WorldWideScience

Sample records for ray primary particles

  1. Primary cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the primary cosmic ray flux from the point of view of particle interactions and production of atmospheric neutrinos. The overall normalization of the cosmic ray flux and its time variations and site dependence are major ingredients of the atmospheric neutrino predictions and the basis for the derivation of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  2. Anomalous Distributions of Primary Cosmic Rays as Evidence for Time-dependent Particle Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yiran; Liu, Siming; Yuan, Qiang, E-mail: liusm@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-07-20

    Recent precise measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) spectra show that the energy distribution of protons is softer than those of heavier nuclei, and there are spectral hardenings for all nuclear compositions above ∼200 GV. Models proposed for these anomalies generally assume steady-state solutions of the particle acceleration process. We show that if the diffusion coefficient has a weak dependence on the particle rigidity near shock fronts of supernova remnants (SNRs), time-dependent solutions of the linear diffusive shock acceleration at two stages of SNR evolution can naturally account for these anomalies. The high-energy component of CRs is dominated by acceleration in the free expansion and adiabatic phases with enriched heavy elements and a high shock speed. The low-energy component may be attributed to acceleration by slow shocks propagating in dense molecular clouds with low metallicity in the radiative phase. Instead of a single power-law distribution, the spectra of time-dependent solutions soften gradually with the increase of energy, which may be responsible for the “knee” of CRs.

  3. The search for primary particle tracks in nucleon-nucleus interactions with gamma ray energy ΣEγ ≥ 3 TeV registered in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers using data of the RUNJOB experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayarnaya I.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the result of a retreatment of data from the RUNJOB (RUssia-Nippon JOint Balloon experiment of nucleon-nucleus interactions registered in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers (REC using a new method for searching and tracing of galactic particles in nuclear emulsions. In about halfcof these interactions (∼ 50 recorded in REC RUNJOB‘96-3B, RUNJOB‘97-6A and RUNJOB‘99-11A,B with energy released in the electromagnetic component ΣEγ ≥ 3 TeV and ΣEγ ≥ 5 TeV respectively, single charged particle tracks are not found within the search area defined individually by the particle track location accuracy. The absence of primary proton tracks is consistent with the original treatment of the RUNJOB experimental data. There is a difference in the zenith angular distribution for two groups of events in which a single charged particle track is observed or absent. The average penetration depth of the primary particles in REC to the interaction vertex in the zenith angle range from 60∘ to 79∘ differs by a factor two for these groups.

  4. One century of cosmic rays – A particle physicist's view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton Christine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  5. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  6. Particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    The accelerator based ion beam technique of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is discussed in some detail. This report pulls together all major reviews and references over the last ten years and reports on PIXE in vacuum and using external beams. The advantages, limitations, costs and types of studies that may be undertaken using an accelerator based ion beam technique such as PIXE, are also discussed. 25 refs., 7 tabs., 40 figs

  7. Cosmic ray particle dosimetry and trajectory tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruty, M.R.; Benton, E.V.; Turnbill, C.E.; Philpott, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    Five pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) were flown on Apollo XVII, each with a solid-state (plastic) nuclear track detector implanted beneath its scalp. The subscalp detectors were sensitive to HZE cosmic ray particles with a LET greater than or approximately equal to 0.15 million electron volts per micrometer (MeV/micron). A critical aspect of the dosimetry of the experiment involved tracing individual particle trajectories through each mouse head from particle tracks registered in the individual subscalp detectors, thereby establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a trajectory location in the tissue and the presence or absence of a lesion. The other major aspect was the identification of each registered particle. An average of 16 particles with Z greater than or equal to 6 and 2.2 particles with Z greater than or equal to 20 were found per detector. The track density, 29 tracks/sq cm, when adjusted for detection volume, was in agreement with the photographic emulsion data from an area dosimeter located next to the flight package

  8. Search for antimatter in primary cosmic rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.; Alvarez, L. W.; Wahlig, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Data from two flights of a new superconducting magnetic spectrometer are reported. This instrument was capable of a direct matter-antimatter separation in the cosmic rays. Antimatter events would appear in the spectrometer as trajectories which curve in the opposite direction to common matter, because of their negative charge. A brief description of the equipment and of the characteristics of the instrument is presented, along with the data processing techniques used. A new upper limit on the amount of antimatter in primary cosmic rays has been established. The limits are considerably lower than those for any previous experiment.

  9. Observation of superheavy primary cosmic ray nuclei with solid state track detectors and x-ray films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi; Hayashi, Takayoshi; Ito, Kensai; Yanagimachi, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Shigeru.

    1977-01-01

    The measurements of energy spectra and the nuclear charge distribution of superheavy nuclei heavier than iron in primary cosmic ray can provide information on the origin, propagation and life time of the cosmic ray. Since incident particles are in the region of relativistic velocity (the low energy cosmic ray below the cutoff energy is forbidden from entering), the charges of cosmic ray nuclei can be determined without knowing the energy of particles. The balloon-borne solid state track detector and plastic and X-ray films were employed for the detection of superheavy cosmic ray, and the five events were detected with the cellulose nitrate film. The flux of superheavy nuclei is predicted from the present analysis. (Yoshimori, M.)

  10. Corrosion particles in the primary coolant of VVER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, N.; Molnar, Z.; Macsik, Z.; Szeles, E.; Hargittai, P.; Csordas, A.; Pinter, T.; Pinter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion and activity build-up processes are of major concern in ageing and life-extension of nuclear power reactors. Researches to study the migration of radioactive corrosion particles have been initiated at Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary in order to better understand the corrosion of the primary circuit surfaces, the transport and activation of the particles of corrosion origin and their deposition on in-core and out-of-core surfaces. Radioactive corrosion particles were collected from the primary coolant and the steam generator surfaces of the 4 reactor units and subjected to detailed microanalytical and radioanalytical investigations. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX) were used to study the morphology and the composition of the matrix elements in the particles and the deposited corrosion layers. Particles identified by SEM-EDX were re-located under optical microscope by means of a coordinate transformation algorithm and were separated with a micromanipulator for further studies. Activities of γ emitting radionuclides were determined by high resolution γ spectrometry, and those of β decaying isotopes were measured by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry after radiochemical processing. High sensitivity of the nuclear measuring techniques allowed us to determine the low activity concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides, i.e. 60 Co, 54 Mn, 63 Ni, 55 Fe in the individual particles. Finally, high resolution sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was applied to determine the ultralow concentrations of Co, Fe, Ni in the same particles. Specific activities of 60 Co/Co, 54 Mn/Fe, 55 Fe/Fe and 63 Ni/Ni were derived from the measured activity and concentration data. Specific activities of the radioactive corrosion products reveal the history of activity buildup processes in the particle. Typically, Fe-Cr-Ni oxide particles formed as a result of corrosion of the steel

  11. Composition of cosmic rays in the knee region of the primary energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das Gupta, U.

    1989-01-01

    The Soudan Surface-Underground Cosmic Ray Telescope is located at the Soudan iron mine in northern Minnesota. It consists of a coincidence arrangement of two detectors-one installed at the surface of the mine and the other located underground, at a vertical depth of 600 meters. Using such an arrangement, the energy and composition of a primary cosmic ray particle can be determined independently of one another. When a high energy cosmic ray enters the Earth's atmosphere, secondary particles are produced in successive interactions, creating an extensive air shower. Using the surface detector, the number of particles in the shower at the surface of the Earth can be counted and the energy of the primary particle estimated. Of all the particles that are created in a cosmic ray air shower, only the energetic muons are able to penetrate underground. The separations of the muons below ground are measured by the Soudan 1 detector and this serves as an indicator of the type of nucleus that initiated the shower. The Soudan surface-underground detector is sensitive to primary cosmic rays of energies between 10 14 and 10 18 eV. The data from the experiment were compared to the predictions of various cosmic ray composition models, within this energy range. The data supported a composition model that was proton dominated up to the highest energies measured. There was no indication of a shift in the composition towards heavier primaries as would be expected on the basis of some models

  12. Latest AMS Results on elementary particles in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounine, Andrei; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a particle physics detector collecting data on the International Space Station since May 2011. Precision measurements of all elementary charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using a data sample of 85 billion cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations on the Station. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of the elementary cosmic ray particles are presented. They show unique features that require accurate theoretical interpretation as to their origin, be it from dark matter collisions or new astrophysical sources. On behalf of the AMS Collaboration.

  13. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Klimont, Zbigniew; Visschedijk, Antoon; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Amann, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa), coke production (Russia and China), and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation) scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol-cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response to tightening

  14. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas–Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa, coke production (Russia and China, and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol–cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response

  15. Back-tracking of primary particle trajectories for muons detected at the Earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutenko, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth allow to derive information of applied character on the conditions of the interplanetary magnetic field and of the geomagnetic field. For this purpose, it is necessary to collate trajectories of particles detected in the ground-based detector to trajectories of primary cosmic rays in the heliosphere. This problem is solved by means of various back-tracking methods. In this work, one of such methods is presented.

  16. Back-tracking of primary particle trajectories for muons detected at the Earth surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutenko, V V

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth allow to derive information of applied character on the conditions of the interplanetary magnetic field and of the geomagnetic field. For this purpose, it is necessary to collate trajectories of particles detected in the ground-based detector to trajectories of primary cosmic rays in the heliosphere. This problem is solved by means of various back-tracking methods. In this work, one of such methods is presented. (paper)

  17. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  18. Cosmic-ray antimatter - A primary origin hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the possibility that the observed cosmic-ray protons are of primary extragalactic origin, taking into account the significance of the current antiproton data. Attention is given to questions regarding primary antiprotons, antihelium fluxes, and the propagation of extragalactic cosmic rays. It is concluded that the primary origin hypothesis should be considered as a serious alternative explanation for the cosmic-ray antiproton fluxes. Such extragalactic primary origin can be considered in the context of a baryon symmetric domain cosmology. The fluxes and propagation characteristics suggested are found to be in rough agreement with the present antiproton data.

  19. Composition of primary cosmic rays near 10/sup 7/GeV from multiple underground muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamasco, L; D' Ettorre Piazzoli, B; Mannocchi, G [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1980-01-19

    The results on the rate of parallel penetrating particles at the Mt. Blanc Station (approximately 4300 hg.cm/sup -2/) compared with the predictions of the scaling model are in favour of a mean mass A approximately 10-30 for primary cosmic rays at >=10/sup 7/ GeV.

  20. Cosmic ray antimatter: Is it primary or secondary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1981-01-01

    The relative merits and difficulties of the primary and secondary origin hypotheses for the observed cosmic ray antiprotons, including the low energy measurement of Buffington, were examined. It is concluded that the cosmic ray antiproton data may be strong evidence for antimatter galaxies and baryon symmetric cosmology. The present antiproton data are consistent with a primary extragalactic component having antiproton/proton approximately equal to .0032 + or - 0.7.

  1. Cosmic ray muons and their associated shower particles underwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.N.

    1978-01-01

    The nucleonic contamination of the underwater cosmic ray muon flux is studied as a function of depth. Stacks of Ilford G-5 photographic emulsions were assembled and processed in an underground laboratory (9 hg/cm 2 below sea level). In between the assembly and the development they were exposed, stored in small pressure chambers, at various depths underwater for periods of time up to six months. At each depth approximately 10 cm 3 of emulsion were scanned for stopping particles and nuclear disintegrations. Altogether approximately 2000 stopping muons, 50 stopping mesons, and 200 recoil protons were found and analyzed. Comparison with theories as to how the underground cosmic ray muon beam produces a secondary flux of nuclearly active particles are made. Additionally measurements on the residue flux at 440mwe underground are made. Projected rates from the shallow depth studies are used to analyze the results at large depth. Anomalous particle production is observed at the large depth

  2. The response of an RC line MWPC to primary cosmic rays. [Multi-Wire Proportional Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. C.; Selig, W. J.; Austin, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    A simple 50 x 50 sq cm MWPC plane was arranged as an RC-line and flown on a balloon flight with the MSFC-UAH Cosmic Ray experiment. Positions of primary cosmic ray tracks in the RC-line were determined by the risetime method and compared with the expected position as indicated by a best line fitted through four planes of the conventional MWPC hodoscope. Mean errors were estimated for sea-level muons, and CNO group and iron group particles. It is believed that the delta-rays accompanying the primaries degraded the position resolution. Measured standard deviations allowing for uncertainty in the true track position are of the order of 1 cm or less in the primary charge region between 7 and 26.

  3. A satellite born charged particles telescope for the study of cosmic ray nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The description of the high energy particle telescope NINA for the study of cosmic ray nuclei is presented. The instrument will be installed on board of the Resource 01 satellite and will fly on a polar orbit at 690 Km. The telescope consists on a pile of 16 detecting planes each of them is composed by two silicon strip detectors with perpendicular strips and has a total area of 60x60mm{sup 2}. The experiment goals are the study of cosmic ray protons and nuclei in the energy range 12-100 MeV/amu. It will be sensitive to the anomalous component and will also make the observation of the large solar flare events and geophysical phenomena as well. This experiment is the first step of the program RIM whose goal is the satellite study of anti particles in primary cosmic rays.

  4. Particle and astrophysics aspects of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, G.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the major unresolved astrophysical questions. In particular, the highest energy cosmic rays observed possess macroscopic energies and their origin is likely to be associated with the most energetic processes in the Universe. Their existence triggered a flurry of theoretical explanations ranging from conventional shock acceleration to particle physics beyond the Standard Model and processes taking place at the earliest moments of our Universe. Furthermore, many new experimental activities promise a strong increase of statistics at the highest energies and a combination with γ-ray and neutrino astrophysics will put strong constraints on these theoretical models. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations indicate that charged ultra-high energy cosmic rays can also be used as probes of large scale magnetic fields whose origin may open another window into the very early Universe. We give an overview over this quickly evolving research field. (author)

  5. Particle and astrophysics aspects of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigl, G [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Paris (France)

    2001-11-15

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the major unresolved astrophysical questions. In particular, the highest energy cosmic rays observed possess macroscopic energies and their origin is likely to be associated with the most energetic processes in the Universe. Their existence triggered a flurry of theoretical explanations ranging from conventional shock acceleration to particle physics beyond the Standard Model and processes taking place at the earliest moments of our Universe. Furthermore, many new experimental activities promise a strong increase of statistics at the highest energies and a combination with {gamma}-ray and neutrino astrophysics will put strong constraints on these theoretical models. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations indicate that charged ultra-high energy cosmic rays can also be used as probes of large scale magnetic fields whose origin may open another window into the very early Universe. We give an overview over this quickly evolving research field. (author)

  6. Applications of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    In Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis samples are bombarded by protons or α-particles of a few MeV/u. The induced characteristic x-rays are detected with a x-ray detector e.g. a Si(Li)-detector. The energies of the x-ray peaks are characteristic for the elements in the samples and the intensities of the x-ray transitions are proportional to the abundances of the elements. The research area which first attracted those of us working with PIXE was the study of sources, transport and deposition of airborne particulates. Sources, transport, wet deposition, other applications where PIXE is already known to be competitive are trace elemental analysis of water below the ppb-level and analyses requiring a space resolution of 1-10μ. However, there is still much to do for physicists in developing the full potential of low-energy accelerators as analytical tools in multidisciplinary teams. (JIW)

  7. Charged particle induced energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, S.A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This review article deals with the X-ray emission induced by heavy, charged particles and the use of this process as an analytical method (PIXE). The physical processes involved, X-ray emission and the various reactions contributing to the background, are described in some detail. The sensitivity is calculated theoretically and the results compared with practical experience. A discussion is given on how the sensitivity can be optimized. The experimental arrangements are described and the various technical problems discussed. The analytical procedure, especially the sample preparation, is described in considerable detail. A number of typical practical applications are discussed. (author)

  8. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and new particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M.

    2001-02-28

    The current status of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHE CR) enigma and several proposed solutions involving particle physics beyond the standard model are discussed. Emphasis is given to top--down models, and as a main example, supermassive dark matter as galactic source for UHE CR and the status of its experimental signatures (galactic anisotropy, chemical composition and clustering) is reviewed. Then different approaches to calculate fragmentation spectra of supermassive particles are discussed. Finally, it is argued that UHE neutrinos cannot be - neither directly or indirectly - responsible for the observed vertical air showers.

  9. X-ray images in primary bone chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrtmadzhieva, S.; Andreev, I.; Velichkov, L.

    1982-01-01

    The X-ray images of primary bone chondrosarcomas in 76 patients are reviewed. The tumors have been localized largely in the long tubular bones - in some patients centrally or excentrically, in others superficially. The X-ray images presented with osteolytic, osteoplastic and mixed changes, intratumor calcifications and reactive bone and periosteal changes. The presence of any of these changes and their combinations, depending on the localization and the influence of a variety of other factors, resembled much many other primary and metastatic malignant bone tumors, benign bone tumors and tumor-like diseases. The X-ray images showed a major complexity in the development of the primary chondrosarcoma and its relations with the bone as organ. (author)

  10. Quiet Sun X-rays as Signature for New Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Di Lella, L; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Jacoby, J; Papaevangelou, T

    2004-01-01

    We have studied published data from the Yohkoh solar X-ray mission, with the purpose of searching for signals from radiative decays of new, as yet undiscovered massive neutral particles. This search is based on the prediction that solar axions of the Kaluza-Klein type should result in the emission of X-rays from the Sun direction beyond the limb with a characteristic radial distribution. These X-rays should be observed more easily during periods of quiet Sun. An additional signature is the observed emission of hard X-rays by SMM, NEAR and RHESSI. The recent observation made by RHESSI of a continuous emission from the non-flaring Sun of X-rays in the 3 to ~15 keV range fits the generic axion scenario. This work also suggests new analyses of existing data, in order to exclude instrumental effects; it provides the rationale for targeted observations with present and upcoming (solar) X-ray telescopes, which can provide the final answer on the nature of the signals considered here. Such measurements become more pr...

  11. On a modification of the Newtonian particle view of rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Benjamin, J S; Cohen, L

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple Newtonian dynamics for the motion of rays as particles that are governed by Snell’s law. In Newton’s original formulation, the particle moves faster in a relatively higher index of refraction medium. We show that it is the constant mass assumption that leads to this conclusion. We derive an explicit expression for the mass as a function of position and show that the formulation leads to the conclusion that indeed the particle moves slower in a relatively higher index of refraction medium. Our approach leads to a simple Newtonian particle picture where the equations of motion may be simply written. We obtain explicit expressions for the velocity, acceleration, and forces which allow one to write the equations of motion. We also formulate the dynamics in terms of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, taking variable mass into account. The solutions to the dynamics are such that the particle always follows Snell’s law in a variable index of refraction medium. Exactly solvable analytic examples are given. We also we show that the SOFAR channel phenomenon, where a wave is trapped between two regions, is easily explained in the particle picture. (invited comment)

  12. Planetary Produced Axionlike Particles and Gamma-Ray Flashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liolios, Anastasios

    2008-01-01

    Axion-like particles could be created in nuclear disintegrations and deexitations of natural radionuclides present in the interior of the planets. For the Earth and the other planets with a surrounding magnetosphere, axion production could result to gamma and X-ray emission, originating from axion to photon conversion in the planetary magnetic fields. The estimated planetary axion fluxes as well as the related gamma ray fluxes from Earth and the giant planets of our solar system are given along with the axion coupling to ordinary matter. A possible connection with the enigmatic Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) discovered in 1994 by CGRO/BATSE and also detected with the RHESSI satellite, is also discussed.

  13. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  14. Implementation of the Brazilian primary standard for x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.G.P.; Almeida, C.E.V. de

    2002-01-01

    In the field of ionizing radiation metrology, a primary standard of a given physical quantity is essentially an experimental set-up which allows one to attribute a numerical value to a particular sample of that quantity in terms of a unit given by an abstract definition. The absolute measurement of the radiation quantity air kerma, is performed with a free-air ionization chamber. A great deal of research to determine the absolute measurement resulted in different designs for primary standard free-air ionization chambers such as cilindrics or plane parallel chambers. The implementation of primary standard dosimetry with free-air ionization chambers is limited to the National Metrology Institutes - NMIs. Since 1975, the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures - BIPM has been conducting comparisons of NMIs primary free-air standard chambers in the medium energy x-rays range. These comparisons are carried out indirectly through the calibration at both the BIPM and at the NMI of one or more transfer ionization chambers at a series of four reference radiation qualities. The scientific work programme of the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology - LNMRI of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD, which belongs to the National Commission of Nuclear Energy - CNEN, includes the establishment of a primary standard for x-rays of medium energy x-ray range. This activity is justified by the demand to calibrate periodically Brazilian network of the secondary standards without losing quality of the measurement. The LNMRI decided to implement four reference radiation qualities establishing the use of a transfer chamber calibrated at BIPM. The LNMRI decided to implement the primary standard dosimetry using a free-air ionization chamber with variable volume, made by Victoreen, model 480. Parameters related to the measurement of the quantity air kerma were evaluated, such as: air absorption, scattering inside the ionization chamber, saturation, beam

  15. Searches for Particle Dark Matter with gamma-rays.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution I review the present status and discuss some prospects for indirect detection of dark matter with gamma-rays. Thanks to the Fermi Large Area Telescope, searches in gamma-rays have reached sensitivities that allow to probe the most interesting parameter space of the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) paradigm. This gain in sensitivity is naturally accompanied by a number of detection claims or indications, the most recent being the claim of a line feature at a dark matter particle mass of ∼ 130 GeV at the Galactic Centre, a claim which requires confirmation from the Fermi-LAT collaboration and other experiments, for example HESS II or the planned Gamma-400 satellite. Predictions for the next generation air Cherenkov telescope, Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), together with forecasts on future Fermi-LAT constraints arrive at the exciting possibility that the cosmological benchmark cross-section could be probed from masses of a few GeV to a few TeV. Consequently, non-detection wou...

  16. Response of cultured human airway epithelial cells to X-rays and energetic α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.; Holley, W.R.; Curtis, S.B.; Gruenert, D.C.; California Univ., San Francisco, CA

    1990-01-01

    Radon and its progeny, which emit α-particles during decay, may play an important role in inducing human lung cancer. To gain a better understanding of the biological effects of α-particles in human lung we studied the response of cultured human airway epithelial cells to X-rays and monoenergetic helium ions. Experimental results indicated that the radiation response of primary cultures was similar to that for airway epithelial cells that were transformed with a plasmid containing an origin-defective SV40 virus. The RBE for cell inactivation determined by the ratio of D 0 for X-rays to that for 8 MeV helium ions was 1.8-2.2. The cross-section for helium ions, calculated from the D 0 value, was about 24 μm 2 for cells of the primary culture. This cross-section is significantly smaller than the average geometric nuclear area (∼ 180 μm 2 ), suggesting that an average of 7.5 α-particles (8 MeV helium ions) per cell nucleus are needed to induce a lethal lesion. (author)

  17. Improved identification of primary biological aerosol particles using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zawadowicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP, especially at altitudes relevant to cloud formation, are scarce. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS has been used to probe aerosol chemical composition from ground and aircraft for over 20 years. Here we develop a method for identifying bioaerosols (PBAP and particles containing fragments of PBAP as part of an internal mixture using SPMS. We show that identification of bioaerosol using SPMS is complicated because phosphorus-bearing mineral dust and phosphorus-rich combustion by-products such as fly ash produce mass spectra with peaks similar to those typically used as markers for bioaerosol. We have developed a methodology to differentiate and identify bioaerosol using machine learning statistical techniques applied to mass spectra of known particle types. This improved method provides far fewer false positives compared to approaches reported in the literature. The new method was then applied to two sets of ambient data collected at Storm Peak Laboratory and a forested site in Central Valley, California to show that 0.04–2 % of particles in the 200–3000 nm aerodynamic diameter range were identified as bioaerosol. In addition, 36–56 % of particles identified as biological also contained spectral features consistent with mineral dust, suggesting internal dust–biological mixtures.

  18. Determining the primary cosmic ray energy from the total flux of Cherenkov light measured at the Yakutsk EAS array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Knurenko, S. P.; Sleptsov, I. E.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for determining the energy of the primary particle that generates an extensive air shower (EAS) of comic rays based on measuring the total flux of Cherenkov light from the shower. Applying this method to Cherenkov light measurements at the Yakutsk EAS array has allowed us to construct the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range 10 15 - 3 x 10 19 eV

  19. ‘Excess’ of primary cosmic ray electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the accurate cosmic ray (CR electron and positron spectra (denoted as Φe− and Φe+, respectively measured by AMS-02 Collaboration, the difference between the electron and positron fluxes (i.e., ΔΦ=Φe−−Φe+, dominated by the propagated primary electrons, can be reliably inferred. In the standard model, the spectrum of propagated primary CR electrons at energies ≥30GeV softens with the increase of energy. The absence of any evidence for such a continuous spectral softening in ΔΦ strongly suggests a significant ‘excess’ of primary CR electrons and at energies of 100–400GeV the identified excess component has a flux comparable to that of the observed positron excess. Middle-age but ‘nearby’ supernova remnants (e.g., Monogem and Geminga are favored sources for such an excess.

  20. Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of actinide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Hans J; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wilson, Richard E; Werme, Lars; Shuh, David K

    2005-09-01

    A descriptive account is given of our most recent research on the actinide dioxides with the Advanced Light Source Molecular Environmental Science (ALS-MES) Beamline 11.0.2 soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The ALS-MES STXM permits near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and imaging with 30-nm spatial resolution. The first STXM spectromicroscopy NEXAFS spectra at the actinide 4d5/2 edges of the imaged transuranic particles, NpO2 and PuO2, have been obtained. Radiation damage induced by the STXM was observed in the investigation of a mixed oxidation state particle (Np(V,VI)) and was minimized during collection of the actual spectra at the 4d5/2 edge of the Np(V,VI) solid. A plutonium elemental map was obtained from an irregular PuO2 particle with the dimensions of 650 x 650 nm. The Pu 4d5/2 NEXAFS spectra were collected at several different locations from the PuO2 particle and were identical. A representative oxygen K-edge spectrum from UO2 was collected and resembles the oxygen K-edge from the bulk material. The unique and current performance of the ALS-MES STXM at extremely low energies (ca. 100 eV) that may permit the successful measurement of the actinide 5d edge is documented. Finally, the potential of STXM as a tool for actinide investigations is briefly discussed.

  1. Cosmic and solar gamma-ray x-ray and particle measurements from high altitude balloons in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    For measurements of cosmic and solar gamma-rays, hard X-rays, and particles, Antarctica offers the potential for very long, 10--20 day, continuous, twenty-four-hour-a-day observations, with balloon flights circling the South Pole during austral summer. For X-ray/gamma-ray sources at high south latitude the overlying atmosphere is minimized, and for cosmic ray measurements the low geomagnetic cutoff permits entry of low rigidity particles. The first Antarctic flight of a heavy (∼2400 lb.) payload on a large (11.6x10 6 cu. ft.) balloon took place in January, 1988, to search for the gamma-ray lines of 56 Co produced in the new supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The long duration balloon flights presently planned from Antarctica include those for further gamma-ray/hard X-ray studies of SN 1987A and for the NASA Max '91 program for solar flare studies

  2. Primary Cosmic Rays Composition: Simulations and Detector Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supanitsky, D.; Etchegoyen, A.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector system for the detection of very high energy cosmic rays. A most difficult and important problem in these studies is the determination of the primary cosmic ray composition for which muon content in air showers appears to be one of the best parameters to discriminate between different composition types.Although the Pierre Auger surface detectors, which consist of water Cherenkov tanks, are sensitive to muon content they are not able to measure the number of muons directly. In this work we study using simulations the information that can be gained by adding muon detectors to the Auger surface detectors. We consider muon counters with two alternative areas

  3. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  4. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  5. Coagulation of Agglomerates Consisting of Polydisperse Primary Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeli, E; Eggersdorfer, M L; Pratsinis, S E

    2016-09-13

    The ballistic agglomeration of polydisperse particles is investigated by an event-driven (ED) method and compared to the coagulation of spherical particles and agglomerates consisting of monodisperse primary particles (PPs). It is shown for the first time to our knowledge that increasing the width or polydispersity of the PP size distribution initially accelerates the coagulation rate of their agglomerates but delays the attainment of their asymptotic fractal-like structure and self-preserving size distribution (SPSD) without altering them, provided that sufficiently large numbers of PPs are employed. For example, the standard asymptotic mass fractal dimension, Df, of 1.91 is attained when clusters are formed containing, on average, about 15 monodisperse PPs, consistent with fractal theory and the literature. In contrast, when polydisperse PPs with a geometric standard deviation of 3 are employed, about 500 PPs are needed to attain that Df. Even though the same asymptotic Df and mass-mobility exponent, Dfm, are attained regardless of PP polydispersity, the asymptotic prefactors or lacunarities of Df and Dfm increase with PP polydispersity. For monodisperse PPs, the average agglomerate radius of gyration, rg, becomes larger than the mobility radius, rm, when agglomerates consist of more than 15 PPs. Increasing PP polydispersity increases that number of PPs similarly to the above for the attainment of the asymptotic Df or Dfm. The agglomeration kinetics are quantified by the overall collision frequency function. When the SPSD is attained, the collision frequency is independent of PP polydispersity. Accounting for the SPSD polydispersity in the overall agglomerate collision frequency is in good agreement with that frequency from detailed ED simulations once the SPSD is reached. Most importantly, the coagulation of agglomerates is described well by a monodisperse model for agglomerate and PP sizes, whereas the detailed agglomerate size distribution can be obtained by

  6. Mapping metals incorporation of a whole single catalyst particle using element specific X-ray nanotomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Morris, Darius T; Kalirai, Samanbir; Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy has been used to determine the 3D structure of a whole individual fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particle at high spatial resolution and in a fast, noninvasive manner, maintaining the full integrity of the particle. Using X-ray absorption mosaic imaging to

  7. Particle injection and cosmic ray acceleration at collisionless parallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quest, K.B.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of collisionless parallel shocks is studied using one-dimensional hybrid simulations, with emphasis on particle injection into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. It is argued that for sufficiently high Mach number shocks, and in the absence of wave turbulence, the fluid firehose marginal stability condition will be exceeded at the interface between the upstream, unshocked, plasma and the heated plasma downstream. As a consequence, nonlinear, low-frequency, electromagnetic waves are generated and act to slow the plasma and provide dissipation for the shock. It is shown that large amplitude waves at the shock ramp scatter a small fraction of the upstream ions back into the upstream medium. These ions, in turn, resonantly generate the electromagnetic waves that are swept back into the shock. As these waves propagate through the shock they are compressed and amplified, allowing them to non-resonantly scatter the bulk of the plasma. Moreover, the compressed waves back-scatter a small fraction of the upstream ions, maintaining the shock structure in a quasi-steady state. The back-scattered ions are accelerated during the wave generation process to 2 to 4 times the ram energy and provide a likely seed population for cosmic rays. 49 refs., 7 figs

  8. γ-rays kill grasshopper primary spermatocytes in groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Taweel, A.A.; Shawkit, M.A.; Fox, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Primary spermatocyte killing by γ-rays was studied in the grasshopper Heteracris littoralis in which spermatogenic development occurs in cysts containing a maximum of 64 cells during the first meiotic division. Cell killing at this stage is not random and mainly involves the death of whole cysts. The dose-response curve for cell killing has complex kinetics with at least two components but lacks any shoulder at low doses, thus indicating no repair of the lethal damage. Cell loss is apparent from surviving cysts as early as 45 min post irradiation but loss of > 24 cells is incompatible with cyst survival. Loss of fewer than 24 cells also is not random since certain values for cell loss are frequently observed while other, interspersed values are not seen at all. (Auth.)

  9. Contribution of Seawater Surfactants to Generated Primary Marine Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, A. A.; Gerard, V.; Duplessis, P.; Kinsey, J. D.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Bisgrove, J.; Maben, J. R.; Long, M. S.; Chang, R.; Beaupre, S. R.; Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Noziere, B.; Cohen, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Surfactants account for minor fractions of total organic carbon in the ocean but may have major impacts on the surface tension of bursting bubbles at the sea surface that drive the production of primary marine aerosol particles (PMA). Surfactants associated with marine aerosol may also significantly reduce the surface tension of water thereby increasing the potential for cloud droplet activation and growth. During September and October 2016, PMA were produced from bursting bubbles in seawater using a high capacity generator at two biologically productive and two oligotrophic stations in the western North Atlantic, as part of a cruise on the R/V Endeavor. Surfactants were extracted from paired PMA and seawater samples, and their ionic compositions, total concentrations, and critical micelle concentrations (CMC) were quantified and compared for the four hydrographic stations. Higher surfactant concentrations were determined in the aerosol produced from biologically productive seawater compared to oligotrophic seawater, and the surfactants extracted from productive seawater were stronger (had lower CMCs) than those in the oligotrophic seawater. Surfactants associated with PMA and seawater in productive regions also varied over diel cycles, whereas those in the oligotrophic regions did not. This work demonstrates a direct link between surfactants in seawater and those in PMA.

  10. Implementation of a primary standard for x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    1991-04-01

    In the scientific program of the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology of the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, which belongs to the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, a free-air ionization chamber should be established as an exposure primary standard for X-ray s of 10OKV to 250kV of potential range. Preliminary results showed that the available free-air ionization chamber was suitable to be used. The absolute measurement of the radiation quantity exposure, is performed with a free-air ionization chamber. Its geometrical volume, which allows the determination of the air mass, is defined by the effective aperture area and by the length of the region where an electrical field is applied. Most of the ions produced in such volume are collected as an ionization current. Since the collecting rod is small, and positioned far away from the X-ray beam, only a negligible fraction of ionization (0,01 %) is lost due to interactions with it. Parameters related to the measurement of the quantity exposure were evaluated, such as: air absorption, scattering inside the ionization chamber, saturation , beam homogeneity, influence Of beam size and influences of temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure.Preliminary determination of correction factors has showed good results with 99.9% of repeatability and has demonstrated the reliability of the checked chamber as a standard instrument. (author)

  11. All-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum measured by the HAWC experiment from 10 to 500 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Avila Rojas, D.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Brisbois, C.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; Coutiño de León, S.; De León, C.; De la Fuente, E.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Dichiara, S.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Enriquez-Rivera, O.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fleischhack, H.; Fraija, N.; García-González, J. A.; González Muñoz, A.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Hinton, J.; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Iriarte, A.; Jardin-Blicq, A.; Joshi, V.; Kaufmann, S.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longinotti, A. L.; Luis Raya, G.; Luna-García, R.; López-Cámara, D.; López-Coto, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, O.; Martinez-Castellanos, I.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Martínez-Huerta, H.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Nisa, M. U.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Pelayo, R.; Pretz, J.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Ren, Z.; Rho, C. D.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Springer, R. W.; Surajbali, P.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report on the measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory in the energy range 10 to 500 TeV. HAWC is a ground-based air-shower array deployed on the slopes of Volcan Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico, and is sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The data used in this work were taken over 234 days between June 2016 and February 2017. The primary cosmic-ray energy is determined with a maximum likelihood approach using the particle density as a function of distance to the shower core. Introducing quality cuts to isolate events with shower cores landing on the array, the reconstructed energy distribution is unfolded iteratively. The measured all-particle spectrum is consistent with a broken power law with an index of -2.49 ±0.01 prior to a break at (45.7 ±0.1 ) TeV , followed by an index of -2.71 ±0.01 . The spectrum also represents a single measurement that spans the energy range between direct detection and ground-based experiments. As a verification of the detector response, the energy scale and angular resolution are validated by observation of the cosmic ray Moon shadow's dependence on energy.

  12. Particle physics explanations for ultra-high energy cosmic ray events

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this talk I briefly summarize several proposed particle physics explanations: a breakdown ... as primaries, and magnetic monopoles with mass below 1010 GeV as primaries. .... these monopoles would be the ultimate test of this explanation.

  13. Real time 2 dimensional detector for charged particle and soft X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Ito, M.; Endo, T.; Oba, K.

    1995-01-01

    The conventional instruments used in experiments for the soft X-ray region such as X-ray diffraction analysis are X-ray films or imaging plates. However, these instruments are not suitable for real time observation. In this paper, newly developed imaging devices will be presented, which have the capability to take X-ray images in real time with a high detection efficiency. Also, another capability, to take elementary particle tracking images, is described. (orig.)

  14. Handbook on simultaneous x-ray and γ-ray ion beam methods for fine particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Sampling, measurement, characterisation and source appointment of fine atmospheric particles has become increasingly important in recent times. This is due in part to the realisation that the fine particle pollution caused by anthropogenic activities plays a key role in certain aspects of human health, pollution transport and global climate change. This publication discusses accelerator based ion beam analysis (IBA) methods of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) as applied to aerosol analysis. These techniques are sensitive, multielemental, mainly non-destructive, require no sample preparation, have short analysis times and can be used to analyse hundreds of filter samples a day in batch processing with minimum operator interaction. The aspects discussed in the publication include: the basics of the techniques; spectrum analysis; system calibration and blank subtraction; quantification; sensitivity; measurement errors

  15. Source apportionment of aerosol particles using polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Tianxi [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) and Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) and Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)], E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com; Liu Zhiguo [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) and Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) and Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)], E-mail: liuzgbeijing@163.com; Zhu Guanghua; Liu Hui [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Xu Qing [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100039 (China); Li Yude; Wang Guangpu; Luo Ping; Pan Qiuli; Ding Xunliang [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2009-06-11

    A micro-X-ray fluorescence (Micro-XRF) spectrometer based on a polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray lens (PSFXRL) and laboratory X-ray source was designed to carry out the source apportionment of aerosol particles. In the distribution curve of the X-ray intensity in the focal spot of PSFXRL, there was a plateau with a diameter of about 65 {mu}m. The uniformity of this plateau was about 3%. This was helpful in measuring the XRF spectrum of a single aerosol particle in which the element distributions are not uniform. The minimum detection limit (MDL) of this Micro-XRF spectrometer was 15 ppm for the Fe-K{sub {alpha}}. The origins of the aerosol particles at the exit of a subway station and a construction site were apportioned. This Micro-XRF spectrometer has potential applications in analysis of single aerosol particles.

  16. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubehn, T.; Wozniak, G.J.; Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non-destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition. (orig.)

  17. Response of spherical gravitational wave antenna modes to high-energy cosmic ray particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jr, R M Marinho; Magalhaes, N S; Aguiar, O D; Frajuca, C

    2002-01-01

    High-energy cosmic ray particles are expected to be a significant source of noise in resonant mass gravitational wave detectors close to the quantum limit. The spherical, fourth generation antennas have been designed to attain such a limit. In this work we will show how the energy of a cosmic ray particle interacting with such an antenna is distributed over its eigenmodes. We will then make some comments on the relevant consequences of such a distribution for gravitational wave detection

  18. Response of spherical gravitational wave antenna modes to high-energy cosmic ray particles

    CERN Document Server

    Marinho, R M; Aguiar, O D; Frajuca, C

    2002-01-01

    High-energy cosmic ray particles are expected to be a significant source of noise in resonant mass gravitational wave detectors close to the quantum limit. The spherical, fourth generation antennas have been designed to attain such a limit. In this work we will show how the energy of a cosmic ray particle interacting with such an antenna is distributed over its eigenmodes. We will then make some comments on the relevant consequences of such a distribution for gravitational wave detection.

  19. Primary studies on particle recovery of swipe samples for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wang; Yan Chen; Yong-gang Zhao; Yan Zhang; Tong-xing Wang; Jing-huai Li; Zhi-yuan Chang; Hai-ping Cui

    2013-01-01

    Environmental sampling plays a significant role in nuclear safeguards. Isotopic ratio in uranium-bearing particles from swipe samples provides important information for detecting undeclared activities. Particle recovery which is the primary step of particle analysis, would affect the following analysis. The particle recovery efficiency of ultrasoneration recovery and vacuum suction-impact recovery were measured by alpha spectrometer with standard particles produced via aerosol spray pyrolysis method. The conditions of ultrasoneration were optimized and both recovery methods were evaluated. Finally, a procedure of particle recovery for unknown swipe samples was set up. (author)

  20. High energy particles from {gamma}-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waxman, E [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2001-11-15

    A review is presented of the fireball model of {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs), and of the production in GRB fireballs of high energy protons and neutrinos. Constraints imposed on the model by recent afterglow observations, which support the association of GRB and ultra-high energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources, are discussed. Predictions of the GRB model for UHECR production, which can be tested with planned large area UHECR detectors and with planned high energy neutrino telescopes, are reviewed. (author)

  1. Constraining sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and shear acceleration mechanism of particles in relativistic jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruoyu

    2015-06-10

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are extreme energetic particles from outer space. They have aroused great interest among scientists for more than fifty years. However, due to the rarity of the events and complexity of the process of their propagation to Earth, they are still one of the biggest puzzles in modern high energy astrophysics. This dissertation is dedicated to study the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from various aspects. Firstly, we discuss a possible link between recently discovered sub-PeV/PeV neutrinos and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. If these two kinds of particles share the same origin, the observation of neutrinos may provide additional and non-trivial constraints on the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. Secondly, we jointly employ the chemical composition measurement and the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, and find a robust upper limit for distances of sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above ∝55 EeV, as well as a lower limit for their metallicities. Finally, we study the shear acceleration mechanism in relativistic jets, which is a more efficient mechanism for the acceleration of higher energy particle. We compute the acceleration efficiency and the time-dependent particle energy spectrum, and explore the feature of synchrotron radiation of the accelerated particles. The possible realizations of this mechanism for acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in different astrophysical environments is also discussed.

  2. Detecting particle dark matter signatures by cross-correlating γ-ray anisotropies with weak lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2016-05-01

    The underlying nature of dark matter still represents one of the fundamental questions in contemporary cosmology. Although observations well agree with its description in terms of a new fundamental particle, neither direct nor indirect signatures of its particle nature have been detected so far, despite a strong experimental effort. Similarly, particle accelerators have hitherto failed at producing dark matter particles in collider physics experiments. Here, we illustrate how the cross-correlation between anisotropies in the diffuse γ-ray background and weak gravitational lensing effects represents a novel promising way in the quest of detecting particle dark matter signatures.

  3. Random ray-tracing and graphic analysing of charged particle trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaomei; Mao Naifeng; Chen Jingxian

    1990-01-01

    In order to describe the optical properties of a charged particle beam realistically, the random sampling of initial conditions of particles in ray-tracing is discussed. The emission surface of particles may be a plane, a cylindrical surface or a spherical surface. The distribution functions may be expressed analytically or numerically. In order to analyse the properties of the charged particle beam systematically by use of the results from ray-tracing efficiently, the graphic processing and analysing of particle trajectories are also discussed, including the spline function fitting of trajectories, the graphic drafting of trajectories and beam envelopes, the determining of image dimensions and the correspinding positions, and also the graphic drafting of particle distributions on arbitrary cross sections

  4. Single particle transfer for quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The technique of single particle transfer was applied to quantitative analysis with total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. The technique was evaluated by performing quantitative analysis of individual Cu particles with diameters between 3.9 and 13.2 μm. The direct quantitative analysis of the Cu particle transferred onto a Si carrier gave a discrepancy between measured and calculated Cu amounts due to the absorption effects of incident and fluorescent X-rays within the particle. By the correction for the absorption effects, the Cu amounts in individual particles could be determined with the deviation within 10.5%. When the Cu particles were dissolved with HNO 3 solution prior to the TXRF analysis, the deviation was improved to be within 3.8%. In this case, no correction for the absorption effects was needed for quantification

  5. Experimental data on study of cosmic ray particles in the E≥2 TeV energy range at the Kosmos-1713 satellite with the Sokol-2 device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, I.P.; Rapoport, I.D.; Shestoperov, V.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    Primary data of results of experiment on studying the cosmic ray particles with energy in the range exceeding 2 TeV at the Kosmos-1713 satellite using the Sokol-2 equipment are presented in the tabular form. A brief description of the equipment is given. 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werz, T., E-mail: thomas.werz@uni-ulm.de [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Baumann, M. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Wolfram, U. [Ulm University, Institute of Orthopaedic Research and Biomechanics, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 89081 (Germany); Krill, C.E. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  7. Searching for Axion-Like Particles with X-ray Polarimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Day

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available X-ray telescopes are an exceptional tool for searching for new fundamental physics. In particular, X-ray observations have already placed world-leading bounds on the interaction between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs. ALPs are hypothetical new ultra-light particles motivated by string theory models. They can also act as dark matter and dark energy, and provide a solution to the strong CP problem. In a background magnetic field, ALPs and photons may interconvert. This leads to energy dependent modulations in both the flux and polarisation of the spectra of point sources shining through large magnetic fields. The next generation of polarising X-ray telescopes will offer new detection possibilities for ALPs. Here we present techniques and projected bounds for searching for ALPs with X-ray polarimetry. We demonstrate that upcoming X-ray polarimetry missions have the potential to place world-leading bounds on ALPs.

  8. Effect of energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles on interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Okada, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyoki, Shinji; Ohashi, Masatake; Kuroda, Kazuaki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Tsunesada, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the noise of interferometric gravitational wave detectors due to heat energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles. We derived a general formula that describes the response of a mirror against a cosmic-ray passage. We found that there are differences in the comic-ray responses (the dependence of temperature and cosmic-ray track position) in cases of interferometric and resonant gravitational wave detectors. The power spectral density of vibrations caused by low-energy secondary muons is 100 times smaller than the goal sensitivity of future second-generation interferometer projects, such as LCGT and Advanced LIGO. The arrival frequency of high-energy cosmic-ray muons that generate enough large showers inside mirrors of LCGT and Advanced LIGO is one per a millennium. We also discuss the probability of exotic-particle detection with interferometers.

  9. Physical aspects of quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence and electron microprobe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present both physical fundamentals and recent advances in quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microprobe (EPXMA) techniques. A method of correction for the particle-size effect in XRF analysis is described and theoretically evaluated. New atomic number- and absorption correction procedures in EPXMA of individual particles are proposed. The applicability of these two correction methods is evaluated for a wide range of elemental composition, X-ray energy and sample thickness. Also, a theoretical model for composition and thickness dependence of Bremsstrahlung background generated in multielement bulk specimens as well as thin films and particles are presented and experimantally evaluated. Finally, the limitations and further possible improvements in quantitative particles analysis by XFR and EPXMA are discussed. 109 refs. (author)

  10. The Random Ray Method for neutral particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tramm, John R., E-mail: jtramm@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-107, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Mathematics and Computer Science Department 9700 S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Smith, Kord S., E-mail: kord@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-107, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forget, Benoit, E-mail: bforget@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-107, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Siegel, Andrew R., E-mail: siegela@mcs.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Mathematics and Computer Science Department 9700 S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    A new approach to solving partial differential equations (PDEs) based on the method of characteristics (MOC) is presented. The Random Ray Method (TRRM) uses a stochastic rather than deterministic discretization of characteristic tracks to integrate the phase space of a problem. TRRM is potentially applicable in a number of transport simulation fields where long characteristic methods are used, such as neutron transport and gamma ray transport in reactor physics as well as radiative transfer in astrophysics. In this study, TRRM is developed and then tested on a series of exemplar reactor physics benchmark problems. The results show extreme improvements in memory efficiency compared to deterministic MOC methods, while also reducing algorithmic complexity, allowing for a sparser computational grid to be used while maintaining accuracy.

  11. The Random Ray Method for neutral particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tramm, John R.; Smith, Kord S.; Forget, Benoit; Siegel, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach to solving partial differential equations (PDEs) based on the method of characteristics (MOC) is presented. The Random Ray Method (TRRM) uses a stochastic rather than deterministic discretization of characteristic tracks to integrate the phase space of a problem. TRRM is potentially applicable in a number of transport simulation fields where long characteristic methods are used, such as neutron transport and gamma ray transport in reactor physics as well as radiative transfer in astrophysics. In this study, TRRM is developed and then tested on a series of exemplar reactor physics benchmark problems. The results show extreme improvements in memory efficiency compared to deterministic MOC methods, while also reducing algorithmic complexity, allowing for a sparser computational grid to be used while maintaining accuracy.

  12. Alpha Particle Induced X-ray Emission in the Classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Jorge A.; Borunda, Mario F.; Morales, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration in an introductory modern physics course to elucidate the X-ray line spectra, and how they arise from transitions of electrons to inner shells. We seek to determine the effect of limited use of an interactive component as a supplement to a traditional lecture, and how it would improve the student achievement. In this preliminary study the students were exposed to traditional lectures on X-ray production and Bohr's model, they then were given a homework on the abc of X-ray spectra, after which they were given a pre-test on the materials, followed by an in-class demonstration, and a final post-exam. The gain, as measured from pre- to post-exams appears to remark the differences in how students approached the subject before and after the use of the demonstration. This initial study shows the validity of in-class demonstrations as teaching tools and opens a wide new area of research in modern physics teaching

  13. The ozonolysis of primary aliphatic amines in fine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahardis, J.; Geddes, S.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2008-02-01

    The oxidative processing by ozone of the particulate amines octadecylamine (ODA) and hexadecylamine (HDA) is reported. Ozonolysis of these amines resulted in strong NO2- and NO3- ion signals that increased with ozone exposure as monitored by photoelectron resonance capture ionization aerosol mass spectrometry. These products suggest a mechanism of progressive oxidation of the particulate amines to nitroalkanes. Additionally, a strong ion signal at 125 m/z is assigned to the ion NO3- (HNO3). For ozonized mixed particles containing ODA or HDA + oleic acid (OL), with pO3≥3×10-7 atm, imine, secondary amide, and tertiary amide products were measured. These products most likely arise from reactions of amines with aldehydes (for imines) and stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) or secondary ozonides (for amides) from the fatty acid. The routes to amides via SCI and/or secondary ozonides were shown to be more important than comparable amide forming reactions between amines and organic acids, using azelaic acid as a test compound. Finally, direct evidence is provided for the formation of a surface barrier in the ODA + OL reaction system that resulted in the retention of OL at high ozone exposures (up to 10-3 atm for 17 s). This effect was not observed in HDA + OL or single component OL particles, suggesting that it may be a species-specific surfactant effect from an in situ generated amide or imine. Implications to tropospheric chemistry, including particle bound amines as sources of oxidized gas phase nitrogen species (e.g.~NO2, NO3), formation of nitrogen enriched HULIS via ozonolysis of amines and source apportionment are discussed.

  14. The ozonolysis of primary aliphatic amines in fine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative processing by ozone of the particulate amines octadecylamine (ODA and hexadecylamine (HDA is reported. Ozonolysis of these amines resulted in strong NO2 and NO3 ion signals that increased with ozone exposure as monitored by photoelectron resonance capture ionization aerosol mass spectrometry. These products suggest a mechanism of progressive oxidation of the particulate amines to nitroalkanes. Additionally, a strong ion signal at 125 m/z is assigned to the ion NO3 (HNO3. For ozonized mixed particles containing ODA or HDA + oleic acid (OL, with pO3≥3×10–7 atm, imine, secondary amide, and tertiary amide products were measured. These products most likely arise from reactions of amines with aldehydes (for imines and stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI or secondary ozonides (for amides from the fatty acid. The routes to amides via SCI and/or secondary ozonides were shown to be more important than comparable amide forming reactions between amines and organic acids, using azelaic acid as a test compound. Finally, direct evidence is provided for the formation of a surface barrier in the ODA + OL reaction system that resulted in the retention of OL at high ozone exposures (up to 10−3 atm for 17 s. This effect was not observed in HDA + OL or single component OL particles, suggesting that it may be a species-specific surfactant effect from an in situ generated amide or imine. Implications to tropospheric chemistry, including particle bound amines as sources of oxidized gas phase nitrogen species (e.g.~NO2, NO3, formation of nitrogen enriched HULIS via ozonolysis of amines and source apportionment are discussed.

  15. Monte-Carlo simulation of primary electrons in the matter for the generation of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendjama, H.; Laib, Y.; Allag, A.; Drai, R.

    2006-01-01

    The x-rays imagining chains components from the source to the detector, rest on the first part of simulation to the energy production of x-rays emission (source), which suggest us to identified the losses energies result from interaction between the fast electrons and the particles of metal : the energies losses due to 'collisional losses' (ionization, excitation) and radiative losses. For the medium and the primary electron energy which interests us, the electrons slowing down in the matter results primarily from the inelastic collisions; whose interest is to have to simulate the x-rays characteristic spectrum. We used a Monte-Carlo method to simulate the energy loss and the transport of primary electrons. This type of method requires only the knowledge of the cross sections attached to the description of all the elementary events. In this work, we adopted the differential cross section of Mott and the total cross section of inner-shell ionization according to the formulation of Gryzinski, to simulate the energy loss and the transport of primary electrons respectively. The simulation allows to follow the electrons until their energy reaches the atomic ionization potential of the irradiated matter. The differential cross section of Mott gives us a very good representation of the pace of the distribution of the energy losses. The transport of primary electron is approximately reproduced

  16. Development of a compact x-ray particle image velocimetry for measuring opaque flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Guk Bae; Yim, Dae Hyun; Jung, Sung Yong

    2009-03-01

    A compact x-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV) system employing a medical x-ray tube as a light source was developed to measure quantitative velocity field information of opaque flows. The x-ray PIV system consists of a medical x-ray tube, an x-ray charge coupled device camera, a programmable shutter for a pulse-type x ray, and a synchronization device. Through performance tests, the feasibility of the developed x-ray PIV system as a flow measuring device was verified. To check the feasibility of the developed system, we tested a tube flow at two different mean velocities of 1 and 2 mm/s. The x-ray absorption of tracer particles must be quite different from that of working fluid to have a good contrast in x-ray images. All experiments were performed under atmospheric pressure condition. This system is unique and useful for investigating various opaque flows or flows inside opaque conduits.

  17. Development of a compact x-ray particle image velocimetry for measuring opaque flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Guk Bae; Yim, Dae Hyun; Jung, Sung Yong

    2009-01-01

    A compact x-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV) system employing a medical x-ray tube as a light source was developed to measure quantitative velocity field information of opaque flows. The x-ray PIV system consists of a medical x-ray tube, an x-ray charge coupled device camera, a programmable shutter for a pulse-type x ray, and a synchronization device. Through performance tests, the feasibility of the developed x-ray PIV system as a flow measuring device was verified. To check the feasibility of the developed system, we tested a tube flow at two different mean velocities of 1 and 2 mm/s. The x-ray absorption of tracer particles must be quite different from that of working fluid to have a good contrast in x-ray images. All experiments were performed under atmospheric pressure condition. This system is unique and useful for investigating various opaque flows or flows inside opaque conduits.

  18. X-ray fluorescence analysis of welding fume particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsey, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    A commercial standard filter set and two laboratory-made standard filter sets are compared via the analysis of generated welding fume samples by X-ray fluorescence. The latter standards are made by (1) hydrophobic-edge membrane filters spiked with prepared metal ion solutions, and (2) filters through which a dispersion of metal oxide powder in isopropanol has been drawn. The results are presented in table form. Precision (Pre) is the relative standard deviation of the six samples. Four main conclusions are enumerated

  19. Particle-scale structure in frozen colloidal suspensions from small-angle x-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa; Mochrie, S. G. J.; Peppin, S. S. L.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    During directional solidification of the solvent in a colloidal suspension, the colloidal particles segregate from the growing solid, forming high-particle-density regions with structure on a hierarchy of length scales ranging from that of the particle-scale packing to the large-scale spacing between these regions. Previous work has concentrated mostly on the medium- to large-length scale structure, as it is the most accessible and thought to be more technologically relevant. However, the packing of the colloids at the particle scale is an important component not only in theoretical descriptions of the segregation process, but also to the utility of freeze-cast materials for new applications. Here we present the results of experiments in which we investigated this structure across a wide range of length scales using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering and direct optical imaging. As expected, during freezing the particles were concentrated into regions between ice dendrites forming a microscopic pattern of high- and low-particle-density regions. X-ray scattering indicates that the particles in the high-density regions were so closely packed as to be touching. However, the arrangement of the particles does not conform to that predicted by standard interparticle pair potentials, suggesting that the particle packing induced by freezing differs from that formed during equilibrium densification processes. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  20. Particle-scale structure in frozen colloidal suspensions from small-angle x-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-02-01

    During directional solidification of the solvent in a colloidal suspension, the colloidal particles segregate from the growing solid, forming high-particle-density regions with structure on a hierarchy of length scales ranging from that of the particle-scale packing to the large-scale spacing between these regions. Previous work has concentrated mostly on the medium- to large-length scale structure, as it is the most accessible and thought to be more technologically relevant. However, the packing of the colloids at the particle scale is an important component not only in theoretical descriptions of the segregation process, but also to the utility of freeze-cast materials for new applications. Here we present the results of experiments in which we investigated this structure across a wide range of length scales using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering and direct optical imaging. As expected, during freezing the particles were concentrated into regions between ice dendrites forming a microscopic pattern of high- and low-particle-density regions. X-ray scattering indicates that the particles in the high-density regions were so closely packed as to be touching. However, the arrangement of the particles does not conform to that predicted by standard interparticle pair potentials, suggesting that the particle packing induced by freezing differs from that formed during equilibrium densification processes. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  1. Particle spectra and mass composition in the ultra-high energy region in the framework of the Galactic origin of cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagutin A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility for a self-consistent description of all the basic features of the observed cosmic ray spectra and primary composition variations in the energy range of 1015 ÷ 1020 eV within the Galactic origin scenario is examined. We assume the existence of Galactic sources that accelerate particles up to ∼ 3 · 1018Z eV and take into account a highly inhomogeneous (fractal-like distribution of matter and magnetic fields in the Galaxy that leads to extremely large free paths of particles (“Lévy flights”, along with an overwhelming contribution to the cosmic ray fluxes observed above ∼1018 eV from particles reaching the Solar System without scattering. Our scenario was refined on the basis of recent experimental results on primary mass composition. Model predictions, which could be verified with the improved high-precision measurements in the nearest future are discussed.

  2. Hard jet production in cosmic ray particle interactions at the energy of about 1000 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buja, Z.; Gladysz, E.; Mikocki, S.; Szarska, M.; Zawiejski, L.

    1987-01-01

    Eight photon-hadron families with the energy of primary particles of about 1000 TeV detected in a X-ray emulsion chamber of Pamir Experiment have features which indicate the production of hard jets. Lateral distribution and the distribution of transverse momentum flow indicate the existence of two groups of particles. The average transverse momentum for particles in one group is more than 6 times larger then that for the other group. Azimuthal asymmetry is visible in the particle number and transverse momentum flow. Transverse energy E T for individual families oscillates between 26 and 120 GeV with an average value of 57 GeV. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulation in which QCD parton hard scattering mechanism in interactions of primary hadrons was assumed. An agreement can be reached if the fraction of jet production exceeded 60% and the transverse momenta of jets are not smaller than 40 GeV/c. 37 refs., 11 figs. (author)

  3. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigment particles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.S.; Chen, B.; Zhang, F.; Berenguer, F.; Bean, R.; Kewish, C.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Rodenburg, J.; Robinson, I.

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  4. Improved soil particle-size analysis by gamma-ray attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, J.C.M.; Vaz, C.M.P.; Reichardt, K.; Swartzendruber, D.

    1997-01-01

    The size distribution of particles is useful for physical characterization of soil. This study was conducted to determine whether a new method of soil particle-size analysis by gamma-ray attenuation could be further improved by changing the depth and time of measurement of the suspended particle concentration during sedimentation. In addition to the advantage of nondestructive, undisturbed measurement by gamma-ray attenuation, as compared with conventional pipette or hydrometer methods, the modifications here suggested and employed do substantially decrease the total time for analysis, and will also facilitate total automation and generalize the method for other sedimentation studies. Experimental results are presented for three different Brazilian soil materials, and illustrate the nature of the fine detail provided in the cumulative particle-size distribution as given by measurements obtained during the relatively short time period of 28 min

  5. The application of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers to charged particle and x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Fujieda, I.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.

    1989-04-01

    We outline the characteristics of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers which are optimized for the detection of charged particles, x-rays and γ-rays. Signal amplitude as a function of the linear energy transfer of various particles are given. Noise sources generated by the detector material and by the thin film electronics - a-Si:H or polysilicon proposed for pixel position sensitive detectors readout are described, and their relative amplitudes are calculated. Temperature and neutron radiation effects on leakage currents and the corresponding noise changes are presented. 17 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Snow particles extracted from X-ray computed microtomography imagery and their single-scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Aoki, Teruo; Masuda, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Sizes and shapes of snow particles were determined from X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) images, and their single-scattering properties were calculated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths using a Geometrical Optics Method (GOM). We analyzed seven snow samples including fresh and aged artificial snow and natural snow obtained from field samples. Individual snow particles were numerically extracted, and the shape of each snow particle was defined by applying a rendering method. The size distribution and specific surface area distribution were estimated from the geometrical properties of the snow particles, and an effective particle radius was derived for each snow sample. The GOM calculations at wavelengths of 0.532 and 1.242 μm revealed that the realistic snow particles had similar scattering phase functions as those of previously modeled irregular shaped particles. Furthermore, distinct dendritic particles had a characteristic scattering phase function and asymmetry factor. The single-scattering properties of particles of effective radius reff were compared with the size-averaged single-scattering properties. We found that the particles of reff could be used as representative particles for calculating the average single-scattering properties of the snow. Furthermore, the single-scattering properties of the micro-CT particles were compared to those of particle shape models using our current snow retrieval algorithm. For the single-scattering phase function, the results of the micro-CT particles were consistent with those of a conceptual two-shape model. However, the particle size dependence differed for the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor.

  7. Utility of replica techniques for x-ray microanalysis of second phase particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, J.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis of second phase particles in ion-milled or electropolished thin foils is often complicated by the presence of the matrix nearby. Extraction replica techniques provide a means to avoid many of the complications of thin-foil analyses. In this paper, three examples of the analysis of second phase particles are described and illustrate the improvement obtained by the use of extraction replicas for qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, and analysis of radioactive specimens

  8. Smoothed Particle Inference: A Kilo-Parametric Method for X-ray Galaxy Cluster Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, John R.; Marshall, P.J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Andersson, K.; /Stockholm U. /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    We propose an ambitious new method that models the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies as a set of X-ray emitting smoothed particles of plasma. Each smoothed particle is described by a handful of parameters including temperature, location, size, and elemental abundances. Hundreds to thousands of these particles are used to construct a model cluster of galaxies, with the appropriate complexity estimated from the data quality. This model is then compared iteratively with X-ray data in the form of adaptively binned photon lists via a two-sample likelihood statistic and iterated via Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The complex cluster model is propagated through the X-ray instrument response using direct sampling Monte Carlo methods. Using this approach the method can reproduce many of the features observed in the X-ray emission in a less assumption-dependent way that traditional analyses, and it allows for a more detailed characterization of the density, temperature, and metal abundance structure of clusters. Multi-instrument X-ray analyses and simultaneous X-ray, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and lensing analyses are a straight-forward extension of this methodology. Significant challenges still exist in understanding the degeneracy in these models and the statistical noise induced by the complexity of the models.

  9. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification.The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations.Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  10. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification. The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations. Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  11. Particle transport simulation for spaceborne, NaI gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, C.S.; Truscott, P.R.; Sims, A.J.; Comber, C.; Hammond, N.D.A.

    1988-11-01

    Radioactivity induced in detectors by protons and secondary neutrons limits the sensitivity of spaceborne gamma-ray spectrometers. Three dimensional Monte Carlo transport codes have been employed to simulate particle transport of cosmic rays and inner-belt protons in various representations of the Gamma Ray Observatory Spacecraft and the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment. Results are used to accurately quantify the contributions to the radioactive background, assess shielding options and examine the effect of detector and space-craft orientation in anisotropic trapped proton fluxes. (author)

  12. Cloud a particle beam facility to investigate the influence of cosmic rays on clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01

    Palaeoclimatic data provide extensive evidence for solar forcing of the climate during the Holocene and the last ice age, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. However recent observations suggest that cosmic rays may play a key role. Satellite data have revealed a surprising correlation between cosmic ray intensity and the fraction of the Earth covered by low clouds \\cite{svensmark97,marsh}. Since the cosmic ray intensity is modulated by the solar wind, this may be an important clue to the long-sought mechanism for solar-climate variability. In order to test whether cosmic rays and clouds are causally linked and, if so, to understand the microphysical mechanisms, a novel experiment known as CLOUD\\footnotemark\\ has been proposed \\cite{cloud_proposal}--\\cite{cloud_addendum_2}. CLOUD proposes to investigate ion-aerosol-cloud microphysics under controlled laboratory conditions using a beam from a particle accelerator, which provides a precisely adjustable and measurable artificial source of cosmic rays....

  13. On the equation of transport for cosmic-ray particles in the interplanetary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.M.; Gleeson, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Two new alternative derivations of the equation of transport for cosmic-ray particles in the interplanetary region are provided. Both derivations are carried out by using particle position r and time t in a frame of reference fixed in the solar system, and the particle momentum p' is specified relative to a local frame of reference moving with the solar wind. The first derivation is carried out by writing down a continuity equation for the cosmic rays, taking into account particle streaming and energy changes, and subsequently deriving the streaming and energy change terms in this equation. The momentum change term in the continuity equation, previously considered to be due to the adiabatic deceleration of particles in the expanding magnetic fields carried by the solar wing, appears in the present analysis as a dynamic effect in which the Lorentz force on the particle does not appear explicitly. An alternative derivation based on the ensemble averaged Liouville equation for charged particles in the stochastic interplanetary magnetic field using (r,p',t) as independent coordinates is also given. The latter derivation confirms the momentum change interpretation of the first derivation. A new derivation of the adiabatic rate as a combination of inverse-Fermi and betatron deceleration processes is also provided. (Auth.)

  14. Source Apportionment of Atmospheric Particles by Electron Probe X-Ray Microanalysis and Receptor Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Borm, Werner August

    Electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) in combination with an automation system and an energy-dispersive X-ray detection system was used to analyse thousands of microscopical particles, originating from the ambient atmosphere. The huge amount of data was processed by a newly developed X-ray correction method and a number of data reduction procedures. A standardless ZAF procedure for EPXMA was developed for quick semi-quantitative analysis of particles starting from simple corrections, valid for bulk samples and modified taking into account the particle finit diameter, assuming a spherical shape. Tested on a limited database of bulk and particulate samples, the compromise between calculation speed and accuracy yielded for elements with Z > 14 accuracies on concentrations less than 10% while absolute deviations remained below 4 weight%, thus being only important for low concentrations. Next, the possibilities for the use of supervised and unsupervised multivariate particle classification were investigated for source apportionment of individual particles. In a detailed study of the unsupervised cluster analysis technique several aspects were considered, that have a severe influence on the final cluster analysis results, i.e. data acquisition, X-ray peak identification, data normalization, scaling, variable selection, similarity measure, cluster strategy, cluster significance and error propagation. A supervised approach was developed using an expert system-like approach in which identification rules are builded to describe the particle classes in a unique manner. Applications are presented for particles sampled (1) near a zinc smelter (Vieille-Montagne, Balen, Belgium), analyzed for heavy metals, (2) in an urban aerosol (Antwerp, Belgium), analyzed for over 20 elements and (3) in a rural aerosol originating from a swiss mountain area (Bern). Thus is was possible to pinpoint a number of known and unknown sources and characterize their emissions in terms of particles

  15. X-ray diffraction analysis of particles ingested by filter-feeding animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, R.W.; Gersabeck, E.F.; Ross, D.H.; Mortland, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    The size and relative abundance of mineral particles ingested by two filter-feeding aquatic insects, Simulium vittatum Zett. (Diptera: Simuliidae) and Aedes triseriatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. Different minerals representing different particle size categories were supplied larval black flies and mosquitoes. Since minerals possess characteristic diffraction properties, their presence and relative abundance can be determined. Early instars of the black fly ingested and retained particles of three different size ranges: however, more coarse particles relative to fine particles were retained by smaller instars as compared with the larger instars. With mosquito larvae, there was a proportional increase in coarser material ingested with increasing age and size of larvae. Other applications of this method are discussed. (Auth.)

  16. [A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper

  17. [Particle size determination by radioisotope x-ray absorptiometry with sedimentation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Y; Furuta, T; Miyagawa, S

    1976-09-01

    The possibility of radioisotope X-ray absorptiometry to determine the particle size of powder in conjunction with sedimentation was investigated. The experimental accuracy was primarily determined by Cow and X-ray intensity. where Co'=weight concentration of the particle in the suspension w'=(micron/rho)l/(mu/rho)s-rhol/rhos rho; density micron/rho; mass absorption coefficient, suffix l and s indicate dispersion and particle, respectively. The radiosiotopes, Fe-55, Pu-238 and Cd-109 have high w-values over the wide range of the atomic number. However, a source of high micron value such as Fe-55 is not suitable because the optimal X-ray transmission length, Lopt is decided by the expression, micronlLopt approximately 2/(1+C'ow') by using Cd-109 AgKX-ray source, the weight size distribution of particles from the heavy elements such as PbO2 to light elements such as Al2O3 or flyash was determined.

  18. Atmospheric data over a solar cycle: no connection between galactic cosmic rays and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, through their activation into cloud droplets. Both effects are known with considerable uncertainty only, and translate into even bigger uncertainties in future climate predictions. More than a decade ago, variations in galactic cosmic rays were suggested to closely correlate with variations in atmospheric cloud cover and therefore constitute a driving force behind aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Later, the enhancement of atmospheric aerosol particle formation by ions generated from cosmic rays was proposed as a physical mechanism explaining this correlation. Here, we report unique observations on atmospheric aerosol formation based on measurements at the SMEAR II station, Finland, over a solar cycle (years 1996–2008 that shed new light on these presumed relationships. Our analysis shows that none of the quantities related to aerosol formation correlates with the cosmic ray-induced ionisation intensity (CRII. We also examined the contribution of ions to new particle formation on the basis of novel ground-based and airborne observations. A consistent result is that ion-induced formation contributes typically significantly less than 10% to the number of new particles, which would explain the missing correlation between CRII and aerosol formation. Our main conclusion is that galactic cosmic rays appear to play a minor role for atmospheric aerosol formation events, and so for the connected aerosol-climate effects as well.

  19. Qualitative analysis of a powdered diamond sample by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabida, C.; Annegarn, H.J.; Renan, M.J.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    The main purpose of this analysis was to determine whether nickel is present in diamond powder as a trace element. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) showed unambiguously that nickel was present. Due to the convenience of PIXE in multielemental analysis, the investigations also include a number of other trace elements in the sample

  20. 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef; Pineda-Vargas, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission ("PIXE 2015") that was held in Somerset West (South Africa) from 25th February to 3rd March 2015.

  1. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  2. Study of colloidal particles behaviour in the PWR primary circuit conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, M.

    2006-12-01

    EDF wants to understand, model and limit primary circuit contamination of Pressurized Water Reactors by colloidal particles resulting from corrosion. The electrostatic behaviour of representative oxide particles (cobalt ferrite, nickel ferrite and magnetite) has been studied in primary circuit conditions with the influence of boric acid and lithium hydroxide. The isoelectric point (IEP) and the point of zero charge (PZC) of particles, measured between 5 C and 320 C, exhibit a minimum towards 200 C. The thermodynamic constants of the protonation equilibrium of surface sites were calculated. When boric acid is added, zeta potential and IEP decrease because of borate ions sorption. On the contrary, there is not effect of lithium ions. The modelling of these results under conditions representative of primary circuit shows that these oxides exhibit a negative surface charge, explaining their sorption and adhesion behaviour. (author)

  3. Material analysis with the aid of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, E.

    1984-12-01

    Material analysis are discussed on the basis of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Various problems including cross-section changes, energy changes, count rate and deadtime, background, escape peaks and perturbations and overlap are discussed in relation to PIXE, while the influence of the energy loss of the projectile, the mass of the projectile, the cinematic factor, projectile energy, the scattering angle and the solid angle are discussed in terms of Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. X-ray production theory and x-ray detectors are also briefly discussed. The effect of elastically scattered protons on the energy resolution of the x-ray detector is discussed. The application of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy to the analysis of air particle samples, and to the determination of the efficiency of the filters used for the collection of air-particle samples is also discussed

  4. Role of fluctuations in the primary energy estimation of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempa, J.; Malecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    Energy spectrum and chemical composition of primary cosmic ray for energies higher than 1 PeV are obtained mainly from research on the intensity and properties of extensive air showers (EAS). Similar additional information is obtained from research on properties of gamma ray families. A common characteristic of these researches is the fact that we are working in the range of high fluctuation parameters serving us to obtain primary energy spectrum. In this research different probability distributions have been used as well as their convolutions with the power spectrum. The role of the influence of different parameters on measurements of the primary energy spectrum

  5. Primary particles and their agglomerate formation as modifying risk factors of nonfibrous nanosized dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J; Walter, D; Brückel, B; Rödelsperger, K

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of certain cancers correlates with the number of dust particles in the air. Nanosized particles differ from coarser particles by their increasing tendency to form agglomerates. The dissociation of biodurable agglomerates after deposition in the alveolar region resulted in a higher toxic potential. Biodurable dusts in the urban and workplace environment were analyzed to determine an effect-relevant exposure parameter. The characterization of the dusts relating to their number of primary particles (P(p)) and agglomerates and aggregates (A + A) was performed by electron microscopy. Diesel soot, toner material, and seven further dust samples in the workplace environment are composed of high numbers of nanosized primary particles (agglomerates. Primary particles of rock, kaoline, and seven further dusts sampled in the workplace are not nanosized. In a multivariate analysis that predicted lung tumor risk, the mass, volume, and numbers of A + A and P(p) per milligram dust were shown to be relevant parameters. Dose-response relationships revealed an increased tumor risk in rats with higher numbers of P(p) in nanosized dust, which occurs unintentionally in the environment.

  6. Energy dispersive soft X-ray fluorescence analysis by radioisotopic α-particle excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1977-01-01

    A Si(Li) X-ray detector system and 210 Po α-particle excitation source are combined to form a spectrometer for low energy X-rays. Its response in terms of Ksub(α) X-ray rate is shown for thick targets of elements from fluorine to copper. Potential applications of the equipment to useful quantitative elemental analysis of geological, biological and organic materials are explored. The results of analyses for oxygen and silicon in rocks and potassium in vegetation samples are included. A semi-empirical method of correcting for absorption and enhancement effects is employed. This is based upon X-ray production and photon absorption cross-sections taken from the literature and upon a minimal number of experimentally derived coefficients. (Auth.)

  7. A study of the scintillation induced by alpha particles and gamma rays in liquid xenon in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.V.; Howard, A.S.; Akimov, D.; Araujo, H.; Bewick, A.; Davidge, D.C.R.; Jones, W.G.; Joshi, M.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Liubarsky, I.; Quenby, J.J.; Rochester, G.; Shaul, D.; Sumner, T.J.; Walker, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Scintillation produced in liquid xenon by alpha particles and gamma rays has been studied as a function of applied electric field. For back scattered gamma rays with energy of about 200keV, the number of scintillation photons was found to decrease by 64±2% with increasing field strength. Consequently, the pulse shape discrimination power between alpha particles and gamma rays is found to reduce with increasing field, but remaining non-zero at higher fields

  8. Effect of the primary particle morphology on the micromechanical properties of nanostructured alumina agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilde, Carsten; Westphal, Bastian; Kwade, Arno

    2012-01-01

    Depending on the application of nanoparticles, certain characteristics of the product quality such as size, morphology, abrasion resistance, specific surface, dispersibility and tendency to agglomeration are important. These characteristics are a function of the physicochemical properties, i.e. the micromechanical properties of the nanostructured material. The micromechanical properties of these nanostructured agglomerates such as the maximum indentation force, the plastic and elastic deformation energy and the strength give information on the product properties, e.g. the efficiency of a dispersion process of the agglomerates, and can be measured by nanoindentation. In this study a Berkovich indenter tip was used for the characterisation of model aggregates out of sol–gel produced silica and precipitated alumina agglomerates with different primary particle morphologies (dimension of 15–40 nm). In general, the effect of the primary particle morphology and the presence or absence of solid bonds can be characterised by the measurement of the micromechanical properties via nanoindentation. The micromechanical behaviour of aggregates containing solid bonds is strongly affected by the elastic–plastic deformation behaviour of the solid bonds and the breakage of solid bonds. Moreover, varying the primary particle morphology for similar particle material and approximately isotropic agglomerate behaviour the particle–particle interactions within the agglomerates can be described by the elementar breaking stress according to the formula of Rumpf.

  9. The new Athena alpha particle X-ray spectrometer for the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, R.; Gellert, R.; Brückner, J.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Dreibus, G.; Yen, A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2003-11-01

    The new alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is part of the Athena payload of the two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER). The APXS sensor head is attached to the turret of the instrument deployment device (IDD) of the rover. The APXS is a very light-weight instrument for determining the major and minor elemental composition of Martian soils, rocks, and other geological materials at the MER landing sites. The sensor head has simply to be docked by the IDD on the surface of the selected sample. X-ray radiation, excited by alpha particles and X rays of the radioactive sources, is recorded by a high-resolution X-ray detector. The X-ray spectra show elements starting from sodium up to yttrium, depending on their concentrations. The backscattered alpha spectra, measured by a ring of detectors, provide additional data on carbon and oxygen. By means of a proper calibration, the elemental concentrations are derived. Together with data from the two other Athena instruments mounted on the IDD, the samples under investigation can be fully characterized. Key APXS objectives are the determination of the chemistry of crustal rocks and soils and the examination of water-related deposits, sediments, or evaporates. Using the rock abrasion tool attached to the IDD, issues of weathering can be addressed by measuring natural and abraded surfaces of rocks.

  10. Effects of Heavy particle ray on regeneration and reproduction with planarian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kaori; Matsumoto, Midori; Nojima, Kumie

    2006-01-01

    Space age is coming and many topics on cosmic space are pointed out like zero gravity and cosmic ray. Planarian is one of the attractive organisms, which could be a useful laboratory animal for space science. It is famous for its remarkable regeneration ability by pluripotent stem cells called neoblast. And they can produce their offspring by asexual reproduction and sexual reproduction. In this study, we focused on effects of the cosmic ray on the regeneration and the reproduction with planarian. As it has known that the major effective cosmic ray is a heavy particle ray, effects of the heavy particle ray on the regeneration and the reproduction was researched with C290, which is carbon ion beam, and Fe500, which is iron ion beam. In asexual reproduction worms, the irradiations of both beams had effects on dose dependency. The minimum lethal doses of both beams were 6 Gy and their neoblasts were disappeared. And in sexual reproduction worms, the irradiations of both beams also effects on dose dependency and the minimum lethal doses were 12 Gy. It showed that the relative biological effectiveness is different on the reproduction system in planarian. (author)

  11. Cosmic ray investigation for the Voyager missions; energetic particle studies in the outer heliosphere - and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E C; Vogt, R E [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA); McDonald, F B; Teegarden, B J; Trainor, J H [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, Md. (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center; Jokipii, J R [Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA); Webber, W R [New Hampshire Univ., Durham (USA)

    1977-12-01

    A cosmic-ray detector system (CRS) has been developed for the Voyager mission which will measure the energy spectrum of electrons from approximately 3-110 MeV and the energy spectra and elemental comparison of all cosmic-ray nuclei from hydrogen through iron over an energy range from approximately 1-500 MeV.nuc. Isotopes of hydrogen through sulfur will be resolved from approximately 2-75 MeV/nuc. Studies with CRS data will provide information on the energy content, origin and acceleration process, life history, and dynamics of cosmic rays in the galaxy, and contribute to an understanding of the nucleosynthesis of elements in the cosmic-ray sources. Particular emphasis will be placed on low-energy phenomena that are expected to exist in interstellar space and are known to be present in the outer Solar System. This investigation will also add to our understanding of the transport of cosmic rays, Jovian electrons, and low-energy interplanetary particles over an extended region of interplanetary space. A major contribution to these areas of study will be the measurement of three-dimensional streaming patterns of nuclei from H through Fe and electrons over an extended energy range, with a precision that will allow determination of anisotropies down to 1%. The required combination of charge resolution, reliability and redundance has been achieved with systems consisting entirely of solid-state charged-particle detectors.

  12. Measurement of H, He, C and O Cosmic ray primaries preliminary results from the CREAM II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mognet, Samuel

    The direct measurement of the energy spectrum and composition of the incoming cosmic-ray flux at multi-TeV energies is of great interest. A feature located somewhere between 1000-10,000 TeV in the all-particle spectrum, referred to as the ‘knee’ characterized by a steepening of the power-law flux, has been observed by ground-based detectors for many years. It is believed to be related to an upper limit or change in efficiency of the Galactic accelerators of cosmic rays and/or properties of the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Presented here is a preliminary analysis of the flux of primary H, He, C and O cosmic-ray species measured using the CREAM II instrument. This analysis is conducted using the Penn State-built Timing Charge Detector, distinct from other charge detectors used in alternative published CREAM II results. The second Antarctic flight of the CREAM instrument had a ∼ 28 day flight in the 2005-2006 Antarctic flight season. The instrument was launched on December 16th 2005 from Willi...

  13. Stratospheric particles: Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence determination of trace element contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, S.R.; Flynn, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The first trace element analyses on stratospheric particles using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) are reported. Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, Se and Br were detected. Concentrations for chondritic particle U2022G1 are within a factor of 1.7 of CI for all elements detected with the exception of Br which is 37 times CI. Chondritic particle W7029*A27 is also near CI for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ge but enriched in Ga, Se, and Br by factors of 5.8, 3.5 and 8.4, respectively. The third particle of the cosmic dust class also showed high Br enriched relative to CI by a factor of 28. Br was also detected at a high level in an aluminum-rich particle classified as probable artificial terrestrial contamination but exhibiting a chondritic Fe/Ni ratio. Br was not detected in a fifth particle also classified terrestrial and exhibiting a crustal Fe/Ni ratio. If the high Br has a pre-terrestrial origin, the ubiquity of the effect suggests that a large fraction of the chondritic interplanetary dust particles derive from a parent body (bodies) not sampled in the meteorite collection. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Size effect in X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from hydroxyapatite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, E.I.; Buffat, P.-A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron microdiffraction, and X-ray diffraction were used to study hydroxyapatite specimens with particle sizes from a few nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. Diffuse scattering (without clear reflections in transmission diffraction patterns) or strongly broadened peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns are characteristic for agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. However, HRTEM and microdiffraction showed that this cannot be considered as an indication of the amorphous state of the matter but rather as the demonstration of size effect and the morphological and structural features of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

  15. Nuclear and particle physics with inverse compton γ-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2004-01-01

    A new facility for GeV γ-ray beams in the energy range of 1.5 - 2.4 GeV is now used to develop hadron physics, and lead to an important finding of ''Penta-quark'' hadron, Θ + particle at 1540 MeV. The experimental results to observe φ and K + mesons guide us to a new look of quark dynamics with strangeness quarks. A beam line for MeV γ-rays is discussed in view of the observation of the parity violation due to the weak-strong coupling in nuclear medium. (author)

  16. Particle modeling of transport of α-ray generated ion clusters in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Lizhu; Nanbu, Kenichi; Hirata, Yosuke; Izumi, Mikio; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    A particle model is developed using the test-particle Monte Carlo method to study the transport properties of α-ray generated ion clusters in a flow of air. An efficient ion-molecule collision model is proposed to simulate the collisions between ion and air molecule. The simulations are performed for a steady state of ion transport in a circular pipe. In the steady state, generation of ions is balanced with such losses of ions as absorption of the measuring sensor or pipe wall and disappearance by positive-negative ion recombination. The calculated ion current to the measuring sensor agrees well with the previous measured data. (author)

  17. Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Norbert Pietralla

    2006-01-01

    The research project ''Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability'' with sponsor ID ''DE-FG02-04ER41334'' started late-summer 2004 and aims at the investigation of highly excited low-spin states of selected key-nuclei in the vicinity of the particle separation threshold by means of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in electromagnetic excitation reactions. This work addresses nuclear structures with excitation energies close to the binding energy or highly excited off-yrast states in accordance with the NSAC milestones. In 2005 the program was extended towards additional use of virtual photons and theoretical description of the low-lying collective excitations in the well deformed nuclei

  18. Microstructures for high-energy x-ray and particle-imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stone, G.F.; Hawryluk, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Coded imaging techniques using thick, micro-Fresnel zone plates as coded apertures have been used to image x-ray emissions (2-20 keV) and 3.5 MeV Alpha particle emissions from laser driven micro-implosions. Image resolution in these experiments was 3-8 μm. Extension of this coded imaging capability to higher energy x-rays (approx. 100 keV) and more penetrating charged particles (e.g. approx. 15 MeV protons) requires the fabrication of very thick (50-200 μm), high aspect ratio (10:1), gold Fresnel zone plates with narrow linewidths (5-25 μm) for use as coded aperatures. A reactive ion etch technique in oxygen has been used to produce thick zone plate patterns in polymer films. The polymer patterns serve as electroplating molds for the subsequent fabrication of the free-standing gold zone plate structures

  19. GAMCAT - a personal computer database on alpha particles and gamma rays from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepel, J.W.; Mueller, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    The GAMCAT database is a compilation of data describing the alpha particles and gamma rays that occur in the radioactive decay of all known nuclides, adapted for IBM Personal Computers and compatible systems. These compiled data have been previously published, and are now available as a compact database. Entries can be retrieved by defining the properties of the parent nuclei as well as alpha-particle and gamma-ray energies or any combination of these parameters. The system provides fast access to the data and has been completely written in C to run on an AT-compatible computer, with a hard disk and 640K of memory under DOS 2.11 or higher. GAMCAT is available from the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe. (orig.)

  20. X-ray emission of the hot gas and of accelerated particles in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, F.

    2008-09-01

    The current observations seem to support the theory that the shock wave of supernova remnants accelerate electrons (representing about 1% of cosmic rays) of the interstellar medium up to energies of about 10 15 eV. However there is still no solid evidence that supernova remnants also accelerate protons (major component of cosmic rays). The X-ray observations of those supernova remnants with the satellite XMM-Newton can provide crucial information on the acceleration mechanisms and on this population of accelerated particles. This thesis presents the X-ray analysis of the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and SN 1006 for which it has been shown that they accelerate electrons efficiently. As a result, these objects are very good targets to compare the theoretical models of acceleration to the observation. For the first object, I constructed through new XMM-Newton observations, the first high-angular resolution mosaic of the entire supernova remnant. I then compared the X- and gamma-ray emission of this object in order to understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission. This spectral and morphological comparison allowed me to discuss the two possible origins of the gamma-ray radiation (issued by electrons or by protons). For SN 1006, I studied the density of the ambient medium in which the shock wave propagates. This density is a key parameter for the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant and for studying a future gamma-ray emission. The study of X-ray emission of the gas heated by the shock wave allowed me to better estimate of the value of the density so far poorly constrained for this object. (author)

  1. Pre-scission particle and gamma-ray emission in heavy-ion induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J.O.

    1989-02-01

    An introduction is given to the physics of the equilibrium transition model and of dissipative nuclear dynamics. Experimental data on pre-scission particle and gamma-ray emission and their interpretation are reviewed. They appear to indicate overdamped motion of the nuclear fluid. A time scale for compound-nucleus fission of about 30x10 -21 sec or greater is indicated, whilst that for quasi- or fast-fission is somewhat shorter. 99 refs., 28 figs

  2. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Asenovski, S.; Kudela, K.; Laštovička, Jan; Mateev, L.; Mishev, A.; Tonev, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, 26 March (2013), A14/1-A14/17 ISSN 2115-7251 Grant - others:European COST Action(XE) ES0803 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : cosmic rays * solar energetic particles * ionization * ionosphere * atmosphere * solar activity * solar-terrestrial relationships Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013 http://www.swsc-journal.org/articles/swsc/abs/2013/01/swsc120040/swsc120040.html

  3. Particle induced X-ray emission for quantitative trace-element analysis using the Eindhoven cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivits, H.

    1980-01-01

    Development of a multi-elemental trace analysis technique using PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission), was started almost five years ago at the Eindhoven University of Technology, in the Cyclotron Applications Group of the Physics Department. The aim of the work presented is to improve the quantitative aspects of trace-element analysis with PIXE, as well as versatility, speed and simplicity. (Auth.)

  4. Characterisation of silica nanoparticles prior to in vitro studies: from primary particles to agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orts-Gil, Guillermo; Natte, Kishore; Drescher, Daniela; Bresch, Harald; Mantion, Alexandre; Kneipp, Janina; Österle, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The size, surface charge and agglomeration state of nanoparticles under physiological conditions are fundamental parameters to be determined prior to their application in toxicological studies. Although silica-based materials are among the most promising candidates for biomedical applications, more systematic studies concerning the characterisation before performing toxicological studies are necessary. This interest is based on the necessity to elucidate the mechanisms affecting its toxicity. We present here TEM, SAXS and SMPS as a combination of methods allowing an accurate determination of single nanoparticle sizes. For the commercial material, Ludox TM50 single particle sizes around 30 nm were found in solution. DLS measurements of single particles are rather affected by polydispersity and particles concentration but this technique is useful to monitor their agglomeration state. Here, the influence of nanoparticle concentration, ionic strength (IS), pH and bath sonication on the agglomeration behaviour of silica particles in solution has been systematically investigated. Moreover, the colloidal stability of silica particles in the presence of BSA has been investigated showing a correlation between silica and protein concentrations and the formation of agglomerates. Finally, the colloidal stability of silica particles in standard cell culture medium has been tested, concluding the necessity of surface modification in order to preserve silica as primary particles in the presence of serum. The results presented here have major implications on toxicity investigations because silica agglomeration will change the probability and uptake mechanisms and thereby may affect toxicity.

  5. Erzion interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhutov, Yu. N.

    2001-08-01

    It is discussed the interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT" for the momentum range P > P0 = 30 GeV/c by Erzions, hypothetical heavy stable penetrating hadrons, proposed to explain the anomalous vertical muons energy spectrum at small depth underground. Here it is shown that negative charge of p articles observed in "SKAT" is the same as predicted by theoretical Erzion model. The excess particles flux ( J ˜ 10-5 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 ) corresponds to the Erzion intensity observed by scintillation telescope in our previous experiment. The threshold momentum ( P0 ) and the track length threshold ( L0 = 50 cm of liquid BrF3C) are in good accordance with Erzion stop path as for the single charged particle with mass M ≅ 200 GeV/c2 . But to don't contradict with all previous charge ratio results for cosmic ray muons in 30 - 100 GeV/c momentum range it is necessary to propose for such particles the Solar sporadic origin taking to account that both Erzion observations were in the active Sun years (April 23,1979 & July, 1999). INTRODUCTION. 20 years ago to explain anomalous energy spectrum of vertical cosmic ray muons, observed at sea level and small depth underground (particles were started [4,5,6]. Later the theoretical model U(1)xSUl(2)xSU r(2)xSU(3) of such particles (Erzions) has been created in framework of "mirror" models [7,8], which without contradictions to elementary particles Standard Model has explained large kind of another anomalous results in cosmic rays and nuclear physics [9-19]. At last after almost 20 years Erzions search they have been observed due to small vertical original scintillation telescope "Doch-4" [20,21,22]. The observed Erz ions mass was ME = (175+/-25) GeV/c2 and intensity at sea level - JE = (1.8+/-0.4)ṡ10-6 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 (at EE ≤ 6 GeV, PE ≤ 50 GeV/c2 ). To confirm such Erzion discovery it was undertook the attempt of Erzions search on one of the largest bubble chamber (BC

  6. Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering characterization of diesel/gasoline soot: sizes and particle-packing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameya, Yuki, E-mail: ykameya@anl.gov; Lee, Kyeong O. [Argonne National Laboratory, Center for Transportation Research (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Regulations on particulate emissions from internal combustion engines tend to become more stringent, accordingly the importance of particulate filters in the after-treatment system has been increasing. In this work, the applicability of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) to diesel soot cake and gasoline soot was investigated. Gasoline-direct-injection engine soot was collected at different fuel injection timings. The unified fits method was applied to analyze the resultant scattering curves. The validity of analysis was supported by comparing with carbon black and taking the sample images using a transmission electron microscope, which revealed that the primary particle size ranged from 20 to 55 nm. In addition, the effects of particle-packing conditions on the USAXS measurement were demonstrated by using samples suspended in acetone. Then, the investigation was extended to characterization of diesel soot cake deposited on a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Diesel soot was trapped on a small piece of DPF at different deposition conditions which were specified using the Peclet number. The dependence of scattering curve on soot-deposition conditions was demonstrated. To support the interpretation of the USAXS results, soot cake samples were observed using a scanning electron microscope and the influence of particle-packing conditions on scattering curve was discussed.

  7. Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering characterization of diesel/gasoline soot: sizes and particle-packing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameya, Yuki; Lee, Kyeong O.

    2013-10-01

    Regulations on particulate emissions from internal combustion engines tend to become more stringent, accordingly the importance of particulate filters in the after-treatment system has been increasing. In this work, the applicability of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) to diesel soot cake and gasoline soot was investigated. Gasoline-direct-injection engine soot was collected at different fuel injection timings. The unified fits method was applied to analyze the resultant scattering curves. The validity of analysis was supported by comparing with carbon black and taking the sample images using a transmission electron microscope, which revealed that the primary particle size ranged from 20 to 55 nm. In addition, the effects of particle-packing conditions on the USAXS measurement were demonstrated by using samples suspended in acetone. Then, the investigation was extended to characterization of diesel soot cake deposited on a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Diesel soot was trapped on a small piece of DPF at different deposition conditions which were specified using the Peclet number. The dependence of scattering curve on soot-deposition conditions was demonstrated. To support the interpretation of the USAXS results, soot cake samples were observed using a scanning electron microscope and the influence of particle-packing conditions on scattering curve was discussed.

  8. Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering characterization of diesel/gasoline soot: sizes and particle-packing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Yuki; Lee, Kyeong O.

    2013-01-01

    Regulations on particulate emissions from internal combustion engines tend to become more stringent, accordingly the importance of particulate filters in the after-treatment system has been increasing. In this work, the applicability of ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) to diesel soot cake and gasoline soot was investigated. Gasoline-direct-injection engine soot was collected at different fuel injection timings. The unified fits method was applied to analyze the resultant scattering curves. The validity of analysis was supported by comparing with carbon black and taking the sample images using a transmission electron microscope, which revealed that the primary particle size ranged from 20 to 55 nm. In addition, the effects of particle-packing conditions on the USAXS measurement were demonstrated by using samples suspended in acetone. Then, the investigation was extended to characterization of diesel soot cake deposited on a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Diesel soot was trapped on a small piece of DPF at different deposition conditions which were specified using the Peclet number. The dependence of scattering curve on soot-deposition conditions was demonstrated. To support the interpretation of the USAXS results, soot cake samples were observed using a scanning electron microscope and the influence of particle-packing conditions on scattering curve was discussed

  9. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE ORIGIN OF X-RAY FLARES IN GRMHD SIMULATIONS OF SGR A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, David; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Chan, Chi-kwan [Steward Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Significant X-ray variability and flaring has been observed from Sgr A* but is poorly understood from a theoretical standpoint. We perform general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations that take into account a population of non-thermal electrons with energy distributions and injection rates that are motivated by PIC simulations of magnetic reconnection. We explore the effects of including these non-thermal electrons on the predicted broadband variability of Sgr A* and find that X-ray variability is a generic result of localizing non-thermal electrons to highly magnetized regions, where particles are likely to be accelerated via magnetic reconnection. The proximity of these high-field regions to the event horizon forms a natural connection between IR and X-ray variability and accounts for the rapid timescales associated with the X-ray flares. The qualitative nature of this variability is consistent with observations, producing X-ray flares that are always coincident with IR flares, but not vice versa, i.e., there are a number of IR flares without X-ray counterparts.

  10. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Svenda, Martin; Andreasson, Jakob; Jönsson, Olof; Odić, Duško; Iwan, Bianca; Rocker, Andrea; Westphal, Daniel; Hantke, Max; DePonte, Daniel P.; Barty, Anton; Schulz, Joachim; Gumprecht, Lars; Coppola, Nicola; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; White, Thomas A.; Martin, Andrew; Caleman, Carl; Stern, Stephan; Abergel, Chantal; Seltzer, Virginie; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Boutet, Sébastien; Miahnahri, A. Alan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Krzywinski, Jacek; Williams, Garth; Hodgson, Keith O.; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Starodub, Dmitri; Andersson, Inger; Bajt, Saša; Barthelmess, Miriam; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Kirian, Richard; Hunter, Mark; Doak, R. Bruce; Marchesini, Stefano; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Frank, Matthias; Shoeman, Robert L.; Lomb, Lukas; Epp, Sascha W.; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Hömke, André; Reich, Christian; Pietschner, Daniel; Weidenspointner, Georg; Strüder, Lothar; Hauser, Günter; Gorke, Hubert; Ullrich, Joachim; Schlichting, Ilme; Herrmann, Sven; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Andritschke, Robert; Schröter, Claus-Dieter; Krasniqi, Faton; Bott, Mario; Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Hirsemann, Helmut; Potdevin, Guillaume; Graafsma, Heinz; Nilsson, Björn; Chapman, Henry N.; Hajdu, Janos

    2014-01-01

    X-ray lasers offer new capabilities in understanding the structure of biological systems, complex materials and matter under extreme conditions1–4. Very short and extremely bright, coherent X-ray pulses can be used to outrun key damage processes and obtain a single diffraction pattern from a large macromolecule, a virus or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into plasma1. The continuous diffraction pattern of non-crystalline objects permits oversampling and direct phase retrieval2. Here we show that high-quality diffraction data can be obtained with a single X-ray pulse from a non-crystalline biological sample, a single mimivirus particle, which was injected into the pulsed beam of a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source5. Calculations indicate that the energy deposited into the virus by the pulse heated the particle to over 100,000 K after the pulse had left the sample. The reconstructed exit wavefront (image) yielded 32-nm full-period resolution in a single exposure and showed no measurable damage. The reconstruction indicates inhomogeneous arrangement of dense material inside the virion. We expect that significantly higher resolutions will be achieved in such experiments with shorter and brighter photon pulses focused to a smaller area. The resolution in such experiments can be further extended for samples available in multiple identical copies. PMID:21293374

  11. An optimised set-up for total reflection particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Vis, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    MeV proton beams at small angles of incidence (0-35 mrad) are used to analyse trace elements on flat surfaces such as Si wafers or quartz substrates. In these experiments, the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) signal is used in a new optimized set-up. This set-up is constructed in such a way that the X-ray detector can reach very large solid angles, larger than 1 sr. Use of these large detector solid angles, combined with the reduction of bremsstrahlung background, affords limits of detection (LOD) of the order of 10 10 at cm -2 using total reflection particle induced X-ray emission (TPIXE). The LODs from earlier TPIXE measurements in a non-optimized set-up are used to estimate LODs in the new TPIXE set-up. Si wafers with low surface concentrations of V, Ni, Cu and Ag are used as standards to calibrate the LODs found with this set-up. The metal concentrations are determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The TPIXE measurements are compared with TXRF measurements on the same wafers. (Author)

  12. Geometric mechanics of ray optics as particle dynamics: refraction index with cylindrical symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Emilio; Ruiz, Melina

    2017-09-01

    Starting from the Fermat principle of geometrical optics, we analyse the ray dynamics in a graded refractive index system device with cylindrical symmetry and a refractive index that decreases parabolically with the radial coordinate. By applying Hamiltonian dynamics to the study of the ray path we obtain the strict equivalence of this optical system with the dynamics of a particle with an equivalent mass moving in a potential function that may exhibit a well, depending on the value of some associated parameters. We analyse the features of this potential function as well as the energy values and the symmetries of the system and see that both the azimuthal and axial components of the optical conjugate momentum are two constants of motion. The phase space relation for the momentum radial component is obtained analytically, and then we can obtain the components of the momentum vector at any point, given the value of the radial coordinate, and from this we have the direction of the ray. We discuss the optical path length as an action functional and we can evaluate this stationary path, with initial and final arbitrary points, as a line integral of the optical momentum, by showing that this momentum is a conservative vector field. We integrate the equations of motion numerically and obtain different ray paths which depend on the initial conditions. We believe that with this work the physics student will appreciate very clearly the close connection between geometrical optics and particle Hamiltonian dynamics.

  13. Quantitative trace element analysis of individual fly ash particles by means of X-ray microfluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincze, L.; Somogyi, A.; Osan, J.; Vekemans, B.; Torok, S.; Janssens, K.; Adams, F. [Universitaire of Instelling Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    A new quantification procedure was developed for the evaluation of X-ray microfluorescence (XRF) data sets obtained from individual particles, based on iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Combined with the high sensitivity of synchrotron radiation-induced XRF spectroscopy, the method was used to obtain quantitative information down to trace-level concentrations from micrometer-sized particulate matter. The detailed XRF simulation model was validated by comparison of calculated and experimental XRF spectra obtained for glass microsphere standards, resulting in uncertainties in the range of 3-10% for the calculated elemental sensitivities. The simulation model was applied for the quantitative analysis of X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation-induced scanning micro-XRF spectra of individual coal and wood fly ash particles originating from different Hungarian power plants. By measuring the same particles by both methods the major, minor, and trace element compositions of the particles were determined. The uncertainty of the MC based quantitative analysis scheme is estimated to be in the range of 5-30%.

  14. Mathematical modeling of atmospheric fine particle-associated primary organic compound concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Hildemann, Lynn M.; Mazurek, Monica A.; Cass, Glen R.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric transport model has been used to explore the relationship between source emissions and ambient air quality for individual particle phase organic compounds present in primary aerosol source emissions. An inventory of fine particulate organic compound emissions was assembled for the Los Angeles area in the year 1982. Sources characterized included noncatalyst- and catalyst-equipped autos, diesel trucks, paved road dust, tire wear, brake lining dust, meat cooking operations, industrial oil-fired boilers, roofing tar pots, natural gas combustion in residential homes, cigarette smoke, fireplaces burning oak and pine wood, and plant leaf abrasion products. These primary fine particle source emissions were supplied to a computer-based model that simulates atmospheric transport, dispersion, and dry deposition based on the time series of hourly wind observations and mixing depths. Monthly average fine particle organic compound concentrations that would prevail if the primary organic aerosol were transported without chemical reaction were computed for more than 100 organic compounds within an 80 km × 80 km modeling area centered over Los Angeles. The monthly average compound concentrations predicted by the transport model were compared to atmospheric measurements made at monitoring sites within the study area during 1982. The predicted seasonal variation and absolute values of the concentrations of the more stable compounds are found to be in reasonable agreement with the ambient observations. While model predictions for the higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are in agreement with ambient observations, lower molecular weight PAH show much higher predicted than measured atmospheric concentrations in the particle phase, indicating atmospheric decay by chemical reactions or evaporation from the particle phase. The atmospheric concentrations of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic polycarboxylic acids greatly exceed the contributions that

  15. Effect of particle size, filler loadings and x-ray tube voltage on the transmitted x-ray transmission in tungsten oxide—epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Azman, N.Z.; Siddiqui, S.A.; Hart, R.; Low, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of particle size, filler loadings and x-ray tube voltage on the x-ray transmission in WO 3 -epoxy composites has been investigated using the mammography unit and a general radiography unit. Results indicate that nano-sized WO 3 has a better ability to attenuate the x-ray beam generated by lower tube voltages (25–35 kV) when compared to micro-sized WO 3 of the same filler loading. However, the effect of particle size on x-ray transmission was negligible at the higher x-ray tube voltages (40–120 kV). - Highlights: ► Investigated the effect of particle size of WO 3 on the x-ray attenuation ability. ► Nano-sized WO 3 has a better ability to attenuate lower x-ray energies (22–49 kV p ). ► Particle size has negligible effect at the higher x-ray energy range (40–120 kV p ).

  16. X-ray analysis of a single aerosol particle with combination of scanning electron microscope and synchrotron radiation X-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Masatoshi; Kaibuchi, Kazuki; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Terada, Yasuko; Tanabe, Teruo; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Kawai, Jun

    2004-01-01

    We developed a microscope by a combination of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). SR-XRF is appropriate to detect trace and micro amount of elements and sensitive to heavy elements in an analyte but it cannot observe the real time image. SEM-EDX can observe the secondary electron image of a single particle in real time and is appropriate to detect lighter elements. This combination microscope can ensure the identification of the XRF spectrum to the SEM image without transferring the sample. For aerosol analysis, it is important to analyze each particle. The present method makes feasible to analyze not only the average elemental composition as the total particles but also elemental composition of each particle, which is dependent on the particle shape and size. The microscope was applied to an individual aerosol particle study. The X-ray spectra were different among the particles, but also different between SR-XRF and SEM-EDX for the same particle, due to the difference in fluorescence yields between X-ray excitation and electron excitation

  17. Single-particle characterization of 'Asian Dust' certified reference materials using low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hee Jin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2006-01-01

    In order to clearly elucidate whether Asian Dust particles experience chemical modification during long-range transport, it is necessary to characterize soil particles where Asian Dust particles originate. If chemical compositions of source soil particles are well characterized, then chemical compositions of Asian Dust particles collected outside source regions can be compared with those of source soil particles in order to find out the occurrence of chemical modification. Asian Dust particles are chemically and morphologically heterogeneous, and thus the average composition and the average aerodynamic diameter (obtainable by bulk analysis) are not much relevant if the chemical modifications of the particles must be followed. The major elemental composition and abundance of the particle types that are potential subjects of chemical modification can only be obtained using single-particle analysis. A single particle analytical technique, named low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA), was applied to characterize two certified reference materials (CRMs) for Asian Dust particles, which were collected from a loess plateau area and a desert of China. The CRMs were defined by bulk analyses to provide certified concentrations for 13 chemical elements. Using the low-Z particle EPMA technique, the concentrations of major chemical species such as aluminosilicates, SiO 2 , CaCO 3 , and carbonaceous species were obtained. Elemental concentrations obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA are close to the certified values, with considering that the single particle and bulk analyses employ very different approaches. There are still some discrepancies between those concentration values, resulting from analyses of particles with different sizes, different sample amounts analyzed, and uncertainties involved in the single particle analysis

  18. Treatment of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma with superficial x-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Malene E; Gniadecki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The optimal radiation schedule for primary cutaneous anaplastic lymphoma (PCALCL) has not been investigated. We report here satisfactory outcomes of low-dose (16-20 Gy, 3-5 fractions), superficial X-ray radiation (40-50 kV) in a series of 10 patients with PCALCL. Only 1 patient developed a local...

  19. A calculation model for primary intensity distributions from cylindrically symmetric x-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Maltz, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    A calculation model for the quantitative prediction of primary intensity fluence distributions obtained by the Bragg diffraction focusing of kilovoltage radiation by cylindrical x-ray lenses is presented. The mathematical formalism describes primary intensity distributions from cylindrically-symmetric x-ray lenses, with a planar isotropic radiation source located in a plane perpendicular to the lens axis. The presence of attenuating medium inserted between the lens and the lens focus is accounted for by energy-dependent attenuation. The influence of radiation scattered within the media is ignored. Intensity patterns are modeled under the assumption that photons that are not interacting with the lens are blocked out at any point of interest. The main characteristics of the proposed calculation procedure are that (i) the application of vector formalism allows universal treatment of all cylindrical lenses without the need of explicit geometric constructs; (ii) intensity distributions resulting from x-ray diffraction are described by a 3D generalization of the mosaic spread concept; (iii) the calculation model can be immediately coupled to x-ray diffraction simulation packages such as XOP and Shadow. Numerical simulations based on this model are to facilitate the design of focused orthovoltage treatment (FOT) systems employing cylindrical x-ray lenses, by providing insight about the influence of the x-ray source and lens parameters on quantities of dosimetric interest to radiation therapy

  20. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriou, P., E-mail: P.Dimitriou@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Becker, H.-W. [Ruhr Universität Bochum, Gebäude NT05/130, Postfach 102148, Bochum 44721 (Germany); Bogdanović-Radović, I. [Department of Experimental Physics, Institute Rudjer Boskovic, Bijenicka Cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Chiari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Goncharov, A. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, National Science Center, Akademicheskaya Str.1, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Jesus, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Kakuee, O. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, End of North Karegar Ave., PO Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Bem ter 18/c, PO Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lagoyannis, A. [National Center of Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Agia Paraskevi, P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Athens (Greece); Räisänen, J. [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, PO Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Strivay, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Universite de Liège, Sart Tilman, B15 4000 Liège (Belgium); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Faraday 3, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL) ( (http://www-nds.iaea.org/ibandl)) by members of the IBA community by 2011, however a preliminary survey of this body of unevaluated experimental data has revealed numerous discrepancies beyond the uncertainty limits reported by the authors. Using the resources and coordination provided by the IAEA, a concerted effort to improve the situation was made within the Coordinated Research Project on the Development of a Reference Database for PIGE spectroscopy, from 2011 to 2015. The aim of the CRP was to create a data library for Ion Beam Analysis that contains reliable and usable data on charged particle γ-ray emission cross sections that would be made freely available to the user community. As the CRP has reached its completion, we shall present its main achievements, including the results of nuclear cross-section evaluations and the development of a computer code that will become available to the public allowing for the implementation of a standardless PIGE technique.

  1. Production of particle clustern in 50 GeV/cπ- -N and cosmic ray interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    The role of particle clusters in multiple-pion production at accelerator and cosmic ray energies is studied employing the high multiplicity (nsub(c) > = 9) accelerator data at 50 GeV/c, and cosmic ray α-N and N-N data at 0.1-1.21 TeV and 0.25-42.3 TeV respectively. The clusters in individual interactions have been identified by employing three methods. In interactions where the measurement of the secondaries was possible, the parameters of the clusters were found from the kinematics of the cluster production process and in it rest of the cases the parameters were determined by the conventional method. A phenomeological investigation of the following aspects has been made: (i) mass and decay particles of the cluster, (ii) transverse momentum of the cluster, (iii) angular distribution of the secondary particles in the cluster system, and (iv) average momentum (Psub(0)) of the pions in the cluster-rest system. In majority of the events of each type of interactions, at least one cluster is emitted. The average characteristics of clusters produced in double and single cluster events have been found to be similar. The average mass of the cluster and the number of its charged decay particles have been found to be 1.79 +- 0.2 GeV and 5.78 +- 0.4 GeV respectively. Value of (Psub(0)) has been found to be (161.2 +- 12) MeV/c. It has been observed that the features of the clusters at accelerator and cosmic ray energies are almost similar. (author)

  2. Influence of primary-particle density in the morphology of agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camejo, M D; Espeso, D R; Bonilla, L L

    2014-07-01

    Agglomeration processes occur in many different realms of science, such as colloid and aerosol formation or formation of bacterial colonies. We study the influence of primary-particle density in agglomerate structures using diffusion-controlled Monte Carlo simulations with realistic space scales through different regimes (diffusion-limited aggregation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation). The equivalence of Monte Carlo time steps to real time scales is given by Hirsch's hydrodynamical theory of Brownian motion. Agglomerate behavior at different time stages of the simulations suggests that three indices (the fractal exponent, the coordination number, and the eccentricity index) characterize agglomerate geometry. Using these indices, we have found that the initial density of primary particles greatly influences the final structure of the agglomerate, as observed in recent experimental works.

  3. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  4. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Merikanto, J.; Mann, G. W.; Reddington, C. L.; Pickering, S.; Ogren, J. A.; Andrews, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lihavainen, H.; Kivekäs, N.; Komppula, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kouvarakis, G.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weller, R.; Gras, J.; Laj, P.; Sellegri, K.; Bonn, B.; Krejci, R.; Laaksonen, A.; Hamed, A.; Minikin, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Talbot, R.; Sun, J.

    2010-05-01

    We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN) concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300-2000 cm-3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT) and 1000-10 000 cm-3 in the continental boundary layer (BL). Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2-10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46) but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1). The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=-88%) unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=-25%). Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=-74%) unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one) or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two) with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3) than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18). The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were consistent with values derived in previous studies from detailed case studies at individual sites. In our model, kinetic and activation

  5. Observation of cosmic-ray particles with artificial satellites in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Katsuaki

    1981-01-01

    The present status are described on the cosmic-ray observation with artificial satellites in Japan. In 1978, an electrostatic analyzer was loaded on the satellite EXOS-A to measure low energy electrons. The spectra taken on April 27, 1978, showed that the electron flux decreased exponentially with the increasing electron energy. A space environment monitor (SEM) was loaded on a geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) in 1977. The SEM consists of 5 Si detectors, with which particle identification can be made, and protons with the energy of 500 MeV and alpha particles with the energy of 370 MeV were observed. The time variation of particle flux was large in the low energy part and small in the high energy part. In 1984, the satellite EXOS-C will be launched. The purposes of this project are general observation of the middle atmosphere composition and the study of the anomaly of the ionosphere above the Brazilian Anomaly. Measurement of low energy particles will be done with an electrostatic analyzer, and that of high energy particles with a telescope with Si detectors. Other projects designed in Japan are OPEN-J and EXOS-D. (Kato, T.)

  6. On the dependance of the ''normalized multiplicity'' of particles produced in proton-nucleus interactions on the primary energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babecki, J.

    1975-01-01

    The mean ''normalized multiplicities'' of particles produced in p-nucleus interactions: with the leading particles (R 1 ) and without them (R 2 ) were calculated from the emulsion data. The independence of R 2 of the primary energy E 0 were stated in very wide interval of E 0 from 6.2 to thousands of GeV. R 2 is approximately equal to the mean number of collisions of the primary particle in the nucleus. (author)

  7. Current Sheets in Pulsar Magnetospheres and Winds: Particle Acceleration and Pulsed Gamma Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, Jonathan

    The research proposed addresses understanding of the origin of non-thermal energy in the Universe, a subject beginning with the discovery of Cosmic Rays and continues, including the study of relativistic compact objects - neutron stars and black holes. Observed Rotation Powered Pulsars (RPPs) have rotational energy loss implying they have TeraGauss magnetic fields and electric potentials as large as 40 PetaVolts. The rotational energy lost is reprocessed into particles which manifest themselves in high energy gamma ray photon emission (GeV to TeV). Observations of pulsars from the FERMI Gamma Ray Observatory, launched into orbit in 2008, have revealed 130 of these stars (and still counting), thus demonstrating the presence of efficient cosmic accelerators within the strongly magnetized regions surrounding the rotating neutron stars. Understanding the physics of these and other Cosmic Accelerators is a major goal of astrophysical research. A new model for particle acceleration in the current sheets separating the closed and open field line regions of pulsars' magnetospheres, and separating regions of opposite magnetization in the relativistic winds emerging from those magnetopsheres, will be developed. The currents established in recent global models of the magnetosphere will be used as input to a magnetic field aligned acceleration model that takes account of the current carrying particles' inertia, generalizing models of the terrestrial aurora to the relativistic regime. The results will be applied to the spectacular new results from the FERMI gamma ray observatory on gamma ray pulsars, to probe the physics of the generation of the relativistic wind that carries rotational energy away from the compact stars, illuminating the whole problem of how compact objects can energize their surroundings. The work to be performed if this proposal is funded involves extending and developing concepts from plasma physics on dissipation of magnetic energy in thin sheets of

  8. Particle precipitation and atmospheric X-and gamma-rays in the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly by balloon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.M. da.

    1981-06-01

    Studies concerning particle precipitation and atmospheric X-and low energy gamma-rays in the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly by balloons experiments that have been made at INPE since 1968 are reported. (Author) [pt

  9. Formation of fine solid particles from aqueous solutions of sodium chloropalladate by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, Motoyoshi; Fujita, Iwao; Korekawa, Kei-ichi.

    1994-10-01

    Studies have been carried out on the radiation chemical formation of palladium fine particles in argon saturated aqueous solutions of sodium chloropalladate without organic stabilizer. The solutions were irradiated with gamma-rays from a cobalt gamma-ray source and the irradiated solutions were subjected to the dynamic light scattering analysis for the particle diameter measurements, and to the UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy for the measurements of turbidity (absorption at 700 nm) and remaining chloropalladate ion concentrations in the solution. In the solution of pH = 1.95 by HCl, the turbidity increased after the irradiation and then decreased with time. The concentration of remaining palladate ion in the solution decreased by the irradiation, but it gradually increased with time after the irradiation. These phenomena were qualitatively explained by the reaction scheme in that a precursor to the solid particles still exists in the solution after the irradiation was terminated, and that intermediates including the precursor reacted with chloride ion to re-form chloropalladate ions. The average diameter of the particles after the irradiation was ca. 20 nm and it increased with time to 40 nm at 2.75 kGy, and to 80 nm at 8.25 kGy absorption of radiation. The solution of pH = 0.65 by HCl was found to give lower yields of particles than those observed for the solution of pH = 1.95, and to give the particles of diameters about 150-200 nm. In the solution containing HClO 4 instead of HCl, palladium particles were also formed by the irradiation, whereas no backward reaction after the irradiation was observed due to the low concentration of chloride ion in the solution. The average diameter of the particles after the irradiation was about 300 nm and increased with time after the irradiation to a final values which was found to depend on pH of the solution and dose. (author)

  10. Trace analysis by measurements of charged particle-excited X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Takanobu; Morita, Susumu; Kaji, Harumi

    1974-01-01

    Following the introduction on the theory of analysis by charged particle x-ray excitation, experimental methods are explained together with actual examples of quantitative analysis. Protons or particles of 3 He are allowed to hit samples as ion beam. On one target, 4 samples are installed. Therefore, it is possible to analyze 4 samples without breaking vacuum. The x-ray is detected with an Si(Li) detector. The resolving power of this detector was 205 eV for the x-ray of 5.9 KeV. The most important thing is the preparation of samples in thin state. Metals of minerals are easily prepared in films by means of vacuum evaporation. In case of the samples that are hard to prepare in thin films, carbon foils are often used as backing material to support the samples. The limit of determination is about 10 -12 g, but the theoretical limit is about 10 -14 g. The demerits of this method is that the resolving power is not good enough for the determination of light elements. The improvement of S/N ratio is also important for the increase of sensitivity. The development of backing materials is the most important thing in this view. The merits of this method are that the amount of samples may be very small, and that a number of elements are simultaneously determined to very small contents. (Fukutomi, T.)

  11. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  12. The charged particle veto system of the cosmic ray electron synchrotron telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Matthew T.

    The Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope is a balloon-borne detector designed to measure cosmic electrons at energies from 2 to 50 TeV. CREST completed a successful 10-day Antarctic flight which launched on December 25, 2011. CREST utilizes a novel detection method, searching for the synchrotron radiation emitted by the interaction of TeV-energy electrons with the geomagnetic field. The main detector component for CREST is a 32 x 32 square array of BaF 2 crystal detectors coupled to photomultiplier tubes, with an inter-crystal spacing of 7.5 cm. This document describes the design, construction and flight of the CREST experiment. A special focus is put upon the charged particle veto system, and its use in the analysis of the CREST results. The veto system, consisting of a series of 27 large slabs of organic plastic scintillator read out through photomultiplier tubes, is designed as a passive mechanism for rejecting charged particle events that could contaminate the X-ray signal from synchrotron radiation. The CREST veto system has 99.15% geometric coverage, with individual detector components exhibiting a mean detection efficiency of 99.7%. In whole, the veto system provides a charged particle rejection factor of better than 7 x 103.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant hepatitis E virus-like particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Che-Yen; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Li, Tian-Cheng; Takeda, Naokazu; Xing, Li; Hjalmarsson, Erik; Friberg, Claes; Liou, Der-Ming; Sung, Yen-Jen; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Cheng, R. Holland

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant virus-like particle that is a potential oral hepatitis E vaccine was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 8.3 Å resolution and the X-ray structure was phased with the aid of a low-resolution density map determined using cryo-electron microscopy data. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) accounts for the majority of enterically transmitted hepatitis infections worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment for or vaccine against HEV. The major structural protein is derived from open reading frame (ORF) 2 of the viral genome. A potential oral vaccine is provided by the virus-like particles formed by a protein construct of partial ORF3 protein (residue 70–123) fused to the N-terminus of the ORF2 protein (residues 112–608). Single crystals obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K diffract X-rays to 8.3 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 337, b = 343, c = 346 Å, α = β = γ = 90°, and contain one particle per asymmetric unit

  14. Long Duration Gamma-Ray Flares & Solar Energetic Particles — Is there a Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Boezio, M.; Bruno, A.; Christian, E. R.; Martucci, M.; Mergè, M.; Munini, R.; Ricci, M.; Ryan, J. M.; Share, G.; Stochaj, S.

    2017-12-01

    Little is known still about the origin of the high-energy and sustained emission from Long Duration Gamma-Ray Flares (LDGRFs), identified with Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), and now Fermi. Though Fermi/LAT has identified dozens of flares with LDGRF emission, the nature of this emission has been a challenge to explain both due to the extreme energies and long durations. The highest energy emission has generally been attributed to pion production from the interaction of high-energy protons with the ambient matter, suggesting that particle acceleration occurs over large volumes extending high in the corona, either from stochastic acceleration within large coronal loops or from back precipitation from CME-driven shocks. It is possible to test these models by making direct comparisons between the accelerated ion population at the flare derived from the observations of Fermi/LAT with PAMELA measurements of solar energetic particles in the energy range corresponding to the pion-related emission observed with Fermi. For nearly a dozen SEP events, we compare the two populations (SEPs in space and the interacting population at the Sun) and discuss the implications in terms of particle acceleration and transport models.

  15. A moving target for accelerated charged particle induced X-ray measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, L.S.; Shima, K.; Ebihara, H.; Seki, R.; Mikumo, T.

    1980-01-01

    To attain good reproducibility as well as to enable an absolute determination in the measurement of X-ray fluorescences, resulting from bombardment of a heterogeneous sample by accelerated charged particles, a moving-target mechanism incorporating an electronic remote control system has been devised. The system is designed to scan the whole sample area with a chosen constant linear speed, by a fixed particle beam with a cross-sectional area a small fraction of that of the sample. Using 16 MeV protons and 40 MeV oxygen-ion beams, test runs of this system showed that the attempted objectives are attainable with good accuracies: reproducibility of the data for a given target is better than 3%, the linearity of the calibration curve is in good agreement, within the weighing errors of the standard elements and the uncertainty due to beam current fluctuation, with the expected values, and the results of absolute determinations using both metal foils and heterogeneous powder samples are in good agreement with accepted results using different methods. Detailed accounts of the moving-target system, and the test for reproducibility and linearity are presented. An absolute determination of the quantities related to accelerated charged-particle induced X-ray fluorescence (PIXE) using the moving target is presented for samples in different forms. (orig./HP)

  16. Single-particle characterization of urban aerosol particles collected in three Korean cites using low-Z electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Chul-Un; Kim, HyeKyeong; Oh, Keun-Young; Yea, Sun Kyung; Lee, Chong Bum; Jang, Meongdo; Van Grieken, René

    2002-11-15

    A recently developed single-particle analytical technique, called low-Z electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z EPMA), was applied to characterize urban aerosol particles collected in three cities of Korea (Seoul, CheongJu, and ChunCheon) on single days in the winter of 1999. In this study, it is clearly demonstrated that the low-Z EPMA technique can provide detailed and quantitative information on the chemical composition of particles in the urban atmosphere. The collected aerosol particles were analyzed and classified on the basis of their chemical species. Various types of particles were identified, such as soil-derived, carbonaceous, marine-originated, and anthropogenic particles. In the sample collected in Seoul, carbonaceous, aluminosilicates, silicon dioxide, and calcium carbonate aerosol particles were abundantly encountered. In the CheongJu and ChunCheon samples, carbonaceous, aluminosilicates, reacted sea salts, and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles were often seen. However, in the CheongJu sample, ammonium sulfate particles were the most abundant in the fine fraction. Also, calcium sulfate and nitrate particles were significantly observed. In the ChunCheon sample, organic particles were the most abundant in the fine fraction. Also, sodium nitrate particles were seen at high levels. The ChunCheon sample seemed to be strongly influenced by sea-salt aerosols originating from the Yellow Sea, which is located about 115 km away from the city.

  17. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ruiping; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► α-Particle induced MN had a biphasic dose–response followed by a bystander model. ► MN dose–response of α- and γ-combination IR was similar to that of α-particle. ► α-Particles followed by γ-rays yielded a synergistic effect on MN induction. ► Low dose γ-rays triggered antagonistic and adaptive responses against α-particle. - Abstract: Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose–response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose–response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4 h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles.

  18. Tar balls are processed, weakly absorbing, primary aerosol particles formed downwind of boreal forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.; Adachi, K.; Kleinman, L. I.; Onasch, T. B.; Springston, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of light-absorbing black and brown carbonaceous aerosols Brown carbon is a poorly characterized mixture that includes tar balls (TBs), a type of carbonaceous particle unique to biomass burning. Here we describe the first atmospheric observations of the formation and evolution of TBs Aerosol particles were collected on TEM grids during individual aircraft transects at varying downwind distances from the Colockum Tarp wildland fire. The TEM images show primary particles transforming from viscous, impact-deformed particles to spherical TBs. The number fraction of TBs in the wildfire smoke plume increased from less than 5% in samples collected close to the emission source to greater than 40% after 3 hours of aging, with little change in downwind TB diameters. The TB mass fraction increased from 2% near the fire to 23±9% downwind. Single-scatter albedo determined from scattering and absorption measurements increased slightly with downwind distance. Mie calculations show this observation is consistent with weak light absorbance by TBs (m=1.56 - 0.02i) but not consistent with order-of-magnitude stronger absorption observed in different settings. The field-derived TB mass fractions reported here indicate that this particle type should be accounted for in biomass-burn emission inventories.

  19. First multimodal embolization particles visible on x-ray/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, Soenke H; Budjan, Johannes; Aviv, Hagit; Haneder, Stefan; Kraenzlin, Bettina; Michaely, Henrik; Margel, Shlomo; Diehl, Steffen; Semmler, Wolfhard; Gretz, Norbert; Schönberg, Stefan O; Sadick, Maliha

    2011-03-01

    Embolization therapy is gaining importance in the treatment of malignant lesions, and even more in benign lesions. Current embolization materials are not visible in imaging modalities. However, it is assumed that directly visible embolization material may provide several advantages over current embolization agents, ranging from particle shunt and reflux prevention to improved therapy control and follow-up assessment. X-ray- as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible embolization materials have been demonstrated in experiments. In this study, we present an embolization material with the property of being visible in more than one imaging modality, namely MRI and x-ray/computed tomography (CT). Characterization and testing of the substance in animal models was performed. To reduce the chance of adverse reactions and to facilitate clinical approval, materials have been applied that are similar to those that are approved and being used on a routine basis in diagnostic imaging. Therefore, x-ray-visible Iodine was combined with MRI-visible Iron (Fe3O4) in a macroparticle (diameter, 40-200 μm). Its core, consisting of a copolymerized monomer MAOETIB (2-methacryloyloxyethyl [2,3,5-triiodobenzoate]), was coated with ultra-small paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (150 nm). After in vitro testing, including signal to noise measurements in CT and MRI (n = 5), its ability to embolize tissue was tested in an established tumor embolization model in rabbits (n = 6). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) (Integris, Philips), CT (Definition, Siemens Healthcare Section, Forchheim, Germany), and MRI (3 Tesla Magnetom Tim Trio MRI, Siemens Healthcare Section, Forchheim, Germany) were performed before, during, and after embolization. Imaging signal changes that could be attributed to embolization particles were assessed by visual inspection and rated on an ordinal scale by 3 radiologists, from 1 to 3. Histologic analysis of organs was performed. Particles provided a

  20. The primary exposure standard of ENEA for medium energy X-ray: characteristics and measurements procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of a medium energy X-ray free-air chamber used, as primary exposure standard, at the Laboratorio di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of the Enea in Italy. The main features of an X-ray facility for the production of radiation between 40 KeV and 400 KeV are also described. The measurements procedures are then analyzed with respect to the realization of the exposure unit in the relevant energy range. Finally the results of some international comparisons are reported

  1. Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurement of the Cd content in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Huong Quynh; Demeter, I.; Hollos-Nagy, K.; Szoekefalvi-Nagy, Z.

    1989-12-01

    Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurements were performed on thin samples prepared from different rabbit tissues, using 3 MeV proton beam for inducing x-rays from the animal tissues. This method is very sensitive and very small amounts of trace elements can be detected. Cadmium, one of the most toxic elements which can be concentrated in animal and human tissues due to environmental pollution, was detected with a limit of 0.7 ppm. The trace element concentrations obtained by PIXE were compared to those measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. PIXE method is proposed for routine analysis at the Veterinary and Food Investigating Service, Budapest, Hungary. (D.Gy.) 6 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Constraints on Massive Axion-Like Particles from X-ray Observations of NGC1275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linhan; Conlon, Joseph P.

    2018-06-01

    If axion-like particles (ALPs) exist, photons can convert to ALPs on passage through regions containing magnetic fields. The magnetised intracluster medium of large galaxy clusters provides a region that is highly efficient at ALP-photon conversion. X-ray observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) located within galaxy clusters can be used to search for and constrain ALPs, as photon-ALP conversion would lead to energy-dependent quasi-sinusoidal modulations in the X-ray spectrum of an AGN. We use Chandra observations of the central AGN of the Perseus Cluster, NGC1275, to place bounds on massive ALPs up to ma ˜ 10-11eV, extending previous work that used this dataset to constrain massless ALPs.

  3. Particle induced X-ray emission and complementary nuclear methods for trace element determination; Plenary lecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, S A.E. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1992-03-01

    In this review the state-of-the-art of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) methods for the determination of trace elements is described. The developmental work has mostly been carried out in nuclear physics laboratories, where accelerators are available, but now the increased interest has led to the establishment of other dedicated PIXE facilities. The reason for this interest is the versatility, high sensitivity and multi-element capability of PIXE analysis. A further very important advantage is that PIXE can be combined with the microbeam technique, which makes elemental mapping with a spatial resolution of about 1 {mu}m possible. As a technique, PIXE can also be combined with other nuclear reactions such as elastic scattering and particle-induced gamma emission, so that light elements can be determined. The usefulness of PIXE is illustrated by a number of typical applications in biology, medicine, geology, air pollution research, archaeology and the arts. (author).

  4. On the high energy gamma ray spectrum and the particle production model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Itaru; Tezuka, Ikuo.

    1979-01-01

    A small emulsion chamber, 25 cm x 20 cm in area and 12 radiation lengths in thick, was exposed with JAL jet-cargo at an atmospheric depth of 260 g/cm 2 during 150 hrs. The gamma ray spectrum derived by combining data from X-ray films and nuclear emulsions is well represented by I sub(r) (>=Er) = (3.65 +- 0.30) x 10 -8 [E sub(r)/TeV]sup(-1.89+0.06-0.09)/cm 2 sr sec in the energy range 200 - 3,000 GeV. This result is in good agreement with those of several other groups. We discuss our data in terms of Feynman's and Koba-Nielsen-Olesen's scaling law of high energy particle production model. Interpreted in terms of an assumption of mild violation of the scaling law as x.d delta-s / delta-s indx = AE sup(2a)exp (-BE sup(a)x), our gamma ray spectrum results suggest an existence of a violation parameter of a = 0.18, which is consistent with results from gamma ray spectrum observations at great depth such as the mountain elevations. (author)

  5. The instrumental blank of the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The alpha particle X-ray spectrometers on the Mars exploration rovers Spirit and Opportunity accomplished extensive elemental analysis of the Martian surface through a combination of XRF and PIXE. An advanced APXS is now part of the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. APXS spectra contain contributions which enhance elemental peak areas but which do not arise from these elements within the sample under study, thereby introducing error into derived concentrations. A detailed examination of these effects in the MSL APXS enables us to test two schemes for making the necessary corrections.

  6. X-ray microtomography of damage in particle-reinforced metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummery, P.M.; Derby, B.; Anderson, P.; Davis, G.; Elliott, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The damage which occurs on plastic straining of silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminium alloys has been characterised using x-ray microtomography. The technique is used to provide density measurements as a function of strain in addition to imaging the internal structure with a resolution of ∼15μm. This allows a much more accurate determination of microstructural damage in terms of void growth than is available from measurements of density using buoyancy methods or from elastic modulus decrease. These data can be combined with acoustic emission measurements during straining to allow damage nucleation and growth contributions to be separated. (orig.)

  7. Luminescence yield in irradiating gases by X-rays and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combecher, D.

    1973-01-01

    In this paper, the measurable light emission in the irradiation of gases as modle substances has been quantitatively determined. The gases Ar, H 2 , N 2 , air, and C 3 H 8 were irradiated with X-rays and α-particles at a pressure of 730 torr. The emitted light was measured in the spectral range between the short-wave absorption edge of the gases and 6000 A (spectral resolution: 20 A). The spectral light yield was determined from the efficiency of the apparatus and from the total energy absorbed in the gases. (HK) [de

  8. Charged-particle induced radiation damage of a HPGe gamma-ray detector during spaceflight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Larry G. [Computer Sciences Corporation, Science Programs, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Starr, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Department of Physics, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Brueckner, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Boynton, William V. [University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bailey, S.H. [University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Trombka, J.I. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    1999-02-11

    The Mars Observer spacecraft was launched on September 26, 1992 with a planned arrival at Mars after an 11-month cruise. Among the scientific instruments carried on the spacecraft was a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) experiment to measure the composition of Mars. The GRS used a passively cooled high-purity germanium detector for measurements in the 0.2-10 MeV region. The sensor was a closed-end co-axial detector, 5.5 cm diameter by 5.5 cm long, and had an efficiency along its axis of 28% at 1332 keV relative to a standard NaI(Tl) detector. The sensor was surrounded by a thin (0.5 cm) plastic charged-particle shield. This was the first planetary mission to use a cooled Ge detector. It was expected that the long duration in space of three years would cause an increase in the energy resolution of the detector due to radiation damage and could affect the expected science return of the GRS. Shortly before arrival, on August 21, 1993, contact was lost with the spacecraft following the pressurization of the propellent tank for the orbital-insertion rocket motor. During much of the cruise to Mars, the GRS was actively collecting background data. The instrument provided over 1200 h of data collection during periods of both quiescent sun and solar flares. From the charged particle interactions in the shield, the total number of cosmic ray hits on the detector could be determined. The average cosmic ray flux at the MO GRS was about 2.5 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The estimated fluence of charged particles during cruise was about 10{sup 8} particles cm{sup -2} with 31% of these occurring during a single solar proton event of approximately 10 days duration. During cruise, the detector energy resolution determined from a background gamma-ray at 1312 keV degraded from 2.4 keV full-width at half-maximum shortly after launch to 6.4 keV 11 months later. This result agrees well with measurements from ground-based accelerator irradiations (at 1.5 GeV) on a similar size detector.

  9. Fluorine determination in human and animal bones by particle-induced gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, Chaturvedula S.; Hoffmann, Peter; Ortner, Hugo M.; Iyengar, Venkatesh; Blondiaux, Gilbert; Tessier, Yves; Petri, Hermann; Aras, Namik K.; Zaichick, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine was determined in the iliac crest bones of patients and in ribs collected from postmortem investigations by particle-induced gamma-ray emission based on the 19 F(p,pγ) 19 F reaction, using 20/2.5 MeV protons. The results indicate that for 68% of the human samples the F concentration is in the range 500-1999 μg g -1 . For comparison purposes fluorine was also determined in some animal bones; in some animal tissues lateral profiles of fluorine were measured. (abstract)

  10. Development of a Reference Database for Particle Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis techniques are non-destructive analytical techniques used to identify the composition and structure of surface layers of materials. The applications of these techniques span environmental control, cultural heritage and conservation, materials and fusion technologies. The particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy technique in particular, is a powerful tool for detecting light elements in certain depths of surface layers. This publication describes the coordinated effort to measure and compile cross section data relevant to PIGE analysis and make these data available to the community of practice through a comprehensive online database.

  11. Particle induced X-ray emission: a valuable tool for the analysis of metalpoint drawings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, A.; Guicharnaud, H.; Dran, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    For several years, we carry out a research on metalpoint drawings, a graphic technique mainly employed by European artists during the 15th and 16th centuries. As a non-destructive and very sensitive analytical technique is required, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis with an external beam has been used for this purpose. More than 70 artworks drawn by Italian, Flemish and German artists have been analysed, including leadpoint and silverpoint drawings. Following a short description of the metalpoint technique, the results are compared with the recipes written by Cennino Cennini at the beginning of the 15th century and specific examples are presented

  12. Particle acceleration in explosive relativistic reconnection events and Crab Nebula gamma-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2018-04-01

    We develop a model of gamma-ray flares of the Crab Nebula resulting from the magnetic reconnection events in a highly magnetised relativistic plasma. We first discuss physical parameters of the Crab Nebula and review the theory of pulsar winds and termination shocks. We also review the principle points of particle acceleration in explosive reconnection events [Lyutikov et al., J. Plasma Phys., vol. 83(6), p. 635830601 (2017a); J. Plasma Phys., vol. 83(6), p. 635830602 (2017b)]. It is required that particles producing flares are accelerated in highly magnetised regions of the nebula. Flares originate from the poleward regions at the base of the Crab's polar outflow, where both the magnetisation and the magnetic field strength are sufficiently high. The post-termination shock flow develops macroscopic (not related to the plasma properties on the skin-depth scale) kink-type instabilities. The resulting large-scale magnetic stresses drive explosive reconnection events on the light-crossing time of the reconnection region. Flares are produced at the initial stage of the current sheet development, during the X-point collapse. The model has all the ingredients needed for Crab flares: natural formation of highly magnetised regions, explosive dynamics on the light travel time, development of high electric fields on macroscopic scales and acceleration of particles to energies well exceeding the average magnetic energy per particle.

  13. Search for GLAST gamma ray burst triggers due to particle precipitation in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, C. R. A.; Navia, C. E.; Tsui, K. H.

    2008-01-01

    When GLAST is in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the rate of charged particles is too high to be efficiently filtered out. Moreover the high rate can cause saturation effects in the readout electronics and the sensors must be turned off. The SAA area relative to the total area of GLAST's orbit is approximately 12.5% and GLAST spends 18% of the time in it. In spite of these cares, we show in this work that, due to drift processes, particle precipitation can still trigger GLAST when it is close to the SAA region. Here, we report two GLAST gamma ray burst monitor (GBM) triggers, trigger 239895229 and trigger 239913100, on August, 08, 2008 whose characteristics are similar to the ones observed in the Swift-BAT noise triggers (due to particle precipitation in the SAA region). Both GLAST triggers happened during a plentiful particle precipitation in the SAA region, observed by Tupi telescopes at the ground with their trigger coordinates close to the field of view of the telescopes. Details of these results are reported.

  14. Quasi-particle interference of heavy fermions in resonant x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenis, András; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H; Sutarto, Ronny; Schierle, Enrico; He, Feizhou; Weschke, Eugen; Kavai, Mariam; Baumbach, Ryan E; Thompson, Joe D; Bauer, Eric D; Fisk, Zachary; Damascelli, Andrea; Yazdani, Ali; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-10-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) has recently become an increasingly important tool for the study of ordering phenomena in correlated electron systems. Yet, the interpretation of RXS experiments remains theoretically challenging because of the complexity of the RXS cross section. Central to this debate is the recent proposal that impurity-induced Friedel oscillations, akin to quasi-particle interference signals observed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), can lead to scattering peaks in RXS experiments. The possibility that quasi-particle properties can be probed in RXS measurements opens up a new avenue to study the bulk band structure of materials with the orbital and element selectivity provided by RXS. We test these ideas by combining RXS and STM measurements of the heavy fermion compound Ce M In 5 ( M = Co, Rh). Temperature- and doping-dependent RXS measurements at the Ce- M 4 edge show a broad scattering enhancement that correlates with the appearance of heavy f -electron bands in these compounds. The scattering enhancement is consistent with the measured quasi-particle interference signal in the STM measurements, indicating that the quasi-particle interference can be probed through the momentum distribution of RXS signals. Overall, our experiments demonstrate new opportunities for studies of correlated electronic systems using the RXS technique.

  15. Microstructural analysis of TRISO particles using multi-scale X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, T., E-mail: tristan.lowe@manchester.ac.uk [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bradley, R.S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Yue, S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Barii, K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gelb, J. [Zeiss Xradia Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Rohbeck, N. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Turner, J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    TRISO particles, a composite nuclear fuel built up by ceramic and graphitic layers, have outstanding high temperature resistance. TRISO fuel is the key technology for High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) and the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) variant. TRISO offers unparalleled containment of fission products and is extremely robust during accident conditions. An understanding of the thermal performance and mechanical properties of TRISO fuel requires a detailed knowledge of pore sizes, their distribution and interconnectivity. Here 50 nm, nano-, and 1 μm resolution, micro-computed tomography (CT), have been used to quantify non-destructively porosity of a surrogate TRISO particle at the 0.3–10 μm and 3–100 μm scales respectively. This indicates that pore distributions can reliably be measured down to a size approximately 3 times the pixel size which is consistent with the segmentation process. Direct comparison with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) sections indicates that destructive sectioning can introduce significant levels of coarse damage, especially in the pyrolytic carbon layers. Further comparative work is required to identify means of minimizing such damage for SEM studies. Finally since it is non-destructive, multi-scale time-lapse X-ray CT opens the possibility of intermittently tracking the degradation of TRISO structure under thermal cycles or radiation conditions in order to validate models of degradation such as kernel movement. X-ray CT in-situ experimentation of TRISO particles under load and temperature could also be used to understand the internal changes that occur in the particles under accident conditions.

  16. Microstructure of Semi-Solid Billets Produced by Electromagnetic Stirring and Behavior of Primary Particles during the Indirect Forming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Kyu Jin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An A356 alloy semi-solid billet was fabricated using electromagnetic stirring. After inserting the semi-solid billet into an indirect die, a thin plate of 1.2 mm thickness was fabricated by applying compression. The microstructure of the semi-solid billets fabricated in various stirring conditions (solid fraction and stirring force were analyzed. The deformation and behavior of the primary α-Al particles were analyzed for various parameters (solid fraction, die friction, compression rate, and compression pressure. In the stirred billets, a globular structure was dominant, while a dendrite structure was dominant in the unstirred billets. As the solid fraction decreased and the stirring current increased, the equivalent diameter and roundness of the primary α-Al particles decreased. The primary α-Al particle sizes were reduced as the compressing velocity increased, while a greater number of particles could move as the compressing pressure increased. As the path over which the motion occurred became smoother, the fluidity of the particles improved. Under compression, bonded primary α-Al particles became separated into individual particles again, as the bonds were broken. As wearing caused by friction and collisions between the particles during this motion occurred, the particle sizes were reduced, and the particle shapes become increasingly spheroid.

  17. Ordered array of ω particles in β-Ti matrix studied by small-angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šmilauerová, J.; Harcuba, P.; Stráský, J.; Stráská, J.; Janeček, M.; Pospíšil, J.; Kužel, R.; Brunátová, T.; Holý, V.; Ilavský, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nanosized particles of ω phase in a β-Ti alloy were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation. We demonstrated that the particles are spontaneously weakly ordered in a three-dimensional cubic array along the 〈100〉-directions in the β-Ti matrix. The small-angle scattering data fit well to a three-dimensional short-range-order model; from the fit we determined the evolution of the mean particle size and mean distance between particles during ageing. The self-ordering of the particles is explained by elastic interaction between the particles, since the relative positions of the particles coincide with local minima of the interaction energy. We performed numerical Monte Carlo simulation of the particle ordering and we obtained a good agreement with the experimental data

  18. Inhibitory Effects of Far-Infrared Ray-Emitting Belts on Primary Dysmenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Yi Liau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the therapeutic effect of the far-infrared ray-emitting belt (FIRB in the management of primary dysmenorrhea in female patients. Forty adolescent females with primary dysmenorrhea were enrolled in the study. Quantitative measurements were taken during the menstruation. Several parameters were measured and compared, including temperature, abdominal blood flow, heart rate variability, and pain assessment. Statistical analysis shows that treatment with FIRB had significant efficiency in increasing regional surface temperature and abdominal blood flow, widening standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals, and reducing VRS and NRS pain scores. The application of an FIRB appears to alleviate dysmenorrhea.

  19. Alteration of UV primary fluorescence of vital tumor cells following irradiation with neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, K.

    1980-01-01

    The change of UV primary fluorescence intensity of vital unstained cells of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma after 60 Co-gamma and neutron irradiation was investigated. The mean neutron energy was 6.2 MeV. Fluorescence intensity was detected using impulse cytophotometry. The UV intensity of single cells was measured in the spectral range from 300-400 nm. An monotonous increase of dose-effect curves and a maximum at 3.5 Gy (neutrons) and 30 Gy (γ-rays) was obtained. The first relevant increase of fluorescence intensity was detected at 0.4 Gy (neutrons) and 0.75 Gy (γ-rays). Factors influencing the increase and decrease of primary fluorescence behavior of vital cells are discussed. (author)

  20. A study of changes in the primary dose penetrating the protective apron on SID in x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    This study is to figure out the amount of primary X-ray generated in SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m penetrating protective aprons in X-ray radiography for hands, skull, and lumbar spine. Results are as follows: Firstly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is low such as that of hand X-ray may be reduced by 270 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still slightly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Secondly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is moderate such as that of skull X-ray may be reduced by 22 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still fairly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Thirdly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is very high such as that of lumbar spine X-ray may be reduced b y 13 times if protective aprons a re worn, but it still penetrates a lot 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Therefore, people in X-ray room should not only wear protective aprons at any spaces that the primary X-ray can reach, but also need to stand behind the thick Pb shield to protect the body if it is inevitable to stay in the room

  1. A study of changes in the primary dose penetrating the protective apron on SID in x-ray radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seong Kwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study is to figure out the amount of primary X-ray generated in SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m penetrating protective aprons in X-ray radiography for hands, skull, and lumbar spine. Results are as follows: Firstly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is low such as that of hand X-ray may be reduced by 270 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still slightly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Secondly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is moderate such as that of skull X-ray may be reduced by 22 times if protective aprons are worn, but it still fairly penetrates 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Thirdly, the exposure dose of primary X-ray which is very high such as that of lumbar spine X-ray may be reduced b y 13 times if protective aprons a re worn, but it still penetrates a lot 0.3mm thick Pb protective aprons at SID 50cm, 1m, and 2m. Therefore, people in X-ray room should not only wear protective aprons at any spaces that the primary X-ray can reach, but also need to stand behind the thick Pb shield to protect the body if it is inevitable to stay in the room.

  2. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray primary spectrum with ARGO-YBJ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, B; Iuppa, R; Di Sciascio, G

    2013-01-01

    The study of cosmic ray physic of 10 12 – 10 15 primary cosmic energy is one of the main goals of ARGO-YBJ experiment. The detector, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm 2 ), is an EAS array consisting of a continuous carpet of RPCs. The low energy threshold of the detector allows to study an energy region characterized by the transition from the direct to the indirect measurements. In this talk we will report on the measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at different zenith angles. The phenomenology of horizontal air shower (θ > 70°) will be described and discussed.

  3. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering of Cellulose Microstructure in Plant Primary Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dan; Kiemle, Sarah N.; Wang, Cheng; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Gomez, Esther W.; Gomez, Enrique D.

    Cellulosic biomass is the most abundant raw material available for the production of renewable and sustainable biofuels. Breaking down cellulose is the rate-limiting step in economical biofuel production; therefore, a detailed understanding of the microscopic structure of plant cell walls is required to develop efficient biofuel conversion methods. Primary cell walls are key determinants of plant growth and mechanics. Their structure is complex and heterogeneous, making it difficult to elucidate how various components such as pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose contribute to the overall structure. The electron density of these wall components is similar; such that conventional hard X-ray scattering does not generate enough contrast to resolve the different elements of the polysaccharide network. The chemical specificity of resonant soft X-ray scattering allows contrast to be generated based on differences in chemistry of the different polysaccharides. By varying incident X-ray energies, we have achieved increased scattering contrast between cellulose and other polysaccharides from primary cell walls of onions. By performing scattering at certain energies, features of the network structure of the cell wall are resolved. From the soft X-ray scattering results, we obtained the packing distance of cellulose microfibrils embedded in the polysaccharide network.

  4. Light absorption by primary particle emissions from a lignite burning plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, T.C.; Bussemer, M.; Wehner, B.; Keller, S.; Charlson, R.J.; Heintzenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols from the burning of fossil fuels contribute to climate forcing by both scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and estimates of climate forcing by light-absorbing primary particles have recently been published. While the mass and optical properties of emissions are needed for these studies, the available measurements do not characterize the low-technology burning that is thought to contribute a large fraction of light-absorbing material to the global budget. The authors have measured characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from a small, low-technology lignite-burning plant. The PM emission factor is comparable to those used to calculate emission inventories of light-absorbing particles. However, the fine fraction, the absorbing fraction, and the absorption efficiency of the emissions are substantially below assumptions that have been made in inventories of black carbon emissions and calculations of climate forcing. The measurements suggest that nonblack, light-absorbing particles are emitted from low-technology coal burning. As the burning rate increases, the emitted absorption cross-section decreases, and the wavelength dependence of absorption becomes closer to that of black particles

  5. Exploration of X-ray and charged-particle spectroscopy with CCDs and PSDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, D.P.L.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Ijzendoorn, L.J. van; Voigt, M.J.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Two alternative detector types have been studied for use in the Eindhoven scanning ion microprobe set-up. First, the applicability of a charge coupled device (CCD) system for X-ray spectroscopy has been explored. Second, some properties of the SiTek type 1L30 position sensitive detector (PSD) for charged-particle spectroscopy have been studied. A literature survey shows that excellent X-ray spectroscopy with a CCD system is feasible, particularly with a deep-depletion backside-illuminated CCD and low speed read-out. If, however, high-speed CCD read-out is required, such as for scanning microprobe experiments, a CCD system cannot be used for spectroscopy due to excess read-out noise. For the PSD, noise theory calculations are presented, which result in a noise shaping time for optimal energy and position resolution. In practice, however, a much longer time is needed to obtain sufficient energy and position linearity. Characterization measurements of the PSD using our 4 MeV He + microprobe are also described. A position resolution of 0.47 mm and a position linearity of better than 0.15% detector length are found. In addition, an energy linearity better than 0.3% and an energy resolution of 36 keV are measured. The latter will have to be improved, to make the PSD suitable for charged-particle spectroscopy applications. (orig.)

  6. The eikonal function: the commom concept in ray optics and particle mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautter, Martin

    1993-04-01

    The habit of teaching the movements of masses first, and propagation of light later, as an electromagnetic phenomenon was widespread. Looking further back into the history of physics, however, we see earlier the concepts for understanding light rays, and later their successful application to particle trajectories, leading to the highly developed celestial mechanics towards the end of the 19th century. And then, 1905, Karl Schwarzschild transferred the technique of `canonical coordinates,' named so by C.G.J. Jacobi in 1837, back to light rays in imaging systems. I would like to point to the chief steps in the evolution. The learning process for handling both particle and wave propagation aspects continues up to our time: Richard Feynman 1918 - 1988. We may judge each contribution: whether it opens our mind to a unifying theory, or whether it hardens partial understanding. And we can notice where the understanding of light propagation led the evolution, and how the theory for movement of masses caught up.

  7. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.

    1995-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ∼O(10–100  MeV. Our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  9. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES ESCAPING A SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of gamma-ray emission from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) originating from the explosions of massive young stars. The fast forward shock of the supernova remnant (SNR) can accelerate particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in a cavern blown by a strong, pre-SN stellar wind. As a fundamental part of nonlinear DSA, some fraction of the accelerated particles escape the shock and interact with a surrounding massive dense shell producing hard photon emission. To calculate this emission, we have developed a new Monte Carlo technique for propagating the cosmic rays (CRs) produced by the forward shock of the SNR, into the dense, external material. This technique is incorporated in a hydrodynamic model of an evolving SNR which includes the nonlinear feedback of CRs on the SNR evolution, the production of escaping CRs along with those that remain trapped within the remnant, and the broadband emission of radiation from trapped and escaping CRs. While our combined CR-hydro-escape model is quite general and applies to both core collapse and thermonuclear SNe, the parameters we choose for our discussion here are more typical of SNRs from very massive stars whose emission spectra differ somewhat from those produced by lower mass progenitors directly interacting with a molecular cloud.

  10. Alpha Particles and X Rays Interact in Inducing DNA Damage in U2OS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollazzo, Alice; Brzozowska, Beata; Cheng, Lei; Lundholm, Lovisa; Haghdoost, Siamak; Scherthan, Harry; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are monitored for health effects within the Life Span Study (LSS). The LSS results represent the most important source of data about cancer effects from ionizing radiation exposure, which forms the foundation for the radiation protection system. One uncertainty connected to deriving universal risk factors from these results is related to the problem of mixed radiation qualities. The A-bomb explosions generated a mixed beam of the sparsely ionizing gamma radiation and densely ionizing neutrons. However, until now the possible interaction of the two radiation types of inducing biological effects has not been taken into consideration. The existence of such interaction would suggest that the application of risk factors derived from the LSS to predict cancer effects after pure gamma-ray irradiation (such as in the Fukushima prefecture) leads to an overestimation of risk. To analyze the possible interaction of radiation types, a mixed-beam exposure facility was constructed where cells can be exposed to sparsely ionizing X rays and densely ionizing alpha particles. U2OS cells were used, which are stably transfected with a plasmid coding for the DNA repair gene 53BP1 coupled to a gene coding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The induction and repair of DNA damage, which are known to be related to cancer induction, were analyzed. The results suggest that alpha particles and X rays interact, leading to cellular and possibly cancer effects, which cannot be accurately predicted based on assuming simple additivity of the individual mixed-beam components.

  11. At what particle energy do extragalactic cosmic rays start to predominate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibig, Tadeusz; Wolfendale, Arnold W

    2005-01-01

    We have previously argued (e.g. Szabelski et al 2002 Astropart. Phys. 17 125) that the well-known 'ankle' in the cosmic ray energy spectrum, at log E (eV) ∼ 18.7-19.0, marks the transition from mainly galactic sources at lower energies to mainly extragalactic above. Recently, however, there have been claims for lower transitional energies, specifically from log E (eV) ∼ 17.0 (Thompson et al 2004 Proc. Catania Cosmic Ray Conf.) via 17.2-17.8 (Berezinsky et al 2004 Astropart. Phys. 21 617) to 18.0 (Hillas 2004 Proc. Leeds Cosmic Ray Conf.). In our model the ankle arises naturally from the sum of simple power law-spectra with slopes differing by Δγ ∼ 1.8; from differential slope γ = -3.8 for galactic particles (near log E = 19) to γ ∼ -2.0 for extragalactic sources. In the other models, on the other hand, the ankle is intrinsic to the extragalactic component alone, and arises from the shape of the rate of energy loss versus energy for the (assumed) protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our detailed analysis of the world's data on the ultra-high energy spectrum shows that taken together, or separately, the resulting mean sharpness of the ankle (second derivative of the log(intensity x E 3 ) with respect to log E) is consistent with our 'mixed' model. For explanation in terms of extragalactic particles alone, however, the ankle will be at the wrong energy-for reasonable production models and of insufficient magnitude if, as seems likely, there is still a significant fraction of heavy nuclei at the ankle energy

  12. Primary Cosmic Rays with Energies above 1015 eV – Rapporteur Review of Poster Presentations at the 23rd ECRS – Session PCR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric Extensive Air Showers (EAS) are the only way of experimental studies of Primary Cosmic Rays (CR) with energies above 10 15 eV. The final targets of these studies are search for astrophysical origin of these particles and properties of particle production in high energy particle interaction. Works presented at the PCR 2 session in the form of posters reflected the current progress in this area. In this review presented posters were grouped according to CR energy range, astrophysical significance, relation to high energy physics interaction properties and interaction models, and future experiments. 42 posters were submitted for this session. Some of the presented material in posters overlapped in parts with oral presentations.

  13. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A.M.

    2016-11-11

    Results characterizing GaAs p{sup +}-i-n{sup +} mesa photodiodes with a 10 µm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 µm and 400 µm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm{sup 2} to 67 nA/cm{sup 2} at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. {sup 55}Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 µm diameter device and one 400 µm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 µm and 740 eV using the 400 µm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. {sup 63}Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 µm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  14. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Results characterizing GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes with a 10 μm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 μm and 400 μm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm2 to 67 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. 55Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 μm diameter device and one 400 μm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 μm and 740 eV using the 400 μm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. 63Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 μm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  15. Determination of impurities in silicon nitride by particle induced x-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Ishizuka, Toshio; Miyagawa, Soji

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for quantitative particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of impurities in the thick samples of silicon nitride. In the analysis of ceramic materials such as silicon nitride, chemical treatments are required to prepare thin enough samples. However, the chemical treatments are undesirable for the PIXE analysis, because another complications are brought about. Our method does not need any chemical treatments and thick samples can be subjected to the measurements. The determination of impurities were made by on-line use of a personal computer in which standard X-ray intensity data were stored. The method and procedures are as follows: After subtracting a buckground spectrum from an observed PIXE spectrum, the resultant peaks are assigned to individual elements. Then, in order to determine the contents of the impurities, the intensity of each peak is compared with a Gaussian curve which is generated from the standard X-ray intensity data. The latter data were determined theoretically. The results were in satisfactory agreement with those obtained by ICP emission spectrometry. (author)

  16. Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission Spectroscopy Over a Broad Range of Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Hannah; Wilkinson, John; Tighe, Meghanne; McLallen, Walter; McGuire, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis is a common application of nuclear physics that allows elemental and isotopic information about materials to be determined from accelerated light ion beams One of the best know ion beam analysis techniques is Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) spectroscopy, which can be used ex vacuo to identify the elements of interest in almost any solid target. The energies of the gamma-rays emitted by excited nuclei will be unique to each element and depend on its nuclear structure. For the most sensitivity, the accelerated ions should exceed the Coulomb barrier of the target, but many isotopes are known to be accessible to PIGE even below the Coulomb barrier. To explore the sensitivity of PIGE across the periodic table, PIGE measurements were made on elements with Z = 5, 9, 11-15, 17, 19-35, 37, 42, 44-48, 53, 56, 60, 62, 73, and 74 using 3.4 MeV protons. These measurements will be compared with literature values and be used as a basis for comparison with higher-energy proton beams available at the University of Notre Dame's St. Andre accelerator when it comes online this Fall. The beam normalization technique of using atmospheric argon and its 1459 keV gamma-ray to better estimate the integrated beam on target will also be discussed. Funded by the NSF REU program and the University of Notre Dame.

  17. Particle physics seminar: Muon radiography of volcanoes and the MU-RAY project

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 25  May 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Muon radiography of volcanoes and the MU-RAY project Par Prof. Paolo Strolin, Università Federico II and INFN, Napoli Thanks to their penetration power, high energy muons generated in the interactions of cosmic rays with the Earth’s atmosphere offer the possibility to perform “muon radiographies” of geological structures and in particular volcanoes. The principle is similar to that of the imaging of the interior of human body through the observation of the absorption of X rays. Muon radiography has been first applied in 1970 to the search of unknown burial chambers in the Chefren’s pyramid. In the years 2000, the technique has been ...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of polystyrene embolization particles doped with tantalum oxide nanoparticles for X-ray contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Rachel; Thompson, James; Bird, Luke; Hill, Mark A; Townley, Helen

    2015-08-01

    Radiopaque and fluorescent embolic particles have been synthesized and characterised to match the size of vasculature found in tumours to ensure effective occlusion of the vessels. A literature search showed that the majority of vessels surrounding a tumour were less than 50 µm and therefore polydispersed polystyrene particles with a peak size of 50 µm have been synthesised. The embolic particles contain 5-8 nm amorphous tantalum oxide nanoparticles which provide X-ray contrast. Embolic particles containing up to 9.4 wt% tantalum oxide were prepared and showed significant contrast compared to the undoped polystyrene particles. The X-ray contrast of the embolic particles was shown to be linear (R(2) = 0.9) with respect to the concentration of incorporated tantalum nanoparticles. A model was developed which showed that seventy-five 50 µm embolic particles containing 10% tantalum oxide could provide the same contrast as 5 cm of bone. Therefore, the synthesized particles would provide sufficient X-ray contrast to enable visualisation within a tumour.

  19. Estimation of primary cosmic ray characteristics with the help of EAS Cherenkov light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, L.; Brankova, M.; Kirov, I.; Mishev, A.; Stamenov, J.; Ushev, S.; Mavrodiev, S.

    1999-01-01

    A new method of estimating primary cosmic ray characteristics based on the registration and analysis of EAS Cherenkov light is proposed. The nature, energy and arrival direction of primaries are obtained as a solution of a nonlinear inverse problem. The applied mathematical model is created by analyzing 'Hotovo' telescope experimental data. The behaviour of model parameters is studied using CORSIKA code for the primary energy interval 30 GeV-3 TeV. This method could be applied successfully for a different kind of detector displacements of EAS arrays. Moreover, it is shown that the shower parameter estimation could be obtained more effectively and precisely in the case of detectors displacement according to a Spiral

  20. Determination of 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratio for a nuclear bomb particle using X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with γ-ray spectrometry and non-destructive α-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poellaenen, R.; Ruotsalainen, K.; Toivonen, H.

    2009-01-01

    A nuclear bomb particle from Thule containing Pu and U was analyzed using X-ray spectrometry in combination with γ-ray spectrometry and non-destructive α-spectrometry. The main objective was to investigate the possibility to determine the 239 Pu and 240 Pu isotope ratios. Previously, X-ray spectrometry together with the above-mentioned methods has been successfully applied for radiochemically processed samples, but not for individual particles. In the present paper we demonstrate the power of non-destructive analysis. The 239 Pu/( 239 Pu+ 240 Pu) atom ratio for the Thule particle was determined, using two different approaches, to be 0.93±0.07 and 0.91±0.05. These results are consistent with weapons-grade material and the results obtained by other investigators.

  1. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam.

  2. Separation method of heavy-ion particle image from gamma-ray mixed images using an imaging plate

    CERN Document Server

    Yamadera, A; Ohuchi, H; Nakamura, T; Fukumura, A

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a separation method of alpha-ray and gamma-ray images using the imaging plate (IP). The IP from which the first image was read out by an image reader was annealed at 50 deg. C for 2 h in a drying oven and the second image was read out by the image reader. It was found out that an annealing ratio, k, which is defined as a ratio of the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) density at the first measurement to that at the second measurement, was different for alpha rays and gamma rays. By subtracting the second image multiplied by a factor of k from the first image, the alpha-ray image was separated from the alpha and gamma-ray mixed images. This method was applied to identify the images of helium, carbon and neon particles of high energies using the heavy-ion medical accelerator, HIMAC. (author)

  3. Trace element determination in tomato puree using particle induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Davila, E.; Miranda, J.

    2004-01-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were used to determine the concentrations of trace elements in samples of 12 tomato puree brands sold in the Mexican market. While RBS offered information about the main elements present in the matrix, PIXE gave results on trace elements. As a whole, data for 17 elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) were obtained. To evaluate the results, a comparison with brands from USA, Japan, Colombia, and Chile was carried out, using tomato purees produced following the domestic technology recipe. Additionally, the results were considered in the light of the Codex Alimentarius and the Mexican standard. It was found that all of the brands fall within the limits established by these standards, being of the same order of magnitude as the foreign brands. (author)

  4. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams

  5. Particle induced x-ray emission studies of some Indian medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomita Devi, K.; Nandakumar Sarma, H.; Kumar, Sanjiv

    2007-01-01

    Medicinal herbs have been used from antiquity by humanity. This paper discusses the elemental composition and concentration of ten Indian medicinal plants investigated by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. The accuracy and precision of the technique were assured by analyzing three Certified Standard Reference Materials -cabbage- (GBW 08504, China), wheat flour (NIST-8436) and bovine liver (NIST-1577b). The element K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were found to be present in all the samples in varying concentrations. No toxic heavy metals such as As, Pb and Hg were detected in the studied plants. The range of the elemental concentrations in dry weight has been found to vary from 4.69x10 4 mg/kg to 1.81 mg/kg in the plants. The results also show that these plants contain elements of vital importance in man's metabolism and that are needed for growth and developments, prevention and heating of diseases. (author)

  6. Quantification of arsenic in activated carbon using particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Maheswaran, Saravanamuthu; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Ngo, Huu H.; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuth

    2006-01-01

    To date, the trace elemental analysis of solids with inhomogeneous internal structure has been limited, particularly in the case of adsorbents. High-energy ion beam based particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is an ideal analytical tool suitable for simultaneous quantification of trace elements with high accuracy. In this study, PIXE was used to quantify arsenic in the adsorbents, granular activated carbon (GAC) and powder activated carbon (PAC). Pelletized and unmodified GAC and PAC samples were analyzed along with powder samples deposited on thin teflon filters. These sample preparation methods resulted in samples of various thicknesses and densities. PIXE measurements taken from these samples were compared to results from neutron activation analysis (NAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). There is a good agreement between the values from the NAA and pelletized PIXE measurements and some AAS measurements

  7. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) Approach for the Quantification of Thin Al Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, G; Zahraman, K; Nsouli, B; Soueidan, M; Ferro, G

    2008-01-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) has been used as a fast and non-destructive technique for sensitive characterization of ultra thin Al films deposited by evaporation onto Si substrate. In this work the PIXE technique was optimized, using proton beam at different energies and different angles of incidence, for the characterization of ultra thin Al films (few nanometers) deposited onto Si substrate. The PIXE results showed that a proton beam of 300 keV under tilting angle of 80 degree permits an accurate determination of Al with high sensitivity within few minutes of acquisition time and a LOD of less than 0.2 nm. The LOD versus energy and tilting angle will be presented and discussed. (author)

  8. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); DeYoung, Paul A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, 27 Graves Place, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Blum, Arlene [Green Science Policy Institute, Box 5455, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, LSRC Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Peaslee, Graham F., E-mail: peaslee@hope.edu [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  9. [Near infrared distance sensing method for Chang'e-3 alpha particle X-ray spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Ming-Ye; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Gao, Min; Liu, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya

    2013-05-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover, the scientific objective of which is in-situ observation and off-line analysis of lunar regolith and rock. Distance measurement is one of the important functions for APXS to perform effective detection on the moon. The present paper will first give a brief introduction to APXS, and then analyze the specific requirements and constraints to realize distance measurement, at last present a new near infrared distance sensing algorithm by using the inflection point of response curve. The theoretical analysis and the experiment results verify the feasibility of this algorithm. Although the theoretical analysis shows that this method is not sensitive to the operating temperature and reflectance of the lunar surface, the solar infrared radiant intensity may make photosensor saturation. The solutions are reducing the gain of device and avoiding direct exposure to sun light.

  10. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2010-10-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 1012 photons per pulse, 20 µm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  11. Efficiency of the scattered primary radiation as an internal standard in the determination of uranium and thorium in geological materials by X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Guerra, J.P.; Bayon, A.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of the scattered primary coherent and incoherent X-radiation of various wavelengths has been studied as a matrix correction in the determination of uranium and thorium in geological materials by X-ray spectrometry. The excitation has been performed with molybdenum and tungsten targets. Results illustrate that the incoherently-scattered Mok βsub(1,3) and Mok βsub(1,2) radiation are, respectively, the optimum reference lines. The particle size influence and the critical thickness of the sample are also considered.(auth.)

  12. Plastic scintillators in coincidence for the study of multi-particle production of sea level cosmic rays in dense medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, L. S.; Chan, K. W.; Wada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray particles at sea level penetrate a thick layer of dense medium without appreciable interaction. These penetrating particles are identified with muons. The only appreciable interaction of muons are by knock on processes. A muon may have single, double or any number of knock on with atoms of the material so that one, two, three or more particles will come out from the medium in which the knock on processes occur. The probability of multiparticle production is expected to decrease with the increase of multiplicity. Measurements of the single, double, and triple particles generated in a dense medium (Fe and Al) by sea level cosmic rays at 22.42 N. Lat. and 114.20 E. Long. (Hong Kong) are presented using a detector composed of two plastic scintillators connected in coincidence.

  13. Designing a water calorimeter as primary standard of gamma rays at IPEN/CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra, Felipe B. de; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to describe the present stage and the next steps of the development of a water calorimeter of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN/CNEN. This calorimeter will be used as a primary standard of gamma ray sources at the laboratory. Between the design and the construction step it will be shown how this model was chosen and how it is modeled virtually with computer simulation. The two main codes used, MCNP and Fluent, to characterize the prototype before its construction are presented. (author)

  14. Micromanipulation and pick-up system for X-Ray diffraction characterization of micrometer-sized single particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Y; Inami, N; Saito, K; Otori, H; Sagayama, R; Kumai, R; Ono, K; Ueno, T

    2014-01-01

    We describe a micromanipulation and pick-up system for preparing a micrometer-sized single particle for X-ray diffraction characterization. Combining a microgripper based on microelectromechanical systems, piezo-motor-driven linear stages, and a gamepad, the system provides precise and intuitive handling of the object. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements of Sm-Fe-N permanent magnet were performed using this system. We also describe a method to distinguish crystallographically homogeneous particles found in powder-form samples.

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the giant mimivirus particle with an x-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeberg, Tomas; Svenda, Martin; Abergel, Chantal; Maia, Filipe R N C; Seltzer, Virginie; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Hantke, Max; Jönsson, Olof; Nettelblad, Carl; van der Schot, Gijs; Liang, Mengning; DePonte, Daniel P; Barty, Anton; Seibert, M Marvin; Iwan, Bianca; Andersson, Inger; Loh, N Duane; Martin, Andrew V; Chapman, Henry; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Ferguson, Ken R; Krzywinski, Jacek; Epp, Sascha W; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Hajdu, Janos

    2015-03-06

    We present a proof-of-concept three-dimensional reconstruction of the giant mimivirus particle from experimentally measured diffraction patterns from an x-ray free-electron laser. Three-dimensional imaging requires the assembly of many two-dimensional patterns into an internally consistent Fourier volume. Since each particle is randomly oriented when exposed to the x-ray pulse, relative orientations have to be retrieved from the diffraction data alone. We achieve this with a modified version of the expand, maximize and compress algorithm and validate our result using new methods.

  16. Revisiting the SN1987A gamma-ray limit on ultralight axion-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payez, Alexandre; Ringwald, Andreas [Theory group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Evoli, Carmelo; Mirizzi, Alessandro [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Fischer, Tobias [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Wroc\\law, Pl. M. Borna 9, 50-204 Wroc\\law (Poland); Giannotti, Maurizio, E-mail: alexandre.payez@desy.de, E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de, E-mail: fischer@ift.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: mgiannotti@barry.edu, E-mail: alessandro.mirizzi@desy.de, E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de [Physical Sciences, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami Shores, FL 33161 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We revise the bound from the supernova SN1987A on the coupling of ultralight axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. In a core-collapse supernova, ALPs would be emitted via the Primakoff process, and eventually convert into gamma rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. The lack of a gamma-ray signal in the GRS instrument of the SMM satellite in coincidence with the observation of the neutrinos emitted from SN1987A therefore provides a strong bound on their coupling to photons. Due to the large uncertainty associated with the current bound, we revise this argument, based on state-of-the-art physical inputs both for the supernova models and for the Milky-Way magnetic field. Furthermore, we provide major amendments, such as the consistent treatment of nucleon-degeneracy effects and of the reduction of the nuclear masses in the hot and dense nuclear medium of the supernova. With these improvements, we obtain a new upper limit on the photon-ALP coupling: g{sub aγ} ∼< 5.3 × 10{sup -12} GeV{sup -1}, for m{sub a} ∼< 4.4 × 10{sup -10} eV, and we also give its dependence at larger ALP masses m{sub a}. Moreover, we discuss how much the Fermi-LAT satellite experiment could improve this bound, should a close-enough supernova explode in the near future.

  17. Revisiting the SN1987A gamma-ray limit on ultralight axion-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payez, Alexandre; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Evoli, Carmelo; Mirizzi, Alessandro [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Fischer, Tobias [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Giannotti, Maurizio [Barry Univ., Miami Shores, FL (United States). Physical Sciences

    2014-10-15

    We revise the bound from the supernova SN1987A on the coupling of ultralight axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. In a core-collapse supernova, ALPs would be emitted via the Primakoff process, and eventually convert into gamma rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. The lack of a gamma-ray signal in the GRS instrument of the SMM satellite in coincidence with the observation of the neutrinos emitted from SN1987A therefore provides a strong bound on their coupling to photons. Due to the large uncertainty associated with the current bound, we revise this argument, based on state-of-the-art physical inputs both for the supernova models and for the Milky-Way magnetic field. Furthermore, we provide major amendments, such as the consistent treatment of nucleon-degeneracy effects and of the reduction of the nuclear masses in the hot and dense nuclear medium of the supernova. With these improvements, we obtain a new upper limit on the photon-ALP coupling: g{sub aγ}

  18. Electric field of thunderclouds and cosmic rays: evidence for acceleration of particles (runaway electrons)

    CERN Document Server

    Khaerdinov, N S; Petkov, V B; 12th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    2004-01-01

    We present the data on correlations of the intensity of the soft component of cosmic rays with the local electric field of the near-earth atmosphere during thunderstorm periods at the Baksan Valley (North Caucasus, 1700 m a. s. l.). The large-area array for studying the extensive air showers of cosmic rays is used as a particle detector. An electric field meter of the "electric mill" type (rain-protected) is mounted on the roof of the building in the center of this array. The data were obtained in the summer seasons of 2000-2002. We observe strong enhancements of the soft component intensity before some lightning strokes. At the same time, the analysis of the regression curve "intensity versus field" discovers a bump at the field sign that is opposite to the field sign corresponding to acceleration of electrons. It is interpreted as a signature of runaway electrons from the region of the strong field (with opposite sign) overhead.

  19. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Andreas [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Statistique et des Plasmas, CP 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Effenberger, Frederic [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrecht-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  20. Revisiting the SN1987A gamma-ray limit on ultralight axion-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payez, Alexandre; Ringwald, Andreas; Evoli, Carmelo; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Fischer, Tobias; Giannotti, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    We revise the bound from the supernova SN1987A on the coupling of ultralight axion-like particles (ALPs) to photons. In a core-collapse supernova, ALPs would be emitted via the Primakoff process, and eventually convert into gamma rays in the magnetic field of the Milky Way. The lack of a gamma-ray signal in the GRS instrument of the SMM satellite in coincidence with the observation of the neutrinos emitted from SN1987A therefore provides a strong bound on their coupling to photons. Due to the large uncertainty associated with the current bound, we revise this argument, based on state-of-the-art physical inputs both for the supernova models and for the Milky-Way magnetic field. Furthermore, we provide major amendments, such as the consistent treatment of nucleon-degeneracy effects and of the reduction of the nuclear masses in the hot and dense nuclear medium of the supernova. With these improvements, we obtain a new upper limit on the photon-ALP coupling: g aγ -12 GeV -1 , for m a -10 eV, and we also give its dependence at larger ALP masses m a . Moreover, we discuss how much the Fermi-LAT satellite experiment could improve this bound, should a close-enough supernova explode in the near future.

  1. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  2. Applications of particle induced X-ray emission analysis to ambient aerosol studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannefors, H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis in conjunction with different ambient aerosol samplers have been studied. Correction factors have been calculated for homogeneous and inhomogeneous rural and urban aerosol samples. The Nuclepore two stage filter sampler provided the most useful combination of the resolution and particle size fractionation in urban, rural and remote environments. The PIXE-analysis technique in combination with different samplers was employed in aerosol composition studies in rural and remote environments. Particular emphasis was laid on studies of aerosol long range transport. Based on air mass trajectory analysis and aerosol composition measurements the foreign contribution in southern Sweden was estimated to be 70 - 80% for S and Pb but only 30 - 50% for V and Ni. The spatial and temporal extension of a long range transport episode was studied using high time resolution continuous filter samplers in a network in southern Sweden. The variation in the concentration levels of sulphur agreed well with changes in the air mass history. Arctic summer elemental concentration levels as measured during the Swedish YMER-80 icebreaker expedition were typically one order of magnitude lower than Arctic winter levels. The combination of chemical information, optical properties and size distribution data supports the hypothesis of long range transport of air pollution into the Arctic especially during the winter. This takes place during the winter season because the Polar front is further south making conditions for long range transport up to the Arctic more favourable. (Auth.)

  3. X-ray structure analyses of biological molecules and particles in Japan. A brief history and future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, X-ray structure analyses of molecules and particles from biology started in the 1970s. The structure analysis methods have been developed through the innovation of various techniques in advance, and have contributed for understanding the elementary and microscopic processes in life. Here we summarize briefly the history of X-ray structure analyses for structural biology in Japan and think about the prospect. (author)

  4. Bose-type distribution and primary cosmic ray nucleon spectrum from sea-level muon spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, D P; Roychowdhury, R K

    1976-01-01

    The recent CERN Intersecting Storage Ring cross section data on the p +p to pi /sup +or-/+X inclusive reactions have been analysed using the Bose-type distribution of the form E(d/sup 3/ sigma )/(d/sup 3/p)=(Axs /sup 1/2/)/(exp( epsilon ( lambda )/T)-1) proposed by Hoang (1973). This formula has been used to derive the cosmic ray primary nucleon spectrum from the sea-level muon spectrum. It is found that the primary spectrum obeys the following relation: N(E/sub p/)dE/sub p /=2.06E/sub p//sup -2.64/dE/sub p/. The result has been compared with the recent experimental data and theoretical predictions given by different authors. (11 refs).

  5. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schlüter

    Full Text Available Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3. We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  6. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3). We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  7. New Measurements of Suprathermal Ions, Energetic Particles, and Cosmic Rays in the Outer Heliosphere from the New Horizons PEPSSI Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Spencer, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    During the period from January 2012 to December 2017 the New Horizons spacecraft traveled from 22 to 41 AU from the Sun, making nearly continuous interplanetary plasma and particle measurements utilizing the SWAP and PEPSSI instruments. We report on newly extended measurements from PEPSSI (Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation) that now bring together suprathermal particles above 2 keV/nuc (including interstellar pickup ions), energetic particles with H, He, and O composition from 30 keV to 1 MeV, and cosmic rays above 65 MeV (with effective count-rate-limited upper energy of 1 GeV). Such a wide energy range allows us to look at the solar wind structures passing over the spacecraft, the energetic particles that are often accelerated by these structures, and the suppression of cosmic rays resulting from the increased turbulence inhibiting cosmic ray transport to the spacecraft position (i.e., Forbush decreases). This broad perspective provides simultaneous, previously unattainable diagnostics of outer heliospheric particle dynamics and acceleration. Besides the benefit of being recent, in-ecliptic measurements, unlike the historic Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, these PEPSSI observations are also totally unique in the suprathermal range; in this region only PEPSSI can span the suprathermal range, detecting a population that is a linchpin to understanding the outer heliosphere.

  8. EAS primary particle parameter estimation with the complex Pamir-XXI detector array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galkin V.I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Some new developments in EAS methods made in the framework of the Pamir-XXI project are presented. First, primary energy and direction definition accuracies by a network of fast scintillators are considered, optimum network cell size is defined for 10 PeV showers. Second, the same accuracies for a network of fast optical (Cherenkov detectors are considered for 30 TeV–10 PeV showers. Third, the possibilities of separation of EAS initiated by protons, nitrogen and iron nuclei of 1 and 10 PeV energies using a wide-angle Cherenkov telescope are discussed. Finally, the results of the extraction of 30–50 TeV gamma showers from the proton shower background with the same telescope are presented. Presumably, our developments can help in the study of PCR mass composition and ultra high energy gamma ray astronomy in other projects.

  9. An Application of X-ray Fluorescence as Process Analytical Technology (PAT) to Monitor Particle Coating Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshio; Katakuse, Yoshimitsu; Azechi, Yasutaka

    2018-03-30

    An attempt to apply X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis to evaluate small particle coating process as a Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) was made. The XRF analysis was used to monitor coating level in small particle coating process with at-line manner. The small particle coating process usually consists of multiple coating processes. This study was conducted by a simple coating particles prepared by first coating of a model compound (DL-methionine) and second coating by talc on spherical microcrystalline cellulose cores. The particles with two layered coating are enough to demonstrate the small particle coating process. From the result by the small particle coating process, it was found that the XRF signal played different roles, resulting that XRF signals by first coating (layering) and second coating (mask coating) could demonstrate the extent with different mechanisms for the coating process. Furthermore, the particle coating of the different particle size has also been investigated to evaluate size effect of these coating processes. From these results, it was concluded that the XRF could be used as a PAT in monitoring particle coating processes and become powerful tool in pharmaceutical manufacturing.

  10. Cosmic ray observations deep underground and further analysis of the evidence for the production of new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Menon, M.G.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Ito, N.; Kawakami, S.; Miyake, S.

    1976-01-01

    In a cosmic ray experiment at a depth of 7000 kg/cm 2 three clear new particle events are found, out of a total of 17 events, in which the zenith angle of the penetrating particles is greater than 50 0 , and which have so far been identified as arising from neutrino interactions. The new heavy particles, charged or neutral, must have had low momenta to be consistent which the large opening angles of their decay products. There exists so far no observation of these Kolar events in accelerator experiments with neutrinos. (BJ) [de

  11. Choice of primary transducers of beam parameters for measuring and control systems of charged particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybin, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations on classification of primary transducers (pT) of the main parameters of charged particle beams are conducted for development of the common series on the base of program- controlled module systems for measuring the parameters of charged particle beams. The PT classification is exercised by: the physical principle of single transformation, the degree of effect on the beam, principle of operation, design, performance, location. It is shown that the optimal choice of PT and their parameters should be necessarily executed in several stages: estimation of the limiting possibilities of PT; choice of PT by time and metrological characteristics as well as sensitivity for the determined operation conditions; choice of the PT by the degree of effect on the beam: choice of the PT type with account of its design performance and location, determination of PT parameters with account of possibility of information, energy and design compatibility of the used standard. The classification results of magnetoinduction and acoustic transducers have shown that the number of their modifications does not exceed 100 [ru

  12. Bystander-induced apoptosis and premature differentiation in primary urothelial explants after charged particle microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.; Folkard, M.; Mothersill, C.; Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    The ureter primary explant technique was developed to study bystander effects under in vivo like conditions where stem and differentiated cells are present. Irradiation was performed with a 3 He 2+ charged particle microbeam available at the Gray Cancer Institute, with high (∼2 μm) precision. Tissue sections from porcine ureters were pre-irradiated with the microbeam at a single location with 10 3 He 2+ particles (5 MeV; LET 70 keV.μm -1 ). After irradiation, the tissue section was incubated for 7 days, thus allowing the explant outgrowth to form. Total cellular damage (total fraction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells) was measured according to morphological criteria. Apoptosis was also assessed using a 3'-OH DNA end-labelling technique. Premature differentiation was estimated using antibodies to uroplakin III, a specific marker of terminal urothelial differentiation. Results of our experiments demonstrated a significant bystander-induced differentiation and a less significant increase in apoptotic and micronucleated cells. A hypothesis based on the protective nature of the bystander effect is proposed. (author)

  13. Scatter correction method for x-ray CT using primary modulation: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hewei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert; Sun Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scatter correction is a major challenge in x-ray imaging using large area detectors. Recently, the authors proposed a promising scatter correction method for x-ray computed tomography (CT) using primary modulation. Proof of concept was previously illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments on a small phantom with a simple geometry. In this work, the authors provide a quantitative evaluation of the primary modulation technique and demonstrate its performance in applications where scatter correction is more challenging. Methods: The authors first analyze the potential errors of the estimated scatter in the primary modulation method. On two tabletop CT systems, the method is investigated using three phantoms: A Catphan(c)600 phantom, an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the Catphan(c)600 phantom with two annuli. Two different primary modulators are also designed to show the impact of the modulator parameters on the scatter correction efficiency. The first is an aluminum modulator with a weak modulation and a low modulation frequency, and the second is a copper modulator with a strong modulation and a high modulation frequency. Results: On the Catphan(c)600 phantom in the first study, the method reduces the error of the CT number in the selected regions of interest (ROIs) from 371.4 to 21.9 Hounsfield units (HU); the contrast to noise ratio also increases from 10.9 to 19.2. On the anthropomorphic chest phantom in the second study, which represents a more difficult case due to the high scatter signals and object heterogeneity, the method reduces the error of the CT number from 327 to 19 HU in the selected ROIs and from 31.4% to 5.7% on the overall average. The third study is to investigate the impact of object size on the efficiency of our method. The scatter-to-primary ratio estimation error on the Catphan(c)600 phantom without any annulus (20 cm in diameter) is at the level of 0.04, it rises to 0.07 and 0.1 on the phantom with an

  14. Measurement of illite particle thickness using a direct Fourier transform of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Chao; Rice, James A.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Lin, Jar-Shyong

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstratified illite-smectite (I-S) minerals are composed of aggregates of fundamental particles. Many attempts have been made to measure the thickness of such fundamental particles, but each of the methods used suffers from its own limitations and uncertainties. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to measure the thickness of particles that scatter X-rays coherently. We used SAXS to study suspensions of Na-rectorite and other illites with varying proportions of smectite. The scattering intensity (I) was recorded as a function of the scattering vector, q = (4 /) sin(/2), where  is the X-ray wavelength and  is the scattering angle. The experimental data were treated with a direct Fourier transform to obtain the pair distance distribution function (PDDF) that was then used to determine the thickness of illite particles. The Guinier and Porod extrapolations were used to obtain the scattering intensity beyond the experimental q, and the effects of such extrapolations on the PDDF were examined. The thickness of independent rectorite particles (used as a reference mineral) is 18.3 Å. The SAXS results are compared with those obtained by X-ray diffraction peak broadening methods. It was found that the power-law exponent (α) obtained by fitting the data in the region of q = 0.1-0.6 nm-1 to the power law (I = I0q-α) is a linear function of illite particle thickness. Therefore, illite particle thickness could be predicted by the linear relationship as long as the thickness is within the limit where α <4.0.

  15. The anisotropy of cosmic ray particles in the energy range 1011-1019 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chunxian

    1985-01-01

    A study of the anisotropy of primary cosmic ray is presented. The expression of the anisotropy is derived in a model of statistical discrete sources in an infinite galaxy. Using these derived formulas, the amplitudes of the first harmonic anisotropies caused by eleven supernovea nearby the Earth are estimated individually and the trend of the resultant anisotropy is investigated. It is found that the expected results can account for the power law of Esup(0.5) of the anisotropy above the energy 5 x 10 15 eV. The Compton-getting effect can cause an additional anisotropy which is independent of energy and added to the resultant anisotropy of these discrete sources. It is apparent that the anisotropies available in the low energy range 10 11 - 10 14 eV are caused by the Compton-Getting effect. Taking the differential spectrum index γ = 2.67 measured in the same energy bound we get the streaming velocity of 35 km/s with respect to the cosmic ray background

  16. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analyses of stratospheric cosmic dust: New results for chondritic and nickel-depleted particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    Trace element abundance determinations were performed using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence on nine particles collected from the stratosphere and classified as ''cosmic''. Improvements to the Synchrotron Light Source allowed the detection of all elements between Cr and Mo, with the exceptions of Co and As, in our largest particle. The minor and trace element abundance patterns of three Ni-depleted particles were remarkably similar to those of extraterrestrial igneous rocks. Fe/Ni and Fe/Mn ratios suggest that one of these may be of lunar origin. All nine particles exhibited an enrichment in Br, ranging form 1.3 to 38 times the Cl concentration. Br concentrations were uncorrelated with particle size, as would be expected for a surface correlated component acquires from the stratosphere. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Design of a versatile detector for the detection of charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays. Neutron interaction with the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez P, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Fostron detector detects charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays with a reasonable discrimination power. Because the typical detectors for neutrons present a great uncertainty in the detection, this work was focused mainly to the neutron detection in presence of gamma radiation. Also there are mentioned the advantages and disadvantages of the Fostron detector

  18. Scanning electron-microscopic and X-ray-microanalytic observation of diesel-emission particles associated with mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, K.; Yoshitsugu, K.; Tokiwa, H.; Fukuoka Environmental Research Center

    1983-01-01

    The particles formed by diesel combustion, which may contain various mutagenic chemicals like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), are analyzed in their morphology by scanning electron microscopy; their sulfur content is detected by X-ray microanalysis, and mutagenicity is tested with a Salmonella typhimurium bioassay. The authors find a close correlation between sulfur content and mutagenicity of PAH. (Auth.)

  19. The quantitative determination of trace elements in giant unicellular plants by particle-induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete-Dominguez, V.R.; Yoshihara, K.; Tanaka, N.

    1982-01-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was applied for the determination of trace elements in biologically interesting materials, giant unicellular plants. It was found that the PIXE method had advantages in multi-element trace analysis of a single cell of the sample plant. (author)

  20. Micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to mixed beams of X-rays and alpha particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staaf, E.; Brehwens, K.; Haghdoost, S.; Nievaart, S.; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Czub, J.; Braziewicz, J.; Wojcik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2012), s. 283-293 ISSN 0301-634X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Micronuclei * LET * Combined exposure * Mixed beams * Alpha particles * X-rays Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.754, year: 2012

  1. Variability in the primary emissions and secondary gas and particle formation from vehicles using bioethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramsch, E; Papapostolou, V; Reyes, F; Vásquez, Y; Castillo, M; Oyola, P; López, G; Cádiz, A; Ferguson, S; Wolfson, M; Lawrence, J; Koutrakis, P

    2018-04-01

    Bioethanol for use in vehicles is becoming a substantial part of global energy infrastructure because it is renewable and some emissions are reduced. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and total hydrocarbons (THC) are reduced, but there is still controversy regarding emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), aldehydes, and ethanol; this may be a concern because all these compounds are precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The amount of emissions depends on the ethanol content, but it also may depend on the engine quality and ethanol origin. Thus, a photochemical chamber was used to study secondary gas and aerosol formation from two flex-fueled vehicles using different ethanol blends in gasoline. One vehicle and the fuel used were made in the United States, and the others were made in Brazil. Primary emissions of THC, CO, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from both vehicles decreased as the amount of ethanol in gasoline increased. NO x emissions in the U.S. and Brazilian cars decreased with ethanol content. However, emissions of THC, CO, and NO x from the Brazilian car were markedly higher than those from the U.S. car, showing high variability between vehicle technologies. In the Brazilian car, formation of secondary nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ozone (O 3 ) was lower for higher ethanol content in the fuel. In the U.S. car, NO 2 and O 3 had a small increase. Secondary particle (particulate matter [PM]) formation in the chamber decreased for both vehicles as the fraction of ethanol in fuel increased, consistent with previous studies. Secondary to primary PM ratios for pure gasoline is 11, also consistent with previous studies. In addition, the time required to form secondary PM is longer for higher ethanol blends. These results indicate that using higher ethanol blends may have a positive impact on air quality. The use of bioethanol can significantly reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Given the extent of

  2. X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis of kaolins particle size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia dos Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaolins are common geological materials and have high concentrations of kaolinite as well as the clay fraction of tropical and subtropical soils of Brazil. The characterization of kaolin is a proxy of assessing the contribution of kaolinite to important soil chemical and mineralogical attributes. This study evaluated four kaolins (commercial kaolin A (CCA, commercial kaolin B (CCB, pink sandy kaolin A (CRA and green sandy kaolin A (CVA in the original form and after particle size separation into: sand (200-53 mm, coarse silt (53-20 m, fine silt (20-2 m, large clay (2-1m, medium clay (1-0.5 m and fine clay (<0.5m fractions. The minerals were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD and evaluated for crystallinity (kaolinite and halloysite through indexes Hughes and Brown, Amigó, Bramão and the dehydroxylation temperature. The physical fractionation was efficient to concentrate minerals in specific size fractions which were not identified in the original material. In CCA kaolin was concentrated one mineral which remains unidentified in fine fractions, in kaolin CRA, zircon was concentrated in the coarse silt and different silicates in the fine fractions, in kaolin CCB were concentrated kaolinite and a silicate in the medium and coarse clay fractions. The estimate by X-ray diffraction overestimated the amount of kaolinite and halloysite underestimated when compared to quantification by thermal gravimetric analysis The crystallinity index exhibit different behaviors depending on the mineralogy of each material, thus the correlation between the crystallinity of kaolinite and / or halloysite and other variables, may be compromised, especially in materials with distinct geological origins.

  3. The problems of cosmic ray particle simulation for the near-Earth orbital and interplanetary flight conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymmik, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide range of the galactic cosmic ray and SEP event flux simulation problems for the near-Earth satellite and manned spacecraft orbits and for the interplanetary mission trajectories are discussed. The models of the galactic cosmic ray and SEP events in the Earth orbit beyond the Earth's magnetosphere are used as a basis. The particle fluxes in the near-Earth orbits should be calculated using the transmission functions. To calculate the functions, the dependences of the cutoff rigidities on the magnetic disturbance level and on magnetic local time have to be known. In the case of space flights towards the Sun and to the boundary of the solar system, particular attention is paid to the changes in the SEP event occurrence frequency and size. The particle flux gradients are applied in this case to galactic cosmic ray fluxes

  4. Conceptual design of the Radial Gamma Ray Spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nocente, Massimo; Tardocchi, Marco; Barnsley, Robin

    2017-01-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines...... the measurements sensitive to α particles at characteristic resonant energies and to possible anisotropies of their slowing down distribution function. An independent assessment of the neutron rate by gamma-ray emission is also feasible. In case of runaway electrons born in disruptions with a typical duration...... of 100ms, a time resolution of at least 10ms for runaway electron studies can be achieved depending on the scenario and down to a current of 40 kA by use of external gas injection. We find that the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the MeV range from confined runaways is sensitive to the electron velocity space...

  5. Development of a PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis device using an extracted proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental device described allows the extention of the PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) method to the analysis, by means of proton beams, of solid or liquid samples, which can not be analyzed under vacuum conditions. The homogeneity of the surfaces to be analysed and elements (in the atmosphere) which absorb X-rays must be taken into account. Liquid samples do not need special care. The results show that: at high energies, the extracted beam sensibility is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained under vacuum; at low energies, the performance under vacuum conditions is better. The particles energy losses, at the exit membrane and in the outer atmosphere, decrease the X-rays production efficiency [fr

  6. Recoil Distance Method lifetime measurements via gamma-ray and charged-particle spectroscopy at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Philip Jonathan

    The Recoil Distance Method (RDM) is a well-established technique for measuring lifetimes of electromagnetic transitions. Transition matrix elements derived from the lifetimes provide valuable insight into nuclear structure. Recent RDM investigations at NSCL present a powerful new model-independent tool for the spectroscopy of nuclei with extreme proton-to-neutron ratios that exhibit surprising behavior. Neutron-rich 18C is one such example, where a small B(E2; 2+1 → 0+gs) represented a dramatic shift from the expected inverse relationship between the B(E2) and 2+1 excitation energy. To shed light on the nature of this quadrupole excitation, the RDM lifetime technique was applied with the Koln/NSCL plunger. States in 18C were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of a 19N secondary beam. De-excitation gamma rays were detected with the Segmented Germanium Array in coincidence with reaction residues at the focal plane of the S800 Magnetic Spectrometer. The deduced B(E2) and excitation energy were both well described by ab initio no-core shell model calculations. In addition, a novel extension of RDM lifetime measurements via charged-particle spectroscopy of exotic proton emitters has been investigated. Substituting the reaction residue degrader of the Koln/NSCL plunger with a thin silicon detector permits the study of short-lived nuclei beyond the proton dripline. A proof of concept measurement of the mean lifetime of the two-proton emitter 19Mg was conducted. The results indicated a sub-picosecond lifetime, one order of magnitude smaller than the published results, and validate this new technique for lifetime measurements of charged-particle emitters.

  7. Therapeutic application of metallic nanoparticles combined with particle-induced x-ray emission effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun [Biomedical Engineering and Radiology, School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu 705-034 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Hong [Department of Optometry and Visual Sciences, Catholic University of Daegu, Kyungsan 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Jeong [Applied Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyungpuk National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Kye-Ryung [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Tae-Keun, E-mail: jkkim@cu.ac.kr [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-22

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNP) are able to release localized x-rays when activated with a high energy proton beam by the particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) effect. The exploitation of this phenomenon in the therapeutic irradiation of tumors has been investigated. PIXE-based x-ray emission directed at CT26 tumor cells in vitro, when administered with either gold (average diameter 2 and 13 nm) or iron (average diameter 14 nm) nanoparticles (GNP or SNP), increased with MNP solution concentration over the range of 0.1-2 mg ml{sup -1}. With irradiation by a 45 MeV proton therapy (PT) beam, higher concentrations had a decreased cell survival fraction. An in vivo study in CT26 mouse tumor models with tumor regression assay demonstrated significant tumor dose enhancement, thought to be a result of the PIXE effect when compared to conventional PT without MNP (radiation-only group) using a 45 MeV proton beam (p < 0.02). Those receiving GNP or SNP injection doses of 300 mg kg{sup -1} body weight before proton beam therapy demonstrated 90% or 75% tumor volume reduction (TVR) in 20 days post-PT while the radiation-only group showed only 18% TVR and re-growth of tumor volume after 20 days. Higher complete tumor regression (CTR) was observed in 14-24 days after a single treatment of PT with an average rate of 33-65% for those receiving MNP compared with 25% for the radiation-only group. A lower bound of therapeutic effective MNP concentration range, in vivo, was estimated as 30-79 {mu}g g{sup -1} tissue for both gold and iron nanoparticles. The tumor dose enhancement may compensate for an increase in entrance dose associated with conventional PT when treating large, solid tumors with a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) technique. The use of a combined high energy Bragg peak PT with PIXE generated by MNP, or PIXE alone, may result in new treatment options for infiltrative metastatic tumors and other diffuse inflammatory diseases.

  8. Implication of EAS data for the study of primary cosmic rays above 10 to the 5th power GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, L.; Wdowczyk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Due to the strong decrease of the energetic cosmic ray flux its direct detection at the top of atmosphere with aircraft is limited at the present time to about 100,000 GeV. The intensity of all primary particles can be approximated in the range 100 to 100,000 GeV by power function with power index 2.65. There are predominantly protons and the rest is represented by several groups of nuclei. In the range of 100,000 to 10 to the 8th power GeV considerable disagreement is most probably connected with the uncertainity of the indirect derivation of the parameters of extensive air showers. Results for the primary spectrum in the range to the 8th power GeV, obtained by implication of extensive air showers (EAS) data from mountain altitudes are discussed.

  9. Forensic analysis of tempered sheet glass by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jisonna, L.J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); DeYoung, P.A., E-mail: deyoung@hope.ed [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Ferens, J.; Hall, C.; Lunderberg, J.M.; Mears, P. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Padilla, D. [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1233 (United States); Peaslee, G.F. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Sampson, R. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} PIXE was found to give the same results for trace elements in glass as ICP. {yields} PIXE can non-destructively determine trace element concentrations in auto glass. {yields} Measured Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, and Sr in auto glass with PIXE. -- Abstract: The elemental concentrations of five trace elements in tempered sheet glass fragments were determined using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The trace element concentrations for calcium, iron, manganese, strontium, and titanium are compared to those obtained by inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) following complete digestion by hydrofluoric acid. For these five elements, the absolute concentrations obtained by both methods are shown to agree well over a wide range of concentrations. The limits of detection for trace elements are typically lower for the ICP-AES method. However, we show that the concentrations of these five elements can be accurately measured by the PIXE method. Since PIXE is an entirely non-destructive method, there exists a niche for this technique to be used as a complement to the more sensitive ICP-AES technique in the forensic analysis of sheet glass.

  10. X-ray Spectroscopic Characterization of Plasma for a Charged-Particle Energy-Loss Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nm; Lee, Cl; Wilson, Dc; Barnes, Cris W.; Petrasso, Rd; Li, C.; Hicks, D.

    2000-10-01

    We are pursuing an approach to a charged-particle energy-loss experiment in which charged fusion products from an imploded ICF capsule travel through a well characterized, spatially separate plasma. For this purpose, a fully ionized, uniform, nearly steady-state carbon-hydrogen plasma will be created by laser irradiation of a plastic foil. The temperature and density structure of this plasma must be determined accurately in order to relate observed energy losses to predictions of theory. Various methods for diagnosing the plasma are possible, including Thomson scattering. Alternatively, if a small admixture of higher-Z material such as chlorine is included in the plastic, x-ray spectroscopic techniques will allow the plasma's temperature and density to be determined. Electron temperature is inferred from the ratios of line strengths of various chlorine ion stages, while electron density is determined from the spectra of lithium-like satellite lines near the He beta line of helium-like chlorine. We present results from detailed-configuration accounting (DCA) models of line emission from C+H+Cl plasmas, and estimate the accuracy with which such plasmas can be characterized.

  11. Composition of Renaissance paint layers: simultaneous particle induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, L; Beck, L; Salomon, J; Pichon, L; Walter, Ph

    2009-10-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) is now routinely used in the field of cultural heritage. Various setups have been developed to investigate the elemental composition of wood/canvas paintings or of cross-section samples. However, it is not possible to obtain information concerning the quantity of organic binder. Backscattering spectrometry (BS) can be a useful complementary method to overcome this limitation. In the case of paint layers, PIXE brings the elemental composition (major elements to traces) and the BS spectrum can give access to the proportion of pigment and binder. With the use of 3 MeV protons for PIXE and BS simultaneously, it was possible to perform quantitative analysis including C and O for which the non-Rutherford cross sections are intense. Furthermore, with the use of the same conditions for PIXE and BS, the experiment time and the potential damage by the ion beam were reduced. The results obtained with the external beam of the Accélérateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire (AGLAE) facility on various test painting samples and on cross sections from Italian Renaissance masterpieces are shown. Simultaneous combination of PIXE and BS leads to a complete characterization of the paint layers: elemental composition and proportion of the organic binder have been determined and thus provide useful information about ancient oil painting recipes.

  12. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. - Highlights: • PIGE was evaluated for measuring blood boron concentration during clinical BNCT. • PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in culture medium. • All measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. • Two hours of f-BPA exposure is required to create boron distribution image by PIGE. • Boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from boron in the cytoplasm.

  13. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  14. JULIA: calculation projection software for primary barriers shielding to X-Rays using barite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Júlia R.A.S. da; Vieira, José W.; Lima, Fernando R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to program a software to calculate the required thicknesses to attenuate X-rays in kilovoltage of 60 kV, 80 kV, 110 kV and 150 kV. The conventional methodological parameters for structural shield calculations established by the NCRP (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements) were presented. The descriptive and exploratory methods allowed the construction of the JULIA. In this sense and based on the result obtained, the tool presented is useful for professionals who wish to design structural shielding in radiodiagnostic and/or therapy. The development of calculations in the computational tool corresponds to the accessibility, optimization of time and estimation close to the real. Such heuristic exercise represents improvement of calculations for the estimation of primary barriers with barite

  15. X-ray diagnostic sign for the differentiation of neurogenic and primary muscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palvoelgyi, R.; Gallai, M.

    1981-01-01

    The authors give an account of X-ray examinations of the limb musculature of 70 patients suffering from neurogenic muscular diseases, 42 suffering from primary muscular diseases and 45 suffering from senile degeneration of the muscles. Different degree of damage to different parts of the same muscle could only been observed in one case of neurogenic atrophy (in the postpoliomyelitic states) and in two cases of senile degeneration, while it was found in 11 cases (20%) for the other muscular diseases. In the latter cases the more severe muscle damage, which could be demonstrated radiographically, was always found in the part of the muscle adjacent to a tendon. On the above reasons the authors consider that radiographically demonstrable partial or uneven damage to any particular muscle can be used as a new diagnostical information in distinguishing muscular diseases from neurogenic muscular atrophy. (orig.) [de

  16. Application of micron X-ray CT based on micro-PIXE to investigate the distribution of Cs in silt particles for environmental remediation in Fukushima Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Keizo, E-mail: keizo.ishii@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Hatakeyama, Taisuke; Itoh, Shin; Sata, Daichi [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Ohnuma, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Toshiro; Arai, Hiromu; Arai, Hirotsugu [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Matsuyama, Shigeo; Terakawa, Atsuki; Kim, Seong-Yun [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) using characteristic X-rays produced in micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to investigate the internal structure of silt particles and develop new methods to decontaminate soil containing radioactive cesium. We obtained 3D attenuation coefficient images of silt particles with a diameter of approximately 100 μm for V K and Cr K X-rays. Owing to the absorption edges of the Cs L-shell, the differences between the V K and Cr K X-ray images revealed the spatial distribution of Cs atoms in the silt particles. Cs atoms were distributed over the surfaces of the silt particles to a thickness of approximately 10 μm. This information is useful for the decontamination of silt contaminated by radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

  17. Primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Ehara, K.

    2011-02-01

    The national primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range has been developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. The standard consists of a total number counting type flow cytometer (T-FCM) and an electronic balance. The T-FCM is a commercial flow cytometer modified so that the total number of particles in an aqueous suspension sampled in a test tube can be counted, and the electronic balance is used to determine the mass of the suspension. This standard is intended to be used for calibrating commercial standard suspensions of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. The measurand in the calibration is the mass-based number concentration (the particle number in a unit mass of a suspension), and the calibration capability covers the concentration range from 5 × 102 to 2 × 106 particles g-1. When the concentration of the suspension is higher than 2 × 103 particles g-1, the suspension is first diluted to about 1 × 103 particles g-1 to suppress the coincidence loss in particle counting by the T-FCM. The validity of the calibration with the T-FCM was examined by comparison with an independent method in which a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the number concentration of particles deposited on a silicon wafer. For a suspension of 10 µm PSL particles with a concentration of approximately 1 × 106 particles g-1, the concentration values determined by the T-FCM and SEM methods were 1.042 × 106 and 1.035 × 106 particles g-1, respectively: The difference was less than 0.7%. The relative expanded uncertainty of the measurement by the T-FCM method with the coverage factor k = 2 was 4.4%.

  18. Primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, T; Ehara, K

    2011-01-01

    The national primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range has been developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. The standard consists of a total number counting type flow cytometer (T-FCM) and an electronic balance. The T-FCM is a commercial flow cytometer modified so that the total number of particles in an aqueous suspension sampled in a test tube can be counted, and the electronic balance is used to determine the mass of the suspension. This standard is intended to be used for calibrating commercial standard suspensions of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. The measurand in the calibration is the mass-based number concentration (the particle number in a unit mass of a suspension), and the calibration capability covers the concentration range from 5 × 10 2 to 2 × 10 6 particles g −1 . When the concentration of the suspension is higher than 2 × 10 3 particles g −1 , the suspension is first diluted to about 1 × 10 3 particles g −1 to suppress the coincidence loss in particle counting by the T-FCM. The validity of the calibration with the T-FCM was examined by comparison with an independent method in which a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the number concentration of particles deposited on a silicon wafer. For a suspension of 10 µm PSL particles with a concentration of approximately 1 × 10 6 particles g −1 , the concentration values determined by the T-FCM and SEM methods were 1.042 × 10 6 and 1.035 × 10 6 particles g −1 , respectively: The difference was less than 0.7%. The relative expanded uncertainty of the measurement by the T-FCM method with the coverage factor k = 2 was 4.4%

  19. X-ray induction of immortalization in primary rat embryo cells associated with and without tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, E.; Oberley, L.W.; Guernsey, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Cultures of primary rat embryo fibroblasts were irradiated with X-rays (3 Gy). After 14 days the majority of colonies in both irradiated and control plates had senesced. Surviving clones were ring isolated from irradiated and control plates and grown in culture. A phase of rapid proliferation after isolation was observed, followed by a decline (crisis) leading to senescence. Several clones from the irradiated plates were able to recover from this crisis and gave rise to continuous cell lines, while all colonies from control plates senesced. Three types of cells have been identified among the irradiated survivors: (1) immortal fully transformed, capable of growth in soft agar (Aga/sup +/) and tumor formation, (2) immortal normal, not able to grow in soft agar (Aga/sup -/) and nontumorigenic, and (3) immortal Aga/sup -/ cells which progressed to malignancy (Aga/sup +/, tumorigenicity) after further sub-culture. These data support the suggestion that X-rays can induce immortalization of mammalian cells in the absence of tumorigenicity, in addition to (and separate from) the fully tumorigenetic state

  20. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Jenni; Simonen, Pauli; Saarikoski, Sanna; Timonen, Hilkka; Kangasniemi, Oskari; Saukko, Erkka; Hillamo, Risto; Lehtoranta, Kati; Murtonen, Timo; Vesala, Hannu; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2017-07-01

    Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6-268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential was measured to be 9-20 mg kgfuel-1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize - more than half an hour - which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission source and system temperatures. Sulfate was

  1. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alanen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6–268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation potential was measured to be 9–20 mg kgfuel−1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize – more than half an hour – which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission

  2. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic 132Sn from fission product γ-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic 132 Sn by analyzing fission product γ-ray data from a 248 Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through γγ cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei 132 Sb, 134 Te, 134 Sb and 134 Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei 134 Te and 135 I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus 136 Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus 134 Sn and the N = 83 isotones 134 Sb, 135 Te and 135 I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above 132 Sn

  3. Radiobiological studies on eggs of the rice weevil (Tribolium confusum) after exposure to heavy primary particles of the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, B.

    1982-01-01

    The thesis explains the radiation effects observed during the holometabolism of Tribolium confusum after exposure of the eggs to heavy primary particles of cosmic radiation, i.e. to atomic nuclei of relatively high energy with a mass greater than helium atoms. The first section describes the technical layout of the BIOSTACK experiment and the fixation of the Tribolium eggs and the positioning of the nuclear track detectors. This part is followed by the description of methods used to detect the eggs hit by the heavy nuclei, and their isolation and subsequent growth. Terrestrial irradiation of eggs with x-rays served as a control, as well as unirradiated egg cultures. The amount of larvae produced from incubated eggs hit by heavy nuclei was 66%, that of eggs exposed to cosmic background radiation was 69%, and that produced by the control culture kept on the earth was 87%. Investigations of egg samples during various stages of embryogenesis showed differences in the histological findings of the various groups, especially between the two groups of the BIOSTACK experiment. The letality of larvae in the period from emergence up to pupal stage was relatively high (50%) in the group hit by heavy nuclei, especially when compared to the other BIOSTACK experimental group, where this percentage was 10%, and to the terrestrial control group (3%). Also, vitality of larvae of the first group was considerably reduced. In the pupal stage, the letality observed in all three test groups was relatively low with 2-4%. From the animals produced from eggs hit by heavy nuclei, only 25% were still alive after 4 months, from the other space flight group these were 75%, and from the terrestrial control group 93%. Also, the animals from the first group showed a significant increase in bodily anomalies. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Implementing displacement damage calculations for electrons and gamma rays in the Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the Monte Carlo displacement damage calculation method in the Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) was improved to calculate displacements per atom (DPA) values due to irradiation by electrons (or positrons) and gamma rays. For the damage due to electrons and gamma rays, PHITS simulates electromagnetic cascades using the Electron Gamma Shower version 5 (EGS5) algorithm and calculates DPA values using the recoil energies and the McKinley-Feshbach cross section. A comparison of DPA values calculated by PHITS and the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method (MCCM) reveals that they were in good agreement for gamma-ray irradiations of silicon and iron at energies that were less than 10 MeV. Above 10 MeV, PHITS can calculate DPA values not only for electrons but also for charged particles produced by photonuclear reactions. In DPA depth distributions under electron and gamma-ray irradiations, build-up effects can be observed near the target's surface. For irradiation of 90-cm-thick carbon by protons with energies of more than 30 GeV, the ratio of the secondary electron DPA values to the total DPA values is more than 10% and increases with an increase in incident energy. In summary, PHITS can calculate DPA values for all particles and materials over a wide energy range between 1 keV and 1 TeV for electrons, gamma rays, and charged particles and between 10-5 eV and 1 TeV for neutrons.

  5. Primary and secondary organic aerosol origin by combined gas-particle phase source apportionment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Crippa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA, a prominent fraction of particulate organic mass (OA, remains poorly constrained. Its formation involves several unknown precursors, formation and evolution pathways and multiple natural and anthropogenic sources. Here a combined gas-particle phase source apportionment is applied to wintertime and summertime data collected in the megacity of Paris in order to investigate SOA origin during both seasons. This was possible by combining the information provided by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. A better constrained apportionment of primary OA (POA sources is also achieved using this methodology, making use of gas-phase tracers. These tracers made possible the discrimination between biogenic and continental/anthropogenic sources of SOA. We found that continental SOA was dominant during both seasons (24–50% of total OA, while contributions from photochemistry-driven SOA (9% of total OA and marine emissions (13% of total OA were also observed during summertime. A semi-volatile nighttime component was also identified (up to 18% of total OA during wintertime. This approach was successfully applied here and implemented in a new source apportionment toolkit.

  6. Performance test for implantation of a primary standard of low energy X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme P.

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of a standard laboratory of calibration chambers that will serve to radiotherapy activities, radiodiagnosis and radioprotection, depends on the knowledge of physical and dosimetric parameters that characterize the quality of the radiation beam. With the aim of verifying the reliability of the ionizing free-air chamber with variable volume manufactured by Victoreen Instruments, model 481, as a primary standard, a study of the performance of the chamber to x-rays qualities of low energy was developed in this work. These qualities are the ones recommended by 'Bureau International des Poids et Mesures' - BIPM, for daily routine of the calibration service performed by the 'Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes - LNMRI/IRD, for calibration of this secondary standard chambers that serve to the control in hospitals, clinics and industries. The results obtained at the present work show that the Victoreen chamber model 481 behaves as a primary standard, being easy to handle and having simple mechanical construction, and showing an expanded uncertainty equal to 0,26%, regarding the quality of the radiation beam of 30 kV. However, some of the equipment used at the present study need to be submitted to a strict routine calibration, in order for the laboratory to be in accordance with the recommendations of the standard ABNT -NBR ISO/IEC 17025 (2003). (author)

  7. Deciphering the Local Interstellar Spectra of Primary Cosmic-Ray Species with HELMOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschini, M. J.; Della Torre, S.; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; La Vacca, G.; Masi, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Pensotti, S.; Porter, T. A.; Quadrani, L.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M.

    2018-05-01

    Local interstellar spectra (LIS) of primary cosmic ray (CR) nuclei, such as helium, oxygen, and mostly primary carbon are derived for the rigidity range from 10 MV to ∼200 TV using the most recent experimental results combined with the state-of-the-art models for CR propagation in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. Two propagation packages, GALPROP and HELMOD, are combined into a single framework that is used to reproduce direct measurements of CR species at different modulation levels, and at both polarities of the solar magnetic field. The developed iterative maximum-likelihood method uses GALPROP-predicted LIS as input to HELMOD, which provides the modulated spectra for specific time periods of the selected experiments for model–data comparison. The interstellar and heliospheric propagation parameters derived in this study are consistent with our prior analyses using the same methodology for propagation of CR protons, helium, antiprotons, and electrons. The resulting LIS accommodate a variety of measurements made in the local interstellar space (Voyager 1) and deep inside the heliosphere at low (ACE/CRIS, HEAO-3) and high energies (PAMELA, AMS-02).

  8. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, Michael J; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y; Sierra, Raymond G

    2010-01-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 10 12 photons per pulse, 20 μm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  9. Automatic X-ray inspection for escaped coated particles in spherical fuel elements of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Hongsheng; Li, Ziqiang; Liu, Bing; Li, Xingdong; Meng, Fanyong

    2014-01-01

    As a core unit of HTGRs (high-temperature gas-cooled reactors), the quality of spherical fuel elements is directly related to the safety and reliability of HTGRs. In line with the design and performance requirements of the spherical fuel elements, no coated fuel particles are permitted to enter the fuel-free zone of a spherical fuel element. For fast and accurate detection of escaped coated fuel particles, X-ray DR (digital radiography) imaging with a step-by-step circular scanning trajectory was adopted for Chinese 10 MW HTGRs. The scanning parameters dominating the volume of the blind zones were optimized to ensure the missing detection of the escaped coated fuel particles is as low as possible. We proposed a dynamic calibration method for tracking the projection of the fuel-free zone accurately, instead of using a fuel-free zone mask of fixed size and position. After the projection data in the fuel-free zone were extracted, image and graphic processing methods were combined for automatic recognition of escaped coated fuel particles, and some practical inspection results were presented. - Highlights: • An X-ray DR imaging system for quality inspection of spherical fuel elements was introduced. • A method for optimizing the blind-zone-related scanning parameter was proposed. • A dynamic calibration method for tracking the fuel-free zone accurately was proposed. • Some inspection results of the disqualified spherical fuel elements with escaped coated fuel particles were presented

  10. Evaluation of a Lagrangian Soot Tracking Method for the prediction of primary soot particle size under engine-like conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai Ong, Jiun; Pang, Kar Mun; Walther, Jens Honore

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the implementation and evaluation of a Lagrangian soot tracking (LST) method for the modeling of soot in diesel engines. The LST model employed here has the tracking capability of a Lagrangian method and the ability to predict primary soot particle sizing. The Moss-Brookes soot...... in predicting temporal soot cloud development, mean soot diameter and primary soot size distribution is evaluated using measurements of n-heptane and n-dodecane spray combustion obtained under diesel engine-like conditions. In addition, sensitivity studies are carried out to investigate the influence of soot....... A higher rate of soot oxidation due to OH causes the soot particles to be fully oxidized downstream of the flame. In general, the LST model performs better than the Eulerian method in terms of predicting soot sizing and accessing information of individual soot particles, both of which are shortcomings...

  11. Time resolved measurement of laser-ablated particles by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Murakami, Kouichi

    1999-01-01

    The time- and spatially-resolved properties of laser ablated carbon, boron and silicon particles were measured by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy). The maximum speed of positively charged ions is higher than those of neutral atoms and negatively charged ions. The spatial distributions of the laser-ablated particles in the localized rare gas environment were measured. In helium gas environment, by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume depressed the ablation plume. There is no formation of silicon clusters till 15 μs after laser ablation in the argon gas environment. (author)

  12. Final Report on Small Particle Speciation for Forensics Analysis by Soft X-ray Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacold, J. I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Altman, A. B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Donald, S B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Davisson, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holliday, K S [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kristo, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Minasian, S. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nelson, A J [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tyliszczak, T [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Materials of interest for nuclear forensic science are often highly heterogeneous, containing complex mixtures of actinide compounds in a wide variety of matrices. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is ideally suited to study such materials, as it can be used to chemically image specimens by acquiring X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) data with 25 nm spatial resolution. In particular, STXM in the soft X-ray synchrotron radiation regime (approximately 120 – 2000 eV) can collect spectroscopic information from the actinides and light elements in a single experiment. Thus, STXM combines the chemical sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectroscopy with high spatial resolution in a single non-destructive characterization method. This report describes the application of STXM to a broad range of nuclear materials. Where possible, the spectroscopic images obtained by STXM are compared with information derived from other analytical methods, and used to make inferences about the process history of each material. STXM measurements can yield information including the morphology of a sample, “elemental maps” showing the spatial distribution of major chemical constituents, and XANES spectra from localized regions of a sample, which may show spatial variations in chemical composition.

  13. Multispecies Biofilms Transform Selenium Oxyanions into Elemental Selenium Particles: Studies Using Combined Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Imaging and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Soo In; George, Graham N.; Lawrence, John R.; Kaminskyj, Susan G. W.; Dynes, James J.; Lai, Barry; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2016-10-04

    Selenium (Se) is an element of growing environmental concern, because low aqueous concentrations can lead to biomagnification through the aquatic food web. Biofilms, naturally occurring microbial consortia, play numerous important roles in the environment, especially in biogeochemical cycling of toxic elements in aquatic systems. The complexity of naturally forming multispecies biofilms presents challenges for characterization because conventional microscopic techniques require chemical and physical modifications of the sample. Here, multispecies biofilms biotransforming selenium oxyanions were characterized using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These complementary synchrotron techniques required minimal sample preparation and were applied correlatively to the same biofilm areas. Sub-micrometer XFI showed distributions of Se and endogenous metals, while Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of elemental Se (Se0). Nanoscale carbon K-edge STXM revealed the distributions of microbial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and lipids using the protein, saccharide, and lipid signatures, respectively, together with highly localized Se0 using the Se LIII edge. Transmission electron microscopy showed the electron-dense particle diameter to be 50–700 nm, suggesting Se0 nanoparticles. The intimate association of Se0 particles with protein and polysaccharide biofilm components has implications for the bioavailability of selenium in the environment.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of multi-MeV pulsed X-ray induced air plasmas at low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribière, M.; D'Almeida, T.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de; Maulois, M.; Delbos, C.; Garrigues, A.; Cessenat, O.; Azaïs, B.

    2016-01-01

    A full kinetic modelling of the charge particles dynamics generated upon the irradiation of an air-filled cavity by a multi-MeV pulsed x-ray is performed. From the calculated radiative source generated by the ASTERIX generator, we calculated the electromagnetic fields generated by x-ray induced air plasmas in a metallic cavity at different pressures. Simulations are carried out based on a Particle-In-Cell interpolation method which uses 3D Maxwell-Vlasov calculations of the constitutive charged species densities of air plasmas at different pressures at equilibrium. The resulting electromagnetic fields within the cavity are calculated for different electron densities up to 4 × 10"1"0" cm"−"3. For each air pressure, we show electronic plasma waves formation followed by Landau damping. As electron density increases, the calculations exhibit space-charged neutralization and return current formation.

  15. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, Christopher R; Titt, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose. (paper)

  16. Primary benign tumors in chiropractic practice and the importance of x-ray diagnosis: A report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jacques C.

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of primary benign bone tumors were diagnosed radiographically in a chiropractic practice. Although primary osseous tumors are somewhat uncommon, their potential presence emphasizes the importance of x-ray diagnosis as an essential adjunct to chiropractic practice. This procedure may preclude underlying lesions before considering treatment of seemingly uncomplicated injuries. Two such cases are presented: unicameral bone cyst and osteochondroma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  17. Morphology, composition, and mixing state of primary particles from combustion sources - crop residue, wood, and solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Kong, Shaofei; Zhang, Yinxiao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liang; Yan, Qin; Lingaswamy, A P; Shi, Zongbo; Lv, Senlin; Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye; Li, Weijun

    2017-07-11

    Morphology, composition, and mixing state of individual particles emitted from crop residue, wood, and solid waste combustion in a residential stove were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study showed that particles from crop residue and apple wood combustion were mainly organic matter (OM) in smoldering phase, whereas soot-OM internally mixed with K in flaming phase. Wild grass combustion in flaming phase released some Cl-rich-OM/soot particles and cardboard combustion released OM and S-rich particles. Interestingly, particles from hardwood (pear wood and bamboo) and softwood (cypress and pine wood) combustion were mainly soot and OM in the flaming phase, respectively. The combustion of foam boxes, rubber tires, and plastic bottles/bags in the flaming phase released large amounts of soot internally mixed with a small amount of OM, whereas the combustion of printed circuit boards and copper-core cables emitted large amounts of OM with Br-rich inclusions. In addition, the printed circuit board combustion released toxic metals containing Pb, Zn, Sn, and Sb. The results are important to document properties of primary particles from combustion sources, which can be used to trace the sources of ambient particles and to know their potential impacts in human health and radiative forcing in the air.

  18. EXTREME PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION LAYERS: APPLICATION TO THE GAMMA-RAY FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, Dmitri A. [CIPS, Physics Department, University of Colorado, UCB 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: benoit.cerutti@colorado.edu, E-mail: uzdensky@colorado.edu, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    The gamma-ray space telescopes AGILE and Fermi detected short and bright synchrotron gamma-ray flares at photon energies above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula. This discovery suggests that electron-positron pairs in the nebula are accelerated to PeV energies in a milligauss magnetic field, which is difficult to explain with classical models of particle acceleration and pulsar wind nebulae. We investigate whether particle acceleration in a magnetic reconnection layer can account for the puzzling properties of the flares. We numerically integrate relativistic test-particle orbits in the vicinity of the layer, including the radiation reaction force, and using analytical expressions for the large-scale electromagnetic fields. As they get accelerated by the reconnection electric field, the particles are focused deep inside the current layer where the magnetic field is small. The electrons suffer less from synchrotron losses and are accelerated to extremely high energies. Population studies show that, at the end of the layer, the particle distribution piles up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop and is focused into a thin fan beam. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum peaks above 100 MeV and is close to the spectral shape of a single electron. The flare inverse Compton emission is negligible and no detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This mechanism provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula and could be at work in other astrophysical objects such as relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei.

  19. EXTREME PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION LAYERS: APPLICATION TO THE GAMMA-RAY FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2012-01-01

    The gamma-ray space telescopes AGILE and Fermi detected short and bright synchrotron gamma-ray flares at photon energies above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula. This discovery suggests that electron-positron pairs in the nebula are accelerated to PeV energies in a milligauss magnetic field, which is difficult to explain with classical models of particle acceleration and pulsar wind nebulae. We investigate whether particle acceleration in a magnetic reconnection layer can account for the puzzling properties of the flares. We numerically integrate relativistic test-particle orbits in the vicinity of the layer, including the radiation reaction force, and using analytical expressions for the large-scale electromagnetic fields. As they get accelerated by the reconnection electric field, the particles are focused deep inside the current layer where the magnetic field is small. The electrons suffer less from synchrotron losses and are accelerated to extremely high energies. Population studies show that, at the end of the layer, the particle distribution piles up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop and is focused into a thin fan beam. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum peaks above 100 MeV and is close to the spectral shape of a single electron. The flare inverse Compton emission is negligible and no detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This mechanism provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula and could be at work in other astrophysical objects such as relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei.

  20. Conceptual design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers system for α particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Barnsley, R.; Bertalot, L.; Brichard, B.; Croci, G.; Brolatti, G.; Di Pace, L.; Fernandes, A.; Giacomelli, L.; Lengar, I.; Moszynski, M.; Krasilnikov, V.; Muraro, A.; Pereira, R. C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rigamonti, D.; Rebai, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Salewski, M.; Santosh, P.; Sousa, J.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2017-07-01

    We here present the principles and main physics capabilities behind the design of the radial gamma ray spectrometers (RGRS) system for alpha particle and runaway electron measurements at ITER. The diagnostic benefits from recent advances in gamma-ray spectrometry for tokamak plasmas and combines space and high energy resolution in a single device. The RGRS system as designed can provide information on α ~ particles on a time scale of 1/10 of the slowing down time for the ITER 500 MW full power DT scenario. Spectral observations of the 3.21 and 4.44 MeV peaks from the 9\\text{Be}≤ft(α,nγ \\right){{}12}\\text{C} reaction make the measurements sensitive to α ~ particles at characteristic resonant energies and to possible anisotropies of their slowing down distribution function. An independent assessment of the neutron rate by gamma-ray emission is also feasible. In case of runaway electrons born in disruptions with a typical duration of 100 ms, a time resolution of at least 10 ms for runaway electron studies can be achieved depending on the scenario and down to a current of 40 kA by use of external gas injection. We find that the bremsstrahlung spectrum in the MeV range from confined runaways is sensitive to the electron velocity space up to E≈ 30 -40 MeV, which allows for measurements of the energy distribution of the runaway electrons at ITER.

  1. Optimization of in-line phase contrast particle image velocimetry using a laboratory x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, I.; Fouras, A.; Paganin, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a laboratory x-ray microfocus source is investigated using a numerical model. Phase contrast images of 75 μm air bubbles, embedded within water exhibiting steady-state vortical flow, are generated under the paraxial approximation using a tungsten x-ray spectrum at 30 kVp. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast speckle images at a range of source-object and object-detector distances are generated, and used as input into a simulated PIV measurement. The effects of source-size-induced penumbral blurring, together with the finite dynamic range of the detector, are accounted for in the simulation. The PIV measurement procedure involves using the cross-correlation between temporally sequential speckle images to estimate the transverse displacement field for the fluid. The global error in the PIV reconstruction, for the set of simulations that was performed, suggests that geometric magnification is the key parameter for designing a laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast PIV system. For the modeled system, x-ray phase-contrast PIV data measurement can be optimized to obtain low error ( 15 μm) of the detector, high geometric magnification (>2.5) is desired, while for large source size system (FWHM > 30 μm), low magnification (<1.5) would be suggested instead. The methods developed in this paper can be applied to optimizing phase-contrast velocimetry using a variety of laboratory x-ray sources.

  2. Classification of Multiple Types of Organic Carbon Composition in Atmospheric Particles by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcoyne, Arthur L; Takahama, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Russell, L.M.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.

    2007-05-16

    A scanning transmission X-ray microscope at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to measure organic functional group abundance and morphology of atmospheric aerosols. We present a summary of spectra, sizes, and shapes observed in 595 particles that were collected and analyzed between 2000 and 2006. These particles ranged between 0.1 and 12 mm and represent aerosols found in a large range of geographical areas, altitudes, and times. They include samples from seven different field campaigns: PELTI, ACE-ASIA, DYCOMS II, Princeton, MILAGRO (urban), MILAGRO (C-130), and INTEX-B. At least 14 different classes of organic particles show different types of spectroscopic signatures. Different particle types are found within the same region while the same particle types are also found in different geographical domains. Particles chemically resembling black carbon, humic-like aerosols, pine ultisol, and secondary or processed aerosol have been identified from functional group abundance and comparison of spectra with those published in the literature.

  3. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge.

  4. Geneva University: Particle Acceleration in supernova remnants and its implications for the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11h15 - Science III, Auditoire 1S081 Particle Acceleration in supernova remnants and its implications for the origin of galactic cosmic rays Prof. Pasquale BLASI INAF, Arcetri Observatory, Firenze The process of cosmic ray energization in supernova remnant shocks is described by the theory of non linear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA). Such theory is able to describe the acceleration itself, the dynamical reaction of accelerated particles on the shock, and the crucial phenomenon of the magnetic field amplification, the very key to generate high energy cosmic rays. I will illustrate the basic aspects of this theoretical framework, as well as its successes and problems. I will then discuss the observations, in X-rays an...

  5. A fundamental parameters approach to calibration of the Mars Exploration Rover Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. L.; Lee, M.; Jones, B. N.; Andrushenko, S. M.; Holmes, N. G.; Maxwell, J. A.; Taylor, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    The detection sensitivities of the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rovers for a wide range of elements were experimentally determined in 2002 using spectra of geochemical reference materials. A flight spare instrument was similarly calibrated, and the calibration exercise was then continued for this unit with an extended set of geochemical reference materials together with pure elements and simple chemical compounds. The flight spare instrument data are examined in detail here using a newly developed fundamental parameters approach which takes precise account of all the physics inherent in the two X-ray generation techniques involved, namely, X-ray fluorescence and particle-induced X-ray emission. The objectives are to characterize the instrument as fully as possible, to test this new approach, and to determine the accuracy of calibration for major, minor, and trace elements. For some of the lightest elements the resulting calibration exhibits a dependence upon the mineral assemblage of the geological reference material; explanations are suggested for these observations. The results will assist in designing the overall calibration approach for the APXS on the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  6. Alpha particle excited x-ray fluorescence analysis for trace elements in cervical spinal cords of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro; Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Yase, Yoshio; Yoshida, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    The mean contents of trace elements in anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cords of six amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases were relatively determined against those of six control cases by α-particle excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. The anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cord samples were excited by 1.6 MeV α-particle beam of 2 mm diameter accelerated with a Van de Graaff accelerator, and characteristic X-ray spectra were measured with a Si(Li) detector. From the peak areas on the X-ray spectra, the relative mean contents of the trace elements in cervical spinal cords of ALS and control cases were determined. As a result, the X-ray peaks of Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were detected. The contents of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe in ALS cases were higher than those in control cases. The contents of S, Cl, K, Cu and Zn in ALS and in control cases were equal to each other within standard deviation. The precipitation mechanisms of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe into cervical spinal cord of ALS cases are discussed on the basis of the previous studies. (author)

  7. Spatial analysis of galactic cosmic ray particles in low earth orbit/near equator orbit using SPENVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparta, W; Zulkeple, S K

    2014-01-01

    The space environment has grown intensively harmful to spacecraft and astronauts. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are one of the radiation sources that composed of high energetic particles originated from space and capable of damaging electronic systems through single event upset (SEU) process. In this paper, we analyzed GCR fluxes at different altitudes by using Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) software and the results are compared to determine their intensities with respect to distance in the Earth's orbit. The altitudes are set at low earth orbit (400 km and 685 km), medium earth orbit (19,100 km and 20,200 km) and high earth orbit (35,793 km and 1,000,000 km). Then, within Low Earth Orbit (LEO) near the equator (NEqO), we used altitude of 685 km to compare GCRs with the intensities of solar particles and trapped particles in the radiation belt to determine the significance of GCRs in the orbit itself.

  8. Individual particle analysis of coarse air suspended particulate material by synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Silvana; Melo Junior, Ariston; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is evaluate the size of individual particles present in the air suspended particulate material collected in Campinas, Sao Paulo State, and analyze quantitatively the particles using the synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence (μ-SRXRF) associated with the fundamental parameter method to correct attenuation/absorption effects by the matrix. The particles analyzed have size between 50-10 μm and to perform the spatial distribution a white beam of synchrotron radiation condensed by a conical capillary (13 μm diameter) was used. For the quantitative analysis punctual measures in thin films standards in Mylar subtract were performed. The elements detected were Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb. (author)

  9. Selection of stationary phase particle geometry using X-ray computed tomography and computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Irma; Minceva, Mirjana; Arlt, Wolfgang

    2012-02-17

    The X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to determine local parameters related to the column packing homogeneity and hydrodynamics in columns packed with spherically and irregularly shaped particles of same size. The results showed that the variation of porosity and axial dispersion coefficient along the column axis is insignificant, compared to their radial distribution. The methodology of using the data attained by CT measurements to perform a CFD simulation of a batch separation of model binary mixtures, with different concentration and separation factors is demonstrated. The results of the CFD simulation study show that columns packed with spherically shaped particles provide higher yield in comparison to columns packed with irregularly shaped particles only below a certain value of the separation factor. The presented methodology can be used for selecting a suited packing material for a particular separation task. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Individual particle analysis of coarse air suspended particulate material by synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Melo Junior, Ariston [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Recursos Hidricos]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Perez, Carlos Alberto [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: perez@lnls.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this work is evaluate the size of individual particles present in the air suspended particulate material collected in Campinas, Sao Paulo State, and analyze quantitatively the particles using the synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence ({mu}-SRXRF) associated with the fundamental parameter method to correct attenuation/absorption effects by the matrix. The particles analyzed have size between 50-10 {mu}m and to perform the spatial distribution a white beam of synchrotron radiation condensed by a conical capillary (13 {mu}m diameter) was used. For the quantitative analysis punctual measures in thin films standards in Mylar subtract were performed. The elements detected were Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb. (author)

  11. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Colvin

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2-3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region.

  12. Implementation of a primary standard for a x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    peixoto, J.G.P.

    1991-04-01

    In the scientific program of the National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology of the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, which belongs to the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, a free-air ionization chamber should be established as an exposure primary standard for X-rays of 100 K V to 250 K V of potential range. Preliminary results showed that the available free-air ionization chamber was suitable to be used. The absolute measurement of the radiation quantity exposure, is performed with a free-air ionization chamber. Its geometrical volume, which allows the determination of the air mass, is defined by the effective aperture area and by the length of the region where an electrical field is applied. Most of the ions produced in such volume are collected as an ionization current. Parameters related to the measurement of the quantity exposure were evaluated, such as: air absorption, scattering inside the ionization chamber, saturation, beam homogeneity, influence of beam size and influences of temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure. Preliminary determination of correction factors has showed good results with 99.9% of repeatability and has demonstrated the reliability of the checked chamber as a standard instrument. (author)

  13. Structural considerations for the practical development of primary shielding of X-ray rooms of megavoltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the necessity of the use of accelerators with voltages above 10 MV in medical facilities, becomes necessary to evaluate the efficiency of the thickness of shielding materials used in rooms that contain these devices. This work presents the development of an algorithm able to provide data in a practical way, regarding the thickness of materials that can be used for an effective shielding against primary beams from these equipment. The use of the computer language C ++ allowed developing a practical tool for determining the thickness of materials required to protect the public and Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOEs) against major powers beams. Furthermore, it was considered by calculations Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Technique (IMRT). The construction of this tool was based to ensure the dose limits established in the CNEN-NN-3.01. The dose limiting is done through the use of loops able to validate the efficiency of thickness determined by the algorithm itself, and ensure if the radiation dose exceeds the limits set by the standard, it will be the inclusion of sufficient Half-Reducer Layers in so that the dose is within the parameters established by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The code validation is performed by comparing results obtained in the examples p recalculated in the NCRP Report-151 (Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for megavoltage X and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities) with the results generated by the code. The results are satisfactory and consistent with that report

  14. Iron speciation of airborne subway particles by the combined use of energy dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and Raman microspectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Sobanska, Sophie; Chung, Sang-Gwi; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Sunwoo, Young; Ro, Chul-Un

    2013-11-05

    Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), known as low-Z particle EPMA, and Raman microspectrometry (RMS) were applied in combination for an analysis of the iron species in airborne PM10 particles collected in underground subway tunnels. Iron species have been reported to be a major chemical species in underground subway particles generated mainly from mechanical wear and friction processes. In particular, iron-containing particles in subway tunnels are expected to be generated with minimal outdoor influence on the particle composition. Because iron-containing particles have different toxicity and magnetic properties depending on their oxidation states, it is important to determine the iron species of underground subway particles in the context of both indoor public health and control measures. A recently developed analytical methodology, i.e., the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and RMS, was used to identify the chemical species of the same individual subway particles on a single particle basis, and the bulk iron compositions of airborne subway particles were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The majority of airborne subway particles collected in the underground tunnels were found to be magnetite, hematite, and iron metal. All the particles collected in the tunnels of underground subway stations were attracted to permanent magnets due mainly to the almost ubiquitous ferrimagnetic magnetite, indicating that airborne subway particles can be removed using magnets as a control measure.

  15. Study of ultra-energetic cosmic rays at the Pierre Auger Observatory from particle detection to anisotropy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aublin, J.

    2006-09-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, still under construction in Argentina, is designed to study the cosmic rays with energies above a few EeV. The experiment combines two complementary techniques: the fluorescence light detection and the sampling of the shower with an array of detectors at ground, covering a surface of 3000 square kilometers. The calculation of the acceptance of the detector, which is of utmost importance to establish the energy spectrum, has been achieved. The method of computation of the acceptance is simple and reliable. The detection efficiency depends on the nature of primary cosmic rays, allowing to study the cosmic rays composition with the surface detector. The calculation of the cosmic rays energy spectrum has been performed, using different methods to estimate the energy of the events. A cross calibration between the fluorescence and the surface detector provides an estimation of the energy almost independent of hadronic interaction models. The study of large scale anisotropies in the cosmic rays angular distribution provides useful informations about the cosmic rays sources and the conditions of propagation. A new analysis method is presented, allowing to estimate the parameters of an underlying dipolar and quadrupolar anisotropy in the data. The method is applied to a preliminary Auger data set. (author)

  16. Contribution to the study of nuclear aerosol: looking for the dynamic form factor of the aerosol of primary particles of sodium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, M.

    1982-09-01

    The dynamical form factor describes the entrainment of any non spherical particle, of inhomogeneous density, in relation to the entrainment of a spherical particle with the same volume and some sedimentation speed. Experimental study of the form factor and particle size distribution of sodium peroxide primary aerosols [fr

  17. X-ray PIV measurements of blood flows without tracer particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Lee, Sang Joon

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood moving in a circular tube flow using an X-ray PIV method and compared the experimental results with hemodynamic models. The X-ray PIV method was improved for measuring quantitative velocity fields of blood flows using a coherent synchrotron X-ray. Without using any contrast media, this method can visualize flow pattern of blood by enhancing the phase-contrast and interference characteristics of blood cells. The enhanced X-ray images were achieved by optimizing the sample-to-scintillator distance, the sample thickness, and hematocrit in detail. The quantitative velocity fields of blood flows inside opaque conduits were obtained by applying a two-frame PIV algorithm to the X-ray images of the blood flows. The measured velocity data show typical features of blood flow such as the yield stress and shear-thinning effects. (orig.)

  18. FPGA Implementation of an Efficient Algorithm for the Calculation of Charged Particle Trajectories in Cosmic Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Xabier; Piso, Daniel; Bruguera, Javier D.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an FPGA implementation of an algorithm, previously published, for the the reconstruction of cosmic rays' trajectories and the determination of the time of arrival and velocity of the particles. The accuracy and precision issues of the algorithm have been analyzed to propose a suitable implementation. Thus, a 32-bit fixed-point format has been used for the representation of the data values. Moreover, the dependencies among the different operations have been taken into account to obtain a highly parallel and efficient hardware implementation. The final hardware architecture requires 18 cycles to process every particle, and has been exhaustively simulated to validate all the design decisions. The architecture has been mapped over different commercial FPGAs, with a frequency of operation ranging from 300 MHz to 1.3 GHz, depending on the FPGA being used. Consequently, the number of particle trajectories processed per second is between 16 million and 72 million. The high number of particle trajectories calculated per second shows that the proposed FPGA implementation might be used also in high rate environments such as those found in particle and nuclear physics experiments.

  19. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha- (α- particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific.

  20. Primary Results from the Measurement of Nature Ice Nuclear Particles during 2017 Spring in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Y.; Dang, J.; Fang, W.; Qian, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The ice nuclear particles (INPs) play a critical role in weather modification in mixed-phase clouds (MPCs) because ice can influence the supercooled liquid water content through the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The fundamental desire to understand ice nucleation is the same as when such research began in earnest more than 60 years ago while the first cloud seeding activity began and enhanced from the last decade by climate change researches. The primary INPs sources, both from natural and anthropogenic, may be change a lot for decades. The purpose of this paper is to get the new background information of INPs and comparing with historical data. The INPs concentrations were observed twice a day(9:00 am and 14:00 pm) in Beijing from Mar. 20 to Apr. 19, 2017 using the 5 Litters Bigg's mixing cloud chamber. The method, time and sites of the observation are basically the same with the experiment at year 1963, 1995 and 1996. Compared with the previous observations, the observed activation temperature -10° is added, besides the -15°, -20°, -25°, -30°. The results show that the INPs concentrations at the different activation temperatures have good consistency trend as diurnal variation. This is consistent with the observations in 1963, 1995 and 1996. The INPs concentrations in this observation are higher than the result in 1963, but obviously lower than 1995 and 1996. It shows that natural changes and human activities in the past 20 years did not significantly increase the INPs concentration. During the observation period, there were weak precipitations in four days (Mar. 20, Mar. 22, Mar. 23, Mar.24), the INPs concentrations tended to decrease in the intermittent precipitation from Mar. 20 to Mar. 25. This shows that the precipitations have effect on the removal of ice nuclei. The visibility sensor was also synchronized observed in the work. There was clearly an inverse correlation between INPs concentration and visibility with the diurnal variation. The

  1. Analysis of individual environmental particles using modern methods of electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, A.; Cowin, J.P.; Iedema, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the composition of particles in the atmosphere is critical because of their health effects and their direct and indirect effects on radiative forcing, and hence on climate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of single particle off-line analysis to investigate the chemistry of individual atmospheric particles using modern, state-of-the-art electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry techniques. We show that these methods provide specific, detailed data on particle composition, chemistry, morphology, phase and internal structure. This information is crucial for evaluating hygroscopic properties of aerosols, understanding aerosol aging and reactivity, and correlating the characteristics of aerosols with their optical properties. The manuscript presents a number of analytical advances in methods of electron probe particle analysis along with a brief review of a number of the research projects carried out in the authors' laboratory on the chemical characterization of environmental particles. The obtained data offers a rich set of qualitative and quantitative information on the particle chemistry, composition and the mechanisms of gas-particle interactions which are of high importance to atmospheric processes involving particulate matter and air pollution

  2. Tracking the pathway of diesel exhaust particles from the nose to the brain by X-ray florescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yasuto [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: y.matsui@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakai, Nobumitsu [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: sakai@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tsuda, Akira [Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: atsuda@hsph.harvard.edu; Terada, Yasuko [JASRI, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)], E-mail: yterada@spring8.or.jp; Takaoka, Masaki [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: takaoka@epsehost.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fujimaki, Hidekazu [Division of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp; Uchiyama, Iwao [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: uchiyama@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-08-15

    Studies have shown that exposure to nano-sized particles (< 50 nm) result in their translocation to the central nervous system through the olfactory nerve. Translocation commonly occurs via inhalation, ingestion and skin uptake. Little information is available on the specific pathway of cellular localization of nano-sized particles in the olfactory bulb. The nano-sized particles entrance into the postsynaptics cell is of particular interest because the mitral cell projects to the central nucleus of the amygdala and the piriform cortex. Therefore, our objective in this follow-up study has been to determine whether or not the mitral cells project nano-sized particles to the brain. Nano-sized particles in this study were generated using diesel exhaust. Lab mice were exposed for a period of 4 weeks. We employed synchrotron radiation (SPring-8, Japan) to determine the concentration levels of metal in the olfactory neuron pathway. Metal levels were assayed by mapping, using X-ray fluorescence analysis. The major metal components measured in the filter that collected the inhaled diesel exhaust particles were calcium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc. Our studies reveal an increase in the amount of nano-sized particles in the glomerular layer as well as in the neurons in the olfactory epithelium. Higher levels of nickel and iron were found in the olfactory epithelium's lamina propria mucosae in comparison to that in the control group. Higher levels of iron also were observed in the glomerular layer. Our studies do not clarify the specifics of metal adhesion and detachment. This remains to be one of the key issues requiring further clarification.

  3. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarze Per E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α, a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr, with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm, but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm. The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm and quartz (≤ 2 μm to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses

  4. Non-universal spectra of ultra-high energy cosmic ray primaries and secondaries in a structured universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, Guenter

    2007-01-01

    Analytical calculations of extra-galactic cosmic ray spectra above ∼ 10 17 eV are often performed assuming continuous source distributions, giving rise to spectra that depend little on the propagation mode, be it rectilinear or diffusive. We perform trajectory simulations for proton primaries in the probably more realistic case of discrete sources with a density of ∼ 10 -5 Mpc -3 . We find two considerable non-universal effects that depend on source distributions and magnetic fields: First, the primary extra-galactic cosmic ray flux can become strongly suppressed below a few 10 18 eV due to partial confinement in magnetic fields surrounding sources. Second, the secondary photon to primary cosmic ray flux ratio between ≅ 3 x 10 18 eV and ≅ 10 20 eV decreases with decreasing source density and increasing magnetization. As a consequence, in acceleration scenarios for the origin of highest energy cosmic rays the fraction of secondary photons may be difficult to detect even for experiments such as Pierre Auger. The cosmogenic neutrino flux does not significantly depend on source density and magnetization. (author)

  5. Cluster-cluster aggregation kinetics and primary particle growth of soot nanoparticles in flame by light scattering and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stasio, Stefano; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G; Kostoglou, Margaritis

    2002-03-01

    The agglomeration kinetics of growing soot generated in a diffusion atmospheric flame are here studied in situ by light scattering technique to infer cluster morphology and size (fractal dimension D(f) and radius of gyration R(g)). SEM analysis is used as a standard reference to obtain primary particle size D(P) at different residence times. The number N(P) of primary particles per aggregate and the number concentration n(A) of clusters are evaluated on the basis of the measured angular patterns of the scattered light intensity. The major finding is that the kinetics of the coagulation process that yields to the formation of chain-like aggregates by soot primary particles (size 10 to 40 nm) can be described with a constant coagulation kernel beta(c,exp)=2.37x10(-9) cm3/s (coagulation constant tau(c) approximately = 0.28 ms). This result is in nice accord with the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in the free molecular regime, and, vice versa, it is in contrast with previous studies conducted by invasive (ex situ) techniques, which claimed the evidence in flames of coagulation rates much larger than the kinetic theory predictions. Thereafter, a number of numerical simulations is implemented to compare with the experimental results on primary particle growth rate and on the process of aggregate reshaping that is observed by light scattering at later residence times. The restructuring process is conjectured to occur, for not well understood reasons, as a direct consequence of the atomic rearrangement in the solid phase carbon due to the prolonged residence time within the flame. Thus, on one side, it is shown that the numerical simulations of primary size history compare well with the values of primary size from SEM experiment with a growth rate constant of primary diameter about 1 nm/s. On the other side, the evolution of aggregate morphology is found to be predictable by the numerical simulations when the onset of a first-order "thermal" restructuring mechanism is

  6. Average Nuclear Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 56,57FE from Primary (Gamma)-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Becker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.A.; Garrett, P.E.; Guttormsen, M.; Mitchell, G.E.; Rekstad, J.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Voinov, A.; Younes, W.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental primary γ-ray spectrum vs. excitation-energy bin (P(E x , E γ ) matrix) in a light-ion reaction is obtained for 56,57 Fe isotopes using a subtraction method. By factorizing the P(E x , E γ ) matrix according to the Axel-Brink hypothesis the nuclear level density and the radiative strength function (RSF) in 56,57 Fe are extracted simultaneously. A step structure is observed in the level density for both isotopes, and is interpreted as the breaking of Cooper pairs. The RSFs for 56,57 Fe reveal an anomalous enhancement at low γ-ray energies

  7. MER 1 MARS ALPHA PARTICLE X-RAY SPECTROMETER 2 XRAYSPEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains Mars Exploration Rover x-ray data products from the APXS instrument and ancillary files. Each product has a detached PDS label that describes...

  8. Applications of charged particle induced x-ray analysis to forensic and biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, B.K.; Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Mathur, S.C.; Mittler, A.; Quinn, P.W.

    1974-01-01

    X-ray emission analysis was applied to the analysis of firearm discharge residues on hands for trace elements. It was also applied to the determination of trace element concentrations in the blood of malaria-infected and healthy mice

  9. Anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in hadron and gamma-ray families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamada, Masanobu; Funayama, Yoshimi

    1986-01-01

    Correlations in relative (energy-weighted) distance between hadrons and electromagnetic particles are studied in the families observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. It is found that the observed number of hadrons which accompany electromagnetic in very close vicinity, say -5 , and it means there exists anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in the characteristic spread of atmospheric electromagnetic cascade. The results are also compared with those of Japan-USSR joint chamber exposed at Pamir observatory. (author)

  10. Review: The Use of Real-Time Fluorescence Instrumentation to Monitor Ambient Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehael J. Fennelly

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP encompass many particle types that are derived from several biological kingdoms. These aerosol particles can be composed of both whole living units such as pollen, bacteria, and fungi, as well as from mechanically formed particles, such as plant debris. They constitute a significant proportion of the overall atmospheric particle load and have been linked with adverse health issues and climatic effects on the environment. Traditional methods for their analysis have focused on the direct capture of PBAP before subsequent laboratory analysis. These analysis types have generally relied on direct optical microscopy or incubation on agar plates, followed by time-consuming microbiological investigation. In an effort to address some of these deficits, real-time fluorescence monitors have come to prominence in the analysis of PBAP. These instruments offer significant advantages over traditional methods, including the measurement of concentrations, as well as the potential to simultaneously identify individual analyte particles in real-time. Due to the automated nature of these measurements, large data sets can be collected and analyzed with relative ease. This review seeks to highlight and discuss the extensive literature pertaining to the most commonly used commercially available real-time fluorescence monitors (WIBS, UV-APS and BioScout. It discusses the instruments operating principles, their limitations and advantages, and the various environments in which they have been deployed. The review provides a detailed examination of the ambient fluorescent aerosol particle concentration profiles that are obtained by these studies, along with the various strategies adopted by researchers to analyze the substantial data sets the instruments generate. Finally, a brief reflection is presented on the role that future instrumentation may provide in revolutionizing this area of atmospheric research.

  11. Relative cataractogenic effects of X rays, fission-spectrum neutrons, and 56Fe particles: A comparison with mitotic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, E.F.; Lindgren, A.L.; Andersen, A.L.; Miller, R.C.; Ainsworth, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The eyes of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with doses of 2.5-10 Gy 250-kVp X rays, 1.25-2.25 Gy fission-spectrum neutrons (approximately 0.85 MeV), or 0.1-2.0 Gy 600-MeV/A 56Fe particles. Lens opacifications were evaluated for 51-61 weeks following X and neutron irradiations and for 87 weeks following X and 56Fe-particle irradiations. Average stage of opacification was determined relative to time after irradiation, and the time required for 50% of the irradiated lenses to achieve various stages (T50) was determined as a function of radiation dose. Data from two experiments were combined in dose-effect curves as T50 experimental values taken as percentages of the respective T50 control values (T50-% control). Simple exponential curves best describe dose responsiveness for both high-LET radiations. For X rays, a shallow dose-effect relationship (shoulder) up to 4.5 Gy was followed at higher doses by a steeper exponential dose-effect relationship. As a consequence, RBE values for the high-LET radiations are dose dependent. Dose-effect curves for cataracts were compared to those for mitotic abnormalities observed when quiescent lens epithelial cells were stimulated mechanically to proliferate at various intervals after irradiation. Neutrons were about 1.6-1.8 times more effective than 56Fe particles for inducing both cataracts and mitotic abnormalities. For stage 1 and 2 cataracts, the X-ray Dq was 10-fold greater and the D0 was similar to those for mitotic abnormalities initially expressed after irradiation

  12. Molecular characterization of primary humic-like substances in fine smoke particles by thermochemolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingjun; Wei, Siye; Zhu, Mengbo; Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the molecular structures of primary humic-like substances (HULIS) in fine smoke particles emitted from the combustion of biomass materials (including rice straw, corn straw, and pine branches) and coal, and atmospheric HULIS were determined by off-line tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (TMAH-GC/MS). A total of 89 pyrolysates were identified by the thermochemolysis of primary and atmospheric HULIS. The main groups were polysaccharide derivatives, N-containing compounds, lignin derivatives, aromatic acid methyl ester, aliphatic acid methyl ester, and diterpenoid derivatives. Both the type and distribution of pyrolysates among primary HULIS were comparable to those in atmospheric HULIS. This indicates that primary HULIS from combustion processes are important contributors to atmospheric HULIS. Some distinct differences were also observed. The aromatic compounds, including lignin derivatives and aromatic acid methyl ester, were the major pyrolysates (53.0%-84.9%) in all HULIS fractions, suggesting that primary HULIS significantly contributed aromatic structures to atmospheric HULIS. In addition, primary HULIS from biomass burning (BB) contained a relatively high abundance of lignin and polysaccharide derivatives, which is consistent with the large amounts of lignin and cellulose structures contained in biomass materials. Aliphatic acid methyl ester and benzyl methyl ether were prominent pyrolysates in atmospheric HULIS. Moreover, some molecular markers of specific sources were obtained from the thermochemolysis of primary and atmospheric HULIS. For example, polysaccharide derivatives, pyridine and pyrrole derivatives, and lignin derivatives can be used as tracers of fresh HULIS emitted from BB. Diterpenoid derivatives are important markers of HULIS from pine wood combustion sources. Finally, the differences in pyrolysate types and the distributions between primary and atmospheric HULIS

  13. Particle-induced X-ray emission: thick-target analysis of inorganic materials in the determination of light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Arantegui, J.; Castillo, J.R.; Querre, G.

    1994-01-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been applied to the analysis of inorganic materials to determine some elements with Z < 27: Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe, in thick-target analysis. A PIXE method has been developed for the analysis of geological materials, ceramics and pottery. Work has been carried out with an ion beam analytical system, using a low particle beam energy. Relative sensitivity, detection limits, reproducibility and accuracy of the method were calculated based on the analysis of geological standard materials (river sediments, argillaceous limestone, basalt, diorite and granite). Analysis using PIXE offers a number of advantages, such as short analysis time, multi-elemental and nondestructive determinations, and the results are similar to those obtained with other instrumental techniques of analysis. (Author)

  14. A cosmic-ray nuclear event with an anomalously strong concentration of energy and particles in the central region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, N.M.; Arata, N.; Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1986-01-01

    A cosmic-ray induced nuclear event detected in the emulsion chamber is described. The event consists of 217 shower cores with ΣEγ = 1,275 TeV. In log scale, energy and particles are emitted most densely at the small lateral distance corresponding to 0.5 mm; 77 % of the total energy and 61 % of the total multiplicity are inside the radius of 0.65 cm. The shower cores in the central region show exponential-type energy distribution and non-isotropic azimuthal distribution. This event indicates a possibility that phenomena of large transverse momentum could happen to produce a strong concentration of energy and particles in the very forward direction. (Authors) [pt

  15. Study of fission time scale from measurement of pre-scission light particle and γ-ray multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, K.; Chatterjee, A.; Navin, A.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the result of a simultaneous measurement of pre-scission multiplicities and analysis using the statistical model code JOANNE2 which includes deformation effects. Evaporation residue cross-sections has also been measured for the same system and analyzed in a consistent manner. The neutron, charged particle, GDR γ-ray and ER data could be explained consistently. The emission of neutrons seems to be favored towards larger deformation as compared to charged particles. The pre-scission time scale is deduced as 0-2 x 10 -21 s whereas the saddle-to-scission time scale is 36-39 x 10 -21 s. The total fission time scale is deduced as 36-41 x 10 -21 s

  16. A cosmic-ray nuclear event with an anomalously strong concentration of energy and particles in the central region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, N.M.; Arata, N.; Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1987-01-01

    A cosmic-ray-induced nuclear event detected in an emulsion chamber is described. The event consist of 217 shower cores with ΣEγ=1.275 TeV. In a logarithmic scale, energy and particles are emitted most densely at the small lateral distance corresponding to 0.5 mm; 77% of the total energy and 61% of the total multiplicity are inside a radius of 0.65 cm. The shower cores in the central region show exponential-type energy distribution and nonisotropic azimuthal distribution

  17. Dosimetry and monitoring of thin X-ray beam produced by linear particle accelerator, for application in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    The dosimetry and monitoring characteristics of thin X-ray beams, and the application of 4MeV linear particle accelerator to radiosurgery are studied. An addition collimation system, consisted of 3 lead collimators, which allows to obtain thin beams of 6,10 and 15 mm of diameter, was fabricated. The stereo taxic system, together with modifications in dispositives, provide the accuracy required in volum-targed location. The dosimetric informations were determined with silicon detector inserted into water simulator. The isodose curves for each beam, and total isodoses simulating the treatment were established using radiographic emulsions in conditions which reproduce real circunstances of pacient irradiation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Gamma-H2AX foci in cells exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cellular effects of exposure to mixed beams of high and low linear energy transfer radiation. So far, the effects of combined exposures have mainly been assessed with clonogenic survival or cytogenetic methods, and the results are contradictory. The gamma-H2AX assay has up to now not been applied in this context, and it is a promising tool for investigating the early cellular response to mixed beam irradiation. Purpose To determine the dose response and repair kinetics of gamma-H2AX ionizing radiation-induced foci in VH10 human fibroblasts exposed to mixed beams of 241Am alpha particles and X-rays. Results VH10 human fibroblasts were irradiated with each radiation type individually or both in combination at 37°C. Foci were scored for repair kinetics 0.5, 1, 3 and 24 h after irradiation (one dose per irradiation type), and for dose response at the 1 h time point. The dose response effect of mixed beam was additive, and the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles (as compared to X-rays) was of 0.76 ± 0.52 for the total number of foci, and 2.54 ± 1.11 for large foci. The repair kinetics for total number of foci in cells exposed to mixed beam irradiation was intermediate to that of cells exposed to alpha particles and X-rays. However, for mixed beam-irradiated cells the frequency and area of large foci were initially lower than predicted and increased during the first 3 hours of repair (while the predicted number and area did not). Conclusions The repair kinetics of large foci after mixed beam exposure was significantly different from predicted based on the effect of the single dose components. The formation of large foci was delayed and they did not reach their maximum area until 1 h after irradiation. We hypothesize that the presence of low X-ray-induced damage engages the DNA repair machinery leading to a delayed DNA damage response to the more complex DNA damage induced by alpha particles. PMID:23121736

  19. (U) Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis of Uncollided Particle Contributions to Radiation Detector Responses Using Ray-Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-30

    The Second-Level Adjoint Sensitivity System (2nd-LASS) that yields the second-order sensitivities of a response of uncollided particles with respect to isotope densities, cross sections, and source emission rates is derived in Refs. 1 and 2. In Ref. 2, we solved problems for the uncollided leakage from a homogeneous sphere and a multiregion cylinder using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. In this memo, we derive solutions of the 2nd-LASS for the particular case when the response is a flux or partial current density computed at a single point on the boundary, and the inner products are computed using ray-tracing. Both the PARTISN approach and the ray-tracing approach are implemented in a computer code, SENSPG. The next section of this report presents the equations of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS for uncollided particles and the first- and second-order sensitivities that use the solutions of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS. Section III presents solutions of the 1st- and 2nd-LASS equations for the case of ray-tracing from a detector point. Section IV presents specific solutions of the 2nd-LASS and derives the ray-trace form of the inner products needed for second-order sensitivities. Numerical results for the total leakage from a homogeneous sphere are presented in Sec. V and for the leakage from one side of a two-region slab in Sec. VI. Section VII is a summary and conclusions.

  20. DNA damage and defence gene expression after oxidative stress induced by x-rays and diesel exhaust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risom, Lotte

    2004-01-01

    Particulate air pollution is one the most important environmental health factors for people living in cities. Especially the exhaust particles from traffic are possible causes for cancer and cardiopulmonary diseases. The aim of this thesis was to characterize the health effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) by inducing oxidative stress and analyse the underlying mechanisms. Methods for determining oxidative stress, DNA damage, and gene expression were validated and calibrated in lung tissue by studying the dose response relations after ionizing radiation. The study showed the feasibility of partial-body x-ray irradiation as an in vivo model for induction and repair of oxidative DNA damage, of DNA repair enzymes expression, and antioxidant defense genes. A 'nose-only' mouse model for inhalation of ultra-fine particles showed that particles induce oxidative DNA damage in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. The exposure increased the expression of HO-1 mRNA and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase OGG1 mRNA. The levels of 8-oxodG and OGG1 mRNA were mirror images. Colon and liver were analysed after administration of DEP in the diet with or without increasing doses of sucrose. This study indicated that DEP induces DNA adducts and oxidative stress through formation of DNA strand breaks, DNA repair enzyme expression, apoptosis, and protein oxidisation in colon and liver at relatively low exposure doses. The thesis is based on four published journal articles. (ln)

  1. DNA damage and defence gene expression after oxidative stress induced by x-rays and diesel exhaust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risom, Lotte

    2004-07-01

    Particulate air pollution is one the most important environmental health factors for people living in cities. Especially the exhaust particles from traffic are possible causes for cancer and cardiopulmonary diseases. The aim of this thesis was to characterize the health effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) by inducing oxidative stress and analyse the underlying mechanisms. Methods for determining oxidative stress, DNA damage, and gene expression were validated and calibrated in lung tissue by studying the dose response relations after ionizing radiation. The study showed the feasibility of partial-body x-ray irradiation as an in vivo model for induction and repair of oxidative DNA damage, of DNA repair enzymes expression, and antioxidant defense genes. A 'nose-only' mouse model for inhalation of ultra-fine particles showed that particles induce oxidative DNA damage in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. The exposure increased the expression of HO-1 mRNA and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase OGG1 mRNA. The levels of 8-oxodG and OGG1 mRNA were mirror images. Colon and liver were analysed after administration of DEP in the diet with or without increasing doses of sucrose. This study indicated that DEP induces DNA adducts and oxidative stress through formation of DNA strand breaks, DNA repair enzyme expression, apoptosis, and protein oxidisation in colon and liver at relatively low exposure doses. The thesis is based on four published journal articles. (ln)

  2. Hints of an axion-like particle mixing in the GeV gamma-ray blazar data?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Olga [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Razzaque, Soebur, E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es, E-mail: srazzaque@uj.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2013-11-01

    Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), if exist in nature, are expected to mix with photons in the presence of an external magnetic field. The energy range of photons which undergo strong mixing with ALPs depends on the ALP mass, on its coupling with photons as well as on the external magnetic field and particle density configurations. Recent observations of blazars by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope in the 0.1–300 GeV energy range show a break in their spectra in the 1–10 GeV range. We have modeled this spectral feature for the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C454.3 during its November 2010 outburst, assuming that a significant fraction of the gamma rays convert to ALPs in the large scale jet of this blazar. Using theoretically motivated models for the magnetic field and particle density configurations in the kiloparsec scale jet, outside the broad-line region, we find an ALP mass m{sub a} ∼ (1−3)⋅10{sup −7} eV and coupling g{sub aγ} ∼ (1−3)⋅10{sup −10} GeV{sup −1} after performing an illustrative statistical analysis of spectral data in four different epochs of emission. The precise values of m{sub a} and g{sub aγ} depend weakly on the assumed particle density configuration and are consistent with the current experimental bounds on these quantities. We apply this method and ALP parameters found from fitting 3C454.3 data to another flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS1222+216 (4C+21.35) data up to 400 GeV, as a consistency check, and found good fit. We find that the ALP-photon mixing effect on the GeV spectra may not be washed out for any reasonable estimate of the magnetic field in the intergalactic media.

  3. Charged particle induced delayed X-rays (DEX) for the analysis of intermediate and heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, A. E.; Erasmus, C. S.; Andeweg, A. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Annegarn, H. J.; Dunn, J.

    1988-12-01

    The emission of K X-rays from proton-rich and metastable radionuclides, following proton activation of the stable isotopes of the elements of interest, has not been widely used as a means of analysis. The thrust of this paper proposes a nuclear technique using delayed X-rays for the analysis of low concentrations of intermediate and heavy elements. The method is similar to the delayed gamma-ray technique. Proton bombardment induces mainly (p, n) reactions whereas the delayed X-rays originate largely from e --capture and isomeric transition. Samples of rare earth and platinum group elements (PGE), in the form of compacted powders, were irradiated with an 11 MeV proton beam and delayed X-rays detected with a 100 mm 2 Ge detector. Single element spectra for a range of rare earths and PGEs are presented. Analytical conditions are demonstrated for Pd in the range 0.1-5%. Spectra from actual geological samples of a PGE ore, preconcentrated by fire-assay, and monazite are presented. All six platinum group elements are visible and interference-free in a single spectrum, a marked advance on other nuclear techniques for these elements, including PIXE and neutron activation analysis (NAA).

  4. Primary versus secondary and anthropogenic versus natural sources of aminium ions in atmospheric particles during nine coastal and marine campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Yao, X.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, size-segregated dimethylaminium (DMA+) and trimethylaminium (TMA+) in atmospheric particles were measured during four coastal campaigns in Qingdao, China and five campaigns cruising over marginal seas of China and the northwest Pacific Ocean. The measured averages of DMA+ and TMA+ in PM0.056-10 (the sum of chemical concentrations from 0.056 to 10 µm) during each campaign, ranged from 0.045 to 1.1 nmol m-3 and from 0.029 to 0.53 nmol m-3, respectively. Size distributions of DMA+ and TMA+ in coastal atmospheric particles suggested that primary combustion emissions featured by mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) at 0.2 µm generally yielded appreciable contributions to their observed concentrations in PM0.056-10 and sometimes dominantly contributed. In the marine atmospheres, the 0.1-0.2 µm modes of DMA+ and TMA+ also existed and sometimes dominated while they were very likely derived from primary ocean-biogenic emissions. In most of the samples during nine campaigns, secondarily-formed DMA+ and TMA+ in droplet mode with MMAD at 0.3-2 µm dominantly contributed to DMA+ and TMA+ in PM0.056-10. Overall, our results suggested that DMA+ and TMA+ in the marine atmospheric particles overwhelmingly came from ocean biogenic sources while they were likely derived from complicated anthropogenic and natural sources at the coastal sites.

  5. Correction of Doppler broadening of {gamma}-ray lines induced by particle emission in heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, J; Seweryniak, D; Fahlander, C; Insua-Cao, P [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Johnson, A; Cederwall, B [Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Adamides, E; Piiparinen, M [National Centre for Scientific Research, Ag. Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Atac, A; Norlin, L O [Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Ideguchi, E; Mitarai, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Tormanen, S; Virtanen, A [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Karczmarczyk, W; Kownacki, J [Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Schubart, R [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1992-08-01

    The effect of particle emission on the peak shape of {gamma}-ray lines have been investigated using the NORDBALL detector system. By detecting neutrons, protons and {alpha} particles emitted in the {sup 32}S (95 MeV) + {sup 27}Al reaction, the energy and direction of emission of the residual nuclei could be determined and subsequently used for an event-by -event Doppler correction of the detected {gamma} rays. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study how the different Doppler phenomena influence the peak shape and in particular which particle detector properties are important for the Doppler correction. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  6. LHCf-measurement of forward neutral particle production for cosmic ray research

    CERN Multimedia

    Masuda, K; Ito, Y; Adriani, O; Papini, P; Tricomi, A; Perrot, A; Ricciarini, S B; D'alessandro, R; Yoshida, K

    2007-01-01

    An energy calibration experiment is under preparation for ultra high energy cosmic ray experiments in the energy range between 1017eV and 1020eV. Small calorimeters will be installed between the two beam pipes in the â€ワY vacuum chamber” 140m away from the interaction point IP1 of the Large Hadron Collider. Within an exposure time of a few hours at luminosity ~10$^{29}$ cm-2s-1, very important results will be obtained that will resolve long standing quests by the highest energy cosmic ray physics experiments.

  7. Comparison of pulsed fluoroscopy by direct control using a grid-controlled x-ray tube with pulsed fluoroscopy by primary control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Koichi; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Ito, Daisuke; Sato, Kunihiko; Shimura, Hirotaka; Sasaki, Masatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IVR) procedures may involve high radiation doses that are potentially harmful to the patient. In IVR procedures, pulsed fluoroscopy can greatly decrease the radiation that the physician and patient receive. There are two types of pulsed fluoroscopy: direct control and primary (indirect) control. The purpose of this study was to compare pulsed fluoroscopy by direct control, using a grid-controlled x-ray tube, with pulsed fluoroscopy using primary control. For both types of pulsed fluoroscopy, we measured the waveforms (x-ray tube voltage, x-ray tube current, and x-ray output) and the relative radiation dose. In addition, we compared the decrease in radiation during pulsed fluoroscopy using a care filter. The studies were performed using a Siemens Bicor Plus x-ray System (direct control) and a Siemens Multistar Plus x-ray System (primary control). Using primary pulse control, a 50% decrease in the x-ray output waveform took approximately 0.5-1.0 msec, or longer with a lower x-ray tube current. Using direct pulse control, a 50% decrease in the x-ray output waveform took approximately 0.1 msec, and was independent of x-ray tube current. The rate of radiation reduction with primary pulse control using the care filter with a lower x-ray tube current had a slope exceeding 10%. Pulsed fluoroscopy by direct control using a grid-controlled x-ray tube permits an optimal radiation dose. To decrease the radiation in primary pulse control, a care filter must be used, particularly with a lower x-ray tube current. (author)

  8. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hinrichs, R. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z., E-mail: marcos@if.ufrgs.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He{sup +} induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7–2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0–6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0–4.0 MeV for He{sup +}. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He{sup +} that quantity is systematically below. K{sub β}/K{sub α} ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  9. Trace elements in airborne particles in internal industrial environments: spectrometric analysis of x-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Matarrita, Alfonso

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy x-ray, is a technique of non-destructive analysis, that allows quantitative determination of the absolute concentration of chemical elements that make up a given matrix. The detected elements depend on atomic number and energy of the secondary target used for irradiation of samples. X-rays are detected and counted in a spectroscopy system based on a multichannel analyzer, that discriminates by energy and form a spectrum of independent photopeaks, whose energy identifies the element and its intensity is proportional to its concentration. The quantification requires the irradiation and counting of a set of pattern comparators, of the same elements identified in the samples. The x-ray emission shows only during the time that the selected sample is subjected to irradiation by x-ray tube. This irradiation does not change the structure nor the chemical composition of the matrix, so the sample remains unchanged, after irradiation. This condition non-destructive characterizes the fluorescence x-ray. The trace elements present in airborne particles, are determined and collected on a Nuclepore filter. The collection sites selected are: Taller de Mecanica de Precision de la Escuela de Fisica, Universidad de Costa Rica; Taller J. V. G. Precision, San Antonio de Coronado; Taller de Muflas, MUFLASA, Alto de Guadalupe; Industria Silvania S. A., Pavas. In addition, it is attached the service rendered to the enterprise Sellos Generales S. A. The working conditions and physical conditions of facilities were considered. An aerosol sampler with a temporal variation was used. Irradiation of samples and an evaluation of the concentrations have been made. (author) [es

  10. Dosimetry and narrow X-ray beams, produced by particle linear accelerator for use in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F.; Vizeu, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The principal characteristics of dosimetry and narrow X-ray beams(4Mv) monitoring are investigated for use in estereotatic radiosurgery. An additional collimator system and a estereotatic system (Leksell type) are presented. Dosimetric parameters like tissue-air ratio, peak scatter factor, isodose curves are studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  11. Exploration of X-ray and charged-particle spectroscopy with CCDs and PSDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.P.L.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Voigt, de M.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Two alternative detector types have been studied for use in the Eindhoven Scanning Ion Microprobe set-up. First, the applicability of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) system for X-ray spectroscopy has been explored. Second, some properties of the SiTek type 1L30 Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) for

  12. Particle range in a laser-plasma generated soft X-ray chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollanti, S.; Letardi, T.

    1999-01-01

    Some analytical forms are deduced for calculating the flight range of a spherical particle ejected from the laser plasma target and retarded by gas resistance. it is shown that the gas pressure influence on viscosity can not be neglected when are estimated the expansion ranges fro debris of various sizes in a helium gas-buffered, laser produced plasma chamber [it

  13. Advances in X-ray Chemical Imaging of a Single Catalyst Particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, S.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst particles are complex, hierarchical, multi-component systems that are used ubiquitously for the production of valuable hydrocarbons such as gasoline and propylene from crude oil feedstocks. In the FCC unit, high heat, steam and feedstocks contaminated with

  14. Light particle and gamma ray emission measurements in heavy-ion reactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a position-sensitive neutron detector and a data acquisition system at HHIRF for studying light particle emission in heavy ion reactions is described. Results are presented and discussed for the reactions 12 C + 158 Gd, 13 C + 157 Gd, and 20 Ne + 150 Nd

  15. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P.A.; Laird, J.S.; Casey, H.M.; Goodall, L.J.; Ryan, C.G.; Sloggett, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  16. Housing and sustainable development: perspectives offered by thermal solar energy. Particle emissions: prospective investigation of primary particle emissions in France by 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brignon, J.M.; Cauret, L.; Sambat, S.

    2004-09-01

    This publication proposes two investigation reports. A first study proposes a prospective analysis of the housing 'stock' in France and the evolution of global energy consumptions and CO 2 emissions by the housing sector, a prospective study of space heating and hot water needs by defining reference scenarios as well as a target scenario for heating consumption (based on the factor 4 of reduction of emissions by 2050), and an assessment of the contribution of the thermal solar energy applied to winter comfort under the form of direct solar floors and passive solar contributions, and applied to hot water by 2050. The contribution of the thermal solar energy is studied within its regulatory context. An analysis of urban forms is also performed to assess the potential of integration of renewable energy solutions in the existing housing stock, and thus to assess the morphological limits of an attempt of generalized solarization of roofs. The second study proposes a detailed identification and assessment of the various sources of primary particles (combustion, industrial processes, mineral extraction and processing, road transport, waste processing and elimination, agriculture, natural sources, forest fires), providing more precise results and methodological complements for some sources. It also proposes a prospective assessment of emissions and identifies the main factors of particle concentrations in urban environment

  17. Determining of the nuclear composition of primary cosmic rays from the experimental distributions of multiple muons in atmospheric showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    1993-01-01

    Various approaches are discussed for determining the nuclear composition of the primary cosmic radiation from the distributions of multiple muons. Results are presented of calculations of the distributions of multiple muons for A 1 , A 4 , A 14 , A 26 , A 56 nuclei for an infinite plane and for the underground scintillation telescope of the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Academy of Sciences of Russia.The most suitable technique for determination of the primary nuclear composition of cosmic rays from the distribution of multiple muons is shown to be the approximate solution of a set of N equations, in which the respective coefficients of the contributions of various nuclei A i (i=1-N) to the primary composition serve as variables, while the remaining parts of these equations are the distributions of multiple muons obtained experimentally. 7 refs.; 2 tabs

  18. Production of secondary particles and nuclei in cosmic rays collisions with the interstellar gas using the FLUKA code

    CERN Document Server

    Mazziotta, M N; Ferrari, A; Gaggero, D; Loparco, F; Sala, P R

    2016-01-01

    The measured fluxes of secondary particles produced by the interactions of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with the astronomical environment play a crucial role in understanding the physics of CR transport. In this work we present a comprehensive calculation of the secondary hadron, lepton, gamma-ray and neutrino yields produced by the inelastic interactions between several species of stable or long-lived cosmic rays projectiles (p, D, T, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14C, 14N, 15N, 16O, 17O, 18O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si) and different target gas nuclei (p, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 40Ar). The yields are calculated using FLUKA, a simulation package designed to compute the energy distributions of secondary products with large accuracy in a wide energy range. The present results provide, for the first time, a complete and self-consistent set of all the relevant inclusive cross sections regarding the whole spectrum of secondary products in nuclear collisions. We cover, for the projectiles, a ki...

  19. Charge state mapping of mixed valent iron and manganese mineral particles using Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecher, K.; Nealson, K.; Kneedler, E.; Rothe, J.; Meigs, G.; Warwick, T.; Tonner, B.

    2000-01-01

    The interfaces between solid mineral particles and water play a crucial role in partitioning and chemical transformation of many inorganic as well as organic pollutants in environmental systems. Among environmentally significant minerals, mixed-valent oxides and hydroxides of iron (e.g. magnetite, green rusts) and manganese (hausmanite, birnessite) have been recognized as particularly strong sorbents for metal ions. In addition, minerals containing Fe(II) have recently been proven to be powerful reductants for a wide range of pollutants. Chemical properties of these minerals strongly depend on the distribution and availability of reactive sites and little is known quantitatively about the nature of these sites. We have investigated the bulk distribution of charge states of manganese (Mn (II, III, IV)) and iron (Fe(II, III)) in single particles of natural manganese nodules and synthetic green rusts using Scanning Transmission X-ray SpectroMicroscopy (STXM). Pixel resolved spectra (XANES) extracted from stacks of images taken at different wave lengths across the metal absorption edge were fitted to total electron yield (TEY) spectra of single valent reference compounds. Two dimensional maps of bulk charge state distributions clearly reveal domains of different oxidation states within single particles of Mn-nodules and green rust precipitates. Changes of oxidation states of iron were followed as a result of reductive transformation of an environmental contaminant (CCl 4 ) using green rust as the only reductant

  20. Reconnection, Particle Acceleration, and Hard X-ray Emission in Eruptive Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Petrus C.

    1998-11-01

    The frequent occurrence of Hard X-ray emission from the top of flaring loops was one of the discoveries by the Hard X-ray telescope on board the Japanese Yohkoh satellite. I will show how the combined effect of magnetic field convergence and pitch- angle scattering of non-thermal electrons injected at the top of the loop results in the generation of looptop sources with properties akin to those observed by Yohkoh. In addition it is shown that the injection of proton beams in the loop legs, expected from theory, reproduces the observed high temperature ``ridges" in the loop legs by mirroring and energy loss through collisions. I will interpret these numerical results as supporting the now widely accepted model of an erupting magnetic flux tube generating a reconnecting current sheet in its wake, where most of the energy release takes place. The strong similarity with the reconnection observed in the MRX experiment in Princeton will be analyzed in detail.

  1. On the calibration of a single channel cosmic ray particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, A. H.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Alotaibi, R.; Almutari, M. M.; Garawi, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    Cosmic Ray (CR) variation measurements have been extensively conducted using different type of detectors sensing different components of CR and at different locations around the world. We have constructed and, operated a single channel muon detector in the central part of Saudi Arabia. The main goal of this detector is to record the intensity of cosmic rays on different time scales and investigate their correlations with environment parameters. This detector is expected to fill the gap between neutron monitors and muon telescopes that exist around the world. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. Calibration procedures conducted to characterize and improve its performance will be detailed. These include the effect of the detector geometry and the internal surface coating.

  2. Silicon telescope for prototype sensor characterisation using particle beam and cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Fu, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and the performance of a silicon strip telescope that we have built and recently used as reference tracking system for prototype sensor characterisation. The telescope was operated on beam at the CERN SPS and also using cosmic rays in the laboratory. We will describe the data acquisition system, based on a custom electronic board that we have developed, and the online monitoring system to control the quality of the data in real time.

  3. Room temperature CVD diamond X-ray and charged particle microdetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Lo Giudice, A; Polesello, P; Manfredotti, C

    1999-01-01

    Hot filament chemical vapour deposition technique is particularly suitable for the realisation of diamond tip and wire detectors working in a coaxial geometry with a built-in internal metal electrode. By using tungsten wires of different diameters and by controlling the shape of the tip by an electrochemical etch, it is possible to obtain various kinds of microdetectors, with diameters ranging from 50 to 300 mu m. The response of these diamond tip and wire detectors has been tested at low X-ray energies (50-250 keV) and at relatively high energies (6-15 MeV) both in terms of sensitivity (collected charge with respect to the absorbed dose) and of linearity as a function of X-ray fluence. Sensitivities larger than 2 nC/Gy are achieved, with a good linearity in the dose rate range used in applications. Such microprobes have been proved to be suitable as narrow X-ray beam profilers and as surface or in vivo microdosimeters for on-line monitoring of radiotherapy plans. Such detectors have also been used as nuclear...

  4. Light particle and gamma ray emission measurements in heavy ion reactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitt, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of neutron and charged particle emission in heavy ion reactions using the facilities at the HHIRF and the new computer facilities at Georgia State are briefly described. A progress report for 1982 to 1983 is combined with a proposal for work to be performed during 1983 to 1984. Present activities and immediate plans for a run already approved by the Program Advisory Committee of the HHIRF are discussed

  5. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Tibor E-mail: tibpapp@netscape.nettibpapp@yahoo.ca; Lakatos, Tamas; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  6. Primary production, nutrients, and size spectra of suspended particles in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, W.W.C.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of nutrient enrichment from the Rhine on some major characteristics of the phytoplankton ecosystem of Dutch coastal waters was studied with 14C, liquid scintillation and Coulter Counter techniques. The magnitude of primary production in the most eutrophic waters closest to

  7. Primary Versus Secondary Contributions to Particle Number Concentrations in the European Boundary Layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reddington, C.L.; Carslaw, K.S.; Spracklen, D.V.; Frontoso, M.G.; Collins, L.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Hamburger, T.; Coe, H.; Kulmala, M.; Aalto, P.; Flentje, H.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Sonntag, A.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Jennings, S.G.; Dupuy, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, A.; Hansson, H.-C.; Tunved, P.; Laj, P.; Sellegri, K.; Boulon, J.; Putaund, J.-P.; Gruening, C.; Swietlicki, E.; Roldin, P.; Henzing, J.S.; Moerman, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kouvarakis, G.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Zíková, Naděžda; Marinoni, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Duchi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 23 (2011), s. 12007-12036 ISSN 1680-7316 Grant - others:EUCAARI(XE) 036833-2; GFME(DE) FE370343200 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : primary aerosol * secondary aerosol * boundary layer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.520, year: 2011

  8. A neural network device for on-line particle identification in cosmic ray experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrimaglio, R.; Finetti, N.; D'Altorio, L.; Rantucci, E.; Raso, M.; Segreto, E.; Tassoni, A.; Cardarilli, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    On-line particle identification is one of the main goals of many experiments in space both for rare event studies and for optimizing measurements along the orbital trajectory. Neural networks can be a useful tool for signal processing and real time data analysis in such experiments. In this document we report on the performances of a programmable neural device which was developed in VLSI analog/digital technology. Neurons and synapses were accomplished by making use of Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA) structures. In this paper we report on the results of measurements performed in order to verify the agreement of the characteristic curves of each elementary cell with simulations and on the device performances obtained by implementing simple neural structures on the VLSI chip. A feed-forward neural network (Multi-Layer Perceptron, MLP) was implemented on the VLSI chip and trained to identify particles by processing the signals of two-dimensional position-sensitive Si detectors. The radiation monitoring device consisted of three double-sided silicon strip detectors. From the analysis of a set of simulated data it was found that the MLP implemented on the neural device gave results comparable with those obtained with the standard method of analysis confirming that the implemented neural network could be employed for real time particle identification

  9. Measurement of Localized Corrosion Rates at Inclusion Particles in AA7075 by In Situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Williams, Jason J.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; De Carlo, Francesco; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to measure the localized corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles present in 7075 aluminum alloys in deionized ultra-filtered (DIUF) water. The evolution of hydrogen bubbles was captured as a function of time and the measured volume was used to calculate the local corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles. It was shown that in the absence of chloride ions, stress was needed to create fresh particle surfaces, either by fracture or debonding, to initiate corrosion at the particles.

  10. X-ray Analysis of Defects and Anomalies in AGR-5/6/7 TRISO Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schumacher, Austin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Coated particle fuel batches J52O-16-93164, 93165, 93166, 93168, 93169, 93170, and 93172 were produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) for possible selection as fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), or may be used for other tests. Each batch was coated in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace. Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited on 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT lot J52R-16-69317 containing a mixture of 15.4%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO), with the exception of Batch 93164, which used similar kernels from BWXT lot J52L-16-69316. The TRISO-coatings consisted of a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μmnominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. Each coated particle batch was sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batch was designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93164A). Secondary upgrading by sieving was performed on the upgraded batches to remove specific anomalies identified during analysis for Defective IPyC, and the upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter B to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93165B). Following this secondary upgrading, coated particle composite J52R-16-98005 was produced by BWXT as fuel for the AGR Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the INL ATR. This composite was comprised of coated particle fuel batches J52O-16-93165B, 93168B, 93169B, and 93170B.

  11. Exposing primary rat retina cell cultures to γ-rays: An in vitro model for evaluating radiation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddini, Lucia; Balduzzi, Maria; Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Patrono, Clarice; Matteucci, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Retinal tissue can receive incidental γ-rays exposure during radiotherapy either of tumors of the eye and optic nerve or of head-and-neck tumors, and during medical diagnostic procedures. Healthy retina is therefore at risk of suffering radiation-related side effects and the knowledge of pathophysiological response of retinal cells to ionizing radiations could be useful to design possible strategies of prevention and management of radiotoxicity. In this study, we have exploited an in vitro model (primary rat retinal cell culture) to study an array of biological effects induced on retinal neurons by γ-rays. Most of the different cell types present in retinal tissue - either of the neuronal or glial lineages - are preserved in primary rat retinal cultures. Similar to the retina in situ, neuronal cells undergo in vitro a maturational development shown by the formation of polarized neuritic trees and operating synapses. Since 2 Gy is the incidental dose received by the healthy retina per fraction when the standard treatment is delivered to the brain, retina cell cultures have been exposed to 1 or 2 Gy of γ-rays at different level of neuronal differentiation in vitro: days in vitro (DIV)2 or DIV8. At DIV9, retinal cultures were analyzed in terms of viability, apoptosis and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify alterations in neuronal differentiation. After irradiation at DIV2, MTT assay revealed an evident loss of cell viability and βIII-tubulin immunostaining highlighted a marked neuritic damage, indicating that survived neurons showed an impaired differentiation. Differentiated cultures (DIV8) appeared to be more resistant with respect to undifferentiated, DIV2 cultures, both in terms of cell viability and differentiation. Apoptosis evaluated with TUNEL assay showed that irradiation at both DIV2 and DIV8 induced a significant increase in the apoptotic rate. To further investigate the effects of γ-rays on retinal neurons, we evaluated the

  12. Theoretical calculations of primary particle condensation for cadmium and caesium iodide vapours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckle, E.R. [Division of Metallurgy, School of Materials, The University, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Bowsher, B.R. [Chemistry Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1988-10-15

    A theoretical approach to modelling aerosol nucleation from the vapour phase has been developed by Buckle. In this theory, the condensing vapour species are assumed to be transported from an evaporating source across a one-dimensional stagnant boundary layer into an unreactive vapour-free atmosphere. A slip-flow model for interfacial energy and mass flow is combined with this stagnant boundary layer model to yield a set of parameters that uniquely characterise the evaporative flow process (i.e. pressure, source and sink temperatures, sink concentration, and the flux density of heat or mass from the source). To obtain the initial conditions for nucleation the vapour saturation ratio p/p deg is plotted against temperature and compared with the minimum saturation ratio defined by homogeneous nucleation theory. The co-education be represented by a nucleation threshold (or F) diagram. The mass and energy equations of the flow are solved by introducing the Becker-Doering formula for the nucleation rate, and the Stefan diffusion model for particle growth. This gives the rise and fall of supersaturation and the evolution of the particle size distribution along the flow coordinate. In the present studies, the applicability of the model has been tested by considering the condensation of caesium iodide and cadmium vapours under a wide variety of pre-mixed flow conditions of interest to PWR severe accident studies. The model has been used to predict the onset of nucleation and the particle size distribution for single vapour species. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that conditions exist whereby both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation can occur simultaneously. This process could account for experimental observations of chemically-different aerosols being formed under severe reactor accident conditions. (author)

  13. The ozonolysis of primary aliphatic amines in single and multicomponent fine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahardis, J.; Geddes, S.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2007-10-01

    The oxidative processing by ozone of the particulate amines octadecylamine (ODA) and hexadecylamine (HDA) is reported. Ozonolysis of these amines resulted in strong NO2- and NO3- ion signals that increased with ozone exposure as monitored by photoelectron resonance capture ionization aerosol mass spectrometry. These products suggest a mechanism of progressive oxidation of the particulate amines to nitro alkanes. Additionally, a strong ion signal at 125 m/z is assigned to the ion NO3-(HNO3). For ozonized mixed particles containing ODA or HDA + oleic acid (OL), with pO3≥3×10-7 atm, imine, secondary amide, and tertiary amide products were measured. These products most likely arise from reactions of amines with aldehydes (for imines) and stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) or secondary ozonides (for amides) from the fatty acid. The routes to amides via SCI and/or secondary ozonides was shown to be more important than comparable amide forming reactions between amines and organic acids, using azelaic acid as a test compound. Finally, direct evidence is provided for the formation of a surface barrier in the ODA + OL reaction system that resulted in the retention of OL at high ozone exposures (up to 10-3 atm for 17 s). This effect was not observed in HDA + OL or single component OL particles, suggesting that it may be a species-specific surfactant effect from an in situ generated amide or imine. Implications to tropospheric chemistry, including particle bound amines as sources of oxidized gas phase nitrogen species (e.g. NO2, NO3), formation of nitrogen enriched HULIS via ozonolysis of amines and source apportionment are discussed.

  14. Extensive air showers accompanied by gamma-families and fraction of protons in the primary cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamayasu, C.; Saito, To.; Sakata, M.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data of EAS accompanied by gamma-families with a total energy greater than 10 TeV are taken at Mt. Norikura in 1980 -- 1981 and in 1985. An EX (emulsion and/or x-ray film) chamber is used, which consists six sensitive layers and iron plates as the absorber. The iron absorber chamber can detect more hadron origin cascades than a lead absorber chamber for the same chamber thickness in radiation length, though disadvantageous for separation of gamma-ray origin cascades from hadron origin ones. Analysis is made of the single gamma-ray energy spectrum, integral spectrum of total energies of gamma-families, zenith angle distributions of gamma-families, the scatter plot of EAS size - ΣE γ,H correlation, arrival zenith angle distribution of general EAS, and depth dependence of absolute vertical intensities of EAS. The data obtained are compared by the Monte Carlo simulation technique with a moderate rising cross section proportional to the collision energy in the form E 0.04 for p-air nucleus collisions. The absolute intensity of size spectrum of such EAS is strongly affected by the fraction of primary protonsin the 10 15 -- 10 16 eV region. The experimental size spectrum agrees with the simulated spectrum for the p-poor (up to 15 %) primary composition but it disagrees with the p-rich (up to 40 %) one in the first half, at least, of this energy region. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Primary properties of MDF using thermomechanical pulp made from oxalic acid pretreated rice straw particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianjun Li; Yiqiang Wu; Zhiyong Cai; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect the oxalic acid (OA) and steam pretreatment on the primary properties of rice straw medium-density fiberboard (MDF). The results show the IB strength increased about 9.6% and 13.4% for steam-treated MDF (PC) and OA-treated MDF compared with raw control panels, while OA pretreatment has a slight negative effect...

  16. Plant-derived chimeric virus particles for the diagnosis of primary Sjögren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eTinazzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are ideal for the production of protein-based nanomaterials because they synthesize and assemble complex multimeric proteins that cannot be expressed efficiently using other platforms. Plant viruses can be thought of as self-replicating proteinaceous nanomaterials generally stable and easily produced in high titers. We used Potato virus X (PVX chimeric virus particles (CVPs and Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV empty virus-like particles (eVLPs to display a linear peptide (lipo derived from human lipocalin , which is immunodominant in Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS and is thus recognized by autoantibodies in SjS patient serum. These virus-derived nanoparticles (VNPs were thus used to develop a diagnostic assay for SjS based on a direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format. We found that PVX-lipo formulations were more sensitive than the chemically synthesized immunodominant peptide and equally specific when used to distinguish between healthy individuals and SjS patients. Our novel assay therefore allows the diagnosis of SjS using a simple, low-invasive serum test, contrasting with the invasive labial biopsy required for current tests. Our results demonstrate that nanomaterials based on plant viruses can be used as diagnostic reagents for SjS, and could also be developed for the diagnosis of other diseases.

  17. Heavy particle dynamics in liquid Se. Inelastic x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Masanori; Hosokawa, Shinya; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, A. Q. R.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic structure factor of liquid Se was measured at 523 K using high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering. Anomalous narrowing of the spectrum was observed at 15 nm -1 , where the static structure factor S(Q) exhibits a weak shoulder, but the elastic part of the dynamic structure factor S(Q, E=0) exhibited a strong maximum. The second frequency moment, which is estimated from only the quasielastic peak, is consistent with the motion of rigid six-atom clusters, while a formal agreement with the first-moment sum rule is preserved by the appearance of a weak intramolecular mode at 30 meV. (author)

  18. Particle range in a laser-plasma generated soft X-ray chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollanti, S.; Letardi, T. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Zheng, C. [EL.EN, Calenzano, Florence (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    Some analytical forms are deduced for calculating the flight range of a spherical particle ejected from the laser plasma target and retarded by gas resistance. it is shown that the gas pressure influence on viscosity can not be neglected when are estimated the expansion ranges fro debris of various sizes in a helium gas-buffered, laser produced plasma chamber. [Italian] Vengono ricavate alcune formule analitiche per il calcolo del range di frammenti sferici espulsi con velocita' iniziale dati e frenati dalla resistenza di un fondo gassoso. Si mostra che nei gas considerati non si puo' ignorare influenza della pressione nella viscosita' del gas.

  19. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  20. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  1. Influence of the terrestrial magnetic field geometry on the cutoff rigidity of cosmic ray particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, K.; Kopp, A.; Heber, B.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the propagation of charged energetic particles in the Earth's magnetic field go back to Carl Stoermer. In the end, his investigations finally lead to the definition of the so-called cutoff rigidity RC; that is, the minimum momentum per charge a particle must have in order to reach a certain geographical location. Employing Monte Carlo simulations with the PLANETOCOSMICS code we investigate the correlation between the geomagnetic field structure and the cutoff rigidity. We show that the geometry of the magnetic field has a considerable influence on the resulting cutoff rigidity distribution. Furthermore, we will present a simple geometry-based parameter, δB, which is able to reflect the location-dependent cutoff rigidity. We show that this correlation is also visible in the temporal evolution of the Earth's magnetic field, at least over the last 100 yr. Using latitude scans with neutron monitors, changes of the relative counting rates at different positions are calculated, showing small variations for, e.g., Kiel and Moscow, while large ones occur at Mexico City as well as on the British Virgin Islands.

  2. Examination of models of knee in primary cosmic ray spectrum using gamma-hadron families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikova, L.G.; Managadze, A.K.; Roganova, T.M.; Mukhamedshin, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Four models for describing the primary cosmic radiation (PCR) spectrum are proposed/ The examination of the PCR spectra models is carried out from the viewpoint of their consistency with the data on the gamma-hadron families for the threshold energies of 100 and 500 TeV. The maximum possible contribution of the superfamilies, originating from the primary nuclei, but not from the protons, is calculated [ru

  3. MEDEA: A multi element detector array for gamma ray and light charged particle detection at the LNS-Catania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Raia, G.; Sapienza, P.; Bellia, G.

    1992-01-01

    A 4π highly granular Multi Element Detector Array (MEDEA) for γ-rays and light charged particles is described. Its basic configuration consists of 180 barium fluoride scintillator crystals, arranged in the shape of a ball, plus a forward angle wall of 120 phoswich detectors. The inner radius of the ball (22 cm) and the distance of the wall from the target (55 cm) allow the placement of other detectors in the inner volume. The whole detection system operates under vacuum inside a large scattering chamber. Dedicated electronics has been designed and realized. It includes a powerful hardware second level trigger and preanalysis system, which allows on-line event selection, and a modular VME-bus based data acquisition system. In-beam performances of the system are also described. (orig.)

  4. X-ray and pressure conditions on the first wall of a particle beam inertial confinement reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magelssen, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Because of the presence of a chamber gas in a particle beam reactor cavity, nonneutron target debris created from thermonuclear burn will be modified or stopped before it reaches the first reactor wall. The resulting modified spectra and pulse lengths of the debris need to be calculated to determine first wall effects. Further, the cavity overpressure created by the momentum and energy exchange between the debris and gas must also be calculated to determine its effect. The purpose of this paper is to present results of the debris-background gas problem obtained with a one fluid, two temperature plasma hydrodynamic computer code model which includes multifrequency radiation transport. Spherical symmetry, ideal gas equation of state, and LTE for each radiation frequency group were assumed. The transport of debris ions was not included and all the debris energy was assumed to be in radiation. The calculated x-ray spectra and pulse lengths and the background overpressure are presented

  5. Increased sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission analyses using dry ashing for preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, J.-O.; Harju, L.; Saarela, K.-E.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses of biological materials can be enhanced by dry ashing. The gain depends mainly on the mass reduction factor and the composition of the residual ash. The enhancement factor was 7 for the certified reference material Pine Needles and the limits of detection (LODs) were below 0.2 μg/g for Zn, Cu, Rb and Sr. When ashing biological materials with low ash contents such as wood of pine or spruce (0.3% of dry weight) and honey (0.1% of wet weight) the gain was far greater. The LODs for these materials were 30 ng/g for wood and below 10 ng/g for honey. In addition, the ashed samples were more homogenous and more resistant to changes during the irradiation than the original biological samples. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Primary gas- and particle-phase emissions and secondary organic aerosol production from gasoline and diesel off-road engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Timothy D; Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Zhang, Mang; Jathar, Shantanu H; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Massetti, John; Truong, Tin; Cicero-Fernandez, Pablo; Maddox, Christine; Rieger, Paul; Chattopadhyay, Sulekha; Maldonado, Hector; Maricq, M Matti; Robinson, Allen L

    2013-12-17

    Dilution and smog chamber experiments were performed to characterize the primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gasoline and diesel small off-road engines (SOREs). These engines are high emitters of primary gas- and particle-phase pollutants relative to their fuel consumption. Two- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs emit much more (up to 3 orders of magnitude more) nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs), primary PM and organic carbon than newer on-road gasoline vehicles (per kg of fuel burned). The primary emissions from a diesel transportation refrigeration unit were similar to those of older, uncontrolled diesel engines used in on-road vehicles (e.g., premodel year 2007 heavy-duty diesel trucks). Two-strokes emitted the largest fractional (and absolute) amount of SOA precursors compared to diesel and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs; however, 35-80% of the NMOG emissions from the engines could not be speciated using traditional gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. After 3 h of photo-oxidation in a smog chamber, dilute emissions from both 2- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs produced large amounts of semivolatile SOA. The effective SOA yield (defined as the ratio of SOA mass to estimated mass of reacted precursors) was 2-4% for 2- and 4-stroke SOREs, which is comparable to yields from dilute exhaust from older passenger cars and unburned gasoline. This suggests that much of the SOA production was due to unburned fuel and/or lubrication oil. The total PM contribution of different mobile source categories to the ambient PM burden was calculated by combining primary emission, SOA production and fuel consumption data. Relative to their fuel consumption, SOREs are disproportionately high total PM sources; however, the vastly greater fuel consumption of on-road vehicles renders them (on-road vehicles) the dominant mobile source of ambient PM in the Los Angeles area.

  7. Transverse sphericity of primary charged particles in minimum bias proton–proton collisions at √s= 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adam, J.; Bjelogrlic, S; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; de Rooij, R. S.; Grelli, A.; La Pointe, S.L.; Luparello, G.; Mischke, A.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Peitzmann, T.; Reicher, M; Snellings, R.J.M.; Thomas, D; van Leeuwen, M.; Veldhoen, M; Verweij, M.; Zhou, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the sphericity of primary charged particles in minimum bias proton–proton collisions at √ s = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC are presented. The observable is measured in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction using primary charged tracks with pT > 0.5

  8. gamma-Hadron family description by quasi-scaling model at normal nuclear composition of primary cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kalmakhelidze, M; Svanidze, M

    2002-01-01

    Primary Cosmic Rays Nuclear Composition was investigated in energy region 10 sup 1 sup 5 -10 sup 1 sup 6 eV. The study is based on comparison of gamma hadron families observed by Pamir and Pamir-Chacaltaya collaborations with those generated by means of quasi-scaling model MC0 at different nuclear compositions. It was shown that all characteristics of the observed families (including their intensity) are in very good agreement with properties of simulated events MC0 at normal composition and are in disagreement at heavy dominant compositions

  9. Statistics associated with an elemental analysis system of particles induced by X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo K, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    In the quantitative elemental analysis by X-ray techniques one has to use data spectra which present fluctuations of statistical nature both from the energy and from the number of counts accumulated. While processing the results for the obtainment of a quantitative result, a detailed knowledge of the associated statistics distributions is needed. In this work, l) the statistics associated with the system photon's counting as well as 2) the distribution of the results as a function of the energy are analyzed. The first one is important for the definition of the expected values and uncertainties and for the spectra simulation (Mukoyama, 1975). The second one is fundamental for the determination of the contribution for each spectral line. (M.R.) [es

  10. Commercial CMOS image sensors as X-ray imagers and particle beam monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Maffessanti, S.; Montemurro, G.V.; Carraresi, L.

    2015-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are widely used in several applications such as mobile handsets webcams and digital cameras among others. Furthermore they are available across a wide range of resolutions with excellent spectral and chromatic responses. In order to fulfill the need of cheap systems as beam monitors and high resolution image sensors for scientific applications we exploited the possibility of using commercial CMOS image sensors as X-rays and proton detectors. Two different sensors have been mounted and tested. An Aptina MT9v034, featuring 752 × 480 pixels, 6μm × 6μm pixel size has been mounted and successfully tested as bi-dimensional beam profile monitor, able to take pictures of the incoming proton bunches at the DeFEL beamline (1–6 MeV pulsed proton beam) of the LaBeC of INFN in Florence. The naked sensor is able to successfully detect the interactions of the single protons. The sensor point-spread-function (PSF) has been qualified with 1MeV protons and is equal to one pixel (6 mm) r.m.s. in both directions. A second sensor MT9M032, featuring 1472 × 1096 pixels, 2.2 × 2.2 μm pixel size has been mounted on a dedicated board as high-resolution imager to be used in X-ray imaging experiments with table-top generators. In order to ease and simplify the data transfer and the image acquisition the system is controlled by a dedicated micro-processor board (DM3730 1GHz SoC ARM Cortex-A8) on which a modified LINUX kernel has been implemented. The paper presents the architecture of the sensor systems and the results of the experimental measurements

  11. Organic tracers of primary biological aerosol particles at subtropical Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunmao; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kunwar, Bhagawati

    2015-06-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) play an important role in affecting atmospheric physical and chemical properties. Aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa Island, Japan, from October 2009 to February 2012 and analyzed for five primary saccharides and four sugar alcohols as PBAP tracers. We detected high levels of sucrose in spring when blossoming of plants happens and prolifically emits pollen to the air. Concentrations of glucose, fructose, and trehalose showed levels higher than the other saccharides in spring in 2010. In comparison, primary saccharide levels were mutually comparable in spring, summer, and autumn in 2011, indicating the interannual variability of their local production in subtropical forests, which is driven by local temperature and radiation. High trehalose events were found to be associated with Asian dust outflows, indicating that Asian dust also contributes to PBAPs at Okinawa. Sugar alcohols peaked in summer and correlated with local precipitation and temperature, indicating high microbial activities. Positive matrix factorization analysis confirmed that the PBAPs are mainly derived from local vegetation, pollen, and fungal spores. A higher contribution of PBAP tracers to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was found in summer (14.9%). The annual mean ambient loadings of fungal spores and PBAPs were estimated as 0.49 µg m-3 and 4.12 µg m-3, respectively, using the tracer method. We report, for the first time, year-round biomarkers of PBAP and soil dust and their contributions to WSOC in the subtropical outflow region of the Asian continent.

  12. Problem on primary radiation filtration effect on form of coupling equations during X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrent'ev, Yu.G.; Kuznetsova, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified method for x-ray fluorescence analysis is given. It is shown that the system of coupling equations with constant coefficients and with the number of equations equal to the number of unknown elements allows to obtain the same accuracy of the analysis as with the considerably more complex equations with variable coefficients which take into account the filtration of the primary radiation in a direct way. The system can even be more simplified by using linear equations with constant coefficients. In order to test these systems and to compare them with known coupling equations experimental data for the determination of zirconium and niobium from 16 artificial preparations with fillers of variable composition are presented. The calculation of the absorption of the secondary as well as the primary radiation by means of the proposed equations with constant coefficients is sufficiently good

  13. Intercomparison of the medium energy primary standards for X-ray exposure of NPL and ENEA, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, C.J.; Heaton, J.A.; Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.

    1991-04-01

    An intercomparison between the primary standards of exposure for medium energy X-rays held by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and ENEA in Italy is described. The intercomparison, using four different transfer chambers, took place at NPL in December 1989 and at ENEA during March 1990. Measurements were made at four therapy-level qualities, with half value layers of 0.15, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mm Cu (nominal generating voltages of 100, 135, 180 and 250 kV respectively). At the 2.5 mm Cu HVL quality the primary standards were found to agree to within about 0.8%; for the other three qualities the chambers differed by no more than 0.3%. (author)

  14. Monte-Carlo RAY tracing simulation of a falling particle receiver in connection with a central receiver field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alxneit, I [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The program RAY was developed to perform Monte-Carlo simulations of the flux distribution in solar reactors in connection with an arbitrary heliostat field. The code accounts for the shading of the incoming rays from the sun due to the reactor supporting tower as well as for full blocking and shading of the heliostats among themselves. A simplified falling particle reactor (FPR) was evaluated. A central receiver field was used with a total area of 311 m{sup 2} composed of 176 round, focusing heliostats. No attempt was undertaken to optimise either the geometry of the heliostat field nor the aiming strategy of the heliostats. The FPR was evaluated at two different geographic latitudes (-8.23W/47.542N; PSI and -8.23W/20.0N) and during the course of a day (May 30{sup th}). The incident power passing through the reactor aperture and the flux density distribution within the FPR was calculated. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  15. Study of the prompt gamma ray signal from fissions in special nuclear materials induced using an associated particle neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltick, D. S.; Kane, S. Z.

    2009-01-01

    More than 42 million cargo containers entered the United States in 2005. To search for a few kilograms of special nuclear material (SNM) within this vast stream of cargo, an inspection system based on neutron-induced fission followed by the coincident detection of multiple prompt fission gamma rays is investigated using MCNP-Polimi code. The system utilizes two deuterium-tritium (DT) associated particle neutron generators, each capable of 10 9 neutrons/s at 14.1 MeV, with sub-nanosecond timing resolution ZnO:Ga alpha detectors internal to the generator. Because prompt fission signals are approximately 100 times stronger than the delayed signals, the neutron flux is greatly reduced compared to 10 11-12 neutrons/s required for systems based on delayed signals such as the 'nuclear car wash' [4]. In addition the system utilizes 30 cm deep liquid krypton (LKr) noble gas detectors having 94% detection efficiency for 1 MeV gamma rays, high solid angle coverage (∼ 50% of the total solid angle), and sub-nanosecond timing resolution (∼ 600 ps). An algorithm for distinguishing U-235 from U-238 is presented. (authors)

  16. PIXE in 1980: Summary of the second international conference on particle induced x-ray emission and its analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and its analytical applications was held in Lund, Sweden, June 9-12, 1980. About a hundred papers were presented, including seven invited talks (PIXE and particle scattering, microbeam analysis, applications to aerosols and biological samples). The main impression left by the conference was that both the PIXE method and its applications are in a phase of fast development. Considerable effort has successfully been devoted to optimizing the basic PIXE technique. Also the great advantage of simultaneously getting information about lighter elements and sample mass was reported to have been successfully employed in routine analyses. PIXE, which was initially considered to be a method mainly for thin samples, has also been shown to be competitive for a variety of thick samples. Data from aerosol studies was presented. With the PIXE-method, it is feasible to perform series of measurements over a long period of time, many samples in parallel and/or samples from sites of poor accessibility. However, the advantages of PIXE may be further exploited in aerosol investigations and some promising lines of sampler development were reported. Sample preparation techniques are crucial for applications to biological samples and several laboratories are engaged in such developmental work. However, it was also evident that PIXE is already giving significant contributions to research in biology and medicine

  17. Comparison of recovery in the rat lens epithelium after x-ray, fission neutron, or /sup 56/Fe particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, E.F.; Lindgren, A.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are comparing the radiobiological effectiveness of 10 Gy (1000 rads) of 250 kVp X-rays, 2 Gy (200 rads) of fission neutrons, and 1.5 Gy (150 rds) of 600 MeV /sup 56/Fe particles (LET about 180-200 keV/μm). They are evaluating the persistence of latent radiation damage and the very slow recovery (> 1 month) in cells of the central zone of the rat lens epithelium. The central zone is essentially a G/sub o/ population of cells (1 mitotic figure per 2000 cells). These cells normally respond to the mitogenic stimulus of wounding with a ''burst'' of DNA synthesis at 14 hours and a ''burst'' of mitosis at 24 hours after wounding. Irradiation before wounding causes a delay and suppression of the response. With increasing time between irradiation and wounding, the authors note less delay and less suppression of the response. They also note fewer abnormal mitotic figures. For example, at 28 days the X-irradiated, neutron irradiated, and iron irradiated cells developed respectively, 39%, 36%, and 21% fewer abnormal mitotic figures than at 7 days post-irradiation. Slower recovery after /sup 56/Fe particle irradiation is indicated. They are now comparing the amounts of delay and suppression of the responses after exposure to the different radiations

  18. Application of gamma-ray densitometry in developing primary upgrading processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.D.S.; Patmore, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray densitometry has been applied in developing processes for upgrading heavy oils, refinery residua, tar sand bitumen and coal into synthetic crudes. These processes normally operate at high temperatures and pressures, thus non-invasive monitors are highly desirable. Examples of applications at CANMET are given for the following three areas: gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid multiphase flow hydrodynamic studies, monitoring of ash concentration and measurement of thermal expansion coefficient of liquids. (author)

  19. Primary gamma ray selection in a hybrid timing/imaging Cherenkov array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postnikov E.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is a methodical study on hybrid reconstruction techniques for hybrid imaging/timing Cherenkov observations. This type of hybrid array is to be realized at the gamma-observatory TAIGA intended for very high energy gamma-ray astronomy (> 30 TeV. It aims at combining the cost-effective timing-array technique with imaging telescopes. Hybrid operation of both of these techniques can lead to a relatively cheap way of development of a large area array. The joint approach of gamma event selection was investigated on both types of simulated data: the image parameters from the telescopes, and the shower parameters reconstructed from the timing array. The optimal set of imaging parameters and shower parameters to be combined is revealed. The cosmic ray background suppression factor depending on distance and energy is calculated. The optimal selection technique leads to cosmic ray background suppression of about 2 orders of magnitude on distances up to 450 m for energies greater than 50 TeV.

  20. Determination of the saturation curve of a primary standard for low energy X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Poledna, Roberto; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme P.

    2003-01-01

    Thr free air is the well recognized as the primary standard for the measurement of kerma in the air due to his characteristics to perform the absolute measurements of that entity according to definitions. Therefore, the Institute for Radioprotection and dosimetry - IRD, Brazil used for his implantation a free air cylindrical ionization chamber. Initially, a mechanical characterization was performed for verification as a primary standard. This paper will proceed a full detailed description the point operation of 2000 V found for that chamber and her saturation coefficient

  1. A NOVEL APPROACH IN THE WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLE QUEST: CROSS-CORRELATION OF GAMMA-RAY ANISOTROPIES AND COSMIC SHEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camera, Stefano; Fornasa, Mattia; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Both cosmic shear and cosmological gamma-ray emission stem from the presence of dark matter (DM) in the universe: DM structures are responsible for the bending of light in the weak-lensing regime and those same objects can emit gamma rays, either because they host astrophysical sources (active galactic nuclei or star-forming galaxies) or directly by DM annihilations (or decays, depending on the properties of the DM particle). Such gamma rays should therefore exhibit strong correlation with the cosmic shear signal. In this Letter, we compute the cross-correlation angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma rays produced by the annihilation/decay of weakly interacting massive particle DM, as well as by astrophysical sources. We show that this observable provides novel information on the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB), since the amplitude and shape of the cross-correlation signal strongly depend on which class of sources is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. If the DM contribution to the EGB is significant (at least in a definite energy range), although compatible with current observational bounds, its strong correlation with the cosmic shear makes such signal potentially detectable by combining Fermi Large Area Telescope data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like the Dark Energy Survey and Euclid. At the same time, the same signal would demonstrate that the weak-lensing observables are indeed due to particle DM matter and not to possible modifications of general relativity.

  2. A Novel Approach in the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle Quest: Cross-correlation of Gamma-Ray Anisotropies and Cosmic Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Stefano; Fornasa, Mattia; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Both cosmic shear and cosmological gamma-ray emission stem from the presence of dark matter (DM) in the universe: DM structures are responsible for the bending of light in the weak-lensing regime and those same objects can emit gamma rays, either because they host astrophysical sources (active galactic nuclei or star-forming galaxies) or directly by DM annihilations (or decays, depending on the properties of the DM particle). Such gamma rays should therefore exhibit strong correlation with the cosmic shear signal. In this Letter, we compute the cross-correlation angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma rays produced by the annihilation/decay of weakly interacting massive particle DM, as well as by astrophysical sources. We show that this observable provides novel information on the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB), since the amplitude and shape of the cross-correlation signal strongly depend on which class of sources is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. If the DM contribution to the EGB is significant (at least in a definite energy range), although compatible with current observational bounds, its strong correlation with the cosmic shear makes such signal potentially detectable by combining Fermi Large Area Telescope data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like the Dark Energy Survey and Euclid. At the same time, the same signal would demonstrate that the weak-lensing observables are indeed due to particle DM matter and not to possible modifications of general relativity.

  3. A NOVEL APPROACH IN THE WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLE QUEST: CROSS-CORRELATION OF GAMMA-RAY ANISOTROPIES AND COSMIC SHEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camera, Stefano [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Fornasa, Mattia [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino and INFN, Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Both cosmic shear and cosmological gamma-ray emission stem from the presence of dark matter (DM) in the universe: DM structures are responsible for the bending of light in the weak-lensing regime and those same objects can emit gamma rays, either because they host astrophysical sources (active galactic nuclei or star-forming galaxies) or directly by DM annihilations (or decays, depending on the properties of the DM particle). Such gamma rays should therefore exhibit strong correlation with the cosmic shear signal. In this Letter, we compute the cross-correlation angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma rays produced by the annihilation/decay of weakly interacting massive particle DM, as well as by astrophysical sources. We show that this observable provides novel information on the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB), since the amplitude and shape of the cross-correlation signal strongly depend on which class of sources is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. If the DM contribution to the EGB is significant (at least in a definite energy range), although compatible with current observational bounds, its strong correlation with the cosmic shear makes such signal potentially detectable by combining Fermi Large Area Telescope data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like the Dark Energy Survey and Euclid. At the same time, the same signal would demonstrate that the weak-lensing observables are indeed due to particle DM matter and not to possible modifications of general relativity.

  4. 1020 eV cosmic-ray and particle physics with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Halzen, F.

    2001-01-01

    We show that a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory, though optimized for TeV to PeV energy, is sensitive to the neutrinos associated with super-EeV sources. These include super-heavy relics, neutrinos associated with the Greisen cutoff, and topological defects which are remnant cosmic structures associated with phase transitions in grand unified gauge theories. It is a misconception that new instruments optimized to EeV energy are required to do this important science, although this is not their primary goal. Because kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes can reject atmospheric backgrounds by establishing the very high energy of the signal events, they have sensitivity over the full solid angle, including the horizon where most of the signal is concentrated. This is important because up-going neutrino-induced muons, routinely considered in previous calculations, are absorbed by the Earth

  5. Study of particles in solution by small angle x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itri, R.

    1986-01-01

    The implantation of SAXS technique is presented, and mycellas in solution of the dodecyl sodium sulfate SLS/water system are studied. A synthesis of SAXS theory to study parameters such as, volume, radii of gyration and specific surface and distribution function of the distance of homogenous and inhomogeneous particles is also presented. The technique was implanted by the study of a vitreous coal sample with voids in amorphous matrix. Computer programs were used for data treatment. It was concluded that the void configuration must be an oblate ellipsoid with rippled external surface and radii of gyration of ∼20A . The study of mycellas in solution of the SLL/H 2 O binary system showed spherical mycellas with paraffinic radii of 16A and total radii of 25.5 A. Interaction effects start to appear in 15% SLS concentrations. The change in the scattering curve occurs due to the interactions between mycellas. The isotropic-nematic transition in the ternary system by decanol addition was also investigated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. 1020eV cosmic ray and particle physics with IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Halzen, F.

    2001-01-01

    We show that a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory, though optimized for detecting neutrinos of TeV to PeV energy, can reveal the science associated with the enigmatic super-EeV radiation in the Universe. Speculations regarding its origin include heavy relics from the early Universe, particle interactions associated with the Greisen cutoff, and topological defects which are remnant cosmic structures associated with phase transitions in grand unified gauge theories. We show that it is a misconception that new instruments optimized to EeV energy can exclusively do this important science. Because kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes such as IceCube can reject the atmospheric neutrino background by identifying the very high energy of the signal events, they have sensitivity over the full solid angle, including the horizon where most of the signal is concentrated. This is critical because upgoing neutrino-induced muons, considered in previous calculations, are absorbed by the Earth. Previous calculations have underestimated the event rates of IceCube for EeV signals by over one order of magnitude

  7. Outline of an ultracorrector compensating for all primary chromatic and geometrical aberrations of charged-particle lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Harald

    2004-01-01

    A novel ultracorrector is outlined which compensates for the primary and secondary first-order chromatic aberrations and all third-order geometrical aberrations of electron optical systems with a straight axis. Owing to the imposed symmetry conditions on the fields and the paraxial fundamental rays, the corrector does not introduce aberrations with 2-fold symmetry. The chromatic aberrations are corrected by means of crossed electric magnetic quadrupoles while the third-order geometrical aberrations are eliminated by octopoles. By placing these elements at distinct positions within the corrector, it is possible to successively eliminate the third-order aberrations in such a way that each subsequent correction does not affect the aberrations corrected in the preceding correction steps

  8. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-01-01

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth's surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10 5 TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment's fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m x10 m x 31 m proportional tube array (the ''active shield''). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ''knee'' region (10 3 - 10 4 TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events

  9. Some points of the X-ray pattern of acute viral primary pneumonia caused by acute respiratory disease viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, V.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is made of the results of the X-ray studies as well as of the virological and serological tests in 225 out-patients consulted in the first days of their complaints. A predominance of the viral (70.2%) over the viral-bacterial primary pneumonia is established. The acute viral primary pneumonia are caused mostly by single influenza viruses and more rarely - by single respiratory viruses; in the cases of combined influenza viruses influenza-influenza viruses prevail over the influenza-respiratory ones. The morphological changes in pneumonia due to isolated single influenza viruses involve mostly the interstitium and are projected on X-ray as patchy and stripped densities. The inflamatory changes in pneumonia caused by combined influenza viruses affect both ihe interstitium and the broncho-alveolar substrate of the lungs; they are manifested in two roentgenologic forms: creeping (migrating) and fusing (confluent). In viral-bacterial pneumonia the changes affect mostly the lobe. The right lung and the lower parts of the both lungs are affected in most cases. 5 figs., 21 refs

  10. A composition dependent energy scale and the determination of the cosmic ray primary mass in the ankle region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanitsky, A. D.; Etchegoyen, A.; Melo, D.; Sanchez, F.

    2015-08-01

    At present there are still several open questions about the origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays. However, great progress in this area has been made in recent years due to the data collected by the present generation of ground based detectors like the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. In particular, it is believed that the study of the composition of the cosmic rays as a function of energy can play a fundamental role for the understanding of the origin of the cosmic rays. The observatories belonging to this generation are composed of arrays of surface detectors and fluorescence telescopes. The duty cycle of the fluorescence telescopes is ∼10% in contrast with the ∼100% of the surface detectors. Therefore, the energy calibration of the events observed by the surface detectors is performed by using a calibration curve obtained from a set of high quality events observed in coincidence by both types of detectors. The advantage of this method is that the reconstructed energy of the events observed by the surface detectors becomes almost independent of simulations of the showers because just a small part of the reconstructed energy (the missing energy), obtained from the fluorescence telescopes, comes from simulations. However, the calibration curve obtained in this way depends on the composition of the cosmic rays, which can introduce biases in composition analyses when parameters with a strong dependence on primary energy are considered. In this work we develop an analytical method to study these effects. We consider AMIGA (Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array), the low energy extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory corresponding to the surface detectors, to illustrate the use of the method. In particular, we study the biases introduced by an energy calibration dependent on composition on the determination of the mean value of the number of muons, at a given distance to the showers axis, which is one of the parameters most sensitive to

  11. X-ray section topographs under various coherence properties of the primary beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowski, J.; Gronkowski, J.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study to what extent a typical section-topography setup can supply information about the degree of coherence of the incident x-ray beam. In real experiments, the incident beam is partially coherent, with the degree of coherence described by the shape of the correlation function. In this paper the correlation functions for the outgoing beam are calculated by solving the Takagi-Taupin equations, assuming a truncated Gauss correlation function for the incident beam with the correlation length determined by the van Cittert-Zernike theorem. Its influence on the measured intensity of the diffracted beam in section topography is investigated. (author)

  12. Simulation of the time structure of Extensive Air Showers with CORSIKA initiated by various primary particles at Alborz-I observatory level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmanabadi, Mahmud; Moghaddam, Saba Mortazavi

    2018-05-01

    A detailed simulation of showers with various zenith angles in atmosphere produced by different primary particles including gamma, proton, carbon, and iron at Alborz-I observatory level (35∘43‧N, 51∘20‧E, 1200 m a.s.l= 890 gcm-2), in the energy range 3 × 1013 eV-3 × 1015 eV, has been performed by means of the CORSIKA Monte Carlo code. The aim of this study is to examine the time structure of secondary particles in Extensive Air Showers (EAS) produced by the different primary particles. For each primary particle, the distribution of the mean values of the time delays of secondary particles relative to the first particle hitting the ground level in each EAS, = , and the distribution of their mean standard deviations, in terms of distance from the shower core are obtained. The mean thickness and profile of showers as a function of their energy, primary mass, and zenith angle is described.

  13. Effects of Somatothermal Far-Infrared Ray on Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Ke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of using a far-infrared (FIR belt on the management of patients with primary dysmenorrhea. This is the first study to determine the efficacy of somatothermal FIR using a parallel-arm randomized sham-controlled and double-blinded design with objective physical evidence and psychometric self-reports. Fifty-one Taiwanese women with primary dysmenorrhea were enrolled in the study. Results indicate that there was an increased abdominal temperature of 0.6°C and a 3.27% increase in abdominal blood flow in the FIR group (wearing FIR belt compared to those in the control group (wearing sham belt. Verbal rating scale and numeric rating scale scores in the FIR group were both lower than those in the control group. Compared to the blank group (wearing no belt, the average dysmenorrhea pain duration of the FIR group was significantly reduced from 2.5 to 1.8 days, but there was no significant difference in the control group. These results demonstrate that the use of a belt made of far-infrared ceramic materials can reduce primary dysmenorrhea.

  14. Efficient isotope ratio analysis of uranium particles in swipe samples by total-reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Kazuo; Fukuyama, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takashi; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu

    2004-01-01

    A new particle recovery method and a sensitive screening method were developed for subsequent isotope ratio analysis of uranium particles in safeguards swipe samples. The particles in the swipe sample were recovered onto a carrier by means of vacuum suction-impact collection method. When grease coating was applied to the carrier, the recovery efficiency was improved to 48±9%, which is superior to that of conventionally-used ultrasoneration method. Prior to isotope ratio analysis with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) was applied to screen the sample for the presence of uranium particles. By the use of Si carriers in TXRF analysis, the detection limit of 22 pg was achieved for uranium. By combining these methods with SIMS, the isotope ratios of 235 U/ 238 U for individual uranium particles were efficiently determined. (author)

  15. The association of family food security and depression in mothers having primary school children in Ray-Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payab, Moloud; Motlagh, Ahmad-Reza Dorosty; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Rostami, Reza; Siassi, Fereydoun

    2014-01-01

    As a major public health problem, food insecurity has adverse social and psychological effects, in addition to the impact on public health. This study aimed to determine the association of household food security and depression in mothers with primary school children in Ray County. This descriptive, analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on 430 mothers with primary school children in the spring 2010. During a two-stage cluster sampling, an 18-items food security questionnaire (USDA) and the Beck depression inventory were completed via interviewing mothers. Chi-squared test, one-way analysis of variance, simple regression and stepwise multiple regression were used to describe and analyze data, and to identify related factors using SPSS-16 software. The prevalence of food insecurity and depression in mothers were 50.2% and 51.4% respectively. Also 34.6% of mothers in the "food secure" group were depressed and 77.8% in "food insecure with hunger" group were depressed and this difference was statistically significant. Twelve out of the 20 examined variables (age, family size, number of children, economic status, home ownership, employment households, educational level of the mother and also the head of household, height, energy intake, and carbohydrate and protein intakes) were significantly associated with food security and depression. Food insecurity and depression in mothers with primary school children in Ray County showed a significant positive correlation (P < 0.001). The prevalence of household food insecurity and depression in the studied population were high. Since there is a significant relationship between food insecurity and depression, more attention must be paid to this group.

  16. Identifying primary stressors impacting macroinvertebrates in the Salinas River (California, USA): Relative effects of pesticides and suspended particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.S.; Phillips, B.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Connor, V.; Richard, N.; Tjeerdema, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory dose-response experiments with organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, and dose-response experiments with increasing particle loads were used to determine which of these stressors were likely responsible for the toxicity and macroinvertebrate impacts previously observed in the Salinas River. Experiments were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the baetid mayfly Procloeon sp., and the midge Chironomus dilutus (Shobanov, formerly Chironomus tentans). The results indicate the primary stressor impacting H. azteca was pesticides, including chlorpyrifos and permethrin. The mayfly Procloeon sp. was sensitive to chlorpyrifos and permethrin within the range of concentrations of these pesticides measured in the river. Chironomus dilutus were sensitive to chlorpyrifos within the ranges of concentrations measured in the river. None of the species tested were affected by turbidity as high as 1000 NTUs. The current study shows that pesticides are more important acute stressors of macroinvertebrates than suspended sediments in the Salinas River. - Pesticides are the primary stressor impacting macroinvertebrates in sections of the lower Salinas River

  17. Identifying primary stressors impacting macroinvertebrates in the Salinas River (California, USA): Relative effects of pesticides and suspended particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: anderson@ucdavis.edu; Phillips, B.M. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hunt, J.W. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Connor, V. [Division of Water Quality, State Water Resources Control Board, 1001 I. Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (United States); Richard, N. [Division of Water Quality, State Water Resources Control Board, 1001 I. Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (United States); Tjeerdema, R.S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Laboratory dose-response experiments with organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, and dose-response experiments with increasing particle loads were used to determine which of these stressors were likely responsible for the toxicity and macroinvertebrate impacts previously observed in the Salinas River. Experiments were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the baetid mayfly Procloeon sp., and the midge Chironomus dilutus (Shobanov, formerly Chironomus tentans). The results indicate the primary stressor impacting H. azteca was pesticides, including chlorpyrifos and permethrin. The mayfly Procloeon sp. was sensitive to chlorpyrifos and permethrin within the range of concentrations of these pesticides measured in the river. Chironomus dilutus were sensitive to chlorpyrifos within the ranges of concentrations measured in the river. None of the species tested were affected by turbidity as high as 1000 NTUs. The current study shows that pesticides are more important acute stressors of macroinvertebrates than suspended sediments in the Salinas River. - Pesticides are the primary stressor impacting macroinvertebrates in sections of the lower Salinas River.

  18. The occurrence of primary pulmonary neoplasms in rats after inhalation of 147Pm in fused aluminosilicate particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, R.A.; Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Newton, G.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Damon, E.G.; Boecker, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the biological response following low-energy, beta irradiation of the lung, F344/Crl rats were exposed to aerosols of promethium-147 in fused aluminosilicate particles and observed for their life spans. Radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis caused the majority of deaths during the first year after exposure with cumulative doses to the lungs of 210 to 630 Gy. Primary pulmonary neoplasms were responsible for the majority of deaths that occurred beyond 1 yr after exposure and in rats receiving lower cumulative doses to the lung. Hemangiosarcomas and squamous cell carcinomas were the most prevalent pulmonary neoplasms. Three adenocarcinomas were found. The uncorrected crude incidence of primary lung tumors increased with increasing dose to the lung for cumulative doses less than 140 Gy. With higher doses, the incidence declined. Adjusting the data for competing risks eliminated the turnover in the dose-response curve. The times of onset of pulmonary tumors and median survival times were dose-dependent. Rats with higher accumulated radiation doses developed fatal lung tumors at earlier times after exposure. (author)

  19. Trace determination of heavy metal concentrations in fauna, flora and salt samples from Black Sea waters by charged particles - induced X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badica, T.; Ciortea, C.; Dima, S.; Petrovici, A.; Popescu, I.; Serbanescu, O.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were performed on Black Sea pollution by charged particles induced X-rays spectra analysis, using alpha and 16 O beams. Fauna, flora and salt samples were analysed. We found some of the concentrations of pollutant elements to be below the accepted levels. (author)

  20. The primary extinction and static Debye-Waller factor in the characterization of textured nickel by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshtab, T.; Palacios G, J.; Cadena A, A.; Kryvko, A.

    2015-01-01

    The texture analysis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) implies measurement of pole figures (Pf) from the diffracted intensities considering the model of kinematical dispersion. The extinction phenomenon results in a decrease of diffracted intensity and that in turn in a decrease of pole densities (Pds). The phenomenon appears in the kinematical theory of XRD as the primary extinction and the secondary extinction to characterize the loss of intensity of kinematical dispersion. In turn, the static Debye-Waller factor is an integral characteristic of defects in crystals that is introduced in the kinematical theory of XRD and also is used in dynamical theory of XRD. In this work the correlation between the primary extinction coefficient and the static Debye-Waller factor in the case of textured nickel was determined. The value of static Debye-Waller factor was determined from the value of the calculated primary extinction coefficient. For the evaluation there were used Pds in the maxima of Pf obtained for 111 and 200 reflections with Mo Kα radiation, and the Pds in the maxima of Pf obtained for the first and second orders of these reflections with Cu Kα and Co Kα radiations. There were calculated the dislocation densities in grains using values of static Debye-Waller factor and the extinction coefficients. The dislocation densities calculated from these two characteristics are practically equal. (Author)

  1. X-ray appearance of the heart in primary pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveeva, L.S.; Kitaeva, I.T.; Efimova, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    Roentgenological picture of heart in 36 patients with primary pulmonary hypertension is studied. The diagnosis has been reaffirmed using catheterization of cavities of the heart and pulmonary artery and in a number of cases in autopsy. Variability of the form and the size of the heart depending on different degrees of hypertrophy and dilatation of the right ventricle with possible relative insufficiency of the tricuspid valve and on different degree of ecstasia of the pulmonary arterial trunk and functional state of myocardium. All this to a certain degree is dependent on the patient age, duration and the character of the disease

  2. Assessment of homogeneity of candidate reference material at the nanogram level and investigation on representativeness of single particle analysis using electron probe X ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Chul-Un; Hoornaerta, S.; Griekena, R. van

    2002-01-01

    Particulate samples of a candidate reference material are evaluated on their homogeneity from bottle to bottle using electron probe X ray microanalysis technique. The evaluation on the homogeneity is done by the utilization of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics to the processing of the quantitative electron probe X ray microanalysis data. Due to a limitation, existing even in computer controlled electron probe X ray microanalysis, in terms of analysis time and expenses, the number of particles analyzed is much smaller compared to that in the sample. Therefore, it is investigated whether this technique provides representative analysis results for the characteristics of the sample, even though a very small portion of the sample is really analyzed. Furthermore, the required number of particles for the analysis, to insure a certain level of reproducibility, e.g. 5% relative standard deviation, is determined by the application of the Ingamells sampling theory. (author)

  3. Evaluation through comet assay of DNA damage induced in human lymphocytes by alpha particles. Comparison with protons and Co-60 gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Kreiner, A. J.; Schuff, J. A.; Vallerga, M. B.; Taja, M. R.; Lopez, F. O.; Alvarez, D. E.; Saint Martin, G.; Burton, A.; Debray, M. E.; Kesque, J. M.; Somacal, H.; Stoliar, P.; Valda, A.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Ozafran, M. J.; Vazquez, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Several techniques with different sensitivity to single-strand breaks and/or double strand breaks were applied to detect DNA breaks generated by high LET particles. Tests that assess DNA damage in single cells might be the appropriate tool to estimate damage induced by particles, facilitating the assessment of heterogeneity of damage in a cell population. The microgel electrophoresis (comet) assay is a sensitive method for measuring DNA damage in single cells. The objective of this work was to evaluate the proficiency of comet assay to assess the effect of high LET radiation on peripheral blood lymphocytes, compared to protons and Co-60 gamma rays. Materials and methods: Irradiations of blood samples were performed at TANDAR laboratory (Argentina). Thin samples of human peripheral blood were irradiated with different doses (0-2.5 Gy) of 20.2 MeV helium-4 particles in the track segment mode, at nearly constant LET. Data obtained were compared with the effect induced by a MeV protons and Co-60 gamma rays. Alkaline comet assay was applied. Comets were quantified by the Olive tail moment. Distribution of the helium-4 particle and protons were evaluated considering Poisson distribution in lymphocyte nuclei. The mean dose per nucleus per particle result 0.053 Gy for protons and 0.178 Gy for helium-4 particles. When cells are exposed to a dose of 0.1 Gy, the hit probability model predicts that 43% of the nuclei should have experienced and alpha traversal while with protons, 85% of the nuclei should be hit. The experimental results show a biphasic response for helium-4 particles (0.1 Gy), indicating the existence of two subpopulations: unhit and hit. Distributions of tail moment as a function of fluence and experimental dose for comets induced by helium-4 particles, protons and Co-60 gamma rays were analyzed. With helium-4 irradiations, lymphocyte nuclei show an Olive tail moment distribution flattened to higher tail moments a dose increase. However, for irradiations with

  4. Low-dose gamma-rays and simulated solar particle event protons modify splenocyte gene and cytokine expression patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, A.; Pecaut, M.J.; Gridley, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The goal was to investigate the T helper (Th) response in splenocytes of mice exposed to low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays, simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE), or combination of both. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to LDR γ-radiation ( 57 Co) to a total dose of 0.05 Gray (Gy) at 0.024 cGy/h, either with or without subsequent exposure to 2 Gy sSPE protons. Expression of genes related to Th cells was evaluated immediately after exposure (day 0). On day 21, intra- and extracellular cytokine production was assessed after activation with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionophore (PMA/I). Five genes were significantly modulated on day 0 in one or more of the irradiated groups compared to controls (p<0.05): Ccl11, Ccr5, Cd80, Inha, and Il9. On day 21, numbers of cells positive for interferon-γ were high in the LDR + sSPE group versus 0 Gy and LDR γ-rays (p<0.05), but there was no difference in interleukin (IL)-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Levels of secreted cytokines after anti-CD3 mAb activation were high for 5 (maximum intensity projection (MIP)-1α, GM-CSF, interferon (IFN)-γ, TNF-α, IL-13) and low for 2 (IL-7, IL-9) in all irradiated groups. Priming with LDR photons had a significant effect on IFN-γ and IL-17 compared to sSPE protons alone; IL-2 was low only in the LDR + sSPE group. The cytokine patterns after anti-phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/ionomycin (I) activation were different compared to anti-CD3 mAb and with fewer differences among groups. The data show that total-body exposure to space-relevant radiation has profound effects on Th cell status and that priming with LDR γ-rays can in some cases modulate the response to sSPE. (author)

  5. Use of alpha-particle excited x-rays to measure the thickness of thin films containing low-Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanser, F.A.; Sellers, B.; Ziegler, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The thickness of thin surface films containing low Z elements can be determined by measuring the K X-ray yields from alpha particle excitation. The samples are irradiated in a helium atmosphere by a 5 mCi polonium-210 source, and the low energy X-rays detected by a flow counter with a thin-stretched polypropylene window. The flow counter output is pulse height sorted by a single channel analyzer (SCA) and counted to give the X-ray yield. Best results have been obtained with Z = 6 to 9 (C, N, O, and F), but usable yields are obtained even for Z = 13 or 14 (Al and Si). The low energy of the X-rays (0.28 to 1.74 keV) limits the method to films of several hundred nm thickness or less and to situations where the substrate does not produce interfering X-rays. It is possible to determine the film thickness with 50 percent accuracy by direct calculation using the measured alpha-particle spectrum and known or calculated K X-ray excitation cross sections. By calibration with known standards the accuracy can be increased substantially. The system has thus far been applied to SiO 2 on Si, Al 2 O 3 on Al, and CH 2 on Al

  6. Morphology transition of the primary silicon particles in a hypereutectic A390 alloy in high pressure die casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Guo, Z; Song, J L; Hu, W X; Li, J C; Xiong, S M

    2017-11-03

    The microstructure of a high-pressure die-cast hypereutectic A390 alloy, including PSPs, pores, α-Al grains and Cu-rich phases, was characterized using synchrotron X-ray tomography, together with SEM, TEM and EBSD. The Cu-rich phases exhibited a net morphology and distributed at the boundaries of the α-Al grains, which in turn surrounded the PSPs. Statistical analysis of the reconstructed 1000 PSPs showed that both equivalent diameter and shape factor of the PSPs exhibited a unimodal distribution with peaks corresponding to 25 μm and 0.78, respectively.) PSPs morphology with multiple twinning were observed and morphological or growth transition of the PSPs from regular octahedral shape (with a shape factor of 0.85 was mainly caused by the constraint of the Cu-rich phases. In particular, the presence of the Cu-rich phases restricted the growth of the α-Al grains, inducing stress on the internal silicon particles, which caused multiple twinning occurrence with higher growth potential and consequently led to growth transitions of the PSPs.

  7. A simple method for detection of gunshot residue particles from hands, hair, face, and clothing using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, S; Kudo, K; Kaizoji, A; Ryumoto, J; Ikeda, H; Ikeda, N

    2001-07-01

    We devised a simple and rapid method for detection of gunshot residue (GSR) particles, using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX) analysis. Experiments were done on samples containing GSR particles obtained from hands, hair, face, and clothing, using double-sided adhesive coated aluminum stubs (tape-lift method). SEM/WDX analyses for GSR were carried out in three steps: the first step was map analysis for barium (Ba) to search for GSR particles from lead styphnate primed ammunition, or tin (Sn) to search for GSR particles from mercury fulminate primed ammunition. The second step was determination of the location of GSR particles by X-ray imaging of Ba or Sn at a magnification of x 1000-2000 in the SEM, using data of map analysis, and the third step was identification of GSR particles, using WDX spectrometers. Analysis of samples from each primer of a stub took about 3 h. Practical applications were shown for utility of this method.

  8. A superconducting wavelength shifter as primary radiometric source standard in the X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: roman.klein@ptb.de; Brandt, G.; Cibik, L.; Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Scheer, M. [BESSY GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-10-11

    For more than 20 years, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been using the calculable radiation of bending magnets from the BESSY I and BESSY II electron storage rings in the visible, UV, vacuum-UV (VUV) and X-ray spectral range for radiometry, especially for the calibration of radiation sources and energy-dispersive detectors. Due to its-compared to bending magnets-higher magnetic field, wavelength shifters (WLS) have the potential to extend the usable spectral range for these applications to higher photon energies. Thus, the characteristic energies of BESSY II bending magnet radiation and a 6 T WLS radiation are 2.5 and 11.5 keV, respectively. Within the scope of this work, the properties of the synchrotron radiation from the 6 T WLS have been investigated and compared to theoretical predictions for photon energies up to 150 keV. Good agreement within the experimental uncertainty of several percent was found. Further improvements for a future radiometric use of WLS radiation with low uncertainties will be discussed.

  9. A superconducting wavelength shifter as primary radiometric source standard in the X-ray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.; Brandt, G.; Cibik, L.; Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G.; Scheer, M.

    2007-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been using the calculable radiation of bending magnets from the BESSY I and BESSY II electron storage rings in the visible, UV, vacuum-UV (VUV) and X-ray spectral range for radiometry, especially for the calibration of radiation sources and energy-dispersive detectors. Due to its-compared to bending magnets-higher magnetic field, wavelength shifters (WLS) have the potential to extend the usable spectral range for these applications to higher photon energies. Thus, the characteristic energies of BESSY II bending magnet radiation and a 6 T WLS radiation are 2.5 and 11.5 keV, respectively. Within the scope of this work, the properties of the synchrotron radiation from the 6 T WLS have been investigated and compared to theoretical predictions for photon energies up to 150 keV. Good agreement within the experimental uncertainty of several percent was found. Further improvements for a future radiometric use of WLS radiation with low uncertainties will be discussed

  10. A superconducting wavelength shifter as primary radiometric source standard in the X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R.; Brandt, G.; Cibik, L.; Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Müller, P.; Ulm, G.; Scheer, M.

    2007-10-01

    For more than 20 years, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been using the calculable radiation of bending magnets from the BESSY I and BESSY II electron storage rings in the visible, UV, vacuum-UV (VUV) and X-ray spectral range for radiometry, especially for the calibration of radiation sources and energy-dispersive detectors. Due to its—compared to bending magnets—higher magnetic field, wavelength shifters (WLS) have the potential to extend the usable spectral range for these applications to higher photon energies. Thus, the characteristic energies of BESSY II bending magnet radiation and a 6 T WLS radiation are 2.5 and 11.5 keV, respectively. Within the scope of this work, the properties of the synchrotron radiation from the 6 T WLS have been investigated and compared to theoretical predictions for photon energies up to 150 keV. Good agreement within the experimental uncertainty of several percent was found. Further improvements for a future radiometric use of WLS radiation with low uncertainties will be discussed.

  11. Trace metal analysis in sea grasses from Mexican Caribbean Coast by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Issac O, K.; Martinez, A.; Lavoisier, E.; Martinez, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing urban and tourist activity in the Mexican Caribbean coasts has resulted in an increase of chemical substances, metals in particular, discharged to the coastal waters. In order to reach an adequate management and conservation of these marine ecosystems it is necessary to perform an inventory of the actual conditions that reflect the vulnerability and the level of damage. Sea-grasses are considered good biological indicators of heavy metal contamination in marine systems. The goal of this preliminary work is to evaluate the concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Pb in Thalassia testudinum, a very common sea-grass in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samples were collected from several locations in the coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula: Holbox, Blanquizal and Punta Allen, areas virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. Trace elements in different part plants were determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This is a very suitable technique since it offers a fast, accurate and multi-element analysis. Also, the analysis by PIXE can be performed directly on powdered leaves without a laborious sample preparation. The trace metal concentration determined in sea-grasses growing in Caribbean generally fall in the range of the lowest valuables reported for sea grasses from the Gulf of Mexico. The results indicate that the studied areas do not present contamination by heavy metals. (Author)

  12. Development of a β-delayed charged particle detector for studying novae and x-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Moshe; Budner, Tamas; Cortesi, Marco; Harris, Madison; Janasik, Molly; Perez-Loureiro, David; Pollaco, Emmanuel; Roosa, Michael; Tiwari, Pranjal; Wrede, Chris; Yurkon, John

    2017-09-01

    Classical novae and type I x-ray bursts are energetic and common thermonuclear astrophysical explosions. However, our ability to understand these events is limited by the lack of comprehensive nuclear data on proton-rich nuclei. Specifically, constraining the 30P(p , γ) 31S and 15O(α , γ) 19N e reaction rates has been found to be crucial to the understanding of nucleosynthesis and energy generation in these events. As direct measurements of these reactions are not technically feasible at the present time, a gas-filled detector of β-delayed charged particles has been designed and built to measure the 31Cl(βp) 30P and 20Mg(βpα) 15O decay sequences at NSCL, providing an indirect probe of resonances in the radiative capture reactions above. The detector is coupled with the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA) to enable coincidence γ detection, as an additional probe of interaction details and for normalization purposes. The first phase of the detector functions as a proton calorimeter and it is currently being tested and optimized. We will describe the technical status of Phase I, including the concept, simulations, design, assembly, and first offline measurements using radioactive sources. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1102511 and DOE Award No. DE-SC0016052.

  13. Evaluation of material properties of SiC particle reinforced aluminum alloy composite using neutron and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Machiya, Shutaro; Kimura, Hidehiko; Tanaka, Keisuke; Minakawa, Nobuaki; Morii, Yukio; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The phase stresses under loading in a monolithic aluminum alloy and an aluminum alloy reinforced with silicon carbide particles were measured by the neutron diffraction method. Under uniaxial loading, the longitudinal and transverse strains in each constituent phase were measured. The diffraction elastic constants for each diffraction plane were investigated as a function of the diffraction intensity by TOF. Single peak analysis was carried out for each diffraction profile. The measured results were compared with the theoretical micromechanical models such as the self-consistent and Mori-Tanaka method using the Eshelby theory (MTE). The accuracy of the elastic constant strongly depends on the diffraction intensity. In order to confirm the rule of mixture, the phase stress was measured by the X-ray method. The macrostress calculated by the rule of mixture agreed very well with the applied stress. Finally, fatigue damage was evaluated by the neutron method. The change of the full width at half maximum in the aluminum phase during fatigue is small. On the other hand, the value in the SiC phase increased steeply just before fracture

  14. Growth and sedimentation of fine particles produced in aqueous solutions of palladium sulfate and palladium sulfate-silver sulfate induced by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, Motoyoshi; Jonah, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    It is known that palladium and palladium-silver fine particles were formed from deaerated aqueous solutions of palladium sulfate and palladium sulfate-silver sulfate induced by gamma-ray irradiation. Changes in particle size and with amount of particles in the solution with time during and after irradiation were studied using dynamic light scattering technique and UV spectrophotometer. The particles formed from palladium sulfate solution are found to be water-filled bulky particles of diameter of 200 nm, which grow by mutual coagulation even after irradiation was terminated. Average density depends on concentration of palladium ion in the solution and dose, and the lowest density was about 2 g/cm 3 for particles of 200 nm obtained from 0.06 mM solution by 2.4 kGy irradiation. The average density of the particles obtained from palladium sulfate-silver sulfate solutions was smaller than those obtained for the corresponding palladium sulfate solutions. Supersonic agitation destroyed coagulated precipitates to form fine particles, but did not form clusters of a few atoms. (author)

  15. The size distribution of marine atmospheric aerosol with regard to primary biological aerosol particles over the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias-Maser, Sabine; Brinkmann, Jutta; Schneider, Wilhelm

    The marine atmosphere is characterized by particles which originate from the ocean and by those which reached the air by advection from the continent. The bubble-burst mechanism produces both sea salt as well as biological particles. The following article describes the determination of the size distribution of marine aerosol particles with special emphasis on the biological particles. Th data were obtained on three cruises with the German Research Vessel "METEOR" crossing the South Atlantic Ocean. The measurements showed that biological particles amount to 17% in number and 10% in volume concentration. Another type of particle became obvious in the marine atmosphere, the biologically contaminated particle, i.e. particles which consist partly (approximately up to one-third) of biological matter. Their concentration in the evaluated size class ( r>2 μm) is higher than the concentration of the pure biological particles. The concentrations vary over about one to two orders of magnitude during all cruises.

  16. Establishment of a primary standard system for low energy X-rays using a free air ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Natalia Fiorini da

    2016-01-01

    In this work a primary standard system was established for low energy X-rays (10 kV to 50 kV), using a free air ionization chamber with concentric cylinders, Victoreen (Model 481-5), at the Calibration Laboratory of Instruments (LCI) of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP). For this, a new ionization chamber alignment protocol was developed for the radiation system and a modification on the micrometer housing used for the movement of the internal cylinders was ma de. The results obtained for the stability and characterization tests showed to be within the limits established by the standards IEC 61674 and IEC 60731. The correction factors for photon attenuation in the air, transmission and scattering in the diaphragm, scattering and fluorescence and ion recombination were also determined. These values were compared with those obtained by the German primary standard laboratory, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), showing good agreement. Finally, the absolute values of the quantity air kerma rate for the standard qualities direct beams MWV28 and WMV35 and the attenuated beams WMH28 and WMH35 were determined; the results are in agreement, with a maximum difference of 3,8% with the values obtained using the secondary standard system of LCI. (author)

  17. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070139032; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Rooij, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315888644; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, I.M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530780; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362845670; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074064975; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; de Ladron Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080192; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330612220; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080400; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369405870; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32823219X; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165585781; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szabo, A.; de Szanto Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836737; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304845035; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    The transverse momentum (Formula presented.) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p–Pb collisions at (Formula presented.)NN = 5.02(Formula presented.) TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range. The spectra are compared to the expectation

  18. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p–Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070139032; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Rooij, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315888644; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, I.M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530780; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362845670; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074064975; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; de Ladron Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080192; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330612220; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080400; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369405870; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H O; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32823219X; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165585781; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J M; Szabo, A.; de Szanto Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836737; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I. K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304845035; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    The transverse momentum (Formula presented.) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p–Pb collisions at (Formula presented.)NN = 5.02(Formula presented.) TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range. The spectra are compared to the expectation

  19. Studies on tableting properties of lactose. VII. The effect of variations in primary particle size and percentage of amorphous lactose in spray dried lactose products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromans, H.; Bolhuis, G.K.; Lerk, C.F.; van de Biggelaar, H.; Bosch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Sieve fractions of α-lactose monohydrate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, respectively, suspended in solutions of lactose, were spray dried in order to obtain products with various amorphous lactose contents. The compactibility of the samples appeared to be a function of both the primary particle

  20. Particle coagulation in molten metal based on three-dimensional analysis of cluster by x-ray micro-computer tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Shimasaki, Shin-ichi; Taniguchi, Shoji; Narita, Shunsuke; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Particle coagulation plays a key role in steel refining process to remove inclusions. Many research works focus on the behaviors of particle coagulation. To reveal its mechanism water model experiments have been performed by some researchers including the authors' group. In this paper, experiments of particle coagulation were carried out with molten Al including SiC particles in a mechanically agitated crucible with two baffles. Particle coagulation and formation of clusters were observed on the microscopy images of as-polished samples. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the clusters in solidified Al was implemented by X-ray micro CT available at SPring-8. The methods to distinguish clusters on two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional images were discussed, which were established in the previous works by the present authors' group. The characteristics of the 3D SiC clusters and their 2D cross-sections were analyzed. The statistical ranges of the parameters for 2D clusters were used as criterions to distinguish the clusters on 2D microscopy images from the as-polished samples. The kinetics of SiC particle coagulation was studied by the measured cluster number density and size using our program to distinguish cluster in 2D cross-sectional images according to 3D information (DC-2D-3D). The calculated and experimental results of the SiC particle coagulation in molten Al agree well with each other. (author)

  1. Comparative study of the Quality Control of x-ray tubes and generators in hospital assistance and primary assistance in Galician autonomous community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombar Camean, M.; Lobato Busto, R.

    1992-01-01

    The quality guarantee in Diagnostic Radiology is defined as the organized effort of surgical staff to guarantee sufficient quality images, which provide the correct diagnostic information, as cheaply as possible and with the least exposure to radiation for the patient. In this paper a comparative study about the quality control of x-ray tube and generators in hospital assistance and primary assistance is present. In the conclusions, it is confirmed that the antiquity and poor conservation of the primary attendance x-ray equipment, have influence on the studied constants and therefore, influence the doses received by the patients. (author)

  2. Semiclassical approach to trajectory effects on the anisotropy coefficient of L3-subshell X-rays induced by slow heavy particles collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, E.C.; Pinho, A.G. de

    1982-01-01

    The deflection and the retardation of a slow bare heavy particle by the repulsive Coulomb field of the target nucleus are known to modify the ionization cross sections of inner shells. It is shown how to calculate these effects in the magnetic substates of the 2p-subshell in the frame of the impact parameter picture. These corrections are essential to understand the energy dependence of the anisotropy coefficient of X-ray emitted in transitions filling an L 3 -subshell vacancy produced by massive particle bombardment. (Author) [pt

  3. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4 + T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo

  4. Efficient internalization of mesoporous silica particles of different sizes by primary human macrophages without impairment of macrophage clearance of apoptotic or antibody-opsonized target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witasp, Erika; Kupferschmidt, Natalia; Bengtsson, Linnea; Hultenby, Kjell; Smedman, Christian; Paulie, Staffan; Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.; Fadeel, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage recognition and ingestion of apoptotic cell corpses, a process referred to as programmed cell clearance, is of considerable importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and in the resolution of inflammation. Moreover, macrophages are the first line of defense against microorganisms and other foreign materials including particles. However, there is sparse information on the mode of uptake of engineered nanomaterials by primary macrophages. In this study, mesoporous silica particles with cubic pore geometries and covalently fluorescein-grafted particles were synthesized through a novel route, and their interactions with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages were assessed. Efficient and active internalization of mesoporous silica particles of different sizes was observed by transmission electron microscopic and flow cytometric analysis and studies using pharmacological inhibitors suggested that uptake occurred through a process of endocytosis. Moreover, uptake of silica particles was independent of serum factors. The silica particles with very high surface areas due to their porous structure did not impair cell viability or function of macrophages, including the ingestion of different classes of apoptotic or opsonized target cells. The current findings are relevant to the development of mesoporous materials for drug delivery and other biomedical applications.

  5. High Fidelity Measurement of Free Space Solar Particle Event and Galactic Cosmic Ray Environments at Intermediate Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgab, M.

    2018-02-01

    A charged particle measurement experiment mounted externally to the Deep Space Gateway is proposed, contributing to improving astronaut radiation exposure management during Solar Particle Events and Extra Vehicular Activities.

  6. Element analysis of the eutardigrades Richtersius coronifer and Milnesium cf. asiaticum using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Nilsson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Semi-terrestrial tardigrades are well-known for their tolerance to a variety of environmental extremes, including desiccation, freezing and radiation. Despite several attempts to reveal the genetic and molecular mechanisms behind the resilience of tardigrades, it is still unknown how these animals are able to maintain the integrity of their cellular components under severe stress. Quantitative or qualitative changes in molecular compounds (e.g., carbohydrates, proteins are expected, and have been the main line of research towards understanding the tolerance of tardigrades. In radiation tolerant bacteria, a tolerance mechanism based on manganese has been proposed. We evaluate this hypothesis in tardigrades and provide the first data on element composition in desiccated and non-desiccated specimens of two eutardigrade species, Richtersius coronifer and Milnesium cf. asiaticum. A focused 2 MeV proton microbeam was utilised to determine the elemental content, distributions and concentrations, using the ion beam analytical technique particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE. The presence of six elements – phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, potassium, calcium and iron – were confirmed in all tardigrade specimens, at levels up to a few mg g–1. However, manganese was found in less than 10% of the analysed specimens, and in low amounts, thus our study provides no evidence for the manganese hypothesis. We also show that the distributions and/or concentrations of some elements differ between the two species as well as between the dehydrated and hydrated state. In particular, very low levels of iron were found in dehydrated M. cf. asiaticum. Our analysis shows that the PIXE technique is a useful tool for investigating questions on the distribution of elements both in dehydrated and hydrated tardigrades.

  7. A simple method to extract information on anisotropy of particle fluxes from spin-modulated counting rates of cosmic ray telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, K.C.; Lin, Y.C.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A simple method to extract information on anisotropy of particle fluxes from data collected by cosmic ray telescopes on spinning spacecraft but without sectored accumulators is presented. Application of this method to specific satellite data demonstrates that it requires no prior assumption on the form of angular distribution of the fluxes; furthermore, self-consistency ensures the validity of the results thus obtained. The examples show perfect agreement with the corresponding magnetic field directions

  8. Application of hepatitis B core particles produced by human primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PLC/342) propagated in nude mice to the determination of anti-HBc by passive hemagglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Itoh, Y; Tsuda, F; Matsui, T; Tanaka, T; Miyamoto, H; Naitoh, S; Imai, M; Usuda, S; Nakamura, T

    1986-05-22

    Human primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PLC/342), carried by nude mice, produces hepatitis B core particles as well as hepatitis B surface antigen particles. Core particles purified form PLC/342 tumors displayed epitopes of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) but not epitopes of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) on their surface, unlike core particles prepared from Dane particles, derived from plasma of asymptomatic carriers, that expressed epitopes of both HBcAg and HBeAg. Core particles obtained from PLC/342 tumors were applied to the determination of antibody to HBcAg (anti-HBc) by passive hemagglutination. The assay detected anti-HBc not only in individuals with persistent infection with hepatitis B virus and in those who had recovered from transient infection, but also in patients with acute type B hepatitis, indicating that it can detect anti-HBc of either IgG or IgM class. A liberal availability of core particles from tumors carried by nude mice, taken together with an easy applicability of the method, would make the passive hemagglutination for anti-HBc a valuable tool in clinical and epidemiological studies, especially in places where sophisticated methods are not feasible.

  9. Construction of a laboratory for the implantation of primary standardization of the magnitude kerma in the air for the X-ray beams used in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo, W.L.; Magalhes, L.A.A.M.F.; Peixoto, J.G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to diminish the uncertainty in each phase of the metrological chain, and the uncertainty in dosimetry processed at the X-ray beam applied in the mammography, is necessary that the LNMRI/IRD to develop a reference primary standard for the absolute form to the magnitude kerma in the air

  10. Texture development study during the primary recrystallization of ferritic steels by using X ray and electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    X ray and electron backscattering diffraction, in distinct levels, were applied to evaluate microstructural changes in two low carbon ferritic steels (2 per cent Si and ABNT 1006), observing the texture development in cold lamination step (skin-pass) and in the subsequent annealing at 760 deg C. In these two steels, results showed that after the skin-pass and annealing in the conditions of the present work, the observed phenomenon is the primary recrystallization. By applying skin-pass dislocations were introduced mostly in low Taylor factor grains as they are prone to be more deformed. Nucleation and grain growth were observed in high density dislocation cell regions. Silicon presence delayed the recovery favoring the sub-boundaries increase. It was not observed the abnormal grain growth, even in the presence of Gross grains. CSL boundaries did not guarantee the grains growth. Growing nuclei gave rise to grains with distinct orientations, showing that the grain growth was not dependent on the previous presence of grains with the developed orientation. This fact demonstrates that the abnormal grain growth is not necessarily related to the Gross grains. (author)

  11. Morphology, composition, and mixing state of primary particles from combustion sources ? crop residue, wood, and solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lei; Kong, Shaofei; Zhang, Yinxiao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liang; Yan, Qin; Lingaswamy, A. P.; Shi, Zongbo; Lv, Senlin; Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2017-01-01

    Morphology, composition, and mixing state of individual particles emitted from crop residue, wood, and solid waste combustion in a residential stove were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study showed that particles from crop residue and apple wood combustion were mainly organic matter (OM) in smoldering phase, whereas soot-OM internally mixed with K in flaming phase. Wild grass combustion in flaming phase released some Cl-rich-OM/soot particles and cardboard combusti...

  12. Gelatin sponge particle used as an embolic agent in transcatheter arterial chemoembolization treatment for primary hepatocellular carcinoma: its current situation in research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Jin; Zhang Yuewei; Xu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is one of the most commonly used therapeutic procedures for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As an important and easily-available embolic agent, gelatin sponge (Gelfoam) particles have been constantly and widely employed in clinical practice. Various types of embolic agents have been continuously developed and effectively used in TACE for liver cancers. For recent years, great progress has been made in the clinical use of gelatin sponge particles, as the most traditional embolic agent, in the interventional therapeutic field for HCC. This article aims to make a comprehensive review about gelatin sponge. (authors)

  13. Design of the detector to observe the energetic charged particles: a part of the solar X-ray spectrophotometer ChemiX onboard Interhelio-Probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Oleksiy; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Siarkowski, Marek; Evgen Kurbatov, mgr..

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic particle radiation may damages payload's electronics, optics, and sensors during of long-term scientific space mission especially the interplanetary ones. That is why it's extremely important to prevent failures of digital electronics, CCDs, semiconductor detectors at the times of passing through regions of enhanced charged particle fluxes. Well developed models of the Earth's radiation belts allow to predict and to protect sensitive equipment against disastrous influence of radiation due to energetic particle contained in the Van Allen belts. In the contrary interplanetary probes flying far away from our planet undergoes passages through clouds of plasma and solar cosmic rays not predictable by present models. Especially these concerns missions planned for non-ecliptic orbits. The practical approach to protect sensitive modules may be to measure the in situ particle fluxes with high time resolution and generation of alarm flags, which will switch off sensitive units of particular scientific equipment. The ChemiX (Chemical composition in X-rays) instrument is being developed by the Solar Physics Division of Polish Space Research Centre for the Interhelio-Probe interplanetary mission. Charged particle bursts can badly affect the regular measurements of X-ray spectra of solar origin. In order to detect presence of these enhanced particle fluxes the Background Particle Monitor (BPM) was developed constituting now a vital part of ChemiX. The BPM measurements of particle fluxes will assist to determine level of X-ray spectra contamination. Simultaneously BPM will measure the energy spectra of ambient particles. We present overall structure, design, technical and a scientific characteristic of BPM, particle sorts, and energy ranges to be registered. We describe nearly autonomous modular structure of BPM consisting of detector head, analogue and digital electronics modules, and of module of secondary power supply [1-3]. Detector head consists of three

  14. Data processing for the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer and initial scientific results from Chang'e-3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Hui; Li, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zou, Yong-Liao; Liu, Jian-Jun; Ren, Xin; Tan, Xu; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Zuo, Wei; Wen, Wei-Bin; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is an important payload mounted on the Yutu rover, which is part of the Chang'e-3 mission. The scientific objective of APXS is to perform in-situ analysis of the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. The radioactive sources, 55Fe and 109Cd, decay and produce α-particles and X-rays. When X-rays and α-particles interact with atoms in the surface material, they knock electrons out of their orbits, which release energy by emitting X-rays that can be measured by a silicon drift detector (SDD). The elements and their concentrations can be determined by analyzing their peak energies and intensities. APXS has analyzed both the calibration target and lunar soil once during the first lunar day and again during the second lunar day. The total detection time lasted about 266 min and more than 2000 frames of data records have been acquired. APXS has three operating modes: calibration mode, distance sensing mode and detection mode. In detection mode, work distance can be calculated from the X-ray counting rate collected by SDD. Correction for the effect of temperature has been performed to convert the channel number for each spectrum to X-ray energy. Dead time correction is used to eliminate the systematic error in quantifying the activity of an X-ray pulse in a sample and derive the real count rate. We report APXS data and initial results during the first and second lunar days for the Yutu rover. In this study, we analyze the data from the calibration target and lunar soil on the first lunar day. Seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe, have been identified. Comparing the peak areas and ratios of calibration basalt and lunar soil the landing site was found to be depleted in K, and have lower Mg and Al but higher Ca, Ti, and Fe. In the future, we will obtain the elemental concentrations of lunar soil at the Chang'e-3 landing site using APXS data.

  15. Clustering of DSB in DNA by X-Ray and a-particle irradiation in MCF-7 cells studied with anti γ-H2AX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia, O.; Soto, J.; Castro, F.A.; Berciano, Ma T; Lafarga, M.; Cos, S.; Sanchez-Barcelo, E.

    2007-01-01

    Among the effects produced by the ionizing radiations in cellular DNA, double strand breaks (DSB) are considered particularly important. These ruptures and their grouping in certain points, clustering, are acknowledged as the cause for mutagenic effects and cellular death. In this work we present the methodology and the results of the application of the DSB - DNA marking technique by using anti γ-H2AX, taking human cancerous cells MCF-7 as model and X-rays and a particles as irradiation agents. The obtained results are showed in a qualitative way like a set of figures. Are shows the effects of a dose of 2 Gy X-rays in the DSB - DNA after 30 minutes of the irradiation that responds to a certain pattern in which a spatially homogenous irradiation interacts with the DNA. As in previous case, the effects of X-rays in the DSB - DNA shows a different pattern affecting the cells that are in mitosis. Also, the effects of a dose of 2 Gy X-rays obtained after 24 hours of irradiation shows a number of DSB smaller, which is indicative of the repairing process. The results of the irradiation with a dose of 0.1 Gy originated from a particles cause a smaller number of DSB. Nevertheless, the existence of a bigger clustering with the appearance of clearly more intense points is appraised. Also, the effect of the irradiation is showed as an aligned trace of clusters that is possible to attribute to the passing of a a particle through the cellular nucleus. (Author)

  16. Comparison cosmic ray irradiation simulation and particle beam test on UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger telescope(UBAT) detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, H. M.; Jeong, S.; Kim, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder(UFFO-p) was launched onboard Lomonosov on 28th of April, 2016, and now is under various types of calibration for detection of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Since last September UFFO-p has taken X-ray data in space with UFFO Burst Alert &Trigger telescope (UBAT),...

  17. A Critical Shock Mach Number for Particle Acceleration in the Absence of Pre-existing Cosmic Rays: M = √5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Yamazaki, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M > √5. The reason is that for M ≤ √5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain.

  18. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle-component-based factor analysis

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Stroud; M. D. Moran; P. A. Makar; S. Gong; W. Gong; J. Zhang; J. G. Slowik; J. P. D. Abbatt; G. Lu; J. R. Brook; C. Mihele; Q. Li; D. Sills; K. B. Strawbridge; M. L. McGuire

    2012-01-01

    Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007) in Southern Ontario, Canada, were used to evaluate predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and two other carbonaceous species, black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO), made for this summertime period by Environment Canada's AURAMS regional chemical transport model. Particle component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON) and two...

  19. X-ray tomography studies on porosity and particle size distribution in cast in-situ Al-Cu-TiB{sub 2} semi-solid forged composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, James; Mandal, Animesh [School of Minerals, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Warnett, Jason; Williams, Mark A. [WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chakraborty, Madhusudan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Srirangam, Prakash, E-mail: p.srirangam@warwick.ac.uk [WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was used to characterise the internal microstructure and clustering behaviour of TiB{sub 2} particles in in-situ processed Al-Cu metal matrix composites prepared by casting method. Forging was used in semi-solid state to reduce the porosity and to uniformly disperse TiB{sub 2} particles in the composite. Quantification of porosity and clustering of TiB{sub 2} particles was evaluated for different forging reductions (30% and 50% reductions) and compared with an as-cast sample using XCT. Results show that the porosity content was decreased by about 40% due to semi-solid forging as compared to the as-cast condition. Further, XCT results show that the 30% forging reduction resulted in greater uniformity in distribution of TiB{sub 2} particles within the composite compared to as-cast and the 50% forge reduction in semi-solid state. These results show that the application of forging in semi-solid state enhances particle distribution and reduces porosity formation in cast in-situ Al-Cu-TiB{sub 2} metal matrix composites. - Highlights: •XCT was used to visualise 3D internal structure of Al-Cu-TiB{sub 2} MMCs. •Al-Cu-TiB{sub 2} MMC was prepared by casting using flux assisted synthesis method. •TiB{sub 2} particles and porosity size distribution were evaluated. •Results show that forging in semi-solid condition decreases the porosity content and improve the particle dispersion in MMCs.

  20. Transverse sphericity of primary charged particles in minimum bias proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonschior, Alexey; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grinyov, Boris; Grion, Nevio; Gros, Philippe; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerra Gutierrez, Cesar; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guilbaud, Maxime Rene Joseph; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Gutbrod, Hans; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Han, Byounghee; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harmanova, Zuzana; Harris, John William; Hartig, Matthias; Hasegan, Dumitru; Hatzifotiadou, Despoina; Hayrapetyan, Arsen; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Norbert; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hicks, Bernard; Hille, Per Thomas; Hippolyte, Boris; Horaguchi, Takuma; Hori, Yasuto; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hrivnacova, Ivana; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ichou, Raphaelle; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Innocenti, Pier Giorgio; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivan, Cristian George; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Andrey; Ivanytskyi, Oleksii; Jacholkowski, Adam Wlodzimierz; Jacobs, Peter; Jang, Haeng Jin; Jangal, Swensy Gwladys; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Janik, Rudolf; Jayarathna, Sandun; Jena, Satyajit; Jha, Deeptanshu Manu; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jirden, Lennart; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyung Taik; Jusko, Anton; Kaidalov, Alexei; Kakoyan, Vanik; Kalcher, Sebastian; Kalinak, Peter; Kalliokoski, Tuomo Esa Aukusti; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kazantsev, Andrey; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Khan, Palash; Khan, Mohisin Mohammed; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Koch, Kathrin; Kohler, Markus; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Korneev, Andrey; Kour, Ravjeet; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kraus, Ingrid Christine; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, AB; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Lea, Ramona; Le Bornec, Yves; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Graham Richard; Lefevre, Frederic; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Leistam, Lars; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Liu, Lijiao; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohn, Stefan Bernhard; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luquin, Lionel; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Rongrong; Ma, Ke; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Markert, Christina; Martashvili, Irakli; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastromarco, Mario; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayani, Daniel; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Naumov, Nikolay; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nazarov, Gleb; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Ortona, Giacomo; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, S; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Pastircak, Blahoslav; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puchagin, Sergey; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujol Teixido, Jordi; Pulvirenti, Alberto; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Radomski, Sylwester; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Sudhir; Raniwala, Rashmi; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, Bartolomeu; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Satoshi; Sano, Masato; Santo, Rainer; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Sharma, Rohini; Shigaki, Kenta; Shimomura, Maya; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Sicking, Eva; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Tinku; Sinha, Bikash; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Jihye; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinbeck, Timm Morten; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strabykin, Kirill; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sukhorukov, Mikhail; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Toscano, Luca; Truesdale, David Christopher; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; van der Kolk, Naomi; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vikhlyantsev, Oleg; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vranic, Danilo; Øvrebekk, Gaute; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Vladimir; Wagner, Boris; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Wang, Yaping; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilk, Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Shiming; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2012-09-18

    Measurements of the sphericity of primary charged particles in minimum bias proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC are presented. The observable is linearized to be collinear safe and is measured in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction using primary charged tracks with $p_{\\rm T}\\geq0.5$ GeV/c in $|\\eta|\\leq0.8$. The mean sphericity as a function of the charged particle multiplicity at mid-rapidity ($N_{\\rm ch}$) is reported for events with different $p_{\\rm T}$ scales ("soft" and "hard") defined by the transverse momentum of the leading particle. In addition, the mean charged particle transverse momentum versus multiplicity is presented for the different event classes, and the sphericity distributions in bins of multiplicity are presented. The data are compared with calculations of standard Monte Carlo event generators. The transverse sphericity is found to grow with multiplicity at all collision energies, with a steeper rise at low $N_{\\rm ch}...

  1. A new data-processing approach to study particle motion using ultrafast X-ray tomography scanner: case study of gravitational mass flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waktola, Selam; Bieberle, Andre; Barthel, Frank; Bieberle, Martina; Hampel, Uwe; Grudzień, Krzysztof; Babout, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    In most industrial products, granular materials are often required to flow under gravity in various kinds of silo shapes and usually through an outlet in the bottom. There are several interrelated parameters which affect the flow, such as internal friction, bulk and packing density, hopper geometry, and material type. Due to the low-spatial resolution of electrical capacitance tomography or scanning speed limitation of standard X-ray CT systems, it is extremely challenging to measure the flow velocity and possible centrifugal effects of granular materials flow effectively. However, ROFEX (ROssendorf Fast Electron beam X-ray tomography) opens new avenues of granular flow investigation due to its very high temporal resolution. This paper aims to track particle movements and evaluate the local grain velocity during silo discharging process in the case of mass flow. The study has considered the use of the Seramis material, which can also serve as a type of tracer particles after impregnation, due to its porous nature. The presented novel image processing and analysis approach allows satisfyingly measuring individual particle velocities but also tracking their lateral movement and three-dimensional rotations.

  2. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  3. Gradient forces on double-negative particles in optical tweezers using Bessel beams in the ray optics regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-08

    Gradient forces on double negative (DNG) spherical dielectric particles are theoretically evaluated for v-th Bessel beams supposing geometrical optics approximations based on momentum transfer. For the first time in the literature, comparisons between these forces for double positive (DPS) and DNG particles are reported. We conclude that, contrary to the conventional case of positive refractive index, the gradient forces acting on a DNG particle may not reverse sign when the relative refractive index n goes from |n|>1 to |n|<1, thus revealing new and interesting trapping properties.

  4. Response of mammary tissue to high-LET HZE particle (Silicon ions) radiation or low-LET gamma-rays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Transcriptional profiling of mammary tissue irradiated at 10 weeks of age with either 100 cGy sparsely ionizing gamma-rays or 10 cGy or 30 cGy densely ionizing...

  5. Transcriptome Profiles in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells after Exposure to gamma-rays and different HZE particles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distinct transcriptome profiles in response to low-LET and high-LET and different radiation qualities of HZE particles. Total RNA obtained from HBEC3KT cells after 1...

  6. EVIDENCE FOR ENHANCED {sup 3}HE IN FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES BASED ON NEW CALCULATIONS OF THE GAMMA-RAY LINE SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R. J. [Code 7650, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kozlovsky, B. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Share, G. H., E-mail: murphy@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: share@astro.umd.edu [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The {sup 3}He abundance in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events is enhanced up to several orders of magnitude compared to its photospheric value of [{sup 3}He]/[{sup 4}He] = 1–3 × 10{sup −4}. Interplanetary magnetic field and timing observations suggest that these events are related to solar flares. Observations of {sup 3}He in flare-accelerated ions would clarify the relationship between these two phenomena. Energetic {sup 3}He interactions in the solar atmosphere produce gamma-ray nuclear-deexcitation lines, both lines that are also produced by protons and α particles and lines that are essentially unique to {sup 3}He. Gamma-ray spectroscopy can, therefore, reveal enhanced levels of accelerated {sup 3}He. In this paper, we identify all significant deexcitation lines produced by {sup 3}He interactions in the solar atmosphere. We evaluate their production cross sections and incorporate them into our nuclear deexcitation-line code. We find that enhanced {sup 3}He can affect the entire gamma-ray spectrum. We identify gamma-ray line features for which the yield ratios depend dramatically on the {sup 3}He abundance. We determine the accelerated {sup 3}He/ α ratio by comparing these ratios with flux ratios measured previously from the gamma-ray spectrum obtained by summing the 19 strongest flares observed with the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma-Ray Spectrometer. All six flux ratios investigated show enhanced {sup 3}He, confirming earlier suggestions. The {sup 3}He/ α weighted mean of these new measurements ranges from 0.05 to 0.3 (depending on the assumed accelerated α /proton ratio) and has a <1 × 10{sup −3} probability of being consistent with the photospheric value. With the improved code, we can now exploit the full potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy to establish the relationship between flare-accelerated ions and {sup 3}He-rich SEPs.

  7. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper looks at the discovery and investigation of strange particles in the 1950s and points to the importance of two factors in achieving this, namely, penetrating-shower selection and counter control in cloud chambers. Experiments at Pic-du-Mide are detailed as is the Bagneres de Bigorre conference and concludes with some of the work done on charged strange particles. (UK)

  8. Summary report of the first research coordination meeting on development of a reference database for particle-induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Pedro de Jesus, A.

    2011-07-01

    The First Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy' was held at the IAEA, Vienna, from 16-20 May 2011. A summary of the participants' presentations is given as well as background information, objectives and recommendations concerning approach and methodology. The extension of the IBANDL database format to include PIGE data was discussed. The different tasks to achieve the CRP objectives were assigned to participants. A list of priority measurements was produced and the individual sets of measurements assigned to participants. (author)

  9. Summary Report of the 3rd Research Coordination Meeting on Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Pedro de Jesus, A.

    2014-05-01

    The Third Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy” was held at the IAEA, Vienna, from 7 to 11 April 2014. Participants reviewed the progress made since the previous RCM and agreed upon the work that remains to be done by the end of the CRP. The contents of the final Technical Document were discussed and individual chapters were assigned. The summaries of participants’ presentations as well as the technical discussions and the list of assigned tasks are included in this report. (author)

  10. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinati, E.; Diebold, S.; Kendziorra, E.

    2012-01-01

    and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage...... or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper...

  11. An in situ cell to study phase transitions in individual aerosol particles on a substrate using scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huthwelker, T.; Zelenay, V.; Birrer, M.; Krepelova, A.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M.; Tzvetkov, G.; Vernooij, M. G. C.

    2010-01-01

    A new in situ cell to study phase transitions and chemical processes on individual aerosol particles in the x-ray transmission microscope at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss light source has been built. The cell is machined from stainless steel and aluminum components and is designed to be used in the standard mount of the microscope without need of complicated rearrangements of the microscope. The cell consists of two parts, a back part which contains connections for the gas supply, heating, cooling devices, and temperature measurement. The second part is a removable clip, which hosts the sample. This clip can be easily exchanged and brought into a sampling unit for aerosol particles. Currently, the cell can be operated at temperatures ranging from -40 to +50 deg. C. The function of the cell is demonstrated using two systems of submicron size: inorganic sodium bromide aerosols and soot originating from a diesel passenger car. For the sodium bromide we demonstrate how phase transitions can be studied in these systems and that O1s spectra from aqueous sodium bromide solution can be taken from submicron sized particles. For the case of soot, we demonstrate that the uptake of water onto individual soot particles can be studied.

  12. An electron storage ring as primary standard for the realization of radiation optical units from the infrared to the soft X-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riehle, F.; Wende, B.

    1987-01-01

    The electron storage ring BESSY optimized for radiometry is shown to be a primary standard of spectral photon flux with a relative uncertainty increasing from 0.3% in the infrared (photon energy ≅ 1 eV) to 2% in the soft X-ray region (photon energy ≅ 5 keV). The small uncertainties at high photon energies were achieved by measuring the spatial and angular distributions of the electrons around the mean electron orbit and by calculating the corresponding distributions of the emitted synchrotron radiation. Results of various intercomparisons with other standards in the near infrared, visible, and soft X-ray region support the low uncertainties of this new primary standard. (orig.)

  13. Study of the Solar Anisotropy for Cosmic Ray Primaries of about 200 GeV Energy with the L3+C Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benitez, M; van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, J; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, Valery P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bahr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillere, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Bohm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J; de Asmundis, R; Deglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degre, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; DeNotaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Duran, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El Hage, A; El Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagan, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S N; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grabosch, H J; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Gruenewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, Ch; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Hu, Y; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jing, C L; Jones, Lawrence W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; Konig, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V; Kraber, M; Kuang, H H; Kraemer, R W; Kruger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladron de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levtchenko, P; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, F L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Mana, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, y G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novak, T; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J -F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroue, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P; Riemann, y S; Riles, Keith; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sanchez, E; Schafer, C; Schegelsky, V; Schmitt, V; Schoeneich, B; Schopper, H; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Straessner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillasi, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Toth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vasquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitsky, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopianov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; van Wijk, R; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, An; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zhu, Q Q; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zoller, M; Zwart, A N M

    2008-01-01

    Primary cosmic rays experience multiple deflections in the nonuniform galactic and heliospheric magnetic fields which may generate anisotropies. A study of anisotropies in the energy range between 100 and 500 GeV is performed. This energy range is not yet well explored. The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, is used for a study of the angular distribution of atmospheric muons with energies above 20 GeV. This distribution is used to investigate the isotropy of the time-dependent intensity of the primary cosmic-ray flux with a Fourier analysis. A small deviation from isotropy at energies around 200 GeV is observed for the second harmonics at the solar frequency. No sidereal anisotropy is found at a level above 10^-4. The measurements have been performed in the years 1999 and 2000.

  14. Preparation, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of mutant carboxypeptidase T containing the primary specificity pocket of carboxypeptidase B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Grishin, A. M.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant G215S, A251G, T257A, D260G, T262D mutant carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris containing mutations in the primary specificity pocket was prepared and crystallized. Single crystals with a size of up to 0.3 mm were grown and investigated by X-ray diffraction. Recombinant mutant carboxypeptidase T containing the primary specificity subsite compositionally identical to that of pancreatic carboxypeptidase B crystallizes in the same space group as the natural enzyme. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P6 3 22; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 157.867 A, c = 104.304 A, α = β = 90 deg., γ = 120 deg. X-ray diffraction data suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution were collected from one crystal.

  15. Differential superiority of heavy charged-particle irradiation to x-rays: Studies on biological effectivenes and side effect mechanisms in multicellular tumor and normal tissue models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWalenta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to x-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis.Multicellular spheroids (MCS from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with x-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER were 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, 12C+6 in the plateau region, and 12C+6 in the Bragg peak, respectively. A relative biological effectiveness (RBE of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M, and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy of x-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in 1 integrin expression. Unlike with particles, the photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Comparing the gene toxicity of x-rays with that of particles using the gamma-H2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral mucosa, the superior effectiveness of heavy ions was confirmed by a two-fold higher number of foci per nucleus. Pro-inflammatory signs, however, were similar for both treatment modalities, e. g., the activation of NFkappaB, and the release of IL

  16. Comparative phototoxicity of nanoparticulate and bulk ZnO to a free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: The importance of illumination mode and primary particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, H.; Kabengi, N.J.; Bertsch, P.M.; Unrine, J.M.; Glenn, T.C.; Williams, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated phototoxicity of nanoparticulate ZnO and bulk-ZnO under natural sunlight (NSL) versus ambient artificial laboratory light (AALL) illumination to a free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Phototoxicity of nano-ZnO and bulk-ZnO was largely dependent on illumination method as 2-h exposure under NSL caused significantly greater mortality in C. elegans than under AALL. This phototoxicity was closely related to photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the ZnO particles as indicated by concomitant methylene blue photodegradation. Both materials caused mortality in C. elegans under AALL during 24-h exposure although neither degraded methylene blue, suggesting mechanisms of toxicity other than photocatalytic ROS generation were involved. Particle dissolution of ZnO did not appear to play an important role in the toxicity observed in this study. Nano-ZnO showed greater phototoxicity than bulk-ZnO despite their similar size of aggregates, suggesting primary particle size is more important than aggregate size in determining phototoxicity. - Highlights: → Phototoxicity of nano- or bulk-ZnO was enhanced by natural sunlight illumination. → This phototoxicity was well-correlated to photocatalytic ROS generation. → Toxicity of ZnO particles not related to photocatalytic ROS generation was also observed. → Nano-ZnO showed greater phototoxicity than bulk-ZnO due to its greater total surface area per unit mass. → Primary particle size appeared to be more important than aggregate size in determining phototoxicity. - Phototoxicity of nanoparticulate and bulk ZnO was greatly enhanced by natural sunlight illumination compared to artificial laboratory light illumination.

  17. Comparative phototoxicity of nanoparticulate and bulk ZnO to a free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: The importance of illumination mode and primary particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, H., E-mail: mah77@uga.edu [Department of Environmental Health Science, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Kabengi, N.J.; Bertsch, P.M.; Unrine, J.M. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Glenn, T.C.; Williams, P.L. [Department of Environmental Health Science, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The present study evaluated phototoxicity of nanoparticulate ZnO and bulk-ZnO under natural sunlight (NSL) versus ambient artificial laboratory light (AALL) illumination to a free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Phototoxicity of nano-ZnO and bulk-ZnO was largely dependent on illumination method as 2-h exposure under NSL caused significantly greater mortality in C. elegans than under AALL. This phototoxicity was closely related to photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the ZnO particles as indicated by concomitant methylene blue photodegradation. Both materials caused mortality in C. elegans under AALL during 24-h exposure although neither degraded methylene blue, suggesting mechanisms of toxicity other than photocatalytic ROS generation were involved. Particle dissolution of ZnO did not appear to play an important role in the toxicity observed in this study. Nano-ZnO showed greater phototoxicity than bulk-ZnO despite their similar size of aggregates, suggesting primary particle size is more important than aggregate size in determining phototoxicity. - Highlights: > Phototoxicity of nano- or bulk-ZnO was enhanced by natural sunlight illumination. > This phototoxicity was well-correlated to photocatalytic ROS generation. > Toxicity of ZnO particles not related to photocatalytic ROS generation was also observed. > Nano-ZnO showed greater phototoxicity than bulk-ZnO due to its greater total surface area per unit mass. > Primary particle size appeared to be more important than aggregate size in determining phototoxicity. - Phototoxicity of nanoparticulate and bulk ZnO was greatly enhanced by natural sunlight illumination compared to artificial laboratory light illumination.

  18. Charged Particle Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Coulomb multiple scattering of charged particles as they pass through material allows them to be used as a radiographic probe. This forms the basis for a new kind of radiography that is finding application where conventional x-ray radiography is limited by flux or backgrounds. Charged-particle radiography is providing a versatile new probe that has advantages over conventional x-ray radiography for some unique application. Proton radiography has been used to make quantitative motion pictures of high explosive driven experiments and proves to be of great value for radiographing experiments that mock up nuclear weapon primaries for stockpile certification. By taking advantage of magnetic lens to magnify images and by using the very bright beams that can be made with electrons, charged-particle radiography may be useful for studying the fine spatial detail and very fast motion in laser driven implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Finally, radiographs can be made using cosmic-ray muons for searching vehicles and cargo containers for surreptitious cargo of high z materials such as uranium or plutonium.

  19. Identification of light and very heavy cosmic ray primaries at E0 ∼ 1015 eV from surface and deep underground measurements at the Gran Sasso Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarra, G.

    1999-01-01

    'Very heavy' (iron-like) and 'light' (proton-like) cosmic ray primaries are identified at primary energies E 0 ∼ 10 15 eV by means of simultaneous measurements of shower size N e , N μ GeV (= N μ (E μ > 1 GeV)) at the surface, and N μ TeV (= N μ (E μ > 1.3 TeV)) and ΔE μ /ΔL (i.e. muon energy losses per unit of track length) at the Gran Sasso Laboratories by EAS-TOP at the surface (2000 m a.s.l.) and LVD deep underground (3400 m w.e. depth). 'Very heavy' primaries are selected using large muon numbers detected by LVD; 'light' primaries using high muon energy losses in the LVD scintillation counters, the two selections operating in two different predefined ranges of N e . Their identification is confirmed from the analysis at the surface in the N e - N μ GeV domain, by their 'location' in regions of 'high' and 'low' muon numbers. The experimental points lay around the average predictions from the CORSIKA-HDPM code. This procedure provides the first interpretation of individual events at such primary energies through the Extensive Air Shower technique, and the verification (at least on average) of the CORSIKA-HDPM code. The presence of iron-like primaries is proved up to primary energies E 0 ∼ 5.10 15 eV

  20. Nano particle fluidisation in model 2-D and 3-D beds using high speed X-ray imaging and microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.; Jenneson, P. M.; Tuzun, U.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles and nanocomposites have become a major focus of interest in science and technology due to exceptional properties they provide. However, handling and processing of ultra-fine powders is very challenging because they are extremely cohesive. Fluidization is one of techniques available to process powders. It has become increasingly important to understand how these nanoparticles can be handled and processed to benefit from their favourable properties. A high spatial (down to 400 nm) and temporal resolution (down to 1 ms) X-ray imaging apparatus has been designed to study nanoparticles in fluidized beds under different gas flow velocities. The mean volume distribution of the nanoparticle agglomerates was determined with X-ray microtomography. The X-ray microtomography technique provides valuable in situ, non-destructive structural information on the morphological changes that take place during fluidisation of powder samples

  1. Nano particle fluidisation in model 2-D and 3-D beds using high speed X-ray imaging and microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Surrey, Chemical and Process Engineering, School of Engineering (United Kingdom)], E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk; Jenneson, P. M. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences (United Kingdom); Tuzun, U. [University of Surrey, Chemical and Process Engineering, School of Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Nanoparticles and nanocomposites have become a major focus of interest in science and technology due to exceptional properties they provide. However, handling and processing of ultra-fine powders is very challenging because they are extremely cohesive. Fluidization is one of techniques available to process powders. It has become increasingly important to understand how these nanoparticles can be handled and processed to benefit from their favourable properties. A high spatial (down to 400 nm) and temporal resolution (down to 1 ms) X-ray imaging apparatus has been designed to study nanoparticles in fluidized beds under different gas flow velocities. The mean volume distribution of the nanoparticle agglomerates was determined with X-ray microtomography. The X-ray microtomography technique provides valuable in situ, non-destructive structural information on the morphological changes that take place during fluidisation of powder samples.

  2. Cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    In this talk I will review results of cosmic ray observations at the highest energies. This year the new results on energy spectra, composition and the study of arrival directions of cosmic ray primaries came from the Telescope Array collaboration. I present these results in comparison with measurements done by other recent experiments and discuss their implications for the search of cosmic ray sources. Some related results in gamma-ray astronomy and selected recent advances in theory are also covered. (author)

  3. Possible measurements of gamma ray astronomy through the detection of EAS particles in Chacaltaya (5220 m a. s. 1. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, C; Navarra, G; Martinic, N; Miranda, P; Turtelli, Junior, A

    1986-01-01

    Since the beginning of August '82 an array for measurements of cosmic ray variations is operating at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia, 5220 m a.s.1.). The possibility of using the same detector for measurements of high energy gamma-ray astronomy from the Galactic Center and the sources PSR 0833-45 and Centaurus A is discussed. In one year of continuous operation a flux: S(E/sub 0/>2.5 x 10/sup 4/ GeV) = 10/sup -11/ Ph/cm/sup 2/ sec can be detected from a point source within a confidence level of 3 s.d.

  4. Possible measurements of gamma ray astronomy through the detection of EAS particles in Chacaltaya (5220 m a.s.1.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Martinic, N.; Miranda, P.; Turtelli Junior, A.

    1986-01-01

    Since the beginning of August'82 an array for measurements of cosmic ray variations is operating at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia, 5220 m a.s.1.). The possibility of using the same detector for measurements of high energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Galactic Center and the sources PSR 0833-45 and Centaurus A is discussed. In one year of continuous operation a flux: S(E 0 >2.5x10 4 GeV) = 10 -11 Ph/cm 2 sec can be detected from a point source within a confidence level of 3 s.d. (Author) [pt

  5. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  6. Strontium-Substituted Bioceramics Particles: A New Way to Modulate MCP-1 and Gro-α Production by Human Primary Osteoblastic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Braux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To avoid morbidity and limited availability associated with autografts, synthetic calcium phosphate (CaP ceramics were extensively developed and used as bone filling materials. Controlling their induced-inflammatory response nevertheless remained a major concern. Strontium-containing CaP ceramics were recently demonstrated for impacting cytokines’ secretion pattern of human primary monocytes. The present study focuses on the ability of strontium-containing CaP to control the human primary bone cell production of two major inflammatory and pro-osteoclastogenic mediators, namely MCP-1 and Gro-α, in response to ceramics particles. Methods: This in vitro study was performed using human primary osteoblasts in which their response to ceramics was evaluated by PCR arrays, antibody arrays were used for screening and real-time PCR and ELISA for more focused analyses. Results: Study of mRNA and protein expression highlights that human primary bone cells are able to produce these inflammatory mediators and reveal that the adjunction of CaP in the culture medium leads to their enhanced production. Importantly, the current work determines the down-regulating effect of strontium-substituted CaP on MCP-1 and Gro-α production. Conclusion: Our findings point out a new capability of strontium to modulate human primary bone cells’ communication with the immune system.

  7. Dosimetry and monitoring of X-rays narrow beams produced by linear particle accelerator, for using in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F.; Vizeu, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The main characteristics of X-rays narrow beams dosimetry and monitoring are examined, aiming the introduction of this system in brain radiosurgery. The non-protocolize detectors are used, once that the detectors used in therapy by megavoltage were projected for dosimetry with an irradiation field above 40 mm diameter. (C.G.C.) [pt

  8. Detection of radioactive particles offshore by mu-ray spectrometry - Part I : Monte Carlo assessment of detection depth limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M.; de Meijer, RJ; Rigollet, C; Hendriks, Peter; Jones, DG

    2004-01-01

    A joint research project between the British Geological Survey and Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen, the Netherlands, was commissioned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to establish the efficiency of a towed seabed gamma-ray spectrometer for

  9. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-15

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover’s alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  10. High-energy X-ray imaging of the pulsar wind nebula MSH 15-52: constraints on particle acceleration and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Hongjun; Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15−52 in the hard X-ray band (8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3–7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high-resolutio......We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15−52 in the hard X-ray band (8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3–7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high...... of the PWN softens away from the central pulsar B1509−58, and that there exists a roughly sinusoidal variation of spectral hardness in the azimuthal direction. We discuss the results using particle flow models.We find non-monotonic structure in the variation with distance of spectral hardness within 50...... of the pulsar moving in the jet direction, which may imply particle and magnetic-field compression by magnetic hoop stress as previously suggested for this source. We also present two-dimensional maps of spectral parameters and find an interesting shell-like structure in the NH map.We discuss possible origins...

  11. Evaluate an impact of incident alpha particle and gamma ray on human blood components: A comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Asaad H.; Yaba, Sardar P.; Ismail, Haider J. [Medical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Education College, Salahaddin University-Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2015-07-01

    An impact of alpha and gamma irradiation on human blood components have been evaluated and compared for healthy blood samples (male and females). Irradiation dose and time of irradiation calibrated and considered as a main comparison factors. Density of blood components measured for each in vitro irradiation before and after irradiation for males and females. Survey radiation dosimeter (Inspector Exp) and nuclear track detectors type CR-39 used to evaluate exposure dose rate and incident density of alpha particles, respectively. Experiment results verified that the irradiation of blood makes ionizing of blood components, either alpha or gamma irradiation dose, and the impacts of ionizing radiation were relativity for WBC, RBC, and PLT. Limited irradiation doses of 1-5 μSv/hr considered as a low radiation dose of alpha and gamma radiation sources ({sup 226}Ra, and {sup 137}Cs). Density of alpha particles accumulated on the blood surface was 34 (alpha particle/cm{sup 2}) for selected dose of incident alpha particle. Optimum value of irradiation dose and time of irradiation were 5 μSv/hr and 4 second for males and females. On the other hands, the values of irradiation dose and time of irradiation were 2.1 μSv/hr and 2 second for males and females for gamma irradiation. Thus, present results demonstrated that densities of RBC and WBC cells are capable of inducing reproduction in vitro for both type of irradiation. (authors)

  12. Evaluate an impact of incident alpha particle and gamma ray on human blood components: A comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Asaad H.; Yaba, Sardar P.; Ismail, Haider J.

    2015-01-01

    An impact of alpha and gamma irradiation on human blood components have been evaluated and compared for healthy blood samples (male and females). Irradiation dose and time of irradiation calibrated and considered as a main comparison factors. Density of blood components measured for each in vitro irradiation before and after irradiation for males and females. Survey radiation dosimeter (Inspector Exp) and nuclear track detectors type CR-39 used to evaluate exposure dose rate and incident density of alpha particles, respectively. Experiment results verified that the irradiation of blood makes ionizing of blood components, either alpha or gamma irradiation dose, and the impacts of ionizing radiation were relativity for WBC, RBC, and PLT. Limited irradiation doses of 1-5 μSv/hr considered as a low radiation dose of alpha and gamma radiation sources ( 226 Ra, and 137 Cs). Density of alpha particles accumulated on the blood surface was 34 (alpha particle/cm 2 ) for selected dose of incident alpha particle. Optimum value of irradiation dose and time of irradiation were 5 μSv/hr and 4 second for males and females. On the other hands, the values of irradiation dose and time of irradiation were 2.1 μSv/hr and 2 second for males and females for gamma irradiation. Thus, present results demonstrated that densities of RBC and WBC cells are capable of inducing reproduction in vitro for both type of irradiation. (authors)

  13. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; B