WorldWideScience

Sample records for ray antiproton measurements

  1. A measurement of the antiproton flux in the cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, A.; Schindler, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument has been used to detect cosmic-ray antiprotons. These are identified topologically by the appearance of annihilation prongs in a thick lead-plate spark chamber. The initial recording of the data is enriched in potential antimatter events by a selective trigger. After a small subtraction for background, 14 identified antiprotons yield a flux of 1.7 plus or minus 0.00005 antiproton/(sq m ster sec MeV) between 130 and 320 MeV at the top of the atmosphere. When combined with higher energy antiproton flux measurements, this result indicates that the antiprotons have a spectrum whose shape is the same as that of the protons, but with a magnitude reduced by a factor of 1/3000.

  2. Recent cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, A.; Schindler, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons have been detected by a new balloon-borne experiment which covers the energy range between 130 and 320 MeV. Fourteen detected events yield a measured flux of 1.7 plus or minus 0.5 x 10 to the -4th antiprotons/sq m sr s MeV. The corresponding antiproton/proton ratio is 2.2 plus or minus 0.6 x 10 to the -4th, only slightly smaller than the ratio observed by other experiments at higher energies. The measured flux is significantly larger than predicted, and some cosmic-ray models which could explain this result are discussed.

  3. A measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux and a search for antihelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, A.; Schindler, S. M.; Pennypacker, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Balloon-borne instrument measurements are presented of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux between 130 and 320 MeV, as well as the results of a search for antihelium between 130 and 370 MeV per nuclear. The antiprotons are found to have a spectral shape similar to the protons, down to about 100 MeV. Calculations of the expected flux of these particles under the assumption that they were created by collisions of high-energy cosmic rays with the interstellar gas, using the standard leaky box model for propagation in the Galaxy, predict a flux two orders of magnitude smaller than that observed. The discrepancy between calculation and experiment may be evidence that cosmic-ray protons have passed through more than 5.0 g/sq cm of material during their lifetime. The search for cosmic-ray antihelium sets a 95% confidence level upper limit on the antihelium/helium ratio of 0.000022.

  4. Unified interpretation of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton recent measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Gaggero, Daniele [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. die Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' ; Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Pisa (Italy); Evoli, Carmelo [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. die Fisica ' ' E. Fermi' ' ; Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2009-09-15

    We use our numerical code, DRAGON, to study the implications and the impact of recent CREAM and PAMELA data on our knowledge of the propagation properties of cosmic ray nuclei with energy >or similar 1 GeV/n in the Galaxy. We will show that B/C (as well as N/O and C/O) and anti p/p data (especially including recent PAMELA results) can consistently be matched within a unique diffusion-reacceleration model. The requirement that light nuclei and anti p data are both reproduced within experimental uncertainties places stringent limits on suitable propagation parameters. In particular, we find the allowed range of the diffusion coefficient spectral index to be 0.38<{delta}<0.57 at 95% confidence level and that Kraichnan type diffusion is significantly favored respect to Kolmogorov. While some amount of reacceleration is required to account for low energy data, only a limited range of values of the Alfv'en velocity ({upsilon}{sub A} {approx_equal}15 kms{sup -1}) is allowed. Furthermore, we do not need to introduce any ad hoc break in the injection spectrum of primary cosmic rays. If antiproton data are not used to constrain the propagation parameters, a larger set of models is allowed. In this case, we determine which combinations of the relevant parameters maximize and minimize the antiproton flux under the condition of still fitting light nuclei data at 95% C.L. These models may then be used to constrain a possible extra antiproton component arising from astrophysical or exotic sources (e.g. dark matter annihilation or decay). (orig.)

  5. Towards an antiproton measurement with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    AMS-02 is a high-precision multi-purpose particle detector. It has been onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The antiproton measurement is an important part of the AMS-02 physics program. An excess above the expected spectrum due to interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar matter can hint at exotic sources like dark matter annihilation. The antiproton-to-proton ratio and the antiproton flux itself may also improve the understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Due to the very small abundance of antiprotons in the cosmic radiation of about 10{sup -5} compared to protons a very precise particle identification is crucial. The main backgrounds are other singly charged particles like protons, electrons, and pions produced within the detector material itself. At lower energies the time-of-flight system and the ring-imaging Cherenkov detector separate light particles from protons. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the transition radiation detector redundantly suppress the electron background. The reconstruction of the charge sign by the magnetic spectrometer is limited by its resolution and has to be taken into account carefully. The methods to identify antiprotons in the cosmic-ray measurement of AMS-02 in different energy regions will be presented. The ways to handle the uncertainties to the antiproton-to-proton ratio considering the various challenges will be discussed.

  6. Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p-bar's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p-bar's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p-bar calculations. Cosmologically primary p-bar's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p-bar spectra. BESS-Polar II data.show no evidence of primary p-bar's from the evaporation of primordial black holes.

  7. Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p(raised bar)'s) collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The p(raised bar) spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary p(raised bar) calculations. Cosmologically primary p(raised bar)'s have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated p(raised bar) spectra. The BESSPolar II result shows no evidence of primary p(raised bar)'s originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  8. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  9. Measurement of strong interaction parameters in antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    In the PS207 experiment at CERN, X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressure. The strong interaction shift and the broadening of the K/sub alpha / transition in antiprotonic hydrogen were $9 determined. Evidence was found for the individual hyperfine components of the protonium ground state. (7 refs).

  10. Measurement of antiproton production in $p$–He collisions at LHCb to constrain the secondary cosmic antiproton flux

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Giacomo

    2018-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons is a powerful tool for indirect detection of dark matter. The sensitivity is limited by the uncertainty on the predicted antiproton flux from scattering of primary rays on the interstellar medium. This is, in turn, limited by the knowledge of production cross-sections, notably in p–He scattering. Thanks to its internal gas target, the LHCb experiment performed the first measurement of antiproton production from collisions of LHC proton beams on He nuclei at rest. The results and prospects are presented.

  11. Measurement of antiproton production in p-He collisions and prospects for other inputs to cosmic rays physics from the fixed target program of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Giacomo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has the unique possibility, among the LHC experiments, to be operated in fixed target mode, using its internal gas target SMOG. The energy scale achievable at the LHC and the excellent detector capabilities for vertexing, tracking and particle identification allow a wealth of measurements of great interest for cosmic ray physics. We present the first measurement of antiproton production in proton-helium collisions at $\\sqrt s_{NN} = 110$ GeV, which allows to improve the accuracy of the prediction for secondary antiproton production in cosmic rays. Prospects for other measurements achievable in the fixed target program are also discussed.

  12. Detailed analysis of observed antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Davoudifar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the origin of antiprotons observed in cosmic rays (above the atmosphere is analyzed in details. We have considered the origin of the primaries, (which their interactions with the interstellar medium is one of the most important sources of antiprotons is a supernova type II then used a diffusion model for their propagation. We have used the latest parameterization for antiproton production cross section in pp collisions (instead of well known parameterization introduced by Tan et al. as well as our calculated residence time for primaries. The resulted intensity shows the secondary antiprotons produced in pp collisions in the galaxy, have a high population as one can not consider an excess for extragalactic antiprotons. Also there is a high degree of uncertainty in different parameters.

  13. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  14. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  15. Measurement of the Shadowing of High-Energy Cosmic Rays by the Moon A Search for TeV-Energy Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The shadowing of high-energy cosmic rays by the Moon has been observed with a significance of 9.4 standard deviations with the L3+C muon spectrometer at CERN. A significant effect of the Earth magnetic field is observed. Since no event deficit on the east side of the Moon has been observed, an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the antiproton to proton ratio of 0.11 is obtained for primary energies around 1 TeV.

  16. Improved limit on the directly measured antiproton lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellner, S.; Besirli, M.; Bohman, M.; Borchert, M. J.; Harrington, J.; Higuchi, T.; Mooser, A.; Nagahama, H.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Tanaka, T.; Blaum, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2017-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of a cloud of antiprotons stored in a Penning trap for 405 days enables us to set an improved limit on the directly measured antiproton lifetime. From our measurements we extract a storage time of 3.15× {10}8 equivalent antiproton-seconds, resulting in a lower lifetime limit of {τ }\\bar{{{p}}}> 10.2 {{a}} with a confidence level of 68 % . This result improves the limit on charge-parity-time violation in antiproton decays based on direct observation by a factor of 7.

  17. Antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Segre, Emilio; Wiegand, Clyde

    1955-11-29

    Since the development of Dirac's theory of the electron and the brilliant confirmation of one of its most startling predictions by the discovery of the positron by Anderson, it has been assumed most likely that the proton would also have its charge conjugate, the antiproton. The properties that define the antiproton are: (a) charge equal to the electron charge (also in sign); (b) mass equal to the proton mass; (c) stability against spontaneous decay; (d) ability to annihilate by interaction with a proton or neutron, probably generating pions and releasing in some manner the energy 2 mc{sup 2}; (e) generation in pairs with ordinary nucleons; (f) magnetic moment equal but opposite to that of the proton; (g) fermion of spin 1/2. Not all these properties are independent, but all might ultimately be subjected to experiment.

  18. Precision mass measurements of antiprotons in a Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhe, W.; Phillips, D.; Gabrielse, G. (Dept. of Physics, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Groeber, J. (Leopold-Franzens-Univ., Innsbruck (Austria)); Kalinowsky, H. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. Mainz (Germany))

    1992-09-01

    Utilizing electron cooling, the TRAP collaboration has lowered the energy at which antiprotons can be stored and studied by more than 10 orders of magnitude, starting with 6 MeV particles from LEAR. We have held cryogenic antiprotons a few degrees above absolute zero for two months and the storage lifetime so established, more than 3.4 months is the longest directly measured limit for antiprotons. Measuring their cyclotron frequencies in a precision cylindrical Penning trap, we have shown that the inertial masses of the antiprotons and protons are the same to a fractional accuracy of 4 parts in 10[sup 8], a 1000-fold improvement over the previous comparisons. This is the most stringent test of CPT invariance with baryons. We have recently demonstrated a linewidth resolution of more than 10 times narrower than our current measurement accuracy, making possible a new series of systematic tests to improve the accuracy by one or even two orders of magnitude.

  19. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  20. Measurement of 0.25-3.2 GeV antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, J.W.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada on 16-17 July 1992. Using velocity and magnetic rigidity to determine mass, we have directly measured the abundances of cosmic ray antiprotons and protons in the energy range from 0.25 to 3.2 Ge...

  1. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  2. Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Origins and for Cosmological Antimatter with BESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Yoshimura, K.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The balloon-borne experiment with a superconducting spectrometer (BESS) has performed cosmic-ray observations as a US-Japan cooperative space science program, and has provided fundamental data on cosmic rays to study elementary particle phenomena in the early Universe. The BESS experiment has measured the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic origins such as dark matter candidates or primordial black holes. and searched for heavier antinuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed in the early Universe. The apex of the BESS program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007- 2008 Austral Summer, that obtained over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events from 24.5 days of observation. The flight took place at the expected solar minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. Here, we report the scientific restults, focusing on the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II (2007-2008).

  3. Hyperfine Structure Measurements of Antiprotonic $^3$He using Microwave Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Friedreich, Susanne

    The goal of this project was to measure the hyperfine structure of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^3$He$^+$ using the technique of laser-microwave-laser spectroscopy. Antiprotonic helium ($\\overline{\\text{p}}$He$^+$) is a neutral exotic atom, consisting of a helium nucleus, an electron and an antiproton. The interactions of the angular momenta of its constituents cause a hyperfine splitting ({HFS}) within the energy states of this new atom. The 3\\% of formed antiprotonic helium atoms which remain in a metastable, radiative decay-dominated state have a lifetime of about 1-3~$\\mu$s. This time window is used to do spectroscopic studies. The hyperfine structure of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^4$He$^+$ was already extensively investigated before. From these measurements the spin magnetic moment of the antiproton can be determined. A comparison of the result to the proton magnetic moment provides a test of {CPT} invariance. Due to its higher complexity the new exotic three-body system of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^3$He$^+$ is a cross-check...

  4. Beam Measurement Systems for the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Odier, P; Pedersen, F; Raich, U; Søby, L; Tranquille, G; Spickermann, T

    2001-01-01

    The new, low-energy antiproton physics facility at CERN has been successfully commissioned and has been delivering decelerated antiprotons at 100 MeV/c since July 2000. The AD consists of one ring where the 3.5 GeV/c antiprotons produced from a production target are injected, rf manipulated, stochastically cooled, decelerated (with further stages involving additional stochastic and electron cooling and rf manipulation) and extracted at 100 MeV/c. While proton test beams of sufficient intensity could be used for certain procedures in AD commissioning, this was not possible for setting-up and routine operation. Hence, special diagnostics systems had to be developed to obtain the beam and accelerator characteristics using the weak antiproton beams of a few 10E7 particles at all momenta from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c. These include systems for position measurement, intensity, beam size measurements using transverse aperture limiters and scintillators and Schottky-based tools. This paper gives an overall view of...

  5. Antiproton beam profile measurements using Gas Electron Multipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge; Spanggaard, Jens; Tranquille, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~0.4% X_0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEgIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  6. Measurement of antiproton production in $p$He collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\scriptscriptstyle\\rm NN}}=110$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The antiproton production cross-section in collisions of a 6.5 TeV LHC proton beam on helium at rest is measured by the LHCb experiment using the SMOG internal gas target from a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.4 $\\text{nb}^{-1}$. This is the first direct measurement of antimatter production in $p$He collisions, and has important implications for the interpretation of recent results from the PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments, which measure the antiproton component in cosmic rays outside of the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  8. Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Antiprotons and Gamma-rays in the Galaxy: a New Diffusion Model

    OpenAIRE

    Evoli, C.; Gaggero, D.; Grasso, D.; Maccione, L.

    2008-01-01

    We model the transport of cosmic ray nuclei in the Galaxy by means of a new numerical code. Differently from previous numerical models we account for a generic spatial distribution of the diffusion coefficient. We found that in the case of radially uniform diffusion, the main secondary/primary ratios (B/C, N/O and sub-Fe/Fe) and the modulated antiproton spectrum match consistently the available observations. Convection and re-acceleration do not seem to be required in the en...

  9. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  10. A self-consistent model for the Galactic cosmic ray, antiproton and positron spectra

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    In this talk I will present the escape model of Galactic cosmic rays. This model explains the measured cosmic ray spectra of individual groups of nuclei from TeV to EeV energies. It predicts an early transition to extragalactic cosmic rays, in agreement with recent Auger data. The escape model also explains the soft neutrino spectrum 1/E^2.5 found by IceCube in concordance with Fermi gamma-ray data. I will show that within the same model one can explain the excess of positrons and antiprotons above 20 GeV found by PAMELA and AMS-02, the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range and the plateau in cosmic ray dipole anisotropy in the 2-50 TeV energy range by adding the effects of a 2 million year old nearby supernova.

  11. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy in light antiprotonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borchert, G L; Augsburger, M A; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Elble, M; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    2000-01-01

    At the LEAR facility, CERN, antiprotonic L alpha transitions in light elements have been investigated with a focussing crystal spectrometer. The high resolution of the experiment allowed for the first time to resolve in pH/pH the 2/sup 3/P/sub 0/ state from the close-lying states 2/sup 3/P/sub 2/, 2/sup 1/P/sub 1/, and 2/sup 3/P /sub 1/. In pD the corresponding transitions were found to be more than an order of magnitude broader. To a large extent the results for pH support the meson exchange model. (15 refs).

  12. A combined dark matter study of AMS-02 antiprotons and Fermi-LAT gamma rays

    OpenAIRE

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Heisig, Jan; Korsmeier, Michael; Krämer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Observations of cosmic rays are a sensitive probe of dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy. In this article we present an analysis of the AMS-02 antiproton data, reducing cosmic-ray propagation uncertainties by fitting at the same time dark matter and propagation parameters. The result exhibits a possible hint for dark matter pointing to an annihilation cross section close to the thermal value. We investigate the compatibility of this signal with a dark matter interpretation of the Galactic ...

  13. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T., E-mail: ksenofon@ikfia.sbras.ru [Yu. G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Avenue, 677891 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  14. Antiprotons Produced in Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-01

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  15. One-Particle Measurement of the Antiproton Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    DiSciacca, J.; Marable, K.; Gabrielse, G.; Ettenauer, S.; Tardiff, E.; Kalra, R.; Fitzakerley, D.W.; George, M.C.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Weel, M.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.

    2013-01-01

    The antiproton $(\\bar{p})$ magnetic moment $\\mu \\bar{p} = \\mu_{\\bar{p}} S/(\\bar{h}/2)$ is proportional to its spin $S$. A single trapped $\\bar{p}$ is used for the first time to measure the $\\bar{p}$ magnetic moment in nuclear magnetons, giving $\\mu_\\bar{p}/\\mu N = -2.792 845 \\pm 0.000 012$. The 4.4 parts per million (ppm) uncertainty is 680 times smaller than previously realized. Comparing to the proton moment $\\mu_{p} = \\mu_{p} S/\\bar{h}/2)$ measured using the same method and trap electrodes gives $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}/\\mu_{p} = -1.000 000 \\pm 0.000 005$ to 5 ppm, consistent with the prediction of the CPT theorem.

  16. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  17. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproto...... annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured....

  18. Highlights on gamma rays, neutrinos and antiprotons from TeV Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammaldi Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted as the secondary gamma-rays photons generated from Dark Matter annihilating into Standard Model particles in combination with a simple power law background. The neutrino flux expected from such Dark Matter source has been also analyzed. The main results of such analyses for 50 TeV Dark Matter annihilating into W+W− gauge boson and preliminary results for antiprotons are presented.

  19. Illuminating dark matter and primordial black holes with interstellar antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, J D; Ormes, J F; Wells, James D.; Moiseev, Alexander; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    1999-01-01

    Interstellar antiproton fluxes can arise from dark matter annihilating or decaying into quarks or gluons that subsequently fragment into antiprotons. Evaporation of primordial black holes also can produce a significant antiproton cosmic-ray flux. Since the background of secondary antiprotons from spallation has an interstellar energy spectrum that peaks at $\\sim 2\\gev$ and falls rapidly for energies below this, low-energy measurements of cosmic antiprotons are useful in the search for exotic antiproton sources. However, measurement of the flux near the earth is challenged by significant uncertainties from the effects of the solar wind. We suggest evading this problem and more effectively probing dark-matter signals by placing an antiproton spectrometer aboard an interstellar probe currently under discussion. We address the experimental challenges of a light, low-power-consuming detector, and present an initial design of such an instrument. This experimental effort could significantly increase our ability to d...

  20. Using Time Separation of Signals to Obtain Independent Proton and Antiproton Beam Position Measurements Around the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Independent position measurement of the counter-circulating proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron presents a challenge to upgrading the Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system. The inherent directionality of the Tevatron BPM pickup design provides 26dB isolation between signals from the two beams. At the present typical 10:1 proton-to-antiproton bunch intensity ratio, this isolation alone is insufficient to support millimeter accuracy antiproton beam position measurements due to interfering proton signals. An accurate and manageable solution to the interfering signal problem is required for antiproton measurements now and, as machine improvements lead to increased antiproton intensity, will facilitate future elimination of antiproton bias on proton beam position measurements. This paper discusses the possibilities and complications of using time separation of the two beam signals at the numerous Tevatron BPM locations and given the dynamic longitudinal conditions of Tevatron operation. Results of me...

  1. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  2. Stacking of cold antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Oxley, P; Speck, A K; Storry, C H; Tan, J N; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2002-01-01

    The stacking of cold antiprotons is currently the only way to accumulate the large numbers of the cold antiprotons that are needed for low energy experiments. Both the largest possible number and the lowest possible temperature are desired, especially for the production and study of cold antihydrogen. The antiprotons accumulated in our particle trap have an energy 10/sup 10/ times lower than the energy of those delivered by CERN's Antiprotons Decelerator (AD). The number accumulated (more than 0.4 million in this demonstration) is linear in the number of accepted high energy antiproton pulses (32 in this demonstration). Accumulation efficiencies and losses are measured and discussed. (12 refs).

  3. Measurement of Antiproton-proton Cross-Sections at Low Antiproton Momenta

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure four different cross sections in the momentum range 150~MeV/c to 600~MeV/c: 1)~~~~the differential elastic \\\\ \\\\ 2)~~~~the differential charge exchange\\\\ \\\\ 3)~~~~the annihilation into charged and neutral pions\\\\ \\\\ 4)~~~~and the total cross section via the optical theorem. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment allows one to search once again and with good precision for baryonium. Of special interest is the existence of the S-meson, for which a signal of about 20~MeV-mb was found in a 1981 experiment (performed in the East Hall).\\\\ \\\\ A second point of special interest is the momentum region below 300~MeV/c because the cross sections are basically unknown. We will be able to explore the momentum dependence of this region for the first time.\\\\ \\\\ The elastic cross section is measured by a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber and a scintillator hodoscope placed around a scattering chamber under vacuum. The charge exchange cross section is measured by a ring of 32~anti-neutron detector...

  4. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    . The stopping power of high-energetic antiprotons in tissue, is similar to that of protons. Most energy is lost per unit distance as the particle comes to rest, but when the antiprotons stops, each one will annihilate on a nuclei, releasing 1.9 GeV of energy. Most of this energy is carried away by pions, gamma...... rays and neutrons, but a part of the annihilation energy is still deposited locally as recoiling nuclear fragments with limited range. These fragments will also increase the relative biological effect at the annihilation vertex. We have masured the biological effect of an antiproton beam for the first...... to handle antiprotons. This will enable us to do treatment planning with antiprotons, and thereby bring us closer to answer the question of the potential clinical benefit of antiprotons....

  5. Search for TeV-Antiprotons in Space from the Shadowing of Cosmic Rays by the Moon with the L3+C Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yupeng

    2005-01-01

    A search for antiprotons in the primary cosmic ray flux has been performed by observing the Moon shadow with the muon data collected by the L3+C experiment at CERN during 1999 and 2000. The angular resolution of the detector and its dependences on the muon energy and zenith angle are obtained at the event level with a Monte Carlo simulation and the analysis of real double muon data using a maximum likelihood method. The Moon shadow effect is observed in three muon momentum bands > 100GeV/c, 65 - 100 GeV/c and 30 - 65 GeV/c with a significance of 7.0 cr, 5.8 cr and 5.2 cr respectively. Two dimensional maximum likelihood analyses are performed, both with binned data and unbinned data. The unbinned method gives a smaller uncertainty on the measurement of the antiproton to proton ratio. For a muon momentum cut at 70 GeV/c, the antiproton to proton ratio is measured to be -0.12 + 0.11 and an upper limit of this ratio is estimated to be 0.08 (at 90% confidence level) for primary energies in the range 0.8 TeV to 2.4...

  6. Interstellar Low Energy Antiprotons as a Probe of Dark Matter and Primordial Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ormes, J F; Wells, J

    1999-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons can originate from dark matter annihilating into quarks that subsequently decay into antiprotons. Evaporation of primordial black holes also can produce a significant antiproton flux. Since the spectrum of secondary antiprotons from cosmic ray interactions peaks at ~ 2 GeV and goes down sharply at lower energy, there is a window at energies < 1 GeV in which to look for excess antiprotons as a signature of these exotic antiproton sources. However, in the vicinity of the Earth low energy particles are strongly modulated by the solar wind, which makes any analysis ambiguous. The adverse effects of the solar wind can be avoided by placing a low energy antiproton spectrometer aboard an interstellar probe. The theoretical predictions are reviewed and the preliminary design of a light-weight, low-power instrument to make the measurements and a summary of the anticipated results are given in this paper.

  7. Antiprotons Produced in Supernova Remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-01-01

    We present the energy spectrum of antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNR). The model includes reacceleration of already existing in interstellar medium antiprotons as well as creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shock. It is shown that antiprotons production in SNRs produces considerable effect in their result...

  8. The semi-Hooperon: Gamma-ray and anti-proton excesses in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Siqueira, Clarissa

    2017-12-01

    A puzzling excess in gamma-rays at GeV energies has been observed in the center of our galaxy using Fermi-LAT data. Its origin is still unknown, but it is well fitted by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) annihilations into quarks with a cross section around 10-26 cm3s-1 with masses of 20-50 GeV, scenario which is promptly revisited. An excess favoring similar WIMP properties has also been seen in anti-protons with AMS-02 data potentially coming from the Galactic Center as well. In this work, we explore the possibility of fitting these excesses in terms of semi-annihilating dark matter, dubbed as semi-Hooperon, with the process WIMP WIMP → WIMP X being responsible for the gamma-ray excess, where X = h , Z. An interesting feature of semi-annihilations is the change in the relic density prediction compared to the standard case, and the possibility to alleviate stringent limits stemming from direct detection searches. Moreover, we discuss which models might give rise to a successful semi-Hooperon setup in the context of Z3,Z4 and extra ;dark; gauge symmetries.

  9. Towards a high-precision measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, C.; Franke, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Nagahama, H.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2014-01-01

    The recent observation of single spins flips with a single proton in a Penning trap opens the way to measure the proton magnetic moment with high precision. Based on this success, which has been achieved with our apparatus at the University of Mainz, we demonstrated recently the first application of the so called double Penning-trap method with a single proton. This is a major step towards a measurement of the proton magnetic moment with ppb precision. To apply this method to a single trapped antiproton our collaboration is currently setting up a companion experiment at the antiproton decelerator of CERN. This effort is recognized as the Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE). A comparison of both magnetic moment values will provide a stringent test of CPT invariance with baryons.

  10. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  11. Measurement of the Transverse Momentum of Dielectron Pairs in Proton - Anti-Proton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Dylan Patrick [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present a measurement of the transverse momentum distribution of dielectron pairs with invariant mass near the mass of the Z boson. The data were obtained using the DO detector during the 1994-1995 run of the Tevatron Co!lider at Fermilab. The data used in the measurement corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 108.5 $pb^{-1}$ The measurement is compared to current phenomenology for vector boson production in proton-antiproton interactions, and the results are found to be consistent with expectation from Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).

  12. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Dossanov, A; Drugakov, V; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-, C; Estrada; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300--318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements.

  13. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...

  14. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux; Propagation des rayons cosmiques dans un modele de diffusion: une nouvelle estimation des parametres de diffusion et du flux d'antiprotons secondaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurin, D

    2001-02-01

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  15. Measurement of the Antiproton-Proton Total Cross-Section at the CERN ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a measurement of small angle scattering of antiprotons on protons and of protons on protons at 15/15, 22/22, 26/26 and 31/31 GeV, with the aim of obtaining data on the total cross-section for the scattering of protons on protons, and of determining the ratio of the real to the imaginary scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer for antiprotons on protons. The measurement is divided into two parts: \\item 1) The measurement of @s^t^o^t(@*p) and @s^t^o^t(pp), using hodoscopes placed at small angles, outside the vacuum pipe, at approximately 9 metres from the intersection point. \\item 2) The measurement of the region in !t!, the momentum transfer squared, around the value !t^c!, where Coulomb and nuclear scattering are equal, in order to deduce the quantity @r = Re f(t=0)/Im f(t=0). This latter measurement is done by employi in earlier @s^t(pp) and @r experiments at the ISR. \\end{enumerate} In both set-ups the measurements are made by recording coincidences between collinear counters in th...

  16. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  17. S142 set-up to detect X-ray from antiproton-proton atoms (protonium).

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the Daresbury-Mainz-TRIUMF Collaboration and was located in the m14 partially separated antiproton beam in the PS South Hall. It used a gaseous hydrogen target, 1 m long, surrounded by a ring of proportional counters, surrounded in turn by a ring of 36 scintillators strips to aid in the annihilation product identification. Ugo Gastaldi (centre)

  18. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  19. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  20. Fixed target measurements at LHCb for cosmic rays physics

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Giacomo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has the unique possibility, among the LHC experiments, to be operated in fixed target mode, using its internal gas target. The energy scale achievable at the LHC, combined with the LHCb forward geometry and detector capabilities, allow to explore particle production in a wide Bjorken-$x$ range at the $\\sqrt {s_{NN}} ~$ ~ 100 GeV energy scale, providing novel inputs to nuclear and cosmic ray physics. The first measurement of antiproton production in collisions of LHC protons on helium nuclei at rest is presented. The knowledge of this cross-section is of great importance for the study of the cosmic antiproton flux, and the LHCb results are expected to improve the interpretation of the recent high-precision measurements of cosmic antiprotons performed by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments.

  1. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  2. Sixfold improved single particle measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Nagahama, H; Sellner, S; Harrington, J; Higuchi, T; Borchert, M J; Tanaka, T; Besirli, M; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of the Universe comes, among others, from particle physics and cosmology. In particle physics an almost perfect symmetry between matter and antimatter exists. On cosmological scales, however, a striking matter/antimatter imbalance is observed. This contradiction inspires comparisons of the fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles with high precision. Here we report on a measurement of the g-factor of the antiproton with a fractional precision of 0.8 parts per million at 95% confidence level. Our value /2=2.7928465(23) outperforms the previous best measurement by a factor of 6. The result is consistent with our proton g-factor measurement gp/2=2.792847350(9), and therefore agrees with the fundamental charge, parity, time (CPT) invariance of the Standard Model of particle physics. Additionally, our result improves coefficients of the standard model extension which discusses the sensitivity of experiments with respect to CPT violation by up to a factor of 20.

  3. Sixfold improved single particle measurement of the magnetic moment of the antiproton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, H; Smorra, C; Sellner, S; Harrington, J; Higuchi, T; Borchert, M J; Tanaka, T; Besirli, M; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2017-01-18

    Our current understanding of the Universe comes, among others, from particle physics and cosmology. In particle physics an almost perfect symmetry between matter and antimatter exists. On cosmological scales, however, a striking matter/antimatter imbalance is observed. This contradiction inspires comparisons of the fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles with high precision. Here we report on a measurement of the g-factor of the antiproton with a fractional precision of 0.8 parts per million at 95% confidence level. Our value /2=2.7928465(23) outperforms the previous best measurement by a factor of 6. The result is consistent with our proton g-factor measurement gp/2=2.792847350(9), and therefore agrees with the fundamental charge, parity, time (CPT) invariance of the Standard Model of particle physics. Additionally, our result improves coefficients of the standard model extension which discusses the sensitivity of experiments with respect to CPT violation by up to a factor of 20.

  4. A parts-per-billion measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorra, C; Sellner, S; Borchert, M J; Harrington, J A; Higuchi, T; Nagahama, H; Tanaka, T; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Bohman, M; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2017-10-18

    Precise comparisons of the fundamental properties of matter-antimatter conjugates provide sensitive tests of charge-parity-time (CPT) invariance, which is an important symmetry that rests on basic assumptions of the standard model of particle physics. Experiments on mesons, leptons and baryons have compared different properties of matter-antimatter conjugates with fractional uncertainties at the parts-per-billion level or better. One specific quantity, however, has so far only been known to a fractional uncertainty at the parts-per-million level: the magnetic moment of the antiproton, . The extraordinary difficulty in measuring with high precision is caused by its intrinsic smallness; for example, it is 660 times smaller than the magnetic moment of the positron. Here we report a high-precision measurement of in units of the nuclear magneton μN with a fractional precision of 1.5 parts per billion (68% confidence level). We use a two-particle spectroscopy method in an advanced cryogenic multi-Penning trap system. Our result  = -2.7928473441(42)μN (where the number in parentheses represents the 68% confidence interval on the last digits of the value) improves the precision of the previous best measurement by a factor of approximately 350. The measured value is consistent with the proton magnetic moment, μp = 2.792847350(9)μN, and is in agreement with CPT invariance. Consequently, this measurement constrains the magnitude of certain CPT-violating effects to below 1.8 × 10-24 gigaelectronvolts, and a possible splitting of the proton-antiproton magnetic moments by CPT-odd dimension-five interactions to below 6 × 10-12 Bohr magnetons.

  5. Measurement of (anti)deuteron and (anti)proton production in DIS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    The first observation of (anti)deuterons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA has been made with the ZEUS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 300-318 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed in the central rapidity region for transverse momentum per unit of mass in the range 0.3anti)proton yield by approximately three orders of magnitude, consistent with the world measurements. (orig.)

  6. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  7. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  8. Search for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Oelert, W.; Diermaier, M.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Glowacz, B.; Moskal, P.; Zielinski, M.; Wolke, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Asaturyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Eyrich, W.; Hauenstein, F.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described.

  9. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  10. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  11. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Maggiore, C J; Bassler, N; Blackmore, E; Beyer, G; De Marco, J J; Doser, Michael; Gruhn, Charles R; Holzscheiter, M H; Ichioka, T; Iwamoto, K S; Knudsen, H V; Landua, Rolf; McBride, W H; Møller, S P; Petersen, J; Smathers, J B; Skarsgard, L D; Solberg, T; Uggerhøj, U; Withers, H R; Wouters, B G

    2004-01-01

    A new experiment, AD-4/ACE (antiproton cell experiment), has been approved by the CERN Research Board. The experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in June and continue through the 2003 run cycle. The experiment is designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in "biological dose" in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status of the experiment are given.

  12. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  13. The closed-orbit measurement system for the CERN antiproton decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Le Gras, M; Williams, D J

    2000-01-01

    The closed-orbit measurement system for the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) employs 59 electrostatic pick-ups (PU). The intensity range from 2·1010 down to 107 particles poses challenging demands on the dynamic range and noise of the head amplifier. A low noiseamplifier has been developed, having an equivalent input noise of 0.6nV/√(Hz), allowing beam positions to be measured to ±0.5 mm with 5·106 particles. Two different gains take care of the large dynamic range. After amplification and multiplexing, the PU signals are fed to a network analyser, where each measurement point corresponds to one PU. The network analyser is phase locked to the RF of the AD, thus acting as a “tracking filter” instrument. An orbit measurement takes from 0.2 to 12 s depending on the IF-bandwidth of the network analyser, selected according to the beam intensity, and the precision required. At the end of the network analyser sweep the data are read via a GPIB interface and tre...

  14. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  15. A parts-per-billion measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, C; Borchert, M J; Harrington, J A; Higuchi, T; Nagahama, H; Tanaka, T; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2016-01-01

    Precise comparisons of the fundamental properties of matter–antimatter conjugates provide sensitive tests of charge–parity–time (CPT) invariance1, which is an important symmetry that rests on basic assumptions of the standard model of particle physics. Experiments on mesons2, leptons3, 4 and baryons5, 6 have compared different properties of matter–antimatter conjugates with fractional uncertainties at the parts-per-billion level or better. One specific quantity, however, has so far only been known to a fractional uncertainty at the parts-per-million level7, 8: the magnetic moment of the antiproton, . The extraordinary difficulty in measuring with high precision is caused by its intrinsic smallness; for example, it is 660 times smaller than the magnetic moment of the positron3. Here we report a high-precision measurement of in units of the nuclear magneton μN with a fractional precision of 1.5 parts per billion (68% confidence level). We use a two-particle spectroscopy method in an advanced cryogenic ...

  16. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  17. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  18. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Xu, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Khoukaz, A.; Taeschner, A. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Klehr, F.; Wuestner, P. [Elektronik und Analytik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Engineering, Juelich (Germany); Ritman, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90 {sup circle} are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment. (orig.)

  19. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  20. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  1. Measurements of Wake-Riding Electrons in Antiproton-Carbon-Foil Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When a charged particle passes through dielectric media, e.g. a thin carbon foil, a ``wake'' is induced. The characteristic wake-potential shows an oscillatory behaviour, with a wavelength of about $ 2 \\pi v _{p} / \\omega _{p} _{l} $ where $ v _{p} $ is the projectile velocity and $ \\omega _{p} _{l} $ the plasmon energy of the target. This induced wake potential is superimposed on the Coulomb potential of the projectile, the latter leading to a pronounced ``cusp'' of electrons leaving the solid at $ v _{e} app v _{p} $ for positively charged projectiles in the MeV region. Correspondingly, an ``anti-cusp'' is expected for antiprotons. \\\\ \\\\ In the solid, the wake-potential leads to an attractive force on electrons, and a dynamic electronic state is predicted both for proton and antiproton projectiles. In the solid, the wake-riding electrons are travelling with the projectile speed $ v _{p} $ Upon exit of the foil, the electron released from the wake-riding state of an antiproton will suddenly find itself in th...

  2. Evidence for the Stochastic Acceleration of Secondary Antiprotons by Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Hooper, Dan [Chicago U., KICP; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U.

    2017-01-16

    The antiproton-to-proton ratio in the cosmic-ray spectrum is a sensitive probe of new physics. Using recent measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton and proton fluxes in the energy range of 1-1000 GeV, we study the contribution to the $\\bar{p}/p$ ratio from secondary antiprotons that are produced and subsequently accelerated within individual supernova remnants. We consider several well-motivated models for cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium and marginalize our results over the uncertainties related to the antiproton production cross section and the time-, charge-, and energy-dependent effects of solar modulation. We find that the increase in the $\\bar{p}/p$ ratio observed at rigidities above $\\sim$ 100 GV cannot be accounted for within the context of conventional cosmic-ray propagation models, but is consistent with scenarios in which cosmic-ray antiprotons are produced and subsequently accelerated by shocks within a given supernova remnant. In light of this, the acceleration of secondary cosmic rays in supernova remnants is predicted to substantially contribute to the cosmic-ray positron spectrum, accounting for a significant fraction of the observed positron excess.

  3. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Antiprotons are interesting as a modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, they behave as protons. Well before the Bragg-peak, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers exhibit equal radiobiology. But when the antiprotons come...

  4. Midrapidity antiproton-to-proton ratio in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aamodt, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; de Rooij, R. S.; Grelli, A.; Ivan, C.G.; Kamermans, R.; Mischke, A.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Peitzmann, T.; Simili, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Verweij, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ratio of the yields of antiprotons to protons in pp collisions has been measured by the ALICE experiment at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ and $7$~TeV during the initial running periods of the Large Hadron Collider(LHC). The measurement covers the transverse momentum interval $0.45

  5. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  6. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum pT in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet pT resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet pT resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The

  7. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...

  8. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  9. Antiproton-Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    When the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was stopped in 1996, because of its costly operation, a cheaper way of continuing low-energy antiproton physics was sought. The Antiproton-Collector (AC), added in 1987 to the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) to provide a tenfold intensity increase, was converted into the Antiproton-Decelerator (AD). Antiprotons from the target at 3.5 GeV/c are decelerated to 100 MeV/c, and fast-ejected to the experiments. Major changes were necessary. Above all, the conversion from a constant-field machine to one with a magnetic cycle, modulating the field by an impressive factor 35. New systems for stochastic and electron cooling had to be added. Beam diagnostics at an intensity of only 2E7 antiprotons was a challenge. In 2000, the AD began delivery of antiprotons to the experiments.

  10. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  11. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration at CERN is investigating the anticipated benefit of antiproton radiotherapy. The experimental tasks have been twofold: 1) To quantify the radiobiological properties of the antiproton beam. 2) Perform absolute dosimetry on a pulsed antiproton beam. In order to do define ...

  12. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  13. New limit on the low-energy antiproton/proton ratio in the Galactic cosmic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, S. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Barwick, S.; Gerbier, G.; Bower, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from a balloon-borne apparatus searching for low-energy antiprotons in the Galactic cosmic rays. For energies less than 640 MeV at the top of the atmosphere, no cosmic-ray antiprotons were observed. This yields an upper limit to the antiproton/proton ratio of 0.000046 at the 85-percent confidence level.

  14. The relative biological effectiveness of antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Alsner, Jan; Bassler, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Aside from the enhancement of physical dose deposited by antiprotons annihilating in tissue-like material compared to protons of the same range a further increase of biological effective dose has been demonstrated. This enhancement can be expressed in an increase of the re......Background and purpose: Aside from the enhancement of physical dose deposited by antiprotons annihilating in tissue-like material compared to protons of the same range a further increase of biological effective dose has been demonstrated. This enhancement can be expressed in an increase...... of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of antiprotons near the end of range. We have performed the first-ever direct measurement of the RBE of antiprotons both at rest and in flight. Materials and methods: Experimental data were generated on the RBE of an antiproton beam entering a tissue-like target...

  15. PAMELA: A Satellite Experiment for Antiparticles Measurement in Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongi, M.; Adriani, O.; Ambriola, M.; Bakaldin, A.; Barbarino, G. C.; Basili, A.; Bazilevskaja, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bencardino, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, L.; Bongiorno, L.; Bonvicini, V.; Boscherini, M.; Cafagna, F. S.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C. N.; De Pascale, M. P.; Furano, G.; Galper, A. M.; Giglietto, N.; Grigorjeva, A.; Koldashov, S. V.; Korotkov, M. G.; Krut'kov, S. Y.; Lund, J.; Lundquist, J.; Menicucci, A.; Menn, W.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Minori, M.; Mirizzi, N.; Mitchell, J. W.; Mocchiutti, E.; Morselli, A.; Mukhametshin, R.; Orsi, S.; Osteria, G.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Romita, M.; Rossi, G.; Russo, S.; Schiavon, P.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Spinelli, P.; Stochaj, S. J.; Stozhkov, Y.; Straulino, S.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Taccetti, F.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Wischnewski, R.; Yurkin, Y.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2004-06-01

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that will study the antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays in a wide range of energy (from 80 MeV up to 190 GeV for antiprotons and from 50 MeV up to 270 GeV for positrons) and with high statistics, and that will measure the antihelium/helium ratio with a sensitivity of the order of 10/sup -8/. The detector will fly on-board a polar orbiting Resurs DK1 satellite, which will be launched into space by a Soyuz rocket in 2004 from Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, for a 3-year-long mission. Particle identification and energy measurements are performed in the PAMELA apparatus using the following subdetectors: a magnetic spectrometer made up of a permanent magnet equipped with double-sided microstrip silicon detectors, an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter composed of layers of tungsten absorber and silicon detectors planes, a transition radiation detector made of straw tubes interleaved with carbon fiber radiators, a plastic scintillator time-of-flight and trigger system, a set of anticounter plastic scintillator detectors, and a neutron detector. The features of the detectors and the main results obtained in beam test sessions are presented.

  16. Treatment Plans for Antiproton Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Herrmann, Rochus

    from these measurements were used to benchmark the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, which then has been used for calculations of physical dose inside and outside of the primary antiproton beam. From clonogenic survival studies on the different cell lines mentioned above we have determined biological effective...

  17. Measurement of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Peter Joseph [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The top quark is an extremely massive fundamental particle that is predominantly produced in pairs at particle collider experiments. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that top quarks can also be produced singly by the electroweak force; however, this process is more difficult to detect because it occurs at a smaller rate and is more difficult to distinguish from background processes. The cross section of this process is related to the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V tb|, and measurement of the single top quark production cross section is currently the only method to directly measure this quantity without assuming the number of generations of fermions. This thesis describes a measurement of the cross section of electroweak single top quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This analysis uses 2.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The search is performed using a matrix element method which calculates the differential cross section for each event for several signal and background hypotheses. These numbers are combined into a single discriminant and used to construct templates from Monte Carlo simulation. A maximum likelihood fit to the data distribution gives a measurement of the cross section. This analysis measures a value of 2.2$+0.8\\atop{-0.7}$ pb, which corresponds to a value of |V tb| = 0.88$+0.16\\atop{-0.14}$experimental±0.7(theoretical). The probability that this result originates from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top production (p-value) is 0.0003, which is equivalent to 3.4 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics. The expected (median) p-value as estimated from pseudo-experiments for this analysis is 0.000003, which corresponds to 4.5 standard deviations in Gaussian statistics.

  18. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  19. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  20. Measuring the low-energy cosmic ray spectrum with the AFIS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy cosmic rays interact with Earth's upper atmosphere and produce antiprotons, which can be trapped in Earth's magnetic field. The Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) Mission will measure the flux of trapped antiprotons with energies less than 100 MeV aboard the nanosatellite MOVE 2. An active-target tracking detector comprised of scintillating plastic fibers and silicon photomultipliers is already under construction at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen. As a precursor to the space-bound mission, a prototype version of the detector will be launched aboard a balloon from Kiruna, Sweden as part of the REXUS/BEXUS student program by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Named AFIS-P, it will be used to measure the low-energy part of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies less than 100 MeV-per-nucleon. Spectrometers in previous balloon missions were not sensitive in this low-energy region. Thus AFIS-P will deliver unprecedented data, while simultaneously allowing us to field-test the AFIS detector.

  1. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Document Server

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  2. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  3. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  4. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge [Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-03-25

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70+1.18-0.93 pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 ± 2.3) x 10-8, assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 ± 0.6) x 10-6, corresponding to an expected significance

  5. Measurement of the dijet transverse thrust distribution in proton - anti-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorin, Maria Veronica

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first measurement in a hadron collider of an event shape variable, the Dijet Transverse Thrust T$t\\atop{2}$ which is sensitive to the spatial jet distribution on the plane perpendicular to the colliding p$\\bar{p}$ beams. $t\\atop{2}$ is calculated with the two most energetic jets reconstructed with the k$\\perp$ algorithm, and it ranges from T$t\\atop{2}$ =1, for a pencil-like configuration, to T$t\\atop{2}$ =√2/2, for two equal energy jets at 90°. The measurement is based on 87.3 pb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ Collider. The cross section is reported as a function of 1-T$t\\atop{2}$ and log (1-T$t\\atop{2}$), with enhances the high statistics T$t\\atop{2}$→1 region, and presented for four separate event energy ranges. The measurement is in good agreement with a fixed-order O(α$3\\atop{s}$) perturbative QCD prediction, except at high T$t\\atop{2}$, where resummation corrections are expected to be important, and below T$t\\atop{2}$≃√3/2, where the leading order diagrams contributing to T$t\\atop{2}$ are O(α$4\\atop{s}$). The data also show a very good level of agreement with a recent Next-to-Leading pQCD three jet generator which covers the full T$t\\atop{2}$ range, except for the T$t\\atop{2}$=1 point.

  6. Measurements of the Ratio Between Double and Single Ionization of Helium for Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The inclusive spectra of @p|0's and @h's associated with @*p annihilation at rest are measured. Peaks in these spectra can be identified either with so far not explicitly observed two mesonic final states such as @p|0@w, @p|0@h, @h@h or @p|0@g, or with production of exotic mesonlike states such as baryonium. The apparatus is also suitable for searching for baryonium through some of its particular decay channels. As a by-product we expect information on direct @g production in @*p annihilations at rest.\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists of two modular BGO spectrometers and one array of leadglas detectors. The BGO spectrometers are adjustable in angle relative to each other and to the leadglas matrix, thus allowing to cover an angular range from 9|0 to 180|0, corresponding to momenta of zero to more than 1~GeV/c. The apparatus is designed such as to utilize the full potential of LEAR.

  7. Antiproton focusing horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    This focusing horn was developed in 1992 by Remo Maccaferri, Jean Claude Schnuriger and Lubrano di Scampamorte and is still operating in the AD complex at CERN (as of 2017). This device could pulse at 400 KA (160 KA for the previous version). This enabled an antiproton collection ten times better than the old one. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV/c and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, the magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet. For a million protons hitting the target, ten antiprotons were captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 - three hundred thousand million - antiprotons. Originally magnetic focusing horns were developed by Simon van der Meer - see for example object AC-022 in this database.

  8. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  9. The Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation Process (Antiproton Collaboration Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, W. H.; Birge, R. W.; Chupp, W. W.; Ekspong, A. G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Heckman, H. H.; Perkins, D. H.; Sandweiss, J.; Segre, E.; Smith, F. M.; Stork, D. H.; Rossum, L. Van; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-09-10

    In the exposure to a 700-MeV/c negative particle beam, 35 antiproton stars have been found. Of these antiprotons, 21 annihilate in flight and three give large-angle scatters ({Theta} > 15 , T{sub P-} > 50 Mev), while 14 annihilate at rest. From the interactions in flight we obtain the total cross section for antiproton interaction.

  10. Directed flow of antiprotons in Au+Au collisions at AGS

    OpenAIRE

    Barrette, J.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bersch, R.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Chang, W. C.; Cleland, W. E.; Clemen, M.; Cole, J.; Cormier, T. M.; Dai, Y.; David, G.; Dee, J.; Dietzsch, O.; Drigert, M.

    2000-01-01

    Directed flow of antiprotons is studied in Au+Au collisions at a beam momentum of 11.5A GeV/c. It is shown that antiproton directed flow is anti-correlated to proton flow. The measured transverse momentum dependence of the antiproton flow is compared with predictions of the RQMD event generator.

  11. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Majersky, O.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, AFB , in b b ¯ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic b -hadron decays. The event sample is collected at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of AFB(b b ¯ ) =(1.2 ±0.7 )% at the particle level for b -quark pairs with invariant mass, mb b ¯ , down to 40 GeV /c2 and measure the dependence of AFB(b b ¯ ) on mb b ¯ . The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  12. Electron plasma for antiproton cooling in the ATHENA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Amoretti, M; Lagomarsino, V; Manuzio, G; Testera, G; Variola, A

    2002-01-01

    The first phase of the ATHENA (Antihydrogen Apparatus) experiment is devoted to the study of cold antihydrogen production. The apparatus includes an antiproton capture trap designed to trap and to cool antiprotons coming from the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The antiproton cooling is achieved by means of the collisional interaction with a cold cloud of trapped electrons. The electron plasma is loaded in the trap before the antiproton capture by means of a small-size heated filament and cooled to sub-eV temperatures by cyclotron radiation. We report some measurements devoted to the characterization of the electron plasma. The ATHENA apparatus design does not allow the use of complex diagnostics; therefore the plasma properties are obtained using electrostatic wall probes, radio- frequency diagnostics, and dumping the electrons onto a charge collector. A simple experimental method to obtain an estimate of the electron plasma radius is discussed. (9 refs).

  13. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-07-15

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  14. Antiprotons and the Crystal Ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgower, C.; Peaslee, D.

    1999-11-15

    During the 1998 running of the Crystal Ball experiment, a couple of brief test runs were done with the C6 beamline tuned to produce antiprotons. Specifically, one shift on July 29th produced runs 329-334 with the beam momentum set for 650 MeV/c, run 355 was done on July 31st with a 550 MeV/c beam momentum, and run 926-929 were obtained in a single shift on November 3rd, also with a beam momentum of 550 MeV/c. The beam tune for the November data was greatly superior to that of the July data, however. Therefore, only the November data have been analyzed in detail, and the results of this analysis are presented in this note. Due to the paucity of statistics that were obtained, it was decided not to attempt to publish the results. However, the results are valuable as a tool for planning a possible future program of dedicated measurements of antiproton-proton annihilation into all-neutral final states using the Crystal Ball. The data in fact show that the Crystal Ball with its large angular acceptance and multi-photon capability would be an excellent detector for such an experiment. Only one other such experiment (the Crystal Barrel experiment at CERN/LEAR) has ever been done in the past. Also in this document is a survey of published results for old antiproton-proton experiments, some discussion of physics issues that are relevant to measurements of {anti p} + p {r_arrow} all-neutral final states, and some estimates about the kinds of experiments they could contemplate doing in the C6 and D6 lines at the AGS.

  15. Gold fragmentation induced by stopped antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Lubinski, P.; Von Egidy, T.; Gulda, K.; Hartmann, F.J.; Jastrzebski, J.; Kurcewicz, W.; Pienkowski, L.; Stolarz, A.; Trzcinska, A.

    2002-01-01

    A natural gold target was irradiated with the antiproton beam from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN. Antiprotons of 200 MeV/c momentum were stopped in a thick target, products of their annihilations on Au nuclei were detected using the off-line gamma-ray spectroscopy method. In total, yields for 114 residual nuclei were determined, providing a data set to deduce the complete mass and charge distribution of all products with A > 20 from a fitting procedure. The contribution of evaporation and fission decay modes to the total reaction cross section as well as the mean mass loss were estimated. The fission probability for Au absorbing antiprotons at rest was determined to be equal to (3.8+-0.5)%, in good agreement with an estimation derived using other techniques. The mass-charge yield distribution was compared with the results obtained for proton and pion induced gold fragmentation. On the average, the energy released in pbar annihilation is similar to that introduced by ~ 1 GeV protons. However, compared...

  16. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  17. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  18. CERN Antiproton Decelerator Beam Instrumentation for the ELENA era

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, M; Gasior, M; Søby, L; Tranquille, G; Fernandes, M

    2014-01-01

    CERN is currently constructing an Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which will allow the further deceleration of antiprotons from the currently exploited Antiproton Decelerator (AD). In order to meet the challenges of ELENA the beam instrumentation systems of the CERN AD are being consolidated and upgraded. An updated controls architecture with a more flexible timing system needs to be adopted and obsolete systems must be replaced. This paper presents the status and plans for improved performance and measurement availability of the AD beam instrumentation with a decreased risk of failure.

  19. Midrapidity antiproton-to-proton ratio in pp collisons at sqrt[s]=0.9 and 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, K; Abel, N; Abeysekara, U; Abrahantes Quintana, A; Abramyan, A; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S U; Akimoto, R; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anelli, G; Angelov, V; Anson, C; Anticić, T; Antinori, F; Antinori, S; Antipin, K; Antończyk, D; Antonioli, P; Anzo, A; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arcelli, S; Arceo, R; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bablok, S; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Bán, J; Barbera, R; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Barile, F; Basile, M; Basmanov, V; Bastid, N; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Becker, B; Belikov, I; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Belogianni, A; Benhabib, L; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdermann, E; Berdnikov, Y; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielcík, J; Bielcíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bimbot, L; Biolcati, E; Blanc, A; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Bohm, J; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Bombonati, C; Bondila, M; Borel, H; Borisov, A; Bortolin, C; Bose, S; Bosisio, L; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Böttger, S; Bourdaud, G; Boyer, B; Braun, M; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Bruckner, G; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo, E; Camacho, E; Camerini, P; Campbell, M; Canoa Roman, V; Capitani, G P; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Caselle, M; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Catanescu, V; Cattaruzza, E; Cavicchioli, C; Cerello, P; Chambert, V; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charpy, A; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Choi, K; Chojnacki, M; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chuman, F; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Cobanoglu, O; Coffin, J-P; Coli, S; Colla, A; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Conner, E S; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Corrales Morales, Y; Cormier, T M; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Cussonneau, J; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, I; Dash, A; Dash, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gaspari, M; de Groot, J; De Gruttola, D; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; De Remigis, R; de Rooij, R; de Vaux, G; Delagrange, H; Delgado, Y; Dellacasa, G; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; Dénes, E; Deppman, A; D'Erasmo, G; Derkach, D; 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    2010-08-13

    The ratio of the yields of antiprotons to protons in pp collisions has been measured by the ALICE experiment at sqrt[s]=0.9 and 7 TeV during the initial running periods of the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement covers the transverse momentum interval 0.45measured to be R_{|y|<0.5}=0.957±0.006(stat)±0.014(syst) at 0.9 TeV and R_{|y|<0.5}=0.991±0.005(stat)±0.014(syst) at 7 TeV and it is independent of both rapidity and transverse momentum. The results are consistent with the conventional model of baryon-number transport and set stringent limits on any additional contributions to baryon-number transfer over very large rapidity intervals in pp collisions.

  20. Midrapidity antiproton-to-proton ratio in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ and $7$~TeV measured by the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

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Fokin, S.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Furano, F.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M.S.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia Trapaga, C.; Gebelein, J.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glasow, R.; Glassel, P.; Glenn, A.; Gomez Jimenez, R.; Gonzalez Santos, H.; Gonzalez-Trueba, L.H.; Gonzalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Grabski, V.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamblen, J.; Han, B.H.; Harris, J.W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Hernandez, C.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.F.; Hicks, B.; Hiei, A.; Hille, P.T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hrivnacova, I.; Hu, S.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T.J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D.S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, P.G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Iwasaki, T.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jancurova, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jirden, L.; Jones, G.T.; Jones, P.G.; Jovanovic, P.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, E.; Kang, J.H.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Kapusta, S.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M.M.; Khan, S.A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.J; Kim, D.S.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, H.N.; Kim, J.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, J.S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bosing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M.L.; Kniege, S.; Koch, K.; Kolevatov, R.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskih, A.; Kornas, E.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Kral, J.; Kralik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravcakova, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Krumbhorn, D.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.G.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kupczak, R.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A.N.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutouski, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Lackner, F.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; Lal, C.; Lara, Camilo; Larsen, D.T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Le Bris, N.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.C.; Lefevre, F.; Lenhardt, M.; Leistam, L.; Lehnert, J.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Leon Monzon, I.; Leon Vargas, H.; Levai, P.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, L.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lopez, X.; Lopez Noriega, M.; Lopez-Ramirez, R.; Lopez Torres, E.; Lovhoiden, G.; Lozea Feijo Soares, A.; Lu, S.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Lutz, J.-R.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D.M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Maire, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malaev, M.; Malagalage, K.J.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malek, M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Mares, J.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez Hernandez, M.I.; Martinez Davalos, A.; Martinez Garcia, G.; Maruyama, Y.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z.L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Miftakhov, N.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mizoguchi, K.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M.M.; Montano Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Muller, H.; Munhoz, M.G.; Munoz, J.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B.K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nendaz, F.; Newby, J.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B.S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.S.; Nilsson, M.S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Okada, K.; Okada, Y.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleniacz, J.; 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Zavada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zychacek, V.; Zynovyev, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ratio of the yields of antiprotons to protons in pp collisions has been measured by the ALICE experiment at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ and $7$~TeV during the initial running periods of the Large Hadron Collider(LHC). The measurement covers the transverse momentum interval $0.45 < p_{\\rm{t}} < 1.05$~GeV/$c$ and rapidity $|y| < 0.5$. The ratio is measured to be $R_{|y| < 0.5} = 0.957 \\pm 0.006 (stat.) \\pm 0.014 (syst.)$ at $0.9$~TeV and $R_{|y| < 0.5} = 0.991 \\pm 0.005 (stat.) \\pm 0.014 (syst.)$ at $7$~TeV and it is independent of both rapidity and transverse momentum. The results are consistent with the conventional model of baryon-number transport and set stringent limits on any additional contributions to baryon-number transfer over very large rapidity intervals in pp collisions.

  1. What Does The PAMELA Antiproton Spectrum Tell Us About Dark Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Linden, Tim [Chicago U., KICP; Mertsch, Philipp [KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2015-03-11

    Measurements of the cosmic ray antiproton spectrum can be used to search for contributions from annihilating dark matter and to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. Depending on the assumptions made regarding cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy, such constraints can be quite stringent. We revisit this topic, utilizing a set of propagation models fit to the cosmic ray boron, carbon, oxygen and beryllium data. We derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and find that when the cosmic ray propagation parameters are treated as nuisance parameters (as we argue is appropriate), the resulting limits are significantly less stringent than have been previously reported. We also note (as have several previous groups) that simple GALPROP-like diffusion-reacceleration models predict a spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons that is in good agreement with PAMELA's observations above ~ 5 GeV, but that significantly underpredict the flux at lower energies. Although the complexity of modeling cosmic ray propagation at GeV-scale energies makes it difficult to determine the origin of this discrepancy, we consider the possibility that the excess antiprotons are the result of annihilating dark matter. Suggestively, we find that this excess is best fit for mDM ~ 35 GeV and σ v ~ 10$-$26 cm3/s (to $b\\bar{_b}$), in good agreement with the mass and cross section previously shown to be required to generate the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic Center.

  2. Anisotropic flow of charged hadrons, pions and (anti-)protons measured at high transverse momentum in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; 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Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghidini, Bruno; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonschior, Alexey; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoriev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; 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Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-02-12

    The elliptic, $v_2$, triangular, $v_3$, and quadrangular, $v_4$, azimuthal anisotropic flow coefficients are measured for unidentified charged particles, pions, and (anti-)protons in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results obtained with the event plane and four-particle cumulant methods are reported for the pseudo-rapidity range |$\\eta$|8 GeV/c. The small $p_T$ dependence of the difference between elliptic flow results obtained from the event plane and four-particle cumulant methods suggests a common origin of flow fluctuations up to $p_T$ =8 GeV/c. The magnitude of the (anti-)proton elliptic and triangular flow is larger than that of pions out to at least $p_T$ =8 GeV/c indicating that the particle type dependence persists out to high $p_T$.

  3. Measurement of Event Shapes in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy 1.96 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J.P.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H.C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jha, M.K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, H.W.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N.S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Griso, S.Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schmidt, M.P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R.St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzman, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W.C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    A study of event shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event shape mean values on the leading jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton level predictions that were matched to fixed order results at NLO accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted di...

  4. Cosmic Ray Antimatter

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, space-born experiments have delivered new measurements of high energy cosmic-ray (CR) antiprotons and positrons, opening new frontiers in energy reach and precision. While being a promising discovery tool for new physics or exotic astrophysical phenomena, an irreducible background of antimatter comes from CR collisions with interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Understanding this irreducible source or constraining it from first principles is an interesting challenge: a game of hide-and-seek where the objective is to identify the laws of basic particle physics among the forest of astrophysical uncertainties. I describe an attempt to obtain such understanding, combining information from a zoo of CR species including massive nuclei and relativistic radioisotopes. I show that: (i) CR antiprotons most likely come from CR-gas collisions; (ii) positron data is consistent with, and suggestive of the same astrophysical production mechanism responsible for antiprotons and dominated by proton-proton c...

  5. Current status of antiproton impact ionization of atoms and molecules: theoretical and experimental perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Tom; Knudsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical progress in the field of antiproton-impact-induced ionization of atoms and molecules is reviewed. We describe the techniques used to measure ionization cross sections and give an overview of the experimental results supplemented by tables of all existing data...... status of our understanding of antiproton impact ionization. The related issues of energy loss measurements and antiproton therapy are briefly described and directions for possible future work are pointed out as well....

  6. Measurement of the antiproton-proton annihilation cross-section into pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ or K/sup +/K/sup -/ at 300 MeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, G; Dalpiaz, P; Dalpiaz, P F; Gissinger, G; Jacquey, S; Peroni, C; Schneegans, M; Tecchio, L B

    1977-01-01

    Data on the process pp to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ or K/sup +/K/sup -/, with antiprotons stopped in a liquid-hydrogen target, were taken in a counter experiment at the CERN Proton Synchrotron. A fraction of these annihilations occurred during the slowing down of the antiprotons in the target at an average momentum of 300 MeV/c. From these events, a cross-section at 300 MeV/c is deduced. It is noted that cross-sections for pp annihilations into pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ or K/sup +/K/sup -/ are known only down to 400 MeV/c antiproton momentum. (5 refs).

  7. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  8. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  9. Measurement of Z+ γ production and search for anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianrong [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The author presents a measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → Zγ + X → e+e-γ + X production using proton-antiproton collisions data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Zγ production provides a direct test of the triple neutral gauge couplings. A measurement of Zγ production cross section and search for anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are presented. The data presented are from 1.1 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ integrated luminosity collected at the CDF Detector. Electrons from Z decays are selected with Et > 20 Gev. Photons (Et > 7 GeV) are required to be well-separated from the electrons. There are 390 eeγ candidate events found with 1.1 fb-1 of data, compared to the SM prediction of 375.3 ± 25.2 events. The Standard Model prediction for the cross section for p$\\bar{p}$ → e+e-γ + X production at √s = 1.96 TeV is 4.5 ± 0.4 pb. The measured cross section is 4.7 ± 0.6 pb. The cross section and kinematic distributions of the eeγ events are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Limits on the ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are extracted using the photon Et distribution of eeγ events with meeγ > 100 GeV/c2. These are the first limits measured using CDF Run II data. These limits provide important test of the interaction of the photon and the Z boson.

  10. Centrifugal Separation of Antiprotons and Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Wrubel, J; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Borbely, J S; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Mullers, A; Walz, J; Speck, A

    2010-01-01

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  11. Nuclear stopping power of antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, Kai; Sundholm, Dage; Pyykkö, Pekka; Zambrano, Daniel Martinez; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2017-10-01

    The slowing down of energetic ions in materials is determined by the nuclear and electronic stopping powers. Both of these have been studied extensively for ordinary-matter ions. For antiprotons, however, there are numerous studies of the electronic stopping power, but none of the nuclear stopping power. Here, we use quantum-chemical methods to calculate interparticle potentials between antiprotons and different atoms, and derive from these the nuclear stopping power of antiprotons in solids. The results show that the antiproton nuclear stopping powers are much stronger than those of protons, and can also be stronger than the electronic stopping power at the lowest energies. The interparticle potentials are also implemented in a molecular dynamics ion range calculation code, which allows us to simulate antiproton transmission through degrader foil materials. Foil transmission simulations carried out at experimentally relevant conditions show that the choice of antiproton-atom interaction model has a large effect on the predicted yield of antiprotons slowed down to low (a few keV) energies.

  12. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    particle transport code against dosimetry experiments. This finally enables us to determine the relative biological efficiency of a beam of antiprotons. materials/methods We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the radiobiological properties using an antiproton beam line at the European...... nuclear research facility CERN. A beam of 126 MeV antiprotons, corresponding to about 12 cm range in water, was spread out to a SOBP with a width of 1 cm. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film, and the results were used for benchmarking...

  13. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  14. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  15. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  16. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  17. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  18. Cosmic Ray Experiments and the Implications for Indirect Detection of Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John W.; Ormes, Jonathan F.; Streitmatter, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of cosmic-ray antiprotons was first reported by Golden et al. in 1979 and their existence was firmly established by the BESS and IMAX collaborations in the early 1990s. Increasingly precise measurements of the antiproton spectrum, most recently from BESS-Polar and PAMELA, have made it an important tool for investigating cosmic-ray transport in the galaxy and heliosphere and for constraining dark-matter models. The history of antiproton measurements will be briefly reviewed. The current status will be discussed, focusing on the results of BESS-Polar II and their implications for the possibility of antiprotons from primordial black hole evaporation. The current results of the BESS-Polar II antihelium search are also presented.

  19. A Measurement of Z Boson Production and Rapidity Distribution in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, Aidan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Particle Physics Dept.

    2004-12-25

    High-precision measurements are made of Z boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, using the electron decay channel. The cross-section times branching ratio is measured to be σZ · Br(Z → e+e-) = (255.7 ± 2.4stat ± 5.2sys ± 15.2lum)pb in a dataset of 194 pb-1 collected between March 2002 and June 2003. This agrees well with theoretical predictions. The cross-section for W boson production in the electron channel has also been measured in the subset of this dataset of 72 pb-1 collected up until January 2003. Using this smaller dataset the ratio of cross-sections is determined to be R ≡ σW · Br(W → eν)/σZ · Br(Z → ee) = 10.82 ± 0.18stat ± 0.16sys. Combining these results with measurements made in the muon channel gives R = 10.92 ± 0.15stat ± 0.14sys (e + μ channels), from which the branching ratio of the W to electrons and muons, and the total width of the W, have been extracted: Br(W → lν) = 0.1089 ± 0.0022 (l = e,μ); Γ(W) = 2078.8 ± 41.4 MeV, which are in good agreement with the Standard Model values and with other measurements. The CKM quark mixing matrix element |Vcs| has been extracted: |Vcs| = 0.967 ± 0.030. The rapidity distribution dσ/dy for Z → ee has also been measured over close to the full kinematic range using 194 pb-1 of data, and is found to be in good agreement with the NNLO prediction.

  20. Propagation Model for Cosmic Ray Species in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Moskalenko, I. V.; Jones, F. C.; Ptuskin, V. S.; Strong, A. W.; Mashnik, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade there have been a number of space and balloon experiments with improved sensivity and statistics, which impose stricter constraints on cosmic ray propagation models. Propagation is the main issue in the interpretation of such data as antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays, and diffuse gamma-ray emission. We develop a new propagation model that reproduces measurements of secondary antiprotons as well as primary and secondary nuclei. We will present results of our calculation of CR propagation in the Galaxy for this model using the GALPROP code.

  1. Measurement of top anti-top cross section in proton - anti-proton collider at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mal, Prolay Kumar [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India)

    2005-04-01

    Discovery of the top quark in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron collider concluded a long search following the 1977 discovery of bottom (b) quark [1] and represents another triumph of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles. Top quark is one of the fundamental fermions in the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and is the weak-isospin partner of the bottom quark. A precise measurement of top pair production cross-section would be a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) prediction. Presently, Tevatron is the world's highest energy collider where protons (p) and anti-protons ($\\bar{p}$) collide at a centre of mass energy √s of 1.96 TeV. At Tevatron top (t) and anti-top ($\\bar{t}$) quarks are predominantly pair produced through strong interactions--quark annihilation (≅ 85%) and gluon fusion (≅ 15%). Due to the large mass of top quark, t or $\\bar{t}$ decays (~ 10-25 sec) before hadronization and in SM framework, it decays to a W boson and a b quark with ~ 100% branching ratio (BR). The subsequent decay of W boson determines the major signatures of t$\\bar{t}$ decay. If both W bosons (coming from t and $\\bar{t}$ decays) decay into leptons (viz., eve, μvμ or τcτ) the corresponding t$\\bar{t}$ decay is called dileptonic decay. Of all dileptonic decay modes of t$\\bar{t}$, the t$\\bar{t}$ → WWb$\\bar{b}$ → eveμvμb$\\bar{b}$ (eμ channel) decay mode has the smallest background contamination from Z0 production or Drell-Yan process; simultaneously, it has the highest BR (~ 3.16%) [2] amongst all dileptonic decay modes of t$\\bar{t}$. During Run I (1992-1996) of Tevatron, three eμ candidate events were detected by D0 experiment, out of 80 candidate events (inclusive of all decay modes of t$\\bar{t}$). Due to the rarity of the t$\\bar{t}$ events, the measured cross-section has large uncertainty in its value (viz., 5.69 ± 1.21(stat) ± 1.04(sys) pb {at} √s = 1

  2. Novel Dark Matter Constraints from Antiprotons in Light of AMS-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Krämer, Michael; Korsmeier, Michael

    2017-05-12

    We evaluate dark matter (DM) limits from cosmic-ray antiproton observations using the recent precise AMS-02 measurements. We properly take into account cosmic-ray propagation uncertainties, fitting DM and propagation parameters at the same time and marginalizing over the latter. We find a significant indication of a DM signal for DM masses near 80 GeV, with a hadronic annihilation cross section close to the thermal value, ⟨σv⟩≈3×10^{-26}  cm^{3} s^{-1}. Intriguingly, this signal is compatible with the DM interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess. Confirmation of the signal will require a more accurate study of the systematic uncertainties, i.e., the antiproton production cross section, and the modeling of the effect of solar modulation. Interpreting the AMS-02 data in terms of upper limits on hadronic DM annihilation, we obtain strong constraints excluding a thermal annihilation cross section for DM masses below about 50 GeV and in the range between approximately 150 and 500 GeV, even for conservative propagation scenarios. Except for the range around ∼80  GeV, our limits are a factor of ∼4 stronger than the limits from gamma-ray observations of dwarf galaxies.

  3. Measurement of the Cross Section for Production of Prompt Diphoton in proton anti-proton Collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan-wen [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of prompt diphoton production rate in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). This process deserves some attention for the following reasons. The H → γγ decay mode is an important channel for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson searches in the low mass region (MH < 130 GeV) at the forth coming LHC. In many models involving physics beyond the SM, cascade decays of heavy new particles generate a γγ signature. Some examples are supersymmetry with a light gravitino, radiative decays to a higgsino-LSP and models with large symmetry groups. The QCD production of prompt photon pairs with large invariant mass is the irreducible background to these searches. The rate is huge and requires to be quantitatively evaluated prior to any of the possible discoveries. In a hadronic collider environment such as LHC, prompt photon signals are contaminated by the production of neutral mesons which decay to multiple collinear photons. The experience of classifying background of neutral meson is very important. The process can be used to test the Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) calculation of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The 4-momentum of particles in the di-photon final state can be precisely determined due to the fine energy resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeters. The imbalance in the transverse momentum of the two photons reflects the transverse motion of the colliding partons. At collider energies, most of the transverse momentum of the incoming partons can be attributed to multiple soft gluon emissions prior to the collision, of which the effect to di-photon production can be resummed by Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) formalism. The Tevatron data can be used to test the resummation formalisms. They have used 207 pb-1 of data collected by CDF II detector during the February 2002 to September 2003 running period to study the diphoton

  4. Antiproton identification below threshold with the AMS-02 RICH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Yuan; Delgado Mendez, Carlos Jose; Giovacchini, Francesca; Haino, Sadakazu; Hoffman, Julia

    2017-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), which is installed on the International Space Station (ISS), has been collecting data successfully since May 2011. The main goals of AMS-02 are the search for cosmic anti-matter, dark matter and the precise measurement of the relative abundance of elements and isotopes in galactic cosmic rays. In order to identify particle properties, AMS-02 includes several specialized sub-detectors. Among these, the AMS-02 Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) is designed to provide a very precise measurement of the velocity and electric charge of particles. We describe a method to reject the dominant electron background in antiproton identification with the use of the AMS-02 RICH detector as a veto for rigidities below 3 GV. A ray tracing integration method is used to maximize the statistics of p¯ with the lowest possible e- background, providing 4 times rejection power gain for e- background with respect to only 3% of p¯ signal efficiency loss. By using the collected cosmic-ray data, e- contamination can be well suppressed within 3% with β ≈ 1, while keeping 76% efficiency for p¯ below the threshold. Supported by China Scholarship Council (CSC) under Grant No.201306380027.

  5. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Koji [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    Top quarks are predominantly produced in pairs via the strong interaction in $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV . The top quark has a weak isospin 1/2, composing a weak isospin doublet with the bottom quark. This characteristic predicts not only top quark pair production via strong interaction but also single production together with a bottom quark via weak interaction. However, finding single top quark production is challenging since it is rarely produced (σ singletop = 2.9 pb) against background processes with the same final state like W+jets and t$\\bar{t}$. A measurement of electroweak single top production probes the W-t-b vertex, which provides a direct determination of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vtb|. The sample offers a source of almost 100% polarized top quarks. This thesis describes an optimized search for s-channel single top quark production and a measurement of the single top production cross section using 2.7 fb-1 of data accumulated with the CDF detector. We are using events with one high-pT lepton, large missing ET and two identified b-quark jets where one jet is identified using a secondary vertex tagger, called SecVtx, and the other jet is identified using SecVtx or a jet probability tagger, called JetProb. In this analysis we have developed a kinematics fitter and a likelihood-based separator between signal and background. As a result, we found that the probability (p-value) that the candidate events originate from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top s-channel production is 0.003, which is equivalent to 2.7 σ deviations in Gaussian statistics, and this excess corresponds to the single top s-channel cross section of 2.38-0.84+1.01 pb. An observed value of |Vtb| is 1.43-0.26+0.38(experimental) ± 0.11(theory). We also set the 95% CL. upper limit of σs = 4.15 pb for the s

  6. Precise absolute gamma-ray wavelength measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, E. G.; Dewey, M. S.; Greene, G. L.; Deslattes, R. D.; Börner, H.

    1991-10-01

    Gamma-ray wavelengths measured with the joint NIST/ILL GAMS4 facility at the High Flux Reactor, Grenoble, France, are discussed. This primary goal of these measurements is gamma-ray wavelengths which are consistent with the optical wavelength scale and the Rydberg constant with an uncertainty no larger than 0.1 ppm for energies up to 5 MeV. The current status of the Bragg angle and crystal lattice spacing measurements on reference energy values, the neutron mass, and the determination of fundamental constants is reviewed. Measurement of structure factors at high energies is also considered.

  7. Status of the analysis for the search of polarization in the antiproton production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfs D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The P-349 experiment aims to test whether for antiprotons the production process itself can be a source of polarization in view of the preparation of a polarized antiproton beam. In this article we present the details of performed measurements and report on the status of the ongoing analysis.

  8. In the steps of the antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    Amsler, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Sixty years after the discovery of the antiproton at Berkeley, a look at some of the ways that studies with antiprotons at CERN have cast light on basic physics and, in particular, on fundamental symmetries.

  9. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  10. Improved Study of the Antiprotonic Helium Hyperfine Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Pask, T.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Hori, M.; Horvath, D.; Juhasz, B.; Malbrunot, C.; Marton, J.; Ono, N.; Suzuki, K.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report the initial results from a systematic study of the hyperfine (HF) structure of antiprotonic helium (n,l) = (37,~35) carried out at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We performed a laser-microwave-laser resonance spectroscopy using a continuous wave (cw) pulse-amplified laser system and microwave cavity to measure the HF transition frequencies. Improvements in the spectral linewidth and stability of our laser system have increased the precision of these measurements by a factor of five and reduced the line width by a factor of three compared to our previous results. A comparison of the experimentally measured transition frequencies with three body QED calculations can be used to determine the antiproton spin magnetic moment, leading towards a test of CPT invariance.

  11. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  12. Polarization measurements of proton capture gamma rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suffert, M.; Endt, P.M.; Hoogenboom, A.M.

    1959-01-01

    The linear polarization has been measured of eight different gamma rays of widely differing energies (Eγ = 0.8 - 8.0 MeV) emitted at resonances in the 24Mg(p, γ)25Al, 30Si(p, γ)31P, and 32S(p, γ)33Cl reactions. The gamma rays emitted at 90° to the proton beam were Compton scattered in a 2″ NaI

  13. Review of the results of measurements of the fluxes of the charged components of galactic cosmic rays in the experiments PAMELA and AMS-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Belotsky, K. M.; Bogomolov, Yu. V.; Budaev, R. I.; Galper, A. M.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Kirillov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mosichkin, A. F.; Okrugin, A. A.; Rodenko, S. A.; Shitova, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper provides a review of the results of precision measurements of the fluxes of different charged components of galactic cosmic rays (positrons and antiprotons, protons and helium nuclei) in modern experiments with magnetic spectrometers PAMELA and AMS-02, operating successfully for a few years (since 2006 and 2011, respectively) in Earth orbit. A priority of the PAMELA spectrometer scientific discoveries is noted. It is also noted that the measurements from the AMS-02 experiment are of high statistical accuracy and have reliably confirmed previous data, having been able to advance to a higher energy range.

  14. X-ray measurements on wood - spectra measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Kamp; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Gerward, Leif

    The report concerns simultaneous non-destructive measurements of water content and density of wood. Theoretically, this should be possible using a x-ray equipment newly build at BKM, and this work is an attempt to use the equipment for assessing water content and density of wood samples under...... laboratory conditions. A number of wood samples with different densities are placed at different relative humidities from 0.5 to 97 %RH. When equilibrium is obtained the samples are measured with the x-ray equipment such that 10 points are measured in the sample followed by measurements outside the sample...... (free-scanning). In this way 100 points are measured for each wood sample. This produces information about moisture content and density of the samples as water and wood attenuations of the x-rays are different for the different energy levels contained in the x-rays. The "real" density and moisture...

  15. Sympathetic laser cooling of antiprotons with molecular anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sebastian; Fesel, Julian; Tietje, Ingmari; Zimmer, Christian; Hinterberger, Alexander; Doser, Michael; Yzombard, Pauline; Comparat, Daniel; Aegis Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Antimatter experiments conducted at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN address the fundamental questions why primordial antimatter is not observed in the present Universe. The weak equivalent principle (WEP) can be tested measuring the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen atoms in the Earth's gravitational field that are horizontally emitted from a Penning trap. The antihydrogen atoms can be produced via resonant charge exchange of Rydberg positronium and antiprotons at temperatures potentially determined by the recoil limit of the constituents To prepare an ensemble of cold antihydrogen with a narrow velocity spread we plan to extend the existing electron cooling mechanism of antiprotons by laser-cooling techniques of negative C2-molecules in a Penning trap in order to sympathetically cool antiprotons to the mK regime. The generation of cold antihydrogen atoms can ultimately also be used for precision spectroscopy experiments of electromagnetic interaction as a test of CPT symmetry. In this presentation the status of the experiment at CERN and a computational study of sympathetic cooling of antiprotons using photodetachment cooling, Doppler and AC Stark Sisyphus cooling of C2-will be presented.

  16. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  17. Search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Marriner, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Martens, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Ray, R. E. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Streets, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Hu, M. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Snow, G. R. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Armstrong, T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Buchanan, C. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-09-01

    A search for antiproton decay has been made at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. Limits are placed on 13 antiproton decay modes. The results include the first explicit experimental limits on the muonic decay modes of the antiproton, and the first limits on the decay modes e{sup -}{gamma}{gamma} and e{sup -}{omega}. The most stringent limit is for the decay mode p(bar sign){yields}e{sup -}{gamma}. At 90% C.L. we find that {tau}{sub p(bar} {sub sign)}/B(p(bar sign){yields}e{sup -}{gamma})>7x10{sup 5} yr. The most stringent limit for decay modes with a muon in the final state is for the decay p(bar sign){yields}{mu}{sup -}{gamma}. At 90% C.L. we find that {tau}{sub p(bar} {sub sign)}/B(p(bar sign){yields}{mu}{sup -}{gamma})>5x10{sup 4} yr. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section in dimuon final states in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrath, Jens Peter [Albert Ludwigs Univ., Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-10-24

    Particle physics deals with the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions. The vast number of subatomic particles can be reduced to twelve fundamental fermions, which interact by the exchange of spin-1 particles as described in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM provides the best description of the subatomic world to date, despite the fact it does not include gravitation. Following the relation Λ = h/p, where h is Planck's constant, for the examination of physics at subatomic scales with size Λ probes with high momenta p are necessary. These high energies are accessible through particle colliders. Here, particles are accelerated and brought to collision at interaction points at which detectors are installed to record these particle collisions. Until the anticipated start-up of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron collider at Fermilab near Chicago is the highest energy collider operating in the world, colliding protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. Its two interaction points are covered by the multi purpose particle detectors D0 and CDF. During the first data-taking period, known as Run I, the Tevatron operated at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. This run period lasted from 1992 to 1996. During this period, the long-predicted top quark was discovered. From 1996 and 2001, the accelerator was upgraded to deliver higher instantaneous luminosities at its current center-of-mass energy. At the same time, the experiments were upgraded to take full advantage of the upgraded accelerator complex. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator in the world with a sufficient energy to produce top quarks. Studying top quark production, decay and properties is an important part of the D0 and CDF physics programs. Because of its large mass, the top quark is a unique probe of the Standard Model, and an interesting environment to search for new physics. In this thesis, a measurement of the

  19. Anisotropic flow of charged hadrons, pions and (anti-)protons measured at high transverse momentum in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelev, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Adam, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Adamová, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Řež u Prahy (Czech Republic); Adare, A.M. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Aggarwal, M.M. [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Aglieri Rinella, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Agocs, A.G. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Agostinelli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università and Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Aguilar Salazar, S. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Ahammed, Z. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N. [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Ahn, S.U. [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Akindinov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, D. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alessandro, B. [Sezione INFN, Turin (Italy); Alfaro Molina, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Alici, A. [Centro Fermi – Centro Studi e Ricerche e Museo Storico della Fisica “Enrico Fermi”, Rome (Italy); Alkin, A. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); and others

    2013-02-12

    The elliptic, v{sub 2}, triangular, v{sub 3}, and quadrangular, v{sub 4}, azimuthal anisotropic flow coefficients are measured for unidentified charged particles, pions, and (anti-)protons in Pb–Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results obtained with the event plane and four-particle cumulant methods are reported for the pseudo-rapidity range |η|<0.8 at different collision centralities and as a function of transverse momentum, p{sub T}, out to p{sub T}=20 GeV/c. The observed non-zero elliptic and triangular flow depends only weakly on transverse momentum for p{sub T}>8 GeV/c. The small p{sub T} dependence of the difference between elliptic flow results obtained from the event plane and four-particle cumulant methods suggests a common origin of flow fluctuations up to p{sub T}=8 GeV/c. The magnitude of the (anti-)proton elliptic and triangular flow is larger than that of pions out to at least p{sub T}=8 GeV/c indicating that the particle type dependence persists out to high p{sub T}.

  20. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  1. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  2. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  3. A high-intensity low-momentum separated antiproton beam for the study of annihilations at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, G; Dalpiaz, P; Dalpiaz, P F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Gissinger, G; Jacquey, S; Peroni, C; Schmitt, F M; Schneegans, M; Tecchio, L B

    1977-01-01

    The main features of the low-momentum separated antiproton beam built at the CERN Proton Synchrotron to allow the stopping of a large number of antiprotons are described. An effective stopping rate of 1000 antiproton per 10/sup 12/ protons on the Ps internal target is obtained. Results of the measurement of the rate of reaction pp to h /sup +/h/sup -/ in a 50 cm long liquid hydrogen target are given to illustrate the stopping and monitoring techniques. (6 refs).

  4. Antiproton Stråleterapi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    omkringliggende normalvæv sammenlignet med konventionel strålebehandling eller IMRT. Højenergetiske antiprotoner opfører sig som protoner under nedbremsning i vævet. Når antiprotonen er fuldstændigt nedbremset indfanges den af en kerne og annihilerer med en nucleon herfra. Derved frigives hvilemasseenergien på 2...

  5. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  6. Annihilation of low energy antiprotons in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Burghart, G; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Canali, C; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Derking, J H; Di Domizio, S; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ferragut, R; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Haider, S; Harasimovic, J; Huse, T; Jordan, E; Jørgensen, L V; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Knecht, A; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Magnani, A; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Moia, F; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Pacifico, N; Petrácek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Regenfus, C; Riccardi, C; Røhne, O; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Susa, A; Vasquez, M A Subieta; Špacek, M; Testera, G; Welsch, C P; Zavatarelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. To achieve this goal, the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS collaboration will produce a pulsed, cold (100 mK) antihydrogen beam with a velocity of a few 100 m/s and measure the magnitude of the vertical deflection of the beam from a straight path. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1$%$ precision on the measurement of $\\bar{g}$ with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct measurement of antiproton annihilation in a segmented silicon sensor, the first step towards designing a position sensitive silicon detector for the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment. We also pr...

  7. A measurement of the top-antitop production cross section in the dimuon final state with the D0 detector for proton-antiproton collisions as √s = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Susan Elizabeth [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top pair production cross section in the dimuon final state for proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. Approximately 420 pb-1 of data collected with the Run II D0 detector are used for this measurement. Two data events are observed with a total expected signal plus background yield of 3.6 events. Assuming a top mass of 175 GeV, the measured cross section is: σt$\\bar{t}$= 3.13$+4.17\\atop{-2.60}$(stat)$+0.92\\atop{-0.86}$(sys)±0.19(lumi)pb, which is consistent with a NNLO prediction of 6.77 ± 0.42 pb.

  8. Implications of the cosmic ray electron spectrum and anisotropy measured with Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Evoli, Carmelo [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. die Fisica; INFN, Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Mazziotta, Mario Nicola [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration recently released the updated results of the measurement of the cosmic ray electron (CRE) spectrum and published its first constraints on the CRE anisotropy. With respect to the previous Fermi-LAT results, the CRE spectrum measurement was extended down from 20 to 7 GeV, thus providing a better lever arm to discriminate theoretical models. Here we show that the new data strengthen the evidence for the presence of two distinct electron and positron spectral components. Furthermore, we show that under such hypothesis most relevant CRE and positron data sets are remarkably well reproduced. Consistent fits of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton data, which are crucial to validate the adopted propagation setup(s) and to fix the solar modulation potential, are obtained for the Kraichnan and plain-diffusion propagation setups, while the Kolmogorov one is disfavored. We then confirm that nearby pulsars are viable source candidates of the required e{sup {+-}} extra-component. In that case, we show that the predicted CRE anisotropy is compatible with Fermi-LAT constraints and that a positive detection should be at hand of that observatory. Models assuming that only nearby supernova remnants contribute to the high energy tail of the observed CRE spectrum are in contrast with anisotropy limits. (orig.)

  9. Measurements of pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton spectra in proton-proton interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c with the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Aduszkiewicz, A.; The NA61 collaboration; Andronov, E.; Antićić, T.; Baatar, B.; Baszczyk, M.; Bhosale, S.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Busygina, O.; Cherif, H.; Ćirković, M.; Czopowicz, T.; Damyanova, A.; Davis, N.; Dembinski, H.; Deveaux, M.; Dominik, W.; Dorosz, P.; Dumarchez, J.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G.A.; Fodor, Z.; Francois, C.; Garibov, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hervé, A.E.; Hylen, J.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Johnson, S.R.; Kadija, K.; Kaptur, E.; Kiełbowicz, M.; Kireyeu, V.A.; Klochkov, V.; Knezević, N.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V.P.; Korzenev, A.; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalik, K.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kucewicz, W.; Kuich, M.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lewicki, M.; Lundberg, B.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Łysakowski, B.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A.I.; Manić, D.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Marino, A.D.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G.L.; Merzlaya, A.; Messerly, B.; Mik, Ł.; Mills, G.B.; Morozov, S.; Mrówczyński, S.; Nagai, Y.; Naskręt, M.; Ozvenchuk, V.; Paolone, V.; Pavin, M.; Petukhov, O.; Pistillo, C.; Płaneta, R.; Podlaski, P.; Popov, B.A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rameika, R.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Renfordt, R.; Richter-Wąs, E.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rumberger, B.T.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Schmidt, K.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seryakov, A.; Seyboth, P.; Słodkowski, M.; Snoch, A.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Strikhanov, M.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tefelska, A.; Tefelski, D.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toia, A.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V.V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Walewski, M.; Wickremasinghe, A.; Wilkinson, C.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Zwaska, R.

    2017-10-10

    Measurements of inclusive spectra and mean multiplicities of pions, kaons, protons and anti-protons produced in inelastic p+p interactions at incident projectile momenta of 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c (c.m. energy = 6.3, 7.7, 8.8, 12.3 and 17.3 GeV, respectively) were performed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer. Spectra are presented as function of rapidity and transverse momentum and are compared to predictions of current models. The measurements serve as the baseline in the NA61/SHINE study of the properties of the onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter.

  10. Measurement Of The Ratio Of Inclusive Cross Sections Of (proton-antiproton Decaying To Z Boson + Bottom- Jet)/(proton-antiproton Decaying To Z Boson + Jet) At Center Of Mass Energy = 1.96 Tev

    CERN Document Server

    Mutaf, Y D

    2005-01-01

    Using the data collected with the DØ detector at s = 1.96 TeV with integrated luminosities of about 180 pb−1 , we have measured the ratio of inclusive cross sections for pp¯ → Z + b-jet to pp¯ → Z + jet production. The inclusive Z + b-jet reaction is an important background to searches for the Higgs boson in associated ZH production at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and is sensitive to the b quark content of the proton. This thesis describes our measurement which is performed using the dimuon decay channel of the Z boson, i.e., Z → μ+μ−. The ratio in the dimuon channel is measured to be 1.86 ± 0.44 (stat) +0.24-0.28 (syst)% for hadronic jets with transverse momenta pT > 20 GeV/c and pseudorapidities |η| < 2.5, consistent with next- to-leading order predictions of the standard model. This measurement is also combined with the result of the same ratio using the dielectron decay of the Z ...

  11. Measurement of the branching ratio $\\Gamma(\\overline{p}p\\to e^{+}e^{-})/\\Gamma(\\overline{p}p\\to total)$ in antiproton-proton annihilation at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, G; Dalpiaz, P; Dalpiaz, P F; Gissinger, G; Jacquey, S; Peroni, C; Schneegans, M; Tecchio, L B

    1976-01-01

    Analyzing a sample of 220000 events from an experiment still in progress at the CERN Proton Synchrotron, 60 pairs of electrons with an energy above 700 MeV have been observed. The electrons, produced by annihilation of antiproton stopped in a liquid-hydrogen target, are detected with optical spark chambers and scintillation counters. Twenty-nine out of these 60 pairs have been found to be collinear; normalizing with respect to the hadronic two-body channels pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ and K/sup +/K/sup -/, a branching raio B/sub ee/= Gamma (pp to e/sup +/e/sup -/) Gamma /(pp to total)=(3.2+or-0.9)*10/sup -7/ has been obtained. (11 refs).

  12. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  13. Antiproton cooling in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, S.; Bolshakov, A.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, G.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; Zenkevich, P.; /Fermilab /Moscow, ITEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    The 8.9-GeV/c Recycler antiproton storage ring is equipped with both stochastic and electron cooling systems. These cooling systems are designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. In this paper we report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons. At the time of writing this report, the Recycler electron cooling system is routinely used in collider operations. It has helped to set recent peak luminosity records.

  14. Two photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN’s AD

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms using counter-propagating ultraviolet laser beams. This excited some non-linear transitions of the antiproton at the wavelengths λ = 139.8–197.0 nm, in a way that reduced the thermal Doppler broadening of the observed resonances. The resulting narrow spectral lines allowed the measurement of three transition frequencies with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing these values with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was derived as 1836.1526736(23). We briefly review these results.

  15. Cryogenic tunable microwave cavity at 13 GHz for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaguchi, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Suzukia, K; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Caspers, Friedhelm; Eades, John; Horib, M; Barna, D; Horváth, D; Juhász, B; Torie, H A; Yamazakif, T

    2004-01-01

    For the precise measurement of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium, microwave radiation of 12.9 GHz frequency is needed, tunable over . A cylindrical microwave cavity is used whose front and rear faces are meshed to allow the antiprotons and laser beams to enter. The cavity is embedded in a cryogenic helium gas target. Frequency tuning of with Q values of 2700?3000 was achieved using over-coupling and an external triple stub tuner. We also present Monte-Carlo simulations of the stopping distribution of antiprotons in the low-density helium gas using the GEANT4 package with modified energy loss routines.

  16. Cryogenic Tunable Microwave Cavity at 13 GHz for Hyperfine Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Barna, D; Eades, John; Gilg, H; Hayano, R S; Hori, Masaki; Horváth, M; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Juhász, B; Sakaguchi, J; Suzuki, K; Torii, H A; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Yamazaki, T

    2004-01-01

    For the precise measurement of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium microwave radiation of 12.9 GHz frequency is needed, tunable over ±100 MHz. A cylindrical microwave cavity is used whose front and rear faces are meshed to allow the antiprotons and laser beams to enter. The cavity is embedded in a cryogenic helium gas target. Frequency tuning of 300 MHz with Q values of 2700-3000 was achieved using over-coupling and an external triple stub tuner. We also present Monte-Carlo simulations of the stopping distribution of antiprotons in the low-density helium gas using the GEANT4 package with modified energy loss routines.

  17. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  18. Primary populations of metastable antiprotonic $^{4}He$ and $^{3}He$ atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakuguchi, J; Tasaki, T; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Initial population distributions of metastable antiprotonic **4He and **3He atoms over principal and angular momentum quantum numbers were investigated using laser spectroscopy. The total fractions of antiprotons captured into the metastable states of the atoms were deduced. Cascade calculations were performed using the measure populations to reproduce the delayed annihilation time spectrum. Results showed agreement between the simulated and measured spectra. (Edited abstract) 30 Refs.

  19. Antiproton radiotherapy: peripheral dose from secondary neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; DeMarco, John J.; Keyes, Roy

    2009-01-01

    is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT...

  20. Proposed New Antiproton Experiments at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense source of antiprotons. Recently various experiments have been proposed that can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Tevatron Collider running or after the Tevatron Collider finishes in about 2010. We discuss the physics goals and prospects of the proposed experiments.

  1. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  2. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A P; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-12-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  3. Antiprotons for Nuclear Structure Research

    CERN Document Server

    Lenske, H

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of antiprotons with nuclei is investigated in a model using the free space pN T-matrix and nuclear densities from HFB calculations. Elastic scattering and annihilation reactions are used as probes for nuclear sizes of exotic nuclei. The annihilation cross sections are related to the nuclear root-mean-square radii by a scaling law. By detecting a pion ejected from the annihilation zone in coincidence with the final A-1 system the the annihilation process can be localized spatially and used to to extract specific information on the nuclear wave function.

  4. It's About Time: Interpreting AMS Antimatter Data in Terms of Cosmic Ray Propagation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    If cosmic ray positrons come from a secondary origin, then their production spectrum is correlated with the production spectrum of other secondary particles such as boron and antiprotons through scattering cross sections measured in the laboratory. This allows to define a first-principle upper bound on the positron flux at the Earth, independent of propagation model assumptions. Using currently available B/C and antiproton/proton data, we show that the positron flux reported by AMS is consistent with the bound and saturates it at high energies. This coincidence is a compelling indication for a secondary source. We explain how improved AMS measurements of the high energy boron, antiproton, and secondary radioactive nuclei fluxes can corroborate or falsify the secondary source hypothesis. Assuming that the positrons are secondary, we show that AMS data imply a propagation time in the Galaxy of order 1Myr or less for cosmic rays with magnetic rigidity > 300 GV. This corresponds to an average traversed interstel...

  5. Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics with the Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TApAS*) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoszek, Larry [Bartoszek Engineering, Aurora, IL (United States); Piacentino, Giovanni M. [Univ. of Cassino (Italy); Phillips, Thomas J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Broemmelsiek, Daniel R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Brown, Charles N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, David C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hahn, Alan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Papadimitriou, Vaia [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stancari, Michelle [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stefanski, Ray [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Volk, James T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Werkema, Steven [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wester, Willam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); White, Herman B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yeh, G. P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Baldini, Wander [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Jackson, Gerald P. [Hbar Technologies, Chicago, IL (United States); Lau, Kwong [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Kaplan, Daniel M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Torun, Yagmur [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); White, Christopher G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States). et al.

    2008-01-01

    We propose to assemble a cost-effective, yet powerful, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events and use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, and precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration, with installation occurring during the accelerator downtime following the completion of the Tevatron run, and with funding largely from university research grants. The experiment will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle-physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S.

  6. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Della Valle, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    In a few dozen seconds, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit up to 1054 erg in terms of an equivalent isotropically radiated energy Eiso, so they can be observed up to z 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the universe. Here, we review the use of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter ΩM. We show that the present data set of GRBs, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that ΩM 0.3. We show that current (e.g. Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming gamma ray burst (GRB) experiments (e.g. CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us to constrain ΩM with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.

  7. X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS 1915+ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS. 1915+105 and the Evolution of Hard X-ray Spectrum. R. K. Manchanda, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India,. Received 1999 December 28; accepted 2000 February 9. Abstract. We report the spectral measurement of GRS 1915+105 ...

  8. Physics with antiprotons at P¯ANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, V.

    2013-12-01

    The P¯ANDA collaboration (anti-Proton ANnihilations at DArmstadt) is a next generation hadron physics experiment to be operated at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, Germany. It will use intensive cooled antiproton beams with a momentum between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c. The P¯ANDA detector is a state-of-the-art internal target detector allowing the detection and identification of neutral and charged particles almost in the whole solid angle.

  9. Fission of heavy hypernuclei formed in antiproton annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bocquet, J.P.; Ericsson, G.; Johansson, T.; Krogulski, T.; Lewis, R.A.; Malek, F.; Maurel, M.; Monnand, E.; Mougey, J.; Nifenecker, H.; Passaneau, J.; Perrin, P.; Polikanov, S.M.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Ristori, C.; Smith, G.A.; Tibell, G. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States) Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particles, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and University of Grenoble, Grenoble, CEDEX (France) Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University, P. O. Box 535, S-75121 Uppsala (Sweden) Warsaw University, Bialystok Branch, PL-15-424 Bialystok (Poland) DRFMC, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, Boite Postale 85X, 3804 1 Grenoble (France) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschumg Darmstadt, Postfach 110541, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Centre de Spectrometr

    1993-05-01

    Heavy hypernuclei are produced in the annihilation of antiprotons in [sup 238]U. The delayed fission of heavy hypernuclei and hypernuclei of fission fragments are observed by using the recoil-distance method in combination with measurement of secondary electron multiplicity. The lifetime of hypernuclei in the region of uranium is found to be (1.25[plus minus]0.15)[times]10[sup [minus]10] sec. It is observed that [Lambda] hyperons predominantly stick to the heavier fission fragments. The yield of hypernuclei is found to be (7.4[plus minus]1.7)[times]10[sup [minus]3] per stopped antiproton. No coincidences with [ital K][sup +] were found. Statistical and systematic errors on the number of events expected do not rule out this possibility.

  10. GEM-based beam profile monitors for the antiproton decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Pinto, S.; Jones, R.; Ropelewski, L.; Spanggaard, J.; Tranquille, G.

    2012-03-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~ 0.4% X0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEGIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  11. GEM-based beam profile monitors for the antiproton decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, S.; Ropelewski, L.; Spanggaard, J.; Tranquille, G.

    2012-01-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~0.4% X0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEGIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  12. Influence by x-ray facula on dimension measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xulei; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo; Zhao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Based on the imaging features of the original image intensifier of X-ray, the light halo caused by X-ray projective halation is analyzed, the result shows the stray X-ray energy is lower than the direct X-ray energy. The screen brightness generated by the image intensifier of X-ray stimulated by the stray X-ray energy is weaker than that generated by the direct X-ray energy. In addition the projector facula reflected from the direct X-ray is focused on the central region of X-ray image intensifier, therefore a toroidal ring similar to the solar halation is formed around the projector halation. The results of the theoretical analysis and experimental discovery show this phenomenon caused by X-ray tube on X-ray image intensifier can not be eliminated and in the system of X-ray size detection composed of them the X-ray halation will reduce the detection accuracy resulting in measurement results' deviation dispersion under given conditions. This kind of nonlinear system error can not be canceled out by the segmented modification of coefficient compensation but it can be restrained through the adjustment of correction coefficients. After the physical testing and comparison of the physical normal size the accuracy of 0.1mm of the compensated X-ray measurement results after the adjustment of correction coefficient has been reached. The results are highly reproducible and the method of the segmented coefficient compensation has been improved.

  13. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  14. Physics with antiprotons at P{sup ¯}ANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalov, V.

    2013-12-15

    The P{sup ¯}ANDA collaboration (anti-Proton ANnihilations at DArmstadt) is a next generation hadron physics experiment to be operated at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, Germany. It will use intensive cooled antiproton beams with a momentum between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c. The P{sup ¯}ANDA detector is a state-of-the-art internal target detector allowing the detection and identification of neutral and charged particles almost in the whole solid angle. One of the major goal of the experiment is the comprehensive study of charmonium and candidates to the hybrids, molecules and other exotics. Charmonium states with different quantum numbers can be reached via the decay of these resonances. The P{sup ¯}ANDA will scan the parameters of the resonances in formation mode with the use of the excellent momentum resolution Δp/p=10{sup 4} – 10{sup 5} of the HESR beam. The precision measurements of light mesons mass and width will be fulfilled as well as glueball search. Study of double hyperon production including their spin properties is another important item of the P{sup ¯}ANDA experiment.

  15. Analysis of subthreshold anti-proton production at KEK-PS and anti-proton potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, T. [Nihon Univ., College of Bioresource Sciences, Fujisawa, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    Using the RBUU approach we calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the p- and d-nucleus reactions done by the KEK-ps collaboration. Then we attempt to determine the depth of the anti-proton potential at the normal nuclear density from experimental data of these reactions, by introducing the (author)

  16. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  17. Cosmic Ray Mass Measurements with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitink, Stijn; Bonardi, Antonio; Corstanje, Arthur; Enriquez, J. Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Mitra, Pragati; Mulrey, Katie; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Jörg Paul; Rossetto, Laura; Schellart, Pim; Scholten, Olaf; Thoudam, Satyendra; Trinh, Gia; ter Veen, Sander; Winchen, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    In the dense core of LOFAR individual air showers are detected by hundreds of dipole antennas simultaneously. We reconstruct Xmax by using a hybrid technique that combines a two-dimensional fit of the radio profile to CoREAS simulations and a one-dimensional fit of the particle density distribution. For high-quality detections, the statistical uncertainty on Xmax is smaller than 20 g/cm2. We present results of cosmic-ray mass analysis in the energy regime of 1017 - 1017.5 eV. This range is of particular interest as it may harbor the transition from a Galactic to an extragalactic origin of cosmic rays.

  18. Experimental determination of the complete spin structure for anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K.D.; Berdoz, A.; Franklin, G.B.; Khaustov, P.; Meyer, C.A.; Bradtke, C.; Gehring, R.; Goertz, S.; Harmsen, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.; Dutz, H.; Pluckthun, M.; Schoch, B.; Dennert, H.; Eyrich, W.; Hauffe, J.; Metzger, A.; Moosburger, M.; Stinzing, F.; Wirth, St.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Heinsius, F.H.; Kriegler, E.; Schmitt, H.; Bunker, B.; Hertzog, D.; Jones, T.; Tayloe, R.; Broders, R.; Geyer, R.; Kilian, K.; Oelert, W.; Rohrich, K.; Sachs, K.; Sefzick, T.; Bassalleck, B.; Eilerts, S.; Fields, D.E.; Kingsberry, P.; Lowe, J.; Stotzer, R.; Johansson, T.; Pomp, S.; Wirth, St.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda -> anti-proton + \\pi^+ + proton + \\pi^- has been measured with high statistics at anti-proton beam momentum of 1.637 GeV/c. The use of a transversely-polarized frozen-spin target combined with the self-analyzing property of \\Lambda/anti-\\Lambda decay allows access to unprecedented information on the spin structure of the interaction. The most general spin-scattering matrix can be written in terms of eleven real parameters for each bin of scattering angle, each of these parameters is determined with reasonable precision. From these results all conceivable spin-correlations are determined with inherent self-consistency. Good agreement is found with the few previously existing measurements of spin observables in anti-proton + proton -> anti-\\Lambda + \\Lambda near this energy. Existing theoretical models do not give good predictions for those spin-observables that had not been previously measured.

  19. Effective X-ray beam size measurements of an X-ray tube and polycapillary X-ray lens system using a scanning X-ray fluorescence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherase, Mihai R., E-mail: mgherase@csufresno.edu; Vargas, Andres Felipe

    2017-03-15

    Size measurements of an X-ray beam produced by an integrated polycapillary X-ray lens (PXL) and X-ray tube system were performed by means of a scanning X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) method using three different metallic wires. The beam size was obtained by fitting the SXRF data with the analytical convolution between a Gaussian and a constant functions. For each chemical element in the wire an effective energy was calculated based on the incident X-ray spectrum and its photoelectric cross section. The proposed method can be used to measure the effective X-ray beam size in XRF microscopy studies.

  20. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huege, T.; Bray, J. D.; Buitink, S.; Dallier, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H.; James, C. W.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Scholten, O.; Schröder, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic

  1. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  2. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  3. The pinching method for Galactic cosmic ray positrons: Implications in the light of precision measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaud, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Caroff, S.; Genolini, Y.; Poulin, V.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Rosier, S.; Salati, P.; Vecchi, M.

    2017-09-01

    : We derive the positron flux from sub-GeV to TeV energies for both gas spallation and dark matter annihilation. We carry out a scan over the cosmic ray propagation parameters, which we strongly constrain by requiring that the secondary component does not overshoot the Ams-02 measurements. We find that only models with large diffusion coefficients are selected by this test. We then add to the secondary component the positron flux yielded by dark matter annihilation. We carry out a scan over WIMP mass to fit the annihilation cross-section and branching ratios, successively exploring the cases of a typical beyond-the-standard-model WIMP and an annihilation through light mediators. In the former case, the best fit yields a p-value of 0.4% for a WIMP mass of 264 GeV, a value that does not allow to reproduce the highest energy data points. If we require the mass to be larger than 500 GeV, the best-fit χ2 per degree of freedom always exceeds a value of 3. The case of light mediators is even worse, with a best-fit χ2 per degree of freedom always larger than 15. Conclusions: We explicitly show that the cosmic ray positron flux is a powerful and independent probe of Galactic cosmic ray propagation. It should be used as a complementary observable to other tracers such as the boron-to-carbon ratio. This analysis shows also that the pure dark matter interpretation of the positron excess is strongly disfavoured. This conclusion is based solely on the positron data, and no other observation, such as the antiproton flux or the CMB anisotropies, needs to be invoked.

  4. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  5. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [Institute of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allgaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Alozy, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bonomi, G. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); TIFPA/INFN Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cabaret, L. [Laboratory Aimé Cotton, University of Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, CNRS, University Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Science, University of Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Campbell, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Department of Physics, University of Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University, Prague, Brehov 7, 11519 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-21

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  6. Electron cooling of 8-GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler: Results and operational implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    Electron cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler storage ring is now routinely used in the collider operation. It requires a 0.1-0.5 A, 4.3 MeV dc electron beam and is designed to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the circulating antiproton beam. This paper briefly describes the characteristics of the electron beam that were achieved to successfully cool antiprotons. Then, results from various cooling force measurements along with comparison to a nonmagnetized model are presented. Finally, operational aspects of the implementation of electron cooling at the Recycler are discussed, such as adjustments to the cooling rate and the influence of the electron beam on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  7. A measurement of forward-backward charge asymmetry of electron-positron pairs in proton-antiproton collision at 1.8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veramendi, Gregory Francisco [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry for e+e- pairs resulting from γ*/Z decays with mass Mee > 40 GeV/c2. The Run II data sample consists of 72 pb-1 of data, which was collected by the CDF detector in $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is compared with predictions from the Standard Model.

  8. Measurement of the W + γ Production in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Michael H. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the $\\bar{p}$p → Wγ + X → evγ + X production cross section using data form the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The p$\\bar{p}$ collisions were provided by the Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Electroweak theory includes the trilinear vector boson coupling, WWγ, which contributes to the evγ final state. The electron decay channel of the W provides a clean sample to study the production of diboson pairs. The measurement of the production cross section tests the structure of the non-Abelian character of Electroweak theory.

  9. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jun-jie [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, ΓW, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb-1 data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, MT, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < MT < 200 GeV. The result if ΓW = 2.011 ± 0.093(stat) ± 0.107(syst) GeV.

  10. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  11. X-Ray-Scattering Measurements Of Strain In PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Lowry, Lynn E.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Yavrouian, Andre H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Internal stress relieved by heating above glass-transition temperature. Report describes wide-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry of specimens of poly(etheretherketone) having undergone various thermal treatments. Wide-angle x-ray scattering particularly useful in determining distances between atoms, crystallinity, and related microstructurally generated phenomena, as thermal expansion and strain. Calorimetric measurements aid interpretation of scattering measurements by enabling correlation with thermal effects.

  12. gamma-ray anisotropy measurement in coincidence mode

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Yong; LiuMinLiang; Liu Zhong; He Jian Jun; Guo Ying Xiang; Lei Xiang Guo; Zhang Yu Hu; Luo Wan Ju

    2002-01-01

    In order to assign gamma-ray multipolarity, a method of ADO ratios deduced from coincidence data has been described. The factors affecting the reliability of the ADO ratios have been discussed using an experimental detector configuration. The multipolarities for known gamma rays deduced by the ADO method are consistent with the previous results obtained from gamma-ray angular distribution and DCO ratio measurements. This consistence proves that the ADO method is reliable. The advantages of the ADO method over the traditional DCO ratio measurement have been discussed

  13. Top Production at the Tevatron: The Antiproton Awakens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Kenneth [Nebraska U.

    2017-07-01

    A long time ago, at a laboratory far, far away, the Fermilab Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. The CDF and D0 experiments each recorded datasets of about 10 fb$^{-1}$. As such experiments may never be repeated, these are unique datasets that allow for unique measurements. This presentation describes recent results from the two experiments on top-quark production rates, spin orientations, and production asymmetries, which are all probes of the $p\\bar{p}$ initial state.

  14. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method using the Lepton plus Jets Events in 1.96 Tev Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, Kohei [Waseda Univ., Shinjuku (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method (DLM) using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Tevatron produces top and anti-top pairs in pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used in this paper was accumulated from March 2002 through August 2003 which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 162 pb-1.

  15. An Antiproton Decelerator in the CERN PS Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Riunaud, J P; Baird, S A; Boillot, J; Bosser, Jacques; Brouet, M; Caspers, Friedhelm; Chanel, M; Chohan, V; Eriksson, T; Garoby, R; Giannini, R; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Gruber, J; Hémery, J Y; Koziol, Heribert; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Metzmacher, K D; Möhl, D; Mulder, H; Pedersen, F; Perriollat, F; Poncet, Alain; Riunaud, J P; Serre, C; Simon, Daniel Jean; Tranquille, G; Tuyn, Jan Willem Nicolaas; Williams, B; Williams, D J

    1996-01-01

    The present CERN PS low-energy antiproton complex involves 4 machines to collect, cool, decelerate and supply experiments with up to 1010 antiprotons per pulse and per hour of momenta ranging from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c. In view of a possible future physics programme requiring low energy antiprotons, mainly to carry out studies on antihydrogen, a simplified scheme providing at low cost antiprotons at 100 MeV/c has been studied. It requires only one machine, the present Antiproton Collector (AC) converted into a cooler and decelerator (Antiproton Decelerator, AD) and delivering beam to experiments in the hall of the present Antiproton Accumulator Complex (AAC) [1]. This paper describes the feasibility study of such a scheme [2].

  16. Measurements of bottom anti-bottom azimuthal production correlations in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN,

    2004-12-01

    The authors have measured the azimuthal angular correlation of b{bar b} production, using 86.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during 1994-1995. In high-energy p{bar p} collisions, such as at the Tevatron, b{bar b} production can be schematically categorized into three mechanisms. The leading-order (LO) process is ''flavor creation'', where both b and {bar b} quarks substantially participate in the hard scattering and result in a distinct back-to-back signal in final state. The ''flavor excitation'' and the ''gluon splitting'' processes, which appear at next-leading-order (NLO), are known to make a comparable contribution to total b{bar b} cross section, while providing very different opening angle distributions from the LO process. An azimuthal opening angle between bottom and anti-bottom, {Delta}{phi}, has been used for the correlation measurement to probe the interaction creating b{bar b} pairs. The {Delta}{phi} distribution has been obtained from two different methods. one method measures the {Delta}{phi} between bottom hadrons using events with two reconstructed secondary vertex tags. The other method uses b{bar b} {yields} (J/{psi}X)({ell}X') events, where the charged lepton ({ell}) is an electron (e) or a muon ({mu}), to measure {Delta}{phi} between bottom quarks. The b{bar b} purity is determined as a function of {Delta}{phi} by fitting the decay length of the J/{psi} and the impact parameter of the {ell}. Both methods quantify the contribution from higher-order production mechanisms by the fraction of the b{bar b} pairs produced in the same azimuthal hemisphere, f{sub toward}. The measured f{sub toward} values are consistent with both parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO QCD predictions.

  17. PAMELA mission: heralding a new era in cosmic ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricciarini S. B.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available After seven years of data taking in space, the experiment PAMELA is showing very interesting features in cosmic rays, namely in the fluxes of protons, helium, electrons, that might change our basic vision of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy. In addition, PAMELA measurements of cosmic antiproton and positron fluxes are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. The continuous particle detection is allowing a constant monitoring of the solar activity and detailed study of the solar modulation for a long period, giving important improvements to the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA is also measuring the radiation environment around the Earth, and has recently discovered an antiproton radiation belt.

  18. X-Ray Polarization Measurements with the EXIST Hard X-Ray Survey Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, Henric; Garson, A., III; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed NASA mission for scanning the entire sky in intermediate and hard X-rays. The EXIST mission includes a wide field of view High Energy Telescope (HET) covering the 5-600 keV energy range, and an infrared telescope. The HET has the capability to measure the energy dependent X-ray polarization properties of moderately bright and bright X-ray sources. Here we report on a study of the polarization sensitivity of EXIST as a function of the integration time. Broadband X-ray polarization measurements with EXIST have the potential to make important contributions to our understanding of a number of astrophysical source types including binary black holes, accreting neutron stars, magnetars, pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. EXIST observations of the X-rays from binary black holes can be used to constrain the spins of black holes. Last but not least, EXIST observations of active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts can be used for extremely sensitive Lorentz Invariance tests.

  19. Proton-Antiproton Pair Production in Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hakobyan, R.S.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> e+e- proton antiproton is studied with the L3 detector at LEP. The analysis is based on data collected at e+e- center-of-mass energies from 183 GeV to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 667 pb-1. The gamma gamma -> proton antiproton differential cross section is measured in the range of the two-photon center-of-mass energy from 2.1 GeV to 4.5 GeV. The results are compared to the predictions of the three-quark and quark-diquark models.

  20. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  1. Measurement Of The Drell-yan Differential Cross Section And Forward-backward Asymmetry In Proton Antiproton Decays To Electron Positron Events Using The Dzero Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gelhaus, R

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of the inclusive Drell-Yan e+e- differential cross section (dσ/dMe+e -) and forward-backward asymmetry (AFB ) as a function of the dielectron invariant mass over the range 70--400 GeV/c2. The data sample consists of 177.3 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s = 1.96 TeV collected by the DØ detector. The results are consistent with the predictions of the standard model.

  2. Velocity measurement by coherent x-ray heterodyning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lhermitte, Julien R. M.; Rogers, Michael C.; Manet, Sabine; Sutton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present a small-angle coherent x-ray scattering technique used for measuring flow velocities in slow moving materials. The technique is an extension of X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS): It involves mixing the scattering from moving tracer particles with a static reference that heterodynes the signal. This acts to elongate temporal effects caused by flow in homodyne measurements, allowing for a more robust measurement of flow properties. Using coherent x-ray heterodyning, velocities ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm/s were measured for a viscous fluid pushed through a rectangular channel. We describe experimental protocols and theory for making these Poiseuille flow profile measurements and also develop the relevant theory for using heterodyne XPCS to measure velocities in uniform and Couette flows.

  3. Measurement of charged particle multiplicities in gluon and quark jets in proton anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN,

    2004-07-01

    The authors report the first model independent measurement of charged particle multiplicities in quark and gluon jets, N{sub q} and N{sub g}, produced at the Tevatron in p{bar p} collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.8 TeV and recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The measurements are made for jets with average energies 41 and 53 GeV by counting charged particle tracks in cones with opening angle of {theta}{sub c} = 0.28, 0.36, and 0.47 rad around the jet axis. The corresponding jet hardness Q = E{sub jet}{theta}{sub c} varies in the range from 12 GeV to 25 GeV. At Q = 19 GeV, the ratio of multiplicities r = N{sub g}/N{sub q} is found to be 1.64 {+-} 0.17, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are added in quadrature. The results are in agreement with re-summed perturbative QCD calculations.

  4. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cembranos, J.A.R.; Gammaldi, V.; Maroto, A.L., E-mail: cembra@ucm.es, E-mail: vivigamm@ucm.es, E-mail: maroto@fis.ucm.es [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Facultad Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high dark matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma-rays have been observed by different telescopes, although their origin is not clear. In this work, we estimate the possible antiproton flux component associated with this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess. We estimate the sensitivity of PAMELA to this new primary antiproton source, which depends on the diffusion model and its spectral features. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production. This latter spectrum is typical in the production from annihilating or decaying dark matter. We pay particular attention to the case of a heavy dark matter candidate, which could be associated with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) data observed from the J1745-290 source.

  5. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first e...

  6. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    of energy per nucleon. Results In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-average LET of about 4 keV/µm which is very different from the expected 0.6 keV/µm of an equivalent primary proton beam. Even though the fluence of secondaries is a magnitude less than the fluence...

  7. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, John C [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  8. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  9. Polarization measurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

  10. Measurement of W + γ Production in the W to Muon Decay Channel in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimoto, Naho [Okayama Univ. (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    The production cross section and the kinematic properties of the decay products of Wγ in the W → μv decay channel from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV are presented. The measurement use the high pT muon data from the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The data were collected between March 2002 and September 2003. The total integrated luminosities are 192 pb-1 with the muon detector which covers the pseudorapidity region of |η| ≤ 0.6 and 175 pb-1 with the muon detector covering the region 0.6 ≤ |η| ≤ 1.0. In the Standard Model the μvγ final states occur due to Wγ → μvγ production and via muon Bremsstrahlung, W → μv → μvγ. W bosons are selected in their muon decay mode. Additionally, photons with transverse energy above 7 GeV, pseudorapidity in the central region (|η| < 1.1) and muon-photon angular separation ΔR(μ,γ) > 0.7 are selected. The author observes a total of 128 Wγ candidates, whereas the Standard Model expectation is 142.4 ± 9.5 events. The Wγ production cross section is found to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → μvγ) = 16.3 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.8(syst.) ± 1.2(lum.) [pb]. The theoretical prediction for this cross section is σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → lvγ) = 19.3 ± 1.4(th.) [pb]. The Standard Model predictions for several kinematic + variables are compared with data for ETγ > 7 GeV and ΔR(μ,γ) > 0.7. The measured cross section and the photon and W boson production kinematics are found to agree with the Standard Model predictions.

  11. Measurements of the B Production Cross Section in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using semileptonic decays of b hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, James Alexander [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section of b hadron (Hb) production in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They use 83 pb-1 of data taken between october 2002 and May 2003 that was collected with a trigger sensitive to high momentum muons and displaced tracks. They use partially reconstructed decays in the following modes: Hb → μ- $\\bar{v}$μD0X, D0 → K-π+, and Hb → μ-$\\bar{v}$μD*+ X, D*+ → D0π+, D0 → K- π+, and their charge conjugates. They correct for the backgrounds from c$\\bar{c}$ and b$\\bar{b}$ decays, for trigger and reconstruction efficiencies, and for detector acceptance. They report the total cross section above a minimum transverse momentum (pT) of 9 GeV/c for the rapidity range |y| ≤ 0.6.

  12. Measurement of the Spin Correlation in the Top Quark Pair Production using the Dilepton Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemasa, Kenichi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    One of the most remarkable properties of the top quark is its extremely short lifetime, which allows us to observe the top quark spin at its production. That means a spin correlation at $t\\bar{t}$ production is possible to be observed. In this thesis, we report on a measurement of the correlation coefficient between top quark spin and antitop quark spin in the beam basis at top quark pair production. We select $t\\bar{t}$ pair production candidates by requiring two high transverse momentum leptons, two jets and large missing $E_T$ . In order to reconstruct the angular distribution of top quark decay products, we perform full kinematical reconstruction using predicted distributions of $p^{t\\bar{t}}_z$ , $p^{t\\bar{t}}_T$ and $M_{t\\bar{t}}$. We make signal and background templates from admixture of Monte Carlo simulations and data-based background modelings. Then, we perform unbinned likelihood fit of angular distribution of data to signal and background templates and obtain result. This analysis is based on the data of 5.1 $fb^{-1}$ collected with the Collider Detector Facility (CDF) at the Fermilab Tevatron between March 2002 and June 2009. We observe 334 $t\\bar{t}$ candidate events. We determine a confidence interval at 68% level for the correlation coefficient $\\kappa$ to be -0.520 < $\\kappa$ < 0.605 or $\\kappa$ = $0.042^{+0.563}_{-0.562}$ on the assumption of $M_{top}$ = 172.5 GeV/$c^2$.

  13. Measurements at LHC and their relevance for cosmic ray physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Many LHC measurements are already used to improve hadronic interaction models used in cosmic ray analyses. This already had a positive effect on the model dependence of crucial data analyses. Some of the data and the model tuning is reviewed. However, the LHC still has a lot more potential to provide crucial information. Since the start of Run2 the highest accelerator beam energies are reached and no further increase can be expected for a long time. First data of Run2 are published and the fundamental performance of cosmic ray hadronic interaction models can be scrutinized. The relevance of LHC data in general for cosmic ray data analyses is demonstrated.

  14. Status Report for Experiment AD-4/ACE Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, M H; Angelopoulos, Angelo; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; Currell, Fred; De Marco, John; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Kavanagh, Joy; Iwamoto, Kei; Jäkel, Oliver; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Knudsen, Helge; Kovacevic, Sandra; McBride, Bill; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen; Ratib, Osman; Schettino, Giuseppe; Timson, David; Singers-Sørensen, Brita; Solberg, Timothy; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Status report for experiment AD-4/ACE showing recent progress in RBE measurements for V79 Chinese Hamster cells irradiated with antiprotons. Also discussed are initial test experiments using the H2AX assay to study DNA damage to cells and initial experiments using liquid ionization chambers.

  15. Gamma-ray line measurements from supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Gamma ray lines are expected to be emitted as part of the afterglow of supernova explosions, because radioactive decay of freshly synthesised nuclei occurs. Significant radioactive gamma ray line emission is expected from 56Ni and 44Ti decay on time scales of the initial explosion (56Ni, τ ~days) and the young supernova remnant (44Ti,τ ~90 years). Less specific, and rather informative for the supernova population as a whole, are lessons from longer lived isotopes such as 26Al and 60Fe. From isotopes of elements heavier than iron group elements, any interesting gamma-ray line emission is too faint to be observable. Measurements with space-based gamma-ray telescopes have obtained interesting gamma ray line emissions from two core collapse events, Cas A and SN1987A, and one thermonuclear event, SN2014J. We discuss INTEGRAL data from all above isotopes, including all line and continuum signatures from these two objects, and the surveys for more supernovae, that have been performed by gamma ray spectrometry. Our objective here is to illustrate what can be learned from gamma-ray line emission properties about the explosions and their astrophysics.

  16. Compensated gamma ray densimeter measures slurry densities in flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, R.J.; Zimmerman, C.W.

    1973-09-01

    A gamma-ray densitometer has been compensated so that the density of flowing oil-field slurries is measured accurately and independent of slurry composition. Accuracies over the range of densities employed in oil-field applications is within +.25 lb/gal of true density. Normal drilling mud densities are measured while flowing through the rig's standpipe at accuracies of +0.1 lb/gal of true density. Until the compensated gamma-ray densitometer was developed, it was necessary to recalibrate densitometers when slurries containing elements of high atomic numbers were present. Most oil-field cementing slurries contain no significant amounts of high atomic number elements. However, some cement slurries and drilling mud contain barite (atomic number 56) which precluded accurate measurements by earlier gamma-ray densitometers without recalibration for changes in slurry composition.

  17. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  18. Neutron/Gamma-ray discrimination through measures of fit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, Moslem [Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanicka 68a, 602 00 Brno, (Czech Republic); Prenosil, Vaclav; Cvachovec, Frantisek [Faculty of Military Technology, University of Defence, Kounicova 156/65, 662 10 Brno, (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Statistical tests and their underlying measures of fit can be utilized to separate neutron/gamma-ray pulses in a mixed radiation field. In this article, first the application of a sample statistical test is explained. Fit measurement-based methods require true pulse shapes to be used as reference for discrimination. This requirement makes practical implementation of these methods difficult; typically another discrimination approach should be employed to capture samples of neutrons and gamma-rays before running the fit-based technique. In this article, we also propose a technique to eliminate this requirement. These approaches are applied to several sets of mixed neutron and gamma-ray pulses obtained through different digitizers using stilbene scintillator in order to analyze them and measure their discrimination quality. (authors)

  19. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Van Belle, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. X-ray scattering measurements from thin-foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; BYRNAK, BP; Hornstrup, Allan

    1992-01-01

    Thin foil X-ray mirrors are to be used as the reflecting elements in the telescopes of the X-ray satellites Spectrum-X-Gamma (SRG) and ASTRO-D. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements from the Au coated and dip-lacquered Al foils are presented. These were obtained from SRG mirrors positioned...... in a test quadrant of the telescope structure and from ASTRO-D foils held in a simple fixture. The X-ray data is compared with laser data and other surface structure data such as STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and electron micrography. The data obtained at Cu K-alpha(1), (8.05 keV) from all...

  1. Two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Barna, Daniel; Andreas Dax,; Hayano, Ryugo; Friedreich, Susanne; Juhász, Bertalan; Pask, Thomas; Widmann, Eberhard; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; 10.1038/nature10260

    2013-01-01

    Physical laws are believed to be invariant under the combined transformations of charge, parity and time reversal (CPT symmetry). This implies that an antimatter particle has exactly the same mass and absolute value of charge as its particle counterpart. Metastable antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}He^+$) is a three-body atom2 consisting of a normal helium nucleus, an electron in its ground state and an antiproton ($\\bar{p}$) occupying a Rydberg state with high principal and angular momentum quantum numbers, respectively n and l, such that n ≈ l + 1 ≈ 38. These atoms are amenable to precision laser spectroscopy, the results of which can in principle be used to determine the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio and to constrain the equality between the antiproton and proton charges and masses. Here we report two-photon spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, in which $\\bar{p}^{3}He^{+}$ and $\\bar{p}^{4}He^{+}$ isotopes are irradiated by two counter-propagating laser beams. This excites nonlinear, two-phot...

  2. Antiproton rate estimates for the 1996 E866 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, J.Y.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Stanskas, P.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College park, MD (United States)

    1996-02-01

    There has always been a strong interest to study antiprotons produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. A specific point has been a puzzle for years in that both ARC and RQMD predict the correct antiproton yield for Au+Au collisions at the AGS, but with two entirely different physical explanations. The RQMD is able to describe available data by relying on the enhanced production of antiprotons, followed by the annihilation of a large fraction of the produced antiprotons. Conversely, ARC describes the data by producing less antiprotons initially, but the annihilation of the antiprotons is {open_quotes}screened{close_quotes} in the high density environment of the collision on account of collisions with mesons. It is then particularly interesting to studying the shadowing effect in the Au-Au collisions at the AGS to shine a light in the theoretical debate in heavy-ion collisions.

  3. Measurements of radio frequent cavity volt ages by X-ray spectrum measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with X-ray spectrum measurement as a method for the measurement of radio frequent cavity voltage and the theory of X-ray spectrum calculation. Experimental results at 72 MHz for three different values of the radio frequent power of ACCEL K250 super conducting cyclotron are being presented.

  4. An antiproton catalyst for inertial confinement fusion propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Raymond A.; Newton, Richard; Smith, Gerald A.; Toothacker, William S.; Kanzleiter, Randall J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an inertial confinement fusion propulsion system involving an antiproton catalyst (for antiproton-induced fission). It is argued that, when the two processes, fusion and antimatter annihilation, are combined into one system, a viable candidate propulsion system for planetary exploration emerges. It is shown that as much as 7.6 GW of power, well within the requrements for interplanetary travel, can be achieved using existing driver technologies and available quantities of antiprotons.

  5. Challenging the Standard Model: High-Precision Comparisons of the Fundamental Properties of Protons and Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE-CERN) at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility is aiming at high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios, magnetic moments and lifetimes. Such experiments provide sensitive tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance in the baryon sector. BASE was approved in 2013 and has measured since then, utilizing single-particle multi-Penning-trap techniques, the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio with a fractional precision of 69 p.p.t. [1], as well as the antiproton magnetic moment with fractional precisions of 0.8 p.p.m. and 1.5 p.p.b., respectively [2]. At our matter companion experiment BASE-Mainz, we have performed proton magnetic moment measurements with fractional uncertainties of 3.3 p.p.b. [3] and 0.3 p.p.b. [4]. By combining the data of both experiments we provide a baryon-magnetic-moment based CPT test gpbar/gp = 1.000 000 000 2(15), which improves the uncertainty of p...

  6. Magnetic horn of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    In the 1960s, the invention of this "current sheet lens" has helped to greatly improve the flux of neutrino beams. It was used again at the AA, collecting antiprotons from the production target at angles too large to fit into the acceptance of the AA. It was machined from aluminium to a thickness of 1.4 mm and pulsed at 400 kA for 15 microseconds (half-sine).

  7. Kaons and antiproton-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, S; Rahman, S N

    2003-01-01

    The elastic scattering of Kaons and antiprotons from several nuclei is studied in the framework of the generalized diffraction model due to Frahn and Venter. The systematics of reaction cross section and the standard nuclear radius, as given by the model, are discussed. The parameters obtained from the elastic scattering analyses are used, without any adjustment, to reproduce some inelastic scattering angular distributions and the corresponding deformation parameters are determined.

  8. Cosmic-ray neutron simulations and measurements in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-10-01

    This study used simulations of galactic cosmic ray in the atmosphere to investigate the neutron background environment in Taiwan, emphasising its altitude dependence and spectrum variation near interfaces. The calculated results were analysed and compared with two measurements. The first measurement was a mobile neutron survey from sea level up to 3275 m in altitude conducted using a car-mounted high-sensitivity neutron detector. The second was a previous measured result focusing on the changes in neutron spectra near air/ground and air/water interfaces. The attenuation length of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere was estimated to be 163 g cm(-2) in Taiwan. Cosmic-ray neutron spectra vary with altitude and especially near interfaces. The determined spectra near the air/ground and air/water interfaces agree well with measurements for neutrons below 10 MeV. However, the high-energy portion of spectra was observed to be much higher than our previous estimation. Because high-energy neutrons contribute substantially to a dose evaluation, revising the annual sea-level effective dose from cosmic-ray neutrons at ground level in Taiwan to 35 μSv, which corresponds to a neutron flux of 5.30 × 10(-3) n cm(-2) s(-1), was suggested. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The 2003 update of antiproton mass by precision three-body calculation of antiprotonic helium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Kino, Y; Kudo, H

    2004-01-01

    The Particle Listings 2000 edition gave the recommended value of antiproton mass, for the first time, to be within 5 * 10/sup -7/ in the relative deviation from the proton mass; this can be a test of the CPT invariance. The value was derived by our precision 3-body calculation, using the Gaussian expansion method, to analyze the laser spectroscopy data of metastable states in antiprotonic helium atoms taken at CERN. The 2002 edition and the 2003 updated version reported an one-order smaller value, 6 * 10/sup -8/, based on further development of both the experiment and our calculation.

  10. Recent X-ray hybrid CMOS detector developments and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Samuel V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.; Wages, Mitchell; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; McQuaide, Maria; Bray, Evan; Kern, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The Penn State X-ray detector lab, in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS), have progressed their efforts to improve soft X-ray Hybrid CMOS detector (HCD) technology on multiple fronts. Having newly acquired a Teledyne cryogenic SIDECARTM ASIC for use with HxRG devices, measurements were performed with an H2RG HCD and the cooled SIDECARTM. We report new energy resolution and read noise measurements, which show a significant improvement over room temperature SIDECARTM operation. Further, in order to meet the demands of future high-throughput and high spatial resolution X-ray observatories, detectors with fast readout and small pixel sizes are being developed. We report on characteristics of new X-ray HCDs with 12.5 micron pitch that include in-pixel CDS circuitry and crosstalk-eliminating CTIA amplifiers. In addition, PSU and TIS are developing a new large-scale array Speedster-EXD device. The original 64 × 64 pixel Speedster-EXD prototype used comparators in each pixel to enable event driven readout with order of magnitude higher effective readout rates, which will now be implemented in a 550 × 550 pixel device. Finally, the detector lab is involved in a sounding rocket mission that is slated to fly in 2018 with an off-plane reflection grating array and an H2RG X-ray HCD. We report on the planned detector configuration for this mission, which will increase the NASA technology readiness level of X-ray HCDs to TRL 9.

  11. Magnetic x-ray measurements using the elliptical multipole wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montano, P. A.; Li, Y.; Beno, M. A.; Jennings, G.; Kimball, C. W.

    1999-10-26

    The EMW at the BESSRC beam lines at the APS provides high photon flux at high energies with the capability of producing circular polarization on axis. The authors observe a high degree of circularly polarized x-rays at such energies. The polarization and frequency tunability of the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW) is an ideal source for many magnetic measurements from X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) to Compton scattering experiments. They performed Compton scattering measurements to determine the polarization and photon flux at the sample as a function of the deflection parameters K{sub y} and K{sub x}. They used for their measurements a Si (220) Laue monochromator providing simultaneous photon energies at 50 keV, 100 keV and 150 keV. Magnetic Compton Profiles were determined by either switching the magnet polarity or the photon helicity. The results obtained using Fe(110) single crystals were very similar.

  12. Determination of the measurement threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2017-03-01

    In gamma-ray spectrometry the measurement threshold describes the lover boundary of the interval of peak areas originating in the response of the spectrometer to gamma-rays from the sample measured. In this sense it presents a generalization of the net indication corresponding to the decision threshold, which is the measurement threshold at the quantity value zero for a predetermined probability for making errors of the first kind. Measurement thresholds were determined for peaks appearing in the spectra of radon daughters 214Pb and 214Bi by measuring the spectrum 35 times under repeatable conditions. For the calculation of the measurement threshold the probability for detection of the peaks and the mean relative uncertainty of the peak area were used. The relative measurement thresholds, the ratios between the measurement threshold and the mean peak area uncertainty, were determined for 54 peaks where the probability for detection varied between some percent and about 95% and the relative peak area uncertainty between 30% and 80%. The relative measurement thresholds vary considerably from peak to peak, although the nominal value of the sensitivity parameter defining the sensitivity for locating peaks was equal for all peaks. At the value of the sensitivity parameter used, the peak analysis does not locate peaks corresponding to the decision threshold with the probability in excess of 50%. This implies that peaks in the spectrum may not be located, although the true value of the measurand exceeds the decision threshold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dark matter annihilation into four-body final states and implications for the AMS antiproton excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Steven J.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Strigari, Louis E.

    2018-01-01

    We consider dark matter annihilation into a general set of final states of standard model particles, including two-body and four-body final states that result from the decay of intermediate states. For dark matter masses ˜10 - 105 GeV , we use updated data from Planck and from high gamma-ray experiments such as Fermi-LAT, MAGIC, and VERITAS to constrain the annihilation cross section for each final state. The Planck constraints are the most stringent over the entire mass range for annihilation into light leptons, and the Fermi-LAT constraints are the most stringent for four-body final states up to masses ˜104 GeV . We consider these constraints in light of the recent AMS antiproton results, and show that for light mediators it is possible to explain the AMS data with dark matter, and remain consistent with Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy measurements, for mχ˜60 - 100 GeV mass dark matter and mediator masses mϕ/mχ≲1 .

  14. Possible Dark Matter Annihilation Signal in the AMS-02 Antiproton Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming-Yang; Yuan, Qiang; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2017-05-12

    Using the latest AMS-02 cosmic-ray antiproton flux data, we search for a potential dark matter annihilation signal. The background parameters about the propagation, source injection, and solar modulation are not assumed a priori but based on the results inferred from the recent B/C ratio and proton data measurements instead. The possible dark matter signal is incorporated into the model self-consistently under a Bayesian framework. Compared with the astrophysical background-only hypothesis, we find that a dark matter signal is favored. The rest mass of the dark matter particles is ∼20-80  GeV, and the velocity-averaged hadronic annihilation cross section is about (0.2-5)×10^{-26}  cm^{3} s^{-1}, in agreement with that needed to account for the Galactic center GeV excess and/or the weak GeV emission from dwarf spheroidal galaxies Reticulum 2 and Tucana III. Tight constraints on the dark matter annihilation models are also set in a wide mass region.

  15. X-Ray Opacity Measurements of Solid Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Justin; Preston, Thomas; Ciricosta, Orlando; Vinko, Sam; Hollebon, Patrick; Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Burian, Thomas; Chalupsky, Jaromir; Vozda, Vojtech; Hall, Frank; Spindloe, Christopher; Zastrau, Ulf; Dakovski, Georgi; Minitti, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Accurate opacity measurements of dense plasmas are scarce, in part owing to the difficulty in creating samples that are uniform in density and temperature, and the associated undertaking of an opacity measurement on a time-scale short compared with disassembly. Here we demonstrate that x-ray opacity information can be obtained from emissivity measurements of solid-density targets of varying but known thickness, irradiated by a sub-100-fsec x-ray pulse from LCLS. As the emission is generated by the creation of core-holes created by the FEL, and they are rapidly filled on a femtosecond time-scale, information is gleaned before any hydrodynamic motion. Comparision with simulations based on the SCFLY atomic-kinetics code reveal that the time-integrated emission data can provide a strong constraint on the opacity under well-defined conditions of density and temperature, and further demonstrate that the technique is relatively insensitive to x-ray pulse-length and spatial distribution. As an example we present measurements of the K-shell opacity of a solid-density magnesium plasma for all ion stages up to helium-like.

  16. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  17. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  18. X-ray speckle measurements of concentrated nanoemulsions under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidib, Samy; Rogers, Michael; Leheny, Robert; Chen, Kui; Mason, Thomas; Harden, James

    We present in situ X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) measurements of a set of concentrated nanoemulsions subjected to oscillatory shear. The nanoemulsion set contained samples with varying packing fractions of oil droplets (r 20nm) above the jamming transition. In order to study their elasticity, yielding, and flow at various shear amplitudes, we employed stroboscopic coherent X-ray scattering measurements triggered at the maximums of the shear cycle. The degree of correlation between speckle in images taken a full period apart is a direct measurement of particle rearrangements during cycling. A comparison of such XPCS ``echo'' measurements with rheological measurements shows an onset of irreversible particle motion at shear strains below the crossover of the storage and loss moduli, which is typically used to indicate the transition to viscoplastic flow. Moreover, the XPCS echo measurements indicate that particle irreversibility increases rapidly with shear amplitude, in contrast to the comparably smooth transition to yielding shown in bulk rheology measurements. However, the macroscopic yield strain observed in rheology and the microscopic yield strain identified from XPCS, which were strong functions of droplet packing fraction, tracked each other closely.

  19. FPGA-Based X-Ray Detection and Measurement for an X-Ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle; Hill, Joanne; Black, Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    This technology enables detection and measurement of x-rays in an x-ray polarimeter using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The technology was developed for the Gravitational and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) mission. It performs precision energy and timing measurements, as well as rejection of non-x-ray events. It enables the GEMS polarimeter to detect precisely when an event has taken place so that additional measurements can be made. The technology also enables this function to be performed in an FPGA using limited resources so that mass and power can be minimized while reliability for a space application is maximized and precise real-time operation is achieved. This design requires a low-noise, charge-sensitive preamplifier; a highspeed analog to digital converter (ADC); and an x-ray detector with a cathode terminal. It functions by computing a sum of differences for time-samples whose difference exceeds a programmable threshold. A state machine advances through states as a programmable number of consecutive samples exceeds or fails to exceed this threshold. The pulse height is recorded as the accumulated sum. The track length is also measured based on the time from the start to the end of accumulation. For track lengths longer than a certain length, the algorithm estimates the barycenter of charge deposit by comparing the accumulator value at the midpoint to the final accumulator value. The design also employs a number of techniques for rejecting background events. This innovation enables the function to be performed in space where it can operate autonomously with a rapid response time. This implementation combines advantages of computing system-based approaches with those of pure analog approaches. The result is an implementation that is highly reliable, performs in real-time, rejects background events, and consumes minimal power.

  20. Annihilation at rest of antiprotons and protons into neutral particles

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Baker, C.A.; Barnett, B.M.; Batty, C.J.; Benayoun, M.; Blum, P.; Braune, K.; Bugg, D.V.; Case, T.; Crede, V.; Crowe, K.M.; Doser, M.; Dunnweber, W.; Engelhardt, D.; Faessler, M.A.; Haddock, R.P.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heinzelmann, M.; Hessey, N.P.; Hidas, P.; Jamnik, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammel, P.; Kisiel, J.; Klempt, E.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Kurilla, U.; Landua, R.; Matthay, H.; Meyer, C.A.; Meyer-Wildhagen, F.; Montanet, L.; Ouared, R.; Peters, K.; Pick, B.; Popkov, W.; Ratajczak, M.; Regenfus, Christian; Reinnarth, J.; Roethel, W.; Sarantsev, A.V.; Spanier, S.; Strohbusch, U.; Suffert, M.; Suh, J.S.; Thoma, U.; Uman, I.; Wallis-Plachner, S.; Walther, D.; Wiedner, U.; Wittmack, K.; Zou, B.S.

    2003-01-01

    Annihilation of antiprotons and protons at rest into neutral particles has been studied with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR. Annihilation frequencies are determined for final states containing π 0 , η , η ′ and ω mesons using a liquid and a room temperature, 12 bar, gaseous hydrogen target. Including annihilation frequencies for production of neutral kaons from other experiments, the identified reactions for annihilation in liquid hydrogen add up to a branching fraction of (3.56±0.28)% per annihilation compared to the frequency of (3.50±0.30)% with which we observe the all-neutral decay modes inclusively. Since the exclusive final states are normalized to the Crystal Barrel measurement of the π 0 π 0 branching ratio, the latter result is strongly supported by this present study.

  1. X-Ray Topographic Measurements of Strain Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    Measurements of Strain Fields 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMDER 17. AUTHOR(.) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMSER(a) S.R. Stock, Haydn Chen and H.K. Birnbaum USN...STRAIN FIELDS S.R. Stock, Haydn Chen and H.K. Birnbaum University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Department of Metallurgy and Mining Eng. Urbana, IL...any purpose of the U.S. government is permitted. 88 09 07 18. - " mIII X-RAY TOPOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENT OF STRAIN FIELDS S.R. Stock*, Haydn Chen and H.K

  2. Investigation of silicon sensors for their use as antiproton annihilation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics and Technology, Allégaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [University of Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, via Valleggio 11, Como (Italy); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-11-21

    We present here a new application of silicon sensors aimed at the direct detection of antinucleons annihilations taking place inside the sensor's volume. Such detectors are interesting particularly for the measurement of antimatter properties and will be used as part of the gravity measurement module in the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. One of the goals of the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen with 1% precision. Three different silicon sensor geometries have been tested with an antiproton beam to investigate their properties as annihilation detection devices: strip planar, 3D pixels and monolithic pixel planar. In all cases we were successfully detecting annihilations taking place in the sensor and we were able to make a first characterization of the clusters and tracks.

  3. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Andrew Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths (~ micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  4. Buffer-gas cooling of antiprotonic helium to 1.5 to 1.7 K, and antiproton-to–electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Sótér, Anna; Barna, Daniel; Dax, Andreas; Hayano, Ryugo; Kobayashi, Takumi; Murakami, Yohei; Todoroki, Koichi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Charge, parity, and time reversal (CPT) symmetry implies that a particle and its antiparticle have the same mass. The antiproton-to-electron mass ratio Embedded Image can be precisely determined from the single-photon transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium. We measured 13 such frequencies with laser spectroscopy to a fractional precision of 2.5 × 10−9 to 16 × 10−9. About 2 × 109 antiprotonic helium atoms were cooled to temperatures between 1.5 and 1.7 kelvin by using buffer-gas cooling in cryogenic low-pressure helium gas; the narrow thermal distribution led to the observation of sharp spectral lines of small thermal Doppler width. The deviation between the experimental frequencies and the results of three-body quantum electrodynamics calculations was reduced by a factor of 1.4 to 10 compared with previous single-photon experiments. From this, Embedded Image was determined as 1836.1526734(15), which agrees with a recent proton-to-electron experimental value within 8 × 10−10.

  5. Antiproton-Proton Glory Scattering

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment measures @*p and K|-p backwards scattering between 8 and 16 GeV/c in the Omega spectrometer using the S1 beam, with sensitivities of several events per nanobarn. The mechanism responsible for backward scattering in channels not mediated by particle exchange is not understood, and could be almost energy-independent glory scattering, especially since relatively high cross sections of 190~(@*p) and 120~(K|-p)nb have been measured earlier at 5~GeV/c. @p|-p backwards scattering is measured for monitoring purposes. The trigger requires a forward particle of momentum close to the beam momentum. Absence of light in the two forward Cerenkov counters indicates that the particle is a proton. Combinations of an incident @p|- and an outgoing K|+, or an incident K|- or @* and an outgoing @p|+, cover the following byproducts: @*p~@A~@p|+@p|- which is an (allowed) baryon exchange reaction, and the exotic exchange reactions @p|-p~@A~K|+Y K|-p~@A~@p|+Y|-, where Y|- may be the @S|- or the Y*|-(1385).

  6. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, C., E-mail: celine.zuber@cea.fr; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Gontier, D.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fronty, J.-P.; Goulmy, C. [Photonis SAS, Avenue Roger Roncier, BP 520, 19106 Brive Cedex (France)

    2016-09-15

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  7. The PAMELA experiment on satellite and its capability in cosmic rays measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Barbier, L M; Bartalucci, S; Bazilevskaja, G; Bellotti, R; Bertazzoni, S; Bidoli, V; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bonvicini, V; Boscherini, M; Bravar, U; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, Per J; Casolino, M; Castellano, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E R; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; D'Alessandro, R; De Marzo, C N; De Pascale, M P; Finetti, N; Furano, G; Gabbanini, A; Galper, A M; Giglietto, N; Grandi, M; Grigorieva, A; Guarino, F; Hof, M; Koldashov, S V; Korotkov, M G; Krizmanic, J F; Krutkov, S; Lund, J; Marangelli, B; Marino, L; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mirizzi, N; Mitchell, J W; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Morselli, A; Mukhametshin, R; Ormes, J F; Osteria, G; Ozerov, J V; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Perego, A; Piccardi, S; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Salsano, A; Schiavon, Paolo; Scian, G; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spataro, B; Spillantini, P; Spinelli, P; Stephens, S A; Stochaj, S J; Stozhkov, Yu I; Straulino, S; Streitmatter, R E; Taccetti, F; Tesi, M; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasiljev, G; Vignoli, V; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2002-01-01

    The PAMELA equipment will be assembled in 2001 and installed on board the Russian satellite Resurs. PAMELA is conceived mainly to study the antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays up to high energy (190 GeV for p-bar and 270 GeV for e sup +) and to search antinuclei, up to 30 GeV/n, with a sensitivity of 10 sup - sup 7 in the He-bar/He ratio. The PAMELA telescope consists of: a magnetic spectrometer made up of a permanent magnet system equipped with double sided microstrip silicon detectors; a transition radiation detector made up of active layers of proportional straw tubes interleaved with carbon fibre radiators; and a silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter made up of layers of tungsten absorbers and silicon detector planes. A time-of-flight system and anti-coincidence counters complete the PAMELA equipment. In the past years, tests have been done on each subdetector of PAMELA; the main results are presented and their implications on the anti-particles identification capability in cosmic rays are discus...

  8. CALET: a calorimeter for cosmic-ray measurements in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Nicola, E-mail: mori@fi.infn.it

    2013-06-15

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) instrument is scheduled for a launch in 2014 and attached to the Exposed Facility of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM-EF) on the International Space Station. Its main objective is to perform precise measurements of the electron+positron spectrum in cosmic rays at energies up to some TeV, searching for signals from dark matter and/or contributions from nearby astrophysical sources like pulsars. Other scientific goals include the investigation of heavy ions spectra up to Fe, elemental abundance of trans-iron nuclei and a measurement of the diffuse γ ray emission with high energy resolution. The instrument is now under construction, and consists of a charge detection device (CHD) composed of two layers of plastic scintillators, a finely-segmented sampling calorimeter (IMC) and a deep, homogeneous calorimeter (TASC) made of PbWO scintillating bars. The good containment of electromagnetic showers (total depth ∼3X{sub 0}(IMC)+27X{sub 0}(TASC)=30X{sub 0}) together with the homogeneity of TASC give an energy resolution for electrons and γ rays about 2%. CHD can discriminate the charge of primary particles with a resolution between 15% and 30% up to Fe. The finely-segmented IMC, made by tungsten layers and 1mm-wide scintillating fibers, can provide detailed information about the start and early development of particle showers. Lateral and longitudinal shower-development information from TASC, together with informations from IMC, can be used to achieve an electron/proton rejection power about 10{sup 5}. High-statistics for collected data will be achieved by means of the planned 5-years exposure time together with a geometrical factor of 0.12 m{sup 2} sr. Furthermore, a Gamma-Ray Burst monitor will complement the main detector. In this paper the status of the mission, the design and expected performance of the instrument will be detailed.

  9. Stochastic Cooling at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, Christian

    2000-01-01

    When transforming the CERN Antiproton Collector (AC) into the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), the stochastic cooling systems were rebuilt to cope with the new requirements. Instead of using the original three frequency bands, (0.9-1.6 GHz, 1.6-2.45 GHz and 2.4-3.2 GHz) only the first of these was used due to lattice limitations and other constraints. The same pick-ups and kickers are in use at two different energies. As in the AC, simultaneous cooling in all three phase planes is required. Switching between two transmission paths (at 3.5 GeV/c and 2.0 GeV/c) became necessary, including separate notch filters and delay compensation for the kicker sections. The tanks has to be rendered bakeable (150 C) to make the vacuum properties (<10-10 Torr) compatible with deceleration to low energies. Further improvements included programmable, phase-invariant electronic attenuators and amplitude-invariant delays. Experience during commissioning showed that careful optimization (depth and periodicity) of the notch filters...

  10. Development of a monoenergetic ultraslow antiproton beam source for high-precision investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuroda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration developed an ultraslow antiproton beam source, monoenergetic ultraslow antiproton source for high-precision investigation (MUSASHI, consisting of an electromagnetic trap with a liquid He free superconducting solenoid and a low energy antiproton beam transport line. The MUSASHI was capable of trapping and cooling more than 1×10^{7} antiprotons and extracting them as an ultraslow antiproton beam with energy of 150–250 eV.

  11. Secondary emission monitor for keV ion and antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, Alejandro; Bravin, Enrico; Harasimowciz, Janusz; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    Beam profile monitoring of low intensity keV ion and antiproton beams remains a challenging task. A Sec- ondary electron Emission Monitor (SEM) has been de- signed to measure profiles of beams with intensities below 107 and energies as low as 20 keV. The monitor is based on a two stage microchannel plate (MCP) and a phosphor screen facing a CCD camera. Its modular design allows two different operational setups. In this contribution we present the design of a prototype and discuss results from measurements with antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment at CERN. This is then used for a characterization of the monitor with regard to its possible future use at different facilities.

  12. A Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility for ATLAS Muon Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Biebel, O; Boutemeur, M; Brandt, A; Dubbert, J; Duckeck, G; Elmsheuser, J; Fiedler, F; Hertenberger, R; Kortner, O; Nunnemann, T; Rauscher, F; Schaile, A D; Schieferdecker, P; Staude, A; Stiller, W; Ströhmer, R; Vertesi, R

    2003-01-01

    Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will constitute the large majority of precision detectors in the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For commissioning and calibration of MDT chambers, a Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility is in operation at Munich University. The objectives of this facility are to test the chambers and on-chamber electronics, to map the positions of the anode wires within the chambers with the precision needed for standalone muon momentum measurement in ATLAS, and to gain experience in the operation of the chambers and on-line calibration procedures. Until the start of muon chamber installation in ATLAS, 88 chambers built at the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich have to be commissioned and calibrated. With a data taking period of one day individual wire positions can be measured with an accuracy of 8.3 micrometers in the chamber plane and 27 micrometers in the direction perpendicular to that plane.

  13. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of 90 Sr/ 90 Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...... on the aircraft. By using simple assumptions on the build-up of contamination it has been possible to separate the signals from contamination and from plume. The analysis further showed that even a detector/spectrometer with low energy resolution is able to identify a contamination with iodine....

  15. Instrumentation for the measurement of cosmic-ray anisotropy /Arkan/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitkov, V. D.; Klimakov, A. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shestakov, V. V.

    1981-07-01

    An ionization-calorimeter and hodoscope for the investigation of the anisotropy of cosmic-ray muons is described. The aperture of the setup makes it possible to search for the local anisotropy of primary charged particles with energies exceeding 10 to the 11th eV in the deflection band from -30 to +50 deg. The hodoscope makes it possible to study the time-correlated arrival of particles in the millisecond range. The autonomous operation of the hodoscopic detectors assures a statistical accuracy for the measurement of muon flux density of 1.5% for one hour of registration.

  16. Advanced Space Propulsion Study - Antiproton and Beamed Power Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Antimatter m at Umw Ewlm mry, 3.2. bonnet and L.5. Pinskyt *.de Ferillab, Batavia, It. (10-12 April 1986). 23. 5. Chu, J.2. 5ookholom, A. Askin, and A. Cable...292. Jean- Marc Richard, "Antiproton-Nucleus Interaction," pp. 309- 324. W.R. Gibbs, "Creating High Energy Density in Nuclei with Energetic...Neutral Beams," pp. 371-391. H. Poth, "Antiprotonic, Hyperonic, and Antihydrogen Atoms," pp. 325-345. Jean- Marc Richard, "Antiproton-Nuclevs

  17. Applications and measurements of polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, C A

    1996-01-01

    The recent invention of Kumakhov polycapillary x-ray and neutron optics has expanded the ways x-ray beams can be controlled. X rays incident on the interior of glass tubes at small angles can be guided down the tubes by total external reflection. Now, arrays of curved tapered capillaries can be used to focus, collimate, and filter x-ray radiation. Extensive research is being conducted on the performance and potential applications of these optics. Potential medical applications include mammography, digital energy subtraction angiography, and focused beam therapy. Other applications are x-ray lithography, x-ray astronomy, crystal diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, and neutron prompt gamma analysis.

  18. Constraining pre big-bang-nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelke, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Catena, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fornengo, N. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Masiero, A. [Pavoa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Pietroni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    A host of dark energy models and non-standard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive can be sizable and apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble-rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of non-standard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model. (Orig.)

  19. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  20. The CERN SPS proton–antiproton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    2016-01-01

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam–beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  1. The CERN SPS proton-antiproton collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a pbar p collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam-beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  2. Utility Monitoring for the Antiproton Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, D.

    1984-06-11

    The purpose of the utility portion of the FIRUS system is to alert humans in the main control room, at Phillips farm, and in building 10 control room when either environmental conditions are unhealthy for antiproton source devices, or electrical or mechanical equipment is malfunctioning. When first envisioned, the FIRUS system consisted of the following equipment: (1) 2 FIRUS mini-computers (wall mounted, 1 fire, 1 utility); (2) emergency power supply (also wall mounted); (3) coax hardline communication cable; (4) Junction boxes; (5) contact points and analog transducers; (6) three-pair 18 gage shielded cable; and (7) silent printer. Each mini can monitor 16 contact points or 15 analog points or a combination of contact and analog points. Each contact point can be more than one physical point if the points are wired in series. An alarm then indicates anyone of a group of points has opened. The following devices/quantities are proposed to be monitored by the utility portion of the FIRUS system: (1) sump pumps; (2) LCW (Low Conductivity Water); (3) auxiliary generator; (4) service building temperatures; (5) stub room/tunnel temperature; and (6) stub room/tunnel humidity. After the number of quantities to be monitored (see table I) was determined, it was found that two or three minis would be required, or a FIRUS crate could be used. A FIRUS crate is an 'old beam transfer crate' with 25 slots which hold cards to either monitor 16 contact points or 15 analog points. The space requirement for the crate system is about half a relay rack. The emergency power supply could remain wall mounted, or it could be rack mounted with the firus crate. Conversations with Al Franck and Rich Mahler concerning availability, expandability, cabling, and cost indicate that the FIRUS crate is the preperable option for the antiproton source.

  3. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  4. A BaF2 crystal array for high energy -ray measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The measurement of high energy 7-ray photons is an important area of current research in nuclear physics. The high energy 7-rays from GDR decay gives us valuable information about the shape of nuclei and equation of state of nuclear matter. The high energy 7-rays above GDR 7-ray energy are primarily produced due to ...

  5. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of liquid waterglycerol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Yukio; Shibata, Nanako; Inui, Masanori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    We have carried out inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on liquid water-glycerol mixtures. The data are analyzed by a damped harmonic oscillator model with two excitations, longitudinal and transverse modes. The sound velocity of the longitudinal mode is almost constant (about 3.1 km/s), being independent of the composition. Thus the strength of 'fast sound' which we define the ratio of this IXS sound velocity to ultrasonic one is largest at pure water and gradually decrease with increasing mole fraction of glycerol. This result indicates that the relaxation phenomena of pure water gradually reduce with increasing the fraction of the solute: the scenario which we proposed for water-monohydric alcohol mixtures hold true for this water-trihydric alcohol mixtures.

  6. Orbital Evolution Measurement of the Accreting Millisecond X-ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    powered millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4–3658 using. X-ray data obtained during four outbursts of this source. Extensive obser- vations were made with the proportional counter array of the Rossi X-ray. Timing Explorer (RXTE) during the four ...

  7. Orbital Evolution Measurement of the Accreting Millisecond X-ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We present results from a pulse timing analysis of the accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4–3658 using X-ray data obtained during four outbursts of this source. Extensive observations were made with the proportional counter array of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) during the ...

  8. X-ray microbeam fluorescence and strain measurements during electromigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsien-Kang (Michael)

    2000-10-01

    Electromigration, atom diffusion caused by an electric current, has long been a matter of concern to the microelectronic industry because it causes failures in thin film interconnects. In industrial practice, a small amount of Cu (0.25 at.%-2 at.%) is alloyed into Al interconnects since Cu is found to inhibit the failure in interconnects caused by electromigration. The beneficial effect of Cu is not fully understood. The available evidence suggests that the Cu is usually swept away from an area by electromigration before fast Al diffusion leads to appreciable damage in the interconnect. Since grain boundary diffusion is the dominant diffusion mechanism at the relatively low temperatures at which most microelectronic devices are used, and since Cu has very low solid solubility in Al at operating temperatures, Cu segregated into the grain boundaries must reduce the electromigration flux of Al along these dominant paths in order to produce the observed electromigration lifetime improvement. Because of the critical role of Cu in Al(Cu), it is essential to obtain information on the motion and distribution of solute Cu atoms during electromigration. The goal of this research was to obtain for the first time, simultaneously and in real time, spatially resolved information on chemical composition and equal-biaxial stress in polycrystalline Al(Cu) thin film interconnects during electromigration testing. Polychromatic x-ray microbeams from a synchrotron were used. A novel x-ray microbeam instrumentation, developed for this purpose, uses tapered glass capillaries to obtain micron-scale spatial resolution. Two energy dispersive solid state detectors were used to measure simultaneously both solute Cu composition and local strain. Results of Cu concentration mapping showed that the solute Cu concentration as dilute as 500 PPM in the SiO2 passivated Al(Cu) interconnects could be detected through Cu K, fluorescence generated by the incident white x-ray. Time evolution of solute Cu

  9. The magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Braeuninger, S.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagahama, H.; Ospelkaus, C.; Rodegheri, C.C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent exciting progress in the preparation and manipulation of the motional quantum states of a single trapped proton enabled the first direct detection of the particle's spin state. Based on this success the proton magnetic moment $\\mu_p$ was measured with ppm precision in a Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic field inhomogeneity. An improvement by an additional factor of 1000 in precision is possible by application of the so-called double Penning trap technique. In a recent paper we reported the first demonstration of this method with a single trapped proton, which is a major step towards the first direct high-precision measurement of $\\mu_p$. The techniques required for the proton can be directly applied to measure the antiproton magnetic moment $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}$. An improvement in precision of $\\mu_{\\bar{p}}$ by more than three orders of magnitude becomes possible, which will provide one of the most sensitive tests of CPT invariance. To achieve this research goal we are currently setting up the Baryo...

  10. Multiplicity dependence of charged pion, kaon, and (anti)proton production at large transverse momentum in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$= 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Benacek, Pavel; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grachov, Oleg Anatolievich; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kostarakis, Panagiotis; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarma, Pranjal; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shahzad, Muhammed Ikram; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Sozzi, Federica; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasin, Zafar; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-09-10

    The production of charged pions, kaons and (anti)protons has been measured at mid-rapidity ($-0.5 10$ GeV/$c$), the particle ratios are consistent with those reported for pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies. At intermediate $p_{\\rm T}$ the (anti)proton $R_{\\rm pPb}$ shows a Cronin-like enhancement, while pions and kaons show little or no nuclear modification. At high $p_{\\rm T}$ the charged pion, kaon and (anti)proton $R_{\\rm pPb}$ are consistent with unity within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  11. Atomic collision and spectroscopy experiments with ultra-low-energy antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, Hiroyuki A; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Imao, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Naofumi; Varentsov, Victor L; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    Antiproton, the antiparticle of proton, is a unique projectile in the study of atomic collision physics, which can be treated theoretically either as a 'negative proton' or a 'heavy electron'. Atomic capture of an antiproton will result in formation of a highly excited exotic atom. Antiprotonic helium atom has been studied intensively by means of precision laser spectroscopy, which has led to a stringent determination of antiproton mass and charge to a level of ppb. Comparison of these values with those of proton gives one of the best tests of CPT invariance, the most fundamental symmetry in physics. However, the dynamic processes of antiproton capture remain unclarified. With an aim to produce an antiproton beam at atomic-physics energies for 'pure' collision experiments, we have so far developed techniques to decelerate, cool and confine antiprotons in vacuo, using a sequential combination of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator (RFQD), and an electromagnetic tra...

  12. Measuring and understanding ultrafast phenomena using X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2014-01-01

    Within the last decade, significant advances in X-ray sources and instrumentation as well as simultaneous developments in analysis methodology has allowed the field of fast- and ultrafast time-resolved X-ray studies of solution-state systems to truly come of age. We here describe some aspects...

  13. High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros, S. J. [Mississippi U.; Acosta, J. G. [Mississippi U.; Cremaldi, L. M. [Mississippi U.; Hart, T. L. [Mississippi U.; Summers, D. J. [Mississippi U.

    2016-10-01

    The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the potential need for a collider beyond the LHC. A $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored. Prior engineering studies for 233 and 270 km circumference tunnels were done for Illinois dolomite and Texas chalk signaling manageable tunneling costs. At a $p\\bar{p}$ the cross section for high mass states is of order 10x higher with antiproton collisions, where antiquarks are directly present rather than relying on gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. In our design the increased momentum acceptance (11 $\\pm$ 2.6 GeV/c) in a Fermilab-like antiproton source is used with septa to collect 12x more antiprotons in 12 channels. For stochastic cooling, 12 cooling systems would be used, each with one debuncher/momentum equalizer ring and two accumulator rings. One electron cooling ring would follow. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  14. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  15. Calculated LET spectrum from antiproton beams stopping in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as a potential modality for radiotherapy because the annihilation at the end of range leads to roughly a doubling of physical dose in the Bragg peak region. So far it has been anticipated that the radiobiology of antiproton beams is similar to that of protons in the entry region of the beam, but very different in the annihilation region, due to the expected high-LET components resulting from the annihilation. On closer inspection we find that calculations of dose averaged LET in the entry region may suggest that the RBE of antiprotons in the plateau region could significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Materials and Methods. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. Results and Discussion. In the plateau region of the simulated antiproton beam we observe a dose-averaged unrestrict...

  16. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Knudsen, H; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  17. Sub-Femtosecond Correlated Dynamics Explored with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Ullrich, J; Fischer, D; Moshammer, R; Najjari, B; Schulz, M; Voitkiv, A; Welsch, C P

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing collisions of antiprotons with atoms or molecules at energies between a few keV up to about one MeV provide a unique tool to explore correlated dynamics of electrons at large perturbations on a time scale between several femtoseconds (1 fs = 10−15 s) down to some tens of attoseconds (1 as = 10−18 s). Exploiting and developing many‐particle imaging methods — Reaction‐Microscopes — integrated into a novel ultra‐low energy storage ring (USR) for slow antiprotons will enable to access for the first time fully differential cross sections for single and multiple ionization in such collisions. Moreover, the formation of antiprotonic atoms, molecules or of protonium might be explored in kinematically complete experiments yielding unprecedented information on (n,l)‐distributions of captured antiprotons as well as precise spectroscopic data of the respective energy levels. In this contribution the present status on single and double ionization by antiproton and ion impact is highlighted pointin...

  18. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M.D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.

    2013-01-01

    are commonly produced by mixing antiprotons and positrons stored in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap, which was achieved in ALPHA by an autoresonant excitation of the antiprotons, injecting them into the positron plasma. In this work, a hybrid numerical model is developed to simulate antiproton and positron...

  19. Measuring Quasar Spin via X-ray Continuum Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Matthew; Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul; Steiner, Jack

    2018-01-01

    We have identified several quasars whose X-ray spectra appear very soft. When fit with power-law models, the best-fit indices are greater than 3. This is very suggestive of thermal disk emission, indicating that the X-ray spectrum is dominated by the disk component. Galactic black hole binaries in such states have been successfully fit with disk-blackbody models to constrain the inner radius, which also constrains the spin of the black hole. We have fit those models to XMM-Newton spectra of several of our identified soft X-ray quasars to place constraints on the spins of the supermassive black holes.

  20. Studies to Increase the Anti-Proton Transmission from the Target to the Debuncher Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Ina; Werkema, Steven J; Zisman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The AP2 beamline at Fermilab transports anti-protons from the production target to the Debuncher ring. The measured admittance of the Debuncher ring and the theoretical aperture of the line are larger than the size of the transmitted beam. Extensive tracking studies were done using the Accelerator Toolbox (AT) to understand the sources of the difference. As simulations pointed to chromatic effects being a source of problems, measurements were done to study this. Several possible remedies were studied including adding sextupoles to the line to reduce the chromatic effects.

  1. Parton coalescence and the antiproton/pion anomaly at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, V; Ko, C M; Lévai, P

    2003-05-23

    Coalescence of minijet partons with partons from the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions is suggested as the mechanism for production of hadrons with intermediate transverse momentum. The resulting enhanced antiproton and pion yields at intermediate transverse momenta give a plausible explanation for the observed large antiproton to pion ratio. With further increasing momentum, the ratio is predicted to decrease and approach the small value given by independent fragmentations of minijet partons after their energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma.

  2. Measurements of the top quark pair production cross section in lepton+jets final states using a topological multivariate technique as well as lifetime b-tagging in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golling, T.

    2005-01-01

    Two alternative measurements of the tt production cross section at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions in the lepton+jets channel are presented. The tt production cross section is extracted by combining the kinematic event information in a multivariate discriminant. The measurement yields {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X} = 5.13{sub -1.57}{sup +1.76} (stat) {sub -1.10}{sup +0.96} (syst) {+-}0.33 (lumi) pb in the muon+jets channel, using 229.1 pb{sup -1}, and in the combination with the electron+jets channel (226.3 pb{sup -1}) {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t}+X = 6.60{sub -1.28}{sup +1.37} (stat) {sub -1.11}{sup +1.25} (syst) {+-} 0.43 (lumi) pb. The second measurement presented reconstructs explicitly secondary vertices to do lifetime b-tagging. The measurement combines the muon+jets and the electron+jets channel, using 158.4 pb{sup -1} and 168.8 pb{sup -1}, respectively: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X} = 8.24{sub -1.25}{sup +1.34} (stat) {sub -1.63}{sup +1.89} (syst) {+-} 0.54 (lumi) pb. (orig.)

  3. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S; Smorra, C; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-08-13

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry--that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime--although it is model dependent. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests--using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others--have been performed, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H(-)) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare the charge-to-mass ratio for the antiproton (q/m)p- to that for the proton (q/m)p and obtain (q/m)p-/(q/m)p − 1 =1(69) × 10(-12). The measurements were performed at cyclotron frequencies of 29.6 megahertz, so our result shows that the CPT theorem holds at the atto-electronvolt scale. Our precision of 69 parts per trillion exceeds the energy resolution of previous antiproton-to-proton mass comparisons as well as the respective figure of merit of the standard model extension by a factor of four. In addition, we give a limit on sidereal variations in the measured ratio of anomaly parameter of |α − 1| < 8.7 × 10(-7).

  4. Fission prompt gamma-ray multiplicity distribution measurements and simulations at DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Ullmann, J; Jandel, M; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Norman, E

    2010-08-24

    The nearly energy independence of the DANCE efficiency and multiplicity response to {gamma} rays makes it possible to measure the prompt {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution in fission. We demonstrate this unique capability of DANCE through the comparison of {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution between the measurement and numerical simulation for three radioactive sources {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 88}Y. The prospect for measuring the {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution for both spontaneous and neutron-induced fission is discussed.

  5. Complexity measures and information planes of x-ray astrophysical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovallo, Michele; Telesca, Luciano

    2011-03-01

    The complex dynamics of x-ray astrophysical sources is investigated by analyzing their daily light curves in four different energy bands by using three information-theoretic measures: Fisher information measure, the Shannon entropy and the disequilibrium. The obtained results suggest a universal complex behavior in the x-ray light, independent of the source and of the energy band.

  6. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers with the SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huege, T.; Bray, J.; Buitink, S.; Dallier, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H. D. E.; James, C. W.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Scholten, O.; Schroeder, F.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic

  7. Flash X-Ray (FXR) Accelerator Optimization Electronic Time-Resolved Measurement of X-Ray Source Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P

    2005-07-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating various approaches to minimize the x-ray source size on the Flash X-Ray (FXR) linear induction accelerator in order to improve x-ray flux and increase resolution for hydrodynamic radiography experiments. In order to effectively gauge improvements to final x-ray source size, a fast, robust, and accurate system for measuring the spot size is required. Timely feedback on x-ray source size allows new and improved accelerator tunes to be deployed and optimized within the limited run-time constraints of a production facility with a busy experimental schedule; in addition, time-resolved measurement capability allows the investigation of not only the time-averaged source size, but also the evolution of the source size, centroid position, and x-ray dose throughout the 70 ns beam pulse. Combined with time-resolved measurements of electron beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and current, key limiting factors can be identified, modeled, and optimized for the best possible spot size. Roll-bar techniques are a widely used method for x-ray source size measurement, and have been the method of choice at FXR for many years. A thick bar of tungsten or other dense metal with a sharp edge is inserted into the path of the x-ray beam so as to heavily attenuate the lower half of the beam, resulting in a half-light, half-dark image as seen downstream of the roll-bar; by measuring the width of the transition from light to dark across the edge of the roll-bar, the source size can be deduced. For many years, film has been the imaging medium of choice for roll-bar measurements thanks to its high resolution, linear response, and excellent contrast ratio. Film measurements, however, are fairly cumbersome and require considerable setup and analysis time; moreover, with the continuing trend towards all-electronic measurement systems, film is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to procure. Here, we shall

  8. 3D Image Reconstruction from X-Ray Measurements with Overlap

    CERN Document Server

    Klodt, Maria

    2016-01-01

    3D image reconstruction from a set of X-ray projections is an important image reconstruction problem, with applications in medical imaging, industrial inspection and airport security. The innovation of X-ray emitter arrays allows for a novel type of X-ray scanners with multiple simultaneously emitting sources. However, two or more sources emitting at the same time can yield measurements from overlapping rays, imposing a new type of image reconstruction problem based on nonlinear constraints. Using traditional linear reconstruction methods, respective scanner geometries have to be implemented such that no rays overlap, which severely restricts the scanner design. We derive a new type of 3D image reconstruction model with nonlinear constraints, based on measurements with overlapping X-rays. Further, we show that the arising optimization problem is partially convex, and present an algorithm to solve it. Experiments show highly improved image reconstruction results from both simulated and real-world measurements.

  9. Polarization observables in low-energy antiproton-proton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Daren; Timmermans, Rob G. E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the polarization parameters in low-energy antiproton-proton elastic ((p) over barp -> (p) over barp) and charge-exchange ((p) over barp -> (n) over barn) scattering. The predictions for unmeasured observables are based on our new energy-dependent partial-wave analysis of all

  10. Physics Performance Report for PANDA : Strong Interaction Studies with Antiprotons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, O.; Xu, H.; Becker, J.; Feldbauer, F.; Heinsius, F. -H.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Pantea, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; De Napoli, M.; Giacoppo, F.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Sfienti, C.; Bialkowski, E.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Kistryn, M.; Kliczewski, S.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Schaefer, W.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.; Czy. zycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Hawryluk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Wojnar, L.; Gil, D.; Hawranek, P.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, St.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Wronska, A.; Al-Turany, M.; Augustin, I.; Deppe, H.; Flemming, H.; Gerl, J.; Goetzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Luehning, J.; Maas, F.; Mishra, D.; Orth, H.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Brinkmann, K. -T.; Freiesleben, H.; Jaekel, R.; Kliemt, R.; Wuerschig, T.; Zaunick, H. -G.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Galoyan, A. S.; Grigoryan, S.; Karmokov, A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Kudaev, V. Ch.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Yu. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mustafaev, G. A.; Olshevski, A.; . Pasyuk, M. A.; Perevalova, E. A.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T. A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Salmin, R. A.; Samartsev, A. G.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, A.; Shabratova, G. S.; Skachkova, A. N.; Skachkov, N. B.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M. K.; Teshev, R. Sh.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Uzhinsky, V. V.; Vodopianov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Foehl, K.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Woods, P.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Teufel, A.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K.; Tann, B.; Tomaradze, A.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Negrini, M.; Savri`e, M.; Stancari, G.; Dulach, B.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Pace, E.; Bersani, A.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Brodski, I.; Doering, W.; Drexler, P.; Dueren, M.; Gagyi-Palffy, Z.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kotulla, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, S.; Liu, M.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Salz, C.; Schneider, J.; Schoenmeier, P.; Schubert, R.; Spataro, S.; Stenzel, H.; Strackbein, C.; Thiel, M.; Thoering, U.; Yang, S.; Clarkson, T.; Cowie, E.; Downie, E.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Lehmann, I.; Livingston, K.; Lumsden, S.; MacGregor, D.; McKinnon, B.; Murray, M.; Protopopescu, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Yang, G.; Babai, M.; Biegun, A. K.; Bubak, A.; Guliyev, E.; Suyam Jothi, Vanniarajan; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Smit, H.; van der Weele, J. C.; Garcia, F.; Riska, D. -O.; Buescher, M.; Dosdall, R.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Grunwald, D.; Jha, V.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Mertens, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Randriamalala, T.; Ritman, J.; Roeder, M.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wuestner, P.; Kisiel, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Fissum, S.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schroeder, B.; Achenbach, P.; Mora Espi, M. C.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Lorente, A.; Dormenev, V. I.; Fedorov, A. A.; Korzhik, M. V.; Missevitch, O. V.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Semenov, A.; Hoeppner, C.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Mann, A.; Neubert, S.; Paul, S.; Weitzel, Q.; Khoukaz, A.; Rausmann, T.; Taeschner, A.; Wessels, J.; Varma, R.; Baldin, E.; Kotov, K.; Peleganchuk, S.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Boucher, J.; Hennino, T.; Kunne, R.; Ong, S.; Pouthas, J.; Ramstein, B.; Rosier, P.; Sudol, M.; Van de Wiele, J.; Zerguerras, T.; Dmowski, K.; Korzeniewski, R.; Przemyslaw, D.; Slowinski, B.; Boca, G.; Braghieri, A.; Costanza, S.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Belikov, N. I.; Davidenko, A. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Goncharenko, Y. M.; Grishin, V. N.; Kachanov, V. A.; Konstantinov, D. A.; Kormilitsin, V. A.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Matulenko, Y. A.; Melnik, Y. M.; Meschanin, A. P.; Minaev, N. G.; Mochalov, V. V.; Morozov, D. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ryazantsev, A. V.; Semenov, P. A.; Soloviev, L. F.; Uzunian, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Yakutin, A. E.; Baeck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P. E.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Itzotov, A.; Kisselev, A.; Kravchenko, P.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Naryshkin, Y.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Zhadanov, A.; Fava, L.; Panzieri, D.; Alberto, D.; Amoroso, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Ferrero, L.; Grasso, A.; Greco, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Maggiora, M.; Marcello, S.; Serbanut, G.; Sosio, S.; Bertini, R.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Mazza, G.; Rivetti, A.; Szymanska, K.; Tosello, F.; Wheadon, R.; Morra, O.; Agnello, M.; Iazzi, F.; Szymanska, K.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Clement, H.; Ekstroem, C.; Calen, H.; Grape, S.; Hoeistad, B.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Thome, E.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Diaz, J.; Ortiz, A.; Borsuk, S.; Chlopik, A.; Guzik, Z.; Kopec, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Melnychuk, D.; Plominski, M.; Szewinski, J.; Traczyk, K.; Zwieglinski, B.; Buehler, P.; Gruber, A.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Lutz, M. F. M.; Pire, B.; Scholten, O.; Timmermans, R.

    To study fundamental questions of hadron and nuclear physics in interactions of antiprotons with nucleons and nuclei, the universal PANDA detector will be built. Gluonic excitations, the physics of strange and charm quarks and nucleon structure studies will be performed with unprecedented accuracy

  11. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Knudsen, H; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  12. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, M.; Sessler, A.; Penn, G.; Wurtele, J. S.; Charman, A. E.

    2012-03-01

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  13. Outer casing of the AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling.

  14. Calculated LET Spectrum from Antiproton Beams Stopping in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    significantly differ from unity, which seems to warrant closer inspection of the radiobiology in this region. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA were performed for calculating the entire particle spectrum of a beam of 126 MeV antiprotons hitting a water phantom. In the plateau region of the simulated...

  15. The CERN Antiproton Programme: Imagination and Audacity Rewarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Vinod; Darriulat, Pierre

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Stochastic Cooling: Technology to Compress the Beams * Radio Frequency Quadrupole: Slowing Down Antimatter * The LEAR Ultra-Slow Beam Extraction: Trickling Antiprotons * The UA1 Tracker: An Electronic Bubble Chamber * A Novel Particle Detector for UA2: The Power of Silicon * Antimatter's Disappearing Act * References

  16. Characterization of uranium bearing material using x-ray fluorescence and direct gamma-rays measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujaini, M., E-mail: madihah@uniten.edu.my; Chankow, N. [Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University Phyathai Rd., Wang Mai, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Yusoff, M. Z.; Hamid, N. A. [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Uranium ore can be easily detected due to various gamma-ray energies emitted from uranium daughters particularly from {sup 238}U daughters such as {sup 214}Bi, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 226}Ra. After uranium is extracted from uranium ore, only low energy gamma-rays emitted from {sup 235}U may be detected if the detector is placed in close contact to the specimen. In this research, identification and characterization of uranium bearing materials is experimentally investigated using direct measurement of gamma-rays from {sup 235}U in combination with the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Measurement of gamma-rays can be conducted by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector or cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector while a {sup 57}Coradioisotope-excited XRF spectrometer using CdTe detector is used for elemental analysis. The proposed technique was tested with various uranium bearing specimens containing natural, depleted and enriched uranium in both metallic and powder forms.

  17. Is bone mineral density measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry affected by gamma rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Liang-Jun; Li, Jian-Fang; Zeng, Feng-Wei; Jiang, Hang; Cheng, Mu-Hua; Chen, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the gamma rays emitted from the radionuclide effect bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. Nine subjects (mean age: 56 ± 17.96 yr) scheduled for bone scanning underwent BMD measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Hologic/Discovery A) before and 1, 2, and 4 h after injection of technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP). Ten subjects (mean age: 41 ± 15.47 yr) scheduled for therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with iodine-131 underwent BMD measurement before and 2 h after therapeutic radionuclide administration. All patients were given whole body BMD measurement, including head, arm, ribs, lumbar spine, pelvis, and leg sites. Besides, patients who referred to radioiodine therapy were given total hip and femoral neck BMD measurement as well. No statistically significant changes in BMD values were detected after 99mTc-MDP and iodine-131 administration for all measurement sites (p > 0.05), and individual difference of BMD before and after radionuclide imaging or therapy was less than the least significant change in lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck. In conclusion, BMD measurements are not influenced by the gamma rays emitted from technetium-99m and iodine-131. DXA bone densitometry may be performed simultaneously with bone scanning and radioiodine therapy. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The New Digital-Receiver-Based System for Antiproton Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Pedersen, F

    2001-01-01

    An innovative system to measure antiproton beam intensity, momentum spread and mean momentum in CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is described. This system is based on a state-of-the-art Digital Receiver (DRX) board, consisting of 8 Digital Down-Converter (DDC) chips and one Digital Signal Processor (DSP). An ultra-low-noise, wide-band AC beam transformer (0.2 MHz - 30 MHz) is used to measure AC beam current modulation. For bunched beams, the intensity is obtained by measuring the amplitude of the fundamental and second RF Fourier components. On the magnetic plateaus the beam is debunched for stochastic or electron cooling and longitudinal beam properties (intensity, momentum spread and mean momentum) are measured by FFT-based spectral analysis of Schottky signals. The system thus provides real time information characterising the machine performance; it has been used for troubleshooting and to fine-tune the AD, thus achieving further improved performances. This system has been operating since May 2000 and ty...

  19. [Multiple linear regression analysis of X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores of knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Feng; Wang, Qing-Fu; Chen, Zhao-Jun; Du, Chun-Lin; Li, Jun-Hai; Huang, Hu; Shi, Zong-Ting; Yin, Yue-Shan; Zhang, Lei; A-Di, Li-Jiang; Dong, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ji

    2012-05-01

    To perform Multiple Linear Regression analysis of X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores of knee osteoarthritis, and to analyze their relationship with clinical and biomechanical concepts. From March 2011 to July 2011, 140 patients (250 knees) were reviewed, including 132 knees in the left and 118 knees in the right; ranging in age from 40 to 71 years, with an average of 54.68 years. The MB-RULER measurement software was applied to measure femoral angle, tibial angle, femorotibial angle, joint gap angle from antero-posterir and lateral position of X-rays. The WOMAC scores were also collected. Then multiple regression equations was applied for the linear regression analysis of correlation between the X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores. There was statistical significance in the regression equation of AP X-rays value and WOMAC scores (Pregression equation of lateral X-ray value and WOMAC scores (P>0.05). 1) X-ray measurement of knee joint can reflect the WOMAC scores to a certain extent. 2) It is necessary to measure the X-ray mechanical axis of knee, which is important for diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis. 3) The correlation between tibial angle,joint gap angle on antero-posterior X-ray and WOMAC scores is significant, which can be used to assess the functional recovery of patients before and after treatment.

  20. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaw, J. L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, Y. -H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alessi, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  1. Using gamma-ray emission to measure areal density of inertial confinement fusion capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N M; Wilson, D C; Herrmann, H W; Young, C S

    2010-10-01

    Fusion neutrons streaming from a burning inertial confinement fusion capsule generate gamma rays via inelastic nuclear scattering in the ablator of the capsule. The intensity of gamma-ray emission is proportional to the product of the ablator areal density (ρR) and the yield of fusion neutrons, so by detecting the gamma rays we can infer the ablator areal density, provided we also have a measurement of the capsule's total neutron yield. In plastic-shell capsules, for example, (12)C nuclei emit gamma rays at 4.44 MeV after excitation by 14.1 MeV neutrons from D+T fusion. These gamma rays can be measured by a new gamma-ray detector under development. Analysis of predicted signals is in progress, with results to date indicating that the method promises to be useful for diagnosing imploded capsules.

  2. Proceedings of the Antiproton Technology Workshop Held in Upton, New York on 10 May 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    ANTIPROTONS IN RADIATION ONCOLOG Y Mark H. Liebenhaut, M.D. Department of Radiation Therapy Lahey Clinic Medical Center Boston MA PRESENTED AT THE...Indirect Effects - Form Free Radicals OH’ DNA’ DNA, + 02 ---->DNAOO. 31 Dose Hypoxic Oxygen Enhancement Ratio se in Oxygen x-rays OER =2.5-3 I...LUI C.) c o t Ij c -4 LUJ 00. 00 (m~AJ Li.I~ CmD 0CIO m) L uLmu La.. I- i he Cm 3 cI L. .in L Umm. LL. LJL cc ~ ~ ~ C U. 0 jC L.LIi LU LJ I-D Cmi I

  3. TRYAD: a Pair of CubeSats to Measure Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M. S.; Wersinger, J. M.; Fogle, M., Jr.; Biaz, S.; Jenke, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Terrestrial RaYs Analysis and Detection (TRYAD) mission is designed to measure the beam profiles and tilts of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) using a pair of CubeSats separated by several hundred km in low Earth orbit. Until now, all TGF gamma-ray measurements have been made from single locations so that there is substantial degeneracy in modeling TGF beams. TRYAD will sample the gamma-ray beam at two locations. Additionally, for many TGFs the source location will be determined using networks of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) radio receivers. With gamma-ray measurements at two positions of known location relative to the TGF source, we will be able to test and distinguish between TGF beam models. Control of satellite separation is essential to the TRYAD mission. Separation control is achieved by using ionospheric differential drag on the two satellites.

  4. Measurements of gamma-ray production cross sections for shielding materials of space nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphan, V. J.; John, J.; Hoot, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of secondary gamma ray production from neutron interactions have been made over the entire energy range of interest in shielding applications. The epithermal capture gamma ray yields for both resolved gamma ray lines and continuum have been measured from thermal energies to 100 KeV for natural tungsten and U-238, two important candidate shield materials in SNAP reactor systems. Data are presented to illustrate the variation of epithermal capture gamma ray yields with neutron energy. The gamma ray production cross sections from (n,xy) reactions have been measured for Fe and Al from the threshold energies for inelastic scattering to approximately 16 MeV. Typical Fe and Al cross sections obtained with high-neutron energy resolution and averaged over broad neutron-energy groups are presented.

  5. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F.; Thorn, D. B.; Kemp, G. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Ping, Y.; Eggert, J. H.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  6. The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bish

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale crater on Mars in August 2012, and the Curiosity rover then began field studies on its drive toward Mount Sharp, a central peak made of ancient sediments. CheMin is one of ten instruments on or inside the rover, all designed to provide detailed information on the rocks, soils and atmosphere in this region. CheMin is a miniaturized X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF instrument that uses transmission geometry with an energy-discriminating CCD detector. CheMin uses onboard standards for XRD and XRF calibration, and beryl:quartz mixtures constitute the primary XRD standards. Four samples have been analysed by CheMin, namely a soil sample, two samples drilled from mudstones and a sample drilled from a sandstone. Rietveld and full-pattern analysis of the XRD data reveal a complex mineralogy, with contributions from parent igneous rocks, amorphous components and several minerals relating to aqueous alteration. In particular, the mudstone samples all contain one or more phyllosilicates consistent with alteration in liquid water. In addition to quantitative mineralogy, Rietveld refinements also provide unit-cell parameters for the major phases, which can be used to infer the chemical compositions of individual minerals and, by difference, the composition of the amorphous component.

  7. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, Burnham [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Results are reported on the reaction γp → p$\\bar{p}$p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p$\\bar{p}$. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is σ = 33 ± 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c2 is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  8. Meas.of the Ratio Between Double and Single Ionization of Helium for Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the ratio between double and single ionization of helium by antiprotons in the energy range $>$~3~MeV. Comparison with already existing proton data will yield information on the mechanisms for double ionization, which could not be extracted from previous comparisons between ratios measured for equivelocity electrons and protons. The most basic information to be obtained from an antiproton experiment will be the amount of correlation existing between the two electrons in the ground-state helium atom.\\\\ \\\\ The equipment consists of a gas cell, which employs slow-ion collection via the so-called condenser-plate method for the absolute sum of partial-ionization cross sections and determination of the relative contribution of multiple charged ions by TOF. The gas cell has movable entrance and exit slits and a grid system to account for secondary emission from the collection of slow ions. Together with a field of 800~V/cm in the collision region, the potentials of the TOF sp...

  9. Method of and device for measuring image lag in x-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, J.N.; Schmal, F.

    1990-01-16

    This patent describes a method of measuring image lag in an x-ray system. The system comprises an x-ray source, an image intensifier and a video camera, in which a disc having a pattern of comparatively strongly and comparatively weakly x-ray-absorbing areas is placed between the x-ray source and the image intensifier with its axis substantially parallel to the axis of an x-ray beam emitted by the x-ray source, which disc is made to rotate bout its axis, and in which the image lag of the x-ray system is determined from the output signal of the video camera. The pattern of the disc comprises at least a coiled comparatively strongly x-ray-absorbing area which is coaxial with the disc, that at least one video line, that is situated in a part of the image on which the center of the disc is displayed, is selected from the video signal produced by the video camera that the signal amplitude of the selected video line is determined. The image lag is measured from the ratio of the signal amplitude measured while the disc is stationary and the signal amplitude measured while the disc is rotating at a given speed.

  10. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Arindam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  11. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Pal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for 2×2 MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  12. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  13. Towards a gravity measurement on cold antimatter atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Caravita, R; Amsler, C; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Chlouba, K; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ereditato, A; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Forslund, O K; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Holmestad, H; Huse, T; Jernelv, I L; Jordan, E; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Kimura, M; Koetting, T; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Lehner, S; Liberadzka, J; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marx, L; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Resch, L; Rienäcker, B; Røhne, O M; Rosenberger, S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Scampoli, P; Sorrentino, F; Spacek, M; Storey, J; Strojek, I M; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Vamosi, S; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zavatarelli, S; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    The present status of the AEGIS experiment at CERN (AD-06), on the way of forming anti-hydrogen for a first gravity measurement, is reviewed. Recent results in trapping and cooling positrons and antiprotons in the main electromagnetic traps are presented, including the storage time measurement obtained during the 2014 run with antiprotons, the observation of centrifugal separation of a mixed antiproton/electron plasma and positron accumulation and transfer results obtained during 2015.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  15. Measurement of Top Quark Properties and Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Proton Anti-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebina, Koji [Waseda Univ., Shinjuku (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass and of the top-antitop ( tf) pair production cross section and a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with CDF II Detector in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV. The integrated luminosity of 2.9 $fb^{-1}$ is used for top-antitop pair production cross section and top quark mass measurement. We adopt a neural-network algorithm to select candidate events from six or more jets. At least one of these jets should be required to be b jet, as identified by the reconstruction of a secondary vertex inside the jet. The mass measurement is based on a likelihood fit incorporating reconstructed mass distributions representative of signal and background, where the absolute jet energy scale (JES) is measured simultaneously with the top quark mass. The measurement yields a value of 174.8 ± 2.4 (stat + JES) $^{+1.2}_{-1.0}$ (syst) GeV/$c^2$ , where the uncertainty from the absolute jet energy scale is evaluated together with the statistical uncertainty. The procedure also measures the amount of signal from which we derive a cross section, $\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}}$ = 7.2 ± 0.5 (stat) ±1.0 (syst) ± 0.4 (lum) $pb$, for the measured values of top quark mass and JES. Top quark mass and W boson mass constrain the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson, indirectly. This prediction implies MH = 89 $^{+35}_{-26}$GeV/$c^2$ (68% confidence level) as of July 2010. Therefore, we concentrate on the Standard Model Higgs mass search region with $\\le$ 135 GeV / $c^2$ . Then, we search for the Standard Model Higgs boson associated with vector boson using the decay modes consisting of leptons only: Signal processes are $WH \\to \\ell \

  16. X-ray-based flow visualization and measurement: application in multiphase flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Axel; Affeld, Klaus; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Delfos, Rene

    2002-10-01

    Information concerning continuous or discreet phase flow in multiphase systems is desired for various practical and analytical applications. The potential of X-ray-based flow visualization and measurement of multiphase flow is demonstrated here by two non-intrusive methods: (1) Measurement of the three-dimensional (3D) velocity field of the continuous liquid phase in a bubble column by X-ray-based particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of seeded particles. (2) Liquid flow visualization in a bubble column by injecting an X-ray absorbing liquid into the bubble column. X-rays have the advantage that they are not affected by the various refraction indices of the multiphase system and penetrate the multiphase flow in undistorted straight lines. Hence, in contrast to optical methods, both of these X-ray-based methods are independent of the void fraction and are applicable to opaque liquids.

  17. Software System for the Calibration of X-Ray Measuring Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytán-Gallardo, E.; Tovar-Muñoz, V. M.; Cruz-Estrada, P.; Vergara-Martínez, F. J.; Rivero-Gutiérrez, T.

    2006-09-01

    A software system that facilities the calibration of X-ray measuring instruments used in medical applications is presented. The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of the Nuclear Research National Institute in México (ININ in Spanish), supports activities concerning with ionizing radiations in medical area. One of these activities is the calibration of X-ray measuring instruments, in terms of air kerma or exposure by substitution method in an X-ray beam at a point where the rate has been determined by means of a standard ionization chamber. To automatize this process, a software system has been developed, the calibration system is composed by an X-ray unit, a Dynalizer IIIU X-ray meter by RADCAL, a commercial data acquisition card, the software system and the units to be tested and calibrated. A quality control plan has been applied in the development of the software system, ensuring that quality assurance procedures and standards are being followed.

  18. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Hiroshi, E-mail: sakuraih@gunma-u.ac.jp [Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kawahara, Nobuyuki [Okayama University, Tsushima-Naka 3, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Itou, Masayoshi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tomita, Eiji [Okayama University, Tsushima-Naka 3, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Suzuki, Kosuke [Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Sakurai, Yoshiharu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-02-17

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction.

  19. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  20. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, A. [Shenzhen College of International Education, 1st HuangGang Park St., Shenzhen, GuangDong (China); Luo, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, 332 Bonner Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-1920 (United States); Wang, A. [Department of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Broadbent, C. [School of Engineering, Columbia University, 1130 Amsterdam Av., New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhong, J. [Department of English, Dartmouth College, 6032 Sanborn House, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Dilmanian, F.A. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Neurology, and Radiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 743, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  1. Fat to Muscle Ratio Measurements with Dual Energy X Ray Absorbtiometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, A; Broadbent, C; Zhong, J; Dilmanian, A; Zafonte, F; Zhong, Z

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  2. Cryogenic Current Comparator as Low Intensity Beam Current Monitor in the CERN Antiproton Decelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Soby, L; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor any losses during the deceleration and cooling phases. However, existing DC current transformers can hardly reach the μA level, while at the AD and ELENA currents can be as low as 100 nA. A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is currently being designed and shall be installed in the AD and ELENA machines. It should meet the following specifications: A current resolution smaller than 10 nA, a dynamic range covering currents between 100 nA and 1 mA, as well as a bandwidth from DC to 1 kHz. Different design options are being considered, including the use of low or high temperature superconductor materials, different CCC shapes and dimensions, different SQUID characteristics, as well as electromagnetic shielding requirements. In this contribution we present first results f...

  3. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  4. Dark matter for excess of AMS-02 positrons and antiprotons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dark matter explanation to simultaneously account for the excess of antiproton-to-proton and positron power spectra observed in the AMS-02 experiment while having the right dark matter relic abundance and satisfying the current direct search bounds. We extend the Higgs triplet model with a hidden gauge symmetry of SU(2X that is broken to Z3 by a quadruplet scalar field, rendering the associated gauge bosons stable weakly-interacting massive particle dark matter candidates. By coupling the complex Higgs triplet and the SU(2X quadruplet, the dark matter candidates can annihilate into triplet Higgs bosons each of which in turn decays into lepton or gauge boson final states. Such a mechanism gives rise to correct excess of positrons and antiprotons with an appropriate choice of the triplet vacuum expectation value. Besides, the model provides a link between neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology.

  5. The Antiproton Accumulator and Collector and the discovery of the W & Z intermediate vector bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Chohan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    The following sections are included: Preface ; Brief outline of the overall scheme for antiprotons of the SPS as a collider ; Antiproton production and accumulation ; The AA and AC storage rings ; Stochastic cooling and stacking ; Post-acceleration of antiprotons and beams for SPS Collider ; Proton test beams for the AA and AC from the PS ; The W and Z discoveries and the Nobel Prize ; Accumulator performance ; Acknowledgements and conclusions ; References

  6. Nuclear Physics in Space: What We Can Learn From Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2004-01-01

    Studies and discoveries in cosmic-ray physics and generally in Astrophysics provide a fertile ground for research in many areas of Particle Physics and Cosmology, such as the search for dark matter, antimatter, new particles, and exotic physics, studies of the nucleosynthesis, origin of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray diffuse emission, formation of the large scale structure of the universe etc. In several years new missions are planned for cosmic-ray experiments, which will tremendously increase the quality and accuracy of cosmic-ray data. On the other hand, direct measurements of cosmic rays are possible in only one location on the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy and present only a snapshot of very dynamic processes. It has been recently realized that direct information about the fluxes and spectra of cosmic rays in distant locations is provided by the Galactic diffuse gamma-rays, therefore, complementing the local cosmic-ray studies. A wealth of information is also contained in the isotopic abundances of cosmic rays, therefore, accurate evaluation of the isotopic production cross sections is of primary importance for Astrophysics of cosmic rays, studies of the galactic chemical evolution, and Cosmology. In this talk, I will show new results obtained with GALPROP, the most advanced numerical model for cosmic-ray propagation, which includes in a self-consistent way all cosmic-ray species (stable and long-lived radioactive isotopes from H to Ni, antiprotons, positrons and electrons, gamma rays and synchrotron radiation), and all relevant processes and reactions.

  7. LCLS in—photon out: fluorescence measurement of neon using soft x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Razib; Buth, Christian; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Beerwerth, Randolf; Holmes, Michael; Aldrich, Jeff; Lin, Ming-Fu; Minitti, Michael; Osipov, Timur; Schlotter, William; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Fritzsche, Stephan; Berrah, Nora

    2018-02-01

    We measured the fluorescence photon yield of neon upon soft x-ray ionization (∼1200 eV) from the x-ray free-electron laser at Linac Coherent Light Source, and demonstrated the usage of a grazing incidence spectrometer with a variable line spacing grating to perform x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on a gas phase system. Our measurements also allowed us to estimate the focal size of the beam from the theoretical description developed, in terms of the rate equation approximation accounting for photoionization shake off of neutral neon and double auger decay of single core holes.

  8. LCLS in - photon out: fluorescence measurement of neon using soft x-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Obaid, Razib; Buth, Christian; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Beerwerth, Randolf; Holmes, Michael; Aldrich, Jeff; Lin, Ming-Fu; Minitti, Michael; Osipov, Timur; Schlotter, William; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Fritzsche, Stephan; Berrah, Nora

    2017-01-01

    We measured the fluorescence photon yield of neon upon soft x-ray ionization (~1200 eV) from the x-ray free electron laser at Linac Coherent Light Source, and demonstrated the usage of a grazing incidence spectrometer with a variable linespacing grating to perform x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on a gas phase system. Our measurements also allowed us to estimate the focal size of the beam from the theoretical description developed, in terms of the rate equation approximation accounting for ph...

  9. Selected Papers on Low-Energy Antiprotons and Possible Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert [Fermilab

    1998-09-19

    The only realistic means by which to create a facility at Fermilab to produce large amounts of low energy antiprotons is to use resources which already exist. There is simply too little money and manpower at this point in time to generate new accelerators on a time scale before the turn of the century. Therefore, innovation is required to modify existing equipment to provide the services required by experimenters.

  10. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the All-Hadronic Channel at Proton Antiproton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaroli, Fabrizio [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass in the all-hadronic channel with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab using an integrated luminosity of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ . Top quarks are produced mostly in pairs at the Tevatron Collider; they subsequently decay almost 100% of the time in a W boson and a b quark each. Final states are classified according to the decays of the W bosons. Here we study only those events in which both W's decay into quark pairs. This channel has the advantage of a large branching ratio and of being fully reconstructed. On the other hand the signal is overwhelmed by a background which surpasses it by three orders of magnitude even after the requirement of a specific trigger. A neural network is thus used to discriminate signal from background events in order to achieve a good signal over background ratio. We look for a variable which is strongly correlated with the top quark mass, and compare the corresponding distribution in the data to signal and background templates in order to measure the top quark mass. Here is an outline of the following of this work: Chapter 1 presents an introduction to the path that lead to the formalization of the Standard Model of fundamental interactions. We discuss in Chapter 2 the need for a 6th quark in the Standard Model, the phenomenology of the top quark and a summary of the current experimental knowledge of its properties, and motivate the need for a precise measurement of its mass. In Chapter 3 we describe the experimental apparatus needed to produce the top quarks, i.e. the Tevatron Collider, and the detector which collects the data analyzed in this work, CDF II. Chapter 4 describes how CDF II interprets the output from the various subdetectors and translate them into the physics objects which are needed for the measurement. In Chapter 5 we present how we overcome the problem of the huge background which overwhelms the top production by using for the first time in this channel a neural network

  11. X-Ray Micro-Calorimeter Based on Si Thermistors for X-Ray Astronomy: Design and First Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliane, A.; de Moro, F.; Pigot, C.; Agnese, P.; de La Broïse, X.; Gasse, A.; Navick, X.-F.; Karolak, M.; Ribot, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Szeflinski, V.; Gobil, Y.; Renaud, D.; Rivallin, P.; Geoffray, H.

    2008-04-01

    X-ray Astronomy provides a unique window on a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. The currently operating X-ray space observatories perform X-ray spectral imaging with the use of CCDs. When available, cryogenic X-ray microcalorimeter arrays will far outperform CCDs in terms of spectral resolution, energy bandwidth and count rate. Experience has been gained with Infra-Red bolometer arrays at CEA-LETI (Grenoble) in collaboration with the CEA-SAp (Saclay); taking advantage of this background, we are now developing an X-ray spectro-imaging camera for the next generation space astronomy missions, using silicon technology (implanted and high temperature diffused thermistors). Each pixel of this array detector is made of a tantalum absorber bound, by indium bump hybridization, to a silicon thermistor. The absorber array is bound to the thermistor array in a single automatic step. The thermo-mechanical link, provided by hybridization, is being improved in terms of thermal capacitance. Finally, our main effort is in developing arrays of silicon thermistors with negligible excess 1/ f noise. The thermistor has been simulated with the 2D simulator ATHENA (SILVACO International). We studied the effects of the implants and their thermal treatment on both vertical and lateral dopant distributions at the edges of the thermistor. Prototypes have been created following the procedure optimized by the ATHENA simulation. We present the status of the development and results of measurements performed on these four main building blocks required to create a detector array up to 32×32 pixels in size.

  12. A measurement of top anti-top quark pair production cross section in proton anti-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jongyoung [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A measurement of the top anti-top quark pair production cross section in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented. The measurement is made using data with integrated luminosity of 109.4 pb-1, obtained at the Collider Detector at Fermilab between August 2002 and May 2003. A search is made for the dilepton decay channel of top anti-top production, t$\\bar{t}$→l+νbl-νl$\\bar{b}$. The Standard Model dilepton decay channel of the top anti-top quark pair production involves two high transverse momentum leptons, a large missing energy from the undetected neutrinos, two jets from the b and b¯ quark fragmentations. Various Standard Model processes can mimic t$\\bar{t}$ production in this decay channel. These backgrounds are estimated to be 0.65 ± 0.13 events in an integrated luminosity of 109.4 pb-1. In the data, one ee, three μμ, and two eμ dilepton candidates were observed. From these data, the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section of σ t$\\bar{t}$ =11.4 $+6.2\\atop{-4.6}$ pb has been measured. This measurement is consistent with the theoretical prediction of the Standard Model, σ t$\\bar{t}$ =6.70 $+71\\atop{0.88}$ pb assuming a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2.

  13. Driving Extreme Variability: Measuring the Changing Characteristics of the X-ray Emitting Coronae in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Daniel; Gallo, Luigi C.; Kara, Erin; Fabian, Andrew c

    2014-08-01

    Through detailed analysis of the reflection of the X-ray continuum from the accretion disc, it is possible to probe the innermost structures right down to the innermost stable circular orbit and event horizon around the supermassive black holes in AGN. By measuring the emissivity profile of the accretion disc, that is its pattern of illumination by the coronal X-ray source, along with reverberation time lags between variability in the X-ray continuum and reflection, it has proven possible to measure the geometry and spatial extend of the corona that produces the X-ray continuum when the observed data are combined with insight gained from general relativistic ray tracing simulations.We conducted detailed analysis of both the X-ray continuum and its reflection from the accretion disc during periods of high and low X-ray flux drawn from long observations of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy, 1H0707-495, totalling more than 1.3Ms with XMM Newton, as well as during the course of an X-ray flare in another narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy, Markarian 335, observed in 2013 by Suzaku.These observations allow us to trace, for the first time, from observations, the evolution of the X-ray emitting corona that gives rise to the extreme variability seen in the X-ray emission from AGN. We detect expansion in the corona as well as variations in its energetics as the X-ray flux increases, which gives us insight into the physical processes by which energy is liberated from black hole accretion flows and allows observational constraints to be placed upon theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and associated coronae.

  14. A novel antiproton radial diagnostic based on octupole induced ballistic loss

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G.B.; Bowe, P.D.; Bray, C.C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C.L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D.R.; Hangst, J.S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayano, R.S.; Hayden, M.E.; Humphries, A.J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M.J.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R.D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D.M.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time-history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.

  15. A Measurement of the Inclusive Z / γ* → μ+ μ- Cross-Section and Study of W and Z Events in proton - anti-proton Collisions at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurse, Emily L. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive Z/γ* → μ+ μ- cross section for Mμμ > 40 GeV at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The measurement is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 147.7 pb-1, collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron, Fermilab, between September 2002 and October 2003. A total of 14352 di-muon events are selected and a final result of σ(Z/γ*) = 327.8 ± 3.4(stat.) ± 8.4(syst.) ± 21.3(lumi.) pb is obtained. Correcting the number of di-muon events by a factor of 0.885 ± 0.015 for the contribution from pure γ* exchange and Z/γ* interference, the inclusive Z → μ+ μ- cross section is found to be: σ(Z) = 290.1 ± 3.0(stat.) ± 7.4(syst.) ± 18.9(lumi.) pb. Finally, comparisons of W and Z boson pT distributions as measured with D0 during Run I of the Tevatron are compared to HERWIG and MC@NLO predictions. Relevant parameters in the simulations are tuned to obtain the best possible fit to the data. An excellent agreement is found for both HERWIG and MC@NLO.

  16. A measurement of the t anti t production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV with the DOe detector at the Tevatron using final states with a muon and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, M.

    2004-02-01

    A preliminary measurement of the t anti t production cross section at {radical}s=1.96 TeV is presented. The {mu}-plus-jets final state is analyzed in a data sample of 94 pb{sup -1} and a total of 14 events are selected with a background expectation of 11.7{+-}1.9 events. The measurement yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=2.4{sub -3.5}{sup +4.2}(stat.){sub -2.6}{sup +2.5}(syst.){+-}0.3(lumi.) pb. The analysis, being part of a larger effort to re-observe the top quark in Tevatron Run II data and to measure the production cross section, is combined with results from the available analysis channels. The combined result yields: {sigma}{sub p} {sub anti} {sub p{yields}}{sub t} {sub anti} {sub t+X}=8.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(syst.){+-}0.8(lumi.) pb.

  17. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Kline

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. These measurements show that the mass-ablation rate of Al is higher than plastic (CH, comparable to high density carbon (HDC, and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. The results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators and further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  18. Measurement of the top pair-production cross section in the dilepton channel in proton-antiproton collisions at a $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coca, Mircea Norocel [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The top quark was discovered by CDF and D0 in 1995, in Run I. This thesis presents the results of the top production cross-section measurement, in the dilepton channel, using data taken at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions, at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1.96 TeV. The dataset represents an integrated luminosity of 193 pb-1 and was collelcted between the period March 2002 - September 2003. Thirteen events were observed (1 e/e, 9 e/ μ , 3 μ/μ ), passing the selection requirements, with an estimated background of 2.8 ± 0.7 events. These are used to measure a t$\\bar{t}$ ross-section of σ t$\\bar{t}$ = 8.4_ $+3.2\\atop{-2.7}$ (stat)_ $+1.5\\atop{- 1.1}$ (syst) ± 0.5 (lum)pb. This is in a good agreement with the Standard Model prediction of σ$t\\bar{t}$ = 6.7_ $+0.71\\atop{- 0.88}$ pb, for a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2 . Also few kinematical distributions are compared with the Standard Model and found to agree well.

  19. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhenbin [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5 fb-1 of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator POWHEG is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include s-channel, t-channel, and Wt-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53} (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})$ pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\ ± 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of $|V_{tb}|>0.78$ at the 95% credibility level.

  20. A Measurement of the B Quark and Neutral B Meson Production Cross-Sections in Proton - Antiproton Collisions at a Center-of-Mass Energy of 1.8-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejcik, III, Steve [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The measurement of the b quark and $B^0$ meson production cross sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV for $\\mid y \\mid$ < 1.0 and $P_T(B^0$) > 9.0 GeV /c, $P_T$(b) > 11.5 GeV /c is reported. The $B^0$ sample was tagged with the decay chain $B^0 \\to J /\\psi K^{0*}$, $J/ \\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-, K^{0*} \\to K^{\\pm} \\pi^{\\mp}$ from a sample of pp collisions with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 $pb^{-1}$. The results are compared to the values predicted from O($\\alpha_{s^3}$) perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics and indicate a production rate for b quarks which is in excess of that predicted. Implications of the result are that the next-to-leading order calculations are not yet capable of precisely predicting heavy quark production rates. The same calculations are presently utilized to estimate the production cross section of top quarks. While these calculations may be more reliable for top quarks, the discrepancy between the calculated and measured b quark production cross section could indicate that present upper limits on the top quark mass are conservative. This thesis was prepared under the guidance of Professor Bruce Barnett.

  1. X-RAY MEASUREMENTS OF IMPACTED MANDIBULAR THIRD MOLARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petya G. Kanazirska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray diagnostics is essential in case of retention of teeth. An important condition for proper treatment plan for impacted third molars of the mandible is the determination of the type of retention in the jaw in accordance with their medio-distal inclination and the space available for eruption (retromolar space. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present an objective method for determination of the medio-distal inclination and the space for eruption of the third molars of the mandible. Materials and methods: The studied patients with impacted third molars of the mandible are 127, aged 17 through 60. They were examined with Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT. On the orthopantomography, obtained after the scanning as a reconstructed image, we defined the medio-distal inclination and space for eruption of the third molars of the mandible. For this purpose, we summarized several methods. Results: The most common inclination of the third molars of the mandible with retained eruption is the medial one at 120 teeth (61.5% ± 3.5. Second in frequency is the vertical one-34 teeth (17.4% ± 2.7, followed by the distal inclination– 21 teeth (10.8% ± 2.2. With the lowest frequency are the teeth which are positioned horizontally –20 teeth (10.3% ± 2.2. Shortage of retromolar space is established for173 teeth (88.7% ± 2.3. In 22 teeth (11.3% ± 2.3 there is enough space in the jaw for eruption. Conclusion: An objective method for determination of the medio-distal inclination of the teeth and the space available for eruption is introduced for the first time in Bulgaria. By determining the inclination of impacted wisdom teeth under this methodology one can avoid the subjective factor–the seventh tooth. It is not a reference plane, because it can also be tilted or missing. With the help of the developed method the retromolar point can be determined more objectively.

  2. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  3. X-ray reflection and scatter measurements on selected optical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, S. A.; Reynolds, J. M.; Holland, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results from an experimental program to determine the reflection efficiency and scatter parameters of selected optical samples are presented. The measurements were made using 8.34A X-rays at various angles of incidence. Selected samples were contaminated after being measured and then remeasured to determine the effects of contamination. The instrumentation involved in taking the data, including the X-ray reflectometer and data processing equipment, is discussed in detail. The condition of the optical surfaces, the total reflection measurements, the scatter measurements, and the analysis are discussed.

  4. Measurement of the top-antitop quark pair differential cross section with respect to the invariant mass of the pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgeman, Alice Patricia [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2008-01-01

    I present a measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ differential cross section, dσ/dMt$\\bar{t}$, in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 2.7 fb-1 of CDF II data. I find that dσ/dMt$\\bar{t}$ is consistent with the Standard Model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions. I set limits on the ratio Κ/MPl in the Randall-Sundrum model by looking for Kaluza Klein gravitons which decay to top quarks. I find Κ/MPl > 0.16 at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Measurements of top quark pair production cross section in proton anti-proton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV in the τ + jets final state using 1 fb-1 of data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Sohrab [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a new measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$X production at √s = 1.96 TeV using 974.2 pb-1of data collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006. We focus on the final state where the W boson from one of the top quarks decays into a τ lepton and its associated neutrino, while the other W boson decays into a quark-antiquark pair. We aim to select those events in which the τ lepton subsequently decays hadronically, meaning to one or three charged hadrons, zero or more neutral hadrons and a tau neutrino (the charge conjugate processes are implied in all of the above). The observable signature thus consists of a narrow calorimeter shower with associated track(s) characteristic of a hadronic tau decay, four or more jets, of which two are initiated by b quarks accompanying the W's in the top quark decays, and a large net missing momentum in the transverse plane due to the energetic neutrino-antineutrino pair that leave no trace in the detector media. The preliminary result for the measured cross section is: σ(t$\\bar{t}$) = 6.9-1.2 +1.2(stat)-0.7+0.8(syst) ± 0.4 (lumi) pb. This indicates that our finding is consistent with the Standard Model prediction.

  6. Soft x-ray pulse length measurement by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom, H.W.K. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Sher, M.H.; Mohideen, U.; Wood, O.R. II; Aumiller, G.D. [AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States); McIlrath, T.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bokor, J.; Freeman, R.R. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Sugar, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have demonstrated a system for subpicosecond, soft-x-ray continuum, pump-probe absorption spectroscopy. Using multiphoton ionization to abruptly change the x-ray absorption spectra of a gas, they have measured the temporal profile of laser-generated x-ray pulses near 90 eV. Although the x-ray pulses from a laser-generated plasma here were only as short as {approximately}20 psec, the technique is extendible to higher energy x-rays which will have pulse durations approaching 100 fsec. They also present the absorption spectrum of Kr ions produced under conditions of high intensity non-resonant multiphoton ionization. The spectra are identified with a fit to the Cowan code.

  7. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Masato, E-mail: hoshino@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsukube, Takuro [Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital, 1-3-1 Wakinohamakaigandori, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-0073 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-08

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching.

  8. Simulation of an antiprotons beam applied to the radiotherapy; Simulacao de um feixe de antiprotons aplicado a radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Leonardo de Almeida

    2006-07-15

    Results for the interaction of a antiproton beam with constituent nuclei of the organic matter are presented. This method regards of the application of an computational algorithm to determine quantitatively the differential cross sections for the scattered particles, starting from the interaction of these antiprotons with the nuclei, what will allow in the future to draw the isodose curve for antiproton therapy, once these beams are expected to be used in cancer treatment soon. The calculation will be done through the application of the concepts of the method of intranuclear cascade, providing yield and differential cross sections of the scattered particles, present in the software MCMC. Th algorithm was developed based on Monte Carlo's method, already taking into account a validate code. The following physical quantities are presented: the yield of secondary particles, their spectral and angular distributions for these interactions. For the energy range taken into account the more important emitted particles are protons, neutrons and pions. Results shown that emitted secondary particles can modify the isodose curves, because they present high yield and energy for transverse directions. (author)

  9. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido [Univ. of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2009-01-16

    Of the six quarks in the standard model the top quark is by far the heaviest: 35 times more massive than its partner the bottom quark and more than 130 times heavier than the average of the other five quarks. Its correspondingly small decay width means it tends to decay before forming a bound state. Of all quarks, therefore, the top is the least affected by quark confinement, behaving almost as a free quark. Its large mass also makes the top quark a key player in the realm of the postulated Higgs boson, whose coupling strengths to particles are proportional to their masses. Precision measurements of particle masses for e.g. the top quark and the W boson can hereby provide indirect constraints on the Higgs boson mass. Since in the standard model top quarks couple almost exclusively to bottom quarks (t → Wb), top quark decays provide a window on the standard model through the direct measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element Vtb. In the same way any lack of top quark decays into W bosons could imply the existence of decay channels beyond the standard model, for example charged Higgs bosons as expected in two-doublet Higgs models: t → H+b. Within the standard model top quark decays can be classified by the (lepton or quark) W boson decay products. Depending on the decay of each of the W bosons, t$\\bar{t}$ pair decays can involve either no leptons at all, or one or two isolated leptons from direct W → e$\\bar{v}${sub e} and W → μ$\\bar{v}$μ decays. Cascade decays like b → Wc → e$\\bar{v}$ec can lead to additional non-isolated leptons. The fully hadronic decay channel, in which both Ws decay into a quark-antiquark pair, has the largest branching fraction of all t$\\bar{t}$ decay channels and is the only kinematically complete (i.e. neutrino-less) channel. It lacks, however, the clear isolated lepton signature and is therefore hard to distinguish from the multi-jet QCD background. It

  10. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  11. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  12. Post-Shot Simulations of NIC Experiments with Comparison to X-ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, David; Jones, Oggie; Suter, Larry; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn

    2012-10-01

    National Ignition Campaign experiments at NIF are ongoing and post-shot simulations play an important role in understanding the physical processes occurring in the quest for demonstrating fusion burn. In particular, it is important to understand the x-ray environment inside the hohlraum targets, which is studied using various x-ray diagnostics. The Dante instrument measures the time dependent x-ray emission escaping out of the hohlraum laser entrance holes (LEHs) and the SXI instrument provides a time-integrated image of both soft and hard x-rays. We compare calculated total x-ray emission with Dante data as well as the relative high energy Mband emission that contributes to capsule preheat. We correct our calculated x-ray emission to account for differences between simulation and data on LEH closure using SXI data. We provide results for both ``standard candle'' simulation with no added multipliers and for simulations with time-dependent multipliers that are used to obtain agreement with shock timing and implosion velocity data. The physics justification for the use of multipliers is to account for potential missing energy or incorrect ablation modeling. The relative importance of these two effects can be studied through comparison of post-shot simulations with x-ray measurements.

  13. Measurements of keV-neutron capture {gamma} rays of fission products. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashira, Masayuki [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1997-03-01

    {gamma} rays from the keV-neutron capture reactions by {sup 143,145}Nd and {sup 153}Eu have been measured in a neutron energy region of 10 to 80 keV, using a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) {gamma}-ray spectrometer and the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be pulsed neutron source with a 3-MV Pelletron accelerator. The preliminary results for the capture cross sections and {gamma}-ray spectra of those nuclei are presented and discussed. (author)

  14. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  15. Measurement of mixtures of melamine using THz ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ye; Mu, Kaijun; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Cunlin

    2009-07-01

    The terahertz spectra of pure melamine and two kinds of its mixtures that mix with polyethylene and milk powder were measured using the terahertz time-domain-spectroscopy (THz-TDS). It was found that there are two absorption peaks at 1.99THz and 2.29THz in all three spectra. The absorption coefficient of the mixture varies with the proportion of melamine in the mixture. Increasing the percentage of melamine in the mixture, the absorption peaks in spectrum get more obvious and sharper. According to the Lambert-Beer law, the absorption coefficient and the proportion of the melamine should followed linear relationship. The experimental data accord to this theory well. Using density functional theory, the vibration of melamine crystal was calculated, which accords to experimental data well. This work provides a method of detecting melamine in milk powders. It is expected that the terahertz spectroscopy technology can be used in food safety and other applications.

  16. Unfolding the fission prompt gamma-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J; Laptev, A

    2010-10-16

    The nearly energy independence of the {gamma}-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  17. Cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture measurements in cropped fields

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos Andres

    2013-01-01

    This cumulative dissertation explored the use of the detection of natural background of fast neutrons, the so-called cosmic-ray neutron sensing (CRS) approach to measure field-scale soil moisture in cropped fields. Primary cosmic rays penetrate the top atmosphere and interact with atmospheric particles. Such interaction results on a cascade of high-energy neutrons, which continue traveling through the atmospheric column. Finally, neutrons penetrate the soil surface and a second cascade is pro...

  18. Temperature measurement through detailed balance in X-ray Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doppner, T; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Neumayer, P; Regan, S P; Glenzer, S H

    2009-02-02

    The plasma conditions in isochorically heated beryllium are measured by x-ray Thomson scattering in the collective regime with a Cl Ly-{alpha} x-ray source at 2.96 keV. In addition to the down-shifted plasmon shape which provides electron density and temperature information, an up-shifted plasmon signal is observed allowing a model independent determination of the plasma temperature from the detailed balance relation.

  19. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  20. Longitudinal Coherence Measurements of the Transient Collisional X-Ray Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R F; Hubert, S; Fajardo, M; Zeitoun, P; Dunn, J; Hunter, J R; Remond, C; Vanbostal, L; Jaquemot, S; Nilsen, J; Lewis, C L S; Marmoret, R

    2002-08-09

    The first longitudinal coherence measurement of the transient inversion collisional x-ray laser is presented. The scheme under study is the picosecond output of the Ni-like Pd x-ray laser at 14.68 nm generated by the C0MET laser facility at LLNL. Interference fringes were generated using a Michelson interferometer setup in which a thin multilayer membrane was used as a beam splitter. Longitudinal coherence measurements were made for this transition by changing the length of one interferometer arm and measuring the resultant variation in fringe visibility. The nature of this dependence also allows for an estimation of the linewidth of the lasing transition to be made. Analysis indicates a linewidth of {approx}0.3 pm which is a factor of four less than previous measurements on quasi-steady state x-ray laser schemes.

  1. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  2. Development of a compact beam intensity monitor for micro X-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hayakawa, S; Oshima, M; Hirokawa, T

    2001-01-01

    A compact beam intensity monitor detecting an X-ray excited sample current from a thin metal foil was developed for micro X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. By utilizing gas amplification caused by the ejected photoelectrons or Auger electrons, the monitor can achieve better sensitivity than what can be realized with the ionization chamber. Fluctuation of the beam intensity through the pinhole of 10 mu m was precisely measured by using this monitor, and the XAFS spectrum from a Ni thin foil was successfully measured with adequate normalization.

  3. Measurements of X-ray relectivities of Au-coatings at several energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornstrup, Allan; Christensen, Finn Erland; Garnaes, J.

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of an extensive study of X-ray reflectivities of dip lacquered and Au-coated Al foils. The measurements are performed at four different energies from 0.71 keV to 8.1 keV. The foils span a range of fabrication parameters. We show that two of three examined versions...... of a density variation model are able to explain the data. We find a strong dependence on the microroughness of thickness of the Au coating and of the Au deposition rates. We present data suggesting important correspondence between X-ray measurements and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We find...

  4. Precise measurement of inner diameter of mono-capillary optic using X-ray imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonmu; Lim, Jae Hong; Namba, Yoshiharu; Chon, Kwon Su

    2017-11-16

    Mono-capillary optics have been applied to increase the performance of X-ray instruments. However, performance of a mono-capillary optic strongly depends on the shape accuracy, which is determined by the diameters of the inner hollow of the capillary along the axial direction. To precisely determine the inner diameter of the capillary optic used in X-ray imaging technique, which aims to replace the conventional method using a visible microscope. High spatial resolution X-ray images of the mono-capillary optic were obtained by a synchrotron radiation beamline. The inner diameter of the mono-capillary optic was measured and analyzed by the pixel values of the X-ray image. Edge enhancement effect was quite useful in determining the inner diameter, and the accuracy of the diameter determination was less than 1.32 μm. Many images obtained by scanning the mono-capillary optic along the axial direction were combined, and the axial profile, consisting of diameters along the axial direction, was obtained from the combined image. The X-ray imaging method could provide an accurate measurement with slope error of±19 μrad. Applying X-ray imaging technique to determine the inner diameter of a mono-capillary optic can contribute to increasing fabrication accuracy of the mono-capillary optic through a feedback process between the fabrication and measurement of its diameter.

  5. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Amanda Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haines, Todd Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mendez, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moir, David C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sedillo, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shurter, Roger P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Volegov, Petr Lvovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources are difficult to measure. The sources measured were Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (370 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse) and Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) (550 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse). Features of the Compton spectrometer are described, and spectra are shown. Additional slides present data on instrumental calibration.

  6. The PS200 catching trap: A new tool for ultralow-energy antiproton physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Dyer, P.L.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Schecker, J.A. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Hoibraten, S. (University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)); Lewis, R.A.; Otto, T. (Pennsylvania State University, Osmond Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)); Rochet, J. (CERN, Division PPE, CH 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Schauer, M.M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Pennsylvania State University, Osmond Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States))

    1994-10-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been trapped and electron cooled in the PS200 catching trap from a single fast extracted pulse from LEAR. The system is described in detail, different extraction schemes are discussed, and possible applications of this instrument to ultralow-energy atomic and nuclear physics with antiprotons are mentioned. [copyright] 1994 MAIK/Interperiodika

  7. The PS 200 catching trap: A new tool for ultra-low energy antiproton physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Dyer, P.L.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Schauer, M.M.; Schecker, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hoibraten, S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Lewis, R.A.; Otto, T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Noise Control Lab.; Rochet, J. [CERN, Div. PPE, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1994-04-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been trapped and electron cooled in the PS200 catching trap from a single fast extracted pulse from LEAR. The system is described in detail, different extraction schemes are discussed, and possible applications of this instrument to ultra-low energy atomic and nuclear physics with antiprotons are mentioned.

  8. Technical Development of Profile Measurement for the Soft X-Ray Via Compton Backward Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Taku; Hayano, Hitoshi; Hidume, Kentaro; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Minamiguchi, Shuichi; Oshima, Akihiro; Ueyama, Daisuke; Urakawa, Junji; Washio, Masakazu

    2005-01-01

    A compact X-ray source is called for such various fields as material development, biological science, and medical treatment. At Waseda University, we have already succeeded to generate the soft X-ray of the wavelength within so-called water window region (250-500eV) via Compton backward scattering between 1047nm Nd:YLF laser and 4.2MeV high quality electron beam. Although this method equips some useful characters, e.g. high intensity, short pulse, energy variableness, etc, the X-ray generating system is compact enough to fit in tabletop size. In the next step, there rises two principal tasks, that is, to make the soft X-ray intensity higher, and to progress X-ray profile measurement techniques as preliminary experiments for biomicroscopy. Specifically, we utilize two-pass amp for the former, and irradiate X-ray to a resist film which is previously exposed by UV lamp or get images with X-ray CCD for the latter. In this conference, we will show the experimental results and some future plans.

  9. Measurement and simulation for a complementary imaging with the neutron and X-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kaoru Y.; Sato, Hirotaka; Kamiyama, Takashi; Shinohara, Takenao

    2017-09-01

    By using a composite source system, we measured radiographs of the thermal neutron and keV X-ray in the 45-MeV electron linear accelerator facility at Hokkaido University. The source system provides the alternative beam of neutron and X-ray by switching the production target onto the electron beam axis. In the measurement to demonstrate a complementary imaging, the detector based on a vacuum-tube type neutron color image intensifier was applied to the both beams for dual-purpose. On the other hand, for reducing background in a neutron transmission spectrum, test measurements using a gadolinium-type neutron grid were performed with a cold neutron source at Hokkaido University. In addition, the simulations of the neutron and X-ray transmissions for various substances were performed using the PHITS code. A data analysis procedure for estimating the substance of sample was investigated through the simulations.

  10. Analog Cherenkov detectors used in laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Hayano, R S; Yamazaki, T

    2003-01-01

    We describe some acrylic Cherenkov detectors read out by gateable fine-mesh photomultipliers, used in laser spectroscopy experiments of metastable antiprotonic helium (pbarHe+) atoms carried out at the LEAR and AD facilities at CERN. The atoms were produced by stopping pulsed antiproton beams in a helium target. Charged particles emerging from the antiproton annihilations produced Cherenkov light in the detector, the time envelope of which consisted of a strong flash from the promptly-annihilating antiprotons, followed by a much longer but less intense tail from the delayed annihilations of the metastable atoms. The photomultiplier was turned off during the initial light flash by reversing the electric potential on its dynodes, thus allowing only the delayed annihilations to be recorded as an analog pulse. The atoms were irradiated with a laser pulse tuned to the characteristic wavelength whic simulated antiproton transitions from a metastable state to a state with a short lifetime against annihilation. The r...

  11. SphinX Measurements of the 2009 Solar Minimum X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bakała, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 × 1047 cm-3 and 1.1 × 1048 cm-3. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  12. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622, Kopernika 11, Wroclaw (Poland); Kuzin, S. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Farnik, F. [Astronomical Institute, Ondrejov Observatory (Czech Republic); Reale, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, and INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Phillips, K. J. H., E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  13. Physics-based modeling of X-ray CT measurements with energy-integrating detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yong; Gao, Hewei; Wu, Mingye; Pack, Jed D.; Xu, Hao; Tao, Kun; Fitzgerald, Paul F.; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Computer simulation tools for X-ray CT are important for research efforts in developing reconstructionmethods, designing new CT architectures, and improving X-ray source and detector technologies. In this paper, we propose a physics-based modeling method for X-ray CT measurements with energy-integrating detectors. It accurately accounts for the dependence characteristics on energy, depth and spatial location of the X-ray detection process, which is either ignored or over simplified in most existing CT simulation methods. Compared with methods based on Monte Carlo simulations, it is computationally much more efficient due to the use of a look-up table for optical collection efficiency. To model the CT measurments, the proposed model considers five separate effects: energy- and location-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays, conversion of the absorbed X-rays into the optical photons emitted by the scintillator, location-dependent collection of the emitted optical photons, quantumefficiency of converting fromoptical photons to electrons, and electronic noise. We evaluated the proposed method by comparing the noise levels in the reconstructed images from measured data and simulations of a GE LightSpeed VCT system. Using the results of a 20 cm water phantom and a 35 cm polyethylene (PE) disk at various X-ray tube voltages (kVp) and currents (mA), we demonstrated that the proposed method produces realistic CT simulations. The difference in noise standard deviation between measurements and simulations is approximately 2% for the water phantom and 10% for the PE phantom.

  14. Simultaneous scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron X-ray measurements in a gas environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mom, Rik V; Onderwaater, Willem G; Rost, Marcel J; Jankowski, Maciej; Wenzel, Sabine; Jacobse, Leon; Alkemade, Paul F A; Vandalon, Vincent; van Spronsen, Matthijs A; van Weeren, Matthijs; Crama, Bert; van der Tuijn, Peter; Felici, Roberto; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Carlà, Francesco; Frenken, Joost W M; Groot, Irene M N

    2017-11-01

    A combined X-ray and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrument is presented that enables the local detection of X-ray absorption on surfaces in a gas environment. To suppress the collection of ion currents generated in the gas phase, coaxially shielded STM tips were used. The conductive outer shield of the coaxial tips can be biased to deflect ions away from the tip core. When tunneling, the X-ray-induced current is separated from the regular, 'topographic' tunneling current using a novel high-speed separation scheme. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by measuring the local X-ray-induced current on Au(1 1 1) in 800 mbar Ar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurement of Neutron Star Radii with X-ray Binaries and Recycled Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-03-01

    Detailed modeling of the observed surface X-ray radiation from neutron stars can in principle reveal their interior structure, thereby constraining the state of matter at the most extreme densities. This talk will provide a summary of on-going observational efforts with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton towards this end, with a focus on two particular varieties of neutron stars - thermally-emitting quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and ``recycled'' millisecond pulsars. An overview of future prospects for measuring the elusive neutron star equation of state using forthcoming X-ray missions such as the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) and Athena+ will also be presented.

  16. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  17. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  18. X-ray Stress Analysis in Single Crystallites - Measuring Method and Analysis Routines

    CERN Document Server

    Turki, J

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray stress analysis in single grains of a coarse grained material can be performed by using the single crystal method. In this work theoretical basics and measuring algorithms for the single crystal method are presented. Test measurements on an iron-silicon alloy were carried out for different wave lengths and for different lattice planes. It is demonstrated that the Mo-K alpha radiation is well suited for the X-ray stress analysis in single grains of the material investigated. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Measurements of prompt fission gamma-rays and neutrons with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Oberstedt, A; Billnert, R; Borcea, R; Brys, T; Chaves, C; Gamboni, T; Geerts, W; Göök, A; Guerrero, C; Hambsch, F-J; Kis, Z; Martinez, T; Oberstedt, S; Szentmiklosi, L; Takács, K; Vivaldi, M

    2014-01-01

    Photons have been measured with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors in coincidence with fission fragments. Using the time-of-flight information, reactions from γ-rays and neutrons could easily be distinguished. In several experiments on $^{252}$Cf(sf), $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) and $^{241}$Pu(n$_{th}$,f) prompt fission γ-ray spectra characteristics were determined with high precision and the results are presented here. Moreover, a measured prompt fission neutron spectrum for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) is shown in order to demonstrate a new detection technique.

  20. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  1. An Update on the Depth-Dose Curve of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Knudsen, Helge

    we refine the experimental set-up to obtain absolute dose per primary particle, and compare these with simulations. Materials and Methods: Scrutinizing the geometrical setup, we could calculate beam scattering along the antiproton beam, which enables replotting the depth-dose curve as absolute dose...... in water. The experimental results are compared with the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A. Contrary to [1], here the full ionization chamber is simulated and the dose is scored in the ionization chamber air gap. Stopping power ratios are determined as well in order to translate...

  2. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  3. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  4. Bottom quark anti-quark production and mixing in proton anti-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhaoou [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2003-03-01

    The studies of bottom quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions play an important role in testing perturbative QCD. Measuring the mixing parameter of B mesons imposes constraints on the quark mixing (CKM) matrix and enhances the understanding of the Standard Model. Multi-GeV p$\\bar{p}$ colliders produce a significant amount of b$\\bar{b}$ pairs and thus enable studies in both of these fields. This thesis presents results of the b$\\bar{b}$ production cross section from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV and the time-integrated average B$\\bar{B}$ mixing parameter ($\\bar{χ}$) using highmass dimuon d a ta collected by CDF during its Run IB.

  5. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  6. Propagation and secondary production of low energy antiprotons in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T.; Moats, A.

    1985-01-01

    Current theories, in which the observed antiproton component is attributed strictly to secondary production in high energy inelastic collisions of protons with the interstellar medium or the atmosphere, apparently fail to explain the relatively high p vertical intensities measured at mountain and balloon altitudes. Therefore, a more careful calculation of the theoretical secondary intensity spectra is required before more exotic sources for these excess p's can be explored. A one dimensional diffusion equation is used to calculate the expected vertical intensity of p's due only to secondary production in the atmosphere; any assumed primary p spectrum is also included. Two adjustable parameters, the inelasticity and charge exchange in nucleon-nucleus collisions, were included in the algorithm. In order to obtain an independent estimate of their values the proton vertical intensities in the atmosphere were calculated, adjusting the parameters until the curves fit the experimental proton data, and then assumed that these values were identical in antinucleon-nucleus collisions.

  7. Measurements of Strontium Levels in Human Bone In Vivo Using Portable X-ray Fluorescence (XRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Aaron J; Mostafaei, Farshad; Lin, Yanfen; Xu, Jian; Nie, Linda H

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of bone strontium (Sr) is vital to determining the effectiveness of Sr supplementation, which is commonly used for the treatment of osteoporosis. Previous technology uses radioisotope sources and bulky equipment to measure bone Sr. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for bone Sr measurement and validates it using data from a population of 238 children. We identified correlations between bone Sr and age in our participants.

  8. X-ray transmission/scattering technique for thickness-independent density measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomelli, E.J.

    1978-12-20

    A nondestructive technique, using penetrating x radiation, has been developed to measure the density uniformity of low-Z, compressible materials that is independent of material thickness. Thickness independence is achieved by simultaneously monitoring the transmitted and scattered x rays. Results on samples of pressed carbon materials have demonstrated that there is the expected linear relationship between measured quantities and material density, independent of material thickness, and that this is a viable means of measuring density uniformity.

  9. Estimation of measurement uncertainties in X-ray computed tomography metrology using the substitution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; Hiller, Jochen; Dai, Y.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the substitution method for the estimation of measurement uncertainties using calibrated workpieces in X-ray computed tomography (CT) metrology. We have shown that this, well accepted method for uncertainty estimation using tactile coordinate measuring...... machines, can be applied to dimensional CT measurements. The method is based on repeated measurements carried out on a calibrated master piece. The master piece is a component of a dose engine from an insulin pen. Measurement uncertainties estimated from the repeated measurements of the master piece were...

  10. Reconstruction of the X-ray tube spectrum from a scattering measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jorge E., E-mail: jorge.fernandez@unibo.it [Laboratory of Montecuccolino, Department of Energy, Nuclear and Environmental Control Engineering (DIENCA), Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, via dei Colli,16, I-40136, Bologna (Italy); Scot, Viviana [Laboratory of Montecuccolino, Department of Energy, Nuclear and Environmental Control Engineering (DIENCA), Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, via dei Colli,16, I-40136, Bologna (Italy); Bare, Jonathan [Laboratory of Montecuccolino, Department of Energy, Nuclear and Environmental Control Engineering (DIENCA), Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, via dei Colli,16, I-40136, Bologna (Italy); Laboratory of Nuclear and Radiological Physics, Institut Superieur Industriel de Bruxelles (ISIB) (Belgium); Tondeur, Francois [Laboratory of Nuclear and Radiological Physics, Institut Superieur Industriel de Bruxelles (ISIB) (Belgium); Gallardo, Sergio; Rodenas, Jose [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia (Spain); Rossi, Pier Luca [Operational Unit of Health Physics, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    An inverse technique has been designed to unfold the x-ray tube spectrum from the measurement of the photons scattered by a target interposed in the path of the beam. A special strategy is necessary to circumvent the ill-conditioning of the forward transport algebraic problem. The proposed method is based on the calculation of both, the forward and adjoint analytical solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation. After testing the method with numerical simulations, a simple prototype built at the Operational Unit of Health Physics of the University of Bologna was used to test the method experimentally. The reconstructed spectrum was validated by comparison with a straightforward measurement of the X-ray beam. The influence of the detector was corrected in both cases using standard unfolding techniques. The method is capable to accurately characterize the intensity distribution of an X-ray tube spectrum, even at low energies where other methods fail. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A complete inverse technique of source unfolding is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X-ray tube spectrum is recovered from a scattering measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ill conditioning of the plain forward transport algebraic problem is avoided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forward and adjoint solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The technique characterizes X-ray tube spectra even at low energies.

  11. Electron temperature from x-ray continuum measurements on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrott, Leonard; Bachmann, Benjamin; Benedetti, Robin; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Khan, Shahab; Landen, Otto; Ma, Tammy; Nagel, Sabrina; Pak, Arthur; Patel, Prav; Schneider, Marilyn; Springer, Paul; LLNL Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We report on measurements of the electron temperature within the hot spot of inertially confined, layered implosions on the NIF using a titanium differential filtering x-ray diagnostic. The electron temperature from x-ray emission is insensitive to non-thermal velocity flows as is the case with ion temperature measurements and is thus a critical parameter in interpreting stagnated hot spot conditions. Here we discuss measurements using titanium filters ranging from 10 μm to 1mm in thickness with a sensitivity band of 10-30keV coupled with penumbral pinholes. The use of larger pinhole diameters increases x-ray fluence improving sensitivity of photon energies with minimal attenuation from the compressed fuel/shell. This diagnostic has been fielded on a series of cryogenic shots with DT ion temperatures ranging from 2-5keV. Analysis of the measurement will be presented along with a comparison against simulated electron temperatures and x-ray spectra as well as a comparison to DT ion temperature measurements. This work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  13. Measurement Over Large Solid Angle of Low Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, H. F., III; Schwitters, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in portable muon detectors have made cosmic ray imaging practical for many diverse applications. Working muon attenuation detectors have been built at the University of Texas and are already successfully being used to image tunnels, structures, and Mayan pyramids. Most previous studies have focused on energy measurements of the cosmic ray spectrum from of 1 GeV or higher. We have performed an accurate measurement of the ultra-low energy (muon spectrum down to the acceptance level of our detector, around one hundred MeV. Measurements include angular dependence, with acceptance approaching horizontal. Measurements were made underwater using a custom enclosure in Lake Travis, Austin, TX. This measurement will allow more accurate predictions and simulations of attenuation for small (muon tomography.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Acoustic X-ray Detector to Measure the LCLS Beam Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, Jennifer L.; /San Jose State U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    On April 11, 2009, first light was seen from LCLS. The present apparatus being used to measure the x-ray beam energy is the Total Energy Sensor which uses a suite of thermal sensors. Another device is needed to cross-check the energy measurements. This new diagnostic tool utilizes radiation acoustic phenomena to determine the x-ray beam energy. A target is hit by the x-rays from the beam, and a voltage is generated in two piezoelectric sensors attached to the target in response to the consequent deformation. Once the voltage is known, the power can be obtained. Thermal sensors will also be attached to the target for calibration purposes. Material selection and design were based on: durability, ultra-high vacuum compatibility, safety and thermal properties. The target material was also chosen for its acoustic properties which were determined from tests using a frequency generator and laser. Initial tests suggest the device will function as anticipated.

  15. SuNSCREEN: A cosmic-ray veto detector for capture-reaction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopfer, E. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics & Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Brett, J.; DeYoung, P.A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Dombos, A.C.; Quinn, S.J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics & Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Simon, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Spyrou, A., E-mail: spyrou@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics & Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    The Summing NaI(Tl) detector (SuN) is used in nuclear astrophysics experiments measuring (p,γ) and (α,γ) reactions. The main background in these experiments in the energy region of interest comes from cosmic rays. The Scintillating Cosmic Ray Eliminating Ensemble (SuNSCREEN) was developed to be combined with the SuN detector to increase the sensitivity of reaction cross-section measurements by reducing the cosmic-ray background. SuNSCREEN is a plastic scintillating array consisting of 9 bars, which are positioned in a roof-like configuration above SuN. A significant reduction of the background was observed in the energy region of interest.

  16. Measuring the X-ray Emission Impacting the Planets Orbiting Nearby Low-mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    M dwarf planetary systems present a truly exciting opportunity to discover and study the first habitable extrasolar planets in the next 5-10 years. As part of our larger HST MUSCLES project, we propose ACIS-S observations of 4 low-mass exoplanet hosts (3 M dwarfs -- GJ581, GJ1214, GJ849, and 1 K dwarf -- HD97658) that have no existing measurements of their coronal X-ray emission. We will measure their X-ray luminosities and coronal temperatures, and derive the high energy radiation field to facilitate exoplanet atmospheric modeling. These planetary systems allow study of exoplanet atmospheric chemistry and evolution under a wide diversity of physical situations. X-ray heating enhances evaporation and atmospheric escape, which can impact the long-term stability of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  17. Multi-scale mechanics of granular solids from grain-resolved X-ray measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, R C; Hall, S A; Wright, J P

    2017-11-01

    This work discusses an experimental technique for studying the mechanics of three-dimensional (3D) granular solids. The approach combines 3D X-ray diffraction and X-ray computed tomography to measure grain-resolved strains, kinematics and contact fabric in the bulk of a granular solid, from which continuum strains, grain stresses, interparticle forces and coarse-grained elasto-plastic moduli can be determined. We demonstrate the experimental approach and analysis of selected results on a sample of 1099 stiff, frictional grains undergoing multiple uniaxial compression cycles. We investigate the inter-particle force network, elasto-plastic moduli and associated length scales, reversibility of mechanical responses during cyclic loading, the statistics of microscopic responses and microstructure-property relationships. This work serves to highlight both the fundamental insight into granular mechanics that is furnished by combined X-ray measurements and describes future directions in the field of granular materials that can be pursued with such approaches.

  18. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  19. Porosity measurement of solid pharmaceutical dosage forms by gamma-ray transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose, E-mail: jose.oliveira@prof.uniso.b [Universidade de Sorocaba, UNISO, Campus Seminario, Caixa Postal 578, Avenue, Dr. Eugenio Salermo, 100, Centro, 18035-430 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Andreo Filho, Newton; Vinicius Chaud, Marco; Angiolucci, Tatiana; Aranha, Norberto [Universidade de Sorocaba, UNISO, Campus Seminario, Caixa Postal 578, Avenue, Dr. Eugenio Salermo, 100, Centro, 18035-430 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, UNESP, GAGI, Avenue, 3 de Marco, 511, Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of the present work is the determination of porosity in tablets by using the gamma-ray transmission technique. Tablet dissolution depends on some inherent characteristics of the manufacturing process, such as compression force, tablet volume, density and porosity, nature of excipients, preparation methods and its physical-chemical properties. Porosity is a measure of empty spaces in a material and can be determined by various techniques. In this paper, we propose the use of a gamma-ray transmission technique to obtain the porosity of experimental formulation of tablets. The results of porosity were compared with those obtained by using conventional methodology (density and mercury intrusion). The experimental setup for gamma-ray transmission consists of a gamma-ray source of {sup 241}Am (photons of 59.6 keV and an activity of 3.7x10{sup 9} Bq), an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, collimators and a standard gamma-ray spectrometry electronics. Our results suggest that the gamma-ray transmission technique is a powerful tool for non-destructive porosity quantification of solid pharmaceutical forms and presents smaller errors than those obtained with conventional methodologies.

  20. Improvements on Low Level Activity Gamma Measurements and X-ray Spectrometry at the CEA-MADERE Measurement Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeyeva Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The CEA MADERE platform (Measurement Applied to DosimEtry in REactors is a part of the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory (LDCI. This facility is dedicated to the specific activity measurements of solid and radioactive samples using Gamma and X-ray spectrometry. MADERE is a high-performance facility devoted to neutron dosimetry for experimental programs performed in CEA and for the irradiation surveillance programmes of PWR vessels. The MADERE platform is engaged in a continuous improvement process. Recently, two High Efficiency diodes have been integrated to the MADERE platform in order to manage the accurate low level activity measurements (few Bq per sample. This new equipment provides a good level of efficiency over the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. The background continuum is reduced due to the use of a Ultra Low Background (ULB lead shielding. Relative and absolute X-ray measurement techniques have been improved in order to facilitate absolute rhodium activity measurement (Rh103m on solid samples. Additional efforts have been made to increase the accuracy of the relative niobium (Nb93m activity measurement technique. The way of setting up an absolute measurement method for niobium is under investigation. After a presentation of the MADERE's measurement devices, this paper focuses on the technological options taken into account for the design of high efficiency measurement devices. Then, studies performed on X-ray measurement techniques are presented. Some details about the calculation of uncertainties and correction factors are also mentioned. Finally, future research and development axes are exposed.

  1. Eta Carinae's Thermal X-Ray Tail Measured with XMM-Newton and NuStar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore R.; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Grefenstette, Brian; Yuasa, Takayuki; Stuhlinger, Martin; Russell, Christopher; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Madura, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The evolved, massive highly eccentric binary system, Car, underwent a periastron passage in the summer of 2014. We obtained two coordinated X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during the elevated X-ray flux state and just before the X-ray minimum flux state around this passage. These NuSTAR observations clearly detected X-ray emission associated with eta Car extending up to approx. 50 keV for the first time. The NuSTAR spectrum above 10 keV can be fit with the bremsstrahlung tail from a kT approx. 6 keV plasma. This temperature is delta kT 2 keV higher than those measured from the iron K emission line complex, if the shocked gas is in collisional ionization equilibrium. This result may suggest that the companion star's pre-shock wind velocity is underestimated. The NuSTAR observation near the X-ray minimum state showed a gradual decline in the X-ray emission by 40% at energies above 5 keV in a day, the largest rate of change of the X-ray flux yet observed in individual eta Car observations. The column density to the hardest emission component, N(sub H) approx. 10(exp24) H cm(exp-2), marked one of the highest values ever observed for eta Car, strongly suggesting the increased obscuration of the wind-wind colliding X-ray emission by the thick primary stellar wind prior to superior conjunction. Neither observation detected the power-law component in the extremely hard band that INTEGRAL and Suzaku observed prior to 2011. The power-law source might have faded before these observations.

  2. Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction Measurement with the AMS-02 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079577

    The study of Cosmic-Rays has proved to be of utmost importance in the understanding of the processes that govern our galaxy and has became a privileged field for the discovery of new physics. The current availability of precision measurements in a number of recent experiments such as PAMELA or Fermi, and in particular AMS-02, has provided a unique opportunity to challenge the theoretical framework that builds our comprehension of Nature. Certainly, the recent advent of new data on Cosmic-Ray electrons and positrons has raised disagreements with our current knowledge of production and propagation of Cosmic-Rays. The observation of an excess in the Cosmic-Ray electron spectrum has triggered enormous efforts to understand the origin of this anomaly, both from the theoretical and experimental points of view. In this context, AMS is a long awaited program, that among other objectives, will provide the most accurate measurement of the Cosmic-Ray electron spectrum, making possible to investigate a fundamental open q...

  3. The W boson transverse momentum spectrum in proton-antiproton collisions at radical s = 1. 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, B.L.

    1991-02-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) was used to measure the transverse momentum distribution of W boson produced in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider. The W bosons were identified by the decay W {yields} e{nu}. The results are in good agreement with a next-to-leading order calculation. The cross section for W production with P{sub T} > 50 GeV/c is 423 {plus minus} 58 (stat.) {plus minus} 108 (sys.) pb. 58 refs., 53 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Ionization of hydrogen and hydrogenic ions by antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Krstić, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Wells, J. C.

    1996-05-01

    Motivated by earlier theoretical studies which utilized simplified models and by a very recent experiment regarding antiproton-impact of hydrogen, we present a description (D.R. Schultz, P.S. Krstić, C.O. Reinhold, and J.C. Wells, Phys. Rev. Lett. (1996) submitted.) of ionization of hydrogen and hydrogenic ions based on very large scale numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in three spatial dimensions and on analysis of the topology of the electronic eigenenergy surfaces in the plane of complex internuclear distance. It is illustrated how ionization of atomic hydrogen and hydrogenic ions by antiprotons is quite different from that for impact by positively charged particles at low energies. Most significantly, for hydrogen targets, the quasi-molecular electronic eigenenergies approach close to and ultimately merge with the continuum at small distances, leading to a plateau of the low energy ionization cross section. Work supported by US DOE Office of BES through contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp.

  5. X-ray phase-shifts-based method of volumetric breast density measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xizeng; Yan, Aimin; Liu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The high breast density is one of the biggest risk factors for breast cancer. Identifying patient having persistent high breast density is important for breast cancer screening and prevention. In this work the authors propose for the first time an x-ray phase-shifts-based method of breast density measurement.

  6. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, K.; Diao, Z.; Campanini, D.; Welp, U.; Divan, R.; Hudl, M.; Islam, Z.; Kwok, W.-K.; Rydh, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-δ crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  7. A BaF2 crystal array for high energy-ray measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We shall discuss about the scientific motivation and construction of a 7 × 7 BaF2 crystal array at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. This detector would be used to measure high energy -ray photons from GDR decay and proton–neutron bremsstrahlung reactions at the present 88'' cyclotron and upcoming ...

  8. Comarability of digital and analouge x-rays for migration measurements with EBRA

    CERN Document Server

    Brabec, E

    2001-01-01

    EBRA is a computer supported method for measuring the migration of total hip prostheses by using consecutive standard X-rays of the pelvis. PACS is a picture archiving and communication system used to handle digitally taken X-rays. After the installation of a PACS at the University Clinic of Innsbruck it was impossible to compare the digital pictures with the former analogue pictures with EBRA, as they have different scales. By introducing a calibrating step into the EBRA-program it was possible to do measurements on series of pictures containing digital pictures as well as analogue ones. For displaying the failure of EBRA caused by different radiological techniques we did measurements on a series of consecutive X-rays taken of a model made of acrylic glass and simulating the relevant anatomic structures by screws. The migration of the implant was simulated by shifting it in two directions. Whilst using analogue and digital radiological techniques for taking X-rays, the difference in measurement errors of bot...

  9. X-ray measurements of total reflectivity and scattering from Au-coated foils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornstrup, Allan; Christensen, Finn Erland; Jespersen, Ellen

    1990-01-01

    We present x-ray measurements of total reflectivity and scattering from gold-coated foils. The foils are two sorts of 0.3 mm thick dip-lacquered aluminum, 0.125 mm thick plastic (Upilex) and 0.5 mm thick dip-lacquered nickel. The analysis of the data shows a high reflectivity for all...

  10. X-Ray Measurements Of Total Reflectivity And Scattering From Au-Coated Foils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornstrup, Allan; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    We present X-ray measurements of total reflectivity and scattering from gold coated foils. The foils are two sorts of 0.3 mm thick dip-lacquered aluminum, 0.125 mm thick plastic (Upilex) and 0.5 mm thick dip-lacquered nickel. The analysis of the data show a high reflectivity for all but the plastic...

  11. High precision neutron capture gamma-ray and conversion electron measurements of 181Ta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, I.; Börner*, H. G.; v. Brentano, P.; Colvin*, G.; Haque, A. M. I.; Kerr*, S. A.; Rascher, R.; Richter, R.; Schreckenbach*, K.

    1985-01-01

    As part of neutron capture γ-ray studies in the rare earth region the deexcitation spectra of the reactions 180Ta(n,γ)181Ta and 180Ta(n,e-)181Ta have been measured at the ILL high flux reactor, using bent crystal, pair and electron spectrometers. (AIP)

  12. Fast, versatile x-ray fluorescence method for measuring tin in impregnated wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabæk, I.; Christensen, Leif Højslet

    1985-01-01

    The present paper describes an energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence method for measuring tin in bis(tri-n-butyl)tin-oxide impregnated wood. The proposed method is of the backscatter/fundamental parameter type. Its versatility, precision, and accuracy is demonstrated by analyses of eleven samples...

  13. Measurement of the gamma-ray energy spectrum of the educational Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Taniguchi, Tatsuro; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Takada, Masashi; Kamada, So; Horiguchi, Tetsuo; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    The gamma-ray energy spectrum of the Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI) was estimated from Ge detector measurements combined with Monte Carlo N-particle transport criticality calculations. The gamma rays mainly originated from prompt fission components, although small amounts of gamma rays from (n,γ) reactions, fission product gamma rays, and activation gamma rays were detected. The averaged gamma-ray tissue kerma rate in the irradiation port during UTR-KINKI operation at 1W was calculated as 10.5cGy/h based on the estimated gamma-ray energy spectrum. This value is consistent with a previous measurement with paired ionization chambers and a tissue equivalent gas proportional counter. This result demonstrates the reliability of the estimated gamma-ray energy spectrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, M J; Wu, M; Jacoby, K D; Loisel, G P

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  15. Soft-x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect and element-specific hysteresis measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the utilization of x-ray magneto-optical properties to provide element-specific magnetic information, combined with recent development of tunable linear polarizers for spectroscopic polarization measurement, have led the authors to the study of magneto-optical rotation (MOR) near core levels of magnetic atoms in magnetic multilayer and alloy films. Their initial observation of Faraday rotation (in transmission) demonstrated that for Fe MOR is easily measured and is larger at its L{sub 3} resonance than in the near-visible spectral regions. This work also demonstrated that the spectroscopic behavior of the MOR signal in transmission, resulting from the differential reaction of left- and right-circular components of a linearly polarized beam, is related to the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), or differential absorption, as expected by a Kramers-Kronig transformation. Thus MCD measurements using circular polarization and MOR measurements using linear polarization can provide complementary, and in some cases equivalent, information. On beamline 6.3.2 the authors have begun to investigate soft x-ray MOR in the reflection geometry, the x-ray magneto-optic Kerr effect (XMOKE). Early measurements have demonstrated the ability to measure element-specific hysteresis loops and large rotations compared to analogous near-visible measurements. The authors are investigating the spectral dependence of the XMOKE signal, and have initiated systematic materials studies of sputter-deposited films of Fe, Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 1{minus}x} alloys, and Fe/Cr multilayers.

  16. Schottky barrier measurements on individual GaAs nanowires by X-ray photoemission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Mario, Lorenzo [IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Turchini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.turchini@cnr.it [ISM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Zamborlini, Giovanni; Feyer, Vitaly [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Tian, Lin [IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Schneider, Claus M. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Fakultät für Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Rubini, Silvia [IOM-CNR, TASC Laboratory, Basovizza 34149, Trieste (Italy); Martelli, Faustino, E-mail: faustino.martelli@cnr.it [IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Schottky barrier at the interface between Cu and GaAs nanowires was measured. • Individual nanowires were investigated by X-ray Photoemission Microscopy. • The Schottky barrier at different positions along the nanowire was evaluated. - Abstract: We present measurements of the Schottky barrier height on individual GaAs nanowires by means of x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM). Values of 0.73 and 0.51 eV, averaged over the entire wires, were measured on Cu-covered n-doped and p-doped GaAs nanowires, respectively, in agreement with results obtained on bulk material. Our measurements show that XPEEM can become a feasible and reliable investigation tool of interface formation at the nanoscale and pave the way towards the study of size-dependent effects on semiconductor-based structures.

  17. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission x-ray microscopy measurements under water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Stephen T.; Nigge, P.; Prakash, Shruti; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Leone, Stephen R.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2013-08-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a compact gas-phase reactor for performing in situ soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) measurements. The reactor accommodates many gas atmospheres, including reactive or corrosive gasses, but was designed specically to address the needs of measurements under water vapor. An on-board sensor measures the relative humidity and temperature inside the reactor, minimizing uncertainties associated with measuring these quantities outside the instrument. The reactor mounts directly to the existing sample holder used in the majority of STXM instruments around the world and installs with minimal instrument reconguration. Using the reactor contributes over 85% less additional absorption compared to lling the STXM chamber with process gas, and results in much more stable imaging conditions. The reactor is in use at the STXM instruments at beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source.

  18. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P.

    2017-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  19. Efficient accumulation of antiprotons and positrons, production of slow mono-energetic beams, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) project, particularly the antiproton trapping and slow antiproton production, is discussed. An RFQD (Radio Frequency Quadrupole Decelerator) installed in the ASACUSA beam line has an excellent deceleration efficiency of 25% providing 10-130keV antiprotons, which improves the final accumulation efficiency at least one and half orders of magnitude. The decelerated antiprotons are then injected in a large volume multiring trap, stored, and electron-cooled. About 1 million antiprotons are successfully accumulated per one AD shot and 10-500eV antiprotons are extracted as a mono-energetic beam. A UHV compatible positron accumulation is newly developed combining electron plasma and an ion cloud, which yields an accumulation rate as high as 400e **+s/mCi, two and a half orders of magnitude higher than other UHV compatible schemes. A new scheme to synthesize a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam is also discussed, which will play a vit...

  20. Cosmic-ray positron fraction measurement from 1 to 30 GeV with AMS-01

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Allaby, James V; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, M; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Cardano, F; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Cho, K; Choi, M J; Choi, Y Y; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cortina, E; Cristinziani, M; Dai, T S; Delgado, C; Difalco, S; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, P; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gast, H; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Hungerford, W; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kim, M Y; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Lanciotti, E; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lechanoine-Leluc, C; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Liu, C L; Liu, H T; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mujunen, A; Oliva, A; Olzem, J; Palmonari, F; Park, H B; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilo, F; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Pohl, M; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Ro, S; Röser, U; Rossin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schultzvon Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shin, J W; Shoumilov, E; Shoutko, V; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Trumper, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Vite, D; Von Gunten, H; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Xu, S; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zuccon, P

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the cosmic ray positron fraction e+/(e+ + e-) in the energy range of 1-30 GeV is presented. The measurement is based on data taken by the AMS-01 experiment during its 10 day Space Shuttle flight in June 1998. A proton background suppression on the order of 10^6 is reached by identifying converted bremsstrahlung photons emitted from positrons.

  1. Modeling of possible localized electron flux in cosmic rays with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2017-10-01

    Discrete quantum Boltzmann model together with the introduction of an external-field-tuned orientation parameter as well as the acoustic analog are adopted to study the possible localization of electron (fermion) flux in cosmic rays considering the precision measurement with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Our approximate results match qualitatively with those data measured with the AMS on the ISS.

  2. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of biological materials by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, N. [Science and Art Faculty, Department of Physics, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)]. E-mail: nekinci@atauni.edu.tr; Astam, N. [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2007-03-15

    The mass attenuation coefficients for cornea taken from keratitis patient and soft contact lens (-1.75, -3.75, -4 dioptres), leiomyomata uteri and uterus were measured in the X-ray energy (5.9keV) using a SiLi detector and Fe{sup 55} annular source. Full details of the experimental method, experimental set up, the procedure of sample preparation and the results within estimated error are presented. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique has been successfully used for the determination of the mass attenuation coefficients.

  3. Radiochromic film measurement of spatial uniformity for a laser generated x-ray environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Horton, R.; Fournier, K. B.; Emig, J.; Patterson, R.; Davis, J. F.; Seiler, S.; Jenkins, P. P.

    2012-10-01

    n existing x-ray source application (XRSA) test cassette was modified to hold multiple x-ray filter materials followed by two radiochromic film types (FWT-60 and HD-810 Gafchromic® film) to qualitatively characterize the spectral-spatial uniformity over the XRSA sample field of view. Multiple sets of film were examined and nominal set was determined. These initial, qualitative measurements suggest a low-energy regime (E < 3 keV) spatial anisotropy and spatial isotropy at higher energies (E > 3 keV).

  4. A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Minowa, M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to p...

  5. X-ray reflectivity measurements of liquid/solid interfaces under high hydrostatic pressure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirkert, Florian J; Paulus, Michael; Nase, Julia; Möller, Johannes; Kujawski, Simon; Sternemann, Christian; Tolan, Metin

    2014-01-01

    A high-pressure cell for in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements of liquid/solid interfaces at hydrostatic pressures up to 500 MPa (5 kbar), a pressure regime that is particularly important for the study of protein unfolding, is presented. The original set-up of this hydrostatic high-pressure cell is discussed and its unique properties are demonstrated by the investigation of pressure-induced adsorption of the protein lysozyme onto hydrophobic silicon wafers. The presented results emphasize the enormous potential of X-ray reflectivity studies under high hydrostatic pressure conditions for the in situ investigation of adsorption phenomena in biological systems.

  6. Measurements of reciprocity law failure in green-sensitive X-ray films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, B A; Eisenberg, H; Bjärngard, B E

    1978-02-01

    Reciprocity law failure was measured for four brands of medical x-ray films exposed with intensifying screens. Three of the films are green light-sensitized for use in combination with green light-emitting rare-earth screens. These films showed larger reciprocity failure effects than one conventional blue-sensitive film, Dupont Cronex-2. Development conditions had a small effect on reciprocity failure. As part of the investigation, a detector was constructed with a response that accurately monitors the light emission from the double screen-cassette combination over a wide range of x-ray photon energies.

  7. A compact x-ray system for two-phase flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyle; Liu, Yang

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a compact x-ray densitometry system consisting of a 50 kV, 1 mA x-ray tube and several linear detector arrays is developed for two-phase flow measurement. The system is capable of measuring void fraction and velocity distributions with a spatial resolution of 0.4 mm per pixel and a frequency of 1000 Hz. A novel measurement model has been established for the system which takes account of the energy spectrum of x-ray photons and the beam hardening effect. An improved measurement accuracy has been achieved with this model compared with the conventional log model that has been widely used in the literature. Using this system, void fraction and velocity distributions are measured for a bubbly and a slug flow in a 25.4 mm I.D. air–water two-phase flow test loop. The measured superficial gas velocities show an error within  ±4% when compared with the gas flowmeter for both conditions.

  8. Comparison of similarity measures for rigid-body CT/Dual X-ray image registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkoo; Li, Shidong; Pradhan, Deepak; Hammoud, Rabih; Chen, Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Yang; Kim, Jae Ho; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    A set of experiments were conducted to evaluate six similarity measures for intensity-based rigid-body 3D/2D image registration. Similarity measure is an index that measures the similarity between a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) and an x-ray planar image. The registration is accomplished by maximizing the sum of the similarity measures between biplane x-ray images and the corresponding DRRs in an iterative fashion. We have evaluated the accuracy and attraction ranges of the registrations using six different similarity measures on phantom experiments for head, thorax, and pelvis. The images were acquired using Varian Medial System On-Board Imager. Our results indicated that normalized cross correlation and entropy of difference showed a wide attraction range (62 deg and 83 mm mean attraction range, omega(mean)), but the worst accuracy (4.2 mm maximum error, e(max)). The gradient-based similarity measures, gradient correlation and gradient difference, and the pattern intensity showed sub-millimeter accuracy, but narrow attraction ranges (omega(mean)=29 deg, 31 mm). Mutual information was in-between of these two groups (e(max)=2.5 mm, omega(mean)= 48 deg, 52 mm). On the data of 120 x-ray pairs from eight IRB approved prostate patients, the gradient difference showed the best accuracy. In the clinical applications, registrations starting with the mutual information followed by the gradient difference may provide the best accuracy and the most robustness.

  9. Strip velocity measurements for gated x-ray imagers using short pulse lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time- resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  10. Core Length and Spray Width Measurements in Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors from X-ray Radiography Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    cone sprays, impinging- jet sprays and gas-centered swirl -coaxial injectors [11-15]. While x-ray radiography can be performed using a synchro- tron...are so named because they rely on the shear between an outer low-density, high-velocity annulus and a high- density, low-velocity inner jet to atomize...two-phase core length measurements from the literature. The core length nondimensionalized by the inner jet diameter was found to scale with the

  11. Highly efficient angularly resolving x-ray spectrometer optimized for absorption measurements with collimated sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, M.; Gallardo González, I.; Ekerfelt, H.; Björklund Svensson, J.; Hansson, M.; Wood, J. C.; Persson, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Lundh, O.; Falk, K.

    2017-06-01

    Highly collimated betatron radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator is a promising tool for spectroscopic measurements. Therefore, there is a requirement to create spectrometers suited to the unique properties of such a source. We demonstrate a spectrometer which achieves an energy resolution of 1800 ) and is angularly resolving the x-ray emission allowing the reference and spectrum to be recorded at the same time. The single photon analysis is used to significantly reduce the background noise. Theoretical performance of various configurations of the spectrometer is calculated by a ray-tracing algorithm. The properties and performance of the spectrometer including the angular and spectral resolution are demonstrated experimentally on absorption above the K-edge of a Cu foil backlit by a laser-produced betatron radiation x-ray beam.

  12. Measurement of 3He/4He ratio in cosmic rays with the AMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong Zhao Hua; Chen Gang; Chen He Sheng; Lü Yu Sheng; Tang, Xiaowei; Yang Chang Gen; Yang Min; Zhuang, Honglin

    2003-01-01

    The cosmic-ray 3He/4He ratios from 0.09 to 1.2 GeV per nucleon are measured by Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) at its precursor mission on broad the space shuttle Discovery during flight STS-91 in June 1998. Taking unique advantage of AMS data collected from large region covering the earth equator, we also studied the magnetic latitude effect on the ratios. Our analysis shows that the relative abundances of 3He and 4He in cosmic rays depend weakly on the magnetic latitude, and given present uncertainties, the observed isotopic compositions are generally consistent with the predictions of the standard propagation model of cosmic rays.

  13. Measurements of the cosmic-ray electron and positron spectrum and anisotropies with the Fermi LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loparco, F.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite is a pair-conversion telescope for high-energy gamma rays of astrophysical origin. Although it was designed to be a high-sensitivity gamma-ray telescope, the LAT has proved to be an excellent electron/positron detector. It has been operating in low Earth orbit since June 2008 and has collected more than 16 million cosmic-ray electron and positron (CRE) events in its first seven years of operation. The huge data sample collected by the LAT enables a precise measurement of the CRE energy spectrum up to the TeV region. A search for anisotropies in the arrival directions of CREs was also performed. The upper limits on the dipole anisotropy probe the presence of nearby young and middle-aged CRE sources.

  14. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  15. Very-high-energy antiproton physics colliding 1-TeV 'antiquarks' on heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, F

    1980-01-01

    Dorfan et al. (1965) demonstrated experimentally that one can extend the mass range of an accelerator by using the Fermi motion of nucleons inside heavy nuclear targets. The development of antiproton sources and intense pion beams at Fermilab and CERN makes possible a dramatic enhancement of this mechanism. The authors show that the increase in threshold production using antiprotons or pions rather than protons far exceeds the loss in luminosity. Furthermore, by using antiprotons in an internal-target experiment, the modest instantaneous rates and large signal/background ratio permit detailed study of the final state. (19 refs).

  16. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Shibayama, Naoya, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Okabe, Takahiro [Division of Biophysics, Department of Physiology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke 329-0498 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Asa-Minami-Ku, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Kimura, Koji [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Matsushita, Tomohiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Park, Sam-Yong [Drug Design Laboratory, Department of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Material Science, Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α{sub 2}β{sub 2} tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm{sup 3}) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  17. Fast X-ray reflectivity measurements using an X-ray pixel area detector at the DiffAbs beamline, Synchrotron SOLEIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocuta, Cristian; Stanescu, Stefan; Gallard, Manon; Barbier, Antoine; Dawiec, Arkadiusz; Kedjar, Bouzid; Leclercq, Nicolas; Thiaudiere, Dominique

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a method for rapid measurements of the specular X-ray reflectivity signal using an area detector and a monochromatic, well collimated X-ray beam (divergence below 0.01°), combined with a continuous data acquisition mode during the angular movements of the sample and detector. In addition to the total integrated (and background-corrected) reflectivity signal, this approach yields a three-dimensional mapping of the reciprocal space in the vicinity of its origin. Grazing-incidence small-angle scattering signals are recorded simultaneously. Measurements up to high momentum transfer values (close to 0.1 nm-1, also depending on the X-ray beam energy) can be performed in total time ranges as short as 10 s. The measurement time can be reduced by up to 100 times as compared with the classical method using monochromatic X-ray beams, a point detector and rocking scans (integrated reflectivity signal).

  18. Simultaneous measurements of X-rays and electrons during a pulsating aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Østgaard

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available The PULSAUR II rocket was launched from Andøya Rocket Range at 23.43 UT on 9 February 1994 into a pulsating aurora. In this paper we focus on the observations of precipitating electrons and auroral X-rays. By using models it is possible to deduce the electron energy spectrum from X-ray measurements. Comparisons are made between the deduced electron fluxes and the directly measured electron fluxes on the rocket. We found the shape of the observed and the deduced electron spectra to fit very well, with almost identical e-folding energies in the energy range from 10 ke V to ~60–80 ke V. For the integrated fluxes from 10.8 to 250 ke V, we found a discrepancy of 30% . By combining two models, we have found a good method of deducing the electron precipitation from X-ray measurements. The discrepancies between calculations and measurements are in the range of the uncertainties in the measurements.Key words. Ionospheric particle precipitation · Magnetospheric physics · Annual phenomena · Energetic particle

  19. Device for measuring the exposure time in dental X-ray - Cronox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Claudio J.M.; Santos, Luiz A.P. dos, E-mail: cjmm@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE) developed a test device for monitoring the X-ray beam in dental equipment to its application in quality control programs. This device, called Odontologic Dosimetric Card (CDO of Cartao Dosimetrico Odontologico in Portuguese) uses thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for the measurement of some parameters of the X-ray beam as the entrance surface dose, the peak tension and half value layer (HVL). Radiographic films record the size of the radiation field. However, the TLD does not allow the assessment of exposure time, a parameter that complements the requirements of the Diretrizes de Protecao Radiologica em Radiodiagnostico Medico e Odontologico of Department of Health in Brazil for such equipment. Thus was developed a system based on sensitivity to ionizing radiation of phototransistors for measurement of exposure time when a patient is put in a clinical dental radiography. The system, called CRONOX was sized to be inserted within the CDO. The results showed that the measuring error had developed for less than 3% when compared to reference values obtained with the Tektronix digital oscilloscope, TDS2022 model. The readings obtained with the CRONOX were also compared with the nominal values selected in the X-ray equipment and with the values measured with the instrument of trade PTW Diavolt Universal. The results showed that the measuring device developed showed a maximum deviation of 5.92% on the nominal value selected, while for the instrument of PTW was 17.86%. (author)

  20. All-Particle Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Measured with 26 Icetop Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, thesurface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysiswere taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 square kilometers.The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenithangle ranges between 0 and 46. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectrafrom all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under differentassumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenithangle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. Forzenith angles theta less than 30 deg., where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrumwas observed at about 4 PeV, with a spectral index above the knee of about -3.1. Moreover, an indicationof a flattening of the spectrum above 22 PeV was observed.

  1. Transmission properties of barite mortar using X-ray spectra measured with Cd Te detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J. C.; Mariano, L.; Costa, P. R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R. 187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: josilene@usp.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970 Goiania (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Current methods for calculating X-ray shielding barriers do not take into account spectral distribution of the beam transmitted by the protective material. This consideration is important in dose estimations for radiation workers and general public in diagnostic radiology facilities. The aim of the present study was to estimate barite mortar attenuation curves using X-ray spectra weighted by a workload distribution. These curves were described in units of ambient dose equivalent (H (10)), since it is the radiation quantity adopted by IAEA for dose assessment in medical environment. Attenuation curves were determined using the optimized model for shielding evaluation presented by Costa and Caldas (2002). Workload distribution presented by Simpkin (1996), measured primary spectra and mass attenuation coefficients of barite mortar were used as input data in this model. X-ray beams in diagnostic energy range were generated by an industrial X-ray tube with 3 mm of aluminum additional filtration. Primary experimental spectra were measured by a Cd Te detector and corrected by the response function of detector by means of a stripping procedure. Air kerma measurements were performed using an ionization chamber for normalization purpose of the spectra. The corrected spectra presented good agreement with spectra generated by a semi-empirical model. The variation of the ambient dose equivalent as a function of barite mortar thickness was calculated. Using these data, it was estimated the optimized thickness of protective barrier needed for shielding a particular area in an X-ray imaging facility. The results obtained for primary protective barriers exhibit qualitative agreement with those presented in literature. (Author)

  2. Eta Carinae's Hard X-ray Tail Measured with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Sharma, Neetika; Gull, Theodore R.; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Grefenstette, Brian; Yuasa, Takayuki; Stuhlinger, Martin; Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Madura, Thomas; Richardson, Noel; Groh, Jose; Pittard, Julian; Owocki, Stan

    2016-04-01

    Massive binary stellar systems drive shock plasma heating via the collision of winds from two stars (wind-wind collision: WWC). With typical (pre-shock) wind speeds of ≥1000 km s-1, temperatures can reach as high as several tens of millions of Kelvin. X-ray emission from these stable shocks provides important tests of shock physics. While the spectrum below 10 keV is complicated by discrete line emission and absorption components, the X-ray spectrum above 10 keV is relatively simple. This high-energy emission therefore provides important clues on the condition of the maximum thermalized plasma where the winds collide head-on, while also providing important information about particle acceleration through the shock.We obtained two coordinated X-ray observations of the super massive binary system η Carinae with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR, during the elevated X-ray flux state and just before the X-ray minimum flux state around the periastron passage in the summer of 2014. These NuSTAR observations clearly detected X-ray emission associated with η Car extending up to ~50 keV for the first time. The NuSTAR spectrum above 10 keV can be fit with the bremsstrahlung tail from a kT ~6 keV plasma, about 2 keV higher than those measured from the iron K emission line complex. This result may suggest that the companion star's pre-shock wind velocity is underestimated. The NuSTAR observation near the X-ray minimum state showed a gradual decline in the >5 keV emission by 40% in a day. The extreme absorption to the hardest emission component (NH~1e24 cm-2) suggests increased obscuration of the WWC X-ray emission by the thick primary stellar wind prior to superior conjunction. Neither observation detected the power-law component in the extremely hard band that INTEGRAL and Suzaku observed prior to 2011. If the non-detection by NuSTAR is caused by absorption, the power-law source must be small and located very near the WWC apex. Alternatively, it may be that the power-law source is not

  3. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  4. Measuring the Galactic Cosmic Ray flux with the LISA Pathfinder radiation monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Castelli, E.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Finetti, N.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Freschi, M.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; Lopez-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Meshskar, N.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zweifel, P.

    2018-03-01

    Test mass charging caused by cosmic rays will be a significant source of acceleration noise for space-based gravitational wave detectors like LISA. Operating between December 2015 and July 2017, the technology demonstration mission LISA Pathfinder included a bespoke monitor to help characterise the relationship between test mass charging and the local radiation environment. The radiation monitor made in situ measurements of the cosmic ray flux while also providing information about its energy spectrum. We describe the monitor and present measurements which show a gradual 40% increase in count rate coinciding with the declining phase of the solar cycle. Modulations of up to 10% were also observed with periods of 13 and 26 days that are associated with co-rotating interaction regions and heliospheric current sheet crossings. These variations in the flux above the monitor detection threshold ( ≈ 70 MeV) are shown to be coherent with measurements made by the IREM monitor on-board the Earth orbiting INTEGRAL spacecraft. Finally we use the measured deposited energy spectra, in combination with a GEANT4 model, to estimate the galactic cosmic ray differential energy spectrum over the course of the mission.

  5. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10−6 to 10−3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy. PMID:21048295

  6. High-resolution 3D translation measurements using point source x-ray stereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Wasil H. M.; Soons, Joris A. M.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2011-02-01

    A method for high-resolution measurement of 3D coordinates and translations of small objects is presented, using single x-ray point-source stereoscopy. The theory of the pinhole method is re-derived for a point-source x-ray projection setup using a conical beam. The method is then implemented using a micro x-ray tomography setup with a single 8 µm point source. Stereo projections are obtained by rotating the object over 90° between subsequent recordings, and microscopic tungsten beads are used as marker points. The accuracy of the method is tested on a spherical calibration object, and found to be better than 10 µm. Using a translation stage, the measurement uncertainty for translation measurements was found to be better than 5 µm along both axes parallel to the detector and at right angles to the detector. Due to the short measurement time and the high resolution, the method will be useful to study the biomechanics of small specimens, and the principle of the method is useful in any cone-beam-based setup.

  7. Toward polarized antiprotons: Machine development for spin-filtering experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Weidemann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the commissioning of the experimental equipment and the machine studies required for the first spin-filtering experiment with protons at a beam kinetic energy of 49.3 MeV in COSY. The implementation of a low-β insertion made it possible to achieve beam lifetimes of τ_{b}=8000  s in the presence of a dense polarized hydrogen storage-cell target of areal density d_{t}=(5.5±0.2×10^{13}  atoms/cm^{2}. The developed techniques can be directly applied to antiproton machines and allow the determination of the spin-dependent p[over ¯]p cross sections via spin filtering.

  8. FPGA-Based Instrumentation for the Fermilab Antiproton Source

    CERN Document Server

    Ashmanskas, Bill; Kiper, Terry; Peterson, David

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and built low-cost, low-power, ethernet-based circuit boards to apply DSP techniques to several instrumentation upgrades in the Fermilab Antiproton Source. Commodity integrated circuits such as direct digital synthesizers, D/A and A/D converters, and quadrature demodulators enable digital manipulation of RF waveforms. A low cost FPGA implements a variety of signal processing algorithms in a manner that is easily adapted to new applications. An embedded microcontroller provides FPGA configuration, control of data acquisition, and command-line interface. A small commercial daughter board provides an ethernet-based TCP/IP interface between the microcontroller and the Fermilab accelerator control network. The board is packaged as a standard NIM module. Applications include Low Level RF control for the Debuncher, readout of transfer-line Beam Position Monitors, and narrow-band spectral analysis of diagnostic signals from Schottky pickups.

  9. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  10. Correlating Gas Transport Parameters and X-ray Computed Tomography Measurements in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Kawamoto, Ken

    2013-01-01

    physical processes. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationships between gas transport parameters and soil-pore geometry revealed by X-ray CT. Sands of different shapes with a mean particle diameter (d50) ranging from 0.19 to 1.51 mm were used as porous media under both air...... on mean particle size and direct correlation with gas diffusivity. Tortuosity (TMFX) and equivalent pore diameter (deq.MFX) analyzed from microfocus X-ray CT increased linearly with increasing d50 for both Granusil and Accusand and further showing no effect of particle shape. The TUMS values showed......-dried and partially saturated conditions. Gas transport parameters including gas dispersivity (α), diffusivity (DP/D0), and permeability (ka) were measured using a unified measurement system (UMS). The 3DMA-Rock computational package was used for analysis of three-dimensional CT data. A strong linear relationship...

  11. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  12. Measurement of the cosmic rays light component (p+He) primary spectrum with ARGO-YBJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panico, B., E-mail: beatrice.panico@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); INFN, Sezione Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Di Sciascio, G. [INFN, Sezione Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm{sup 2}) has an high segmentation that allows the detection of air showers with greater detail and lower energy threshold (a few hundred GeV) compared to other EAS arrays. The spectrum of the primary cosmic ray light (p+He) component in the energy range {approx}10-100TeV is measured selecting quasi-vertical showers ({theta}<15 Degree-Sign ) with the reconstructed core position located in a 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 m{sup 2} fiducial area. The results are compared with other measurements carried out with direct methods.

  13. Integrated x-ray reflectivity measurements of elliptically curved pentaerythritol crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, M J; Regan, S P; Jacoby, K D; Ross, P W; Magoon, J; Barrios, M A; Emig, J A; Shoup, M J; Fournier, K B

    2012-10-01

    The elliptically curved pentaerythritol (PET) crystals used in the Supersnout 2 x-ray spectrometer on the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been calibrated photometrically in the range of 5.5-16 keV. The elliptical geometry provides broad spectral coverage and minimizes the degradation of spectral resolution due to the finite source size. The reflectivity curve of the crystals was measured using a x-ray line source. The integrated reflectivity (R(I)) and width of its curve (ΔΘ) were the measurements of major interest. The former gives the spectrometer throughput, and the latter gives the spectrometer resolving power. Both parameters are found to vary considerably with the radius of curvature of the crystal and with spectral energy. The results are attributed to an enhanced mosaic effect due to the increase in curvature. There are also contributions from the crystal cleaving and gluing processes.

  14. Soft x-ray magneto-optic Kerr rotation and element-specific hysteresis measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.

    1996-03-01

    Soft x-ray magneto-optic Kerr rotation has been measured using a continuously tunable multilayer linear polarizer in the beam reflected form samples in applied magnetic fields. Like magnetic circular dichroism, Kerr rotation in the soft x-ray can be element - specific and much larger than in the visible spectral range when the photon energy is tuned near atomic core resonances. Thus sensitive element-specific hysteresis measurements are possible with this technique. Examples showing large Kerr rotation from an Fe film and element-specific hysteresis loops of the Fe and Cr in an Fe/Cr multilayer demonstrate these new capabilities. Some consequences of the strong anomalous dispersion near the FeL{sub 2,3} edges to the Kerr rotation are discussed.

  15. Gamma ray facilities at the University of Maryland cyclotron. [data acquisition and radiation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A special beam line was set up in a separate shielded experimental room to provide a low background station for gamma-ray measurements at the University of Maryland cyclotron. The transmitted beam leaving the target is gathered in by a magnetic quadrupole lens located 1.8 m further downstream and focused on a Faraday cup located on the far side of the 2.5 m thick concrete shielding wall of the experimental room. A software computer program permits timing information ot be obtained using the cyclotron beam fine structure as a time reference for the observed gamma-ray events. Measurements indicate a beam fine structure width of less than 1.2 nanoseconds repeated, for example, in the case of 140 MeV alpha particles every 90 nanoseconds. Twelve contiguous time channels of adjustable width may be set as desired with reference to the RF signal. This allows the creation of 12 separate 8192 channel analyzers.

  16. MEASUREMENTS OF COSMIC-RAY HYDROGEN AND HELIUM ISOTOPES WITH THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [University of Naples “Federico II,” Department of Physics, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Formato, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M.; Santis, C. De [University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Department of Physics, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Donato, C. De; Simone, N. De; Felice, V. Di [INFN, Sezione di Rome “Tor Vergata,” I-00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2016-02-10

    The cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He) isotopic composition has been measured with the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on 2006 June 15. The rare isotopes {sup 2}H and {sup 3}He in cosmic rays are believed to originate mainly from the interaction of high-energy protons and helium with the galactic interstellar medium. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 1100 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 1400 MeV/n for helium isotopes using two different detector systems over the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 July to 2007 December.

  17. Nano-metrology: The art of measuring X-ray mirrors with slope errors <100 nrad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Simon G; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the systematic and random errors of the nano-metrology instruments used to characterize synchrotron X-ray optics at Diamond Light Source. With experimental skill and careful analysis, we show that these instruments used in combination are capable of measuring state-of-the-art X-ray mirrors. Examples are provided of how Diamond metrology data have helped to achieve slope errors of <100 nrad for optical systems installed on synchrotron beamlines, including: iterative correction of substrates using ion beam figuring and optimal clamping of monochromator grating blanks in their holders. Simulations demonstrate how random noise from the Diamond-NOM's autocollimator adds into the overall measured value of the mirror's slope error, and thus predict how many averaged scans are required to accurately characterize different grades of mirror.

  18. Nano-metrology: The art of measuring X-ray mirrors with slope errors <100 nrad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, Simon G., E-mail: simon.alcock@diamond.ac.uk; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the systematic and random errors of the nano-metrology instruments used to characterize synchrotron X-ray optics at Diamond Light Source. With experimental skill and careful analysis, we show that these instruments used in combination are capable of measuring state-of-the-art X-ray mirrors. Examples are provided of how Diamond metrology data have helped to achieve slope errors of <100 nrad for optical systems installed on synchrotron beamlines, including: iterative correction of substrates using ion beam figuring and optimal clamping of monochromator grating blanks in their holders. Simulations demonstrate how random noise from the Diamond-NOM’s autocollimator adds into the overall measured value of the mirror’s slope error, and thus predict how many averaged scans are required to accurately characterize different grades of mirror.

  19. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  20. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements using an X-ray phase retarder on the BM25 A-SpLine beamline at the ESRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Roberto; Laguna-Marco, María Ángeles; Gallastegui, Jon Ander; Castro, Germán R.; Chaboy, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Circularly polarized X-rays produced by a diamond X-ray phase retarder of thickness 0.5 mm in the Laue transmission configuration have been used for recording X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) on the bending-magnet beamline BM25A (SpLine) at the ESRF. Field reversal and helicity reversal techniques have been used to carry out the measurements. The performance of the experimental set-up has been demonstrated by recording XMCD in the energy range from 7 to 11 keV. PMID:20400827

  1. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Steffen M; Bruetzel, Linda K; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ2(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), where I(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transfer q; k and const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors.

  2. Body composition in hemodialysis patients measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenver, Doris Irene; Gotfredsen, Arne; Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures three of the principal components of the body: fat mass, lean soft-tissue mass (comprising muscle, inner organs, and the body water), and the bone mineral content. The purpose of this study was to test the estimation capacity of DXA when it is applied...... that DXA is a useful tool for estimating the magnitude of body compartments in patients with end-stage renal failure....

  3. Measurement of Total Calcium in Neurons by Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Andrews, S. Brian

    2013-01-01

    In this article the tools, techniques, and instruments appropriate for quantitative measurements of intracellular elemental content using the technique known as electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) are described. Intramitochondrial calcium is a particular focus because of the critical role that mitochondrial calcium overload plays in neurodegenerative diseases. The method is based on the analysis of X-rays generated in an electron microscope (EM) by interaction of an electron beam with the spe...

  4. Soil Moisture at Intermediate Scales: Linking Cosmic Ray Measurements with the Hydrologic Model mHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrön, M.; Zacharias, S.; Samaniego, L. E.; Dietrich, P.

    2013-12-01

    Measuring soil moisture with Cosmic Ray Sensors (CRS) is an emerging field of research, because the mesoscale footprint (~0.3 km^2) is of great interest for land surface models that usually work at resolutions ranging between point measurements (e.g. TDR) and remote sensing data. We run Cosmic Ray Sensors in the small catchment "Schäfertal" (1.4 km^2) in the lower Harz Mountains, central Germany. Simultaneously, the mesoscale Hydrologic Model (mHM) [Samaniego et al. 2010] is set up for the small catchment scale for the first time. We aim (1) to find crucial spots in the field with high variability of soil moisture in order to effectively place the static sensors with the support of the model, (2) to improve soil moisture calibration and evaluation in mHM with the support of the intermediate-scale soil moisture information from the CRS. The novel key of this approach is the synergy of mesoscale soil moisture measurements and the parameterization of the hydrologic model. This work prepares upcoming projects with mobile Cosmic Ray Sensors on a rover, which have a great potential to enlarge the measurement area up to scales of remote sensing footprints. References: Samaniego, L., Kumar, R., & Attinger, S. (2010). Multiscale parameter regionalization of a grid-based hydrologic model at the mesoscale. Water Resources Research, 46(5), 1-25. doi:10.1029/2008WR007327 Zreda, M., Shuttleworth, W. J., Zeng, X., Zweck, C., Desilets, D., Franz, T., & Rosolem, R. (2012). COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(11), 4079-4099. doi:10.5194/hess-16-4079-2012

  5. Direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra using a CdZnTe detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, M; Yamamoto, A; Honda, I; Taniguchi, A; Kanamori, H

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose is to directly measure mammographic x-ray spectra with collimators and a low-efficiency CdZnTe detector developed recently and to find out the best fit response function of CdZnTe detector to correct the measured spectra. Photon spectra (target Mo or Rh) produced by a mammographic x-ray unit at 25-32 kV and 240 mAs (= 3 times of 80 mAs) and transmitted through 0.03 mm Mo or 0.025 mm Rh filter and object (0.1 mm Al to 0.8 mm Al phantoms) have been analyzed. Since detected spectra were distorted by the response of CdZnTe detector and did not present the true photon spectra, the correction was applied by the stripping procedure. The response function of detector used in this procedure has been determined by the evaluation of interactions (K-escape, coherent scattering, and Compton scattering processes) and incomplete charge collection calculated using the Monte Carlo method. We have used Kalpha1, Kalpha2, Kbeta1, Kbeta2 radiations of Cd, Zn, and Te, respectively and have used the weight function for the incomplete charge collection and have considered Compton scattering. The Monte Carlo simulations were continued by changing the important factors (mean path length of hole lambda(h), dead layer of the CZT crystal and weight factor Wq) of incomplete charge collection until the best fit response function was found out. Corrected photon spectra were compared with the mammographic x-ray spectral data of Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) measured using a Ge detector. Attenuation curves of aluminum for 25-32 kV were calculated from the corrected photon spectra and compared with the attenuation curves measured using an ionization chamber. These results obtained using the CdZnTe detector agreed with the mammographic x-ray spectral data of BRH and attenuation curves obtained by the ionization chamber.

  6. The Measurement of Strain Fields by X-Ray Topographic Contour Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    FIELDS BY X-RAY TOPOGRAPHIC CONTOUR MAPPING S.R. Stock, Haydn Chen and H.K. Birnbaum University of Illinois Department of Metallurgy Urbana, IL 61801...TOPOGRAPHIC CONTOUR MAPPING S. R. Stock*# Haydn Chen and H. K. Birnbaum Department of Metallurgy and Mining Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana...Birnbaum, - - H. K. and Chen, Haydn , Topographic EXAFS, Nature 309: 336 . - (1984). Hart, M., Bragg angle measurement and mapping, J. Cryst. Growth

  7. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  8. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  9. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons measured with H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egberts, Kathrin

    2009-03-30

    The spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons has so far been measured using balloon and satellite-based instruments. At TeV energies, however, the sensitivity of such instruments is very limited due to the low flux of electrons at very high energies and small detection areas of balloon/satellite based experiments. The very large collection area of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon/ satellite based instruments when detecting very-high-energy electrons (> 300 GeV). By analysing data taken by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), this work extends the known electron spectrum up to 4 TeV - a range that is not accessible to direct measurements. However, in contrast to direct measurements, imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. detect air showers that cosmic-ray electrons initiate in the atmosphere rather than the primary particle. Thus, the main challenge is to differentiate between air showers initiated by electrons and those initiated by the hadronic background. A new analysis technique was developed that determines the background with the support of the machine-learning algorithm Random Forest. It is shown that this analysis technique can also be applied in other areas such as the analysis of diffuse {gamma} rays from the Galactic plane. (orig.)

  10. Exposure measurement in the neighboring hospital beds during an x-ray procedure in hospitalization unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Rafael E.; Capeleti, Felipe F.; Cabete, Henrique V., E-mail: rafael.goto@fcmsantacasasp.edu.br, E-mail: felipe.capeleti@fcmsantacasasp.edu.br, E-mail: henrique@gmpbrasil.com.br [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); GMP Consultoria em Radioprotecao e Fisica Medica e Assessoria LTDA, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    There are lots of discussion about the exposure in hospitalization units in Brazil, especially around labor legislation and economic advantages of unhealthiness. With the attention focused on hospitalized patients, there were measured the exposure in neighboring beds of the patient submitted to an X-ray procedure with a mobile X-ray system that could be used to illustrate the discussion with consistent values. The most common X-ray procedure made in hospitalization units are chests images with techniques between 70 to 120 kV and 5 to 20 mAs. The measurement was made during routine exposure and simulations using a scattering phantom with Radcal AccuPro electrometer and 1800cc ionization chamber in a private hospital and a philanthropic hospital, both in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The ionization chambers are placed at 2 meters distance of the patient exposed of both sides during the routine procedure. During the simulation, a nylon phantom of 20 centimeters thick and 30 x 30 cm² size was placed on the bed, a typical exposure technique was used and the exposure was measured surrounding the phantom at 0.6, 1.0 and 2.0 meters distance for scattered radiation characterization. Initial results showed that the neighboring exposure at about 2 meters distance from the exposed patient bed have low values, even when exposure is integrated during the length of hospital stay. Therefore, the exposure in hospitalization units are very low compared to the exams doses. (author). (author)

  11. First dedicated in-beam X-ray measurement in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl E12 (Germany); RIKEN, Research Group for Superheavy Elements (Japan); Henning, W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division (United States); RIKEN, Research Group for Superheavy Elements (Japan); Muecher, D.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Hellgartner, S.; Maier, L. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl E12 (Germany); Morita, K.; Morimoto, K.; Kaji, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Baba, H. [RIKEN, Research Group for Superheavy Elements (Japan); Lutter, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We report on an experiment aiming at in-beam X-ray spectroscopy of heavy and superheavy elements (SHE). The goal is to establish K-X-ray spectroscopy as a sensitive tool to identify SHE produced in fusion reactions. SHE, formed after cold or hot fusion, are usually identified via the alpha-decay products, which have to be connected to well-known elements. However, various theories predict spontaneous fission as the dominant decay mode for the daughter nuclides. Additionally, half-lives of these elements are expected to increase to values impeding the identification of SHE solely by their decay. The in-beam identification of the characteristic X-rays would precisely allow to identify the charge number of the produced SHE. Experiments were performed at the RIKEN Nishina Centre for Accelerator based Science by using the gas-filled magnet separator GARIS for superheavy element detection. A high-purity, low-energy planar germanium LEGe-detector was adapted to the GARIS system at the target place for the first time in order to measure the element-characteristic, prompt X-ray emission.

  12. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Detector Optimization for Flash X-Ray Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roecker, Caleb Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schirato, Richard C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Charge trapping, resulting in a decreased and spatially dependent electric field, has long been a concern for wide bandgap semiconductor detectors. While significant work has been performed to characterize this degradation at varying temperatures and radiation environments, this work concentrates upon examining the event-to-event response in a flash X-ray environment. The following work investigates if charge trapping is a problem for CZT detectors, with particular emphasis on flash X-ray radiation fields at cold temperatures. Results are compared to a non-flash radiation field, using an Am-241 alpha source and similar temperature transitions. Our ability to determine if a response change occurred was hampered by the repeatability of our flash X-ray systems; a small response change was observed with the Am-241 source. Due to contrast of these results, we are in the process of revisiting the Am-241 measurements in the presence of a high radiation environment. If the response change is more pronounced in the high radiation environment, a similar test will be performed in the flash X-ray environment.

  13. Exploring the potential of the cosmic-ray neutron method to measure interception storage dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Jannis; Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture probes are an emerging technology that relies on the negative correlation between near-surface fast neutron counts and soil moisture content. Hydrogen atoms in the soil, which are mainly present as water, moderate the secondary neutrons on the way back to the surface. Any application of this method needs to consider the sensitivity of the neutron counts to additional sources of hydrogen (e.g. above- and below-ground biomass, humidity of the lower atmosphere, lattice water of the soil minerals, organic matter and water in the litter layer, intercepted water in the canopy, and soil organic matter). In this study, we analyzed the effects of canopy-intercepted water on the cosmic-ray neutron counts. For this, an arable field cropped with sugar beet was instrumented with several cosmic-ray neutron probes and a wireless sensor network with more than 140 in-situ soil moisture sensors. Additionally rainfall interception was estimated using a new approach coupling throughfall measurements and leaf wetness sensors. The derived interception storage was used to correct for interception effects on cosmic ray neutrons to enhance soil water content prediction. Furthermore, the potential for a simultaneous prediction of above- and below-ground biomass, soil moisture and interception was tested.

  14. Measurement of a wide-range of X-ray doses using specialty doped silica fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Sani, S. F.; Hammond, R.; Jafari, S. M.; Wahab, Norfadira; Amouzad Mahdiraji, G.; Siti Shafiqah, A. S.; Abdul Rashid, H. A.; Maah, M. J.; Aldousari, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alzimami, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using six types of tailor-made doped optical fibres, we carry out thermoluminescent (TL) studies of X-rays, investigating the TL yield for doses from 20 mGy through to 50 Gy. Dosimetric parameters were investigated for nominal 8 wt% Ge doped fibres that in two cases were co-doped, using B in one case and Br in the other. A comparative measurement of surface analysis has also been made for non-annealed and annealed capillary fibres, use being made of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Comparison was made with the conventional TL phosphor LiF in the form of the proprietary product TLD-100, including dose response and glow curves investigated for X-rays generated at 60 kVp over a dose range from 2 cGy to 50 Gy. The energy response of the fibres was also performed for X-rays generated at peak accelerating potentials of 80 kVp, 140 kVp, 250 kVp and 6 MV photons for an absorbed dose of 2 Gy. Present results show the samples to be suitable for use as TL dosimeters, with good linearity of response and a simple glow curve (simple trap) distribution. It has been established that the TL performance of an irradiated fibre is not only influenced by radiation parameters such as energy, dose-rate and total dose but also the type of fibre.

  15. A Current Mode Detector Array for Gamma-Ray Asymmetry Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, M T; Bowman, J D; Gillis, R C; Hartfield, J; Ino, T; Leuschner, M; Masuda, Y; Mitchell, G S; Muto, S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttil"a, S I; Ramsay, W D; Seo, P N; Snow, W M; Tasson, J; Wilburn, W S

    2004-01-01

    We have built a CsI(Tl) gamma-ray detector array for the NPDGamma experiment to search for a small parity-violating directional asymmetry in the angular distribution of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons by protons with a sensitivity of several ppb. The weak pion-nucleon coupling constant can be determined from this asymmetry. The small size of the asymmetry requires a high cold neutron flux, control of systematic errors at the ppb level, and the use of current mode gamma-ray detection with vacuum photo diodes and low-noise solid-state preamplifiers. The average detector photoelectron yield was determined to be 1300 photoelectrons per MeV. The RMS width seen in the measurement is therefore dominated by the fluctuations in the number of gamma rays absorbed in the detector (counting statistics) rather than the intrinsic detector noise. The detectors were tested for noise performance, sensitivity to magnetic fields, pedestal stability and cosmic background. False asymmetries due to ga...

  16. Feasibility study for the in vivo measurement of lead in bone using L-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.; Slatkin, D.N.; Vartsky, D.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    Lead deposits in bone were detected by x-ray fluorescence using x-rays from either a /sup 125/I or a /sup 109/Cd source. Measurements were taken from tibia in intact human legs, post-mortem. On the basis of preliminary measurements, it was concluded that an exposure of one rad is adequate for determination of lead in bone. Both the advantages and the disadvantages of L-x-rays, used in the technique developed for this study, are compared with those of K-x-rays.

  17. Detailed assessment of diesel spray atomization models using visible and X-ray extinction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnotti, G.M.; Genzale, C.L. (GIT)

    2017-12-01

    The physical mechanisms characterizing the breakup of a diesel spray into droplets are still unknown. This gap in knowledge has largely been due to the challenges of directly imaging this process or quantitatively measuring the outcomes of spray breakup, such as droplet size. Recent x-ray measurements by Argonne National Laboratory, utilized in this work, provide needed information about the spatial evolution of droplet sizes in selected regions of the spray under a range of injection pressures (50–150 MPa) and ambient densities (7.6–22.8 kg/m3) relevant for diesel operating conditions. Ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) measurements performed at the Advanced Photon Source are presented, which quantify Sauter mean diameters (SMD) within optically thick regions of the spray that are inaccessible by conventional droplet sizing measurement techniques, namely in the near-nozzle region, along the spray centerline, and within the core of the spray. To quantify droplet sizes along the periphery of the spray, a complementary technique is proposed and introduced, which leverages the ratio of path-integrated x-ray and visible laser extinction (SAMR) measurements to quantify SMD. The SAMR and USAXS measurements are then utilized to evaluate current spray models used for engine computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. We explore the ability of a carefully calibrated spray model, premised on aerodynamic wave growth theory, to capture the experimentally observed trends of SMD throughout the spray. The spray structure is best predicted with an aerodynamic primary and secondary breakup process that is represented with a slower time constant and larger formed droplet size than conventionally recommended for diesel spray models. Additionally, spray model predictions suggest that droplet collisions may not influence the resultant droplet size distribution along the spray centerline in downstream regions of the spray.

  18. Measuring the black hole mass in ultraluminous X-ray sources with the X-ray scaling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, I.; Gliozzi, M.; Satyapal, S.; Titarchuk, L.

    2018-01-01

    In our recent work, we demonstrated that a novel X-ray scaling method, originally introduced for Galactic black holes (BH), could be reliably extended to estimate the mass of supermassive black holes accreting at moderate to high level. Here, we apply this X-ray scaling method to ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) to constrain their MBH. Using 49 ULXs with multiple XMM-Newton observations, we infer that ULXs host both stellar mass BHs and intermediate mass BHs. The majority of the sources of our sample seem to be consistent with the hypothesis of highly accreting massive stellar BHs with MBH ∼ 100 M⊙. Our results are in general agreement with the MBH values obtained with alternative methods, including model-independent variability methods. This suggests that the X-ray scaling method is an actual scale-independent method that can be applied to all BH systems accreting at moderate-high rate.

  19. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J. S.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    2016-11-15

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  20. A Simple Detector for Measuring the Density of Air Using an α-Ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shigeaki; Toyooka, Satoru

    1993-03-01

    A simple detector, which consists of a radioactive α-ray source and a ZnS(Ag) scintillator connected with an optical fiber cable, was devised for measuring the density of air under atmospheric pressure. It was shown that the density of air could be measured with the rms error of ± 4× 10-6 g/cm3 in the range from 1.074× 10-3 to 1.309× 10-3 g/cm3.