a relatively easy and interactive access to Monte Carlo techniques in clinical radiation physics. Furthermore, this serves as a visualization tool of the methodology and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The program requires only little effort to formulate and calculate a Monte Carlo problem. The Monte Carlo module of the program is based on the well-known EGS4/PRESTA code. The didactic features of the program are presented using several examples common to the routine of the clinical radiation physicist. (orig.) [de

  6. Markov Stochastic Technique to Determine Galactic Cosmic Ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    has been developed, which allows the study of cosmic-ray production and propagation in ... sive transport equation with a complete network of nuclear interactions using the ... This paper describes a further development of the model to calculate the .... In case of several nuclei the problem is expanded to solve a system of ...

  7. Tenth value layers for 60Co gamma rays and for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays in concrete for beams of cone angles between 0 degrees and 14 degrees calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Adnan K; Biggs, Peter J

    2007-05-01

    The calculation of shielding barrier thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities according to the NCRP formalism is based on the use of broad beams (that is, the maximum possible field sizes). However, in practice, treatment fields used in radiation therapy are, on average, less than half the maximum size. Indeed, many contemporary treatment techniques call for reduced field sizes to reduce co-morbidity and the risk of second cancers. Therefore, published tenth value layers (TVLs) for shielding materials do not apply to these very small fields. There is, hence, a need to determine the TVLs for various beam modalities as a function of field size. The attenuation of (60)Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV bremsstrahlung x ray beams by concrete has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for beams of half-opening angles of 0 degrees , 3 degrees , 6 degrees , 9 degrees , 12 degrees , and 14 degrees . The distance between the x-ray source and the distal surface of the shielding wall was fixed at 600 cm, a distance that is typical for modern radiation therapy rooms. The maximum concrete thickness varied between 76.5 cm and 151.5 cm for (60)Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. Detectors were placed at 630 cm, 700 cm, and 800 cm from the source. TVLs have been determined down to the third TVL. Energy spectra for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays for 10 x 10 cm(2) and 40 x 40 cm(2) field sizes were used to generate depth dose curves in water that were compared with experimentally measured values.

  8. Improvement of air transport data and wall transmission/reflection data in the SKYSHINE code. 2. Calculation of gamma-ray wall transmission and reflection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, Yoshihisa [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Ishikawa, Satoshi; Harima, Yoshiko [CRC Research Institute Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Katsumi; Tayama, Ryuichi [Hitachi Engineering Co. Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Hirayama, Hideo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nemoto, Makoto [Visible Information Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Sato, Osamu [Mitsubishi Research Inst., Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Transmission and reflection data of concrete and steel for 6.2 MeV gamma-ray in the SKYSHINE code have been generated using up-to-date data and method with a view to improving an accuracy of results. The transmission and reflection data depend on energy and angle. The invariant embedding method, which has merits of producing no negative angular flux and of taking small computer time, is suitable and adopted to the present purpose. Transmission data were calculated for concrete of 12 {approx} 160 cm thick and steel of 4 {approx} 39 cm thick based on the PHOTX library. Reflection data were calculated for semi-infinite slabs of concrete and steel. Consequently, smooth and consistent differential data over whole angle and energy were obtained compared with the original data calculated by discrete ordinates Sn code and Monte Carlo code. In order to use these data in the SKYSHINE code, further verification is needed using various calculation method or experimental data. (author)

  9. Dimethyl methylphosphonate adsorption and decomposition on MoO2 as studied by ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ashley R.; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Trotochaud, Lena; Yu, Yi; Karslıoǧlu, Osman; Eichhorn, Bryan; Kuklja, Maija M.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2018-04-01

    Organophosphonates range in their toxicity and are used as pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Few laboratories are equipped to handle the most toxic molecules, thus simulants such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), are used as a first step in studying adsorption and reactivity on materials. Benchmarked by combined experimental and theoretical studies of simulants, calculations offer an opportunity to understand how molecular interactions with a surface changes upon using a CWA. However, most calculations of DMMP and CWAs on surfaces are limited to adsorption studies on clusters of atoms, which may differ markedly from the behavior on bulk solid-state materials with extended surfaces. We have benchmarked our solid-state periodic calculations of DMMP adsorption and reactivity on MoO2 with ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies (APXPS). DMMP is found to interact strongly with a MoO2 film, a model system for the MoO x component in the ASZM-TEDA© gas filtration material. Density functional theory modeling of several adsorption and decomposition mechanisms assist the assignment of APXPS peaks. Our results show that some of the adsorbed DMMP decomposes, with all the products remaining on the surface. The rigorous calculations benchmarked with experiments pave a path to reliable and predictive theoretical studies of CWA interactions with surfaces.

  10. SU-C-204-06: Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Kilovoltage X-Ray-Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT): Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mein, S [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program (United States); Gunasingha, R [Department of Radiation Safety, Duke University Medical Center (United States); Nolan, M [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University (United States); Oldham, M; Adamson, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: X-PACT is an experimental cancer therapy where kV x-rays are used to photo-activate anti-cancer therapeutics through phosphor intermediaries (phosphors that absorb x-rays and re-radiate as UV light). Clinical trials in pet dogs are currently underway (NC State College of Veterinary Medicine) and an essential component is the ability to model the kV dose in these dogs. Here we report the commissioning and characterization of a Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning simulation tool to calculate X-PACT radiation doses in canine trials. Methods: FLUKA multi-particle MC simulation package was used to simulate a standard X-PACT radiation treatment beam of 80kVp with the Varian OBI x-ray source geometry. The beam quality was verified by comparing measured and simulated attenuation of the beam by various thicknesses of aluminum (2–4.6 mm) under narrow beam conditions (HVL). The beam parameters at commissioning were then corroborated using MC, characterized and verified with empirically collected commissioning data, including: percent depth dose curves (PDD), back-scatter factors (BSF), collimator scatter factor(s), and heel effect, etc. All simulations were conducted for N=30M histories at M=100 iterations. Results: HVL and PDD simulation data agreed with an average percent error of 2.42%±0.33 and 6.03%±1.58, respectively. The mean square error (MSE) values for HVL and PDD (0.07% and 0.50%) were low, as expected; however, longer simulations are required to validate convergence to the expected values. Qualitatively, pre- and post-filtration source spectra matched well with 80kVp references generated via SPEKTR software. Further validation of commissioning data simulation is underway in preparation for first-time 3D dose calculations with canine CBCT data. Conclusion: We have prepared a Monte Carlo simulation capable of accurate dose calculation for use with ongoing X-PACT canine clinical trials. Preliminary results show good agreement with measured data and hold

  11. Fast calculator for X-ray emission due to Radiative Recombination and Radiative Electron Capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, M. O.; Weber, G.; Gumberidze, A.; Wu, Z. W.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2017-10-01

    In experiments with highly charged, fast heavy ions the Radiative Recombination (RR) and Radiative Electron Capture (REC) processes have significant cross sections in an energy range of up to a few GeV / u . They are some of the most important charge changing processes in collisions of heavy ions with atoms and electrons, leading to the emission of a photon along with the formation of the ground and excited atomic states. Hence, for the understanding and planning of experiments, in particular for X-ray spectroscopy studies, at accelerator ring facilities, such as FAIR, it is crucial to have a good knowledge of these cross sections and the associated radiation characteristics. In the frame of this work a fast calculator, named RECAL, for the RR and REC process is presented and its capabilities are demonstrated with the analysis of a recently conducted experiment at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. A method is presented to determine unknown X-ray emission cross sections via normalization of the recorded spectra to REC cross sections calculated by RECAL.

  12. Total absorption gamma-ray spectroscopy (TAGS): Current status of measurement programmes for decay heat calculations and other applications. Summary report of consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Nordborg, C.

    2009-02-01

    A Consultants' Meeting on 'Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS)' was held on 27-28 January 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All presentations, discussions and recommendations of this meeting are contained within this report. The purpose of the meeting was to report and discuss progress and plans to measure total gamma-ray spectra in order to derive mean beta and gamma decay data for decay heat calculations and other applications. This form of review had been recommended by contributors to Subgroup 25 of the OECD-NEA Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation of the Nuclear Science Committee, for implementation in 2008/09. Hence, relevant specialists were invited to discuss their recently performed and planned TAGS studies, along with experimentalists proposing to assemble and operate such dedicated facilities. Knowledge and quantification of antineutrino spectra is believed to be a significant asset in the non-invasive monitoring of reactor operations and possible application in safeguards, as well as fundamental in the study of neutrino oscillations - these data needs were also debated in terms of appropriate TAGS measurements. A re-assessment of the current request list for TAGS studies is merited and was undertaken in the context of decay heat calculations, and agreement was reached to extend these requirements to the derivation of antineutrino spectra. (author)

  13. Combined Approach for the Structural Characterization of Alkali Fluoroscandates: Solid-State NMR, Powder X-ray Diffraction, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Polovov, Ilya B; Maltsev, Dmitry; Allix, Mathieu; Volkovich, Vladimir; Chukin, Andrey V; Boča, Miroslav; Bessada, Catherine

    2018-02-05

    The structures of several fluoroscandate compounds are presented here using a characterization approach combining powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR. The structure of K 5 Sc 3 F 14 was fully determined from Rietveld refinement performed on powder X-ray diffraction data. Moreover, the local structures of NaScF 4 , Li 3 ScF 6 , KSc 2 F 7 , and Na 3 ScF 6 compounds were studied in detail from solid-state 19 F and 45 Sc NMR experiments. The 45 Sc chemical shift ranges for six- and seven-coordinated scandium environments were defined. The 19 F chemical shift ranges for bridging and terminal fluorine atoms were also determined. First-principles calculations of the 19 F and 45 Sc NMR parameters were carried out using plane-wave basis sets and periodic boundary conditions (CASTEP), and the results were compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between the calculated shielding constants and experimental chemical shifts was obtained. This demonstrates the good potential of computational methods in spectroscopic assignments of solid-state 45 Sc NMR spectroscopy.

  14. Calculation of direct effects of {sup 60}Co gamma rays on the different DNA structural levels: A simulation study using the Geant4-DNA toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajik, Marjan; Rozatian, Amir S.H. [Department of Physics, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jarib Street, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semsarha, Farid, E-mail: Semsarha@ibb.ut.ac.ir [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics (IBB), University of Tehran, P.O. Box: 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    In this study, simple single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) due to direct effects of the secondary electron spectrum of {sup 60}Co gamma rays on different organizational levels of a volume model of the B-DNA conformation have been calculated using the Geant4-DNA toolkit. Result of this study for the direct DSB yield shows a good agreement with other theoretical and experimental results obtained by both photons and their secondary electrons; however, in the case of SSB a noticeable difference can be observed. Moreover, regarding the almost constant yields of the direct strand breaks in the different structural levels of the DNA, calculated in this work, and compared with some theoretical studies, it can be deduced that the direct strand breaks yields depend mainly on the primary double helix structure of the DNA and the higher-order structures cannot have a noticeable effect on the direct DNA damage inductions by {sup 60}Co gamma rays. In contrast, a direct dependency between the direct SSB and DSB yields and the volume of the DNA structure has been found. Also, a further study on the histone proteins showed that they can play an important role in the trapping of low energy electrons without any significant effect on the direct DNA strand breaks inductions, at least in the range of energies used in the current study.

  15. Affinity and specificity of serine endopeptidase-protein inhibitor interactions. Empirical free energy calculations based on X-ray crystallographic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystek, S; Stouch, T; Novotny, J

    1993-12-05

    An empirical function was used to calculate free energy change (delta G) of complex formation between the following inhibitors and enzymes: Kunitz inhibitor (BPTI) with trypsin, trypsinogen and kallikrein; turkey ovomucoid 3rd domain (OMTKY3) with alpha-chymotrypsin and the Streptomyces griseus protease B; the potato chymotrypsin inhibitor with the protease B; and the barely chymotrypsin inhibitor and eglin-c with subtilisin and thermitase. Using X-ray coordinates of the nine complexes, we estimated the contributions that hydrophobic effect, electrostatic interactions and side-chain conformational entropy make towards the stability of the complexes. The calculated delta G values showed good agreement with the experimentally measured ones, the only exception being the kallikrein/BPTI complex whose X-ray structure was solved at an exceptionally low pH. In complexes with different enzymes, the same inhibitor residues contributed identically towards complex formation (delta G(residue) Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0.7 to 1.0). The most productive enzyme-contacting residues in OMTKY3, eglin-c, and the chymotrypsin inhibitors were found in analogous positions on their respective binding loops; thus, our calculations identified a functional (energetic) motif that parallels the well-known structural similarity of the binding loops. The delta G values calculated for BPTI complexed with trypsin (-21.7 kcal) and trypsinogen (-23.4 kcal) were similar and close to the experimental delta G value of the trypsin/BPTI complex (-18.1 kcal), lending support to the suggestion that the 10(7) difference in the observed stabilities (KA) of these two complexes reflects the energetic cost of conformational changes induced in trypsinogen during the pre-equilibrium stages of complex formation. In almost all of the complexes studied, the stabilization free energy contributed by the inhibitors was larger than that donated by the enzymes. In the trypsin-BPTI complex, the calculated

  16. Pair Natural Orbital Restricted Open-Shell Configuration Interaction (PNO-ROCIS) Approach for Calculating X-ray Absorption Spectra of Large Chemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganas, Dimitrios; DeBeer, Serena; Neese, Frank

    2018-02-08

    In this work, the efficiency of first-principles calculations of X-ray absorption spectra of large chemical systems is drastically improved. The approach is based on the previously developed restricted open-shell configuration interaction singles (ROCIS) method and its parametrized version, based on a density functional theory (DFT) ground-state determinant ROCIS/DFT. The combination of the ROCIS or DFT/ROCIS methods with the well-known machinery of the pair natural orbitals (PNOs) leads to the new PNO-ROCIS and PNO-ROCIS/DFT variants. The PNO-ROCIS method can deliver calculated metal K-, L-, and M-edge XAS spectra orders of magnitude faster than ROCIS while maintaining an accuracy with calculated spectral parameters better than 1% relative to the original ROCIS method (referred to as canonical ROCIS). The method is of a black box character, as it does not require any user adjustments, while it scales quadratically with the system size. It is shown that for large systems, the size of the virtual molecular orbital (MO) space is reduced by more than 90% with respect to the canonical ROCIS method. This allows one to compute the X-ray absorption spectra of a variety of large "real-life" chemical systems featuring hundreds of atoms using a first-principles wave-function-based approach. Examples chosen from the fields of bioinorganic and solid-state chemistry include the Co K-edge XAS spectrum of aquacobalamin [H 2 OCbl] + , the Fe L-edge XAS spectrum of deoxymyoglobin (DMb), the Ti L-edge XAS spectrum of rutile TiO 2 , and the Fe M-edge spectrum of α-Fe 2 O 3 hematite. In the largest calculations presented here, molecules with more than 700 atoms and cluster models with more than 50 metal centers were employed. In all the studied cases, very good to excellent agreement with experiment is obtained. It will be shown that the PNO-ROCIS method provides an unprecedented performance of wave-function-based methods in the field of computational X-ray spectroscopy.

  17. Anisotropic ray trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  18. Introduction to 2D and 3D tomographic methods based on straight line propagation: X-ray, emission and ultrasonic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrin, F.; Magnin, I.; Garnero, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles of computerized tomography (CT), and its evolution towards three dimensional (3D) imaging. Since the modeling of CT reconstruction relies on the Radon transform, its definition and major properties are first recalled. After a brief summary on conventional 2D methods, we present the imaging principles for two modalities appropriated to this modeling: X-Ray and emission tomography. We describe the evolution of the instrumentation for these two techniques, and emphasize the approximations introduced by a modeling using the Radon transform taking into account the physics of the problem. We also describe the principles of ultrasonic tomography systems, and their major differences with the two previous techniques. At last, we formulate the general problematic of 3D image reconstruction from 2D projections. We consider four classes of reconstruction methods corresponding to the classification to the classification chosen for the synthetic presentation of methods, accompanying this paper. (authors)

  19. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems.

  20. Using X-Ray portable fluorescence for alloy contents measurement of steel pipe and optimization of Flow Accelerated Corrosion kinetic calculation with BRT-CICEROTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevin, Stephane; Moutrille, Marie-Pierre; Qiu, Gonghao; Miller, Cecile; Mellin, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    EDF has developed during these 15 last years a software called BRT-CICERO TM for the surveillance of the secondary piping system of its Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). This software enables the operator to calculate the FAC wear rates taking into account all the influencing parameters such as: pipe isometrics, chromium content of the steel, chemical conditioning and operating parameters of the secondary circuit (temperature, pressure, etc.). This is a major tool for the operators to organize the maintenance and to plan the inspections. In the framework of the French pressure vessel law issued on March 15, 2000, the software BRT-CICERO TM has been recognized by the French authority for the FAC surveillance on the secondary pressure piping lines of the EDF 58 NPPs. It takes advantage of the experience feedback of EDF's fleet, of the R and D improvements (especially from the laboratory tests conducted on EDF's CIROCO loop) and is frequently updated. Kinetics calculations made with BRT-CICERO TM are highly dependent of chromium, copper and molybdenum contents of steel. These values are measured on site by X-ray portable fluorescence. EDF elaborated a measurement procedure with a validation process and verification of the measurement devices using certified blocks standard. This procedure enables EDF and service provider companies to measure more than 6 thousand components per year. These values are input in BRT-CICERO TM and the flow accelerated corrosion kinetic is calculated with a higher accuracy than before alloy contents measurement. The next version of BRT-CICERO will take into account chromium, copper and molybdenum contents. The actual version is using only chromium contents. This paper describes the X-Ray fluorescence and the procedure used at EDF. The advantage and drawbacks of this technique are discussed. According to research and development studies, the future algorithm for FAC calculation with these 3 alloys contents is described. Because of

  1. Applying ISO 11929:2010 Standard to detection limit calculation in least-squares based multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectrum evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanisch, G., E-mail: guenter.kanisch@hanse.net

    2017-05-21

    The concepts of ISO 11929 (2010) are applied to evaluation of radionuclide activities from more complex multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectra. From net peak areas estimated by peak fitting, activities and their standard uncertainties are calculated by weighted linear least-squares method with an additional step, where uncertainties of the design matrix elements are taken into account. A numerical treatment of the standard's uncertainty function, based on ISO 11929 Annex C.5, leads to a procedure for deriving decision threshold and detection limit values. The methods shown allow resolving interferences between radionuclide activities also in case of calculating detection limits where they can improve the latter by including more than one gamma line per radionuclide. The co'mmon single nuclide weighted mean is extended to an interference-corrected (generalized) weighted mean, which, combined with the least-squares method, allows faster detection limit calculations. In addition, a new grouped uncertainty budget was inferred, which for each radionuclide gives uncertainty budgets from seven main variables, such as net count rates, peak efficiencies, gamma emission intensities and others; grouping refers to summation over lists of peaks per radionuclide.

  2. A conversion method of air-kerma from the primary, scatter and leakage radiations to ambient dose equivalent for calculating the mamography x-ray shielding barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, H.

    2005-01-01

    The primary, scatter, and leakage doses(in Gy), which constitute the data base for calculating shielding requirements for x-ray facilities, are often converted to the equivalent dose (in sievert) by using a constant of conversion of 1.145Sv/Gy. This constant is used for diagnostic radiology as well as for mammography spectra, and is derived by considering an exposure of 1 R corresponds to an air kerma of 8.73 m Gy, which renders by tradition an equivalent dose of 10 mSv. However, this conversion does not take into account the energy dependence of the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the equivalent dose as described in ICRU report. Moreover, current radiation protection standards propose the use of the quantity ambient dose equivalent in order to qualify the efficiently of given radiation shielding. Therefore, in this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation ambient dose equivalent from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to ambient dose equivalent for mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium (NMi), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and International Atomic Energy Agency (AIEA) laboratories. The calculation has been performed by the means of two methods which show a maximum deviation less than 10%2 for the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations. The results show that the conversion coefficients vary from 0.242 Sv/ Gy to 0.692 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.436 Sv/Gy for the primary and the scatter radiations, and form 0.156 Sv/Gy to 1.329 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.98 Sv/Gy for the leakage radiation. Simpkin et al. using an empirical approach propose a conversion value of 0.50 Sv/Gy for the mammography x-ray spectra. This value approximately coincides with the average conversion value of 0.436 Sv/Gy obtained in this work for

  3. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  4. Preparation for propagation and absorption experiments in MTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Hooper, E.B.; Meassick, S.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Stallard, B.W.

    1989-04-01

    Preparatory calculations of microwave transmission through the MTX access duct, propagation of the waves through the plasma and the resulting power deposition profile on a calorimeter located on the tokamak inside wall have been performed. The microwave transmission calculations include the relative phase slippage of waveguide modes in the duct to determine the spatial structure of the wavefront at the duct exist. Ray-tracing calculations show substantial spreading of the beam in the poloidal direction at densities above 1.5 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/, well within the range of the experiments. Initial experiments with low or high toroidal field (cyclotron resonance outside the plasma) will investigate both diffraction and refraction effects, without absorption. Estimates of the fractional absorption of the beam in the initial experiments with the cyclotron resonance at the plasma axis have also been made. 4 refs., 3 figs

  5. Part two: Error propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this chapter include a discussion of exact results as related to nuclear materials management and accounting in nuclear facilities; propagation of error for a single measured value; propagation of error for several measured values; error propagation for materials balances; and an application of error propagation to an example of uranium hexafluoride conversion process

  6. A tracking system to calculate patient skin dose in real-time during neurointerventional procedures using a biplane x-ray imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, V. K., E-mail: vkrana@buffalo.edu [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203 (United States); Rudin, S., E-mail: srudin@buffalo.edu; Bednarek, D. R., E-mail: bednarek@buffalo.edu [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, Departments of Radiology, Neurosurgery, Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Neurovascular interventional procedures using biplane fluoroscopic imaging systems can lead to increased risk of radiation-induced skin injuries. The authors developed a biplane dose tracking system (Biplane-DTS) to calculate the cumulative skin dose distribution from the frontal and lateral x-ray tubes and display it in real-time as a color-coded map on a 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the physician. The agreement of the calculated values with the dose measured on phantoms was evaluated. Methods: The Biplane-DTS consists of multiple components including 3D graphic models of the imaging system and patient, an interactive graphical user interface, a data acquisition module to collect geometry and exposure parameters, the computer graphics processing unit, and functions for determining which parts of the patient graphic skin surface are within the beam and for calculating dose. The dose is calculated to individual points on the patient graphic using premeasured calibration files of entrance skin dose per mAs including backscatter; corrections are applied for field area, distance from the focal spot and patient table and pad attenuation when appropriate. The agreement of the calculated patient skin dose and its spatial distribution with measured values was evaluated in 2D and 3D for simulated procedure conditions using a PMMA block phantom and an SK-150 head phantom, respectively. Dose values calculated by the Biplane-DTS were compared to the measurements made on the phantom surface with radiochromic film and a calibrated ionization chamber, which was also used to calibrate the DTS. The agreement with measurements was specifically evaluated with variation in kVp, gantry angle, and field size. Results: The dose tracking system that was developed is able to acquire data from the two x-ray gantries on a biplane imaging system and calculate the skin dose for each exposure pulse to those vertices of a patient graphic that are determined to be

  7. A tracking system to calculate patient skin dose in real-time during neurointerventional procedures using a biplane x-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, V. K.; Rudin, S.; Bednarek, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Neurovascular interventional procedures using biplane fluoroscopic imaging systems can lead to increased risk of radiation-induced skin injuries. The authors developed a biplane dose tracking system (Biplane-DTS) to calculate the cumulative skin dose distribution from the frontal and lateral x-ray tubes and display it in real-time as a color-coded map on a 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the physician. The agreement of the calculated values with the dose measured on phantoms was evaluated. Methods: The Biplane-DTS consists of multiple components including 3D graphic models of the imaging system and patient, an interactive graphical user interface, a data acquisition module to collect geometry and exposure parameters, the computer graphics processing unit, and functions for determining which parts of the patient graphic skin surface are within the beam and for calculating dose. The dose is calculated to individual points on the patient graphic using premeasured calibration files of entrance skin dose per mAs including backscatter; corrections are applied for field area, distance from the focal spot and patient table and pad attenuation when appropriate. The agreement of the calculated patient skin dose and its spatial distribution with measured values was evaluated in 2D and 3D for simulated procedure conditions using a PMMA block phantom and an SK-150 head phantom, respectively. Dose values calculated by the Biplane-DTS were compared to the measurements made on the phantom surface with radiochromic film and a calibrated ionization chamber, which was also used to calibrate the DTS. The agreement with measurements was specifically evaluated with variation in kVp, gantry angle, and field size. Results: The dose tracking system that was developed is able to acquire data from the two x-ray gantries on a biplane imaging system and calculate the skin dose for each exposure pulse to those vertices of a patient graphic that are determined to be

  8. GRAB - WRS system module number 60221 for calculating gamma-ray penetration in slab shields by the method of kernel integration with build-up factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.

    1978-06-01

    The WRS Modular Programming System has been developed as a means by which programmes may be more efficiently constructed, maintained and modified. In this system a module is a self-contained unit typically composed of one or more Fortran routines, and a programme is constructed from a number of such modules. This report describes one WRS module, the function of which is to calculate the gamma-ray flux, dose, or heating rate in a slab shield using the build-up factor method. The information given in this manual is of use both to the programmer wishing to incorporate the module in a programme, and to the user of such a programme. (author)

  9. Electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgCl4: DFT calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2016-10-01

    A high-quality single crystal of cesium mercury tetrabromide, Cs2HgCl4, was synthesized by using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method and its electronic structure was studied from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. In particular, X-ray photoelectron spectra were measured for both pristine and Ar+ ion-bombarded Cs2HgCl4 single crystal surfaces. The present XPS measurements indicate that the Cs2HgCl4 single crystal surface is sensitive with respect to Ar+ ion-bombardment: such a treatment changes substantially its elemental stoichiometry. With the aim of exploring total and partial densities of states within the valence band and conduction band regions of the Cs2HgCl4 compound, band-structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) using the augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + lo) method as incorporated within the WIEN2k package are performed. The calculations indicate that the Cl 3p states are the principal contributors in the upper portion of the valence band, while the Hg 5d and Cs 5p states dominate in its lower portion. In addition, the calculations allow for concluding that the unoccupied Cl p and Hg s states are the main contributors to the bottom of the conduction band. Furthermore, main optical characteristics of Cs2HgCl4, namely dispersion of the absorption coefficient, real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, electron energy-loss spectrum, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical reflectivity, are elucidated based on the DFT calculations.

  10. Characterizing the Solvated Structure of Photoexcited [Os(terpy2]2+ with X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the geometric and electronic structures of individual photoexcited dye molecules in solution is an important step towards understanding the interfacial properties of photo-active electrodes. The broad family of “red sensitizers” based on osmium(II polypyridyl compounds often undergoes small photo-induced structural changes which are challenging to characterize. In this work, X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution is employed to determine the geometric and electronic structures of the photoexcited triplet state of [Os(terpy2]2+ (terpy: 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine solvated in methanol. From the EXAFS analysis, the structural changes can be characterized by a slight overall expansion of the first coordination shell [OsN6]. DFT calculations supports the XTA results. They also provide additional information about the nature of the molecular orbitals that contribute to the optical spectrum (with TD-DFT and the near-edge region of the X-ray spectra.

  11. Electronic structure of Ti4Fe2Ox as determined from first-principles APW + LO calculations and X-ray spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrentyev, A.A.; Gabrelian, B.V.; Shkumat, P.N.; Nikiforov, I.Ya.; Zavaliy, I.Yu.; Sinelnichenko, A.K.; Izvekov, A.V.; Khyzhun, O.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic properties of Ti 4 Fe 2 O oxide, a very promising hydrogen-storage material, were studied both from theoretical and experimental points of view employing the first-principles band-structure augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + LO) method with the WIEN2k code as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES). Total and partial densities of states of the constituent atoms of Ti 4 Fe 2 O have been derived from the APW + LO calculations. The XPS valence-band spectra as well as the SXES Ti Lα, Fe Lα and O Kα bands have been measured for a series of Ti 4 Fe 2 O x oxides (x = 1.0, 0.5, and 0.25). The present APW + LO calculations reveal that, the O 2p-like states are the dominant contributors into the bottom of the valence band, whilst the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band of Ti 4 Fe 2 O are dominated by contributions of the Fe 3d- and Ti 3d-like states. The APW + LO results are confirmed experimentally by a comparison on a common energy scale of the XPS valence-band spectra and the SXES Ti Lα, Fe Lα and O Kα bands of the Ti 4 Fe 2 O x oxides. The XPS Ti 2p, Fe 2p and O 1s core-level binding energies have been measured for the compounds under consideration.

  12. Study of lower hybrid wave propagation and absorption in a tokamak plasma using hard X-Ray tomography; Etude de la propagation et de l'absorption de l'onde hybride dans un plasma de tokamak par tomographie X haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbeaux, F

    1999-09-22

    Control of the current density profile is a critical issue in view to obtain high fusion performances in tokamak plasmas? It is therefore important to be able to control the power deposition profile of the lower hybrid wave, which has the highest current drive efficiency among all other non-inductive additional methods. Propagation and absorption of this wave are investigated in the Tore Supra tokamak using a new hard x-ray tomographic system and a new ray-tracing/Fokker-Planck code. These tools are described in detail and allow to analyse the lower hybrid power deposition profile dependence as a function of various plasma parameters (density, magnetic field, current) and of the injected wave spectrum. A good agreement between the code and the measurements found when the central electron temperature is greater than about 3 keV, that is in regimes where the wave undergoes only a few reflections before being absorbed. The simulations are then used to interpret the experimental trends. The lower hybrid power deposition profile is in nearly all discharges localised at a normalised minor radius of 0.2-0.3, and is weakly sensitive to variations of plasma parameters. It is hence difficult to perform an efficient control of the current profile generated by the lower hybrid wave in Tore Supra. This goal may nevertheless be reached by using an original method, which uses an auxiliary lower hybrid wave injected by a vertical port of the torus. This method is investigated by means of the simulation code. (author)

  13. Reduction of radiation risks in patients undergoing some X-ray examinations by using optimal projections: A Monte Carlo program-based mathematical calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chaparian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper were calculation and comparison of the effective doses, the risks of exposure-induced cancer, and dose reduction in the gonads for male and female patients in different projections of some X-ray examinations. Radiographies of lumbar spine [in the eight projections of anteroposterior (AP, posteroanterior (PA, right lateral (RLAT, left lateral (LLAT, right anterior-posterior oblique (RAO, left anterior-posterior oblique (LAO, right posterior-anterior oblique (RPO, and left posterior-anterior oblique (LPO], abdomen (in the two projections of AP and PA, and pelvis (in the two projections of AP and PA were investigated. A solid-state dosimeter was used for the measuring of the entrance skin exposure. A Monte Carlo program was used for calculation of effective doses, the risks of radiation-induced cancer, and doses to the gonads related to the different projections. Results of this study showed that PA projection of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis radiographies caused 50%-57% lower effective doses than AP projection and 50%-60% reduction in radiation risks. Also use of LAO projection of lumbar spine X-ray examination caused 53% lower effective dose than RPO projection and 56% and 63% reduction in radiation risk for male and female, respectively, and RAO projection caused 28% lower effective dose than LPO projection and 52% and 39% reduction in radiation risk for males and females, respectively. About dose reduction in the gonads, using of the PA position rather than AP in the radiographies of the abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis can result in reduction of the ovaries doses in women, 38%, 31%, and 25%, respectively and reduction of the testicles doses in males, 76%, 86%, and 94%, respectively. Also for oblique projections of lumbar spine X-ray examination, with employment of LAO rather than RPO and also RAO rather than LPO, demonstrated 22% and 13% reductions to the ovaries doses and 66% and 54% reductions in the

  14. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ionization scheme is used to ionize atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere. This scheme utilizes 130 nm light plus three IR lasers to excite and then ionize atomic oxygen. The limiting factor for the channel strength is the energy of the 130 nm laser, which is assumed to be 1.6 mJ for BOLT. At a fixed laser energy and altitude (fixing the density of atomic oxygen), the range can be varied by adjusting the laser tuning, resulting in a neutralization fraction axial profile of the form: f(z) = f(sub 0) e(exp minus z)/R, where R is the range. In this paper we consider the propagation of the BOLT beam and calculate the range of the electron beam taking into account the fact that the erosion rates (magnetic and inductive) vary with beam length as the beam and channel dynamically respond to sausage and hose instabilities.

  15. The T2 phase in the Nb–Si–B system studied by ab initio calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, J.-M.; Colinet, C.; Rodrigues, G.; Suzuki, P.A.; Nunes, C.A.; Coelho, G.C.; Tedenac, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The solid solution based on Nb 5 Si 3 (Cr 5 B 3 structure type, D8 l , tI32, I4/mcm, No140, a=6.5767 Å, c=11.8967 Å) in the Nb–Si–B system was studied from the structural and thermodynamic point of view both experimentally and by ab initio calculations. Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray synchrotron data allowed to determine the boron to silicon substitution mechanism and the structural parameters. Ab initio calculations of different ordered compounds and selected disordered alloys allowed to obtain in addition to the enthalpy of formation of the solution, substitution mechanism and structural parameters which are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The stability of the phase is discussed. - Graphial abstract: Valence-charge electron localization function in the z=0 plane of the D8 l structure for the ordered compound Nb 5 SiB 2 . Highlights: ► Coupling between ab initio data and experimental results from synchrotron powder diffraction. ► Excellent agreement between the two techniques for the site occupancies and internal coordinates. ► Explanation of the phase stability up to Nb 5 SiB 2 .

  16. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

  17. The Effect of Material Homogenization in Calculating the Gamma-Ray dose from Spent PWR Fuel Pins in an Air Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TH Trumbull

    2005-01-01

    The effect of material homogenization on the calculated dose rate was studied for several arrangements of typical PWR spent fuel pins in an air medium using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP. The models analyzed increased in geometric complexity, beginning with a single fuel pin, progressing to ''small'' lattices, i.e., 3x3, 5x5, 7x7 fuel pins, and culminating with a full 17x17 pin PWR bundle analysis. The fuel pin dimensions and compositions were taken directly from a previous study and efforts were made to parallel this study by specifying identical flux-to-dose functions and gamma-ray source spectra. The analysis shows two competing components to the overall effect of material homogenization on calculated dose rate. Homogenization of pin lattices tends to lower the effect of radiation ''channeling'' but increase the effect of ''source redistribution.'' Depending on the size of the lattice and location of the detectors, the net effect of material homogenization on dose rate can be insignificant or range from a 6% decrease to a 35% increase relative to the detailed geometry model

  18. Crystal and electronic structures of pentacene thin films from grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction and first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabok, Dmitrii; Puschnig, Peter; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia; Werzer, Oliver; Resel, Roland; Smilgies, Detlef-M.

    2007-01-01

    Combined experimental and theoretical investigations on thin films of pentacene are performed in order to determine the structure of the pentacene thin film phase. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction is used for studying a pentacene thin film with a nominal thickness of 180 nm. The crystal structure is found to exhibit the lattice parameters a=0.592 nm, b=0.754 nm, c=1.563 nm, α=81.5 deg. , β=87.2 deg. , and γ=89.9 deg. . These crystallographic unit cell dimensions are used as the only input parameters for ab initio total-energy calculations within the framework of density functional theory revealing the molecular packing within the crystal structure. Moreover, we calculate the electronic band structure of the thin film phase and compare it to that of the bulk phase. We find the intermolecular bandwidths of the thin film phase to be significantly larger compared to the bulk structure, e.g., the valence bandwidth is twice as large. This remarkable effect is traced back to an enhanced intermolecular π-π overlap due to the upright standing molecules in the thin film phase

  19. Enhanced Adsorption of p-Arsanilic Acid from Water by Amine-Modified UiO-67 as Examined Using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chen; Zhao, Jian; Ou, Xinwen; Wan, Jieting; Cai, Yuepeng; Lin, Zhang; Dang, Zhi; Xing, Baoshan

    2018-03-20

    p-Arsanilic acid ( p-ASA) is an emerging organoarsenic pollutant comprising both inorganic and organic moieties. For the efficient removal of p-ASA, adsorbents with high adsorption affinity are urgently needed. Herein, amine-modified UiO-67 (UiO-67-NH 2 ) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized, and their adsorption affinities toward p-ASA were 2 times higher than that of the pristine UiO-67. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculation results revealed adsorption through a combination of As-O-Zr coordination, hydrogen bonding, and π-π stacking, among which As-O-Zr coordination was the dominant force. Amine groups played a significant role in enhancing the adsorption affinity through strengthening the As-O-Zr coordination and π-π stacking, as well as forming new adsorption sites via hydrogen bonding. UiO-67-NH 2 s could remove p-ASA at low concentrations (<5 mg L -1 ) in simulated natural and wastewaters to an arsenic level lower than that of the drinking water standard of World Health Organization (WHO) and the surface water standard of China, respectively. This work provided an emerging and promising method to increase the adsorption affinity of MOFs toward pollutants containing both organic and inorganic moieties, via modifying functional groups based on the pollutant structure to achieve synergistic adsorption effect.

  20. Propagation engineering in radio links design

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Propagation Engineering in Radio Link Design covers the basic principles of radiowaves propagation in a practical manner.  This fundamental understanding enables the readers to design radio links efficiently. This book elaborates on new achievements as well as recently developed propagation models.  This is in addition to a comprehensive overview of fundamentals of propagation in various scenarios. It examines theoretical calculations, approaches and applied procedures needed for radio links design. The authors study and analysis of the main propagation phenomena and its mechanisms based on the recommendations of International Telecommunications Union, (ITU). The book has been organized in 9 chapters and examines the role of antennas and passive reflectors in radio services, propagation mechanisms related to radar, satellite, short distance, broadcasting and trans-horizon radio links, with two chapters devoted to radio noise and main  parameters of radio link design. The book presents some 278 illustration...

  1. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution

  2. Wavefront propagation from one plane to another with the use of Zernike polynomials and Taylor monomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guang-ming; Campbell, Charles E; Chen, Li; Zhao, Huawei; Chernyak, Dimitri

    2009-01-20

    In wavefront-driven vision correction, ocular aberrations are often measured on the pupil plane and the correction is applied on a different plane. The problem with this practice is that any changes undergone by the wavefront as it propagates between planes are not currently included in devising customized vision correction. With some valid approximations, we have developed an analytical foundation based on geometric optics in which Zernike polynomials are used to characterize the propagation of the wavefront from one plane to another. Both the boundary and the magnitude of the wavefront change after the propagation. Taylor monomials were used to realize the propagation because of their simple form for this purpose. The method we developed to identify changes in low-order aberrations was verified with the classical vertex correction formula. The method we developed to identify changes in high-order aberrations was verified with ZEMAX ray-tracing software. Although the method may not be valid for highly irregular wavefronts and it was only proven for wavefronts with low-order or high-order aberrations, our analysis showed that changes in the propagating wavefront are significant and should, therefore, be included in calculating vision correction. This new approach could be of major significance in calculating wavefront-driven vision correction whether by refractive surgery, contact lenses, intraocular lenses, or spectacles.

  3. Anisotropic lattice thermal expansion of PbFeBO4: A study by X-ray and neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murshed, M. Mangir; Mendive, Cecilia B.; Curti, Mariano; Nénert, Gwilherm; Kalita, Patricia E.; Lipinska, Kris; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Huq, Ashfia; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mullite-type PbFeBO 4 shows uni-axial negative coefficient of thermal expansion. • Anisotropic thermal expansion of the metric parameters was modeled using modified Grüneisen approximation. • The model includes harmonic, quasi-harmonic and intrinsic anharmonic contributions to the internal energy. • DFT calculation, temperature- and pressure-dependent Raman spectra help understand the phonon decay and associated anharmonicity. - Abstract: The lattice thermal expansion of mullite-type PbFeBO 4 is presented in this study. The thermal expansion coefficients of the metric parameters were obtained from composite data collected from temperature-dependent neutron and X-ray powder diffraction between 10 K and 700 K. The volume thermal expansion was modeled using extended Grüneisen first-order approximation to the zero-pressure equation of state. The additive frame of the model includes harmonic, quasi-harmonic and intrinsic anharmonic potentials to describe the change of the internal energy as a function of temperature. The unit-cell volume at zero-pressure and 0 K was optimized during the DFT simulations. Harmonic frequencies of the optical Raman modes at the Γ-point of the Brillouin zone at 0 K were also calculated by DFT, which help to assign and crosscheck the experimental frequencies. The low-temperature Raman spectra showed significant anomaly in the antiferromagnetic regions, leading to softening or hardening of some phonons. Selected modes were analyzed using a modified Klemens model. The shift of the frequencies and the broadening of the line-widths helped to understand the anharmonic vibrational behaviors of the PbO 4 , FeO 6 and BO 3 polyhedra as a function of temperature

  4. Time-dependent wave front propagation simulation of a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit: Towards a measurement of the temporal coherence properties of x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL a split-and-delay unit based on geometrical wavefront beam splitting and multilayer mirrors is built which covers the range of photon energies from 5 keV up to 20 keV. Maximum delays between Δτ=±2.5  ps at hν=20  keV and up to Δτ=±23  ps at hν=5  keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations have been performed by means of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop software for XFEL pulses at hν=5  keV. The XFEL radiation was simulated using results of time-dependent simulations applying the self-amplified spontaneous emission code FAST. Main features of the optical layout, including diffraction on the beam splitter edge and optics imperfections measured with a nanometer optic component measuring machine slope measuring profiler, were taken into account. The impact of these effects on the characterization of the temporal properties of XFEL pulses is analyzed. An approach based on fast Fourier transformation allows for the evaluation of the temporal coherence despite large wavefront distortions caused by the optics imperfections. In this way, the fringes resulting from time-dependent two-beam interference can be filtered and evaluated yielding a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.187  fs (HWHM for real, nonperfect mirrors, while for ideal mirrors a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.191  fs (HWHM is expected.

  5. Probable approaches to develop particle beam energy drivers and to calculate wall material ablation with X ray radiation from imploded targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuya, K.; Funatsu, M.; Saitoh, S.

    2001-01-01

    The first subject was the development of future ion beam driver with medium-mass ion specie. This may enable us to develop a compromised driver from the point of view of the micro-divergence angle and the cost. We produced nitrogen ion beams, and measured the micro-divergence angle on the anode surface. The measured value was 5-6mrad for the above beam with 300-400keV energy, 300A peak current and 50ns duration. This value was enough small and tolerable for the future energy driver. The corresponding value for the proton beam with higher peak current was 20-30mrad, which was too large. So that, the scale-up experiment with the above kind of medium-mass ion beam must be realized urgently to clarify the beam characteristics in more details. The reactor wall ablation with the implosion X-ray was also calculated as the second subject in this paper. (author)

  6. Lattice dynamics at high pressure: application of inelastic X-ray scattering and ab-initio calculations -MgO at 35 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, Subrata

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Until recently, inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been extensively used to study the phonon dispersion throughout the Brillouin zone and phonon density of states in crystalline materials. The weak interaction of neutrons with matter and the typical size of the neutron beams require the use of cm-size single crystals that puts an upper limit to the measurement of phonon dispersion at high pressure to about 10-15 Gpa by INS. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) using third generation synchrotron sources now makes it possible to measure the phonon dispersion at high pressures up to 50 GP A in crystals tens of microns in size mounted in a diamond-anvil cell, usually using He as the pressure transmitting medium. We have used this technique to measure the longitudinal acoustic and optic phonon branches of MgO along the Γ-X direction at 35 Gpa. The experimentally observed phonon-branches are in remarkable agreement with ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations using the density-functional perturbation theory. The derived thermodynamic properties, such as specific heat and the entropy are in very good agreement with values obtained from a thermodynamically assessed data set

  7. Monte-Carlo method applied to the energy loss calculation of the gamma rays isotropic flux in the NaI(tau l) cylindrical scintillator between 0.5-20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.M.; Dutra, S.L.G.; Palmeira, R.A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the 'Monte Carlo' method, a determination was made of the response function of a NaI cylindrical crystal when exposed to an omnidirectional γ ray flux in the range 0.5 - 20 MeV. Improvements over previous similar calculations include considerations of the bremsstrahlung and multiple scattering processes in the slowing down of the secondary electrons. These calculations will be applied to the problem of determining the energy spectrum of an incident gamma ray flux from the measured response of the crystal in the space [pt

  8. Calculation of heat balance considering the reflection, refraction of incident ray and salt diffusion on solar pad; Hikari no hansha kussetsu oyobi shio no kakusan wo koryoshita solar pond no netsukeisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanayama, K; Li, X; Baba, H; Endo, N [Kitami Institute of Technology, (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    In calculating heat balance of solar pond, calculation was made considering things except quality of the incident ray and physical properties of pond water which were conventionally considered. The real optical path length was determined from the reflection ratio of ray on the water surface based on the refraction ratio of pond water and the locus of water transmitted ray in order to calculate a total transmission rate. The rate of absorption of monochromatic lights composing of solar light in their going through the media is different by wavelength, and therefore, calculation was made in each monochromatic light. As to four kinds of salt water solution, NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2, these phenomena seen in solar pond are taken in, and a total transmission rate based on reality can be calculated by the wavelength integration method. Moreover, in the salt gradient layer, there are gradients in both concentration and temperature, and thermal physical values of each layer change. Accordingly, mass transfer and thermal transfer by both gradients were considered at the same time. An analytic solution was introduced which analyzes salt diffusion in the temperature field in the gradient layer and determines the concentration distribution. By these, concentration and physical values of each layer were calculated according to phenomena, and thermal balance of each layer of the solar pond was able to be accurately calculated. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Drainage and impregnation capillary pressure curves calculated by the X-ray CT model of Berea sandstone using Lattice Boltzmann's method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirov, T.; Galeev, A.; Khramchenkov, M.

    2018-05-01

    The study deals with the features of the technique for simulating the capillary pressure curves of porous media on their X-ray microtomographic images. The results of a computational experiment on the immiscible displacement of an incompressible fluid by another in the pore space represented by a digital image of the Berea sandstone are presented. For the mathematical description of two-phase fluid flow we use Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBM), and phenomena at the fluids interface are described by the color-gradient model. Compared with laboratory studies, the evaluation of capillary pressure based on the results of a computational filtration experiment is a non-destructive method and has a number of advantages: the absence of labor for preparation of fluids and core; the possibility of modeling on the scale of very small core fragments (several mm), which is difficult to realize under experimental conditions; three-dimensional visualization of the dynamics of filling the pore space with a displacing fluid during drainage and impregnation; the possibility of carrying out multivariate calculations for specified parameters of multiphase flow (density and viscosity of fluids, surface tension, wetting contact angle). A satisfactory agreement of the capillary pressure curves during drainage with experimental results was obtained. It is revealed that with the increase in the volume of the digital image, the relative deviation of the calculated and laboratory data decreases and for cubic digital cores larger than 1 mm it does not exceed 5%. The behavior of the non-wetting fluid flow during drainage is illustrated. It is shown that flow regimes under which computational and laboratory experiments are performed the distribution of the injected phase in directions different from the gradient of the hydrodynamic drop, including the opposite ones, is characteristic. Experimentally confirmed regularities are obtained when carrying out calculations for drainage and imbibition at

  10. Cosmic Ray Background Analysis For A Cargo Container Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensslin, Norbert; Geist, W.H.; Lestone, J.P.; Mayo, D.R.; Menlove, Howard O.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new model for calculating the expected yield of cosmic-ray spallation neutrons in a Cargo Container Counter, and we have benchmarked the model against measurements made with several existing large neutron counters. We also developed two versions of a new measurement uncertainty prediction code based on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. The codes calculate the minimum detectability limit for the Cargo Container Counter for either neutron singles or doubles counting, and also propagate the uncertainties associated with efficiency normalization flux monitors and cosmic ray flux monitors. This paper will describe the physics basis for this analysis, and the results obtained for several different counter designs.

  11. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  12. One-Photon Absorption Properties from a Hybrid Polarizable Density Embedding/Complex Polarization Propagator Approach for Polarizable Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hršak, Dalibor; Nørby, Morten Steen; Coriani, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    We present a formulation of the polarizable density embedding (PDE) method in combination with the complex polarization propagator (CPP) method for the calculation of absorption spectra of molecules in solutions. The method is particularly useful for the calculation of near-edge X-ray absorption...... fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. We compare the performance of PDE-CPP with the previously formulated polarizable embedding (PE)-CPP model for the calculation of the NEXAFS spectra of adenine, formamide, glycine, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in water at the carbon and nitrogen K-edges, as well...

  13. Comic ray flux anisotropies caused by astrospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, K.; Strauss, R. D.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Fichtner, H.

    2016-09-01

    Huge astrospheres or stellar wind bubbles influence the propagation of cosmic rays at energies up to the TeV range and can act as small-scale sinks decreasing the cosmic ray flux. We model such a sink (in 2D) by a sphere of radius 10 pc embedded within a sphere of a radius of 1 kpc. The cosmic ray flux is calculated by means of backward stochastic differential equations from an observer, which is located at r0, to the outer boundary. It turns out that such small-scale sinks can influence the cosmic ray flux at the observer's location by a few permille (i.e. a few 0.1%), which is in the range of the observations by IceCube, Milagro and other large area telescopes.

  14. Calculation of cross sections of discrete γ rays production in the (n,n'γ) reaction on chromium and nickel with neutron energy up to 10MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, B.

    1975-01-01

    Cross-sections for the production of de-excitation γ rays following inelastic neutron scattering have been calculated, using the statistical model, and are given for natural chromium and nickel for neutron incident energy up to 10MeV [fr

  15. DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY AND CALCULATED FRAX RISK SCORES MAY UNDERESTIMATE OSTEOPOROTIC FRACTURE RISK IN VITAMIN D-DEFICIENT VETERANS WITH HIV INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Kelly I; Rubinsztain, Leon; Payan, John; Rentsch, Chris; Rimland, David; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the utility of the World Health Organization (WHO) Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) in assessing fracture risk in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and vitamin D deficiency. This was a retrospective study of HIV-infected patients with co-existing vitamin D deficiency at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), and the 10-year fracture risk was calculated by the WHO FRAX algorithm. Two independent radiologists reviewed lateral chest radiographs for the presence of subclinical vertebral fractures. We identified 232 patients with HIV and vitamin D deficiency. Overall, 15.5% of patients met diagnostic criteria for osteoporosis on DEXA, and 58% had low BMD (T-score between -1 and -2.5). The median risk of any major osteoporotic and hip fracture by FRAX score was 1.45 and 0.10%, respectively. Subclinical vertebral fractures were detected in 46.6% of patients. Compared to those without fractures, those with fractures had similar prevalence of osteoporosis (15.3% versus 15.7%; P>.999), low BMD (53.2% versus 59.3%; P = .419), and similar FRAX hip scores (0.10% versus 0.10%; P = .412). While the FRAX major score was lower in the nonfracture group versus fracture group (1.30% versus 1.60%; P = .025), this was not clinically significant. We found a high prevalence of subclinical vertebral fractures among vitamin D-deficient HIV patients; however, DEXA and FRAX failed to predict those with fractures. Our results suggest that traditional screening tools for fragility fractures may not be applicable to this high-risk patient population.

  16. Propagation of synchrotron radiation through nanocapillary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjeoumikhov, A.; Bjeoumikhova, S.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Wedell, R.

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of synchrotron radiation through nanocapillary structures with channel sizes of 200 nm and periods in the micrometer size has been studied experimentally. It was shown that the propagation through individual capillary channels has a mode formation character. Furthermore it was shown that during the propagation through capillary channels the coherence of synchrotron radiation is partially conserved. Interference of beams propagating through different capillary channels is observed which leads to a periodically modulated distribution of the radiation intensity in a plane far from the exit of the structure. These investigations are of high relevance for the understanding of X-ray transmission through nanocapillaries and the appearance of wave properties at this size scale

  17. The structure of the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    The gluon propagator has been calculated for quenched QCD in the Landau gauge at {beta} = 6.0 for volumes 16{sup 3} x 48 and 32{sup 3} x 64, and at {beta} 6.2 for volume 24{sup 3} x 48. The large volume and different lattice spacings allow us to identify and minimise finite volume and finite lattice spacing artefacts. We also study the tensor structure of the gluon propagator, confirming that it obeys the lattice Landau gauge condition.

  18. Propagation Environment Assessment Using UAV Electromagnetic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    losses can be taken into account when calculating propagation losses. To correlate the data correctly, the measured received signal power must be...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In this thesis, we attempt to build a picture of local propagation conditions by measuring ...operators to choose the optimal settings for the maximum detection range of their radar and radio systems. We also investigate the measurement system

  19. Hybrid Model For Reverberant Indoor Radio Channels Using Rays and Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinböck, Gerhard; Gan, Mingming; Meissner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    efficient calculation of the channel transfer function considering infinitely many components. We use ray-tracing and the theory of room electromagnetics to obtain the parameter settings for the propagation graph. Thus the proposed hybrid model does not require new or additional parameters in comparison...... to ray-tracing. Simulation results show good agreement with measurements with respect to the inclusion of the diffuse tail in both the delay power spectrum and the azimuth delay power spectrum....

  20. Acceleration and propagation of cosmic radiation. Production, oscillation and detection of neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.-O.

    1987-06-01

    In recent years, the old problem of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation has become alive again, with the discovery of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, and with the first measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux, which appears to be higher than expected. I have shown that the new acceleration mechanism was slow and I have calculated the maximum energy that can be reached by particles accelerated in various astrophysical sites. I have also studied in detail a cosmic-ray propagation model which takes into account the antiproton measurements. Neutrino astronomy is a field much more recent and in rapid expansion, thanks to a convergence of interests between astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Several large neutrino detectors already exist; really huge ones are in project. I have studied the possible impact of the high energy (> 1 TeV) neutrino astronomy on models of cosmic-ray sources such as Cygnus X3. Comparing the low energy (∼ 10 MeV) cosmic-ray antineutrinos with other sources of neutrinos and antineutrinos (sun, supernova, earth...), I have pointed out that the antineutrino background resulting from all the nuclear power-stations of the planet was sizeable. This background is a nuisance for some astrophysical applications but could be useful for studies on vacuum or matter neutrino oscillations (MSW effect). I have also examined the MSW effect in another context: the travel through the earth of neutrinos from the supernova explosion SN1987a [fr

  1. Dressing the nucleon propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, S.; Gersten, A.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleon propagator in the ''nested bubbles'' approximation is analyzed. The approximation is built from the minimal set of diagrams which is needed to maintain the unitarity condition under two-pion production threshold in the two-nucleon Bethe--Salpeter equation. Recursive formulas for subsets of ''nested bubbles'' diagrams calculated in the framework of the pseudoscalar interaction are obtained by the use of dispersion relations. We prove that the sum of all the ''nested bubbles'' diverges. Moreover, the successive iterations are plagued with ghost poles. We prove that the first approximation--which is the so-called chain approximation--has ghost poles for any nonvanishing coupling constant. In an earlier paper we have shown that ghost poles lead to ghost cuts. These cuts are present in the ''nested bubbles.'' Ghost elimination procedures are discussed. Modifications of the ''nested bubbles'' approximation are introduced in order to obtain convergence and in order to eliminate the ghost poles and ghost cuts. In a similar way as in the Lee model, cutoff functions are introduced in order to eliminate the ghost poles. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the absence of ghost poles are formulated and analyzed. The spectral functions of the modified ''nested bubbles'' are analyzed and computed. Finally, we present a theorem, similar in its form to Levinson's theorem in scattering theory, which enables one to compute in a simple way the number of ghost poles

  2. Seismic tomography analysis using finite differential calculation of the eikonal equation and reciplocal principle; Eikonal equation no sabunkaiho to sohan genri wo riyoshita danseiha tomography kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, M; Ashida, Y; Watanabe, T; Sassa, K [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the seismic tomography analysis of underground structures using finite differential calculation (FDC) and a reciprocal principle which points out that a propagation path is constant even if a source and receiver are exchanged with each other. Tomography analysis generally determines a ray length across each underground cell structure by ray tracing method to modify each cell slowness (inverse of velocity). Travel time field was determined by FDC of eikonal equation among ray tracing methods, and a wave propagation path was determined by reciprocity of elastic wave to carry out inversion. In conventional methods, since a wave length is assumed to be infinitesimal by ray theory, false modified slowness structures frequently appears depending on the density of a ray. Wave propagates in a certain width, and is affected by environment. The slowness was thus modified on the basis of the wave propagation path with a certain width by using not ray-tracing but reciprocity. By this modification, false structures were hardly found under a fine grid, and several propagation paths could be considered. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Measured and calculated K-fluorescence effects on the MTF of an amorphous-selenium based CCD x-ray detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David M; Belev, George; Kasap, Safa; Yaffe, Martin J

    2012-02-01

    Theoretical reasoning suggests that direct conversion digital x-ray detectors based upon photoconductive amorphous-selenium (a-Se) could attain very high values of the MTF (modulation transfer function) at spatial frequencies well beyond 20 cycles mm(-1). One of the fundamental factors affecting resolution loss, particularly at x-ray energies just above the K-edge of selenium (12.66 keV), is the K-fluorescence reabsorption mechanism, wherein energy can be deposited in the detector at locations laterally displaced from the initial x-ray interaction site. This paper compares measured MTF changes above and below the Se K-edge of a CCD based a-Se x-ray detector with theoretical expectations. A prototype 25 μm sampling pitch (Nyquist frequency = 20 cycles mm(-1), 200 μm thick a-Se layer based x-ray detector, utilizing a specialized CCD readout device (200 × 400 area array), was used to make edge images with monochromatic x-rays above and below the K-edge of Se. A vacuum double crystal monochromator, exposed to polychromatic x-rays from a synchrotron, formed the monochromatic x-ray source. The monochromaticity of the x-rays was 99% or better. The presampling MTF was determined using the slanted edge method. The theory modeling the MTF performance of the detector includes the basic x-ray interaction physics in the a-Se layer as well as effects related to the operation of the CCD and charge trapping at a blocking layer present at the CCD/a-Se interface. The MTF performance of the prototype a-Se CCD was reduced from the theoretical value prescribed by the basic Se x-ray interaction physics, principally by the presence of a blocking layer. Nevertheless, the K-fluorescence reduction in the MTF was observed, approximately as predicted by theory. For the CCD prototype detector, at five cycles mm(-1), there was a 14% reduction of the MTF, from a value of 0.7 below the K-edge of Se, to 0.6 just above the K-edge. The MTF of an a-Se x-ray detector has been measured using

  4. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  5. Full-wave Simulations of LH Wave Propagation in Toroidal Plasma with non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, E.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Bonoli, P.T.; Wright, J.C.; Brambilla, M.

    2007-01-01

    The generation of energetic tails in the electron distribution function is intrinsic to lower-hybrid (LH) heating and current drive in weakly collisional magnetically confined plasma. The effects of these deformations on the RF deposition profile have previously been examined within the ray approximation. Recently, the calculation of full-wave propagation of LH waves in a thermal plasma has been accomplished using an adaptation of the TORIC code. Here, initial results are presented from TORIC simulations of LH propagation in a toroidal plasma with non-thermal electrons. The required efficient computation of the hot plasma dielectric tensor is accomplished using a technique previously demonstrated in full-wave simulations of ICRF propagation in plasma with non-thermal ions

  6. Simplified propagation of standard uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    An essential part of any measurement control program is adequate knowledge of the uncertainties of the measurement system standards. Only with an estimate of the standards'' uncertainties can one determine if the standard is adequate for its intended use or can one calculate the total uncertainty of the measurement process. Purchased standards usually have estimates of uncertainty on their certificates. However, when standards are prepared and characterized by a laboratory, variance propagation is required to estimate the uncertainty of the standard. Traditional variance propagation typically involves tedious use of partial derivatives, unfriendly software and the availability of statistical expertise. As a result, the uncertainty of prepared standards is often not determined or determined incorrectly. For situations meeting stated assumptions, easier shortcut methods of estimation are now available which eliminate the need for partial derivatives and require only a spreadsheet or calculator. A system of simplifying the calculations by dividing into subgroups of absolute and relative uncertainties is utilized. These methods also incorporate the International Standards Organization (ISO) concepts for combining systematic and random uncertainties as published in their Guide to the Expression of Measurement Uncertainty. Details of the simplified methods and examples of their use are included in the paper

  7. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals

  8. Spin factor and spinor structure of Dirac propagator in constant field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M.; Cruz, W. da [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Zlatev, S.I. [Sergipe Univ., Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    1996-06-01

    We use bosonic path integral representation of Dirac propagator with a spin factor to calculate the propagator in a constant uniform electromagnetic field. Such a way of calculation allows us to get the explicit spinor structure of the propagator in the case under consideration. The representation obtained differs from the Schwinger`s one but the equivalence can be checked. (author). 21 refs.

  9. Spin factor and spinor structure of Dirac propagator in constant field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Cruz, W. da; Zlatev, S.I.

    1996-01-01

    We use bosonic path integral representation of Dirac propagator with a spin factor to calculate the propagator in a constant uniform electromagnetic field. Such a way of calculation allows us to get the explicit spinor structure of the propagator in the case under consideration. The representation obtained differs from the Schwinger's one but the equivalence can be checked. (author). 21 refs

  10. Laser Beam and Resonator Calculations on Desktop Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumont, Jean-Luc

    There is a continuing interest in the design and calculation of laser resonators and optical beam propagation. In particular, recently, interest has increased in developing concepts such as one-sided unstable resonators, supergaussian reflectivity profiles, diode laser modes, beam quality concepts, mode competition, excess noise factors, and nonlinear Kerr lenses. To meet these calculation needs, I developed a general-purpose software package named PARAXIA ^{rm TM}, aimed at providing optical scientists and engineers with a set of powerful design and analysis tools that provide rapid and accurate results and are extremely easy to use. PARAXIA can handle separable paraxial optical systems in cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, including complex-valued and misaligned ray matrices, with full diffraction effects between apertures. It includes the following programs:. ABCD provides complex-valued ray-matrix and gaussian -mode analyses for arbitrary paraxial resonators and optical systems, including astigmatism and misalignment in each element. This program required that I generalize the theory of gaussian beam propagation to the case of an off-axis gaussian beam propagating through a misaligned, complex -valued ray matrix. FRESNEL uses FFT and FHT methods to propagate an arbitrary wavefront through an arbitrary paraxial optical system using Huygens' integral in rectangular or radial coordinates. The wavefront can be multiplied by an arbitrary mirror profile and/or saturable gain sheet on each successive propagation through the system. I used FRESNEL to design a one-sided negative-branch unstable resonator for a free -electron laser, and to show how a variable internal aperture influences the mode competition and beam quality in a stable cavity. VSOURCE implements the virtual source analysis to calculate eigenvalues and eigenmodes for unstable resonators with both circular and rectangular hard-edged mirrors (including misaligned rectangular systems). I used VSOURCE to

  11. Monte Carlo method for dose calculation due to oral X-rays; Coeficientes de conversao para calculo de doses devidos a radiografias odontologicas utilizando o metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    1998-06-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, especially in youngsters and children, calls for the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, a Monte Carlo code was adapted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM.FOR developed at the GSF-Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO.PAS). Good agreement between results obtained with both codes was observed. Irradiations of the incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone narrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the larger the field area, the higher the dose in assessed organs and tissues. The variation of the source-skin distance does not change the conversion coefficients. On the other hand, the increase in the voltage applied to the X-ray tube causes an increase in the calculated conversion coefficients. (author)

  12. Database for propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-07-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  13. Error propagation analysis for a sensor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeater, M.L.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Hawkins, J.; Wilkinson, J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a program to develop reliability methods for operational use with reactor sensors and protective systems, error propagation analyses are being made for each model. An example is a sensor system computer simulation model, in which the sensor system signature is convoluted with a reactor signature to show the effect of each in revealing or obscuring information contained in the other. The error propagation analysis models the system and signature uncertainties and sensitivities, whereas the simulation models the signatures and by extensive repetitions reveals the effect of errors in various reactor input or sensor response data. In the approach for the example presented, the errors accumulated by the signature (set of ''noise'' frequencies) are successively calculated as it is propagated stepwise through a system comprised of sensor and signal processing components. Additional modeling steps include a Fourier transform calculation to produce the usual power spectral density representation of the product signature, and some form of pattern recognition algorithm

  14. Study of gamma propagation by using the ZEUS mono-kinetic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnaud, Therese

    1969-10-01

    As studies of radiation protection often require the knowledge of heating due to capture gamma of thermal neutrons, the authors report an attempt of assessment of neutrons and γ propagation by using the same code (Zeus) which computes particle scattering by implementing a mono-kinetic Monte Carlo method. With this method, it is possible to study rather complex geometries and gamma source distributions directly obtained by a previous calculation of thermal neutrons. However, this method is not suitable for the study of energy degradation of gamma rays during their propagation. An approximate shock law is used to take shock-induced energy loss into account. This method is tested for different materials or media (either light like water and aluminium, or heavy like iron). Results are compared with those obtained by Goldstein with the method of moments. Results obtained by using Zeus are discussed: some of them appear to be over-estimated [fr

  15. Electron cyclotron heating calculations for ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinger, R.C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1986-03-01

    The RAYS geometrical optics code has been used to calculate electron cyclotron wave propagation and heating in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The intent of this work is to predict the outcome of various heating scenarios and to give guidance in designing an optimum heating system. Particular attention is paid to the effects of wave polarization and antenna location. We investigate first and second harmonic cyclotron heating with the parameters predicted for steady-state ATF operation. We also simulate the effect of wall reflections by calculating a uniform, isotropic flux of power radiating from the wall. These results, combined with the first-pass calculations, give a qualitative picture of the heat deposition profiles. From these results we identify the compromises that represent the optimum heating strategies for the ATF model considered here. Our basic conclusions are that second harmonic heating with the extraordinary mode (X-mode) gives the best result, with fundamental ordinary mode (O-mode) heating being slightly less efficient. Assuming the antenna location is restricted to the low magnetic field side, the antenna should be placed at phi = 0 0 (the toroidal angle where the helical coils are at the sides) for fundamental heating and at phi = 15 0 (where the helical coils are at the top and bottom) for second harmonic heating. These recommendations come directly from the ray tracing results as well as from a theoretical identification of the relevant factors affecting the heating

  16. Pulse Propagation on close conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, A

    2001-01-01

    The propagation and reflection of arbitrarily shaped pulses on non-dispersive parallel conductors of finite length with user defined cross section is simulated employing the discretized telegraph equation. The geometry of the system of conductors and the presence of dielectric material determine the capacities and inductances that enter the calculation. The values of these parameters are found using an iterative Laplace equation solving procedure and confirmed for certain calculable geometries including the line charge inside a box. The evolving pulses and the resulting crosstalk can be plotted at any instant and - in the Mathematica notebook version of this report - be looked at in an animation. As an example a differential pair of microstrips as used in the ATLAS vertex detector is analysed.

  17. Calculation of photonuclear process in the region of several tens MeV. Formulation of exact transition rate for high energy γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hiroaki; Harada, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    The electromagnetic field approximated by using long wave-length limit is not valid for heavy nuclear mass or high energy γ-ray transition. To examine the contribution of the electric multipole field that is neglected in long wave-length limit, we formulize the El transition rate for the strict electric multipole field and compare quantitatively this result with Weisskopf estimate. (author)

  18. EVIDENCE FOR ENHANCED {sup 3}HE IN FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES BASED ON NEW CALCULATIONS OF THE GAMMA-RAY LINE SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R. J. [Code 7650, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kozlovsky, B. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Share, G. H., E-mail: murphy@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: share@astro.umd.edu [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The {sup 3}He abundance in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events is enhanced up to several orders of magnitude compared to its photospheric value of [{sup 3}He]/[{sup 4}He] = 1–3 × 10{sup −4}. Interplanetary magnetic field and timing observations suggest that these events are related to solar flares. Observations of {sup 3}He in flare-accelerated ions would clarify the relationship between these two phenomena. Energetic {sup 3}He interactions in the solar atmosphere produce gamma-ray nuclear-deexcitation lines, both lines that are also produced by protons and α particles and lines that are essentially unique to {sup 3}He. Gamma-ray spectroscopy can, therefore, reveal enhanced levels of accelerated {sup 3}He. In this paper, we identify all significant deexcitation lines produced by {sup 3}He interactions in the solar atmosphere. We evaluate their production cross sections and incorporate them into our nuclear deexcitation-line code. We find that enhanced {sup 3}He can affect the entire gamma-ray spectrum. We identify gamma-ray line features for which the yield ratios depend dramatically on the {sup 3}He abundance. We determine the accelerated {sup 3}He/ α ratio by comparing these ratios with flux ratios measured previously from the gamma-ray spectrum obtained by summing the 19 strongest flares observed with the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma-Ray Spectrometer. All six flux ratios investigated show enhanced {sup 3}He, confirming earlier suggestions. The {sup 3}He/ α weighted mean of these new measurements ranges from 0.05 to 0.3 (depending on the assumed accelerated α /proton ratio) and has a <1 × 10{sup −3} probability of being consistent with the photospheric value. With the improved code, we can now exploit the full potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy to establish the relationship between flare-accelerated ions and {sup 3}He-rich SEPs.

  19. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  1. Fast propagation of electromagnetic fields through graded-index media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huiying; Zhang, Site; Shi, Rui; Hellmann, Christian; Wyrowski, Frank

    2018-04-01

    Graded-index (GRIN) media are widely used for modeling different situations: some components are designed considering GRIN modulation, e.g., multi-mode fibers, optical lenses, or acousto-optical modulators; on the other hand, there are other components where the refractive-index variation is undesired due to, e.g., stress or heating; and finally, some effects in nature are characterized by a GRIN variation, like turbulence in air or biological tissues. Modeling electromagnetic fields propagating in GRIN media is then of high importance for optical simulation and design. Though ray tracing can be used to evaluate some basic effects in GRIN media, the field properties are not considered and evaluated. The general physical optics techniques, like finite element method or finite difference time domain, can be used to calculate fields in GRIN media, but they need great numerical effort or may even be impractical for large-scale components. Therefore, there still exists a demand for a fast physical optics model of field propagation through GRIN media on a large scale, which will be explored in this paper.

  2. ORNL-SAS: Versatile software for calculation of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering intensity profiles from arbitrary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, William T; Tjioe, Elina

    2007-01-01

    ORNL-SAS is software for calculating solution small-angle scattering intensity profiles from any structure provided in the Protein Data Bank format and can also compare the results with experimental data

  3. Nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the linear and the nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave energy in an inhomogeneous plasma. The drift mode excited in such a plasma is dispersive in nature. The drift wave energy spreads out symmetrically along the direction of inhomogeneity with a finite group velocity. To study the effect of the nonlinear coupling on the propagation of energy in a collision free plasma, we solve the Hasegawa-Mima equation as a mixed initial boundary-value problem. The solutions of the linearized equation are used to check the reliability of our numerical calculations. Additional checks are also performed on the invariants of the system. Our results reveal that a pulse gets distorted as it propagates through the medium. The peak of the pulse propagates with a finite velocity that depends on the amplitude of the initial pulse. The polarity of propagation depends on the initial parameters of the pulse. We have also studied drift wave propagation in a resistive plasma. The Hasegawa-Wakatani equations are used to investigate this problem

  4. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in the plasma near electron cyclotron resonance: Undulator-induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, G.; Tushentsov, M.; Tokman, M.D.; Kryachko, A.

    2005-01-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma near the electron cyclotron frequency can be strongly modified by adding a weak magnetic undulator. For example, both right- and left-hand circularly polarized waves can propagate along the magnetic field without experiencing resonant absorption. This effect of entirely eliminating electron cyclotron heating is referred to as the undulator-induced transparency (UIT) of the plasma, and is the classical equivalent of the well-known quantum mechanical effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. The basics of UIT are reviewed, and various ways in which UIT can be utilized to achieve exotic propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in plasmas are discussed. For example, UIT can dramatically slow down the waves' group velocity, resulting in the extreme compression of the wave energy in the plasma. Compressed waves are polarized along the propagation direction, and can be used for synchronous electron or ion acceleration. Strong coupling between the two wave helicities are explored to impart the waves with high group velocities ∂ω/∂k for vanishing wave numbers k. Cross-helicity coupling for realistic density and magnetic field profiles are examined using a linearized fluid code, particle-in-cell simulations, and ray-tracing WKB calculations

  5. Large Charge-Transfer Energy in LiFePO4 Revealed by Full-Multiplet Calculation for the Fe L3 -edge Soft X-ray Emission Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Daisuke; Nanba, Yusuke; Makinose, Yuki; Matsuda, Hirofumi; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Hosono, Eiji

    2018-04-17

    We analyzed the Fe 3d electronic structure in LiFePO 4 /FePO 4 (LFP/FP) nanowire with a high cyclability by using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) combined with configuration-interaction full-multiplet (CIFM) calculation. The ex situ Fe L 2,3 -edge resonant XES (RXES) spectra for LFP and FP are ascribed to oxidation states of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ , respectively. CIFM calculations for Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ states reproduced the Fe L 3 RXES spectra for LFP and FP, respectively. In the calculations for both states, the charge-transfer energy was considerably larger than those for typical iron oxides, indicating very little electron transfer from the O 2p to Fe 3d orbitals and a weak hybridization on the Fe-O bond during the charge-discharge reactions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Swell propagation across a wide continental shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickson, Eric J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of wave refraction and damping on swell propagation across a wide continental shelf were examined with data from a transect of bottom pressure recorders extending from the beach to the shelf break near Duck, North Carolina. The observations generally show weak variations in swell energy across the shelf during benign conditions, in qualitative agreement with predictions of a spectral refraction model. Although the predicted ray trajectories are quite sensitive to the irregular she...

  7. Simplified chiral superfield propagators for chiral constant mass superfields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    Unconstrained superfield potentials are introduced to derive Feynman rules for chiral superfields following conventional procedure which is easy and instructive. Propagators for the case when the mass parameters are constant chiral superfields are derived. The propagators reported here are very simple compared to those available in literature and allow a manageable calculation of higher loops. (Author) [pt

  8. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  9. pySeismicFMM: Python based Travel Time Calculation in Regular 2D and 3D Grids in Cartesian and Geographic Coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde-Piorko, M.; Polkowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation final release of a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. Source code of pySeismicFMM will be published before Fall Meeting. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  10. The effect of basis set and exchange-correlation functional on time-dependent density functional theory calculations within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation of the x-ray emission spectroscopy of transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Ian P E; Besley, Nicholas A

    2016-03-21

    The simulation of X-ray emission spectra of transition metal complexes with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is investigated. X-ray emission spectra can be computed within TDDFT in conjunction with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation by using a reference determinant with a vacancy in the relevant core orbital, and these calculations can be performed using the frozen orbital approximation or with the relaxation of the orbitals of the intermediate core-ionised state included. Both standard exchange-correlation functionals and functionals specifically designed for X-ray emission spectroscopy are studied, and it is shown that the computed spectral band profiles are sensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used. The computed intensities of the spectral bands can be rationalised by considering the metal p orbital character of the valence molecular orbitals. To compute X-ray emission spectra with the correct energy scale allowing a direct comparison with experiment requires the relaxation of the core-ionised state to be included and the use of specifically designed functionals with increased amounts of Hartree-Fock exchange in conjunction with high quality basis sets. A range-corrected functional with increased Hartree-Fock exchange in the short range provides transition energies close to experiment and spectral band profiles that have a similar accuracy to those from standard functionals.

  11. Comparison of 2 accelerators of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, NVIDIA tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor: a case study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.; Xu, X.G.; Carothers, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing systems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER-CT(CPU), ARCHER-CT(GPU) and ARCHER-CT(COP) to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89-4.49 and 3.01-3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER-CT(CPU) running with 12 hyper-threads. (authors)

  12. Comparison of Two Accelerators for Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p Coprocessor: A Case Study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George; Carothers, Christopher D.

    2014-06-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing sys- tems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER - CTCPU, ARCHER - CTGPU and ARCHER - CTCOP to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89~4.49 and 3.01~3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER - CTCPU running with 12 hyperthreads.

  13. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  14. The Three-dimensional Spatial Distribution of Interstellar Gas in the Milky Way: Implications for Cosmic Rays and High-energy Gamma-ray Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannesson, Guđlaugur; Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2018-03-01

    Direct measurements of cosmic ray (CR) species combined with observations of their associated γ-ray emissions can be used to constrain models of CR propagation, trace the structure of the Galaxy, and search for signatures of new physics. The spatial density distribution of interstellar gas is a vital element for all these studies. So far, models have employed the 2D cylindrically symmetric geometry, but their accuracy is well behind that of the available data. In this paper, 3D spatial density models for neutral and molecular hydrogen are constructed based on empirical model fitting to gas line-survey data. The developed density models incorporate spiral arms and account for the warping of the disk, and the increasing gas scale height with radial distance from the Galactic center. They are employed together with the GALPROP CR propagation code to investigate how the new 3D gas models affect calculations of CR propagation and high-energy γ-ray intensity maps. The calculations reveal non-trivial features that are directly related to the new gas models. The best-fit values for propagation model parameters employing 3D gas models are presented and they differ significantly from those derived with the 2D gas density models that have been widely used. The combination of 3D CR and gas density models provide a more realistic basis for the interpretation of non-thermal emissions from the Galaxy.

  15. Steady-state propagation of interface corner crack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state propagation of interface cracks close to three-dimensional corners has been analyzed. Attention was focused on modeling the shape of the interface crack front and calculating the critical stress for steady-state propagation of the crack. The crack propagation was investigated...... on the finite element method with iterative adjustment of the crack front to estimate the critical delamination stresses as a function of the fracture criterion and corner angles. The implication of the results on the delamination is discussed in terms of crack front profiles and the critical stresses...... for propagation and the angle of intersection of the crack front with the free edge....

  16. Mechanism for propagation of the step leader of streak lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, A.I.; Zolotovskil, V.I.; Ivanovskil, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothetical scheme for the development of the step leader of streak lightning is discussed. The mathematical problem of modeling the propagation of the leader in this scheme is stated. The main parameters of the leader are estimated: the length and propagation velocity of the step, the average propagation velocity, etc. This is compared with data from observations in nature. The propagation of the leader is simulated numerically. Results of the calculation are presented for two 'flashes' of the step leader. 25 refs., 6 figs

  17. Propagation speed of gamma radiation in brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovich, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The propagation speed (PS) of visible light -represented by a short frequency range in the large frame of electromagnetic radiations (ER) frequencies- in air was measured during the last century, using a great deal of different methods, with high precision results being achieved. Presently, a well accepted value, with very small uncertainty, is c= 299,792.458 Km/s) (c reporting to the Latin word celeritas: 'speed swiftness'). When propagating in denser material media (MM), such value is always lower when compared to the air value, with the propagating MM density playing an important role. Until present, such studies focusing propagation speeds, refractive indexes, dispersions were specially related to visible light, or to ER in wavelengths ranges dose to it, and with a transparent MM. A first incursion in this subject dealing with γ-rays was performed using an electronic coincidence counting system, when the value of it's PS was measured in air, C γ(air) 298,300.15 Km/s; a method that went on with later electronic improvements. always in air. To perform such measurements the availability of a γ-radiation source in which two γ-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such a suitable source was the positron emitter 22 Na placed in a thin wall metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws - two gamma-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all the previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes. Presently, as an innovative improvement, were used BaF 2

  18. Analyzing the Propagation Behavior of a Gaussian Laser Beam through Seawater and Comparing with Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Dabbagh Kashani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of the beam propagation behavior through oceanic media is a challenging subject. In this paper, based on generalized Collins integral, the mean irradiance profile of Gaussian laser beam propagation through ocean is investigated. Power In Special Bucket (PIB is calculated. Using analytical expressions and calculating seawater transmission, the effects of absorption and scattering on beam propagation are studied. Based on these formulae, propagation in ocean and atmosphere are compared. The effects of some optical and environmental specifications, such as divergence angle and chlorophyll concentration in seawater on beam propagation by using mean irradiance, PIB and analytical formula of oceanic transmission are studied. The calculated results are shown graphically.

  19. Comparison of two accelerators for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, Nvidia Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor: A case study for X-ray CT imaging dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.; Xu, X.G.; Carothers, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo photon transport code ARCHER-CT for CT dose calculations is developed to execute on the GPU and coprocessor. • ARCHER-CT is verified against MCNP. • The GPU code on an Nvidia M2090 GPU is 5.15–5.81 times faster than the parallel CPU code on an Intel X5650 6-core CPU. • The coprocessor code on an Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor is 3.30–3.38 times faster than the CPU code. - Abstract: Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing systems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, Nvidia Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three components, ARCHER-CT CPU , ARCHER-CT GPU and ARCHER-CT COP designed to be run on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms are included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under user-specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agree well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It is found that all the code components are significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX run on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor codes are 5.15–5.81 and 3.30–3.38 times faster than the parallel ARCHER-CT CPU , respectively. The M2090 GPU performs better than the 5110p coprocessor in our specific test. Besides, the heterogeneous computation mode in which the CPU and the hardware accelerator work concurrently can increase the overall performance by 13–18%

  20. Uncertainty propagation in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommé, S.; Jerome, S.M.; Venchiarutti, C.

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty propagation formulae are presented for age dating in support of nuclear forensics. The age of radioactive material in this context refers to the time elapsed since a particular radionuclide was chemically separated from its decay product(s). The decay of the parent radionuclide and ingrowth of the daughter nuclide are governed by statistical decay laws. Mathematical equations allow calculation of the age of specific nuclear material through the atom ratio between parent and daughter nuclides, or through the activity ratio provided that the daughter nuclide is also unstable. The derivation of the uncertainty formulae of the age may present some difficulty to the user community and so the exact solutions, some approximations, a graphical representation and their interpretation are presented in this work. Typical nuclides of interest are actinides in the context of non-proliferation commitments. The uncertainty analysis is applied to a set of important parent–daughter pairs and the need for more precise half-life data is examined. - Highlights: • Uncertainty propagation formulae for age dating with nuclear chronometers. • Applied to parent–daughter pairs used in nuclear forensics. • Investigated need for better half-life data