WorldWideScience

Sample records for ray acceleration model

  1. Cosmic ray acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    We present a brief summary of some of the most popular theories of cosmic ray acceleration: Fermi acceleration, its application to acceleration by shocks in a scattering medium, and impulsive acceleration by relativistic shocks

  2. MODELING THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION IN THE GALACTIC CENTER WITH A FADING COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang, Xiao-Chuan, E-mail: ruoyu@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-12-20

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  3. An MCNP-based model of a medical linear accelerator x-ray photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaj, F A; Ghassal, N M

    2003-09-01

    The major components in the x-ray photon beam path of the treatment head of the VARIAN Clinac 2300 EX medical linear accelerator were modeled and simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP). Simulated components include x-ray target, primary conical collimator, x-ray beam flattening filter and secondary collimators. X-ray photon energy spectra and angular distributions were calculated using the model. The x-ray beam emerging from the secondary collimators were scored by considering the total x-ray spectra from the target as the source of x-rays at the target position. The depth dose distribution and dose profiles at different depths and field sizes have been calculated at a nominal operating potential of 6 MV and found to be within acceptable limits. It is concluded that accurate specification of the component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential gives a good assessment of the x-ray energy spectra.

  4. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E.; Becker Tjus, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10 13 keV cm –1 . At gradients above 1.6 keV cm –1 , muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  5. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  6. Accelerator X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talman, R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first monograph to cover in-depth the production of brilliant x-ray beams in accelerators, with emphasis on fourth generation designs, such as energy recovery linacs (ERL), fast cycling storage rings, and free electron lasers (FEL). Going beyond existing treatments of the influence of synchroton radiation on accelerator operation, special emphasis is placed on the design of undulator-based beam lines, and the physics of undulator radiation. Starting from the unified treatment of electron and photon beams both as bunches of particles and as waves, the author proceeds to analyse the main components, from electron gun, through linac and arc lattice, to the x-ray beam line. Designs are given for both an ERL and a more conventional storage ring complex, and their anticipated properties are compared in detail. Space charge effects are analysed with emphasis on coherent synchrotron radiation and emittance dilution. Beam diagnostics using synchrotron radiation or laser wire (Compton scattering) are also analysed in detail. Written primarily for general, particle, and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers. (orig.)

  7. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante, M; Carrillo Montoya, G; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi accelera...

  8. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  9. Acceleration of cosmic rays in SNR shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.O'C.; Markiewicz, W.J.; Voelk, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The time dependence of the energy density of cosmic rays accelerated in the outer shock of a supernova is studied in simple nonlinear models. The solutions are classified in their dependence on the parameters of the system. (orig.)

  10. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  11. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification.

  12. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification

  13. Cosmic-ray shock acceleration in oblique MHD shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Drury, L. OC.; Volk, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady-state hydrodynamical model of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique MHD shocks is presented. Upstream of the shock the incoming thermal plasma is subject to the adverse pressure gradient of the accelerated particles, the J x B force, as well as the thermal gas pressure gradient. The efficiency of the acceleration of cosmic-rays at the shock as a function of the upstream magnetic field obliquity and upstream plasma beta is investigated. Astrophysical applications of the results are briefly discussed.

  14. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'C Drury, Luke

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes some recent developments in our understanding of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. It is pointed out that while good agreement now exists as to steady nonlinear modifications to the shock structure, there is also growing evidence that the mesoscopic scales may not in fact be steady and that significant instabilities associated with magnetic field amplification may be a feature of strong collisionless plasma shocks. There is strong observational evidence for such magnetic field amplification, and it appears to solve a number of long-standing issues concerned with acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova remnants

  15. The acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Issa, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The idea that the bulk of cosmic rays below 10 GeV are accelerated in supernova remnants suggests that cosmic rays should also exhibit intensity variations on a scale comparable with the linear size of a representative remnant. Following the general spirit of shock-wave acceleration models, here Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to predict what this scale should be and then corroborative evidence is presented from an autocorrelation analysis of the COS B and SAS II γ-ray data for the latitude range |b|=10-20 0 ('near Galaxy') and |b| 0 ('far Galaxy'). (author)

  16. Measurements of x-ray scattering from accelerator vacuum chamber surfaces, and comparison with an analytical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Dugan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares measurements and calculations of scattering of photons from technical vacuum chamber surfaces typical of accelerators. Synchrotron radiation generated by a charged particle beam in the accelerator is either absorbed, specularly reflected, or scattered by the vacuum chamber surface. This phenomenon has important implications on the operation of the accelerator. Measurements of photon scattering were made at the BESSY-II synchrotron radiation facility using samples of aluminum vacuum chamber from Cornell electron storage ring (CESR. A description of the analytic model used in the calculation is given, which takes into account the reflectivity of the material, the surface features of the sample, the wavelengths and the incident angles of the photons. The surface properties used in these calculations were obtained from measurements made from an atomic force microscope.

  17. Cosmic ray acceleration by large scale galactic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.; Lagage, P.O.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration may account for the existence of galactic cosmic rays detailed application to stellar wind shocks and especially to supernova shocks have been developed. Existing models can usually deal with the energetics or the spectral slope, but the observed energy range of cosmic rays is not explained. Therefore it seems worthwhile to examine the effect that large scale, long-lived galactic shocks may have on galactic cosmic rays, in the frame of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Large scale fast shocks can only be expected to exist in the galactic halo. We consider three situations where they may arise: expansion of a supernova shock in the halo, galactic wind, galactic infall; and discuss the possible existence of these shocks and their role in accelerating cosmic rays

  18. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  19. Modeling supernova remnants: effects of diffusive cosmic-ray acceleration on the evolution and application to observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosenko, D.; Blinnikov, S.; Vink, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical models for supernova remnant evolution, using a new version of the hydrodynamical code SUPREMNA. We added a cosmic-ray diffusion equation to the code scheme, employing a two-fluid approximation. We investigate the dynamics of the simulated supernova remnants with different

  20. Acceleration of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in starburst superwinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis Alfredo

    2018-03-01

    The sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been stubbornly elusive. However, the latest report of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides a compelling indication for a possible correlation between the arrival directions of UHECRs and nearby starburst galaxies. We argue that if starbursts are sources of UHECRs, then particle acceleration in the large-scale terminal shock of the superwind that flows from the starburst engine represents the best known concept model in the market. We investigate new constraints on the model and readjust free parameters accordingly. We show that UHECR acceleration above about 1 011 GeV remains consistent with observation. We also show that the model could accommodate hard source spectra as required by Auger data. We demonstrate how neutrino emission can be used as a discriminator among acceleration models.

  1. Accelerator Modeling with MATLAB Accelerator Toolbox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces Accelerator Toolbox (AT)--a collection of tools to model storage rings and beam transport lines in the MATLAB environment. The objective is to illustrate the flexibility and efficiency of the AT-MATLAB framework. The paper discusses three examples of problems that are analyzed frequently in connection with ring-based synchrotron light sources

  2. Linear accelerator with x-ray absorbing insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Annular insulators for supporting successive annular electrodes in a linear accelerator have embedded x-ray absorbing shield structures extending around the accelerating path. The shield members are disposed to intercept x-ray radiation without disrupting the insulative effect of the insulator members. In preferred forms, the structure comprises a plurality of annular members of heavy metal disposed in an x-ray blocking array, spaced from each other by the insulating substance of the insulator member. (auth)

  3. Electromagnetic modeling in accelerator designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Through the years, electromagnetic modeling using computers has proved to be a cost-effective tool for accelerator designs. Traditionally, electromagnetic modeling of accelerators has been limited to resonator and magnet designs in two dimensions. In recent years with the availability of powerful computers, electromagnetic modeling of accelerators has advanced significantly. Through the above conferences, it is apparent that breakthroughs have been made during the last decade in two important areas: three-dimensional modeling and time-domain simulation. Success in both these areas have been made possible by the increasing size and speed of computers. In this paper, the advances in these two areas will be described

  4. The acceleration of cosmic ray by shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, W.I.; Leer, E.; Skadron, G.

    1977-01-01

    The acceleration of cosmic rays in flows involving shocks and other compressional waves is considered in terms of one-dimensionl, steady flows and the diffusion approximation. The results suggest that very substantial energy conversion can occur. (author)

  5. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings

  6. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  7. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfi, E.A.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calcuations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the case) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechnism

  8. Photon losses in cosmic ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10 18 eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies, and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10 20 eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10 13 . Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray 10 20 eV by greater than 10 4 times its energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can avoid disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultrahigh energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found

  9. Accelerators and x-rays in cultural heritage investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz-Eberhard, Mahnke; Salomon, J.; Heinz-Eberhard, Mahnke; Denker, A.; Heinz-Eberhard, Mahnke

    2009-01-01

    In the following article a review is given on the use of accelerators in studies connected to our cultural heritage. It focuses on making use of the production and detection of x-rays as a general tool. At 'small accelerators', the proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE), especially when combined with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), has been developed to a very versatile and powerful technique for near-surface investigations. It is well complemented by larger facilities, synchrotron radiation sources as well as medium energy ion accelerators for high energy PIXE. With the development of small compact electron accelerators, a new generation of mono-energetic high-energy high-intensity x-ray sources will add a very comfortable complement in cultural heritage studies

  10. Accelerator modeling at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, G.; Corbett, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    The response matrix, consisting of the closed orbit change at each beam position monitor (BPM) due to corrector magnet excitations, was measured and analyzed in order to calibrate a linear optics model of SPEAR. The model calibration was accomplished by varying model parameters to minimize the chi-square difference between the measured and the model response matrices. The singular value decomposition (SVD) matrix inversion method was used to solve the simultaneous equations. The calibrated model was then used to calculate corrections to the operational lattice. The results of the calibration and correction procedures are presented

  11. Dynamic accelerator modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi.

    1993-05-01

    Object-Oriented Programming has been used extensively to model the LBL Advanced Light Source 1.5 GeV electron storage ring. This paper is on the present status of the class library construction with emphasis on a dynamic modeling

  12. Soft x-ray driven ablation and its positive use for a new efficient acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, Takashi; Kiyokawa, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu; Sakabe, Shuji; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1983-01-01

    The ablation process driven by soft X-ray is investigated by one-dimensional hydrodynamic code coupled with LTE, average ion model and multi-group radiation package. The following two major results are obtained: (1) the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate scalings, and (2) a new acceleration scheme which positively uses the unique property of soft X-ray transport. (author)

  13. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S.

    2013-01-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied

  14. The Galactic Center: A Petaelectronvolt Cosmic-ray Acceleration Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yi-Qing; Tian, Zhen; Wang, Zhen [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Hai-Jin; Chen, Tian-Lu [Physics Department of the Science School, Tibet University, Lhasa 850000 (China)

    2017-02-20

    The multiteraelectronvolt γ -rays from the galactic center (GC) have a cutoff at tens of teraelectronvolts, whereas the diffuse emission has no such cutoff, which is regarded as an indication of petaelectronvolt proton acceleration by the HESS experiment. It is important to understand the inconsistency and study the possibility that petaelectronvolt cosmic-ray acceleration could account for the apparently contradictory point and diffuse γ -ray spectra. In this work, we propose that the cosmic rays are accelerated up to greater than petaelectronvolts in the GC. The interaction between cosmic rays and molecular clouds is responsible for the multiteraelectronvolt γ -ray emissions from both the point and diffuse sources today. Enhanced by the small volume filling factor (VFF) of the clumpy structure, the absorption of the γ -rays leads to a sharp cutoff spectrum at tens of teraelectronvolts produced in the GC. Away from the GC, the VFF grows, and the absorption enhancement becomes negligible. As a result, the spectra of γ -ray emissions for both point and diffuse sources can be successfully reproduced under such a self-consistent picture. In addition, a “surviving tail” at ∼100 TeV is expected from the point source, which can be observed by future projects CTA and LHAASO. Neutrinos are simultaneously produced during proton-proton (PP) collision. With 5–10 years of observations, the KM3Net experiment will be able to detect the petaelectronvolt source according to our calculation.

  15. Top ten accelerating cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szydlowski, Marek; Kurek, Aleksandra; Krawiec, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Recent astronomical observations indicate that the Universe is presently almost flat and undergoing a period of accelerated expansion. Basing on Einstein's general relativity all these observations can be explained by the hypothesis of a dark energy component in addition to cold dark matter (CDM). Because the nature of this dark energy is unknown, it was proposed some alternative scenario to explain the current accelerating Universe. The key point of this scenario is to modify the standard FRW equation instead of mysterious dark energy component. The standard approach to constrain model parameters, based on the likelihood method, gives a best-fit model and confidence ranges for those parameters. We always arbitrary choose the set of parameters which define a model which we compare with observational data. Because in the generic case, the introducing of new parameters improves a fit to the data set, there appears the problem of elimination of model parameters which can play an insufficient role. The Bayesian information criteria of model selection (BIC) is dedicated to promotion a set of parameters which should be incorporated to the model. We divide class of all accelerating cosmological models into two groups according to the two types of explanation acceleration of the Universe. Then the Bayesian framework of model selection is used to determine the set of parameters which gives preferred fit to the SNIa data. We find a few of flat cosmological models which can be recommend by the Bayes factor. We show that models with dark energy as a new fluid are favoured over models featuring a modified FRW equation

  16. Cosmic rays and new accelerator experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraki, Y.

    The cross-section of sigma(anti-D,D) increases with energy. The heavy vector boson production cross-section deviates from the naive law 1/M 3 F(s/M 2 ) at very high energy. Comparison with dsigma/dP(T)/(had) and Drell-Yan cross-section dsigma/(dM/2)/(d-y) at very high energy will provide evidence about the existence of the colour quantum number. Centauro will soon be checked by a cosmic-ray experiment. The detail dynamics of such a hadron rich event will be extensively studied at anti-pp colliders. The investigation of the Feynman scaling at the anti-pp collider for hadrons brings a very important knowledge on astrophysics. The 2μ, 3μ, 4μ and multi muon bundle at the anti-pp colliders is extremely interesting. A cosmic ray muon bundle event suggests the successive decay of a anti-BB pair. The total cross-section for (anti-BB) is estimated as 500μb at 150 TeV

  17. Cosmic-ray acceleration and the radio evolution of Cassiopeia A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, R.A.; Robertson, J.W.; Scott, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    A more detailed analysis of the Scott and Chevalier model for production of galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants is presented. Particles are accelerated by second-order Fermi acceleration with turbulent vortices (produced by the motions of the supernova ejecta through the remnant) acting as moving scattering centers. The time-dependent equation of continuity in particle energy space is solved numerically. The results of the calculations are in substantial agreement with all time-dependent observations of the radio emission from Cas A. This mechanism implies an dependent solution yields a cosmic ray spectrum with the same slope as galactic cosmic rays. The results of our calculations and new work on γ-rays by, e.g., Stecker and by Lingenfelter and Higdon and cosmic ray composition by, e.g., Hainebach, Norman, and Schramm support our hypothesis that galactic cosmic rays are produced in supernova remnants by the mechanism proposed by Scott and Chevalier

  18. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves Renyi Ma1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves. Renyi Ma1,2,∗ ... ratio of CR to thermal energy in the ICM and WHIM based on numerical simulations and diffusive shock ... Hence, the nonthermal radiation of CRs may provide us a.

  19. Nanodiamond targets for accelerator X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobko, A., E-mail: lobko@inp.bsu.by [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Golubeva, E. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, P.; Maksimenko, S. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Ryazan State RadioEngineering University, 59/1 Gagarina Street, Ryazan 390005 (Russian Federation); Paddubskaya, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Shenderova, O. [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Dr., S. 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States); Uglov, V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Valynets, N. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    Results of fabrication of a nanodiamond target for accelerator X-ray experiments are reported. Nanodiamond film with dimensions 5 × 7 mm and thickness of 500 nm has been made of the high pressure high temperature nanodiamonds using a filtration method. The average crystallite size of primary nanodiamond particles varies around 100 nm. Source nanodiamonds and fabricated nanodiamond film were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary results show that targets made of nanodiamonds are perspective in generating crystal-assisted radiation by the relativistic charged particles, such as parametric X-rays, diffracted transition radiation, diffracted Bremsstrahlung, etc.

  20. Nanodiamond targets for accelerator X-ray experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobko, A.; Golubeva, E.; Kuzhir, P.; Maksimenko, S.; Paddubskaya, A.; Shenderova, O.; Uglov, V.; Valynets, N.

    2015-01-01

    Results of fabrication of a nanodiamond target for accelerator X-ray experiments are reported. Nanodiamond film with dimensions 5 × 7 mm and thickness of 500 nm has been made of the high pressure high temperature nanodiamonds using a filtration method. The average crystallite size of primary nanodiamond particles varies around 100 nm. Source nanodiamonds and fabricated nanodiamond film were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary results show that targets made of nanodiamonds are perspective in generating crystal-assisted radiation by the relativistic charged particles, such as parametric X-rays, diffracted transition radiation, diffracted Bremsstrahlung, etc

  1. X-ray emission of the hot gas and of accelerated particles in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, F.

    2008-09-01

    The current observations seem to support the theory that the shock wave of supernova remnants accelerate electrons (representing about 1% of cosmic rays) of the interstellar medium up to energies of about 10 15 eV. However there is still no solid evidence that supernova remnants also accelerate protons (major component of cosmic rays). The X-ray observations of those supernova remnants with the satellite XMM-Newton can provide crucial information on the acceleration mechanisms and on this population of accelerated particles. This thesis presents the X-ray analysis of the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and SN 1006 for which it has been shown that they accelerate electrons efficiently. As a result, these objects are very good targets to compare the theoretical models of acceleration to the observation. For the first object, I constructed through new XMM-Newton observations, the first high-angular resolution mosaic of the entire supernova remnant. I then compared the X- and gamma-ray emission of this object in order to understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission. This spectral and morphological comparison allowed me to discuss the two possible origins of the gamma-ray radiation (issued by electrons or by protons). For SN 1006, I studied the density of the ambient medium in which the shock wave propagates. This density is a key parameter for the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant and for studying a future gamma-ray emission. The study of X-ray emission of the gas heated by the shock wave allowed me to better estimate of the value of the density so far poorly constrained for this object. (author)

  2. High-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Yang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of an undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning components of the accelerator, undulator, and beam line in an x-ray free-electron laser. Two retractable pinholes at each end of the undulator define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA. Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy (1–3   μm for target pinholes in the transverse directions over a long distance (200 m or longer. It can be used to define the beam axis of the electron-beam–based alignment, enabling high reproducibility of the latter. This x-ray–based concept should complement the electron-beam–based alignment and the existing survey methods to raise the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvement of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates will be discussed. We also propose a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation to allow real-time feedback for transverse position correction.

  3. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...

  4. Cosmic ray acceleration by shock waves in a diffusion medium. Research of high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1982-06-01

    The problem of galactic cosmic-ray acceleration is presented with the study of a new acceleration mechanism by supernova shock waves in a diffusive medium. The question is: do supernova shocks have enough time to accelerate cosmic rays beyond 10 4 -10 5 GeV. A firm upper limit to the energy that can be acquired by particles is established and it is considered that the mean free path of the particle has its lowest possible value and the most favorable model of supernova evolution. The diffusion coefficients which are relevant for the determination of the high energy cut off are investigated. The effect of the spatial dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the rate of acceleration of particles is examined. A more realistic cut off energy is calculated. We find E max = 2 10 4 GeV [fr

  5. Accelerators for E-beam and X-ray processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auslender, V.L. E-mail: auslen@inp.nsk.su; Bryazgin, A.A.; Faktorovich, B.L.; Gorbunov, V.A.; Kokin, E.N.; Korobeinikov, M.V.; Krainov, G.S.; Lukin, A.N.; Maximov, S.A.; Nekhaev, V.E.; Panfilov, A.D.; Radchenko, V.N.; Tkachenko, V.O.; Tuvik, A.A.; Voronin, L.A

    2002-03-01

    During last years the demand for pasteurization and desinsection of various food products (meat, chicken, sea products, vegetables, fruits, etc.) had increased. The treatment of these products in industrial scale requires the usage of powerful electron accelerators with energy 5-10 MeV and beam power at least 50 kW or more. The report describes the ILU accelerators with energy range up to 10 MeV and beam power up to 150 kW.The different irradiation schemes in electron beam and X-ray modes for various products are described. The design of the X-ray converter and 90 deg. beam bending system are also given.

  6. Cosmic ray acceleration in sources of the supersonic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, A.M.; Toptygin, I.N.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of particle acceleration by the supersonic turbulence is studied. The supersonic turbulence is defined as an ensemble of large- and small-scale plasma motions, in which along with the ranges of smooth parameter variation there are randomly distributed shock wave fronts. Particle interaction with the large-scale turbulence is described by the transfer equation which is true at any relation between the Larmor radius and the transport length. The large-scale turbulence can accelerate particles only due to compressibility effects of the medium. The basic theoretical results concerning turbulence properties in compressed media are presented. Concrete physical conditions and the possibility of acceleration of cosmic rays in the interplanetary space, in the vicinity of suppergiant stars of the O and B class with a great loss of mass and strong stellar winds, in supernova remnants, in the interstellar medium and some extragalactic radio sources are considered [ru

  7. Rarefaction acceleration in magnetized gamma-ray burst jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzis, Konstantinos; Vlahakis, Nektarios

    2013-09-01

    Relativistic jets associated with long/soft gamma-ray bursts are formed and initially propagate in the interior of the progenitor star. Because of the subsequent loss of their external pressure support after they cross the stellar surface, these flows can be modelled as moving around a corner. A strong steady-state rarefaction wave is formed, and the sideways expansion is accompanied by a rarefaction acceleration. We investigate the efficiency and the general characteristics of this mechanism by integrating the steady-state, special relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic equations, using a special set of partial exact solutions in planar geometry (r self-similar with respect to the `corner'). We also derive analytical approximate scalings in the ultrarelativistic cold/magnetized, and hydrodynamic limits. The mechanism is more effective in magnetized than in purely hydrodynamic flows. It substantially increases the Lorentz factor without much affecting the opening of the jet; the resulting values of their product can be much greater than unity, allowing for possible breaks in the afterglow light curves. These findings are similar to the ones from numerical simulations of axisymmetric jets by Komissarov et al. and Tchekhovskoy et al., although in our approach we describe the rarefaction as a steady-state simple wave and self-consistently calculate the opening of the jet that corresponds to zero external pressure.

  8. TIME-DEPENDENT ELECTRON ACCELERATION IN BLAZAR TRANSIENTS: X-RAY TIME LAGS AND SPECTRAL FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tiffany R.; Becker, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States); Finke, Justin D., E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu, E-mail: tlewis13@gmu.edu, E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Electromagnetic radiation from blazar jets often displays strong variability, extending from radio to γ -ray frequencies. In a few cases, this variability has been characterized using Fourier time lags, such as those detected in the X-rays from Mrk 421 using Beppo SAX. The lack of a theoretical framework to interpret the data has motivated us to develop a new model for the formation of the X-ray spectrum and the time lags in blazar jets based on a transport equation including terms describing stochastic Fermi acceleration, synchrotron losses, shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, and spatial diffusion. We derive the exact solution for the Fourier transform of the electron distribution and use it to compute the Fourier transform of the synchrotron radiation spectrum and the associated X-ray time lags. The same theoretical framework is also used to compute the peak flare X-ray spectrum, assuming that a steady-state electron distribution is achieved during the peak of the flare. The model parameters are constrained by comparing the theoretical predictions with the observational data for Mrk 421. The resulting integrated model yields, for the first time, a complete first-principles physical explanation for both the formation of the observed time lags and the shape of the peak flare X-ray spectrum. It also yields direct estimates of the strength of the shock and the stochastic magnetohydrodynamical wave acceleration components in the Mrk 421 jet.

  9. Cosmic-ray acceleration at stellar wind terminal shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.M.; Forman, M.A.; Axford, W.I.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state, spherically symmetric, analytic solutions of the cosmic-ray transport equations, applicable to the problem of acceleration of cosmic rays at the terminal shock to a stellar wind, are studied. The spectra, gradients, and flow patterns of particle modulated and accelerated by the stellar wind and shock are investigated by means of monoenergetic-source solutions at finite radius, as well as solutions with monoenergetic and power-law Galactic spectra. The solutions obtained apply in the test particle limit in which the cosmic rays do not modify the background flow. The solutions show a characteristic power-law momentum spectrum for accelerated particles and a more complex spectrum of particles that are decelerated in the stellar wind. The power-law spectral index depends on the compression ratio of the shock and on the modulation parameters characterizing propagation conditions in the upstream and downstream regions of the shock. Solutions of the transport equations for the total density N (integrated over all energies), pressure P/sub c/, and energy flux F/sub c/ of Galactic cosmic rays interacting with a stellar wind and shock are also studied. The density N(r) increases with radius r, and for strong shocks with large enough modulation parameters, there may be a significant enhancement of the pressure of weakly relativistic particles near the shock compared to the cosmic-ray background pressure P/sub infinity/. The emergent energy flux at infinity is of the order of 4π R 2 V 1 P/sub infinity/ (V 1 is wind velocity upstream of the shock, R is shock radius)

  10. Direct electron acceleration in plasma waveguides for compact high-repetition-rate x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M-W; Jovanovic, I

    2014-01-01

    Numerous applications in fundamental and applied research, security, and industry require robust, compact sources of x-rays, with a particular recent interest in monochromatic, spatially coherent, and ultrafast x-ray pulses in well-collimated beams. Such x-ray sources usually require production of high-quality electron beams from compact accelerators. Guiding a radially polarized laser pulse in a plasma waveguide has been proposed for realizing direct laser acceleration (DLA), where the electrons are accelerated by the axial electric field of a co-propagating laser pulse (Serafim et al 2000 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 28 1190). A moderate laser peak power is required for DLA when compared to laser wakefield acceleration, thus offering the prospect for high repetition rate operation. By using a density-modulated plasma waveguide for DLA, the acceleration distance can be extended with pulse guiding, while the density-modulation with proper axial structure can realize the quasi-phase matching between the laser pulses and electrons for a net gain accumulation (York et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 195001; York et al 2008 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25 B137; Palastro et al 2008 Phys. Rev. E 77 036405). We describe the development and application of a test particle model and particle-in-cell model for DLA. Experimental setups designed for fabrication of optically tailored plasma waveguides via the ignitor-heater scheme, and for generation and characterization of radially polarized short pulses used to drive DLA, are presented. (paper)

  11. X-ray production experiments on the RACE Compact Torus Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hartman, C.W.; McLean, H.S.; Molvik, A.W.; Gee, M.

    1989-12-01

    The Purpose of the Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA) program at LLNL is to prove the principle of a unique accelerator concept based on magnetically confined compact torus (CT) plasma rings and to study applications. Successful achievement of these goals could lead to a high power-density driver for many applications including an intense x-ray source for nuclear weapons effects simulation and an inertial fusion driver. Fusion applications and a description of the CTA concept are included in a companion paper at this conference. This paper will describe the initial experiments on soft x-ray production conducted on the plasma Ring ACcelerator Experiment (RACE) and compare the results to modeling studies. The experiments on CT stagnation and soft x-ray production were conducted with unfocused rings as a first of CT dynamics and the physics of x-ray production. The x-ray fluences observed are consistent with expectations based on calculations employing a radiation-hydrodynamics code. We conclude with a diffusion of future x-ray production studies that can be conducted on RACE and a possible multi-megajoule upgrade

  12. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  13. Acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. Production, oscillation and detection of neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to studies on cosmic rays and neutrinos, particles astrophysically relevant. In recent years, the old problem of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation has become alive again, with the discovery of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, and with the first measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton flux, which appears to be higher than expected. I have shown that the new acceleration mechanism was slow and I have calculated the maximum energy that can be reached by particles accelerated in various astrophysical sites. I have also studied in detail a cosmic-ray propagation model which takes into account the antiproton measurements. Neutrino astronomy is a field much more recent and in rapid expansion, thanks to a convergence of interests between astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Several large neutrino detectors already exist; really huge ones are in project. I have studied the possible impact of the high energy (> 1 TeV) neutrino astronomy on models of cosmic-ray sources such as Cygnus X3. Comparing the low energy (∼ 10 MeV) cosmic-ray antineutrinos with other sources of neutrinos and antineutrinos (sun, supernova, earth ...), I have pointed out that the antineutrino background resulting from all the nuclear power-stations of the planet was sizeable. This background is a nuisance for some astrophysical applications but could be useful for studies on vacuum or matter neutrino oscillations (MSW effect). I have also examined the MSW effect in another context: the travel through the earth of neutrinos from the supernova explosion SN1987a [fr

  14. GPU-accelerated depth map generation for X-ray simulations of complex CAD geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Robert J.; Young, Gavin; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2018-04-01

    Interactive x-ray simulations of complex computer-aided design (CAD) models can provide valuable insights for better interpretation of the defect signatures such as porosity from x-ray CT images. Generating the depth map along a particular direction for the given CAD geometry is the most compute-intensive step in x-ray simulations. We have developed a GPU-accelerated method for real-time generation of depth maps of complex CAD geometries. We preprocess complex components designed using commercial CAD systems using a custom CAD module and convert them into a fine user-defined surface tessellation. Our CAD module can be used by different simulators as well as handle complex geometries, including those that arise from complex castings and composite structures. We then make use of a parallel algorithm that runs on a graphics processing unit (GPU) to convert the finely-tessellated CAD model to a voxelized representation. The voxelized representation can enable heterogeneous modeling of the volume enclosed by the CAD model by assigning heterogeneous material properties in specific regions. The depth maps are generated from this voxelized representation with the help of a GPU-accelerated ray-casting algorithm. The GPU-accelerated ray-casting method enables interactive (> 60 frames-per-second) generation of the depth maps of complex CAD geometries. This enables arbitrarily rotation and slicing of the CAD model, leading to better interpretation of the x-ray images by the user. In addition, the depth maps can be used to aid directly in CT reconstruction algorithms.

  15. Cosmic ray acceleration by stellar wind. Simulation for heliosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, S.I.; Turpanov, A.A.; Nikolaev, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    The solar wind deceleration by the interstellar medium may result in the existence of the solar wind terminal shock. In this case a certain fraction of thermal particles after being heated at the shock would obtain enough energy to be injected to the regular acceleration process. An analytical solution for the spectrum in the frame of a simplified model that includes particle acceleration at the shock front and adiabatic cooling inside the stellar wind cavity has been derived. It is shown that the acceleration of the solar wind particles at the solar wind terminal shock is capable of providing the total flux, spectrum and radial gradients of the low-energy protons close to one observed in the interplanetary space

  16. Acceleration of galactic cosmic rays in shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1981-06-01

    The old problem of the origin of cosmic rays has triggered off fresh interest owing to the discovery of a new model which enables a lot of energy to be transferred to a small number of particles on the one hand and the discovery of the coronal environment in which this transfer occurs, on the other. In this paper, interest is taken in the galactic cosmic rays and an endeavour is made to find out if the model can reveal the existence of cosmic rays over a wide energy range. The existence of an energy break, predicted by the model, was recognized fairly early but, in the literature, it varies from 30 GeV ro 10 6 GeV according to the authors. A study has been made of the two main causes of an energy break: the sphericity of the shock and the life time of the shock wave [fr

  17. The acceleration rate of cosmic rays at cosmic ray modified shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Hoshino, Masahiro; Amano, Takanobu

    It is a still controversial matter whether the production efficiency of cosmic rays (CRs) is relatively efficient or inefficient (e.g. Helder et al. 2009; Hughes et al. 2000; Fukui 2013). In upstream region of SNR shocks (the interstellar medium), the energy density of CRs is comparable to a substantial fraction of that of the thermal plasma (e.g. Ferriere 2001). In such a situation, CRs can possibly exert a back-reaction to the shocks and modify the global shock structure. These shocks are called cosmic ray modified shocks (CRMSs). In CRMSs, as a result of the nonlinear feedback, there are almost always up to three steady-state solutions for given upstream parameters, which are characterized by CR production efficiencies (efficient, intermediate and inefficient branch). We evaluate qualitatively the efficiency of the CR production in SNR shocks by considering the stability of CRMS, under the effects of i) magnetic fields and ii) injection, which play significant roles in efficiency of acceleration. By adopting two-fluid model (Drury & Voelk, 1981), we investigate the stability of CRMSs by means of time-dependent numerical simulations. As a result, we show explicitly the bi-stable feature of these multiple solutions, i.e., the efficient and inefficient branches are stable and the intermediate branch is unstable, and the intermediate branch transit to the inefficient one. This feature is independent of the effects of i) shock angles and ii) injection. Furthermore, we investigate the evolution from a hydrodynamic shock to CRMS in a self-consistent manner. From the results, we suggest qualitatively that the CR production efficiency at SNR shocks may be the least efficient.

  18. Very high-energy gamma-ray signature of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration in Centaurus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Miranda, Luis Salvador; Razzaque, Soebur; Yang, Lili

    2018-04-01

    The association of at least a dozen ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) events with energy ≳ 55 EeV detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) from the direction of Centaurus-A, the nearest radio galaxy, supports the scenario of UHECR acceleration in the jets of radio galaxies. In this work, we model radio to very high energy (VHE,≳ 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from Cen A, including GeV hardness detected by Fermi-LAT and TeV emission detected by HESS. We consider two scenarios: (i) Two zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) and external-Compton (EC) models, (ii) Two zone SSC, EC and photo-hadronic emission from cosmic ray interactions. The GeV hardness observed by Fermi-LAT can be explained using these two scenarios, where zone 2 EC emission is very important. Hadronic emission in scenario (ii) can explain VHE data with the same spectral slope as obtained through fitting UHECRs from Cen A. The peak luminosity in cosmic ray proton at 1 TeV, to explain the VHE γ-ray data is ≈2.5 × 1046 erg/s. The bolometric luminosity in cosmic ray protons is consistent with the luminosity required to explain the origin of 13 UHECR signal events that are correlated with Cen A.

  19. Cosmic Ray Acceleration by a Versatile Family of Galactic Wind Termination Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustard, Chad; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cotter, Cory, E-mail: bustard@wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    There are two distinct breaks in the cosmic ray (CR) spectrum: the so-called “knee” around 3 × 10{sup 15} eV and the so-called “ankle” around 10{sup 18} eV. Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at supernova remnant (SNR) shock fronts is thought to accelerate galactic CRs to energies below the knee, while an extragalactic origin is presumed for CRs with energies beyond the ankle. CRs with energies between 3 × 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 18} eV, which we dub the “shin,” have an unknown origin. It has been proposed that DSA at galactic wind termination shocks, rather than at SNR shocks, may accelerate CRs to these energies. This paper uses the galactic wind model of Bustard et al. to analyze whether galactic wind termination shocks may accelerate CRs to shin energies within a reasonable acceleration time and whether such CRs can subsequently diffuse back to the Galaxy. We argue for acceleration times on the order of 100 Myr rather than a few billion years, as assumed in some previous works, and we discuss prospects for magnetic field amplification at the shock front. Ultimately, we generously assume that the magnetic field is amplified to equipartition. This formalism allows us to obtain analytic formulae, applicable to any wind model, for CR acceleration. Even with generous assumptions, we find that very high wind velocities are required to set up the necessary conditions for acceleration beyond 10{sup 17} eV. We also estimate the luminosities of CRs accelerated by outflow termination shocks, including estimates for the Milky Way wind.

  20. Particle injection and cosmic ray acceleration at collisionless parallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quest, K.B.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of collisionless parallel shocks is studied using one-dimensional hybrid simulations, with emphasis on particle injection into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. It is argued that for sufficiently high Mach number shocks, and in the absence of wave turbulence, the fluid firehose marginal stability condition will be exceeded at the interface between the upstream, unshocked, plasma and the heated plasma downstream. As a consequence, nonlinear, low-frequency, electromagnetic waves are generated and act to slow the plasma and provide dissipation for the shock. It is shown that large amplitude waves at the shock ramp scatter a small fraction of the upstream ions back into the upstream medium. These ions, in turn, resonantly generate the electromagnetic waves that are swept back into the shock. As these waves propagate through the shock they are compressed and amplified, allowing them to non-resonantly scatter the bulk of the plasma. Moreover, the compressed waves back-scatter a small fraction of the upstream ions, maintaining the shock structure in a quasi-steady state. The back-scattered ions are accelerated during the wave generation process to 2 to 4 times the ram energy and provide a likely seed population for cosmic rays. 49 refs., 7 figs

  1. Implications of accelerator experiments for models of the Kolar Gold Mine particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, K V.L. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India); Wolfenstein, L [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1976-03-01

    The significance of accelerator searches for the new particles discovered in the Kolar Gold Mine experiments depends on the characteristics of the models of these particles. Models that could give cosmic ray neutrinos a great advantage over accelerator neutrinos are presented. The new particles should be produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams, but the cross-section is model dependent.

  2. ELECTRON ACCELERATION IN PULSAR-WIND TERMINATION SHOCKS: AN APPLICATION TO THE CRAB NEBULA GAMMA-RAY FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Dermer, Charles D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States); Finke, Justin D., E-mail: jkroon@gmu.edu, E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu, E-mail: charlesdermer@outlook.com, E-mail: justin.finke@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The γ -ray flares from the Crab Nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi -LAT reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the standard models for particle acceleration in pulsar-wind nebulae because the radiating electrons have energies exceeding the classical radiation-reaction limit for synchrotron. Previous modeling has suggested that the synchrotron limit can be exceeded if the electrons experience electrostatic acceleration, but the resulting spectra do not agree very well with the data. As a result, there are still some important unanswered questions about the detailed particle acceleration and emission processes occurring during the flares. We revisit the problem using a new analytical approach based on an electron transport equation that includes terms describing electrostatic acceleration, stochastic wave-particle acceleration, shock acceleration, synchrotron losses, and particle escape. An exact solution is obtained for the electron distribution, which is used to compute the associated γ -ray synchrotron spectrum. We find that in our model the γ -ray flares are mainly powered by electrostatic acceleration, but the contributions from stochastic and shock acceleration play an important role in producing the observed spectral shapes. Our model can reproduce the spectra of all the Fermi -LAT and AGILE flares from the Crab Nebula, using magnetic field strengths in agreement with the multi-wavelength observational constraints. We also compute the spectrum and duration of the synchrotron afterglow created by the accelerated electrons, after they escape into the region on the downstream side of the pulsar-wind termination shock. The afterglow is expected to fade over a maximum period of about three weeks after the γ -ray flare.

  3. ENTROPY AT THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AS IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMOLOGICAL COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Recently, gas entropy at the outskirts of galaxy clusters has attracted much attention. We propose that the entropy profiles could be used to study cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration around the clusters. If the CRs are effectively accelerated at the formation of clusters, the kinetic energy of infalling gas is consumed by the acceleration and the gas entropy should decrease. As a result, the entropy profiles become flat at the outskirts. If the acceleration is not efficient, the entropy should continue to increase outward. By comparing model predictions with X-ray observations with Suzaku, which show flat entropy profiles, we find that the CRs have carried ∼< 7% of the kinetic energy of the gas away from the clusters. Moreover, the CR pressure at the outskirts can be ∼< 40% of the total pressure. On the other hand, if the entropy profiles are not flat at the outskirts, as indicated by combined Plank and ROSAT observations, the carried energy and the CR pressure should be much smaller than the above estimations.

  4. Normalization of Gravitational Acceleration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Randy A.; Brown, Aaron J.; Adamo, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the uniform density spherical shell approximations of Newton, the con- sequence of spaceflight in the real universe is that gravitational fields are sensitive to the nonsphericity of their generating central bodies. The gravitational potential of a nonspherical central body is typically resolved using spherical harmonic approximations. However, attempting to directly calculate the spherical harmonic approximations results in at least two singularities which must be removed in order to generalize the method and solve for any possible orbit, including polar orbits. Three unique algorithms have been developed to eliminate these singularities by Samuel Pines [1], Bill Lear [2], and Robert Gottlieb [3]. This paper documents the methodical normalization of two1 of the three known formulations for singularity-free gravitational acceleration (namely, the Lear [2] and Gottlieb [3] algorithms) and formulates a general method for defining normalization parameters used to generate normalized Legendre Polynomials and ALFs for any algorithm. A treatment of the conventional formulation of the gravitational potential and acceleration is also provided, in addition to a brief overview of the philosophical differences between the three known singularity-free algorithms.

  5. Accelerated Aging Test for Plastic Scintillator Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS), collectively referred to as “plastic scintillator,” are synthetic polymer materials used to detect gamma radiation, and are commonly used in instrumentation. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator undergoes an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in gamma ray sensitivity has been seen in some detectors in systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. It has been demonstrated that exposure of plastic scintillator in an environmental chamber to 30 days of high temperature and humidity (90% relative humidity and 55°C) followed by a single cycle to cold temperature (-30°C) will produce severe fogging in all PVT samples. This thermal cycle will be referred to as the “Accelerated Aging Test.” This document describes the procedure for performing this Accelerated Aging Test.

  6. Future X-ray Polarimetry of Relativistic Accelerators: Pulsar Wind Nebulae and Supernova Remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Bucciantini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Supernova remnants (SNRs and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNs are among the most significant sources of non-thermal X-rays in the sky, and the best means by which relativistic plasma dynamics and particle acceleration can be investigated. Being strong synchrotron emitters, they are ideal candidates for X-ray polarimetry, and indeed the Crab nebula is up to present the only object where X-ray polarization has been detected with a high level of significance. Future polarimetric measures will likely provide us with crucial information on the level of turbulence that is expected at particle acceleration sites, together with the spatial and temporal coherence of magnetic field geometry, enabling us to set stronger constraints on our acceleration models. PWNs will also allow us to estimate the level of internal dissipation. I will briefly review the current knowledge on the polarization signatures in SNRs and PWNs, and I will illustrate what we can hope to achieve with future missions such as IXPE/XIPE.

  7. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Constraining the accelerated proton spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David; Dunphy, Philip P.; Mackinnon, Alexander L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a multi-component model to describe the gamma-ray emission, we investigate the flares of December 16, 1988 and March 6, 1989 which exhibited unambiguous evidence of neutral pion decay. The observations are then combined with theoretical calculations of pion production to constrain the accelerated proton spectra. The detection of pi(sup 0) emission alone can indicate much about the energy distribution and spectral variation of the protons accelerated to pion producing energies. Here both the intensity and detailed spectral shape of the Doppler-broadened pi(sup 0) decay feature are used to determine the spectral form of the accelerated proton energy distribution. The Doppler width of this gamma-ray emission provides a unique diagnostic of the spectral shape at high energies, independent of any normalisation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this diagnostic has been used to constrain the proton spectra. The form of the energetic proton distribution is found to be severely limited by the observed intensity and Doppler width of the pi(sup 0) decay emission, demonstrating effectively the diagnostic capabilities of the pi(sup 0) decay gamma-rays. The spectral index derived from the gamma-ray intensity is found to be much harder than that derived from the Doppler width. To reconcile this apparent discrepancy we investigate the effects of introducing a high-energy cut-off in the accelerated proton distribution. With cut-off energies of around 0.5-0.8 GeV and relatively hard spectra, the observed intensities and broadening can be reproduced with a single energetic proton distribution above the pion production threshold.

  8. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES ESCAPING A SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of gamma-ray emission from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) originating from the explosions of massive young stars. The fast forward shock of the supernova remnant (SNR) can accelerate particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in a cavern blown by a strong, pre-SN stellar wind. As a fundamental part of nonlinear DSA, some fraction of the accelerated particles escape the shock and interact with a surrounding massive dense shell producing hard photon emission. To calculate this emission, we have developed a new Monte Carlo technique for propagating the cosmic rays (CRs) produced by the forward shock of the SNR, into the dense, external material. This technique is incorporated in a hydrodynamic model of an evolving SNR which includes the nonlinear feedback of CRs on the SNR evolution, the production of escaping CRs along with those that remain trapped within the remnant, and the broadband emission of radiation from trapped and escaping CRs. While our combined CR-hydro-escape model is quite general and applies to both core collapse and thermonuclear SNe, the parameters we choose for our discussion here are more typical of SNRs from very massive stars whose emission spectra differ somewhat from those produced by lower mass progenitors directly interacting with a molecular cloud.

  9. Cosmic-ray acceleration and gamma-ray signals from radio supernovæ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcowith, A.; Renaud, M. [Laboratoire Univers et particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II/CNRS, place E. Bataillon, cc072, 34095 Montpellier (France); Dwarkadas, V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States); Tatischeff, V. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, IN2P3/CNRS and Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-11-15

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) are among the most extreme events in the universe. The are known to harbor among the fastest (but non- or midly-relativistic) shock waves. Once it has crossed the stellar atmosphere, the SN blast wave expands in the wind of the massive star progenitor. In type IIb SNe, the progenitor is likely a Red SuperGiant (RSG) star which has a large mass loss rate and a slow stellar wind producing a very dense circumstellar medium. A high velocity shock and a high density medium are both key ingredients to initiate fast particle acceleration, and fast growing instabilities driven by the acceleration process itself. We have reanalyzed the efficiency of particle acceleration at the forward shock right after the SN outburst for the particular case of the well-known SN 1993J. We find that plasma instabilities driven by the energetic particles accelerated at the shock front grow over intraday timescales. This growth, and the interplay of non-linear process, permit a fast amplification of the magnetic field at the shock, that can explain the magnetic field strengths deduced from the radio monitoring of the source. The maximum particle energy is found to reach 1–10 PeV depending on the instability dominating the amplification process. We derive the time dependent particle spectra and the associated hadronic signatures of secondary particles (gamma-ray, leptons and neutrinos) arising from proton proton interactions. We find that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) should easily detect objects like SN 1993J in particular above 1 TeV, while current generation of Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. could only marginaly detect such events. The gamma-ray signal is found to be heavily absorbed by pair production process during the first week after the outburst. We predict a low neutrino flux above 10 TeV, implying a detectability horizon with a KM3NeT-type telescope of 1 Mpc only. We finally discuss the essential parameters that control the particle

  10. Compact X-ray source at STF (Super Conducting Accelerator Test Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakawa, J

    2012-01-01

    KEK-STF is a super conducting linear accelerator test facility for developing accelerator technologies for the ILC (International Linear Collider). We are supported in developing advanced accelerator technologies using STF by Japanese Ministry (MEXT) for Compact high brightness X-ray source development. Since we are required to demonstrate the generation of high brightness X-ray based on inverse Compton scattering using super conducting linear accelerator and laser storage cavity technologies by October of next year (2012), the design has been fixed and the installation of accelerator components is under way. The necessary technology developments and the planned experiment are explained.

  11. Acceleration transforms and statistical kinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LuValle, M.J.; Welsher, T.L.; Svoboda, K.

    1988-01-01

    For a restricted class of problems a mathematical model of microscopic degradation processes, statistical kinetics, is developed and linked through acceleration transforms to the information which can be obtained from a system in which the only observable sign of degradation is sudden and catastrophic failure. The acceleration transforms were developed in accelerated life testing applications as a tool for extrapolating from the observable results of an accelerated life test to the dynamics of the underlying degradation processes. A particular concern of a physicist attempting to interpreted the results of an analysis based on acceleration transforms is determining the physical species involved in the degradation process. These species may be (a) relatively abundant or (b) relatively rare. The main results of this paper are a theorem showing that for an important subclass of statistical kinetic models, acceleration transforms cannot be used to distinguish between cases a and b, and an example showing that in some cases falling outside the restrictions of the theorem, cases a and b can be distinguished by their acceleration transforms

  12. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0±0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be γ e / γ i = (0.5±0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A 1g mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase and its development for excitations close to the

  13. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  14. Electron Acceleration by Stochastic Electric Fields in Thunderstorms: Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnussirat, S.; Miller, J. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic pulses of photons, which are intense and short, originating in the atmosphere during thunderstorm activity. Despite the number of observations, the production mechanism(s) of TGFs and other energetic particles is not well understood. However, two mechanisms have been suggested as a source of TGFs: (1) the relativistic runaway electron avalanche mechanism (RREA), and (2) the lightning leader mechanism. The RREA can account for the TGF observations, but requires restrictive or unrealistic assumptions. The lightning leader channel is also expected to produce runaway electrons, but through inhomogeneous, small scale, strong electric fields. In this work we use the Boltzmann equation to model the electron acceleration by the lightning leader mechanism, and we derive the gamma-ray spectrum from the electron distribution function. The electric fields at the tip of the leaders are assumed to be stochastic in space and time. Since the physics involved in the lightening leader is not known, we test different cases of the stochastic acceleration agent. From this modeling we hope to investigate the possibility and efficiency of stochastic acceleration in thunderstorm.

  15. Synergia CUDA: GPU-accelerated accelerator modeling package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Q; Amundson, J

    2014-01-01

    Synergia is a parallel, 3-dimensional space-charge particle-in-cell accelerator modeling code. We present our work porting the purely MPI-based version of the code to a hybrid of CPU and GPU computing kernels. The hybrid code uses the CUDA platform in the same framework as the pure MPI solution. We have implemented a lock-free collaborative charge-deposition algorithm for the GPU, as well as other optimizations, including local communication avoidance for GPUs, a customized FFT, and fine-tuned memory access patterns. On a small GPU cluster (up to 4 Tesla C1070 GPUs), our benchmarks exhibit both superior peak performance and better scaling than a CPU cluster with 16 nodes and 128 cores. We also compare the code performance on different GPU architectures, including C1070 Tesla and K20 Kepler.

  16. Can diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants account for high-energy galactic cosmic rays?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillas, A M

    2005-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration at the outer front of expanding supernova remnants has provided by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays, and has been the subject of intensive theoretical investigation. But several problems loomed at high energies-how to explain the smooth continuation of the cosmic-ray spectrum far beyond 10 14 eV, the very low level of TeV gamma-ray emission from several supernova remnants, and the very low anisotropy of cosmic rays (seeming to conflict with the short trapping times needed to convert a E -2 source spectrum into the observed E -2.7 spectrum of cosmic rays). However, recent work on the cosmic ray spectrum (especially at KASCADE) strongly indicates that about half of the flux does turn down rather sharply near 3 x 10 15 V rigidity, with a distinct tail extending to just beyond 10 17 V rigidity; whilst a plausible description (Bell and Lucek) of the level of self-generated magnetic fields at the shock fronts of young supernova remnants implies that many SNRs in varying environments might very well generate spectra extending smoothly to just this 'knee' position, and a portion of the exploding red supergiants could extend the spectrum approximately as needed. At low energies, recent progress in relating cosmic ray compositional details to modified shock structure also adds weight to the belief that the model is working on the right lines, converting energy into cosmic rays very efficiently where injection can occur. The low level of TeV gamma-ray flux from many young SNRs is a serious challenge, though it may relate to variations in particle injection efficiency with time. The clear detection of TeV gamma rays from SNRs has now just begun, and predictions of a characteristic curved particle spectrum give a target for new tests by TeV observations. However, the isotropy seriously challenges the assumed cosmic-ray trapping time and hence the shape of the spectrum of particles released from SNRs. There is

  17. Current Sheets in Pulsar Magnetospheres and Winds: Particle Acceleration and Pulsed Gamma Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, Jonathan

    The research proposed addresses understanding of the origin of non-thermal energy in the Universe, a subject beginning with the discovery of Cosmic Rays and continues, including the study of relativistic compact objects - neutron stars and black holes. Observed Rotation Powered Pulsars (RPPs) have rotational energy loss implying they have TeraGauss magnetic fields and electric potentials as large as 40 PetaVolts. The rotational energy lost is reprocessed into particles which manifest themselves in high energy gamma ray photon emission (GeV to TeV). Observations of pulsars from the FERMI Gamma Ray Observatory, launched into orbit in 2008, have revealed 130 of these stars (and still counting), thus demonstrating the presence of efficient cosmic accelerators within the strongly magnetized regions surrounding the rotating neutron stars. Understanding the physics of these and other Cosmic Accelerators is a major goal of astrophysical research. A new model for particle acceleration in the current sheets separating the closed and open field line regions of pulsars' magnetospheres, and separating regions of opposite magnetization in the relativistic winds emerging from those magnetopsheres, will be developed. The currents established in recent global models of the magnetosphere will be used as input to a magnetic field aligned acceleration model that takes account of the current carrying particles' inertia, generalizing models of the terrestrial aurora to the relativistic regime. The results will be applied to the spectacular new results from the FERMI gamma ray observatory on gamma ray pulsars, to probe the physics of the generation of the relativistic wind that carries rotational energy away from the compact stars, illuminating the whole problem of how compact objects can energize their surroundings. The work to be performed if this proposal is funded involves extending and developing concepts from plasma physics on dissipation of magnetic energy in thin sheets of

  18. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-01

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  19. The collective acceleration mechanism of solar cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    The collective acceleration mechanism of protons and nuclei in solar flares, which lies in the fact that nuclei are trapped by electron bunches moving along the opened lines of force of the decreasing magnetic field of solar sports, is discussed. The proposed mechanism explains in a natural way the electron and nucleus energy ratio observed during flares. Electron acceleration in the current layers up to energies of the order of a MeV is discussed as a mechanism of electron pulsed injection. The collective acceleration mechanism can be realized at a comparatively small density of accelerated electrons nsub(e) approximately equal to 10 2 10 4 cm -3

  20. Transient accelerating scalar models with exponential potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wen-Ping; Zhang Yang; Fu Zheng-Wen

    2013-01-01

    We study a known class of scalar dark energy models in which the potential has an exponential term and the current accelerating era is transient. We find that, although a decelerating era will return in the future, when extrapolating the model back to earlier stages (z ≳ 4), scalar dark energy becomes dominant over matter. So these models do not have the desired tracking behavior, and the predicted transient period of acceleration cannot be adopted into the standard scenario of the Big Bang cosmology. When couplings between the scalar field and matter are introduced, the models still have the same problem; only the time when deceleration returns will be varied. To achieve re-deceleration, one has to turn to alternative models that are consistent with the standard Big Bang scenario.

  1. A Qualitative Acceleration Model Based on Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester MARTINEZ-MARTIN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the way to autonomous service robots, spatial reasoning plays a main role since it properly deals with problems involving uncertainty. In particular, we are interested in knowing people's pose to avoid collisions. With that aim, in this paper, we present a qualitative acceleration model for robotic applications including representation, reasoning and a practical application.

  2. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  3. Effect of X-ray suppression system upon parameters of electrostatic accelerator ion beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Ignat'ev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study results are presented for a beam profile and emittance of an electrostatic accelerator “Sokol” before and after being equipped with magnet X-ray suppression system.

  4. Development of an accelerator for X-ray inspection apparatus with high clairvoyance

    CERN Document Server

    Onishi, T

    2002-01-01

    At present, there is no portable X-ray generator usable for non-destructive inspection of thick concretes used for bridges, and so on. To enable on non-destructive inspection of such thick concrete materials with more than 300 mm in thickness, authors developed a new small size accelerator with same acceleration principle as that of betatron. And, the authors also developed two types of new induction accelerators such as 'spiral orbit type' and 'cylindrical type'. Furthermore, development of a detector with excellent sensitivity to X-ray with wavelength suitable for inspection and software for image processing are planned. Here was described acceleration principles of new accelerators, test results on prototypes of the accelerators, and development states on field emission array considering new electron gun alternating thermal one and cold cathode type electron gun using carbon nano-tubes. (G.K.)

  5. Modeling accelerator structures and RF components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K., Ng, C.K.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1993-03-01

    Computer modeling has become an integral part of the design and analysis of accelerator structures RF components. Sophisticated 3D codes, powerful workstations and timely theory support all contributed to this development. We will describe our modeling experience with these resources and discuss their impact on ongoing work at SLAC. Specific examples from R ampersand D on a future linear collide and a proposed e + e - storage ring will be included

  6. Flash X-Ray (FXR) Accelerator Optimization Electronic Time-Resolved Measurement of X-Ray Source Size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P

    2005-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating various approaches to minimize the x-ray source size on the Flash X-Ray (FXR) linear induction accelerator in order to improve x-ray flux and increase resolution for hydrodynamic radiography experiments. In order to effectively gauge improvements to final x-ray source size, a fast, robust, and accurate system for measuring the spot size is required. Timely feedback on x-ray source size allows new and improved accelerator tunes to be deployed and optimized within the limited run-time constraints of a production facility with a busy experimental schedule; in addition, time-resolved measurement capability allows the investigation of not only the time-averaged source size, but also the evolution of the source size, centroid position, and x-ray dose throughout the 70 ns beam pulse. Combined with time-resolved measurements of electron beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and current, key limiting factors can be identified, modeled, and optimized for the best possible spot size. Roll-bar techniques are a widely used method for x-ray source size measurement, and have been the method of choice at FXR for many years. A thick bar of tungsten or other dense metal with a sharp edge is inserted into the path of the x-ray beam so as to heavily attenuate the lower half of the beam, resulting in a half-light, half-dark image as seen downstream of the roll-bar; by measuring the width of the transition from light to dark across the edge of the roll-bar, the source size can be deduced. For many years, film has been the imaging medium of choice for roll-bar measurements thanks to its high resolution, linear response, and excellent contrast ratio. Film measurements, however, are fairly cumbersome and require considerable setup and analysis time; moreover, with the continuing trend towards all-electronic measurement systems, film is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive to procure. Here, we shall

  7. Particle acceleration in explosive relativistic reconnection events and Crab Nebula gamma-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2018-04-01

    We develop a model of gamma-ray flares of the Crab Nebula resulting from the magnetic reconnection events in a highly magnetised relativistic plasma. We first discuss physical parameters of the Crab Nebula and review the theory of pulsar winds and termination shocks. We also review the principle points of particle acceleration in explosive reconnection events [Lyutikov et al., J. Plasma Phys., vol. 83(6), p. 635830601 (2017a); J. Plasma Phys., vol. 83(6), p. 635830602 (2017b)]. It is required that particles producing flares are accelerated in highly magnetised regions of the nebula. Flares originate from the poleward regions at the base of the Crab's polar outflow, where both the magnetisation and the magnetic field strength are sufficiently high. The post-termination shock flow develops macroscopic (not related to the plasma properties on the skin-depth scale) kink-type instabilities. The resulting large-scale magnetic stresses drive explosive reconnection events on the light-crossing time of the reconnection region. Flares are produced at the initial stage of the current sheet development, during the X-point collapse. The model has all the ingredients needed for Crab flares: natural formation of highly magnetised regions, explosive dynamics on the light travel time, development of high electric fields on macroscopic scales and acceleration of particles to energies well exceeding the average magnetic energy per particle.

  8. Constraining sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and shear acceleration mechanism of particles in relativistic jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruoyu

    2015-06-10

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are extreme energetic particles from outer space. They have aroused great interest among scientists for more than fifty years. However, due to the rarity of the events and complexity of the process of their propagation to Earth, they are still one of the biggest puzzles in modern high energy astrophysics. This dissertation is dedicated to study the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from various aspects. Firstly, we discuss a possible link between recently discovered sub-PeV/PeV neutrinos and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. If these two kinds of particles share the same origin, the observation of neutrinos may provide additional and non-trivial constraints on the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. Secondly, we jointly employ the chemical composition measurement and the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, and find a robust upper limit for distances of sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above ∝55 EeV, as well as a lower limit for their metallicities. Finally, we study the shear acceleration mechanism in relativistic jets, which is a more efficient mechanism for the acceleration of higher energy particle. We compute the acceleration efficiency and the time-dependent particle energy spectrum, and explore the feature of synchrotron radiation of the accelerated particles. The possible realizations of this mechanism for acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in different astrophysical environments is also discussed.

  9. From laser-plasma accelerators to femtosecond X-ray sources: study, development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corde, S.

    2012-01-01

    During the relativistic interaction between a short and intense laser pulse and an underdense plasma, electrons can be injected and accelerated up to hundreds of MeV in an accelerating structure formed in the wake of the pulse: this is the so-called laser-plasma accelerator. One of the major perspectives for laser-plasma accelerators resides in the realization of compact sources of femtosecond x-ray beams. In this thesis, two x-ray sources was studied and developed. The betatron radiation, intrinsic to laser-plasma accelerators, comes from the transverse oscillations of electrons during their acceleration. Its characterization by photon counting revealed an x-ray beam containing 10"9 photons, with energies extending above 10 keV. We also developed an all-optical Compton source producing photons with energies up to hundreds of keV, based on the collision between a photon beam and an electron beam. The potential of these x-ray sources was highlighted by the realization of single shot phase contrast imaging of a biological sample. Then, we showed that the betatron x-ray radiation can be a powerful tool to study the physics of laser-plasma acceleration. We demonstrated the possibility to map the x-ray emission region, which gives a unique insight into the interaction, permitting us for example to locate the region where electrons are injected. The x-ray angular and spectral properties allow us to gain information on the transverse dynamics of electrons during their acceleration. (author)

  10. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  11. Application of PIN photodiodes on the detection of X-rays generated in an electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon-Contreras, L.; Ramirez-Jimenez, F.J.; Garcia-Hernandez, J.M.; Torres-Bribiesca, M.A.; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Aguilera-Reyes, E.F.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Lopez-Valdivia, H.; Carrasco-Abrego, H.

    2009-01-01

    PIN photodiodes are used in a novel application for the determination, within the energy range from 90 to 485 keV, of the intensity of X-rays generated by an experimental electron accelerator. An easily assembled X-ray monitor has been built with a low-cost PIN photodiode and operational amplifiers. The output voltage signal obtained from this device can be related to the electron beam current and the accelerating voltage of the accelerator in order to estimate the dose rate delivered by bremsstrahlung.

  12. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification.The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations.Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  13. Hard X-ray Emission and Efficient Particle Acceleration by Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the non-thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants. Over the last decade it has become clear from both X-ray and γ-ray observations that young supernovae accelerate particles up to 100 TeV. In soft X-rays the accelerated >10 TeV electrons produce synchrotron radiation, coming from narrow filaments located at the shock fronts. The width of these filaments shows that the magnetic fields are relatively high, thus providing evidence for magnetic field amplification. The synchrotron radiation of several remnants is known to extend into the hard X-ray regime. In particular Cas A, has a spectrum that appears as a power law up to almost 100 TeV. This is very surprising, as a steepening is expected going from the soft to the hard X-ray band. The spectrum is likely a result of many superimposed individual spectra, each steepening at different energies. This implies considerable spatial variation in hard X-rays, an obvious target for Simbol-X. The variations will be important to infer local shock acceleration properties, but also magnetic field fluctuations may cause spatial and temporal variations. Finally, I draw the attention to super bubbles and supernovae as sources of cosmic rays. As such they may be sources of hard X-ray emission. In particular, supernovae exploding inside the dense red supergiants winds of their progenitors ares promising candidates for hard X-ray emission.

  14. Restriction of cosmic-ray acceleration, mechanisms by high-energy Be7/Be data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, C.D.; Buffington, A.; Mast, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    New high-energy cosmic-ray Be data indicate that the ratio Be 7 /Be drops by approximately a factor of two between 200 and 1500 MeV/nucleon. This result may provide a severe constraint for theories of cosmic-ray acceleration

  15. Online modeling of the Fermilab accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, Elliott S.; Michelotti, Leo; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois

    2001-01-01

    We have implemented access to beam physics models of the Fermilab accelerators and beamlines through the Fermilab control system. The models run on Unix workstations, communicating with legacy controls software through a front end redirection mechanism (the open access server), a relational database and a simple text-based protocol over TCP/IP. The clients and the server are implemented in object-oriented C++. We discuss limitations of our approach and the difficulties that arise from it. Some of the obstacles may be overcome by introducing a new layer of abstraction. To maintain compatibility with the next generation of accelerator control software currently under development at the laboratory, this layer would be implemented in Java. We discuss the implications of that choice

  16. Modernization of electron accelerator on the base of the RUP-400 x-ray unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buslaev, I.I.; Kon'kov, N.G.; Kochetov, O.N.; Krylov, S.Yu.; Nikolaev, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    A device has been designed enabling one to change directly from the control panel relation of high to low energy electrons in the beam with a view to up-date a linear electron accelerator. The device comprises a high-voltage transformer accommodating an accelerating tube of the vacuum system with a titanium pump and a scanner. 1.5 BPV-2-400 X-ray tube with a renewable cathode is used as an accelerating tube. As a result of these modifications the accelerator has become smaller and not so heavy. Its characteristics on material irradiation have also improved

  17. Development of accelerator-based γ-ray-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, F.A.; Wells, D.P.; Harmon, J. F.; Williams, J.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerator-based γ-ray-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy performs positron annihilation spectroscopy by utilizing MeV bremsstrahlung radiation generated from an accelerator (We have named the technique 'accelerator-based γ-ray-induced PAS', even though 'bremsstrahlung' is more correct here than 'γ rays'. The reason for that is to make the name of the technique more general, since PAS may be performed by utilizing MeV γ rays emitted from nuclei through the use of accelerators as described later in this article and as in the case of positron lifetime spectroscopy [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, and J.F. Harmon, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 033905 (2005)].) instead of using positrons from radioactive sources or positron beams. MeV γ rays create positrons inside the materials by pair production. The induced positrons annihilate with the material electrons emitting a 511-keV annihilation radiation. Doppler broadening spectroscopy of the 511-keV radiation provides information about open-volume defects and plastic deformation in solids. The high penetration of MeV γ rays allows probing of defects at high depths in thick materials up to several centimeters, which is not possible with most of the current nondestructive techniques. In this article, a detailed description of the technique will be presented, including its benefits and limitations relative to the other nondestructive methods. Its application on the investigation of plastic deformation in thick steel alloys will be shown

  18. Accelerated gradient methods for the x-ray imaging of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonettini, S.; Prato, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present new optimization strategies for the reconstruction of x-ray images of solar flares by means of the data collected by the Reuven Ramaty high energy solar spectroscopic imager. The imaging concept of the satellite is based on rotating modulation collimator instruments, which allow the use of both Fourier imaging approaches and reconstruction techniques based on the straightforward inversion of the modulated count profiles. Although in the last decade, greater attention has been devoted to the former strategies due to their very limited computational cost, here we consider the latter model and investigate the effectiveness of different accelerated gradient methods for the solution of the corresponding constrained minimization problem. Moreover, regularization is introduced through either an early stopping of the iterative procedure, or a Tikhonov term added to the discrepancy function by means of a discrepancy principle accounting for the Poisson nature of the noise affecting the data.

  19. Computational needs for modelling accelerator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanerfeld, H.

    1985-06-01

    The particle-in-cell MASK is being used to model several different electron accelerator components. These studies are being used both to design new devices and to understand particle behavior within existing structures. Studies include the injector for the Stanford Linear Collider and the 50 megawatt klystron currently being built at SLAC. MASK is a 2D electromagnetic code which is being used by SLAC both on our own IBM 3081 and on the CRAY X-MP at the NMFECC. Our experience with running MASK illustrates the need for supercomputers to continue work of the kind described. 3 refs., 2 figs

  20. Non-thermal emission from young supernova remnants: Implications on cosmic ray acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya-Arguedas, Miguel A.

    For a long time, supernova remnants have been thought to constitute the main source of galactic cosmic rays. Plausible mechanisms have been proposed through which these objects would be able to transfer some of their energy to charged particles. Detailed studies of SNRs, particularly allowed by the spectral and spatial resolution obtained with telescopes such as the Chandra X-Ray Observatory , have permitted us to understand some of the properties of high-energy particles within these objects and their interactions with their environment. In the first part of this work, the basic concepts of particle acceleration in SNRs are outlined, and the main observational tools available today for studying high-energy phenomena in astrophysics are mentioned briefly. In the second part, a study of non-thermal emission from the young SNR Cassiopeia A is presented. Through the use of a very deep one million-second Chandra observation of this remnant, the spectral evolution across non-thermal filaments near the forward shock was studied. A consistent hardening of the spectrum towards the exterior of the remnant was found and explained via a model developed that takes into account particle diffusion, plasma advection and radiation losses. The role of particle diffusion was studied and its effect on the photon spectral index quantified. In the model, the diffusion is included as a fraction of Bohm-type diffusion, which is consistent with the data. The model also allowed an estimation of the electron distribution, the magnetic field and its orientation, as well as the level of magnetic turbulence. In the third part, a multi-wavelength study of two young SNRs is presented. Multi-wavelength modeling of spectral energy distributions (SED) may hold the key to disentangle the nature and content of cosmic rays within these objects. The first model shown presents state of the art measurements gathered for Cassiopeia A, and the modeling is based partly on the results presented in the second

  1. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10 18 eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10 20 eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10 15 . Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found

  2. Generation of mesoscale magnetic fields and the dynamics of Cosmic Ray acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    The problem of the cosmic ray origin is discussed in connection with their acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is reviewed and its potential to accelerate particles to the maximum energy of (presumably) galactic cosmic rays (1018eV ) is considered. It is argued that to reach such energies, a strong magnetic field at scales larger than the particle gyroradius must be created as a result of the acceleration process, itself. One specific mechanism suggested here is based on the generation of Alfven wave at the gyroradius scale with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven waves. The generation mechanism is modulational instability of CR generated Alfven wave packets induced, in turn, by scattering off acoustic fluctuations in the shock precursor which are generated by Drury instability.

  3. Acceleration and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays represents one of the most conspicuous enigmas of modern astrophysics, in spite of gigantic experimental efforts in the past fifty years, and of active theoretical research. The past decade has known exciting experimental results, most particularly the detection of a cut-off at the expected position for the long sought Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin suppression as well as evidence for large scale anisotropies. This paper summarizes and discusses recent achievements in this field.

  4. Acceleration and propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Martin

    2013-02-01

    The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays represents one of the most conspicuous enigmas of modern astrophysics, in spite of gigantic experimental efforts in the past fifty years, and of active theoretical research. The past decade has known exciting experimental results, most particularly the detection of a cut-off at the expected position for the long sought Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin suppression as well as evidence for large scale anisotropies. This paper summarizes and discusses recent achievements in this field.

  5. Gamma rays and neutrinos from the Crab Nebula produced by pulsar accelerated nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarek, W.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of the acceleration of heavy nuclei (e.g. iron nuclei) by the Crab pulsar. Accelerated nuclei can photodisintegrate in collisions with soft photons produced in the pulsar's outer gap, injecting energetic neutrons which decay either inside or outside the Crab Nebula. The protons from neutron decay inside the nebula are trapped by the Crab Nebula magnetic field, and accumulate inside the nebula producing gamma-rays and neutrinos in collisions with the matter in t...

  6. Linear accelerator modeling: development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.; Jule, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the parameters of a modern linear accelerator can be selected by simulating the desired machine characteristics in a computer code and observing how the parameters affect the beam dynamics. The code PARMILA is used at LAMPF for the low-energy portion of linacs. Collections of particles can be traced with a free choice of input distributions in six-dimensional phase space. Random errors are often included in order to study the tolerances which should be imposed during manufacture or in operation. An outline is given of the modifications made to the model, the results of experiments which indicate the validity of the model, and the use of the model to optimize the longitudinal tuning of the Alvarez linac

  7. CUDA-Accelerated Geodesic Ray-Tracing for Fiber Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert van Aart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI allows to noninvasively measure the diffusion of water in fibrous tissue. By reconstructing the fibers from DTI data using a fiber-tracking algorithm, we can deduce the structure of the tissue. In this paper, we outline an approach to accelerating such a fiber-tracking algorithm using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. This algorithm, which is based on the calculation of geodesics, has shown promising results for both synthetic and real data, but is limited in its applicability by its high computational requirements. We present a solution which uses the parallelism offered by modern GPUs, in combination with the CUDA platform by NVIDIA, to significantly reduce the execution time of the fiber-tracking algorithm. Compared to a multithreaded CPU implementation of the same algorithm, our GPU mapping achieves a speedup factor of up to 40 times.

  8. VELOCIRAPTOR: An X-band photoinjector and linear accelerator for the production of Mono-Energetic {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.G., E-mail: anderson131@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Albert, F.; Bayramian, A.J.; Beer, G.; Bonanno, R.E.; Cross, R.R.; Deis, G.; Ebbers, C.A.; Gibson, D.J.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; Marsh, R.A.; McNabb, D.P.; Messerly, M.J.; Scarpetti, R.D.; Shverdin, M.Y.; Siders, C.W.; Wu, S.S.; Barty, C.P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Adolphsen, C.E. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); and others

    2011-11-21

    The rf photoinjector and linear accelerator in the Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) facility at LLNL is presented. This machine uses 11.4 GHz rf technology to accelerate a high-brightness electron beam up to 250 MeV to produce MeV {gamma}-rays through Compton scattering with a Joule-class laser pulse. Compton scattering-based generation of high flux, narrow bandwidth {gamma}-rays places stringent requirements on the performance of the accelerator. The component parts of the accelerator are presented and their requirements described. Simulations of expected electron beam parameters and the resulting light source properties are presented.

  9. A cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays detected by Fermi in the Cygnus Superbubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, A.; Allafort, A.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Borgland, A.W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R.A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P.S.; Focke, W.B.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Hayashida, M.; Johnson, A.S.; Kamae, T.; Kerr, M.; Lande, J.; Michelson, P.F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M.E.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P.L.; Okumura, A.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Prokhorov, D.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J.G.; Thayer, J.B.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vianello, G.; Waite, A.P.; Wang, P.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Razzano, M.; Sgro, C.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J.M.; Grenier, I.A.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Tibaldo, L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of Galactic cosmic rays is a century-long puzzle. Indirect evidence points to their acceleration by supernova shock waves, but we know little of their escape from the shock and their evolution through the turbulent medium surrounding massive stars. Gamma rays can probe their spreading through the ambient gas and radiation fields. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed the star-forming region of Cygnus X. The 1- to 100-giga-electron-volt images reveal a 50-parsec-wide cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays that flood the cavities carved by the stellar winds and ionization fronts from young stellar clusters. It provides an example to study the youth of cosmic rays in a superbubble environment before they merge into the older Galactic population. (authors)

  10. Jet browser model accelerated by GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Richárd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last centuries the experimental particle physics began to develop thank to growing capacity of computers among others. It is allowed to know the structure of the matter to level of quark gluon. Plasma in the strong interaction. Experimental evidences supported the theory to measure the predicted results. Since its inception the researchers are interested in the track reconstruction. We studied the jet browser model, which was developed for 4π calorimeter. This method works on the measurement data set, which contain the components of interaction points in the detector space and it allows to examine the trajectory reconstruction of the final state particles. We keep the total energy in constant values and it satisfies the Gauss law. Using GPUs the evaluation of the model can be drastically accelerated, as we were able to achieve up to 223 fold speedup compared to a CPU based parallel implementation.

  11. EXTREME PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION LAYERS: APPLICATION TO THE GAMMA-RAY FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, Dmitri A. [CIPS, Physics Department, University of Colorado, UCB 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: benoit.cerutti@colorado.edu, E-mail: uzdensky@colorado.edu, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    The gamma-ray space telescopes AGILE and Fermi detected short and bright synchrotron gamma-ray flares at photon energies above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula. This discovery suggests that electron-positron pairs in the nebula are accelerated to PeV energies in a milligauss magnetic field, which is difficult to explain with classical models of particle acceleration and pulsar wind nebulae. We investigate whether particle acceleration in a magnetic reconnection layer can account for the puzzling properties of the flares. We numerically integrate relativistic test-particle orbits in the vicinity of the layer, including the radiation reaction force, and using analytical expressions for the large-scale electromagnetic fields. As they get accelerated by the reconnection electric field, the particles are focused deep inside the current layer where the magnetic field is small. The electrons suffer less from synchrotron losses and are accelerated to extremely high energies. Population studies show that, at the end of the layer, the particle distribution piles up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop and is focused into a thin fan beam. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum peaks above 100 MeV and is close to the spectral shape of a single electron. The flare inverse Compton emission is negligible and no detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This mechanism provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula and could be at work in other astrophysical objects such as relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei.

  12. EXTREME PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION LAYERS: APPLICATION TO THE GAMMA-RAY FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2012-01-01

    The gamma-ray space telescopes AGILE and Fermi detected short and bright synchrotron gamma-ray flares at photon energies above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula. This discovery suggests that electron-positron pairs in the nebula are accelerated to PeV energies in a milligauss magnetic field, which is difficult to explain with classical models of particle acceleration and pulsar wind nebulae. We investigate whether particle acceleration in a magnetic reconnection layer can account for the puzzling properties of the flares. We numerically integrate relativistic test-particle orbits in the vicinity of the layer, including the radiation reaction force, and using analytical expressions for the large-scale electromagnetic fields. As they get accelerated by the reconnection electric field, the particles are focused deep inside the current layer where the magnetic field is small. The electrons suffer less from synchrotron losses and are accelerated to extremely high energies. Population studies show that, at the end of the layer, the particle distribution piles up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop and is focused into a thin fan beam. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum peaks above 100 MeV and is close to the spectral shape of a single electron. The flare inverse Compton emission is negligible and no detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This mechanism provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula and could be at work in other astrophysical objects such as relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei.

  13. The LLNL Flash X-Ray Induction Linear Accelerator (FXR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multhauf, L G

    2002-01-01

    The FXR is an induction linear accelerator used for high-speed radiography at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Experimental Test Site. It was designed specifically for the radiography of very thick explosive objects. Since its completion in 1982, it has been very actively used for a large variety of explosives tests, and has been periodically upgraded to achieve higher performance. Upgrades have addressed machine reliability, radiographic sensitivity and resolution, two-frame imaging by double pulsing improvements that are described in detail in the paper. At the same time, the facility in which it was installed has also been extensively upgraded, first by adding space for optical and interferometric diagnostics, and more recently by adding a containment chamber to prevent the environmental dispersal of hazardous and radioactive materials. The containment addition also further expands space for new non-radiographic diagnostics. The new Contained Firing Facility is still in the process of activation. At the same time, FXR is continuing to undergo modifications aimed primarily at further increasing radiographic resolution and sensitivity, and at improving double-pulsed performance

  14. Accelerator Physics Challenges of X-Ray FEL SASE Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emma, Paul J

    2002-05-30

    A great deal of international interest has recently focused on the design and construction of free-electron lasers (FEL) operating in the x-ray region ({approx}1 {angstrom}). At present, a linac-based machine utilizing the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) appears to be the most promising approach. This new class of FEL achieves lasing in a single pass of a high brightness electron beam through a long undulator. The requirements on electron beam quality become more demanding as the FEL radiation wavelength decreases, with the 1-{angstrom} goal still 3-orders of magnitude below the shortest wavelength operational SASE FEL (TTF-FEL at DESY [1]). The subpicosecond bunch length drives damaging effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation, and undulator vacuum chamber wakefields. Unlike linear colliders, beam brightness needs to be maintained only over a small ''slice'' of the bunch length, so the concepts of bunch integrated emittance and energy spread are less relevant than their high-frequency (or ''time-sliced'') counterparts, also adding a challenge to phase space diagnostics. Some of the challenges associated with the generation, preservation, measurement, and stability of high brightness FEL electron beams are discussed here.

  15. Acceleration methods and models in Sn calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, M.M.; Abbate, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    In some neutron transport problems solved by the discrete ordinate method, it is relatively common to observe some particularities as, for example, negative fluxes generation, slow and insecure convergences and solution instabilities. The commonly used models for neutron flux calculation and acceleration methods included in the most used codes were analyzed, in face of their use in problems characterized by a strong upscattering effect. Some special conclusions derived from this analysis are presented as well as a new method to perform the upscattering scaling for solving the before mentioned problems in this kind of cases. This method has been included in the DOT3.5 code (two dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code) generating a new version of wider application. (Author) [es

  16. Control system modelling for superconducting accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarski, T.; Pozniak, K.; Romaniuk, R.

    2006-01-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. FPGA based controller supported by MATLAB system was developed to investigate the novel firmware implementation. Algebraic model in complex domain is proposed for the system analyzing. Calibration procedure of a signal path is considered for a multi-channel control. Identification of the system parameters is carried out by the least squares method application. Control tables: Feed-Forward and Set- Point are determined for the required cavity performance, according to the recognized process. Feedback loop is tuned by fitting a complex gain of a corrector unit. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for feed-forward and feedback modes. Experimental results are presented for a cavity representative operation. (orig.)

  17. Particle-in-cell simulation of x-ray wakefield acceleration and betatron radiation in nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Though wakefield acceleration in crystal channels has been previously proposed, x-ray wakefield acceleration has only recently become a realistic possibility since the invention of the single-cycled optical laser compression technique. We investigate the acceleration due to a wakefield induced by a coherent, ultrashort x-ray pulse guided by a nanoscale channel inside a solid material. By two-dimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations, we show that an acceleration gradient of TeV/cm is attainable. This is about 3 orders of magnitude stronger than that of the conventional plasma-based wakefield accelerations, which implies the possibility of an extremely compact scheme to attain ultrahigh energies. In addition to particle acceleration, this scheme can also induce the emission of high energy photons at ∼O(10–100  MeV. Our simulations confirm such high energy photon emissions, which is in contrast with that induced by the optical laser driven wakefield scheme. In addition to this, the significantly improved emittance of the energetic electrons has been discussed.

  18. Modeling of a new electron-streamer acceleration mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihaddadene, K. M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Liu, N.; Celestin, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning stepped leaders and laboratory spark discharges in air are known to produce X-rays [e.g., Dwyer et al., Geophys. Res. lett., 32, L20809, 2005; Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 45, 425202, 2012]. However, the processes behind the production of these X-rays are still not very well understood. During discharges, encounters between streamers of different polarities are very common. For example, during the formation of a new leader step, the negative streamer zone around the tip of a negative leader and the positive streamers initiated from the posiive part of a bidirectional space leader strongly interact. In laboratory experiments, when streamers are approaching a sharp electrode, streamers with the opposite polarity are initiated from the electrode and collide with the former streamers. Recently, the encounter between negative and positive streamers has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for the production of X-rays by spark discharges [Cooray et la., JASTP, 71, 1890, 2009; Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 45, 425202, 2012], but modeling results have shown later that the increase of the electric field involved in this process, which is above the conventional breakdown threshold field, is accompanied by a strong increase of the electron density. The resulting increase in the conductivity, in turn, causes this electric field to collapse over a few tens of picoseconds, preventing the electrons reaching high energies and producing significant X-ray emissions [e.g., Ihaddadene and Celestin, Geophys. Res. Lett., 45, 5644, 2015]. In this work, we will present simulation results of a new electron acceleration mechanism for producing runaway electron energies above hundred keV. The mechanism couples multiple single streamers and streamer head-on collisions, similar to a laboratory discharge, and is suitable for explaining the high-energy X-rays produced by discharges in air and by lightning stepped leaders.

  19. Rarefaction acceleration of ultrarelativistic magnetized jets in gamma-ray burst sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Königl, Arieh

    2010-09-01

    When a magnetically dominated superfast-magnetosonic long/soft gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet leaves the progenitor star, the external pressure support will drop and the jet may enter the regime of ballistic expansion, during which additional magnetic acceleration becomes ineffective. However, recent numerical simulations by Tchekhovskoy et al. have suggested that the transition to this regime is accompanied by a spurt of acceleration. We confirm this finding numerically and attribute the acceleration to a sideways expansion of the jet, associated with a strong magnetosonic rarefaction wave that is driven into the jet when it loses pressure support, which induces a conversion of magnetic energy into kinetic energy of bulk motion. This mechanism, which we dub rarefaction acceleration, can only operate in a relativistic outflow because in this case the total energy can still be dominated by the magnetic component even in the superfast-magnetosonic regime. We analyse this process using the equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics and demonstrate that it is more efficient at converting internal energy into kinetic energy when the flow is magnetized than in a purely hydrodynamic outflow, as was found numerically by Mizuno et al. We show that, just as in the case of the magnetic acceleration of a collimating jet that is confined by an external pressure distribution - the collimation-acceleration mechanism - the rarefaction-acceleration process in a magnetized jet is a consequence of the fact that the separation between neighbouring magnetic flux surfaces increases faster than their cylindrical radius. However, whereas in the case of effective collimation-acceleration the product of the jet opening angle and its Lorentz factor does not exceed ~1, the addition of the rarefaction-acceleration mechanism makes it possible for this product to become >>1, in agreement with the inference from late-time panchromatic breaks in the afterglow light curves of long/soft GRBs.

  20. Modeling flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of large areas of carbon steel in various circuits of CANDU plants generates significant quantities of corrosion products. As well, the relatively rapid corrosion rate can lead to operating difficulties with some components. Three areas in the plant are identified and a simple model of mass-transfer controlled corrosion of the carbon steel is derived and applied to these areas. The areas and the significant finding for each are given below: A number of lines in the feedwater system generate sludge by FAC, which causes steam generator fouling. Prediction of the steady-state iron concentration at the feedtrain outlet compares well with measured values. Carbon steel outlet feeders connect the reactor core with the steam generators. The feeder surface provides the dissolved iron through FAC, which fouls the primary side of the steam generator tubes, and can lead to derating of the plant and difficulty in tube inspection. Segmented carbon steel divider plates in the steam generator primary head leak at an increasing rate with time. The leakage rate is strongly dependent on the tightness of the overlapping joints. which undergo FAC at an increasing rate with time. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  1. Evaluation of accelerated iterative x-ray CT image reconstruction using floating point graphics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kole, J S; Beekman, F J

    2006-01-01

    Statistical reconstruction methods offer possibilities to improve image quality as compared with analytical methods, but current reconstruction times prohibit routine application in clinical and micro-CT. In particular, for cone-beam x-ray CT, the use of graphics hardware has been proposed to accelerate the forward and back-projection operations, in order to reduce reconstruction times. In the past, wide application of this texture hardware mapping approach was hampered owing to limited intrinsic accuracy. Recently, however, floating point precision has become available in the latest generation commodity graphics cards. In this paper, we utilize this feature to construct a graphics hardware accelerated version of the ordered subset convex reconstruction algorithm. The aims of this paper are (i) to study the impact of using graphics hardware acceleration for statistical reconstruction on the reconstructed image accuracy and (ii) to measure the speed increase one can obtain by using graphics hardware acceleration. We compare the unaccelerated algorithm with the graphics hardware accelerated version, and for the latter we consider two different interpolation techniques. A simulation study of a micro-CT scanner with a mathematical phantom shows that at almost preserved reconstructed image accuracy, speed-ups of a factor 40 to 222 can be achieved, compared with the unaccelerated algorithm, and depending on the phantom and detector sizes. Reconstruction from physical phantom data reconfirms the usability of the accelerated algorithm for practical cases

  2. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Scheinker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: (1 it has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, (2 it gives known bounds on parameter update rates, (3 we give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and (4 it has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the experimental physics and industrial control system (EPICS. Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multiparticle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of 22 quadrupole magnets and two rf buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and rf phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  3. Filtered x-ray diode diagnostics fielded on the Z-accelerator for source power measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, C.; Cuneo, M.

    1998-01-01

    Filtered x-ray diode, (XRD), detectors are used as primary radiation flux diagnostics on Sandia's Z-accelerator, which generates nominally a 200 TW, 2 MJ, x-ray pulse. Given such flux levels and XRD sensitivities the detectors are being fielded 23 meters from the source. The standard diagnostic setup and sensitivities are discussed. Vitreous carbon photocathodes are being used to reduce the effect of hydrocarbon contamination present in the Z-machine vacuum system. Nevertheless pre- and post-calibration data taken indicate spectrally dependent changes in the sensitivity of these detectors by up to factors up to 2 or 3

  4. Detection methods of pulsed X-rays for transmission tomography with a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.

    1988-07-01

    Appropriate detection methods are studied for the development of a high energy tomograph using a linear accelerator for nondestructive testing of bulky objects. The aim is the selection of detectors adapted to a pulsed X-ray source and with a good behavior under X-ray radiations of several MeV. Performance of semiconductors (HgI 2 , Cl doped CdTe, GaAs, Bi 12 Ge0 20 ) and a scintillator (Bi 4 Ge 3 0 12 ) are examined. A prototype tomograph gave images that show the validity of detectors for analysis of medium size equipment such as a concrete drum of 60 cm in diameter [fr

  5. High energy X-ray CT system using a linear accelerator for automobile parts inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, T.; Sukita, T.

    1995-01-01

    A high energy X-ray CT system (maximum photon energy: 0.95 MeV) has been developed for industrial use. This system employs a linear accelerator as an X-ray source. It is able to image the cross section of automobile parts and can be applied to a solidification analysis study of the cylinder head in an automobile. This paper describes the features of the system and application results which can be related to solidification analysis of the cylinder head when fabricated from an aluminum casting. Some cross-sectional images are also presented as evidence for nondestructive inspection of automobile parts. (orig.)

  6. Generation of X-rays by electrons recycling through thin internal targets of cyclic accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplin, V.; Kuznetsov, S.; Uglov, S.

    2018-05-01

    The use of thin (recycling effect) of electrons through them. The multiplicity of electron passes (M) is determined by the electron energy, accelerator parameters, the thickness, structure and material of a target and leads to an increase in the effective target thickness and the efficiency of radiation generation. The increase of M leads to the increase in the emittance of electron beams which can change the characteristics of radiation processes. The experimental results obtained using the Tomsk synchrotron and betatron showed the possibility of increasing the yield and brightness of coherent X-rays generated by the electrons passing (recycling) through thin crystals and periodic multilayers placed into the chambers of accelerators, when the recycling effect did not influence on the spectral and angular characteristics of generated X-rays.

  7. Accelerating transition dynamics in city regions: A qualitative modeling perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Valkering (Pieter); Yücel, G. (Gönenç); Gebetsroither-Geringer, E. (Ernst); Markvica, K. (Karin); Meynaerts, E. (Erika); N. Frantzeskaki (Niki)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this article, we take stock of the findings from conceptual and empirical work on the role of transition initiatives for accelerating transitions as input for modeling acceleration dynamics. We applied the qualitative modeling approach of causal loop diagrams to capture the dynamics

  8. Probing cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation with H{sub 3}{sup +} observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indriolo, Nick; Fields, Brian D.; McCall, Benjamin J. [3D University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    As cosmic rays traverse the interstellar medium (ISM) they interact with the ambient gas in various ways. These include ionization of atoms and molecules, spallation of nuclei, excitation of nuclear states, and production of pions among others. All of these interactions produce potential observables which may be used to trace the flux of cosmic rays. One such observable is the molecular ion H{sub 3}{sup +}-produced via the ionization of an H{sub 2} molecule and its subsequent collision with another H{sub 2}-which can be identified by absorption lines in the 3.5-4 μm spectral region. We have detected H{sub 3}{sup +} in several Galactic diffuse cloud sight lines and used the derived column densities to infer ζ{sub 2}, the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2}. Ionization rates determined in this way vary from about 7×10{sup −17} s{sup −1} to about 8×10{sup −16} s{sup −1}, and suggest the possibility of discrete sources producing high local fluxes of low-energy cosmic rays. Theoretical calculations of the ionization rate from postulated cosmic-ray spectra also support this possibility. Our recent observations of H{sub 3}{sup +} near the supernova remnant IC 443 (a likely site of cosmic-ray acceleration) point to even higher ionization rates, on the order of 10{sup −15} s{sup −1}. Together, all of these results can further our understanding of the cosmic-ray spectrum both near the acceleration source and in the general Galactic ISM.

  9. Anomalous Distributions of Primary Cosmic Rays as Evidence for Time-dependent Particle Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yiran; Liu, Siming; Yuan, Qiang, E-mail: liusm@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-07-20

    Recent precise measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) spectra show that the energy distribution of protons is softer than those of heavier nuclei, and there are spectral hardenings for all nuclear compositions above ∼200 GV. Models proposed for these anomalies generally assume steady-state solutions of the particle acceleration process. We show that if the diffusion coefficient has a weak dependence on the particle rigidity near shock fronts of supernova remnants (SNRs), time-dependent solutions of the linear diffusive shock acceleration at two stages of SNR evolution can naturally account for these anomalies. The high-energy component of CRs is dominated by acceleration in the free expansion and adiabatic phases with enriched heavy elements and a high shock speed. The low-energy component may be attributed to acceleration by slow shocks propagating in dense molecular clouds with low metallicity in the radiative phase. Instead of a single power-law distribution, the spectra of time-dependent solutions soften gradually with the increase of energy, which may be responsible for the “knee” of CRs.

  10. Model-based accelerator controls: What, why and how

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Model-based control is defined as a gamut of techniques whose aim is to improve the reliability of an accelerator and enhance the capabilities of the operator, and therefore of the whole control system. The aim of model-based control is seen as gradually moving the function of model-reference from the operator to the computer. The role of the operator in accelerator control and the need for and application of model-based control are briefly summarized

  11. RAMI analysis and modeling for the LANSCE accelerator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability (RAMI) have become important issues for the high-power machines being planned for applications such as accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW), accelerator production of tritium (APT) and the next generation spallation neutron source. Beam reliability and beam availability are vitally important specifications to the present users of accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources, synchrotron light sources and medical accelerators. At Los Alamos, improved beam availability is a key goal in the planned LANSCE improvement program. Clearly, the capability to adequately model and predict the reliability and availability of complex accelerator systems will be of great value in assessing and optimizing RAMI measures in accelerator design and improvement programs. To date, no major accelerator project has developed comprehensive reliability models although the Advance Photon Source at ANL has started work on reliability analysis for selected subsystems. In this paper the authors discuss their experience in developing RAMI analysis and modeling for the LANSCE Accelerator Systems. Progress has been made in developing suitable measures and functions to characterize user risk, in logging of needed data on failure rates and repair/down times, and in developing a first-pass RAMI model for selected subsystems. Plans have been made for a more complete RAMI model. In addition, the authors discuss their experience in the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology for estimation of the reliability of active, instrumentation-based, radiation safety systems at LANSCE.

  12. On the nature of impulsive electron acceleration on solar hard X-ray flares. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyng, P.

    1977-01-01

    The suggestion is elaborated that shock wave generated Langmuir waves accelerate electrons in the adjoining plasma. Langmuir wave generation can be achieved in ion-acoustic unstable shocks by induced bremsstrahlung from electrons. A crude model analysis shows the Langmuir waves to have short wavelengths, ( approximately equal to ksub(D)/4), while propagating almost parallel to the shock plane. It is possible that sufficient power in Langmuir waves is generated to explain the observed scale of electron acceleration. (orig./BJ) [de

  13. Soft X-ray radiation power characteristics of tungsten wire arrays on Yang accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Siqun; Ouyang Kai; Huang Xianbin; Dan Jiakun; Zhou Rongguo; Yang Liang

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to research the X-ray radiation characteristics of tungsten wire arrays on Yang accelerator. In those experiments, we charged the Marx generator of 60 kV, and the load current of 0.85-1.00 MA, the rise time of 75-90 ns (10%-90%). A soft X-ray scintillator powermeter which responded flatly to 50-1800 eV X-rays was used to measure the power of soft X-ray emitted from implosion plasma. In this paper, we present the measuring results of time-resolved soft X-ray radiation power, and discuss the radiation characteristics of implosion plasma by analyzing the correlations of soft X-ray radiant power and the diameter, length, wire number of the tungsten wire arrays. The optimizing wire array configuration parameters on Yang are as follows: 8 mm array diameter, 15 mm wire length, and 24 wire number. We also present the radiant power difference in radial and axial directions of the wire arrays. (authors)

  14. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND THE ORIGIN OF X-RAY FLARES IN GRMHD SIMULATIONS OF SGR A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, David; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Chan, Chi-kwan [Steward Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Significant X-ray variability and flaring has been observed from Sgr A* but is poorly understood from a theoretical standpoint. We perform general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations that take into account a population of non-thermal electrons with energy distributions and injection rates that are motivated by PIC simulations of magnetic reconnection. We explore the effects of including these non-thermal electrons on the predicted broadband variability of Sgr A* and find that X-ray variability is a generic result of localizing non-thermal electrons to highly magnetized regions, where particles are likely to be accelerated via magnetic reconnection. The proximity of these high-field regions to the event horizon forms a natural connection between IR and X-ray variability and accounts for the rapid timescales associated with the X-ray flares. The qualitative nature of this variability is consistent with observations, producing X-ray flares that are always coincident with IR flares, but not vice versa, i.e., there are a number of IR flares without X-ray counterparts.

  15. X-ray beam size measurements on the Advanced Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.; Chambers, F.W.; Lauer, E.J.; Slaughter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam size has been determined on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) by intercepting the beam with a target and measuring the resulting x-ray intensity as a function of time as the target is moved through the beam. Several types of targets have been used. One is a tantalum rod which extends completely across the drift chamber. Another is a tungsten powder filled carbon crucible. Both of these probes are moved from shot to shot so that the x-ray signal intensity varies with probe position. A third is a larger tantalum disk which is inserted on beam axis to allow determining beam size on a one shot basis. The x-ray signals are detected with an MCP photomultiplier tube located at 90 0 to the beamline. It is sufficiently shielded to reject background x-rays and neutrons. The signals were digitized, recorded and later unfolded to produce plots of x-ray intensity versus probe position for several times during the pulse. The presumption that the x-ray intensity is proportional to beam current density is checked computationally. Details of the probe construction and PMT shielding, as well as sample measurements are given

  16. High-intensity, subkolovolt x-ray calibration facility using a Cockroft--Walton proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckuck, R.W.; Gaines, J.L.; Ernst, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    Considerable need has arisen for the development of well-calibrated x-ray detectors capable of detecting photons with energies between 100 and 1000 electron-volts. This energy region is of significant interest since the x-ray emission from high-temperature (kT approximately 1.0 keV), laser-produced plasmas is predominantly in this range. A high-intensity, subkilovolt x-ray calibration source was developed which utilizes proton-induced inner-shell atomic fluorescence of low-Z elements. The high photon yields and low bremsstrahlung background associated with this phenomenon are ideally suited to provide an intense, nearly monoenergetic x-ray calibration source for detector development applications. The proton accelerator is a 3 mA, 300 kV Cockroft-Walton using a conventional rf hydrogen ion source. Seven remotely-selectable liquid-cooled targets capable of heat dissipation of 5 kW/cm 2 are used to provide characteristic x-rays with energies between 100 and 1000 eV. Source strengths are of the order of 10 13 to 10 14 photons/sec. A description of the facility is presented. Typical x-ray spectra (B-K, C-K, Ti-L, Fe-L and Cu-L) and flux values will be shown. Problems such as spectral contamination due to carbon buildup on the target and to backscattered particles are discussed

  17. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. III. EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caprioli, D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we present the first formulation of the theory of nonlinear particle acceleration in collisionless shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen in the acceleration region. The dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles, the magnetic field amplification, and the magnetic dynamical effects on the shock are also included. The main new aspect of this study, however, consists of accounting for charge exchange and the ionization of a neutral hydrogen, which profoundly change the structure of the shock, as discussed in our previous work. This important dynamical effect of neutrals is mainly associated with the so-called neutral return flux, namely the return of hot neutrals from the downstream region to upstream, where they deposit energy and momentum through charge exchange and ionization. We also present the self-consistent calculation of Balmer line emission from the shock region and discuss how to use measurements of the anomalous width of the different components of the Balmer line to infer cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in supernova remnants showing Balmer emission: the broad Balmer line, which is due to charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with hot ions downstream of the shock, is shown to become narrower as a result of the energy drainage into cosmic rays, while the narrow Balmer line, due to charge exchange in the cosmic-ray-induced precursor, is shown to become broader. In addition to these two well-known components, the neutral return flux leads to the formation of a third component with an intermediate width: this too contains information on ongoing processes at the shock.

  18. Modeling the Acceleration of Global Surface Temperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical projection focusing on the changing rate of acceleration of Global Surface Temperatures. Using historical trajectory and informed expert near-term prediction, it is possible to extend this further forward drawing a reference arc of acceleration. Presented here is an example of this technique based on data found in the Summary of Findings of A New Estimate of the Average Earth Surface Land Temperature Spanning 1753 to 2011 and that same team's stated prediction to 2050. With this, we can project a curve showing future acceleration: Decade (midpoint) Change in Global Land Temp Degrees C Known Slope Projected Trend 1755 0.000 1955 0.600 0.0030 2005 1.500 0.0051 2045 3.000 0.0375 2095 5.485 0.0497 2145 8.895 0.0682 2195 13.488 0.0919 Observations: Slopes are getting steeper and doing so faster in an "acceleration of the acceleration" or an "arc of acceleration". This is consistent with the non-linear accelerating feedback loops of global warming. Such projected temperatures threaten human civilization and human life. This `thumbnail' projection is consistent with the other long term predictions based on anthropogenic greenhouse gases. This projection is low when compared to those whose forecasts include greenhouse gases released from thawing permafrost and clathrate hydrates. A reference line: This curve should be considered a point of reference. In the near term and absent significant drawdown of greenhouse gases, my "bet" for this AGU session is that future temperatures will generally be above this reference curve. For example, the decade ending 2020 - more than 1.9C and the decade ending 2030 - more than 2.3C - again measured from the 1750 start point. *Caveat: The long term curve and prediction assumes that mankind does not move quickly away from high cost fossil fuels and does not invent, mobilize and take actions drawing down greenhouse gases. Those seeking a comprehensive action plan are directed to drawdown.org

  19. Soft X-ray reflectivity: from quasi-perfect mirrors to accelerator walls

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfers, F.

    2013-04-22

    Reflection of light from surfaces is a very common, but complex phenomenon not only in science and technology, but in every day life. The underlying basic optical principles have been developed within the last five centuries using visible light available from the sun or other laboratory light sources. X-rays were detected in 1895, and the full potential of soft- and hard-x ray radiation as a probe for the electronic and geometric properties of matter, for material analysis and its characterisation is available only since the advent of synchrotron radiation sources some 50 years ago. On the other hand high-brilliance and high power synchrotron radiation of present-days 3rd and 4th generation light sources is not always beneficial. Highenergy machines and accelerator-based light sources can suffer from a serious performance drop or limitations due to interaction of the synchrotron radiation with the accelerator walls, thus producing clouds of photoelectrons (e-cloud) which in turn interact with the accelerated ...

  20. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averyanov, G P; Kobylyatskiy, A V

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept. (paper)

  1. A new tool for accelerator system modeling and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Jameson, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators. The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in assessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were sued to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version (1.1) of ASM is briefly described and an example of the modeling and analysis capabilities is illustrated

  2. Anomalous Transport of Cosmic Rays in a Nonlinear Diffusion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P. B. 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand); Fichtner, Horst; Walter, Dominik [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2017-05-20

    We investigate analytically and numerically the transport of cosmic rays following their escape from a shock or another localized acceleration site. Observed cosmic-ray distributions in the vicinity of heliospheric and astrophysical shocks imply that anomalous, superdiffusive transport plays a role in the evolution of the energetic particles. Several authors have quantitatively described the anomalous diffusion scalings, implied by the data, by solutions of a formal transport equation with fractional derivatives. Yet the physical basis of the fractional diffusion model remains uncertain. We explore an alternative model of the cosmic-ray transport: a nonlinear diffusion equation that follows from a self-consistent treatment of the resonantly interacting cosmic-ray particles and their self-generated turbulence. The nonlinear model naturally leads to superdiffusive scalings. In the presence of convection, the model yields a power-law dependence of the particle density on the distance upstream of the shock. Although the results do not refute the use of a fractional advection–diffusion equation, they indicate a viable alternative to explain the anomalous diffusion scalings of cosmic-ray particles.

  3. Radiation shielding analysis of a special linear accelerator for electron beam and X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W G; Pyo, S H; Alkhuraiji, T S; Han, B S; Kang, C M

    2017-01-01

    The King AbdulAziz City for Science & Technology in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia plans to build a 10 MeV, 15 kW linear accelerator (LINAC) for electron beam and X-ray. The accelerator will be supplied by EB Tech, Republic of Korea, and the design and construction of the accelerator building will be conducted in the cooperation with EB Tech. This report presents the shielding analysis of the accelerator building using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). In order to improve the accuracy in estimating deep radiation penetration and to reduce computation time, various variance reduction techniques, including the weight window (WW) method, the deterministic transport (DXTRAN) spheres were considered. Radiation levels were estimated at selected locations in the shielding facility running MCNP6 for particle histories up to 1.0×10+8. The final results indicated that the calculated doses at all selected detector locations met the dose requirement of 50 mSv/yr, which is the United State Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) requirement.

  4. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-01

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width ΔE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As ΔE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For ΔE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d max . Although increasing ΔE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d max by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude. (note)

  5. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks Via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models (Protheroe and Stanev, 1998; Moraal and Axford, 1983; Ball and Kirk, 1992; Drury et al., 1999) in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box (Melrose and Pope, 1993; Zank et al., 2000). We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (Emax) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks (Zank et al., 2000, 2006; Dosch and Shalchi, 2010) and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  6. Observations of multimode perturbation decay at non-accelerating, soft x-ray driven ablation fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Braun, D.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 95281 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Minimizing the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities is a fundamental design issue facing the achievement of thermonuclear ignition and burn with Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The thin capsules and extreme accelerations found in ICF make it an inherently unstable system primarily to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) occurring at the ablation front. A potential mechanism by which perturbations at the outer capsule surface can be reduced lies in the already present ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) effect, which operates during the first shock transit of the ablator. At present, the available Equation of State (EOS) models predict a wide range of behavior for the ablative RM oscillations of multimode isolated defects on plastic (CH) capsules. To resolve these differences, we conducted experiments at the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Optics Comm. 133 (1997)] that measured the evolution of gaussian-shaped bumps driven by soft x-ray ablation from a halfraum. Shock speeds in the CH target were measured to reach 15 {mu}m/ns for halfraum radiation temperatures of 70 eV lasting for up to 7 ns. The evolution of gaussian-shaped bumps of different widths and heights were measured using on-axis x-ray radiography at up to 37 Multiplication-Sign magnification. Bumps with initial widths of 34 and 44 {mu}m FWHM were found to grow by 3 Multiplication-Sign their initial areal density and then saturate out to 6 ns due to lateral compression of the bump characteristic of the formation of a rippled shock front propagating into the solid target. Narrower 17 {mu}m FWHM bumps, on the other hand, grew by roughly 2 Multiplication-Sign followed immediately by a decrease back to initial values of areal density out to 7 ns, which largely agrees with both LEOS 5310 and SESAME 7592 EOS predictions. The difference in observed behavior suggests that high spatial frequency modes found in narrower bumps are needed to significantly affect the ablation front profile on shorter time scales.

  7. Integrated on-line accelerator modeling at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; Shoaee, H.; Van Zeijts, J.; Witherspoon, S.; Watson, W.

    1995-01-01

    An on-line accelerator modeling facility is currently under development at CEBAF. The model server, which is integrated with the EPICS control system, provides coupled and 2nd-order matrices for the entire accelerator, and forms the foundation for automated model- based control and diagnostic applications. Four types of machine models are provided, including design, golden or certified, live, and scratch or simulated model. Provisions are also made for the use of multiple lattice modeling programs such as DIMAD, PARMELA, and TLIE. Design and implementation details are discussed. 2 refs., 4 figs

  8. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases z-accelerator x-ray power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40{+-}20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the {open_quotes}plasma shell{close_quotes} regime, where the plasmas generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.

  9. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases z-accelerator x-ray power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A.

    1997-11-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40±20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the 'plasma shell' regime, where the plasmas generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array

  10. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases Z-accelerator X-ray power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40 ± 20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the plasma shell regime, where the plasma generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array

  11. Wire number doubling in plasma-shell regime increases Z-accelerator X-ray power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Doubling the number of tungsten wires from 120 to 240, keeping the mass fixed, increased the radiated x-ray power relative to the electrical power at the insulator stack of the z accelerator by (40 {+-} 20)% for 8.75- and 20-mm-radii z-pinch wire arrays. Radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the arrays were operating in the plasma shell regime, where the plasma generated by the individual wires merge prior to the inward implosion of the entire array.

  12. Parametric study of emerging high power accelerator applications using Accelerator Systems Model (ASM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Mendelsohn, S.S.; Myers, T.J.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.; Piaszczyk, CM.; Rathke, J.W.; Piechowiak, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Emerging applications for high power rf linacs include fusion materials testing, generation of intense spallation neutrons for neutron physics and materials studies, production of nuclear materials and destruction of nuclear waste. Each requires the selection of an optimal configuration and operating parameters for its accelerator, rf power system and other supporting subsystems. Because of the high cost associated with these facilities, economic considerations become paramount, dictating a full evaluation of the electrical and rf performance, system reliability/availability, and capital, operating, and life cycle costs. The Accelerator Systems Model (ASM), expanded and modified by Northrop Grumman during 1993-96, provides a unique capability for detailed layout and evaluation of a wide variety of normal and superconducting accelerator and rf power configurations. This paper will discuss the current capabilities of ASM, including the available models and data base, and types of trade studies that can be performed for the above applications. (author)

  13. Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The talk summarizes the principles of particle acceleration and addresses problems related to storage rings like LEP and LHC. Special emphasis will be given to orbit stability, long term stability of the particle motion, collective effects and synchrotron radiation.

  14. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  15. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  16. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  17. A new approach to modeling linear accelerator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Jameson, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators with specific applications to machines of interest to Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT). The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in accessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are to be modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were used to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Code (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version of ASM is described and examples of the modeling and analysis capabilities are illustrated. The results of an example study, for an accelerator concept typical of ADTT applications, is presented and sample displays from the computer interface are shown

  18. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a 0 ∼ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic “denting” of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75–200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (∼6 × 10 −12 ) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements

  19. Local re-acceleration and a modified thick target model of solar flare electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. C.; Turkmani, R.; Kontar, E. P.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Vlahos, L.

    2009-12-01

    Context: The collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) bursts has become an almost “standard model” of flare impulsive phase energy transport and radiation. However, it faces various problems in the light of recent data, particularly the high electron beam density and anisotropy it involves. Aims: We consider how photon yield per electron can be increased, and hence fast electron beam intensity requirements reduced, by local re-acceleration of fast electrons throughout the HXR source itself, after injection. Methods: We show parametrically that, if net re-acceleration rates due to e.g. waves or local current sheet electric (E) fields are a significant fraction of collisional loss rates, electron lifetimes, and hence the net radiative HXR output per electron can be substantially increased over the CTTM values. In this local re-acceleration thick target model (LRTTM) fast electron number requirements and anisotropy are thus reduced. One specific possible scenario involving such re-acceleration is discussed, viz, a current sheet cascade (CSC) in a randomly stressed magnetic loop. Results: Combined MHD and test particle simulations show that local E fields in CSCs can efficiently accelerate electrons in the corona and and re-accelerate them after injection into the chromosphere. In this HXR source scenario, rapid synchronisation and variability of impulsive footpoint emissions can still occur since primary electron acceleration is in the high Alfvén speed corona with fast re-acceleration in chromospheric CSCs. It is also consistent with the energy-dependent time-of-flight delays in HXR features. Conclusions: Including electron re-acceleration in the HXR source allows an LRTTM modification of the CTTM in which beam density and anisotropy are much reduced, and alleviates theoretical problems with the CTTM, while making it more compatible with radio and interplanetary electron numbers. The LRTTM is, however, different in some respects such as

  20. Modelling of control system architecture for next-generation accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shi-Yao; Kurokawa, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Functional, hardware and software system architectures define the fundamental structure of control systems. Modelling is a protocol of system architecture used in system design. This paper reviews various modellings adopted in past ten years and suggests a new modelling for next generation accelerators. (author)

  1. A moving target for accelerated charged particle induced X-ray measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, L.S.; Shima, K.; Ebihara, H.; Seki, R.; Mikumo, T.

    1980-01-01

    To attain good reproducibility as well as to enable an absolute determination in the measurement of X-ray fluorescences, resulting from bombardment of a heterogeneous sample by accelerated charged particles, a moving-target mechanism incorporating an electronic remote control system has been devised. The system is designed to scan the whole sample area with a chosen constant linear speed, by a fixed particle beam with a cross-sectional area a small fraction of that of the sample. Using 16 MeV protons and 40 MeV oxygen-ion beams, test runs of this system showed that the attempted objectives are attainable with good accuracies: reproducibility of the data for a given target is better than 3%, the linearity of the calibration curve is in good agreement, within the weighing errors of the standard elements and the uncertainty due to beam current fluctuation, with the expected values, and the results of absolute determinations using both metal foils and heterogeneous powder samples are in good agreement with accepted results using different methods. Detailed accounts of the moving-target system, and the test for reproducibility and linearity are presented. An absolute determination of the quantities related to accelerated charged-particle induced X-ray fluorescence (PIXE) using the moving target is presented for samples in different forms. (orig./HP)

  2. ACCELERATION RENDERING METHOD ON RAY TRACING WITH ANGLE COMPARISON AND DISTANCE COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana liliana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In computer graphics applications, to produce realistic images, a method that is often used is ray tracing. Ray tracing does not only model local illumination but also global illumination. Local illumination count ambient, diffuse and specular effects only, but global illumination also count mirroring and transparency. Local illumination count effects from the lamp(s but global illumination count effects from other object(s too. Objects that are usually modeled are primitive objects and mesh objects. The advantage of mesh modeling is various, interesting and real-like shape. Mesh contains many primitive objects like triangle or square (rare. A problem in mesh object modeling is long rendering time. It is because every ray must be checked with a lot of triangle of the mesh. Added by ray from other objects checking, the number of ray that traced will increase. It causes the increasing of rendering time. To solve this problem, in this research, new methods are developed to make the rendering process of mesh object faster. The new methods are angle comparison and distance comparison. These methods are used to reduce the number of ray checking. The rays predicted will not intersect with the mesh, are not checked weather the ray intersects the mesh. With angle comparison, if using small angle to compare, the rendering process will be fast. This method has disadvantage, if the shape of each triangle is big, some triangles will be corrupted. If the angle to compare is bigger, mesh corruption can be avoided but the rendering time will be longer than without comparison. With distance comparison, the rendering time is less than without comparison, and no triangle will be corrupted.

  3. Compact and intense parametric x-ray radiation source based on a linear accelerator with cryogenic accelerating and decelerating copper structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, J.; Satoh, M.; Yoshida, M.; Sakai, T.; Hayakawa, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Hayakawa, K.; Sato, I.; Endo, K.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a proposal for a compact x-ray source based on parametric x-ray radiation (PXR). The PXR, which is produced when a single crystal is bombarded with relativistic electrons, has good monochromaticity and spatial coherence, and is expected to be well suited for imaging of low-Z materials and medical application. The proposed system employs a pair of copper accelerating structures which are operated at a cryogenic temperature of 20 K and arranged to form a resonant ring configuration. The electron beam is once accelerated up to 75 MeV in one of the structures, being decelerated down to lower than 7 MeV in the other structure after generating PXR at a single crystal, and then dumped. The expected x-ray yield is 1 09 photons /s at a center energy of 15 keV or higher.

  4. Vibration acceleration promotes bone formation in rodent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Uchida

    Full Text Available All living tissues and cells on Earth are subject to gravitational acceleration, but no reports have verified whether acceleration mode influences bone formation and healing. Therefore, this study was to compare the effects of two acceleration modes, vibration and constant (centrifugal accelerations, on bone formation and healing in the trunk using BMP 2-induced ectopic bone formation (EBF mouse model and a rib fracture healing (RFH rat model. Additionally, we tried to verify the difference in mechanism of effect on bone formation by accelerations between these two models. Three groups (low- and high-magnitude vibration and control-VA groups were evaluated in the vibration acceleration study, and two groups (centrifuge acceleration and control-CA groups were used in the constant acceleration study. In each model, the intervention was applied for ten minutes per day from three days after surgery for eleven days (EBF model or nine days (RFH model. All animals were sacrificed the day after the intervention ended. In the EBF model, ectopic bone was evaluated by macroscopic and histological observations, wet weight, radiography and microfocus computed tomography (micro-CT. In the RFH model, whole fracture-repaired ribs were excised with removal of soft tissue, and evaluated radiologically and histologically. Ectopic bones in the low-magnitude group (EBF model had significantly greater wet weight and were significantly larger (macroscopically and radiographically than those in the other two groups, whereas the size and wet weight of ectopic bones in the centrifuge acceleration group showed no significant difference compared those in control-CA group. All ectopic bones showed calcified trabeculae and maturated bone marrow. Micro-CT showed that bone volume (BV in the low-magnitude group of EBF model was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (3.1±1.2mm3 v.s. 1.8±1.2mm3 in high-magnitude group and 1.3±0.9mm3 in control-VA group, but

  5. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  6. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  7. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, C M; Rusby, D R; Armstrong, C; Wilson, L A; Clarke, R; Haddock, D; McClymont, A; Notley, M; Oliver, P; Allott, R; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Neely, D; Mirfayzi, S R; Alejo, A; Ahmed, H; Kar, S; Butler, N M H; Higginson, A; McKenna, P; Murphy, C

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ∼2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification. (paper)

  8. Accurate modeling of the hose instability in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2018-05-01

    Hosing is a major challenge for the applicability of plasma wakefield accelerators and its modeling is therefore of fundamental importance to facilitate future stable and compact plasma-based particle accelerators. In this contribution, we present a new model for the evolution of the plasma centroid, which enables the accurate investigation of the hose instability in the nonlinear blowout regime. It paves the road for more precise and comprehensive studies of hosing, e.g., with drive and witness beams, which were not possible with previous models.

  9. Ideas for fast accelerator model calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.

    1997-05-01

    With the advent of a simple matrix inversion technique, measurement-based storage ring modeling has made rapid progress in recent years. Using fast computers with large memory, the matrix inversion procedure typically adjusts up to 10 3 model variables to fit the order of 10 5 measurements. The results have been surprisingly accurate. Physics aside, one of the next frontiers is to simplify the process and to reduce computation time. In this paper, the authors discuss two approaches to speed up the model calibration process: recursive least-squares fitting and a piecewise fitting approach

  10. Finite difference time domain modelling of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1989-03-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modelling has been successfully applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems for many years. Here the method is extended to incorporate the modelling of wake fields in particle accelerators. Algorithmic comparisons are made to existing wake field codes, such as MAFIA T3. 9 refs., 7 figs

  11. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Particle accelerators are host to myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  12. Electron acceleration in supernova remnants and diffuse gamma rays above 1 GeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Esposito, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    V. The time dependence stems from the Poisson fluctuations in the number of SNRs within a certain volume and within a certain time interval. As far as cosmic-ray electrons are concerned, the Galaxy looks like actively bubbling Swiss cheese rather than a steady, homogeneously filled system. Our finding has...... important consequences for studies of the Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, for which a strong excess over model predictions above 1 GeV has recently been reported. While these models relied on an electron injection spectrum with index 2.4 (chosen to fit the local electron flux up to 1 TeV), we show...

  13. TIME-DEPENDENT STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION MODEL FOR FERMI BUBBLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kento; Asano, Katsuaki; Terasawa, Toshio, E-mail: kentos@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: terasawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    We study stochastic acceleration models for the Fermi bubbles. Turbulence is excited just behind the shock front via Kelvin–Helmholtz, Rayleigh–Taylor, or Richtmyer–Meshkov instabilities, and plasma particles are continuously accelerated by the interaction with the turbulence. The turbulence gradually decays as it goes away from the shock fronts. Adopting a phenomenological model for the stochastic acceleration, we explicitly solve the temporal evolution of the particle energy distribution in the turbulence. Our results show that the spatial distribution of high-energy particles is different from those for a steady solution. We also show that the contribution of electrons that escaped from the acceleration regions significantly softens the photon spectrum. The photon spectrum and surface brightness profile are reproduced by our models. If the escape efficiency is very high, the radio flux from the escaped low-energy electrons can be comparable to that of the WMAP haze. We also demonstrate hadronic models with the stochastic acceleration, but they are unlikely in the viewpoint of the energy budget.

  14. A General Accelerated Degradation Model Based on the Wiener Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Li, Xiaoyang; Sun, Fuqiang; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-06

    Accelerated degradation testing (ADT) is an efficient tool to conduct material service reliability and safety evaluations by analyzing performance degradation data. Traditional stochastic process models are mainly for linear or linearization degradation paths. However, those methods are not applicable for the situations where the degradation processes cannot be linearized. Hence, in this paper, a general ADT model based on the Wiener process is proposed to solve the problem for accelerated degradation data analysis. The general model can consider the unit-to-unit variation and temporal variation of the degradation process, and is suitable for both linear and nonlinear ADT analyses with single or multiple acceleration variables. The statistical inference is given to estimate the unknown parameters in both constant stress and step stress ADT. The simulation example and two real applications demonstrate that the proposed method can yield reliable lifetime evaluation results compared with the existing linear and time-scale transformation Wiener processes in both linear and nonlinear ADT analyses.

  15. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, L.; Youssef, S. A.; de Bruin, A.

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of geroscience,

  16. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs

  17. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience,"

  18. Modeling high-power RF accelerator cavities with SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical interactions between RF accelerator cavities and high-power beams can be treated on personal computers using a lumped circuit element model and the SPICE circuit analysis code. Applications include studies of wake potentials, two-beam accelerators, microwave sources, and transverse mode damping. This report describes the construction of analogs for TM mn0 modes and the creation of SPICE input for cylindrical cavities. The models were used to study continuous generation of kA electron beam pulses from a vacuum cavity driven by a high-power RF source

  19. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L.G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  20. Evaluating secular acceleration in geomagnetic field model GRIMM-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, V.; Wardinski, I.

    2012-12-01

    Secular acceleration of the magnetic field is the rate of change of its secular variation. One of the main results of studying magnetic data collected by the German survey satellite CHAMP was the mapping of field acceleration and its evolution in time. Questions remain about the accuracy of the modeled acceleration and the effect of the applied regularization processes. We have evaluated to what extent the regularization affects the temporal variability of the Gauss coefficients. We also obtained results of temporal variability of the Gauss coefficients where alternative approaches to the usual smoothing norms have been applied for regularization. Except for the dipole term, the secular acceleration of the Gauss coefficients is fairly well described up to spherical harmonic degree 5 or 6. There is no clear evidence from observatory data that the spectrum of this acceleration is underestimated at the Earth surface. Assuming a resistive mantle, the observed acceleration supports a characteristic time scale for the secular variation of the order of 11 years.

  1. On accelerator neutron/γ-ray incineration of long-lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation and control of the incineration of Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFPs) by using the accelerator neutrons/γ-rays is presented. An arbitrary number of the auxiliary transmutation chains, each of which consists of a LLFP and its reaction precursors up to 144, are used for calculating the time-dependent depletion-production of the LLFP. In the energy range below 20 MeV, about 20 types of neutron reaction are energetically possible. The semi-empirical formulas and its parameter systematics are used for all the energy dependent reaction cross sections. A computer code TRANS-N.G based on the foregoing prescription for nuclear reactions could be applied to the LLFP incineration strategies under a large variety of situations. (author)

  2. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  3. High energy emission of supernova sn 1987a. Cosmic rays acceleration in mixed shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehoucq, Roland

    1992-01-01

    In its first part, this research thesis reports the study of the high energy emission of the sn 1987 supernova, based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the transfer of γ photons emitted during disintegration of radioactive elements (such as "5"6Ni, "5"6Co, "5"7Co and "4"4Ti) produced during the explosion. One of the studied problems is the late evolution (beyond 1200 days) of light curvature which is very different when it is powered by the radiation of a central object or by radioactivity. The second part reports the study of acceleration of cosmic rays in two-fluid shock waves in order to understand the different asymmetries noticed in hot spots of extragalactic radio-sources. This work comprises the resolution of structure equations of a shock made of a conventional fluid and a relativistic one, in presence or absence of a magnetic field [fr

  4. Optically controlled laser-plasma electron accelerator for compact gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2018-02-01

    Generating quasi-monochromatic, femtosecond γ-ray pulses via Thomson scattering (TS) demands exceptional electron beam (e-beam) quality, such as percent-scale energy spread and five-dimensional brightness over 1016 A m-2. We show that near-GeV e-beams with these metrics can be accelerated in a cavity of electron density, driven with an incoherent stack of Joule-scale laser pulses through a mm-size, dense plasma (n 0 ˜ 1019 cm-3). Changing the time delay, frequency difference, and energy ratio of the stack components controls the e-beam phase space on the femtosecond scale, while the modest energy of the optical driver helps afford kHz-scale repetition rate at manageable average power. Blue-shifting one stack component by a considerable fraction of the carrier frequency makes the stack immune to self-compression. This, in turn, minimizes uncontrolled variation in the cavity shape, suppressing continuous injection of ambient plasma electrons, preserving a single, ultra-bright electron bunch. In addition, weak focusing of the trailing component of the stack induces periodic injection, generating, in a single shot, a train of bunches with controllable energy spacing and femtosecond synchronization. These designer e-beams, inaccessible to conventional acceleration methods, generate, via TS, gigawatt γ-ray pulses (or multi-color pulse trains) with the mean energy in the range of interest for nuclear photonics (4-16 MeV), containing over 106 photons within a microsteradian-scale observation cone.

  5. Self-powered detector probes for electron and gamma-ray beam monitoring in high-power industrial accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    A self-powered detector (SPD) is a simple passive device that consists of a coaxial probe with a metallic outer sleeve, a mineral oxide insulating layer, and a metallic inner core. SPDs are used in nuclear reactors for monitoring neutron and gamma ray fields. Responses of various SPDs to electron and gamma ray beams from industrial accelerators were investigated with Monte Carlo simulations. By judicious choice of transmission filters, threshold SPD probes were investigated for on-line monitoring of the beam energy spectrum of the high-power IMPELA industrial electron accelerator. (Author) (14 figs, 16 refs.)

  6. Scattered fractions of dose from 18 and 25 MV X-ray radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobe, J.; Rodgers, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Jackson, J.; Popescu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, measurements have been made at a few energies to estimate the scattered fraction of dose from the patient in medical radiotherapy operations. This information has been a useful aid in the determination of shielding requirements for these facilities. With these measurements, known characteriztics of photons, and various other known parameters, Monte Carlo codes are being used to calculate the scattered fractions and hence the shielding requirements for the photons of other energies commonly used in radiotherapeutic applications. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) acquired a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (linac) which was previously located at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. This linac provides an X-ray beam of 25 MV photons and electron beams with energies up to 32 MeV. The housing on the gantry was permanently removed from the accelerator during installation. A Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator was used to produce the 18 MV photons at the Frederick Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Therapy Center in Frederick, MD. This paper represents a study of the photon dose scattered from a patient in typical radiation treatment situations as it relates to the dose delivered at the isocenter in water. The results of these measurements will be compared to Monte Carlo calculations. Photon spectral measurements were not made at this time. Neutron spectral measurements were made on this Sagittaire machine in its previous location and that work was not repeated here, although a brief study of the neutron component of the 18 and 25 MV linacs was performed utilizing thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) to determine the isotropy of the neutron dose. (author)

  7. X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Wang Jue; Chen Weimin

    2009-01-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radiation complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials. (authors)

  8. Gamma-ray and neutron area monitoring system of linear IFMIF prototype accelerator building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Kojima, Toshiyuki; Narita, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Kazuyoshi; Maebara, Sunao; Sakaki, Hironao; Nishiyama, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Area monitoring system and control system are needed for LIPAc radiation management. • To secure the radiation safety, these systems are linked with two kinds of data path. • Hardwired data paths are adopted to realize the fast transfer of interlock signals. • Dual LAN and shared memory are adopted to the reliable transfer of monitoring data. • Data transfers without unnecessary load are designed and configured for these systems. -- Abstract: The linear IFMIF prototype accelerator (LIPAc) produces deuteron beam with 1 MW power. Since huge number of neutrons occur from such a high power beam, therefore, it is important for the radiation management to design a high reliability area monitoring system for gamma-rays and neutrons. To obtain the valuable operation data of the high-power deuteron beam at LIPAc, it is important to link and record the beam operation data and the area monitoring data. We realize the reliable data transfer to provide the area monitoring data to the accelerator control system which needs a high reliability using the shared-memory data link method. This paper describes the area monitoring system in the LIPAc building and the data-link between this system and the LIPAc control system

  9. Chemical Transport Models on Accelerator Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, J.; Sandu, A.

    2008-12-01

    Heterogeneous multicore chipsets with many layers of polymorphic parallelism are becoming increasingly common in high-performance computing systems. Homogeneous co-processors with many streaming processors also offer unprecedented peak floating-point performance. Effective use of parallelism in these new chipsets is paramount. We present optimization techniques for 3D chemical transport models to take full advantage of emerging Cell Broadband Engine and graphical processing unit (GPU) technology. Our techniques achieve 2.15x the per-node performance of an IBM BlueGene/P on the Cell Broadband Engine, and a strongly-scalable 1.75x the per-node performance of an IBM BlueGene/P on an NVIDIA GeForce 8600.

  10. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L Saenz; Bhudatt R Paliwal; John E Bayouth

    2014-01-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This ...

  11. Electric field of thunderclouds and cosmic rays: evidence for acceleration of particles (runaway electrons)

    CERN Document Server

    Khaerdinov, N S; Petkov, V B; 12th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    2004-01-01

    We present the data on correlations of the intensity of the soft component of cosmic rays with the local electric field of the near-earth atmosphere during thunderstorm periods at the Baksan Valley (North Caucasus, 1700 m a. s. l.). The large-area array for studying the extensive air showers of cosmic rays is used as a particle detector. An electric field meter of the "electric mill" type (rain-protected) is mounted on the roof of the building in the center of this array. The data were obtained in the summer seasons of 2000-2002. We observe strong enhancements of the soft component intensity before some lightning strokes. At the same time, the analysis of the regression curve "intensity versus field" discovers a bump at the field sign that is opposite to the field sign corresponding to acceleration of electrons. It is interpreted as a signature of runaway electrons from the region of the strong field (with opposite sign) overhead.

  12. Reconstruction of X-rays spectra of clinical linear accelerators using the generalized simulated annealing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, John Peter O.; Costa, Alessandro M.

    2016-01-01

    The spectral distribution of megavoltage X-rays used in radiotherapy departments is a fundamental quantity from which, in principle, all relevant information required for radiotherapy treatments can be determined. To calculate the dose delivered to the patient who make radiation therapy, are used treatment planning systems (TPS), which make use of convolution and superposition algorithms and which requires prior knowledge of the photon fluence spectrum to perform the calculation of three-dimensional doses and thus ensure better accuracy in the tumor control probabilities preserving the normal tissue complication probabilities low. In this work we have obtained the photon fluence spectrum of X-ray of the SIEMENS ONCOR linear accelerator of 6 MV, using an character-inverse method to the reconstruction of the spectra of photons from transmission curves measured for different thicknesses of aluminum; the method used for reconstruction of the spectra is a stochastic technique known as generalized simulated annealing (GSA), based on the work of quasi-equilibrium statistic of Tsallis. For the validation of the reconstructed spectra we calculated the curve of percentage depth dose (PDD) for energy of 6 MV, using Monte Carlo simulation with Penelope code, and from the PDD then calculate the beam quality index TPR_2_0_/_1_0. (author)

  13. Scatter fractions from linear accelerators with x-ray energies from 6 to 24 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P L; Rodgers, J E; Shobe, J

    1999-08-01

    Computation of shielding requirements for a linear accelerator must take into account the amount of radiation scattered from the patient to areas outside the primary beam. Currently, the most frequently used data are from NCRP 49 that only includes data for x-ray energies up to 6 MV and angles from 30 degrees to 135 degrees. In this work we have determined by Monte Carlo simulation the scattered fractions of dose for a wide range of energies and angles of clinical significance including 6, 10, 18, and 24 MV and scattering angles from 10 degrees to 150 degrees. Calculations were made for a 400 cm2 circular field size impinging onto a spherical phantom. Scattered fractions of dose were determined at 1 m from the phantom. Angles from 10 degrees to 30 degrees are of concern for higher energies where the scatter is primarily in the forward direction. An error in scatter fraction may result in too little secondary shielding near the junction with the primary barrier. The Monte Carlo code ITS (Version 3.0) developed at Sandia National Laboratory and NIST was used to simulate scatter from the patient to the barrier. Of significance was the variation of calculated scattered dose with depth of measurement within the barrier indicating that accurate values may be difficult to obtain. Mean energies of scatter x-ray spectra are presented.

  14. Accelerated diffusion controlled creep of polycrystalline materials. Communication 1. Model of diffusion controlled creep acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, E.S.; Chuvil'deev, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The model is suggested which describes the influence of large-angle grain boundary migration on a diffusion controlled creep rate in polycrystalline materials (Coble creep). The model is based on the concept about changing the value of migrating boundary free volume when introducing dislocations distributed over the grain bulk into this boundary. Expressions are obtained to calculate the grain boundary diffusion coefficient under conditions of boundary migration and the parameter, which characterized the value of Coble creep acceleration. A comparison is made between calculated and experimental data for Cd, Co and Fe

  15. Photoneutron intensity variation with field size around radiotherapy linear accelerator 18-MeV X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghamdi, H.; Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Maalej, N. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-08-15

    In X-ray radiotherapy accelerators, neutrons are produced mainly by ({gamma},n) reaction when high energy X-rays interact with high Z materials of the linear accelerator head. These materials include the lead (Pb) used as shielding in the collimator, tungsten (W) target used for the production of X-rays and iron (Fe) in the accelerator head. These unwanted neutrons contaminate the therapeutic beam and contribute to the patient dose during the treatment of a cancer patient. Knowing the neutron distribution around the radiotherapy accelerator is therefore desired. CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs) were used to study the variation of fast and thermal neutron relative intensities around an 18 MeV linear accelerator X-ray beam with the field sizes of 0, 10x10, 20x20, 30x30 and 40x40cm{sup 2}. For fast neutron detection, bare NTDs were used. For thermal neutron detection, NTDs were covered with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters. The NTDs were placed at different locations in the direction perpendicular to the treatment couch (transversal) and in the direction parallel to the treatment couch (longitudinal) with respect to the isocenter of the accelerator. The fast neutron relative intensity is symmetrical about the beam axis and exhibits an exponential-like drop with distance from the isocenter of the accelerator for all the field sizes. At the primary beam (isocenter), the relative fast neutron intensity is highest for 40x40cm{sup 2} field size and decreases linearly with the decrease in the field size. However, fast neutron intensities do not change significantly with beam size for the measurements outside the primary beam. The fast neutron intensity in the longitudinal direction outside the primary beam decreases linearly with the field size. The thermal neutron intensity, at any location, was found to be almost independent of the field size.

  16. Modeling Nonlinear Change via Latent Change and Latent Acceleration Frameworks: Examining Velocity and Acceleration of Growth Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Kevin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Mazzocco, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of the latent change and latent acceleration frameworks for modeling nonlinear growth in structural equation models. Moving to these frameworks allows for the direct identification of "rates of change" and "acceleration" in latent growth curves--information available indirectly through traditional growth…

  17. Theoretical temperature model with experimental validation for CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2126138; Vamvakas, Alex; Alme, Johan

    Micron level stability of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) components is one of the main requirements to meet the luminosity goal for the future $48 \\,km$ long underground linear accelerator. The radio frequency (RF) power used for beam acceleration causes heat generation within the aligned structures, resulting in mechanical movements and structural deformations. A dedicated control of the air- and water- cooling system in the tunnel is therefore crucial to improve alignment accuracy. This thesis investigates the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC Accelerating Structure (AS). In CLIC, the AS must be aligned to a precision of $10\\,\\mu m$. The thesis shows that a relatively simple theoretical model can be used within reasonable accuracy to predict the temperature response of an AS as a function of the applied RF power. During failure scenarios or maintenance interventions, the RF power is turned off resulting in no heat dissipation and decrease in the overall temperature of the components. The theoretica...

  18. Geneva University: Particle Acceleration in supernova remnants and its implications for the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11h15 - Science III, Auditoire 1S081 Particle Acceleration in supernova remnants and its implications for the origin of galactic cosmic rays Prof. Pasquale BLASI INAF, Arcetri Observatory, Firenze The process of cosmic ray energization in supernova remnant shocks is described by the theory of non linear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA). Such theory is able to describe the acceleration itself, the dynamical reaction of accelerated particles on the shock, and the crucial phenomenon of the magnetic field amplification, the very key to generate high energy cosmic rays. I will illustrate the basic aspects of this theoretical framework, as well as its successes and problems. I will then discuss the observations, in X-rays an...

  19. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  20. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in Toyota Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Part of the US Department of Transportation investigation of Toyota sudden unintended acceleration (SUA) involved analysis of the throttle control software, JPL Laboratory for Reliable Software applied several techniques including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software; A handful of logic models were build, Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found; The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  1. Modeling of thermalization phenomena in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Panneerchelvam, Premkumar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2018-05-01

    Coaxial plasma accelerators are electromagnetic acceleration devices that employ a self-induced Lorentz force to produce collimated plasma jets with velocities ~50 km s‑1. The accelerator operation is characterized by the formation of an ionization/thermalization zone near gas inlet of the device that continually processes the incoming neutral gas into a highly ionized thermal plasma. In this paper, we present a 1D non-equilibrium plasma model to resolve the plasma formation and the electron-heavy species thermalization phenomena that take place in the thermalization zone. The non-equilibrium model is based on a self-consistent multi-species continuum description of the plasma with finite-rate chemistry. The thermalization zone is modelled by tracking a 1D gas-bit as it convects down the device with an initial gas pressure of 1 atm. The thermalization process occurs in two stages. The first is a plasma production stage, associated with a rapid increase in the charged species number densities facilitated by cathode surface electron emission and volumetric production processes. The production stage results in the formation of a two-temperature plasma with electron energies of ~2.5 eV in a low temperature background gas of ~300 K. The second, a temperature equilibration stage, is characterized by the energy transfer between the electrons and heavy species. The characteristic length scale for thermalization is found to be comparable to axial length of the accelerator thus putting into question the equilibrium magnetohydrodynamics assumption used in modeling coaxial accelerators.

  2. Geometry of the non-thermal emission in SN 1006. Azimuthal variations of cosmic-ray acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenflug, R.; Ballet, J.; Dubner, Gloria Mabel; Giacani, Elsa Beatriz; Decourchelle, A.; Ferrando, P.

    2017-01-01

    SN 1006 is the prototype of shell supernova remnants, in which non-thermal synchrotron emission dominates the X-ray spectrum. The non-thermal emission is due to the cosmic-ray electrons accelerated behind the blast wave. The X-ray synchrotron emission is due to the highest energy electrons, and is thus a tracer of the maximum energy electrons may reach behind a shock. We have put together all XMM-Newton observations to build a full map of SN 1006. The very low brightness a...

  3. ANALYTIC SOLUTION FOR SELF-REGULATED COLLECTIVE ESCAPE OF COSMIC RAYS FROM THEIR ACCELERATION SITES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Aharonian, F. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs), as the major contributors to the galactic cosmic rays (CRs), are believed to maintain an average CR spectrum by diffusive shock acceleration regardless of the way they release CRs into the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the interaction of the CRs with nearby gas clouds crucially depends on the release mechanism. We call into question two aspects of a popular paradigm of the CR injection into the ISM, according to which they passively and isotropically diffuse in the prescribed magnetic fluctuations as test particles. First, we treat the escaping CR and the Alfvén waves excited by them on an equal footing. Second, we adopt field-aligned CR escape outside the source, where the waves become weak. An exact analytic self-similar solution for a CR ''cloud'' released by a dimmed accelerator strongly deviates from the test-particle result. The normalized CR partial pressure may be approximated as P(p,z,t)=2[|z| 5/3 +z dif 5/3 (p,t)] -3/5 exp[-z 2 /4D ISM (p)t], where p is the momentum of CR particle, and z is directed along the field. The core of the cloud expands as z dif ∝√(D NL (p)t) and decays in time as p∝2z -1 dif (t). The diffusion coefficient D NL is strongly suppressed compared to its background ISM value D ISM : D NL ∼ D ISM exp (– Π) ISM for sufficiently high field-line-integrated CR partial pressure, Π. When Π >> 1, the CRs drive Alfvén waves efficiently enough to build a transport barrier (p≈2/∣z∣— p edestal ) that strongly reduces the leakage. The solution has a spectral break at p = p br , where p br satisfies the equation D NL (p br ) ≅ z 2 /t.

  4. Mathematical model of two-phase flow in accelerator channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Ф. Нікулін

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The problem of  two-phase flow composed of energy-carrier phase (Newtonian liquid and solid fine-dispersed phase (particles in counter jet mill accelerator channel is considered. The mathematical model bases goes on the supposition that the phases interact with each other like independent substances by means of aerodynamics’ forces in conditions of adiabatic flow. The mathematical model in the form of system of differential equations of order 11 is represented. Derivations of equations by base physical principles for cross-section-averaged quantity are produced. The mathematical model can be used for estimation of any kinematic and thermodynamic flow characteristics for purposely parameters optimization problem solving and transfer functions determination, that take place in  counter jet mill accelerator channel design.

  5. Ice-sheet modelling accelerated by graphics cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brædstrup, Christian Fredborg; Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek

    2014-11-01

    Studies of glaciers and ice sheets have increased the demand for high performance numerical ice flow models over the past decades. When exploring the highly non-linear dynamics of fast flowing glaciers and ice streams, or when coupling multiple flow processes for ice, water, and sediment, researchers are often forced to use super-computing clusters. As an alternative to conventional high-performance computing hardware, the Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) is capable of massively parallel computing while retaining a compact design and low cost. In this study, we present a strategy for accelerating a higher-order ice flow model using a GPU. By applying the newest GPU hardware, we achieve up to 180× speedup compared to a similar but serial CPU implementation. Our results suggest that GPU acceleration is a competitive option for ice-flow modelling when compared to CPU-optimised algorithms parallelised by the OpenMP or Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocols.

  6. SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MODELING OF THE GAMMA-RAY DISTRIBUTION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foreman, Gary; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert; Fields, Brian; Ricker, Paul [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hughes, Annie, E-mail: gforema2@illinois.edu [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-20

    We perform spatial and spectral analyses of the LMC gamma-ray emission collected over 66 months by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In our spatial analysis, we model the LMC cosmic-ray distribution and gamma-ray production using observed maps of the LMC interstellar medium, star formation history, interstellar radiation field, and synchrotron emission. We use bootstrapping of the data to quantify the robustness of spatial model performance. We model the LMC gamma-ray spectrum using fitting functions derived from the physics of π{sup 0} decay, Bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton scattering. We find the integrated gamma-ray flux of the LMC from 200 MeV to 20 GeV to be 1.37 ± 0.02 × 10{sup −7} ph cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, of which we attribute about 6% to inverse Compton scattering and 44% to Bremsstrahlung. From our work, we conclude that the spectral index of the LMC cosmic-ray proton population is 2.4 ± 0.2, and we find that cosmic-ray energy loss through gamma-ray production is concentrated within a few 100 pc of acceleration sites. Assuming cosmic-ray energy equipartition with magnetic fields, we estimate LMC cosmic rays encounter an average magnetic field strength ∼3 μG.

  7. Towards a Unified Source-Propagation Model of Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M.; Molla, M.

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that the cosmic ray energy spectrum is multifractal with the analysis of cosmic ray fluxes as a function of energy revealing a first “knee” slightly below 1016 eV, a second knee slightly below 1018 eV and an “ankle” close to 1019 eV. The behaviour of the highest energy cosmic rays around and above the ankle is still a mystery and precludes the development of a unified source-propagation model of cosmic rays from their source origin to Earth. A variety of acceleration and propagation mechanisms have been proposed to explain different parts of the spectrum the most famous of course being Fermi acceleration in magnetised turbulent plasmas (Fermi 1949). Many others have been proposd for energies at and below the first knee (Peters & Cimento (1961); Lagage & Cesarsky (1983); Drury et al. (1984); Wdowczyk & Wolfendale (1984); Ptuskin et al. (1993); Dova et al. (0000); Horandel et al. (2002); Axford (1991)) as well as at higher energies between the first knee and the ankle (Nagano & Watson (2000); Bhattacharjee & Sigl (2000); Malkov & Drury (2001)). The recent fit of most of the cosmic ray spectrum up to the ankle using non-extensive statistical mechanics (NESM) (Tsallis et al. (2003)) provides what may be the strongest evidence for a source-propagation system deviating significantly from Boltmann statistics. As Tsallis has shown (Tsallis et al. (2003)), the knees appear as crossovers between two fractal-like thermal regimes. In this work, we have developed a generalisation of the second order NESM model (Tsallis et al. (2003)) to higher orders and we have fit the complete spectrum including the ankle with third order NESM. We find that, towards the GDZ limit, a new mechanism comes into play. Surprisingly it also presents as a modulation akin to that in our own local neighbourhood of cosmic rays emitted by the sun. We propose that this is due to modulation at the source and is possibly due to processes in the shell of the originating supernova. We

  8. Numerical modeling of the plasma ring acceleration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling of the LLNL RACE experiment and its many applications has necessitated the development and use of a wide array of computational tools. The two-dimensional MHD code, HAM, has been used to model the formation of a compact torus plasma ring in a magnetized coaxial gun and its subsequent acceleration by an additional applied toroidal field. Features included in the 2-D calculations are self-consistent models for (1) the time-dependent poloidal field produced by a capacitor bank discharge through a solenoid field coil (located either inside the gun inner electrode or outside the outer gun electrode) and the associated diffusion of magnetic flux through neighboring conductors, (2) gas flow into the gun annular region from a simulated puffed gas valve plenum, (3) formation and motion of a current sheet produced by J x B forces resulting from discharge of the gun capacitor bank through the plasma load between the coaxial gun electrodes, (4) the subsequent stretching and reconnection of the poloidal field lines to form a compact torus plasma ring, and (5) finally the discharge of the accelerator capacitor bank producing an additional toroidal field for acceleration of the plasma ring. The code has been extended to include various models for gas breakdown, plasma anomalous resistivity, and mass entrainment from ablation of electrode material

  9. Merging AI and numerical modeling for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the beginnings of an experiment to evaluate the power and limitations of artificial intelligence techniques combined with beam-line modeling for solving problems in accelerator control. Using the Knowledge Engineering Environment (KEE) system, they have built a knowledge base that describes the characteristics and the relationships of about 30 devices in a typical accelerator beam line. Each device in the line is categorized and pertinent attributes for each category are defined. Specific values for each device are assigned in the knowledge base to represent static characteristics. Device-specific slots are also provided for dynamic attributes. The definition of these slots reflects the data type and any limitations or restrictions on the range of the data. The authors model relationships between the various beam-line devices using the techniques of rules, active values, and object-oriented models. The knowledge base provides a framework for analyzing faults and offering suggestions to assist in tuning, based on information provided by the accelerator physicists (domain experts) responsible for designing and tuning this beam line. Our knowledge base has a powerful graphical interface. It allows the operator to mouse on an icon for a particular icon in the schematic of the beam line and obtain device-specific information and control over that device. The beam optics code Transport is used to model the beam line numerically. 11 refs., 7 figs

  10. Propositions for a PDF model based on fluid particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, J.P.; Pozorski, J.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes theoretical propositions to model the acceleration of a fluid particle in a turbulent flow. Such a model is useful for the PDF approach to turbulent reactive flows as well as for the Lagrangian modelling of two-phase flows. The model developed here draws from ideas already put forward by Sawford but which are generalized to the case of non-homogeneous flows. The model is built so as to revert continuously to Pope's model, which uses a Langevin equation for particle velocities, when the Reynolds number becomes very high. The derivation is based on the technique of fast variable elimination. This technique allow a careful analysis of the relations between different levels of modelling. It also allows to address certain problems in a more rigorous way. In particular, application of this technique shows that models presently used can in principle simulate bubbly flows including the pressure-gradient and added-mass forces. (author)

  11. Electron bunch diagnostics for laser-plasma accelerators, from THz to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plateau, G.

    2011-10-01

    This thesis presents a series of single-shot non-intrusive diagnostics of key attributes of electron bunches produced by a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA). Three injection mechanisms of the LPA are characterized: channeled and self-guided self-injection, plasma down-ramp injection, and two-beam colliding pulse injection. New diagnostic techniques are successfully demonstrated: up to 8 times higher sensitivity wavefront sensor-based plasma density measurements, strong spatio-temporal coupling of the focused THz pulse is demonstrated using the temporal electric-field cross-correlation (TEX) of a long chirped probe with a short probe and confirms the two-component structure of the bunch observed by electron spectrometry, and normalized transverse emittances as low as 0.1 mm mrad are demonstrated for 0.5 GeV-class beams produced in a capillary-guided LPA by characterizing the betatron radiation emitted by the electrons inside the plasma using a new single-shot X-ray spectroscopy technique. (author)

  12. Accelerated Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Data Analysis on a Heterogeneous High Performance Computing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, J; Bauer, M A, E-mail: qin.jinhui@gmail.com, E-mail: bauer@uwo.ca [Computer Science Department, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    The analysis of synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) data has been used by scientists and engineers to understand and predict properties of materials. However, the large volume of XRD image data and the intensive computations involved in the data analysis makes it hard for researchers to quickly reach any conclusions about the images from an experiment when using conventional XRD data analysis software. Synchrotron time is valuable and delays in XRD data analysis can impact decisions about subsequent experiments or about materials that they are investigating. In order to improve the data analysis performance, ideally to achieve near real time data analysis during an XRD experiment, we designed and implemented software for accelerated XRD data analysis. The software has been developed for a heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) system, comprised of IBM PowerXCell 8i processors and Intel quad-core Xeon processors. This paper describes the software and reports on the improved performance. The results indicate that it is possible for XRD data to be analyzed at the rate it is being produced.

  13. Accelerated Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Data Analysis on a Heterogeneous High Performance Computing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, J; Bauer, M A

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) data has been used by scientists and engineers to understand and predict properties of materials. However, the large volume of XRD image data and the intensive computations involved in the data analysis makes it hard for researchers to quickly reach any conclusions about the images from an experiment when using conventional XRD data analysis software. Synchrotron time is valuable and delays in XRD data analysis can impact decisions about subsequent experiments or about materials that they are investigating. In order to improve the data analysis performance, ideally to achieve near real time data analysis during an XRD experiment, we designed and implemented software for accelerated XRD data analysis. The software has been developed for a heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) system, comprised of IBM PowerXCell 8i processors and Intel quad-core Xeon processors. This paper describes the software and reports on the improved performance. The results indicate that it is possible for XRD data to be analyzed at the rate it is being produced.

  14. Reconnection, Particle Acceleration, and Hard X-ray Emission in Eruptive Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Petrus C.

    1998-11-01

    The frequent occurrence of Hard X-ray emission from the top of flaring loops was one of the discoveries by the Hard X-ray telescope on board the Japanese Yohkoh satellite. I will show how the combined effect of magnetic field convergence and pitch- angle scattering of non-thermal electrons injected at the top of the loop results in the generation of looptop sources with properties akin to those observed by Yohkoh. In addition it is shown that the injection of proton beams in the loop legs, expected from theory, reproduces the observed high temperature ``ridges" in the loop legs by mirroring and energy loss through collisions. I will interpret these numerical results as supporting the now widely accepted model of an erupting magnetic flux tube generating a reconnecting current sheet in its wake, where most of the energy release takes place. The strong similarity with the reconnection observed in the MRX experiment in Princeton will be analyzed in detail.

  15. A Model of RHIC Using the Unified Accelerator Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trahern, C. G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Malitsky, N. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Unified Accelerator Library (UAL) is an object oriented and modular software environment for accelerator physics which comprises an accelerator object model for the description of the machine (SMF, for Standard Machine Format), a collection of Physics Libraries, and a Perl inte,face that provides a homo­geneous shell for integrating and managing these components. Currently available physics libraries include TEAPOT++, a collection of C++ physics modules conceptually derived from TEAPOT, and DNZLIB, a differential algebra package for map generation. This software environment has been used to build a flat model of RHIC which retains the hierarchical lat­tice description while assigning specific characteristics to individual elements, such as measured field har­monics. A first application of the model and of the simulation capabilities of UAL has been the study of RHIC stability in the presence of siberian snakes and spin rotators. The building blocks of RHIC snakes and rotators are helical dipoles, unconventional devices that can not be modeled by traditional accelerator phys­ics codes and have been implemented in UAL as Taylor maps. Section 2 describes the RHIC data stores, Section 3 the RHIC SMF format and Section 4 the RHIC spe­cific Perl interface (RHIC Shell). Section 5 explains how the RHIC SMF and UAL have been used to study the RHIC dynamic behavior and presents detuning and dynamic aperture results. If the reader is not familiar with the motivation and characteristics of UAL, we include in the Appendix an useful overview paper. An example of a complete set of Perl Scripts for RHIC simulation can also be found in the Appendix.

  16. On the properties of synchrotron-like X-ray emission from laser wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, C.; Schumaker, W.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Dollar, F.; Kalintchenko, G.; Kneip, S.; Najmudin, Z.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Vargas, M.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2018-04-01

    The electric and magnetic fields responsible for electron acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) also cause electrons to radiate x-ray photons. Such x-ray pulses have several desirable properties including short duration and being well collimated with tunable high energy. We measure the scaling of this x-ray source experimentally up to laser powers greater than 100 TW. An increase in laser power allows electron trapping at a lower density as well as with an increased trapped charge. These effects resulted in an x-ray fluence that was measured to increase non-linearly with laser power. The fluence of x-rays was also compared with that produced from K-α emission resulting from a solid target interaction for the same energy laser pulse. The flux was shown to be comparable, but the LWFA x-rays had a significantly smaller source size. This indicates that such a source may be useful as a backlighter for probing high energy density plasmas with ultrafast temporal resolution.

  17. A General Accelerated Degradation Model Based on the Wiener Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated degradation testing (ADT is an efficient tool to conduct material service reliability and safety evaluations by analyzing performance degradation data. Traditional stochastic process models are mainly for linear or linearization degradation paths. However, those methods are not applicable for the situations where the degradation processes cannot be linearized. Hence, in this paper, a general ADT model based on the Wiener process is proposed to solve the problem for accelerated degradation data analysis. The general model can consider the unit-to-unit variation and temporal variation of the degradation process, and is suitable for both linear and nonlinear ADT analyses with single or multiple acceleration variables. The statistical inference is given to estimate the unknown parameters in both constant stress and step stress ADT. The simulation example and two real applications demonstrate that the proposed method can yield reliable lifetime evaluation results compared with the existing linear and time-scale transformation Wiener processes in both linear and nonlinear ADT analyses.

  18. Jet models of X-Ray Flashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, D.Q.; Donaghy, T.Q.; Graziani, C.

    2005-01-01

    One third of all HETE-2-localized bursts are X-Ray Flashes (XRFs), a class of events first identified by Heise in which the fluence in the 2-30 keV energy band exceeds that in the 30-400 keV energy band We summarize recent HETE-2 and other results on the properties of XRFs. These results show that the properties of XRFs, X-ray-rich gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and GRBs form a continuum, and thus provide evidence that all three kinds of bursts are closely related phenomena. As the most extreme burst population, XRFs provide severe constraints on burst models and unique insights into the structure of GRB jets, the GRB rate, and the nature of Type Ib/Ic supernovae. We briefly mention a number of the physical models that have been proposed to explain XRFs. We then consider two fundamentally different classes of phenomenological jet models: universal jet models, in which it is posited that all GRBs jets are identical and that differences in the observed properties of the bursts are due entirely to differences in the viewing angle; and variable-opening angle jet models, in which it is posited that GRB jets have a distribution of jet opening angles and that differences in the observed properties of the bursts are due to differences in the emissivity and spectra of jets having different opening angles. We consider three shapes far the emissivity as a function of the viewing angle θ ν from the axis of the jet: power law, top hat (or uniform) , and Gaussian (or Fisher). We then discuss the effect of relativistic beaming on each of these models. We show that observations can distinguish between these various models

  19. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  20. Accelerator system model (ASM): A unique tool in exploring accelerator driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) system trade space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, T.J.; Favale, A.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Burger, E.C.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.; Piaszczyk, C.M.; Piechowiak, E.M.; Rathke, J.W. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States). Advanced Technology and Development Center

    1997-09-01

    To aid in the development and optimization of emerging Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) concepts, the Northrop Grumman Corporation, working together with G.H. Gillespie Associates and Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a computational tool which combines both accelerator physics layout/analysis capabilities with engineering analysis capabilities to create a standardized platform to compare and contrast accelerator system configurations. In this context, the accelerator system configuration includes not only the accelerating structures, but also the major support systems such as the vacuum, thermal control, RF power, and cryogenic subsystem (if superconducting accelerator operation is investigated) as well as estimates of the costs for enclosures (accelerating tunnel and RF halls). This paper presents an overview of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code flow, as well as a discussion of the data and analysis upon which it is based. Also presented is material which addresses the development of the evaluation criteria employed by this code including a presentation of the economic analysis methods, and a discussion of the cost database employed. The paper concludes with examples depicting completed and planned trade studies for both normal and superconducting accelerator applications. 8 figs.

  1. Understanding Fish Linear Acceleration Using an Undulatory Biorobotic Model with Soft Fluidic Elastomer Actuated Morphing Median Fins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Ren, Ziyu; Di Santo, Valentina; Hu, Kainan; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Tianmiao; Lauder, George V

    2018-04-10

    Although linear accelerations are an important common component of the diversity of fish locomotor behaviors, acceleration is one of the least-understood aspects of propulsion. Analysis of acceleration behavior in fishes with both spiny and soft-rayed median fins demonstrates that fin area is actively modulated when fish accelerate. We implemented an undulatory biomimetic robotic fish model with median fins manufactured using multimaterial three-dimensional printing-a spiny-rayed dorsal fin, soft-rayed dorsal/anal fins, and a caudal fin-whose stiffnesses span three orders of magnitude. We used an array of fluidic elastomeric soft actuators to mimic the dorsal/anal inclinator and erector/depressor muscles of fish, which allowed the soft fins to be erected or folded within 0.3 s. We experimentally show that the biomimetic soft dorsal/anal fin can withstand external loading. We found that erecting the soft dorsal/anal fins significantly enhanced the linear acceleration rate, up to 32.5% over the folded fin state. Surprisingly, even though the projected area of the body (in the lateral plane) increased 16.9% when the median fins were erected, the magnitude of the side force oscillation decreased by 24.8%, which may have led to significantly less side-to-side sway in the robotic swimmer. Visualization of fluid flow in the wake of median fins reveals that during linear acceleration, the soft dorsal fin generates a wake flow opposite in direction to that of the caudal fin, which creates propulsive jets with time-variant circulations and jet angles. Erectable/foldable fins provide a new design space for bioinspired underwater robots with structures that morph to adapt to different locomotor behaviors. This biorobotic fish model is also a potentially promising system for studying the dynamics of complex multifin fish swimming behaviors, including linear acceleration, steady swimming, and burst and coast, which are difficult to analyze in freely swimming fishes.

  2. A model for particle acceleration in lower hybrid collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retterer, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    A model for particle acceleration during the nonlinear collapse of lower hybrid waves is described. Using the Musher-Sturman wave equation to describe the effects of nonlinear processes and a velocity diffusion equation for the particle velocity distribution, the model self-consistently describes the exchange of energy between the fields and the particles in the local plasma. Two-dimensional solutions are presented for the modulational instability of a plane wave and the collapse of a cylindrical wave packet. These calculations were motivated by sounding rocket observations in the vicinity of auroral arcs in the Earth close-quote s ionosphere, which have revealed the existence of large-amplitude lower-hybrid wave packets associated with ions accelerated to energies of 100 eV. The scaling of the sizes of these wave packets is consistent with the theory of lower-hybrid collapse and the observed lower-hybrid field amplitudes are adequate to accelerate the ionospheric ions to the observed energies

  3. Numerical modeling of accelerated, pre-compressed CTs in RACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Logan, B.G.; McLean, H.S.; Molvik, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical modeling of accelerated compact toroids in the RACE experiment has motivated the development and application of a wide range of computational tools. These tools have included the zero-dimensional RAC code for fast parameter and design studies, and the two-dimensional, Eulerian, axisymmetric, magneto-hydrodynamic code, HAM, used to model plasma ring formation in magnetized plasma guns and acceleration in straight cylindrical electrodes. Extension of the RACE geometry to include converging conical electrodes motivated the development of a new two-dimensional, Lagrangian, axisymmetric, magnetohydrodynamic code, TRAC. The code includes optional initialization of the ring magnetic fields to a Taylor-equilibrium profile as well as self-consistent external capacitor bank driving circuit. Stability of initial field configurations with toroidal mode number > 0 may also be determined. The new code is particularly suited for predicting the behavior of accelerated plasma rings in arbitrarily shaped conical electrodes, since the restriction to a rectilinear mesh is removed. In particular, application of the code to the new pre-compression geometry in the RACE experiment is discussed and compared with experimental results

  4. A general Bayes weibull inference model for accelerated life testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, J. Rene van; Mazzuchi, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the development of a general Bayes inference model for accelerated life testing. The failure times at a constant stress level are assumed to belong to a Weibull distribution, but the specification of strict adherence to a parametric time-transformation function is not required. Rather, prior information is used to indirectly define a multivariate prior distribution for the scale parameters at the various stress levels and the common shape parameter. Using the approach, Bayes point estimates as well as probability statements for use-stress (and accelerated) life parameters may be inferred from a host of testing scenarios. The inference procedure accommodates both the interval data sampling strategy and type I censored sampling strategy for the collection of ALT test data. The inference procedure uses the well-known MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) methods to derive posterior approximations. The approach is illustrated with an example

  5. Model- and calibration-independent test of cosmic acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seikel, Marina; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a calibration-independent test of the accelerated expansion of the universe using supernova type Ia data. The test is also model-independent in the sense that no assumptions about the content of the universe or about the parameterization of the deceleration parameter are made and that it does not assume any dynamical equations of motion. Yet, the test assumes the universe and the distribution of supernovae to be statistically homogeneous and isotropic. A significant reduction of systematic effects, as compared to our previous, calibration-dependent test, is achieved. Accelerated expansion is detected at significant level (4.3σ in the 2007 Gold sample, 7.2σ in the 2008 Union sample) if the universe is spatially flat. This result depends, however, crucially on supernovae with a redshift smaller than 0.1, for which the assumption of statistical isotropy and homogeneity is less well established

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron yield analysis of Al and Cu samples exposed to an accelerator environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; McDowell, M. W.; Ma, Q.; Harkay, K. C.

    2003-09-01

    It is well known that exposure to an accelerator environment can cause ``conditioning'' of the vacuum chamber surfaces. In order to understand the manner in which the surface structure might influence the production of gases and electrons in the accelerator, such surfaces should be studied both before and after exposure to accelerator conditions. Numerous studies have been performed on representative materials prior to being inserted into an accelerator, but very little has been done on materials that have ``lived'' in the accelerator for extended periods. In the present work, we mounted Al and Cu coupons at different positions in a section of the Advanced Photon Source storage ring and removed them following exposures ranging from 6 to 18 months. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface was performed before and after exposure. Changes were observed that depended on the location and whether the coupon was facing the chamber interior or chamber wall. These results will be presented and compared to XPS and secondary electron yield data obtained from laboratory measurements meant to simulate the accelerator conditions.

  7. Characterization of a gamma-ray source based on a laser-plasma accelerator with applications to radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.D.; Sinclair, M.A.; Goldsack, T.J.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, E.L.; Dangor, A.E.; Najmudin, Z.; Tatarakis, M.; Walton, B.; Zepf, M.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Spencer, I.; Norreys, P.A.; Clarke, R.J.; Kodama, R.; Toyama, Y.; Tampo, M.

    2002-01-01

    The application of high intensity laser-produced gamma rays is discussed with regard to picosecond resolution deep-penetration radiography. The spectrum and angular distribution of these gamma rays is measured using an array of thermoluminescent detectors for both an underdense (gas) target and an overdense (solid) target. It is found that the use of an underdense target in a laser plasma accelerator configuration produces a much more intense and directional source. The peak dose is also increased significantly. Radiography is demonstrated in these experiments and the source size is also estimated

  8. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, Gustavo, E-mail: duffo@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Gerencia Materiales, Depto. Corrosión, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gaillard, Natalia [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo [Tomografía de Hormigón Armado S.A. (THASA), Reclus 2017, 1609 Boulogne, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  9. Response of the skin of hamsters to fractionated irradiation with X rays or accelerated carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, J.T.; Powers-Risius, P.; Woodruff, K.H.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ventral thoracic skin of hamsters was irradiated with either single, split (two fractions given in 24 hr), or multiple (five fractions given daily) exposures of X rays or accelerated carbon ions using a 4-cm spread Bragg peak. Animals were positioned in the heavy-ion beam so that the ventral thoracic skin surface was 1 cm distal to the proximal peak of the modified beam. Early skin reactions from 6 to 30 days postirradiation were assessed. Using the average skin reactions produced in this period, it was found that the relative biological effect (RBE) for single doses of carbon ions was about 1.6 (5-17 Gy per fraction), for two fractions about 1.8 (5-17 Gy perfraction), and for five fractions about 1.9 (2.4-7.2 Gy per fraction). The fractional amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation was about 0.3 (at dose levels of 2.4-8.0 Gy per fraction) compared to a value of about 0.45 (at dose levels of 60-13.0 Gy per fraction) found for the fractionated X irradiations, indicting about a 33% decrease in the relative amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation in this position in the spread Bragg curve. Also, data were interpreted using plots of the reciprocal total dose needed to produce a given level of skin damage versus the dose per fraction used in the multifraction experiments, and of the RBE versus dose per fraction obtained from a nonparametric analysis of the responses. These approaches allow estimation of RBE at dose levels relevant to the clinical situation. Also, estimation may be made of the maximum permissible RBE by using the zero dose intercept value from the linear reciprocal dose plot. With this approach, the RBE at a dose level of 2 Gy is about 2.5 and the maximum RBE value is about 2.7

  10. A new method for the reconstruction of very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra and application to galatic cosmic-ray accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgilio

    2014-09-15

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E>0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E>0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESSJ1646-458 (2.2 in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESSJ1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of the

  11. A new method for the reconstruction of very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra and application to galatic cosmic-ray accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgilio

    2014-09-01

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E>0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E>0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESSJ1646-458 (2.2 in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESSJ1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of the

  12. Target normal sheath acceleration analytical modeling, comparative study and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perego, C.; Batani, D.; Zani, A.; Passoni, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser interaction with solid targets appears to be an extremely promising technique to accelerate ions up to several MeV, producing beams that exhibit interesting properties for many foreseen applications. Nowadays, most of all the published experimental results can be theoretically explained in the framework of the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism proposed by Wilks et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8(2), 542 (2001)]. As an alternative to numerical simulation various analytical or semi-analytical TNSA models have been published in the latest years, each of them trying to provide predictions for some of the ion beam features, given the initial laser and target parameters. However, the problem of developing a reliable model for the TNSA process is still open, which is why the purpose of this work is to enlighten the present situation of TNSA modeling and experimental results, by means of a quantitative comparison between measurements and theoretical predictions of the maximum ion energy. Moreover, in the light of such an analysis, some indications for the future development of the model proposed by Passoni and Lontano [Phys. Plasmas 13(4), 042102 (2006)] are then presented.

  13. Acceleration (Deceleration Model Supporting Time Delays to Refresh Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gerardo Carrillo González

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a mathematical model to regulate the acceleration (deceleration applied by self-driving vehicles in car-following situations. A virtual environment is designed to test the model in different circumstances: (1 the followers decelerate in time if the leader decelerates, considering a time delay of up to 5 s to refresh data (vehicles position coordinates required by the model, (2 with the intention of optimizing space, the vehicles are grouped in platoons, where 3 s of time delay (to update data is supported if the vehicles have a centre-to-centre spacing of 20 m and a time delay of 1 s is supported at a spacing of 6 m (considering a maximum speed of 20 m/s in both cases, and (3 an algorithm is presented to manage the vehicles’ priority at a traffic intersection, where the model regulates the vehicles’ acceleration (deceleration and a balance in the number of vehicles passing from each side is achieved.

  14. Modelling neutrino and gamma-ray fluxes in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballet, J; Cassam-Chenai, G; Maurin, G; Naumann, C

    2008-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate charged particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and to produce the majority of galactic cosmic rays, at least up to the 'knee' at 3-10 15 electron volts. In the framework of a hydrodynamic self-similar simulation of the evolution of young supernova remnants, its interaction with the ambient matter as well as the microwave and infrared background is studied. The photon spectra resulting from synchrotron and inverse Compton emission as well as from hadronic processes are calculated, as are the accompanying neutrino fluxes. Applying this method to the particular case of the SNR RXJ-1713, 7-3946, we find that its TeV emission can in principle be explained by pion decay if the ambient density is assumed to grow with increasing distance from the centre. The neutrino flux associated with this hadronic model is of a magnitude that may be detectable by a cubic-kilometre sized deep-sea neutrino telescope in the northern hemisphere. In this poster, a description of the supernova remnant simulation is given together with the results concerning RXJ-1713.

  15. An MCNP-based model for the evaluation of the photoneutron dose in high energy medical electron accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinou, Eleutheria; Stamatelatos, Ion Evangelos; Kamenopoulou, Vassiliki; Georgolopoulou, Paraskevi; Sandilos, Panayotis

    The development of a computational model for the treatment head of a medical electron accelerator (Elekta/Philips SL-18) by the Monte Carlo code mcnp-4C2 is discussed. The model includes the major components of the accelerator head and a pmma phantom representing the patient body. Calculations were performed for a 14 MeV electron beam impinging on the accelerator target and a 10 cmx10 cm beam area at the isocentre. The model was used in order to predict the neutron ambient dose equivalent at the isocentre level and moreover the neutron absorbed dose distribution within the phantom. Calculations were validated against experimental measurements performed by gold foil activation detectors. The results of this study indicated that the equivalent dose at tissues or organs adjacent to the treatment field due to photoneutrons could be up to 10% of the total peripheral dose, for the specific accelerator characteristics examined. Therefore, photoneutrons should be taken into account when accurate dose calculations are required to sensitive tissues that are adjacent to the therapeutic X-ray beam. The method described can be extended to other accelerators and collimation configurations as well, upon specification of treatment head component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential.

  16. Estimation for a Weibull accelerated life testing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    It is sometimes reasonable to assume that the lifetime distribution of an item belongs to a certain parametric family, and that actual parameter values depend upon the testing environment of the item. In the two-parameter Weibull family setting, suppose both the shape and scale parameters are expressible as functions of the testing environment. For various models of functional dependency on environment, maximum likelihood methods are used to estimate characteristics of interest at specified environmental levels. The methodology presented handles exact, censored, and grouped data. A detailed accelerated life testing analysis of stress-rupture data for Kevlar/epoxy composites is given. 10 references, 1 figure, 2 tables

  17. Modeling RHIC using the standard machine formal accelerator description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Trahern, C.G.; Wei, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Standard Machine Format (SMF) is a structured description of accelerator lattices which supports both the hierarchy of beam lines and generic lattice objects as well as those deviations (field errors, alignment efforts, etc.) associated with each component of the as-installed machine. In this paper we discuss the use of SMF to describe the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as well as the ancillary data structures (such as field quality measurements) that are necessarily incorporated into the RHIC SMF model. Future applications of SMF are outlined, including its use in the RHIC operational environment

  18. A family of crisis in a dissipative Fermi accelerator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonel, Edson D.; Egydio de Carvalho, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Fermi accelerator model is studied in the framework of inelastic collisions. The dynamics of this problem is obtained by use of a two-dimensional nonlinear area-contracting map. We consider that the collisions of the particle with both periodically time varying and fixed walls are inelastic. We have shown that the dissipation destroys the mixed phase space structure of the nondissipative case and in special, we have obtained and characterized in this problem a family of two damping coefficients for which a boundary crisis occurs

  19. Goodwin accelerator model revisited with fixed time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Merlone, Ugo; Szidarovszky, Ferenc

    2018-05-01

    Dynamics of Goodwin's accelerator business cycle model is reconsidered. The model is characterized by a nonlinear accelerator and an investment time delay. The role of the nonlinearity for the birth of persistent oscillations is fully discussed in the existing literature. On the other hand, not much of the role of the delay has yet been revealed. The purpose of this paper is to show that the delay really matters. In the original framework of Goodwin [6], it is first demonstrated that there is a threshold value of the delay: limit cycles arise for smaller values than the threshold and so do sawtooth oscillations for larger values. In the extended framework in which a consumption or saving delay, in addition to the investment delay, is introduced, three main results are demonstrated under assumption of the identical length of investment and consumption delays. The dynamics with consumption delay is basically the same as that of the single delay model. Second, in the case of saving delay, the steady state can coexist with the stable and unstable limit cycles in the stable case. Third, in the unstable case, there is an interval of delay in which the limit cycle or the sawtooth oscillation emerges depending on the choice of the constant initial function.

  20. Study of the Betatron and Compton X-ray sources produced in laser wakefield acceleration of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, Julien

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse propagating in a low-density gas can accelerate in its wake a part of the electrons ionized from the gas to relativistic energies of a few hundreds of MeV over distances of a few millimeters only. During their acceleration, as a consequence of their transverse motion, these electrons emit strongly collimated X-rays in the forward direction, which are called betatron radiations. The characteristics of this source turn it into an interesting tool for high-resolution imagery.In this thesis, we explore three different axis to work on this source using simulations on the Particles-In-Cells codes CALDER and CALDER-Circ. We first study the creation of a betatron X-ray source with kilo-joule and pico-second laser pulses, for which duration and energy are then much higher than usual in this domain. In spite of the unusual laser parameters, we show that X-ray sources can still be generated, furthermore in two different regimes.In a second study, the generally observed discrepancies between experiments and simulations are investigated. We show that the use of realistic laser profiles instead of Gaussian ones in the simulations strongly degrades the performances of the laser-plasma accelerator and of the betatron source. Additionally, this leads to a better qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experiment. Finally, with the aim of improving the X-ray emission, we explore several techniques based on the manipulation of the plasma density profile used for acceleration. We find that both the use of a transverse gradient and of a density step increases the amplitude of the electrons transverse motions, and then increases the radiated energy. Alternatively, we show that this goal can also be achieved through the transition from a laser wakefield regime to a plasma wakefield regime induced by an increase of the density. The laser wakefield optimizes the electron acceleration whereas the plasma wakefield favours the X-ray

  1. A model for electric field enhancement in lightning leader tips to levels allowing X-ray and γ ray emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2015-01-01

    A model is proposed capable of accounting for the local electric field increase in front of the lightning stepped leader up to magnitudes allowing front electrons to overcome the runaway energy threshold and thus to initiate relativistic runaway electron avalanches capable of generating X......-ray and ray bursts observed in negative lightning leader. The model is based on an idea that an ionization wave, propagating in a preionized channel, is being focused, such that its front remains narrow and the front electric field is being enhanced. It is proposed that when a space leader segment, formed...... that the ionization channels of streamers limit the lateral expansion of the ionization wave, thereby enhancing the peak electric field to values allowing an acceleration of low-energy electrons into the runaway regime where electrons efficiently generate bremsstrahlung. The results suggest that the inhomogeneous...

  2. Modelling of X-ray emission supernova remnants observed by the European satellite XMM-Newton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassam-Chenai, G.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis deals with the X-ray emission of supernova remnants (SNRs) observed by the European satellite XMM-Newton. In SNRs, the matter heated to millions of degrees shines brightly in X-rays. This emission depends on the hydrodynamical evolution of the SNR, on the chemical composition of the ejected matter and on the ambient medium. Moreover, the blast-wave is considered to be the prime site of the production and the acceleration of cosmic-rays in our Galaxy. XMM-Newton is one of the first to allow the investigation of these different aspects thanks to its spatially-resolved spectroscopy and its very good sensitivity. l first studied Kepler's SNR (SN 1604) whose X-ray emission is dominated by the ejecta. Its observation has allowed to obtain information on the nucleosynthesis products, on their spatial distribution and on the temperature structure in the shocked ejecta. This gives strong constraints on the physics of the explosion and on the progenitor's type. l have shown also that the X-ray emission at the shock is likely to be non-thermal. Then, l studied the SNR G347.3-0.5 whose X-ray emission is entirely due to the synchrotron radiation of relativistic (TeV) electrons accelerated at the shock. From five pointing, l made a full mapping of the X-ray emission characteristics (brightness, absorption and spectral index) at small scale. Combined to radio observations, these results have indicated a clear interaction between the SNR and molecular clouds located at 1 kpc and not at 6 kpc as previously estimated. Lastly, in the framework of a self-similar hydrodynamical model coupled with non-linear particle acceleration, l have obtained the synchrotron emission profile in SNRs, including the adiabatic and radiative losses of the accelerated electrons. (author) [fr

  3. Accelerating transient simulation of linear reduced order models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Keiter, Eric Richard; Bond, Brad

    2011-10-01

    Model order reduction (MOR) techniques have been used to facilitate the analysis of dynamical systems for many years. Although existing model reduction techniques are capable of providing huge speedups in the frequency domain analysis (i.e. AC response) of linear systems, such speedups are often not obtained when performing transient analysis on the systems, particularly when coupled with other circuit components. Reduced system size, which is the ostensible goal of MOR methods, is often insufficient to improve transient simulation speed on realistic circuit problems. It can be shown that making the correct reduced order model (ROM) implementation choices is crucial to the practical application of MOR methods. In this report we investigate methods for accelerating the simulation of circuits containing ROM blocks using the circuit simulator Xyce.

  4. THE ROLE OF COSMIC-RAY PRESSURE IN ACCELERATING GALACTIC OUTFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Marinacci, Federico [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Glover, Simon C. O. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, ITA, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Clark, Paul C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen’s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Smith, Rowan J., E-mail: Christine.Simpson@h-its.org [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-20

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova (SN) explosions with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SN placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CRs), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with no CRs. Despite this similarity, CR-driven outflows differ in several other key properties including their overall clumpiness and velocity. Moreover, the forces driving these outflows originate in different sources of pressure, with the CR diffusion model relying on non-thermal pressure gradients to create an outflow driven by internal pressure and the random-placement model depending on kinetic pressure gradients to propel a ballistic outflow. CRs therefore appear to be non-negligible physics in the formation of outflows from the interstellar medium.

  5. Physical constraints on models of gamma-ray bursters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    This report deals with the constraints that can be placed on models of gamma-ray burst sources based on only the well-established observational facts and physical principles. The premise is developed that the very hard x-ray and gamma-ray continua spectra are well-established aspects of gamma-ray bursts. Recent theoretical work on gamma-ray bursts are summarized with emphasis on the geometrical properties of the models. Constraints on the source models which are implied by the x-ray and gamma-ray spectra are described. The allowed ranges for the luminosity and characteristic dimension for gamma-ray burst sources are shown. Some of the deductions and inferences about the nature of the gamma-ray burst sources are summarized. 67 refs., 3 figs

  6. Simulation of enhanced characteristic x rays from a 40-MeV electron beam laser accelerated in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nikzad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of x-ray generation from bombardment of various solid targets by quasimonoenergetic electrons is considered. The electron bunches are accelerated in a plasma produced by interaction of 500 mJ, 30 femtosecond laser pulses with a helium gas jet. These relativistic electrons propagate in the ion channel generated in the wake of the laser pulse. A beam of MeV electrons can interact with targets to generate x-ray radiation with keV energy. The MCNP-4C code based on Monte Carlo simulation is employed to compare the production of bremsstrahlung and characteristic x rays between 10 and 100 keV by using two quasi-Maxwellian and quasimonoenergetic energy distributions of electrons. For a specific electron spectrum and a definite sample, the maximum x-ray flux varies with the target thickness. Besides, by increasing the target atomic number, the maximum x-ray flux is increased and shifted towards a higher energy level. It is shown that by using the quasimonoenergetic electron profile, a more intense x ray can be produced relative to the quasi-Maxwellian profile (with the same total energy, representing up to 77% flux enhancement at K_{α} energy.

  7. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Bayouth, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 ( 60 Co) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving 60 Co ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system. (author)

  8. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L; Paliwal, Bhudatt R; Bayouth, John E

    2014-04-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  9. A cannonball model of gamma-ray bursts superluminal signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that the long-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets emitted in supernova explosions. We propose that the result of the event is not just a compact object plus the ejecta: within a day, a fraction of the parent star falls back to produce a thick accretion disk. The subsequent accretion generates jets and constitutes the GRB ``engine'', as in the observed ejection of relativistic ``cannonballs'' of plasma by microquasars and active galactic nuclei. The GRB is produced as the jetted cannonballs exit the supernova shell reheated by the collision, re-emitting their own radiation and boosting the light of the shell. They decelerate by sweeping up interstellar matter, which is accelerated to cosmic-ray energies and emits synchrotron radiation: the afterglow. We emphasize here a smoking-gun signature of this model of GRBs: the superluminal motion of the afterglow, that can be searched for ---the sooner the better--- in the particular...

  10. A Generalized Equatorial Model for the Accelerating Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnim, S.; Cairns, Iver H.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2018-02-01

    A new theoretical model for the solar wind is developed that includes the wind's acceleration, conservation of angular momentum, deviations from corotation, and nonradial velocity and magnetic field components from an inner boundary (corresponding to the onset of the solar wind) to beyond 1 AU. The model uses a solution of the time-steady isothermal equation of motion to describe the acceleration and analytically predicts the Alfvénic critical radius. We fit the model to near-Earth observations of the Wind spacecraft during the solar rotation period of 1-27 August 2010. The resulting data-driven model demonstrates the existence of noncorotating, nonradial flows and fields from the inner boundary (r = rs) outward and predicts the magnetic field B = (Br,Bϕ), velocity v = (vr,vϕ), and density n(r,ϕ,t), which vary with heliocentric distance r, heliolatitude ϕ, and time t in a Sun-centered standard inertial plane. The description applies formally only in the equatorial plane. In a frame corotating with the Sun, the transformed velocity v' and a field B' are not parallel, resulting in an electric field with a component Ez' along the z axis. The resulting E'×B'=E'×B drift lies in the equatorial plane, while the ∇B and curvature drifts are out of the plane. Together these may lead to enhanced scattering/heating of sufficiently energetic particles. The model predicts that deviations δvϕ from corotation at the inner boundary are common, with δvϕ(rs,ϕs,ts) comparable to the transverse velocities due to granulation and supergranulation motions. Abrupt changes in δvϕ(rs,ϕs,ts) are interpreted in terms of converging and diverging flows at the cell boundaries and centers, respectively. Large-scale variations in the predicted angular momentum demonstrate that the solar wind can drive vorticity and turbulence from near the Sun to 1 AU and beyond.

  11. Thermonuclear model for x-ray transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, R.K.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The thermonuclear evolution of a 1.41 M sub solar neutron star accreting both solar and metal-deficient mixtures of hydrogen, helium, and heavy elements at rates ranging from about 10 -11 to 10 -10 M sub solar per year is examined using a one-dimensional numerical model. The metal deficient compositions may result either from placement of the neutron star in a binary system with a Population II red giant or from gravitational settling of heavy ions in the accreted material. For such accretion rates and metallicities, hydrogen burning, mediated by the β-limited CNO cycle, is stable and leads to the accumulation of a thick helium layer with mass 10 23 to 10 25 g and temperature 0.7 less than or equal to T 8 less than or equal to 1.2. Helium ignition occurs under extremely degenerate circumstances and is catastrophically violent. In the lower t helium shells this runaway is propagated as a convective deflagration, for the thicker layers a detonation front is set up which steepens into a strong relativistic shock wave in the neutron star envelope. In all models greatly super-Eddington luminosities in the outer layers of the neutron star lead to a sustained epoch of radiatively driven mass loss. Observationally, such models may correspond to rapid x-ray transients. The hopeless prospect for constructing a one-dimensional model for γ-ray bursts without magnetic field confinement is discussed and uncertainties pointed out in the strong screening correction for helium burning reaction

  12. Verification of mechanistic-empirical design models for flexible pavements through accelerated pavement testing : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Midwest States Accelerated Pavement Testing Pooled-Fund Program, financed by the : highway departments of Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri, has supported an accelerated : pavement testing (APT) project to validate several models incorporated in the NCHRP :...

  13. Verification of mechanistic-empirical design models for flexible pavements through accelerated pavement testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The Midwest States Accelerated Pavement Testing Pooled Fund Program, financed by the highway : departments of Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri, has supported an accelerated pavement testing (APT) project to : validate several models incorporated in the NCH...

  14. RAPID COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION AT PERPENDICULAR SHOCKS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamoto, Makoto; Kirk, John G., E-mail: mtakamoto@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: john.kirk@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-08-10

    Perpendicular shocks are shown to be rapid particle accelerators that perform optimally when the ratio u{sub s} of the shock speed to the particle speed roughly equals the ratio 1/η of the scattering rate to the gyro frequency. We use analytical methods and Monte-Carlo simulations to solve the kinetic equation that governs the anisotropy generated at these shocks, and find, for ηu{sub s} ≈ 1, that the spectral index softens by unity and the acceleration time increases by a factor of two compared to the standard result of the diffusive shock acceleration theory. These results provide a theoretical basis for the 30 year old conjecture that a supernova exploding into the wind of a Wolf–Rayet star may accelerate protons to an energy exceeding 10{sup 15} eV.

  15. Acrylamide induces accelerated endothelial aging in a human cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Cyril; Boulanger, Eric; Maladry, François; Tessier, Frédéric J; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Nevière, Rémi; Desreumaux, Pierre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Puisieux, François; Grossin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide (AAM) has been recently discovered in food as a Maillard reaction product. AAM and glycidamide (GA), its metabolite, have been described as probably carcinogenic to humans. It is widely established that senescence and carcinogenicity are closely related. In vitro, endothelial aging is characterized by replicative senescence in which primary cells in culture lose their ability to divide. Our objective was to assess the effects of AAM and GA on human endothelial cell senescence. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in vitro were used as model. HUVECs were cultured over 3 months with AAM or GA (1, 10 or 100 μM) until growth arrest. To analyze senescence, β-galactosidase activity and telomere length of HUVECs were measured by cytometry and semi-quantitative PCR, respectively. At all tested concentrations, AAM or GA reduced cell population doubling compared to the control condition (p < 0.001). β-galactosidase activity in endothelial cells was increased when exposed to AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (≥1 μM) (p < 0.05). AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (100 μM) accelerated telomere shortening in HUVECs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in vitro chronic exposure to AAM or GA at low concentrations induces accelerated senescence. This result suggests that an exposure to AAM might contribute to endothelial aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-09-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [1] is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing theframe of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  17. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grotec, D. P.

    2010-06-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high-frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing the frame of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  18. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference (1) is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accommodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing the frame of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  19. Accelerated physical modelling of radioactive waste migration in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmie, T.F.; De, A.; Mahmud, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    A 100 g-tonne geotechnical centrifuge was used to study the long-term migration of a contaminant and radioactive tracer through a saturated soil medium. The use of the centrifuge simulates the acceleration of travel time in the prototype, which is N times larger than the model, by N 2 , where N is the desired g level. For a 5 h run at 60 g, the test modelled a migration time of about 2 years for a prototype 60 times larger than the small-scale model tested. Iodine 131, used as the tracer, was injected onto the surface of the soil, and was allowed to migrate with a constant head of water through the saturated soil. End window Geiger-Mueller (G-M) tubes were used to measure the count rate of the radioactive tracer flowing through the soil. The time from the peak response of one G-M tube to the other denotes the travel time between the two points in the flow domain. The results obtained using the radioactive tracer are in good agreement with the test performed on the same model setup using potassium permanganate as tracer and with numerical flow net modelling. Radioactive tracers can be useful in the study of nonradioactive contaminants as well, offering a nonintrusive (nondestructive) method of measuring contaminant migration. (author). 18 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  20. Omnibus risk assessment via accelerated failure time kernel machine modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-12-01

    Integrating genomic information with traditional clinical risk factors to improve the prediction of disease outcomes could profoundly change the practice of medicine. However, the large number of potential markers and possible complexity of the relationship between markers and disease make it difficult to construct accurate risk prediction models. Standard approaches for identifying important markers often rely on marginal associations or linearity assumptions and may not capture non-linear or interactive effects. In recent years, much work has been done to group genes into pathways and networks. Integrating such biological knowledge into statistical learning could potentially improve model interpretability and reliability. One effective approach is to employ a kernel machine (KM) framework, which can capture nonlinear effects if nonlinear kernels are used (Scholkopf and Smola, 2002; Liu et al., 2007, 2008). For survival outcomes, KM regression modeling and testing procedures have been derived under a proportional hazards (PH) assumption (Li and Luan, 2003; Cai, Tonini, and Lin, 2011). In this article, we derive testing and prediction methods for KM regression under the accelerated failure time (AFT) model, a useful alternative to the PH model. We approximate the null distribution of our test statistic using resampling procedures. When multiple kernels are of potential interest, it may be unclear in advance which kernel to use for testing and estimation. We propose a robust Omnibus Test that combines information across kernels, and an approach for selecting the best kernel for estimation. The methods are illustrated with an application in breast cancer. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  1. Electron acceleration and generation of high-brilliance x-ray radiation in kilojoule, subpicosecond laser-plasma interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ferri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Petawatt, picosecond laser pulses offer rich opportunities in generating synchrotron x-rays. This paper concentrates on the regimes accessible with the PETAL laser, which is a part of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ facility. We explore two physically distinct scenarios through Particle-in-Cell simulations. The first one realizes in a dense plasma, such that the period of electron Langmuir oscillations is much shorter than the pulse duration. Hallmarks of this regime are longitudinal breakup (“self-modulation” of the picosecond-scale laser pulse and excitation of a rapidly evolving broken plasma wake. It is found that electron beams with a charge of several tens of nC can be obtained, with a quasi-Maxwellian energy distribution extending to a few-GeV level. In the second scenario, at lower plasma densities, the pulse is shorter than the electron plasma period. The pulse blows out plasma electrons, creating a single accelerating cavity, while injection on the density downramp creates a nC quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch within the cavity. This bunch accelerates without degradation beyond 1 GeV. The x-ray sources in the self-modulated regime offer a high number of photons (∼10^{12} with the slowly decaying energy spectra extending beyond 60 keV. In turn, quasimonoenergetic character of the electron beam in the blowout regime results in the synchrotron-like spectra with the critical energy around 10 MeV and a number of photons >10^{9}. Yet, much smaller source duration and transverse size increase the x-ray brilliance by more than an order of magnitude against the self-modulated case, also favoring high spatial and temporal resolution in x-ray imaging. In all explored cases, accelerated electrons emit synchrotron x-rays of high brilliance, B>10^{20}  photons/s/mm^{2}/mrad^{2}/0.1%BW. Synchrotron sources driven by picosecond kilojoule lasers may thus find an application in x-ray diagnostics on such facilities such as the LMJ or National

  2. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  3. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation

  4. X-ray Modeling of Classical Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Peter

    2010-01-01

    It has been observed and theoretically supported in the last decade that the peak of the spectral energy distribution of classical novae gradually shifts to higher energies at constant bolometric luminosity after a nova event. For this reason, comprehensive evolutionary studies require spectral analysis in multiple spectral bands. After a nova explosion, the white dwarf can maintain stable surface hydrogen burning, the duration of which strongly correlates with the white dwarf mass. During this stage the peak of the luminosity is in the soft X-ray band (15 - 60 Angstroms). By extending the modeling range of TLUSTY/SYNSPEC, I analyse the luminosity and abundance evolution of classical novae. Model atoms required for this work were built using atomic data from NIST/ASD and TOPBASE. The accurate but incomplete set of energy levels and radiative transitions in NIST were completed with calculated data from TOPBASE. Synthetic spectra were then compared to observed data to derive stellar parameters. I show the capabilities and validity of this project on the example of V4743 Sgr. This nova was observed with both Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories and has already been modeled by several scientific groups (PHOENIX, TMAP).

  5. Forward directed x-ray from source produced by relativistic electrons from a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nuno; Albert, Felicie; Shaw, Jessica; King, Paul; Milder, Avi; Marsh, Ken; Pak, Arthur; Joshi, Chan

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators are now able to provide the scientific community with novel light sources. Their applications span many disciplines, including high-energy density sciences, where they can be used as probes to explore the physics of dense plasmas and warm dense matter. A recent advance is in the experimental and theoretical characterization of x-ray emission from electrons in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA) where little is known about the x-ray properties. A series of experiments at the LLNL Jupiter Laser Facility, using the 1 ps 150 J Titan laser, have demonstrated low divergence electron beams with energies up to 300 MeV and 6 nCs of charge, and betatron x-rays with critical energies up to 20 keV. This work identifies two other mechanisms which produce high energy broadband x-rays and gamma-rays from the SMLWFA: Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We demonstrate the use of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung to generate x/Gamma-rays from 3 keV up to 1.5 MeV with a source size of 50um and a divergence of 100 mrad. This work is an important step towards developing this x-ray light source on large-scale international laser facilities, and also opens up the prospect of using them for applications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  6. Interactions of Cosmic Rays around the Universe. Models for UHECR data interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boncioli Denise

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs are expected to be accelerated inastrophysical sources and to travel through extragalactic space before hitting the Earth atmosphere. They interact both with the environment in the source and with the intergalactic photon fields they encounter, causing different processes at various scales depending on the photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. UHECR interactions are sensitive to uncertainties in the extragalactic background spectrum and in the photo-disintegration models.

  7. Dosimetry and monitoring of thin X-ray beam produced by linear particle accelerator, for application in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    The dosimetry and monitoring characteristics of thin X-ray beams, and the application of 4MeV linear particle accelerator to radiosurgery are studied. An addition collimation system, consisted of 3 lead collimators, which allows to obtain thin beams of 6,10 and 15 mm of diameter, was fabricated. The stereo taxic system, together with modifications in dispositives, provide the accuracy required in volum-targed location. The dosimetric informations were determined with silicon detector inserted into water simulator. The isodose curves for each beam, and total isodoses simulating the treatment were established using radiographic emulsions in conditions which reproduce real circunstances of pacient irradiation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Initial Assessment of Electron and X-Ray Production and Charge Exchange in the NDCX-II Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide initial assessments of some atomic physics effects for the accelerator section of NDCX-II. There are several effects we address: the production of electrons associated with loss of beam ions to the walls, the production of electrons associated with ionization of background gas, the possibly resultant production of X-rays when these electrons hit bounding surfaces, and charge exchange of beam ions on background gas. The results presented here are based on a number of caveats that will be stated below, which we will attempt to remove in the near future.

  9. Thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10 12 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. 13 M 0 yr -1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10 20 to 10 22 g km -2 . Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56 Ni releases from 10 38 to 10 40 erg km -2 and pushes hot plasma with β > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered

  10. Bremsstrahlung hard x-ray source driven by an electron beam from a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, N.; Albert, F.; Shaw, J. L.; Papp, D.; Polanek, R.; King, P.; Milder, A. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Pak, A.; Pollock, B. B.; Hegelich, B. M.; Moody, J. D.; Park, J.; Tommasini, R.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, Hui; Joshi, C.

    2018-05-01

    An x-ray source generated by an electron beam produced using a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator (SM-LWFA) is explored for use in high energy density science facilities. By colliding the electron beam, with a maximum energy of 380 MeV, total charge of >10 nC and a divergence of 64 × 100 mrad, from a SM-LWFA driven by a 1 ps 120 J laser, into a high-Z foil, an x/gamma-ray source was generated. A broadband bremsstrahlung energy spectrum with temperatures ranging from 0.8 to 2 MeV was measured with an almost 2 orders of magnitude flux increase when compared with other schemes using LWFA. GEANT4 simulations were done to calculate the source size and divergence.

  11. Titanium K-Shell X-Ray Production from High Velocity Wire Arrays Implosions on the 20-MA Z Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apruzese, J.P.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, R.C.; Coverdale, C.A.; Davis, J.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Nash, T.J.; Ruiz-Comacho, J.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Thornhill, J.W.; Whitney, K.G.

    1999-01-01

    The advent of the 20-MA Z accelerator [R.B. Spielman, C. Deeney, G.A. Chandler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105, (1997)] has enabled implosions of large diameter, high-wire-number arrays of titanium to begin testing Z-pinch K-shell scaling theories. The 2-cm long titanium arrays, which were mounted on a 40-mm diameter, produced between 75±15 to 125±20 kJ of K-shell x-rays. Mass scans indicate that, as predicted, higher velocity implosions in the series produced higher x-ray yields. Spectroscopic analyses indicate that these high velocity implosions achieved peak electron temperatures from 2.7±0.1 to 3.2±0.2 keV and obtained a K-shell emission mass participation of up to 12%

  12. R-LODs: fast LOD-based ray tracing of massive models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-Eui; Lauterbach, Christian; Manocha, Dinesh

    2006-08-25

    We present a novel LOD (level-of-detail) algorithm to accelerate ray tracing of massive models. Our approach computes drastic simplifications of the model and the LODs are well integrated with the kd-tree data structure. We introduce a simple and efficient LOD metric to bound the error for primary and secondary rays. The LOD representation has small runtime overhead and our algorithm can be combined with ray coherence techniques and cache-coherent layouts to improve the performance. In practice, the use of LODs can alleviate aliasing artifacts and improve memory coherence. We implement our algorithm on both 32bit and 64bit machines and able to achieve up to 2.20 times improvement in frame rate of rendering models consisting of tens or hundreds of millions of triangles with little loss in image quality.

  13. The multi-messenger approach to particle acceleration by massive stars: a science case for optical, radio and X-ray observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, Michaël

    2018-04-01

    Massive stars are extreme stellar objects whose properties allow for the study of some interesting physical processes, including particle acceleration up to relativistic velocities. In particular, the collisions of massive star winds in binary systems lead notably to acceleration of electrons involved in synchrotron emission, hence their identification as non-thermal radio emitters. This has been demonstrated for about 40 objects so far. The relativistic electrons are also expected to produce non-thermal high-energy radiation through inverse Compton scattering. This class of objects permits thus to investigate non-thermal physics through observations in the radio and high energy spectral domains. However, the binary nature of these sources introduces some stringent requirements to adequately interpret their behavior and model non-thermal processes. In particular, these objects are well-established variable stellar sources on the orbital time-scale. The stellar and orbital parameters need to be determined, and this is notably achieved through studies in the optical domain. The combination of observations in the visible domain (including e.g. 3.6-m DOT) with radio measurements using notably GMRT and X-ray observations constitutes thus a promising strategy to investigate particle-accelerating colliding-wind binaries in the forthcoming decade.

  14. Simple cosmological model with inflation and late times acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowski, Marek; Stachowski, Aleksander

    2018-03-01

    In the framework of polynomial Palatini cosmology, we investigate a simple cosmological homogeneous and isotropic model with matter in the Einstein frame. We show that in this model during cosmic evolution, early inflation appears and the accelerating phase of the expansion for the late times. In this frame we obtain the Friedmann equation with matter and dark energy in the form of a scalar field with a potential whose form is determined in a covariant way by the Ricci scalar of the FRW metric. The energy density of matter and dark energy are also parameterized through the Ricci scalar. Early inflation is obtained only for an infinitesimally small fraction of energy density of matter. Between the matter and dark energy, there exists an interaction because the dark energy is decaying. For the characterization of inflation we calculate the slow roll parameters and the constant roll parameter in terms of the Ricci scalar. We have found a characteristic behavior of the time dependence of density of dark energy on the cosmic time following the logistic-like curve which interpolates two almost constant value phases. From the required numbers of N-folds we have found a bound on the model parameter.

  15. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Edelen, A.L.; Chase, B.E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S.V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  16. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Ahmad; Ashhab, Yaqoub; Tamimi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM) is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  17. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Tamimi

    Full Text Available Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  18. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Saenz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60 with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI allows for magnetic resonance (MR-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI, conformity index (CI, and volume receiving <20% of prescription dose (DRx were calculated to assess the plans. The 95% confidence intervals were recorded for all measurements and presented with the associated bars in graphs. The homogeneity index (D5/D95 had a 1-5% inhomogeneity increase for head and neck, 3-8% for lung, and 4-16% for prostate. CI revealed a modest conformity increase for lung. The volume receiving 20% of the prescription dose increased 2-8% for head and neck and up to 4% for lung and prostate. Overall, for head and neck Co-60 ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  19. CUDA-accelerated geodesic ray-tracing for fiber-tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aart, Evert; Sepasian, N.; Jalba, A.C.; Vilanova, A.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) allows to noninvasively measure the diffusion of water in fibrous tissue. By reconstructing the fibers from DTI data using a fiber-tracking algorithm, we can deduce the structure of the tissue. In this paper, we outline an approach to accelerating such a fiber-tracking

  20. 3rd International Conference on Particle Physics Beyond the Standard Model : Accelerator, Non-Accelerator and Space Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Beyond The Desert 2002

    2003-01-01

    The third conference on particle physics beyond the Standard Model (BEYOND THE DESERT'02 - Accelerator, Non-accelerator and Space Approaches) was held during 2--7 June, 2002 at the Finish town of Oulu, almost at the northern Arctic Circle. It was the first of the BEYOND conference series held outside Germany (CERN Courier March 2003, pp. 29-30). Traditionally the Scientific Programme of BEYOND conferences, brought into life in 1997 (see CERN Courier, November 1997, pp.16-18), covers almost all topics of modern particle physics (see contents).

  1. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-04-21

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  2. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  3. Fast solar radiation pressure modelling with ray tracing and multiple reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Ziebart, Marek; Bhattarai, Santosh; Harrison, David; Grey, Stuart

    2018-05-01

    Physics based SRP (Solar Radiation Pressure) models using ray tracing methods are powerful tools when modelling the forces on complex real world space vehicles. Currently high resolution (1 mm) ray tracing with secondary intersections is done on high performance computers at UCL (University College London). This study introduces the BVH (Bounding Volume Hierarchy) into the ray tracing approach for physics based SRP modelling and makes it possible to run high resolution analysis on personal computers. The ray tracer is both general and efficient enough to cope with the complex shape of satellites and multiple reflections (three or more, with no upper limit). In this study, the traditional ray tracing technique is introduced in the first place and then the BVH is integrated into the ray tracing. Four aspects of the ray tracer were tested for investigating the performance including runtime, accuracy, the effects of multiple reflections and the effects of pixel array resolution.Test results in runtime on GPS IIR and Galileo IOV (In Orbit Validation) satellites show that the BVH can make the force model computation 30-50 times faster. The ray tracer has an absolute accuracy of several nanonewtons by comparing the test results for spheres and planes with the analytical computations. The multiple reflection effects are investigated both in the intersection number and acceleration on GPS IIR, Galileo IOV and Sentinel-1 spacecraft. Considering the number of intersections, the 3rd reflection can capture 99.12 %, 99.14 % , and 91.34 % of the total reflections for GPS IIR, Galileo IOV satellite bus and the Sentinel-1 spacecraft respectively. In terms of the multiple reflection effects on the acceleration, the secondary reflection effect for Galileo IOV satellite and Sentinel-1 can reach 0.2 nm /s2 and 0.4 nm /s2 respectively. The error percentage in the accelerations magnitude results show that the 3rd reflection should be considered in order to make it less than 0.035 % . The

  4. A bremsstrahlung gamma-ray source based on stable ionization injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döpp, A., E-mail: andreas.doepp@polytechnique.edu [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Centro de Laseres Pulsados, Parque Cientfico, 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Sylla, F. [SourceLAB SAS, 86 rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Goddet, J-P.; Tafzi, A.; Iaquanello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Rousseau, P. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Conejero, E.; Ruiz, C. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de laMerced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2016-09-11

    Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance with GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations, we measure a γ-ray source size of less than 100 μm for a 0.5 mm tantalum converter placed at 2 mm from the accelerator exit. Furthermore we present radiographs of image quality indicators.

  5. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics

  6. GPU-accelerated ray-tracing for real-time treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, H; Ziegenhein, P; Kamerling, C P; Oelfke, U; Froening, H

    2014-01-01

    Dose calculation methods in radiotherapy treatment planning require the radiological depth information of the voxels that represent the patient volume to correct for tissue inhomogeneities. This information is acquired by time consuming ray-tracing-based calculations. For treatment planning scenarios with changing geometries and real-time constraints this is a severe bottleneck. We implemented an algorithm for the graphics processing unit (GPU) which implements a ray-matrix approach to reduce the number of rays to trace. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of different strategies of accessing memory in kernel implementations as well as strategies for rapid data transfers between main memory and memory of the graphics device. Our study included the overlapping of computations and memory transfers to reduce the overall runtime using Hyper-Q. We tested our approach on a prostate case (9 beams, coplanar). The measured execution times for a complete ray-tracing range from 28 msec for the computations on the GPU to 99 msec when considering data transfers to and from the graphics device. Our GPU-based algorithm performed the ray-tracing in real-time. The strategies efficiently reduce the time consumption of memory accesses and data transfer overhead. The achieved runtimes demonstrate the viability of this approach and allow improved real-time performance for dose calculation methods in clinical routine.

  7. GLAST and Suzaku. Study on cosmic-ray acceleration and interaction in the cosmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency mission scheduled for launch in the fall of 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to ∼300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of 'Data Challenges' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: 1) GLAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; 2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; 3) multiple sources will be 'confused' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics. (author)

  8. Particle acceleration by pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arons, Jonathan.

    1980-06-01

    The evidence that pulsars accelerate relativistic particles is reviewed, with emphasis on the γ-ray observations. The current state of knowledge of acceleration in strong waves is summarized, with emphasis on the inability of consistent theories to accelerate very high energy particles without converting too much energy into high energy photons. The state of viable models for pair creation by pulsars is summarized, with the conclusion that pulsars very likely lose rotational energy in winds instead of in superluminous strong waves. The relation of the pair creation models to γ-ray observations and to soft X-ray observations of pulsars is outlined, with the conclusion that energetically viable models may exist, but none have yet yielded useful agreement with the extant data. Some paths for overcoming present problems are discussed. The relation of the favored models to cosmic rays is discussed. It is pointed out that the pairs made by the models may have observable consequences for observation of positrons in the local cosmic ray flux and for observations of the 511 keV line from the interstellar medium. Another new point is that asymmetry of plasma supply from at least one of the models may qualitatively explain the gross asymmetry of the X-ray emission from the Crab nebula. It is also argued that acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei by pulsars, while energetically possible, can occur only at the boundary of the bubbles blown by the pulsars, if the cosmic ray composition is to be anything like that of the known source spectrum

  9. Combining Acceleration Techniques for Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, image quality in low-dose computed tomography has been greatly improved by various compressive sensing- (CS-) based reconstruction methods. However, these methods have some disadvantages including high computational cost and slow convergence rate. Many different speed-up techniques for CS-based reconstruction algorithms have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a fast reconstruction framework that combines a CS-based reconstruction algorithm with several speed-up techniques. First, total difference minimization (TDM) was implemented using the soft-threshold filtering (STF). Second, we combined TDM-STF with the ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm for accelerating the convergence. To further speed up the convergence of the proposed method, we applied the power factor and the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm to OSTR and TDM-STF, respectively. Results obtained from simulation and phantom studies showed that many speed-up techniques could be combined to greatly improve the convergence speed of a CS-based reconstruction algorithm. More importantly, the increased computation time (≤10%) was minor as compared to the acceleration provided by the proposed method. In this paper, we have presented a CS-based reconstruction framework that combines several acceleration techniques. Both simulation and phantom studies provide evidence that the proposed method has the potential to satisfy the requirement of fast image reconstruction in practical CT.

  10. GAMMA RAYS FROM THE TYCHO SUPERNOVA REMNANT: MULTI-ZONE VERSUS SINGLE-ZONE MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atoyan, Armen [Department of Mathematics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 (Canada); Dermer, Charles D., E-mail: atoyan@mathstat.concordia.ca, E-mail: charles.dermer@nrl.navy.mil [Code 7653, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Recent Fermi and VERITAS observations of the prototypical Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho have discovered {gamma}-rays with energies E in the range 0.4 GeV {approx}< E {approx}< 10 TeV. Crucial for the theory of Galactic cosmic-ray origin is whether the {gamma}-rays from SNRs are produced by accelerated hadrons (protons and ions) or by relativistic electrons. Here we show that strong constraints on the leptonic model imposed in the framework of the commonly used single-zone model are essentially removed if the analysis of the broadband radiation spectrum of Tycho is done in the two-zone (or, in general, multi-zone) approach, which is likely to apply to every SNR. Importantly, we show that the single-zone approach may underpredict the {gamma}-ray fluxes by an order of magnitude. A hadronic model can, however, also fit the detected {gamma}-ray spectrum. The difference between {gamma}-ray fluxes of hadronic and leptonic origins becomes significant only at {approx}<300 MeV, which could be revealed by spectral measurements of Tycho and other SNRs at these energies.

  11. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  12. Characteristics of the magnetic wall reflection model on ion acceleration in gas-puff z pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, M.; Takasugi, K.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic wall reflection model was examined with the numerical simulation of the trajectory calculation of particles. This model is for the ions accelerated by some current-independent mechanism. The trajectory calculation showed angle dependency of highest velocities of accelerated particles. This characteristics is of the magnetic wall reflection model, not of the other current-independent acceleration mechanism. Thomson parabola measurements of accelerated ions produced in the gas-puff z-pinch experiments were carried out for the verification of the angle dependency. (author)

  13. Auralization of Accelerating Passenger Cars Using Spectral Modeling Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Pieren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the technique of auralization has been in use for quite some time in architectural acoustics, the application to environmental noise has been discovered only recently. With road traffic noise being the dominant noise source in most countries, particular interest lies in the synthesis of realistic pass-by sounds. This article describes an auralizator for pass-bys of accelerating passenger cars. The key element is a synthesizer that simulates the acoustical emission of different vehicles, driving on different surfaces, under different operating conditions. Audio signals for the emitted tire noise, as well as the propulsion noise are generated using spectral modeling synthesis, which gives complete control of the signal characteristics. The sound of propulsion is synthesized as a function of instantaneous engine speed, engine load and emission angle, whereas the sound of tires is created in dependence of vehicle speed and emission angle. The sound propagation is simulated by applying a series of time-variant digital filters. To obtain the corresponding steering parameters of the synthesizer, controlled experiments were carried out. The tire noise parameters were determined from coast-by measurements of passenger cars with idling engines. To obtain the propulsion noise parameters, measurements at different engine speeds, engine loads and emission angles were performed using a chassis dynamometer. The article shows how, from the measured data, the synthesizer parameters are calculated using audio signal processing.

  14. Can the Stephani model be an alternative to FRW accelerating models?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Stelmach, Jerzy; Szydlowski, Marek

    2004-01-01

    A class of Stephani cosmological models as a prototype of a non-homogeneous universe is considered. The non-homogeneity can lead to accelerated evolution, which is now observed from the SNe Ia data. Three samples of type Ia supernovae obtained by Perlmutter et al, Tonry et al and Knop et al are taken into account. Different statistical methods (best fits as well as maximum likelihood method) to obtain estimation for the model parameters are used. The Stephani model is considered as an alternative to the ΛCDM model in the explanation of the present acceleration of the universe. The model explains the acceleration of the universe at the same level of accuracy as the ΛCDM model (χ 2 statistics are comparable). From the best fit analysis it follows that the Stephani model is characterized by a higher value of density parameter Ω m0 than the ΛCDM model. It is also shown that the model is consistent with the location of CMB peaks

  15. Dosimetry and narrow X-ray beams, produced by particle linear accelerator for use in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F.; Vizeu, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The principal characteristics of dosimetry and narrow X-ray beams(4Mv) monitoring are investigated for use in estereotatic radiosurgery. An additional collimator system and a estereotatic system (Leksell type) are presented. Dosimetric parameters like tissue-air ratio, peak scatter factor, isodose curves are studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  16. Cross-sectional imaging of large and dense materials by high energy X-ray CT using linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Takahiro; Kamata, Shouji; Ito, Shinichi.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype high energy X-ray CT (computed tomography) system has been developed which employs a linear accelerator as the X-ray source (max. photon energy: 12 MeV). One problem encountered in development of this CT system was to reduce the scattered photons from adjacent detectors, i.e. crosstalk, due to high energy X-rays. This crosstalk was reduced to 2% by means of detector shields using tungsten spacers. Spatial resolution was not affected by such small crosstalk as confirmed by numerical simulations. A second problem was to reduce the scattered photons from the test object. This was done using collimators. A third concern was to realize a wide dynamic range data processing which would allow applications to large and dense objects. This problem was solved by using a sample and hold data acquisition method to reduce the dark current of the photo detectors. The dynamic range of this system was experimentally confirmed over 60 dB. It was demonstrated that slits (width: 2 mm) in an iron object (diameter: 25 cm) could be imaged by this prototype CT system. (author)

  17. Real-time colour hologram generation based on ray-sampling plane with multi-GPU acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirochika; Kakue, Takashi; Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Endo, Yutaka; Wakunami, Koki; Oi, Ryutaro; Yamamoto, Kenji; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2018-01-24

    Although electro-holography can reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) motion pictures, its computational cost is too heavy to allow for real-time reconstruction of 3D motion pictures. This study explores accelerating colour hologram generation using light-ray information on a ray-sampling (RS) plane with a graphics processing unit (GPU) to realise a real-time holographic display system. We refer to an image corresponding to light-ray information as an RS image. Colour holograms were generated from three RS images with resolutions of 2,048 × 2,048; 3,072 × 3,072 and 4,096 × 4,096 pixels. The computational results indicate that the generation of the colour holograms using multiple GPUs (NVIDIA Geforce GTX 1080) was approximately 300-500 times faster than those generated using a central processing unit. In addition, the results demonstrate that 3D motion pictures were successfully reconstructed from RS images of 3,072 × 3,072 pixels at approximately 15 frames per second using an electro-holographic reconstruction system in which colour holograms were generated from RS images in real time.

  18. Particle Acceleration in a Statistically Modeled Solar Active-Region Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutounzi, A.; Vlahos, L.; Isliker, H.; Dimitropoulou, M.; Anastasiadis, A.; Georgoulis, M.

    2013-09-01

    Elaborating a statistical approach to describe the spatiotemporally intermittent electric field structures formed inside a flaring solar active region, we investigate the efficiency of such structures in accelerating charged particles (electrons). The large-scale magnetic configuration in the solar atmosphere responds to the strong turbulent flows that convey perturbations across the active region by initiating avalanche-type processes. The resulting unstable structures correspond to small-scale dissipation regions hosting strong electric fields. Previous research on particle acceleration in strongly turbulent plasmas provides a general framework for addressing such a problem. This framework combines various electromagnetic field configurations obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) or cellular automata (CA) simulations, or by employing a statistical description of the field's strength and configuration with test particle simulations. Our objective is to complement previous work done on the subject. As in previous efforts, a set of three probability distribution functions describes our ad-hoc electromagnetic field configurations. In addition, we work on data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations. A collisional relativistic test-particle simulation traces each particle's guiding center within these configurations. We also find that an interplay between different electron populations (thermal/non-thermal, ambient/injected) in our simulations may also address, via a re-acceleration mechanism, the so called `number problem'. Using the simulated particle-energy distributions at different heights of the cylinder we test our results against observations, in the framework of the collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) emission. The above work is supported by the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) via the THALIS Programme.

  19. Accelerated search of gamma-quantum families in a X-ray emulsion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takibaev, Zh.S.; Bajgubekov, A.S.; Sadykov, T.Kh.

    1977-01-01

    The criteria are derived allowing to considerably accelerate the process of detecting the pure gamma-quantum families. The suitable criterion is the apparent size of the distribution of black spots due to electromagnetic cascades inside a circle of specific radius. The results of assaying 27 gamma-families with energies above 3 TeV generated in a target above the chamber are presented. The method of search for the target families suggested in this paper allows to cut four-fold the roentgen-emulsion cloud chamber treatment time

  20. On the Radio-emitting Particles of the Crab Nebula: Stochastic Acceleration Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shuta J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Asano, Katsuaki, E-mail: sjtanaka@center.konan-u.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    The broadband emission of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) is well described by non-thermal emissions from accelerated electrons and positrons. However, the standard shock acceleration model of PWNe does not account for the hard spectrum in radio wavelengths. The origin of the radio-emitting particles is also important to determine the pair production efficiency in the pulsar magnetosphere. Here, we propose a possible resolution for the particle energy distribution in PWNe; the radio-emitting particles are not accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock but are stochastically accelerated by turbulence inside PWNe. We upgrade our past one-zone spectral evolution model to include the energy diffusion, i.e., the stochastic acceleration, and apply the model to the Crab Nebula. A fairly simple form of the energy diffusion coefficient is assumed for this demonstrative study. For a particle injection to the stochastic acceleration process, we consider the continuous injection from the supernova ejecta or the impulsive injection associated with supernova explosion. The observed broadband spectrum and the decay of the radio flux are reproduced by tuning the amount of the particle injected to the stochastic acceleration process. The acceleration timescale and the duration of the acceleration are required to be a few decades and a few hundred years, respectively. Our results imply that some unveiled mechanisms, such as back reaction to the turbulence, are required to make the energies of stochastically and shock-accelerated particles comparable.

  1. Modelling of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-06-01

    Cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere induce extensive air showers consisting of up to billions of secondary particles. Among them, a multitude of electrons and positrons are generated. These get deflected in the Earth's magnetic field, creating time-varying transverse currents. Thereby, the air shower emits coherent radiation in the MHz frequency range measured by radio antenna arrays on the ground such as LOPES at the KIT. This detection method provides a possibility to study cosmic rays with energies above 1017 eV. At this time, the radio technique undergoes the change from prototype experiments to large scale application. Thus, a detailed understanding of the radio emission process is needed more than ever. Before starting this work, different models made conflicting predictions on the pulse shape and the amplitude of the radio signal. It turned out that a radiation component caused by the variation of the number of charged particles within the air shower was missed in several models. The Monte Carlo code REAS2 superposing the radiation of the individual air shower electrons and positrons was one of those. At this time, it was not known how to take the missing component into account. For REAS3, we developed and implemented the endpoint formalism, a universal approach, to calculate the radiation from each single particle. For the first time, we achieve a good agreement between REAS3 and MGMR, an independent and completely different simulation approach. In contrast to REAS3, MGMR is based on a macroscopic approach and on parametrisations of the air shower. We studied the differences in the underlying air shower models to explain the remaining deviations. For comparisons with LOPES data, we developed a new method which allows "top-down" simulations of air showers. From this, we developed an air shower selection criterion based on the number of muons measured with KASCADE to take shower-to-shower fluctuations for a single event analysis into account. With

  2. Coenzyme Q10 prevents accelerated cardiac aging in a rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth★

    OpenAIRE

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Blackmore, Heather L.; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S.; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; McConnell, Josie M.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies in human and animals have demonstrated that nutritionally induced low birth-weight followed by rapid postnatal growth increases the risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms underlying such nutritional programming are not clearly defined, increased oxidative-stress leading to accelerated cellular aging has been proposed to play an important role. Using an established rodent model of low birth-weight and catch-up growth, we show here that post-weani...

  3. Public Dose Assessment Modeling from Skyshine by Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwambinga, S. A. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, S. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the skyshine dose by proton accelerator (230 MeV) has been evaluated. The amount of dose by skyshine is related to some influence factors which are emission angle (Height wall), the thickness of ceiling and distance from source to receptor (Human body). Empirical formula is made by using MCNPX code results. It can easily calculate and assess dose from skyshine by proton accelerator. The skyshine doses are calculated with MCNPX code and DCFs in ICRP 116. Thereafter, we made empirical formula which can calculate dose easily and be compared with the results of MCNPX. The maximum exposure point by skyshine is about 5 ∼ 10 m from source. Therefore, the licensee who wants to operate the proton accelerator must keep the appropriate distance from accelerator and set the fence to restrict the approach by the public. And, exposure doses by accelerator depend on operating time and proton beam intensities. Eq. (6) suggested in this study is just considered for mono energy proton accelerator. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the dose calculation to diverse proton energies. Radiations like neutron and photon generated by high energy proton accelerators over 10 MeV, are important exposure sources to be monitored to radiation workers and the public members near the facility. At that case, one of the exposure pathways to the public who are located in near the facility is skyshine. Neutrons and photons can be scattered by the atmosphere near the facility and exposed to public as scattered dose. All of the facilities using high energy radiation and NDI (Non-Destructive Inspection) which is tested at open field, skyshine dose must be taken into consideration. Skyshine dose is not related to the wall thickness of radiation shielding directly.

  4. Radiography with cosmic-ray and compact accelerator muons; Exploring inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons (CRM) arriving from the sky on the surface of the earth are now known to be used as radiography purposes to explore the inner-structure of large-scale objects and landforms, ranging in thickness from meter to kilometers scale, such as volcanic mountains, blast furnaces, nuclear reactors etc. At the same time, by using muons produced by compact accelerators (CAM), advanced radiography can be realized for objects with a thickness in the sub-millimeter to meter range, with additional exploration capability such as element identification and bio-chemical analysis. In the present report, principles, methods and specific research examples of CRM transmission radiography are summarized after which, principles, methods and perspective views of the future CAM radiography are described.

  5. Modeling high-Power Accelerators Reliability-SNS LINAC (SNS-ORNL); MAX LINAC (MYRRHA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitigoi, A. E.; Fernandez Ramos, P.

    2013-01-01

    Improving reliability has recently become a very important objective in the field of particle accelerators. The particle accelerators in operation are constantly undergoing modifications, and improvements are implemented using new technologies, more reliable components or redundant schemes (to obtain more reliability, strength, more power, etc.) A reliability model of SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) LINAC has been developed within MAX project and analysis of the accelerator systems reliability has been performed within the MAX project, using the Risk Spectrum reliability analysis software. The analysis results have been evaluated by comparison with the SNS operational data. Results and conclusions are presented in this paper, oriented to identify design weaknesses and provide recommendations for improving reliability of MYRRHA linear accelerator. The SNS reliability model developed for the MAX preliminary design phase indicates possible avenues for further investigation that could be needed to improve the reliability of the high-power accelerators, in view of the future reliability targets of ADS accelerators.

  6. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  7. CONSTRAINTS ON COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION MODELS FROM A GLOBAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotta, R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Porter, T. A.; Ruiz de Austri, R.; Strong, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in many areas of modern physics such as, e.g., indirect searches for dark matter and particle acceleration in supernova remnant shocks rely heavily on studies of cosmic rays (CRs) and associated diffuse emissions (radio, microwave, X-rays, γ-rays). While very detailed numerical models of CR propagation exist, a quantitative statistical analysis of such models has been so far hampered by the large computational effort that those models require. Although statistical analyses have been carried out before using semi-analytical models (where the computation is much faster), the evaluation of the results obtained from such models is difficult, as they necessarily suffer from many simplifying assumptions. The main objective of this paper is to present a working method for a full Bayesian parameter estimation for a numerical CR propagation model. For this study, we use the GALPROP code, the most advanced of its kind, which uses astrophysical information, and nuclear and particle data as inputs to self-consistently predict CRs, γ-rays, synchrotron, and other observables. We demonstrate that a full Bayesian analysis is possible using nested sampling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods (implemented in the SuperBayeS code) despite the heavy computational demands of a numerical propagation code. The best-fit values of parameters found in this analysis are in agreement with previous, significantly simpler, studies also based on GALPROP.

  8. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.; Voelk, H.J.; Bogdan, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium

  9. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  10. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Zach; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  11. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medin, Zach; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  12. An extended car-following model considering the acceleration derivative in some typical traffic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Chen, Dong; Liu, Weining

    2018-03-01

    Based on the full velocity difference and acceleration car-following model, an extended car-following model is proposed by considering the vehicle’s acceleration derivative. The stability condition is given by applying the control theory. Considering some typical traffic environments, the results of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show the extended model has a more actual acceleration of string vehicles than that of the previous models in starting process, stopping process and sudden brake. Meanwhile, the traffic jams more easily occur when the coefficient of vehicle’s acceleration derivative increases, which is presented by space-time evolution. The results confirm that the vehicle’s acceleration derivative plays an important role in the traffic jamming transition and the evolution of traffic congestion.

  13. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  14. Deuteron nuclear data for the design of accelerator-based neutron sources: Measurement, model analysis, evaluation, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kin, Tadahiro; Araki, Shouhei; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Iwamoto, Osamu

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive research program on deuteron nuclear data motivated by development of accelerator-based neutron sources is being executed. It is composed of measurements of neutron and gamma-ray yields and production cross sections, modelling of deuteron-induced reactions and code development, nuclear data evaluation and benchmark test, and its application to medical radioisotopes production. The goal of this program is to develop a state-of-the-art deuteron nuclear data library up to 200 MeV which will be useful for the design of future (d,xn) neutron sources. The current status and future plan are reviewed.

  15. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  16. Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Red Wine Samples Using the Union College Pelletron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott

    2010-11-01

    A 1-megavolt tandem electrostatic Pelletron particle accelerator housed at Union College was used to measure the elemental composition and concentration of homemade Cabernet and Merlot red wine samples. A beam of 1.8-MeV protons directed at an approximately 12-μm thin Mylar substrate onto which 8-μL of concentrated red wine was dried caused inner shell electrons to be ejected from the target nuclei and these vacancies are filled through electronic transitions of higher orbital electrons accompanied by the production of an x-ray photon characteristic of the elemental composition of the target. This is the PIXE Method. Data on the intensity versus energy of the x-rays were collected using an Amptek silicon drift detector and were analyzed to determine the elemental composition and the samples were found to contain P, S, K, Cl, Ca, Sc, Mn, Al, Fe, & Co. Elemental concentrations were determined using the analysis package GUPIX. It is hypothesized that the cobalt seen is a direct result of the uptake by the grapes and as a product of the fermentation process a complex of vitamin B12 is produced.

  17. Tabulated square-shaped source model for linear accelerator electron beam simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Navid; Aghamiri, Mahmood Reza; Aslian, Hossein; Ameri, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Using this source model, the Monte Carlo (MC) computation becomes much faster for electron beams. The aim of this study was to present a source model that makes linear accelerator (LINAC) electron beam geometry simulation less complex. In this study, a tabulated square-shaped source with transversal and axial distribution biasing and semi-Gaussian spectrum was investigated. A low energy photon spectrum was added to the semi-Gaussian beam to correct the bremsstrahlung X-ray contamination. After running the MC code multiple times and optimizing all spectrums for four electron energies in three different medical LINACs (Elekta, Siemens, and Varian), the characteristics of a beam passing through a 10 cm × 10 cm applicator were obtained. The percentage depth dose and dose profiles at two different depths were measured and simulated. The maximum difference between simulated and measured percentage of depth doses and dose profiles was 1.8% and 4%, respectively. The low energy electron and photon spectrum and the Gaussian spectrum peak energy and associated full width at half of maximum and transversal distribution weightings were obtained for each electron beam. The proposed method yielded a maximum computation time 702 times faster than a complete head simulation. Our study demonstrates that there was an excellent agreement between the results of our proposed model and measured data; furthermore, an optimum calculation speed was achieved because there was no need to define geometry and materials in the LINAC head.

  18. CORE-COLLAPSE MODEL OF BROADBAND EMISSION FROM SNR RX J1713.7–3946 WITH THERMAL X-RAYS AND GAMMA RAYS FROM ESCAPING COSMIC RAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Slane, Patrick; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a spherically symmetric, core-collapse model of SNR RX J1713.7–3946 that includes a hydrodynamic simulation of the remnant evolution coupled to the efficient production of cosmic rays (CRs) by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration. High-energy CRs that escape from the forward shock (FS) are propagated in surrounding dense material that simulates either a swept-up, pre-supernova shell or a nearby molecular cloud. The continuum emission from trapped and escaping CRs, along with the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked heated interstellar medium behind the FS, integrated over the remnant, is compared against broadband observations. Our results show conclusively that, overall, the GeV-TeV emission is dominated by inverse-Compton from CR electrons if the supernova is isolated regardless of its type, i.e., not interacting with a >>100 M ☉ shell or cloud. If the supernova remnant is interacting with a much larger mass ∼> 10 4 M ☉ , pion decay from the escaping CRs may dominate the TeV emission, although a precise fit at high energy will depend on the still uncertain details of how the highest energy CRs are accelerated by, and escape from, the FS. Based on morphological and other constraints, we consider the 10 4 M ☉ pion-decay scenario highly unlikely for SNR RX J1713.7–3946 regardless of the details of CR escape. Importantly, even though CR electrons dominate the GeV-TeV emission, the efficient production of CR ions is an essential part of our leptonic model.

  19. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Heinze, Jonas; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Murase, Kohta, E-mail: bustamanteramirez.1@osu.edu, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de, E-mail: jonas.heinze@desy.de, E-mail: murase@psu.edu [Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA16802 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  20. Streaming Model Based Volume Ray Casting Implementation for Cell Broadband Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusub Kim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactive high quality volume rendering is becoming increasingly more important as the amount of more complex volumetric data steadily grows. While a number of volumetric rendering techniques have been widely used, ray casting has been recognized as an effective approach for generating high quality visualization. However, for most users, the use of ray casting has been limited to datasets that are very small because of its high demands on computational power and memory bandwidth. However the recent introduction of the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell B.E. processor, which consists of 9 heterogeneous cores designed to handle extremely demanding computations with large streams of data, provides an opportunity to put the ray casting into practical use. In this paper, we introduce an efficient parallel implementation of volume ray casting on the Cell B.E. The implementation is designed to take full advantage of the computational power and memory bandwidth of the Cell B.E. using an intricate orchestration of the ray casting computation on the available heterogeneous resources. Specifically, we introduce streaming model based schemes and techniques to efficiently implement acceleration techniques for ray casting on Cell B.E. In addition to ensuring effective SIMD utilization, our method provides two key benefits: there is no cost for empty space skipping and there is no memory bottleneck on moving volumetric data for processing. Our experimental results show that we can interactively render practical datasets on a single Cell B.E. processor.

  1. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP); Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murase, Kohta [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  2. Dynamic Model for the Z Accelerator Vacuum Section Based on Transmission Line Code%Dynamic Model for the Z Accelerator Vacuum Section Based on Transmission Line Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    呼义翔; 雷天时; 吴撼宇; 郭宁; 韩娟娟; 邱爱慈; 王亮平; 黄涛; 丛培天; 张信军; 李岩; 曾正中; 孙铁平

    2011-01-01

    The transmission-line-circuit model of the Z accelerator, developed originally by W. A. STYGAR, P. A. CORCORAN, et al., is revised. The revised model uses different calculations for the electron loss and flow impedance in the magnetically insulated transmission line system of the Z accelerator before and after magnetic insulation is established. By including electron pressure and zero electric field at the cathode, a closed set of equations is obtained at each time step, and dynamic shunt resistance (used to represent any electron loss to the anode) and flow impedance are solved, which have been incorporated into the transmission line code for simulations of the vacuum section in the Z accelerator. Finally, the results are discussed in comparison with earlier findings to show the effectiveness and limitations of the model.

  3. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  4. Theoretical model of Orion gamma emission: acceleration, propagation and interaction of energetic particles in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizot, Etienne

    1997-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a general model for the study of the propagation and interaction of energetic particles (cosmic rays, and so on) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The first part addresses the development of theoretical and numerical tools. The author presents cosmic rays and energetic particles, presents and describes the various processes related to high-energy particles (matter ionisation, synchrotron and Bremsstrahlung radiation, Compton scattering, nuclear processes), addresses the transport and acceleration of energetic particles (plasmas, magnetic fields and energetic particles, elements of kinetic theory, transport and acceleration of energetic particles), and describes the general model of production of γ nuclear lines and of secondary nuclei. The second part addresses the gamma signature of a massive star in a dense medium: presentation and description of massive stars and of the circumstellar medium, life, death and gamma resurrection of a massive star at the heart of a cloud. The third part addresses the case of the gamma emission by Orion, and more particularly presents a theoretical model of this emission. Some generalities and perspectives (theoretical as well as observational) are then stated [fr

  5. Lightning leader models of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J. R.; Liu, N.; Ihaddadene, K. M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright sub-millisecond bursts of gamma rays that originate from thunderstorms. Because lightning leaders near the ground have been observed to emit x-rays, presumably due to runaway electron production in the high-field regions near the leader tips, models of TGFs have been developed by several groups that assume a similar production mechanism of runaway electrons from lightning leaders propagating through thunderclouds. However, it remains unclear exactly how and where these runaway electrons are produced, since lightning propagation at thunderstorm altitudes remains poorly understood. In addition, it is not obvious how to connect the observed behavior of the x-ray production from lightning near the ground with the properties of TGFs. For example, it is not clear how to relate the time structure of the x-ray emission near the ground to that of TGFs, since x-rays from stepped leaders near the ground are usually produced in a series of sub-microsecond bursts, but TGFs are usually observed as much longer pulses without clear substructures, at sub-microsecond timescales or otherwise. In this presentation, spacecraft observations of TGFs, ground-based observations of x-rays from lightning and laboratory sparks, and Monte Carlo and PIC simulations of runaway electron and gamma ray production and propagation will be used to constrain the lightning leader models of TGFs.

  6. Accelerating statistical image reconstruction algorithms for fan-beam x-ray CT using cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Somesh; Rao, A. Ravishankar; Sheinin, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Statistical image reconstruction algorithms potentially offer many advantages to x-ray computed tomography (CT), e.g. lower radiation dose. But, their adoption in practical CT scanners requires extra computation power, which is traditionally provided by incorporating additional computing hardware (e.g. CPU-clusters, GPUs, FPGAs etc.) into a scanner. An alternative solution is to access the required computation power over the internet from a cloud computing service, which is orders-of-magnitude more cost-effective. This is because users only pay a small pay-as-you-go fee for the computation resources used (i.e. CPU time, storage etc.), and completely avoid purchase, maintenance and upgrade costs. In this paper, we investigate the benefits and shortcomings of using cloud computing for statistical image reconstruction. We parallelized the most time-consuming parts of our application, the forward and back projectors, using MapReduce, the standard parallelization library on clouds. From preliminary investigations, we found that a large speedup is possible at a very low cost. But, communication overheads inside MapReduce can limit the maximum speedup, and a better MapReduce implementation might become necessary in the future. All the experiments for this paper, including development and testing, were completed on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for less than $20.

  7. Accelerated oxygen-induced retinopathy is a reliable model of ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacampa, Pilar; Menger, Katja E; Abelleira, Laura; Ribeiro, Joana; Duran, Yanai; Smith, Alexander J; Ali, Robin R; Luhmann, Ulrich F; Bainbridge, James W B

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia and pathological angiogenesis cause severe impairment of sight. Oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in young mice is widely used as a model to investigate the underlying pathological mechanisms and develop therapeutic interventions. We compared directly the conventional OIR model (exposure to 75% O2 from postnatal day (P) 7 to P12) with an alternative, accelerated version (85% O2 from P8 to P11). We found that accelerated OIR induces similar pre-retinal neovascularization but greater retinal vascular regression that recovers more rapidly. The extent of retinal gliosis is similar but neuroretinal function, as measured by electroretinography, is better maintained in the accelerated model. We found no systemic or maternal morbidity in either model. Accelerated OIR offers a safe, reliable and more rapid alternative model in which pre-retinal neovascularization is similar but retinal vascular regression is greater.

  8. Model-based Acceleration Control of Turbofan Engines with a Hammerstein-Wiener Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiqiang; Ye, Zhifeng; Hu, Zhongzhi; Wu, Xin; Dimirovsky, Georgi; Yue, Hong

    2017-05-01

    Acceleration control of turbofan engines is conventionally designed through either schedule-based or acceleration-based approach. With the widespread acceptance of model-based design in aviation industry, it becomes necessary to investigate the issues associated with model-based design for acceleration control. In this paper, the challenges for implementing model-based acceleration control are explained; a novel Hammerstein-Wiener representation of engine models is introduced; based on the Hammerstein-Wiener model, a nonlinear generalized minimum variance type of optimal control law is derived; the feature of the proposed approach is that it does not require the inversion operation that usually upsets those nonlinear control techniques. The effectiveness of the proposed control design method is validated through a detailed numerical study.

  9. Modelling of a linear accelerator VARIAN 600 C/D for dosimetric study using the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino, Jorge Luis Batista

    2016-01-01

    Based on the high availability of low energy linear accelerators in Brazil and with the goal of developing a reliable tool for dose distribution calculations in radiotherapy; this research aims to validate a linear accelerator head model using MCNP Monte Carlo code. The Varian 600 C/D linear accelerator installed at the Hospital São João de is taken as reference. The main components of the linear accelerator head were simulated based on detailed information of the manufacturer. In order to calculate dose distribution, a water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 was simulated and placed at 100 cm of source-surface distance. A monoenergetic electron beam of 6,3 MeV was considered as a source. The number of primary particles used in the simulation was 10 8 . A Phase-Space Surface was used to scoring the photon spectrum below the tungsten target. Others two were placed in the model in order to reduce computational time and improve statistical accuracy. In order to validate the developed model, the X-ray spectrum generated by Bremsstrahlung was calculated and analyzed. Furthermore, the results of percentage depth doses and beam profiles calculations were compared with available measurements. The MCNP calculations results were compared to measurement showing good agreement between them. The comparison between MCNP calculations and measurement of PDD showed reasonable coherence at build-up region. The results were in an acceptable interval of confidence at the flat region of beam profiles comparison for three different field sizes. In this work, we compared MCNP calculations to experimental data in order to validate the developed LINAC head model. The results showed a good agreement according to the recommended criteria. The developed model was validated as an accurate tool for LINAC quality control procedures. (author)

  10. Final Report for 'Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  11. A new model for diffuse brain injury by rotational acceleration: I model, gross appearance, and astrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, E; Huang, Y; Haglid, K; Bao, F; Hansson, H A; Hamberger, A; Viano, D

    2001-03-01

    Rapid head rotation is a major cause of brain damage in automobile crashes and falls. This report details a new model for rotational acceleration about the center of mass of the rabbit head. This allows the study of brain injury without translational acceleration of the head. Impact from a pneumatic cylinder was transferred to the skull surface to cause a half-sine peak acceleration of 2.1 x 10(5) rad/s2 and 0.96-ms pulse duration. Extensive subarachnoid hemorrhages and small focal bleedings were observed in the brain tissue. A pronounced reactive astrogliosis was found 8-14 days after trauma, both as networks around the focal hemorrhages and more diffusely in several brain regions. Astrocytosis was prominent in the gray matter of the cerebral cortex, layers II-V, and in the granule cell layer and around the axons of the pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. The nuclei of cranial nerves, such as the hypoglossal and facial nerves, also showed intense astrocytosis. The new model allows study of brain injuries from head rotation in the absence of translational influences.

  12. Flux and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays: beyond homogeneous models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Guilhem

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I study the consequence of non homogeneously distributed cosmic ray sources in the Milky way. The document starts with theoretical and experimental synthesis. Firstly, I will describe the interstellar medium to understand the mechanism of propagation and acceleration of cosmic rays. Then, the detailed study of cosmic rays diffusion on the galactic magnetic field allows to write a commonly used propagation equation. I will recall the Steady-state solutions of this equation, then I will focus on the time dependant solutions with point-like sources. A statistical study is performed in order to estimate the standard deviation of the flux around its mean value. The computation of this standard deviation leads to mathematical divergences. Thus, I will develop statistical tools to bypass this issue. So i will discuss the effect of the granularity of cosmic ray sources. Its impact on cosmic ray spectrum can explain some recent features observed by the experiments CREAM and PAMELA.Besides, this thesis is focused on the study of the anisotropy of cosmic rays. I will recap experimental methods of measurements, and I will show how to connect theoretical calculation from propagation theories to experimental measurements. Then, the influence of the local environment on the anisotropy measurements will be discussed, particularly the effect of a local diffusion coefficient. Then, I will compute anisotropy and its variance in a framework of point-like local sources with the tools developed in the first part. Finally, the possible influence of local sources on the anisotropy is discussed in the light of the last experimental results. (author) [fr

  13. Choice of theoretical model for beam scattering at accelerator output foil for particle energy determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagyra, V.S.; Ryabka, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    For measuring the charged particle energy calculations of mean square angles of electron beam multiple Coulomb scattering at output combined accelerator target were undertaken according to seven theoretical models. Mollier method showed the best agreement with experiments

  14. Adaptive response of low linear energy transfer X-rays for protection against high linear energy transfer accelerated heavy ion-induced teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Tanaka, Kaoru; Maruyama, Kouichi; Varès, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2012-12-01

    Adaptive response (AR) of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations for protection against teratogenesis induced by high LET irradiations is not well documented. In this study, induction of AR by X-rays against teratogenesis induced by accelerated heavy ions was examined in fetal mice. Irradiations of pregnant C57BL/6J mice were performed by delivering a priming low dose from X-rays at 0.05 or 0.30 Gy on gestation day 11 followed one day later by a challenge high dose from either X-rays or accelerated heavy ions. Monoenergetic beams of carbon, neon, silicon, and iron with the LET values of about 15, 30, 55, and 200 keV/μm, respectively, were examined. Significant suppression of teratogenic effects (fetal death, malformation of live fetuses, or low body weight) was used as the endpoint for judgment of a successful AR induction. Existence of AR induced by low-LET X-rays against teratogenic effect induced by high-LET accelerated heavy ions was demonstrated. The priming low dose of X-rays significantly reduced the occurrence of prenatal fetal death, malformation, and/or low body weight induced by the challenge high dose from either X-rays or accelerated heavy ions of carbon, neon or silicon but not iron particles. Successful AR induction appears to be a radiation quality event, depending on the LET value and/or the particle species of the challenge irradiations. These findings would provide a new insight into the study on radiation-induced AR in utero. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Pulsar Wind Nebulae: PIC Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Cerutti, Benoît

    We discuss the role of PIC simulations in unveiling the origin of the emitting particles in PWNe. After describing the basics of the PIC technique, we summarize its implications for the quiescent and the flaring emission of the Crab Nebula, as a prototype of PWNe. A consensus seems to be emerging that, in addition to the standard scenario of particle acceleration via the Fermi process at the termination shock of the pulsar wind, magnetic reconnection in the wind, at the termination shock and in the Nebula plays a major role in powering the multi-wavelength signatures of PWNe.

  16. Accelerated testing statistical models, test plans, and data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Wayne B

    2009-01-01

    The Wiley-Interscience Paperback Series consists of selected books that have been made more accessible to consumers in an effort to increase global appeal and general circulation. With these new unabridged softcover volumes, Wiley hopes to extend the lives of these works by making them available to future generations of statisticians, mathematicians, and scientists. "". . . a goldmine of knowledge on accelerated life testing principles and practices . . . one of the very few capable of advancing the science of reliability. It definitely belongs in every bookshelf on engineering.""-Dev G.

  17. Model Atmospheres for X-ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Medin, Zach; von Steinkirch, Marina; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of t...

  18. A probabilistic model for x-ray PHA data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diesso, M.; Hill, K.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model of the data produced by a single-arm x-ray pulse height analyzer (PHA) system is developed. Given an assumption on the electron temperature and density profiles, a maximum likelihood technique is applied to calculate the peak electron temperature and enhancement factor of the plasma. This method is currently being used in the analysis of x-ray data from the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR); sample results are presented

  19. Second-stage acceleration in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A model proposed by Chevalier and Scott to account for cosmic ray acceleration in an expanding supernova remnant is applied to the case of a shock wave injected into the solar corona by a flare. Certain features of solar cosmic rays can be explained by this model. (orig.) [de

  20. Normalization and Implementation of Three Gravitational Acceleration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Randy A.; Brown, Aaron J.; Adamo, Daniel R.; Gottlieb, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the uniform density spherical shell approximations of Newton, the consequence of spaceflight in the real universe is that gravitational fields are sensitive to the asphericity of their generating central bodies. The gravitational potential of an aspherical central body is typically resolved using spherical harmonic approximations. However, attempting to directly calculate the spherical harmonic approximations results in at least two singularities that must be removed to generalize the method and solve for any possible orbit, including polar orbits. Samuel Pines, Bill Lear, and Robert Gottlieb developed three unique algorithms to eliminate these singularities. This paper documents the methodical normalization of two of the three known formulations for singularity-free gravitational acceleration (namely, the Lear and Gottlieb algorithms) and formulates a general method for defining normalization parameters used to generate normalized Legendre polynomials and Associated Legendre Functions (ALFs) for any algorithm. A treatment of the conventional formulation of the gravitational potential and acceleration is also provided, in addition to a brief overview of the philosophical differences between the three known singularity-free algorithms.

  1. A relativistic model of the topological acceleration effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowski, Jan J; Roukema, Boudewijn F; Buliński, Zbigniew P

    2012-01-01

    It has previously been shown heuristically that the topology of the Universe affects gravity, in the sense that a test particle near a massive object in a multiply connected universe is subject to a topologically induced acceleration that opposes the local attraction to the massive object. It is necessary to check if this effect occurs in a fully relativistic solution of the Einstein equations that has a multiply connected spatial section. A Schwarzschild-like exact solution that is multiply connected in one spatial direction is checked for analytical and numerical consistency with the heuristic result. The T 1 (slab-space) heuristic result is found to be relativistically correct. For a fundamental domain size of L, a slow-moving, negligible-mass test particle lying at distance x along the axis from the object of mass M to its nearest multiple image, where GM/c 2 3 )x, where ζ(3) is Apery's constant. For M ∼ 10 14 M sun and L ∼ 10-20h -1 Gpc, this linear expression is accurate to ±10% over h -1 Mpc/h -1 Gpc. Thus, at least in a simple example of a multiply connected universe, the topological acceleration effect is not an artefact of Newtonian-like reasoning, and its linear derivation is accurate over about three orders of magnitude in x. (paper)

  2. Modelling of post-irradiation accelerated repopulation in squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, L; Doorn, T van; Olver, I

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms postulated to be responsible for the accelerated repopulation of squamous cell carcinomas during radiotherapy are the loss of asymmetry of stem cell division, acceleration of stem cell division, abortive division and/or recruitment of the non-cycling cell with proliferative capacity. Although accelerated repopulation was observed with recruitment and accelerated cell cycles, it was not sufficient to cause an observable change to the survival curve. However, modelling the loss of asymmetry in stem cell division has reshaped the curve with a 'growth' shoulder. Cell recruitment was not found to be a major contributor to accelerated tumour repopulation. A more significant contribution was provided through the multiplication of surviving tumour stem cells during radiotherapy, by reducing their cell cycle time, and due to loss of asymmetry of stem cell division

  3. Charge-coupled-device X-ray detector performance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, M. W.; Berman, G. E.; Doty, J. P.; Ricker, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    A model that predicts the performance characteristics of CCD detectors being developed for use in X-ray imaging is presented. The model accounts for the interactions of both X-rays and charged particles with the CCD and simulates the transport and loss of charge in the detector. Predicted performance parameters include detective and net quantum efficiencies, split-event probability, and a parameter characterizing the effective thickness presented by the detector to cosmic-ray protons. The predicted performance of two CCDs of different epitaxial layer thicknesses is compared. The model predicts that in each device incomplete recovery of the charge liberated by a photon of energy between 0.1 and 10 keV is very likely to be accompanied by charge splitting between adjacent pixels. The implications of the model predictions for CCD data processing algorithms are briefly discussed.

  4. Accounting for measurement error in log regression models with applications to accelerated testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Richardson

    Full Text Available In regression settings, parameter estimates will be biased when the explanatory variables are measured with error. This bias can significantly affect modeling goals. In particular, accelerated lifetime testing involves an extrapolation of the fitted model, and a small amount of bias in parameter estimates may result in a significant increase in the bias of the extrapolated predictions. Additionally, bias may arise when the stochastic component of a log regression model is assumed to be multiplicative when the actual underlying stochastic component is additive. To account for these possible sources of bias, a log regression model with measurement error and additive error is approximated by a weighted regression model which can be estimated using Iteratively Re-weighted Least Squares. Using the reduced Eyring equation in an accelerated testing setting, the model is compared to previously accepted approaches to modeling accelerated testing data with both simulations and real data.

  5. Accounting for measurement error in log regression models with applications to accelerated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robert; Tolley, H Dennis; Evenson, William E; Lunt, Barry M

    2018-01-01

    In regression settings, parameter estimates will be biased when the explanatory variables are measured with error. This bias can significantly affect modeling goals. In particular, accelerated lifetime testing involves an extrapolation of the fitted model, and a small amount of bias in parameter estimates may result in a significant increase in the bias of the extrapolated predictions. Additionally, bias may arise when the stochastic component of a log regression model is assumed to be multiplicative when the actual underlying stochastic component is additive. To account for these possible sources of bias, a log regression model with measurement error and additive error is approximated by a weighted regression model which can be estimated using Iteratively Re-weighted Least Squares. Using the reduced Eyring equation in an accelerated testing setting, the model is compared to previously accepted approaches to modeling accelerated testing data with both simulations and real data.

  6. Evaluation of a server-client architecture for accelerator modeling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; Akers, W.; Shoaee, H.; Watson, W.; Zeijts, J. van; Witherspoon, S.

    1997-01-01

    Traditional approaches to computational modeling and simulation often utilize a batch method for code execution using file-formatted input/output. This method of code implementation was generally chosen for several factors, including CPU throughput and availability, complexity of the required modeling problem, and presentation of computation results. With the advent of faster computer hardware and the advances in networking and software techniques, other program architectures for accelerator modeling have recently been employed. Jefferson Laboratory has implemented a client/server solution for accelerator beam transport modeling utilizing a query-based I/O. The goal of this code is to provide modeling information for control system applications and to serve as a computation engine for general modeling tasks, such as machine studies. This paper performs a comparison between the batch execution and server/client architectures, focusing on design and implementation issues, performance, and general utility towards accelerator modeling demands

  7. Verification of radiodynamic therapy by medical linear accelerator using a mouse melanoma tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Junko; Murakami, Mami; Mori, Takashi; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2018-02-09

    Combined treatment with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and X-rays improves tumor suppression in vivo. This is because the accumulated protoporphyrin IX from 5-ALA enhances the generation of ROS by the X-ray irradiation. In the present study, a high-energy medical linear accelerator was used instead of a non-medical low energy X-ray irradiator, which had been previously used. Tumor-bearing mice implanted with B16-BL6 melanoma cells were treated with fractionated doses of irradiation (in total, 20 or 30 Gy), using two types of X-ray irradiator after 5-ALA administration. Suppression of tumor growth was enhanced with X-ray irradiation in combination with 5-ALA treatment compared with X-ray treatment alone, using both medical and non-medical X-ray irradiators. 5-ALA has been used clinically for photodynamic therapy. Thus, "radiodynamic therapy", using radiation from medical linacs as a physical driving force, rather than the light used in photodynamic therapy, may have potential clinical applications.

  8. ARTEAM - Advanced ray tracing with earth atmospheric models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.; Moerman, M.M.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Ray Tracing with Earth Atmospheric Models (ARTEAM) aims at a description of the electro-optical propagation environment in the marine atmospheric surface layer. For given meteorological conditions, the model evaluates height- and range-resolved transmission losses, refraction and

  9. Waves and particles in the Fermi accelerator model. Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meplan, O.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a numerical study of the quantum dynamics of the Fermi accelerator which is classically chaotic: it is particle in a one dimensional box with a oscillating wall. First, we study the classical dynamics: we show that the time of impact of the particle with the moving wall and its energy in the wall frame are conjugated variables and that Poincare surface of sections in these variables are more understandable than the usual stroboscopic sections. Then, the quantum dynamics of this systems is studied by the means of two numerical methods. The first one is a generalization of the KKR method in the space-time; it is enough to solve an integral equation on the boundary of a space-time billiard. The second method is faster and is based on successive free propagations and kicks of potential. This allows us to obtain Floquet states which we can on one hand, compare to the classical dynamics with the help of Husimi distributions and on the other hand, study as a function of parameters of the system. This study leads us to nice illustrations of phenomenons such as spatial localizations of a wave packet in a vibrating well or tunnel effects. In the adiabatic situation, we give a formula for quasi-energies which exhibits a phase term independent of states. In this regime, there exist some particular situations where the quasi-energy spectrum presents a total quasi-degeneracy. Then, the wave packet energy can increase significantly. This phenomenon is quite surprising for smooth motion of the wall. The third part deals with the evolution of a classical wave in the Fermi accelerator. Using generalized KKR method, we show a surprising phenomenon: in most of situations (so long as the wall motion is periodic), a wave is localized exponentially in the well and its energy increases in a geometric way. (author). 107 refs., 66 figs., 5 tabs. 2 appends

  10. Promotion of accelerated repair in a radiation impaired wound healing model in murine skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.D.

    2000-02-01

    Surgical resection of many tumours following radiotherapy is well established as the preferred approach to eradicating the disease. However, prior irradiation compromises the healing of surgical wounds in 30-60% of cases, depending on the site of treatment. There is a need therefore, to understand the deficit in the repair process and to develop therapeutic interventions that may help address this problem. To this end, the aims of this thesis were to characterise a wound healing model in irradiated murine skin and to investigate the effects of topical- compounds and therapeutic modalities upon this wound healing model. Full-thickness dorsal skin excisions were made within a pre-irradiated area (20Gy) in male Balb/c mice and wounds were made in a corresponding area in control animals. Biopsies were removed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis, whilst wound closure experiments were used to determine effects of topical compounds and therapeutic modalities (Low Intensity Laser Therapy, Therapeutic Ultrasound and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) upon the rate of repair. X-ray irradiation (20Gy) caused a significant delay in the rate of wound closure, whilst histological results indicated that prior irradiation delays the influx of inflammatory cells, delays wound reepithelialisation and reduces granulation tissue formation and collagen deposition. Macrophage and endothelial cell numbers were found to be significantly lower in the irradiated wounds when compared to unirradiated control wounds. Furthermore, apoptosis was affected by irradiation. Although results failed to support any claimed stimulatory effects of various therapeutic modalities upon wound healing, topical application of glucans were shown to have a slight beneficial effect upon the rate of repair. In conclusion, the observed cellular effects caused by irradiation may be a result of permanent damage to stem cells and their ability to replicate and reproduce. Furthermore, the

  11. Two-phase flow dynamics in a model steam generator under vertical acceleration oscillation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.; Teshima, N.; Sakurai, S.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of periodically varying acceleration on hydrodynamic response has been studied experimentally using an experimental rig which models a marine reactor subject to vertical motion. The effect on the primary loop is small, but the effect on the secondary loop is large. The variables of the secondary loop, such as circulation flow rate and water level, oscillate with acceleration. The variation of gains in frequency response is analysed. The variations of flow in the secondary loop and in the downcome water level, increase in proportion to the acceleration. The effect of the flow resistance in the secondary loop on the two-phase flow dynamics is clarified. (7 figures) (Author)

  12. Optics Elements for Modeling Electrostatic Lenses and Accelerator Components: III. Electrostatic Deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code, which includes a linear space charge model, that was originally developed to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators. Several new optical models for a number of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns have been developed recently that allow the code to be used for modeling beamlines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) Einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic prisms, and (4) electrostatic quadrupoles. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the modeling of cylindrical, spherical, and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low energy beamline at CAMS

  13. Model Diagnostics for the Department of Energy's Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, eight Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, four academic institutions, one company, and the National Centre for Atmospheric Research combined forces in a project called Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) with the goal to speed Earth system model development for climate and energy. Over the planned 10-year span, the project will conduct simulations and modeling on DOE's most powerful high-performance computing systems at Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Berkeley Leadership Compute Facilities. A key component of the ACME project is the development of an interactive test bed for the advanced Earth system model. Its execution infrastructure will accelerate model development and testing cycles. The ACME Workflow Group is leading the efforts to automate labor-intensive tasks, provide intelligent support for complex tasks and reduce duplication of effort through collaboration support. As part of this new workflow environment, we have created a diagnostic, metric, and intercomparison Python framework, called UVCMetrics, to aid in the testing-to-production execution of the ACME model. The framework exploits similarities among different diagnostics to compactly support diagnosis of new models. It presently focuses on atmosphere and land but is designed to support ocean and sea ice model components as well. This framework is built on top of the existing open-source software framework known as the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT). Because of its flexible framework design, scientists and modelers now can generate thousands of possible diagnostic outputs. These diagnostics can compare model runs, compare model vs. observation, or simply verify a model is physically realistic. Additional diagnostics are easily integrated into the framework, and our users have already added several. Diagnostics can be generated, viewed, and manipulated from the UV-CDAT graphical user interface, Python command line scripts and programs

  14. Gamma-Ray, Cosmic Ray and Neutrino Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd

    2011-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approximately 10(exp -35) m. I will discuss here the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) from observations of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations of the spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) to the amount of LIV of at a proton Lorentz factor of approximately 2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future.

  15. Empirical model for the Earth's cosmic ray shadow at 400 KM: prohibited cosmic ray access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humble, J.E.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of constructing a unit sphere of access that describes the cosmic radiation allowed to an Earth-orbiting spacecraft is discussed. It is found that it is possible to model the occluded portion of the cosmic ray sphere of access as a circular projection with a diameter bounded by the satellite-Earth horizon. Maintaining tangency at the eastern edge of the spacecraft-Earth horizon, this optically occluded area is projected downward by an angle beta which is a function of the magnetic field inclination and cosmic ray arrival direction. This projected plane, corresponding to the forbidden area of cosmic ray access, is bounded by the spacecraft-Earth horizon in easterly directions, and is rotated around the vertical axis by an angle alpha from the eastern direction, where the angle alpha is a function of the offset dipole latitude of the spacecraft

  16. EVIDENCE FOR ENHANCED {sup 3}HE IN FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES BASED ON NEW CALCULATIONS OF THE GAMMA-RAY LINE SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R. J. [Code 7650, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kozlovsky, B. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Share, G. H., E-mail: murphy@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: share@astro.umd.edu [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The {sup 3}He abundance in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events is enhanced up to several orders of magnitude compared to its photospheric value of [{sup 3}He]/[{sup 4}He] = 1–3 × 10{sup −4}. Interplanetary magnetic field and timing observations suggest that these events are related to solar flares. Observations of {sup 3}He in flare-accelerated ions would clarify the relationship between these two phenomena. Energetic {sup 3}He interactions in the solar atmosphere produce gamma-ray nuclear-deexcitation lines, both lines that are also produced by protons and α particles and lines that are essentially unique to {sup 3}He. Gamma-ray spectroscopy can, therefore, reveal enhanced levels of accelerated {sup 3}He. In this paper, we identify all significant deexcitation lines produced by {sup 3}He interactions in the solar atmosphere. We evaluate their production cross sections and incorporate them into our nuclear deexcitation-line code. We find that enhanced {sup 3}He can affect the entire gamma-ray spectrum. We identify gamma-ray line features for which the yield ratios depend dramatically on the {sup 3}He abundance. We determine the accelerated {sup 3}He/ α ratio by comparing these ratios with flux ratios measured previously from the gamma-ray spectrum obtained by summing the 19 strongest flares observed with the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma-Ray Spectrometer. All six flux ratios investigated show enhanced {sup 3}He, confirming earlier suggestions. The {sup 3}He/ α weighted mean of these new measurements ranges from 0.05 to 0.3 (depending on the assumed accelerated α /proton ratio) and has a <1 × 10{sup −3} probability of being consistent with the photospheric value. With the improved code, we can now exploit the full potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy to establish the relationship between flare-accelerated ions and {sup 3}He-rich SEPs.

  17. A model for the determination of the nominal potential for a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutt, F.; Silva, P.; Guerrero, R.; Diaz, J.; Colmenares, J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to find a physical mathematical model based on the reason of the dose percentages at 10 and 20 cm depth, at 100 cm DFS and a 10 x 10 cm 2 field. It was utilized literature data of new manufactured accelerators and those are in use in hospitals, which allow to prove the model under different conditions. Our objective consists only to obtain a model that verifies the nominal potential for a linear accelerator, but without pretending that such a model to be used to calculate any one factor to determination of absorbed dose. (Author)

  18. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Ho, E-mail: jhjeon07@ibs.re.kr; Nakajima, Kazuhisa, E-mail: naka115@dia-net.ne.jp; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Choi, Il Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Cho, Byoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1–10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  19. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  20. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A. [Grumman Research and Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G.H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  1. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities

  2. Advanced Computational Models for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, A.; Ravetto, P.; Gudowsk, W.

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear engineering scientific community, Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) have been proposed and investigated for the transmutation of nuclear waste, especially plutonium and minor actinides. These fuels have a quite low effective delayed neutron fraction relative to uranium fuel, therefore the subcriticality of the core offers a unique safety feature with respect to critical reactors. The intrinsic safety of ADS allows the elimination of the operational control rods, hence the reactivity excess during burnup can be managed by the intensity of the proton beam, fuel shuffling, and eventually by burnable poisons. However, the intrinsic safety of a subcritical system does not guarantee that ADSs are immune from severe accidents (core melting), since the decay heat of an ADS is very similar to the one of a critical system. Normally, ADSs operate with an effective multiplication factor between 0.98 and 0.92, which means that the spallation neutron source contributes little to the neutron population. In addition, for 1 GeV incident protons and lead-bismuth target, about 50% of the spallation neutrons has energy below 1 MeV and only 15% of spallation neutrons has energies above 3 MeV. In the light of these remarks, the transmutation performances of ADS are very close to those of critical reactors.

  3. Using Intel's Knight Landing Processor to Accelerate Global Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (GNAQPMS) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Chen, H.; Chen, X.; Wu, Q.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The Global Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System for Hg (GNAQPMS-Hg) is a global chemical transport model coupled Hg transport module to investigate the mercury pollution. In this study, we present our work of transplanting the GNAQPMS model on Intel Xeon Phi processor, Knights Landing (KNL) to accelerate the model. KNL is the second-generation product adopting Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) architecture. Compared with the first generation Knight Corner (KNC), KNL has more new hardware features, that it can be used as unique processor as well as coprocessor with other CPU. According to the Vtune tool, the high overhead modules in GNAQPMS model have been addressed, including CBMZ gas chemistry, advection and convection module, and wet deposition module. These high overhead modules were accelerated by optimizing code and using new techniques of KNL. The following optimized measures was done: 1) Changing the pure MPI parallel mode to hybrid parallel mode with MPI and OpenMP; 2.Vectorizing the code to using the 512-bit wide vector computation unit. 3. Reducing unnecessary memory access and calculation. 4. Reducing Thread Local Storage (TLS) for common variables with each OpenMP thread in CBMZ. 5. Changing the way of global communication from files writing and reading to MPI functions. After optimization, the performance of GNAQPMS is greatly increased both on CPU and KNL platform, the single-node test showed that optimized version has 2.6x speedup on two sockets CPU platform and 3.3x speedup on one socket KNL platform compared with the baseline version code, which means the KNL has 1.29x speedup when compared with 2 sockets CPU platform.

  4. On selection of optimal stochastic model for accelerated life testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volf, P.; Timková, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of proper lifetime model selection in the context of statistical reliability analysis. Namely, we consider regression models describing the dependence of failure intensities on a covariate, for instance, a stressor. Testing the model fit is standardly based on the so-called martingale residuals. Their analysis has already been studied by many authors. Nevertheless, the Bayes approach to the problem, in spite of its advantages, is just developing. We shall present the Bayes procedure of estimation in several semi-parametric regression models of failure intensity. Then, our main concern is the Bayes construction of residual processes and goodness-of-fit tests based on them. The method is illustrated with both artificial and real-data examples. - Highlights: • Statistical survival and reliability analysis and Bayes approach. • Bayes semi-parametric regression modeling in Cox's and AFT models. • Bayes version of martingale residuals and goodness-of-fit test

  5. Preferential acceleration in collisionless supernova shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainebach, K.; Eichler, D.; Schramm, D.

    1979-01-01

    The preferential acceleration and resulting cosmic ray abundance enhancements of heavy elements (relative to protons) are calculated in the collisionless supernova shock acceleration model described by Eichler in earlier work. Rapidly increasing enhancements up to several tens times solar ratios are obtained as a function of atomic weight over charge at the time of acceleration. For material typical of hot phase interstellar medium, good agreement is obtained with the observed abundance enhancements

  6. Reaction effects in diffusive shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, L.Oc.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the reaction of accelerated particles back on the shock wave in the diffusive-shock-acceleration model of cosmic-ray generation are investigated theoretically. Effects examined include changes in the shock structure, modifications of the input and output spectra, scattering effects, and possible instabilities in the small-scale structure. It is pointed out that the latter two effects are applicable to any spatially localized acceleration mechanism. 14 references

  7. Extragalactic gamma-ray background from AGN winds and star-forming galaxies in cosmological galaxy-formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamastra, A.; Menci, N.; Fiore, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Guetta, D.; Stamerra, A.

    2017-10-01

    We derive the contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) from active galactic nuclei (AGN) winds and star-forming galaxies by including a physical model for the γ-ray emission produced by relativistic protons accelerated by AGN-driven and supernova-driven shocks into a state-of-the-art semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. This is based on galaxy interactions as triggers of AGN accretion and starburst activity and on expanding blast waves as the mechanism to communicate outwards the energy injected into the interstellar medium by the active nucleus. We compare the model predictions with the latest measurement of the EGB spectrum performed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) in the range between 100 MeV and 820 GeV. We find that AGN winds can provide 35 ± 15% of the observed EGB in the energy interval Eγ = 0.1-1 GeV, for 73 ± 15% at Eγ = 1-10 GeV, and for 60 ± 20% at Eγ ≳10 GeV. The AGN wind contribution to the EGB is predicted to be larger by a factor of 3-5 than that provided by star-forming galaxies (quiescent plus starburst) in the hierarchical clustering scenario. The cumulative γ-ray emission from AGN winds and blazars can account for the amplitude and spectral shape of the EGB, assuming the standard acceleration theory, and AGN wind parameters that agree with observations. We also compare the model prediction for the cumulative neutrino background from AGN winds with the most recent IceCube data. We find that for AGN winds with accelerated proton spectral index p = 2.2-2.3, and taking into account internal absorption of γ-rays, the Fermi-LAT and IceCube data could be reproduced simultaneously.

  8. Accelerating an Ordered-Subset Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction with a Power Factor and Total Variation Minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in low-dose X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in many fields, including dentistry, guided radiotherapy and small animal imaging. Despite reducing the radiation dose, low-dose CBCT has not gained widespread acceptance in routine clinical practice. In addition to performing more evaluation studies, developing a fast and high-quality reconstruction algorithm is required. In this work, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that accelerates ordered-subsets (OS) reconstruction using a power factor. Furthermore, we combine it with the total-variation (TV) minimization method. Both simulation and phantom studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can accelerate conventional OS methods, greatly increase the convergence speed in early iterations. Moreover, applying the TV minimization to the power acceleration scheme can further improve the image quality while preserving the fast convergence rate.

  9. Presentation of a semiempirical method for the calculation of doses due to neutrons and capture gamma rays inside high energy accelerators rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, A.M.; Bonet Duran, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Medical electron accelerators operating above 10 MeV produce radiation beams that are contaminated with neutrons. Therefore, shielding design for high energy accelerator rooms must consider the neutron component of the radiation field. In this paper a semiempirical method is presented to calculate doses due to neutrons and capture gamma rays inside the room and the maze. The calculation method is based on the knowledge of the neutron yield Q (neutrons/Gy of photons at isocenter) and the average energy of the primary beam of neutrons Eo (MeV). The method constitutes an appropriate tool for shielding facilities evaluation. The accuracy of the method has been contrasted with data obtained from the literature and an excellent correlation among the calculations and the measured values was achieved. In addition, the method has been used in the verification of experimental data corresponding to a 15 MeV linear accelerator installed in the country with similar results. (author) [es

  10. Accelerator simulation and theoretical modelling of radiation effects (SMoRE)

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This publication summarizes the findings and conclusions of the IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on accelerator simulation and theoretical modelling of radiation effects, aimed at supporting Member States in the development of advanced radiation-resistant structural materials for implementation in innovative nuclear systems. This aim can be achieved through enhancement of both experimental neutron-emulation capabilities of ion accelerators and improvement of the predictive efficiency of theoretical models and computer codes. This dual approach is challenging but necessary, because outputs of accelerator simulation experiments need adequate theoretical interpretation, and theoretical models and codes need high dose experimental data for their verification. Both ion irradiation investigations and computer modelling have been the specific subjects of the CRP, and the results of these studies are presented in this publication which also includes state-ofthe- art reviews of four major aspects of the project...

  11. Modeling of a new 2D Acceleration Sensor Array using SystemC-AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, Erik; Dienel, Marco; Herrmann, Goeran; Mueller, Dietmar; Heinkel, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for modeling and simulation of a new 2D acceleration sensor array using SystemC-AMS. The sensor array consists of six single acceleration sensors with different detection axes. These single sensors comprise of four capacitive segments and one mass segment, aligned in a semicircle. The redundant sensor information is used for offset correction. Modeling of the single sensors is achieved using sensor structure simplification into 11 points and analytic equations for capacity changes, currents and torques. This model was expanded by a PWM feedback circuit to keep the sensor displacement in a linear region. In this paper the single sensor model is duplicated considering different positions of the seismic mass resulting in different detection axes for the single sensors. The measured accelerations of the sensors are merged with different weights depending on the orientation. This also reduces calculation effort

  12. Radiation transmission of heavyweight and normal-weight concretes containing colemanite for 6 MV and 18 MV X-rays using linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, F.; Budak, G.; Sahin, R.; Karabulut, A.; Oltulu, M.; Serifoglu, K.; Un, A.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate measurements have been made to determine radiation transmission of concretes produced with barite, colemanite and normal aggregate by using beam transmission method for 6 and 18 MV X-rays with a linear accelerator (LINAC). Linear attenuation coefficients of thirteen heavy- and four normal-weight concretes were calculated. It was determined that linear attenuation coefficient (μ, cm -1 ) decreased with colemanite concentration and increased with barite concentration in both types of the concretes.

  13. Accelerating navigation in the VecGeom geometry modeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Sandro; Zhang, Yang; pre="for the"> VecGeom Developers,

    2017-10-01

    The VecGeom geometry library is a relatively recent effort aiming to provide a modern and high performance geometry service for particle detector simulation in hierarchical detector geometries common to HEP experiments. One of its principal targets is the efficient use of vector SIMD hardware instructions to accelerate geometry calculations for single track as well as multi-track queries. Previously, excellent performance improvements compared to Geant4/ROOT could be reported for elementary geometry algorithms at the level of single shape queries. In this contribution, we will focus on the higher level navigation algorithms in VecGeom, which are the most important components as seen from the simulation engines. We will first report on our R&D effort and developments to implement SIMD enhanced data structures to speed up the well-known “voxelised” navigation algorithms, ubiquitously used for particle tracing in complex detector modules consisting of many daughter parts. Second, we will discuss complementary new approaches to improve navigation algorithms in HEP. These ideas are based on a systematic exploitation of static properties of the detector layout as well as automatic code generation and specialisation of the C++ navigator classes. Such specialisations reduce the overhead of generic- or virtual function based algorithms and enhance the effectiveness of the SIMD vector units. These novel approaches go well beyond the existing solutions available in Geant4 or TGeo/ROOT, achieve a significantly superior performance, and might be of interest for a wide range of simulation backends (GeantV, Geant4). We exemplify this with concrete benchmarks for the CMS and ALICE detectors.

  14. Biocellion: accelerating computer simulation of multicellular biological system models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seunghwa; Kahan, Simon; McDermott, Jason; Flann, Nicholas; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-11-01

    Biological system behaviors are often the outcome of complex interactions among a large number of cells and their biotic and abiotic environment. Computational biologists attempt to understand, predict and manipulate biological system behavior through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Discrete agent-based modeling (in combination with high-resolution grids to model the extracellular environment) is a popular approach for building biological system models. However, the computational complexity of this approach forces computational biologists to resort to coarser resolution approaches to simulate large biological systems. High-performance parallel computers have the potential to address the computing challenge, but writing efficient software for parallel computers is difficult and time-consuming. We have developed Biocellion, a high-performance software framework, to solve this computing challenge using parallel computers. To support a wide range of multicellular biological system models, Biocellion asks users to provide their model specifics by filling the function body of pre-defined model routines. Using Biocellion, modelers without parallel computing expertise can efficiently exploit parallel computers with less effort than writing sequential programs from scratch. We simulate cell sorting, microbial patterning and a bacterial system in soil aggregate as case studies. Biocellion runs on x86 compatible systems with the 64 bit Linux operating system and is freely available for academic use. Visit http://biocellion.com for additional information. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Heliospheric modulation of cosmic rays: model and observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimova S.K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the basic model of cosmic ray modulation in the heliosphere, developed in Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The model has only one free modulation parameter: the ratio of the regular magnetic field to the turbulent one. It may also be applied to the description of cosmic ray intensity variations in a wide energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV. Possible mechanisms of generation of the turbulent field are considered. The primary assumption about the electrical neutrality of the heliosphere appears to be wrong, and the zero potential needed to match the model with observations in the solar equatorial plane can be achieved if the frontal point of the heliosphere, which is flowed around by interstellar gas, lies near the plane. We have revealed that the abnormal rise of cosmic ray intensity at the end of solar cycle 23 is related to the residual modulation produced by the subsonic solar wind behind the front of a standing shock wave. The model is used to describe features of cosmic ray intensity variations in several solar activity cycles.

  16. Gamma-ray excess and the minimal dark matter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, Michael; Fileviez Perez, Pavel; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-10-01

    We point out that the gamma-ray excesses in the galactic center and in the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II can both be well explained within the simplest dark matter model. We find that the corresponding region of parameter space will be tested by direct and indirect dark matter searches in the near future.

  17. Model checking the FlexRay startup phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranen, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a discrete-time model of the startup phase of a FlexRay network. The startup behaviour of this network is analysed in the presence of several faults. It is shown that in certain cases a faulty node can prevent the network from communicating altogether. One previously unknown

  18. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorzyca, T.W.; Bautista, M.A.; Hasoglu, M.F.; García, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J.S.; Kallman, T.R.; Manson, S.T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A.J.J.; de Vries, C.P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of O I for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects,

  19. Modeling and design of X-rays bidimensional detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quisbert, Elmer Paz Alcon

    2000-03-01

    In this work has been developed the scintillating fiber optic and semiconductor devices based 2-D detector design, modeling and performance evaluation using Monte Carlo methods, for high X-ray energy range (10-140 kV) radiography and tomography applications. These processes allowed us, also, the imaging system parameters and components optimization and appropriate detector design. The model estimated the detectors performance parameters (DQE, MTF and SNR), and radiation risk (in terms of mean absorbed dose in the patient) and to show up how the sequence of physical processes in X-ray detection influence the performance of this imaging PFOC detectors. In this way, the modeling of the detector includes the statistics of the spatial distribution of absorbed X-rays and of X-ray to light conversion, its transmission, and the light quanta conversion into electrons. Also contributions to noise from the detection system chain is included, mainly the CCD detector ambient noise. Performance prediction, based on calculation taken from simulations, illustrates how such detectors meet the exacting requirements of some medical and industrial applications. Also, it is envisaged that our modeling procedure of the imaging system will be suitable not only for investigating how the system components should be best designed but for CT and RD system performance prediction. The powerful techniques would enable us to give advice for future development, in this field, in search of more dose-efficient imaging systems. (author)

  20. The LHCf experiment modelling cosmic rays at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Castellini, G; D'Alessandro, R; Faus, A; Fukui, K; Haguenauer, M; Itow, Y; Kasahara, K; Macina, D; Mase, T; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Mizuishi, M; Menjo, H; Muraki, Y; Papini, P; Perrot, A L; Ricciarini, S B; Sako, T; Shimizu, Y; Tamura, T; Taki, K; Torii, S; Tricomi, A; Turner, W C; Velasco, J; Watanabe, H; Yoshida, K

    2008-01-01

    The LHCf experiment at LHC has been designed to provide a calibration of nuclear interaction models used in cosmic ray physics up to energies relevant to test the region between the knee and the GZK cut-off. Details of the detector and its performances are discussed.

  1. Turbulence and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    A model for the production of high energy particles in the supernova remnant Cas A is considered. The ordered expansion of the fast moving knots produce turbulent cells in the ambient interstellar medium. The turbulent cells act as magnetic scattering centers and charged particles are accelerated to large energies by the second order Fermi mechanism. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with the observed shape and time dependence of the radio spectrum, and with the scale size of magnetic field irregularities. Assuming a galactic supernova rate at 1/50 yr -1 , this mechanism is capable of producing the observed galactic cosmic ray flux and spectrum below 10 16 eV/nucleon. Several observed features of galactic cosmic rays are shown to be consistent with model predictions. A model for the objects known as radio tall galaxies is also presented. Independent blobs of magnetized plasma emerging from an active radio galaxy into an intracluster medium become turbulent due to Rayleigh--Taylor and Kelvin--Helmholz instabilities. The turbulence produces both in situ betatron and 2nd order Fermi accelerations. Predictions of the dependence of spectral index and flux on distance along the tail match observations well. Fitting provides values of physical parameters in the blobs. The relevance of this method of particle acceleration for the problem of the origin of x-ray emission in clusters of galaxies is discussed

  2. Optics elements for modeling electrostatic lenses and accelerator components: III. Electrostatic deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the envelope (matrix) computer code TRACE 3-D as a part of the development of a suite of electrostatic beamline element models which includes lenses, acceleration columns, quadrupoles and prisms. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the first-order modeling of cylindrical, spherical and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low-energy beamline at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Although initial tests following installation of the new beamline showed that the new spherical electrostatic analyzer was not behaving as predicted by these first-order models, operational conditions were found under which the analyzer now works properly as a double-focusing spherical electrostatic prism

  3. Ray Tracing modelling of reflector for vertical bifacial panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    Bifacial solar panels have recently become a new attractive building block for PV systems. In this work we propose a reflector system for a vertical bifacial panel, and use ray tracing modelling to model the performance. Particularly, we investigate the impact of the reflector volume being filled...... with a refractive medium, and shows the refractive medium improves the reflector performance since it directs almost all the light incident on the incoming plane into the PV panel....

  4. Mathematical model of accelerator output characteristics and their calculation on a computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishulina, O.A.; Ul'yanina, M.N.; Kornilova, T.V.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is described of output characteristics of a linear accelerator. The model is a system of differential equations. Presence of phase limitations is a specific feature of setting the problem which makes it possible to ensure higher simulation accuracy and determine a capture coefficient. An algorithm is elaborated of computing output characteristics based upon the mathematical model suggested. A capture coefficient, coordinate expectation characterizing an average phase value of the beam particles, coordinate expectation characterizing an average value of the reverse relative velocity of the beam particles as well as dispersion of these coordinates are output characteristics of the accelerator. Calculation methods of the accelerator output characteristics are described in detail. The computations have been performed on the BESM-6 computer, the characteristics computing time being 2 min 20 sec. Relative error of parameter computation averages 10 -2

  5. YEREVAN: Acceleration workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Sponsored by the Yerevan Physics Institute in Armenia, a Workshop on New Methods of Charged Particle Acceleration in October near the Nor Amberd Cosmic Ray Station attracted participants from most major accelerator centres in the USSR and further afield

  6. GPU-accelerated 3-D model-based tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J Anthony; Capson, David W

    2010-01-01

    Model-based approaches to tracking the pose of a 3-D object in video are effective but computationally demanding. While statistical estimation techniques, such as the particle filter, are often employed to minimize the search space, real-time performance remains unachievable on current generation CPUs. Recent advances in graphics processing units (GPUs) have brought massively parallel computational power to the desktop environment and powerful developer tools, such as NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), have provided programmers with a mechanism to exploit it. NVIDIA GPUs' single-instruction multiple-thread (SIMT) programming model is well-suited to many computer vision tasks, particularly model-based tracking, which requires several hundred 3-D model poses to be dynamically configured, rendered, and evaluated against each frame in the video sequence. Using 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) rigid hand tracking as an example application, this work harnesses consumer-grade GPUs to achieve real-time, 3-D model-based, markerless object tracking in monocular video.

  7. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Ndiitwani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the Ulysses launch (1990 until recently (2004 when compared to 2.5-GV electron and proton and 1.2-GV electron and Helium observations from this spacecraft. This approach is also applied to compute radial gradients present in 2.5-GV cosmic ray electron and protons in the inner heliosphere. The observed latitude dependence for both positive and negative charged particles during both the fast latitude scan periods, corresponding to different solar activity conditions, could also be realistically computed. For this an additional reduction in particle drifts (compared to diffusion toward solar maximum is needed. This results in a realistic charge-sign dependent modulation at solar maximum and the model is also applied to predict charge-sign dependent modulation up to the next expected solar minimum.

  8. Three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the pulsed-power Z-pinch accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional, fully electromagnetic model of the principal pulsed-power components of the 26-MA ZR accelerator [D. H. McDaniel et al., in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches (AIP, New York, 2002, p. 23] has been developed. This large-scale simulation model tracks the evolution of electromagnetic waves through the accelerator’s intermediate-storage capacitors, laser-triggered gas switches, pulse-forming lines, water switches, triplate transmission lines, and water convolute to the vacuum insulator stack. The insulator-stack electrodes are coupled to a transmission-line circuit model of the four-level magnetically insulated vacuum-transmission-line section and double-post-hole convolute. The vacuum-section circuit model is terminated by a one-dimensional self-consistent dynamic model of an imploding z-pinch load. The simulation results are compared with electrical measurements made throughout the ZR accelerator, and are in good agreement with the data, especially for times until peak load power. This modeling effort demonstrates that 3D electromagnetic models of large-scale, multiple-module, pulsed-power accelerators are now computationally tractable. This, in turn, presents new opportunities for simulating the operation of existing pulsed-power systems used in a variety of high-energy-density-physics and radiographic applications, as well as even higher-power next-generation accelerators before they are constructed.

  9. Modelling of two-zone accelerator-driven systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Babenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutron-physical modelings of two-zone subcritical reactor driven by high-intensity neutron generator are considered. The cascade principle in subcritical reactors, the use of which can hypothetically substantially amplify the neutron flux from the external source is discussed in this article. The theoretical preconditions of the cascade principle are discussed, and the directions of practical realization of the cascade subcritical system are considered, namely the possible methods of neutron feedback between reactor sections elimination. The results of Monte Carlo neutron-physical modeling of the cascade subcritical systems are presented and discussed.

  10. Cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfi, E.A.; Drury, L.O.C.; Voelk, H.J.; Webb, G.M.; Beck, R.; Biermann, P.; Heavens, A.; McKenzie, J.F.; Michel, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration was further developed with particular emphasis on the effects of time-dependence and wave-dissipation. Acceleration by pulsars and the production of gamma-ray bursts was also considered. (orig.)

  11. Gravitational Acceleration Effects on Macrosegregation: Experiment and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Torres, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Sen, S.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were performed under terrestrial gravity (1g) and during parabolic flights (10-2 g) to study the solidification and macrosegregation patterns of Al-Cu alloys. Alloys having 2% and 5% Cu were solidified against a chill at two different cooling rates. Microscopic and Electron Microprobe characterization was used to produce microstructural and macrosegregation maps. In all cases positive segregation occurred next to the chill because shrinkage flow, as expected. This positive segregation was higher in the low-g samples, apparently because of the higher heat transfer coefficient. A 2-D computational model was used to explain the experimental results. The continuum formulation was employed to describe the macroscopic transports of mass, energy, and momentum, associated with the solidification phenomena, for a two-phase system. The model considers that liquid flow is driven by thermal and solutal buoyancy, and by solidification shrinkage. The solidification event was divided into two stages. In the first one, the liquid containing freely moving equiaxed grains was described through the relative viscosity concept. In the second stage, when a fixed dendritic network was formed after dendritic coherency, the mushy zone was treated as a porous medium. The macrosegregation maps and the cooling curves obtained during experiments were used for validation of the solidification and segregation model. The model can explain the solidification and macrosegregation patterns and the differences between low- and high-gravity results.

  12. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths (∼ micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation

  13. Random Walk Model for Cell-To-Cell Misalignments in Accelerator Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupakov, Gennady

    2000-01-01

    Due to manufacturing and construction errors, cells in accelerator structures can be misaligned relative to each other. As a consequence, the beam generates a transverse wakefield even when it passes through the structure on axis. The most important effect is the long-range transverse wakefield that deflects the bunches and causes growth of the bunch train projected emittance. In this paper, the effect of the cell-to-cell misalignments is evaluated using a random walk model that assumes that each cell is shifted by a random step relative to the previous one. The model is compared with measurements of a few accelerator structures

  14. Qualitative models of magnetic field accelerated propagation in a plasma due to the Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, A.B.; Cherepanov, K.V.

    2000-01-01

    Two qualitatively new models of accelerated magnetic field propagation (relative to normal diffusion) in a plasma due to the Hall effect are developed within the frames of the electron magnetic hydrodynamics. The first model is based on a simple hydrodynamic approach, which, in particular, reproduces the number of known theoretical results. The second one makes it possible to obtain exact analytical description of the basic characteristics of the magnetic field accelerated propagation in a inhomogeneous iso-thermic plasma, namely, the magnetic field front and its effective width [ru

  15. DiVinE-CUDA - A Tool for GPU Accelerated LTL Model Checking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Barnat

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a tool that performs CUDA accelerated LTL Model Checking. The tool exploits parallel algorithm MAP adjusted to the NVIDIA CUDA architecture in order to efficiently detect the presence of accepting cycles in a directed graph. Accepting cycle detection is the core algorithmic procedure in automata-based LTL Model Checking. We demonstrate that the tool outperforms non-accelerated version of the algorithm and we discuss where the limits of the tool are and what we intend to do in the future to avoid them.

  16. How to Model Super-Soft X-ray Sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    During outbursts, the surface temperatures of white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables exceed by far half a million Kelvin. In this phase, they may become the brightest super-soft sources (SSS) in the sky. Time-series of high-resolution, high S/N X-ray spectra taken during rise, maximum, and decline of their X-ray luminosity provide insights into the processes following such outbursts as well as in the surface composition of the white dwarf. Their analysis requires adequate NLTE model atmospheres. The Tuebingen Non-LTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) is a powerful tool for their calculation. We present the application of TMAP models to SSS spectra and discuss their validity.

  17. A New Car-Following Model considering Driving Characteristics and Preceding Vehicle’s Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many improved car-following models based on the full velocity difference (FVD model have been developed. But these models do not consider the acceleration of leading vehicle. Some of them consider individual anticipation behavior of drivers, but they either do not quantitatively determine the types of driving or artificially divide the driving types rather than deriving them from actual traffic data. In this paper, driver’s driving styles are firstly categorized based on actual traffic data via data mining and clustering algorithm. Secondly, a new car-following model based on FVD model is developed, taking into account individual anticipation effects and the acceleration of leading vehicle. The effect of driving characteristics and leading vehicle’s acceleration on car-following behavior is further analyzed via numerical simulation. The results show that considering the acceleration of preceding vehicle in the model improves the stability of traffic flow and different driving characteristics have different influence on the stability of traffic flow.

  18. Algorithms and procedures in the model based control of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, E.

    1987-10-01

    The overall design of a Model Based Control system was presented. The system consists of PLUG-IN MODULES, governed by a SUPERVISORY PROGRAM and communicating via SHARED DATA FILES. Models can be ladded or replaced without affecting the oveall system. There can be more then one module (algorithm) to perform the same task. The user can choose the most appropriate algorithm or can compare the results using different algorithms. Calculations, algorithms, file read and write, etc. which are used in more than one module, will be in a subroutine library. This feature will simplify the maintenance of the system. A partial list of modules is presented, specifying the task they perform. 19 refs., 1 fig

  19. Nuclear models and data for gamma-ray production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    The current Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B, Version IV) contains information on prompt gamma-ray production from neutron-induced reactions for some 38 nuclides. In addition, there is a mass of fission product yield, capture, and radioactive decay data from which certain time-dependent gamma-ray results can be calculated. These data are needed in such applications as gamma-ray heating calculations for reactors, estimates of radiation levels near nuclear facilities and weapons, shielding design calculations, and materials damage estimates. The prompt results are comprised of production cross sections, multiplicities, angular distributions, and energy spectra for secondary gamma-rays from a variety of reactions up to an incident neutron energy of 20 MeV. These data are based in many instances on experimental measurements, but nuclear model calculations, generally of a statistical nature, are also frequently used to smooth data, to interpolate between measurements, and to calculate data in unmeasured regions. The techniques and data used in determining the ENDF/B evaluations are reviewed, and comparisons of model-code calculations and ENDF data with recent experimental results are given. 11 figures

  20. Modeling of ion acceleration through drift and diffusion at interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1986-01-01

    A test particle simulation designed to model ion acceleration through drift and diffusion at interplanetary shocks is described. The technique consists of integrating along exact particle orbits in a system where the angle between the shock normal and mean upstream magnetic field, the level of magnetic fluctuations, and the energy of injected particles can assume a range of values. The technique makes it possible to study time-dependent shock acceleration under conditions not amenable to analytical techniques. To illustrate the capability of the numerical model, proton acceleration was considered under conditions appropriate for interplanetary shocks at 1 AU, including large-amplitude transverse magnetic fluctuations derived from power spectra of both ambient and shock-associated MHD waves.

  1. Comparison of pellet acceleration model results to experimentally observed penetration depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szepesi, T., E-mail: szepesi.tamas@gmail.co [KFKI - Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, MTA KFKI-RMKI, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest-114 (Hungary); Kalvin, S.; Kocsis, G. [KFKI - Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, MTA KFKI-RMKI, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest-114 (Hungary); Lang, P.T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Senichenkov, I. [Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Polytehnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Cryogenic hydrogen isotope fuelling pellets were observed to undergo strong radial acceleration in the confined plasma. The reason for pellet acceleration is believed to originate from drift effects: the ionised part of pellet cloud is affected by the grad-B drift, therefore, the cloud becomes polarised. The E x B drift then deforms the pellet cloud so that it can no longer follow the original flux bundle - this results in a less efficient shielding on the pellet's HFS region, where the subsequently enhanced ablation pushes the pellet towards LFS, like a rocket. In order to study this effect, a simple and a comprehensive ablation model was developed. Results from both models show quantitatively acceptable agreement with ASDEX-Upgrade experiments concerning trajectory curvature, corresponding to radial acceleration in the range of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 7} m/s{sup 2}.

  2. Computer Modeling of Acceleration Effects on Cerebral Oxygen Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    a significant physiological threat to etrate the cranium and enter the cerebral cortex. Hongo high-performance aircraft pilots since the development...et al. and Hongo et al. (7,8). blackened out and all that could be seen was the target, The primary focus of this effort was to build a model i.e...O6GInduced.html. 87:402. 12. Tripp LD, Arnold A, Bagian J, et al. Psychophysiological effects 8. Hongo K, Kobayashi S, Okudera H, et al. Noninvasive cerebral of

  3. Modelling accelerated degradation data using Wiener diffusion with a time scale transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, G A; Schenkelberg, F

    1997-01-01

    Engineering degradation tests allow industry to assess the potential life span of long-life products that do not fail readily under accelerated conditions in life tests. A general statistical model is presented here for performance degradation of an item of equipment. The degradation process in the model is taken to be a Wiener diffusion process with a time scale transformation. The model incorporates Arrhenius extrapolation for high stress testing. The lifetime of an item is defined as the time until performance deteriorates to a specified failure threshold. The model can be used to predict the lifetime of an item or the extent of degradation of an item at a specified future time. Inference methods for the model parameters, based on accelerated degradation test data, are presented. The model and inference methods are illustrated with a case application involving self-regulating heating cables. The paper also discusses a number of practical issues encountered in applications.

  4. Methodology of a numerical chain model for x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christenson, P.J.; Snell, C.M.; DeVolder, B.G.; Yin, L.; Mathews, A.R.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Carlsten, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    The chain model for x-ray flash radiography (Ref. 1) developed at Los Alamos is an integrated simulation capability consisting of linked codes for the various physical processes that model an en$= radiographic event. Two new features have been added to the computational chaiwmodel: (1) a link between accelerator and particle-in-cell codes, enabling accelerated electrons to be injected into a 2-D, relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code and propagated to a bremsstrahlung converter target, and (2) a distribution-functio'n capability to create electron sources from PIC simulations for use in Monte Carlo electroxdphoton transport calculations to produce synthetic radiographs. Physical variables of electrons from PIC calculations are binned to produce distribution functions, which can be randomly sampled to obtain source particles for Monte Carlo transport calculations through a bremsstrahlung converter target. Several methods of binning have been used to construct both correlated and uncorrelated distributions. We will present end-to-end simulations of the radiographic process in order to compare synthetic radiographs produced using several electron distribution functions and analoglike links. In addition, we studied the effects of different electron distributions on photon spectra, doses, and spot sizes produced from a converter target. Advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques will be discussed, and applications of the chain model will be presented.

  5. Hierarchical modelling of line commutated power systems used in particle accelerators using Saber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimund, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of hierarchical simulation models using the program Saber trademark for the prediction of magnet ripple currents generated by the power supply/output filter combination. Modeling of an entire power system connected to output filters and particle accelerator ring magnets will be presented. Special emphasis is made on the modeling of power source imbalances caused by transformer impedance imbalances and utility variances. The affect that these imbalances have on the harmonic content of ripple current is also investigated

  6. Development of general X-ray scattering model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, Joe; Wendt, Scott

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a complex process made difficult to describe due to the effects of a complex energy spectrum interacting with a wide range of material types in complex geometry. The scattering is further complicated by the volume of material illuminated and the experimental configuration of the data acquisition. The importance of accounting for the key physics in scattering modeling is critical to the viability of the model. For example, scattering in the detector and the speed of the detector, as measured by the absorbed dose needed to produce a signal, are important in capturing undercut effects. Another example is the noise properties of the detectors are dependent on photon energy. We report on a semi-empirical treatment of x-ray scattering that includes a full energy treatment for a wide range of material types. We also include complex geometry effects that the part shape introduces. The treatment is based on experimental measurements using an energy dispersive germanium detector over energies from treatment is showing good results with experimental measurements of the scattering component agreeing with the model results to the 10% level over the range of x-ray energies and materials typical in industrial applications. Computation times for this model are in the 20 keV to 320 keV. Detector stripping routines for detector artifacts were developed. The computation time is in the range of a few minutes on a typical PC

  7. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  8. Monte Carlo model of diagnostic X-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kutsen, Semion; Gatskevich, George

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A Monte Carlo simulation of absorbed dose distribution in patient's tissues is often used in a dosimetry assessment of X-ray examinations. The results of such simulations in Belarus are presented in the report based on an anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent Rando-like physical phantom. The phantom corresponds to an adult 173 cm high and of 73 kg and consists of a torso and a head made of tissue-equivalent plastics which model soft (muscular), bone, and lung tissues. It consists of 39 layers (each 25 mm thick), including 10 head and neck ones, 16 chest and 13 pelvis ones. A tomographic model of the phantom has been developed from its CT-scan images with a voxel size of 0.88 x 0.88 x 4 mm 3 . A necessary pixelization in Mathematics-based in-house program was carried out for the phantom to be used in the radiation transport code MCNP-4b. The final voxel size of 14.2 x 14.2 x 8 mm 3 was used for the reasonable computer consuming calculations of absorbed dose in tissues and organs in various diagnostic X-ray examinations. MCNP point detectors allocated through body slices obtained as a result of the pixelization were used to calculate the absorbed dose. X-ray spectra generated by the empirical TASMIP model were verified on the X-ray units MEVASIM and SIREGRAPH CF. Absorbed dose distributions in the phantom volume were determined by the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations with a set of point detectors. Doses in organs of the adult phantom computed from the absorbed dose distributions by another Mathematics-based in-house program were estimated for 22 standard organs for various standard X-ray examinations. The results of Monte Carlo simulations were compared with the results of direct measurements of the absorbed dose in the phantom on the X-ray unit SIREGRAPH CF with the calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeter DTU-01. The measurements were carried out in specified locations of different layers in heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, and stomach at high voltage of

  9. Flame acceleration of hydrogen - air - diluent mixtures at middle scale using ENACCEF: experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Malet; Nathalie Lamoureux; Nabiha Djebaili-Chaumeix; Claude-Etienne Paillard; Pierre Pailhories; Jean-Pierre L'heriteau; Bernard Chaumont; Ahmed Bentaib

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the case of hypothetic severe accident on light water nuclear reactor, hydrogen would be produced during reactor core degradation and released to the reactor building which could subsequently raise a combustion hazard. A local ignition of the combustible mixture would give birth initially to a slow flame which can be accelerated due to turbulence. Depending on the geometry and the premixed combustible mixture composition, the flame can accelerate and for some conditions transit to detonation or be quenched after a certain distance. The flame acceleration is responsible for the generation of high pressure loads that could damage the reactor's building. Moreover, geometrical configuration is a major factor leading to flame acceleration. Thus, recording experimental data notably on mid-size installations is required for the numeric simulations validation before modelling realistic scales. The ENACCEF vertical facility is a 6 meters high acceleration tube aimed at representing steam generator room leading to containment dome. This setup can be equipped with obstacles of different blockage ratios and shapes in order to obtain an acceleration of the flame. Depending on the geometrical characteristics of these obstacles, different regimes of the flame propagation can be achieved. The mixture composition's influence on flame velocity and acceleration has been investigated. Using a steam physical-like diluent (40% He - 60% CO 2 ), influence of dilution on flame speed and acceleration has been investigated. The flame front has also been recorded with ultra fast ombroscopy visualization, both in the tube and in dome's the entering. The flame propagation is computed using the TONUS code. Based on Euler's equation solving code using structured finite volumes, it includes the CREBCOM flames modelling and simulates the hydrogen/air turbulent flame propagation, taking into account 3D complex geometry and reactants concentration gradients. Since

  10. Prospects for a soft x-ray FEL powered by a relativistic-klystron high-gradient accelerator (RK-HGA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, H.D.; Barletta, W.A.; Yu, S.S.; Schlueter, R.; Deis, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the concept of x-ray FELs using high gain, single-pass amplifiers with electron beams accelerated in high gradient structures powered by relativistic klystrons. Other authors have also considered x-ray FELs; the unique aspect of this paper is the use of high gradient acceleration. One of the authors has previously presented preliminary studies on this concept. The intent in this paper is to display the results of a top level design study on a high gain FEL, to present its sensitivity to a variety of fabrication and tuning errors, to discuss several mechanisms for increasing gain yet more, and to present explicitly the output characteristics of such an FEL. The philosophy of the design study is to find a plausible operating point which employs existing or nearly existing state-of-the-art technologies while minimizing the accelerator and wiggler lengths. The notion is to distribute the technical risk as evenly as possible over the several technologies so that each must advance only slightly in order to make this design feasible. This study entailed no systematic investigation of possible costs so that, for example, the sole criterion for balancing the trade-off between beam energy and wiggler length is that the two components have comparable lengths. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  11. Complement inhibition accelerates regeneration in a model of peripheral nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Tannemaat, Martijn Rudolf; de Kok, Maryla; Wolterman, Ruud; Vigar, Miriam Ann; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Bryan Paul; Baas, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Complement (C) activation is a crucial event in peripheral nerve degeneration but its effect on the subsequent regeneration is unknown. Here we show that genetic deficiency of the sixth C component, C6, accelerates axonal regeneration and recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. Foot-flick

  12. Evolving an Accelerated School Model through Student Perceptions and Student Outcome Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Donna L.; Gable, Robert K.; Billups, Felice D.; Vieira, Mary; Blasczak, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    A mixed methods convergent evaluation informed the redesign of an innovative public school that uses an accelerated model to serve grades 7-9 students who have been retained in grade level and are at risk for dropping out of school. After over 25 years in operation, a shift of practices/policies away from grade retention and toward social…

  13. Symbolic and Numerical Modeling of Nonlinear Dynamics of Particles in Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Sergey; Sboeva, Ekaterina

    2018-02-01

    This paper is devoted to one of the methods of symbolic computation, which based on perturbation theory and constructed in the framework of matrix formalism. This method can be used for solving optimization problems and preliminary modeling in accelerator physics. There are presented the main theoretical positions and demonstration the result of this method on example of one of classical problems.

  14. Development of an Efficient GPU-Accelerated Model for Fully Nonlinear Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of an optimized sequential single-CPU algorithm based on a flexible-order Finite Difference Method. High performance is pursued by utilizing many-core processing in the model focusing on GPUs for acceleration of code execution. This involves combining analytical methods with an algorithm redesign of the current...

  15. Reliability Models Applied to a System of Power Converters in Particle Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Siemaszko, D; Speiser, M; Pittet, S

    2012-01-01

    Several reliability models are studied when applied to a power system containing a large number of power converters. A methodology is proposed and illustrated in the case study of a novel linear particle accelerator designed for reaching high energies. The proposed methods result in the prediction of both reliability and availability of the considered system for optimisation purposes.

  16. Modeling of a self-healing process in blast furnace slag cement exposed to accelerated carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemskov, S.V.; Ahmad, B.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the current research, a mathematical model for the post-damage improvement of the carbonated blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) exposed to accelerated carbonation is constructed. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight expanded clay aggregate,

  17. Three-dimensional Kinetic Pulsar Magnetosphere Models: Connecting to Gamma-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2018-04-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) global kinetic pulsar magnetosphere models, where the charged particle trajectories and the corresponding electromagnetic fields are treated self-consistently. For our study, we have developed a Cartesian 3D relativistic particle-in-cell code that incorporates radiation reaction forces. We describe our code and discuss the related technical issues, treatments, and assumptions. Injecting particles up to large distances in the magnetosphere, we apply arbitrarily low to high particle injection rates, and obtain an entire spectrum of solutions from close to the vacuum-retarded dipole to close to the force-free (FF) solution, respectively. For high particle injection rates (close to FF solutions), significant accelerating electric field components are confined only near the equatorial current sheet outside the light cylinder. A judicious interpretation of our models allows the particle emission to be calculated, and consequently, the corresponding realistic high-energy sky maps and spectra to be derived. Using model parameters that cover the entire range of spin-down powers of Fermi young and millisecond pulsars, we compare the corresponding model γ-ray light curves, cutoff energies, and total γ-ray luminosities with those observed by Fermi to discover a dependence of the particle injection rate, { \\mathcal F }, on the spin-down power, \\dot{{ \\mathcal E }}, indicating an increase of { \\mathcal F } with \\dot{{ \\mathcal E }}. Our models, guided by Fermi observations, provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed γ-ray phenomenologies of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  18. Determination of solar flare accelerated ion angular distributions from SMM gamma ray and neutron measurements and determination of the He-3/H ratio in the solar photosphere from SMM gamma ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Comparisons of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observations of gamma-ray line and neutron emission with theoretical calculation of their expected production by flare accelerated ion interactions in the solar atmosphere have led to significant advances in the understanding of solar flare particle acceleration and interaction, as well as the flare process itself. These comparisons have enabled the determination of, not only the total number and energy spectrum of accelerated ions trapped at the sun, but also the ion angular distribution as they interact in the solar atmosphere. The Monte Carlo program was modified to include in the calculations of ion trajectories the effects of both mirroring in converging magnetic fields and of pitch angle scattering. Comparing the results of these calculations with the SMM observations, not only the angular distribution of the interacting ions can be determined, but also the initial angular distribution of the ions at acceleration. The reliable determination of the solar photospheric He-3 abundance is of great importance for understanding nucleosynthesis in the early universe and its implications for cosmology, as well as for the study of the evolution of the sun. It is also essential for the determinations of the spectrum and total number of flare accelerated ions from the SMM/GRS gamma-ray line measurements. Systematic Monte Carlo calculations of the time dependence were made as a function of the He-3 abundance and other variables. A new series of calculations were compared for the time-dependent flux of 2.223 MeV neutron capture line emission and the ratio of the time-integrated flux in the 2.223 MeV line to that in the 4.1 to 6.4 MeV nuclear deexcitation band.

  19. Towards the petascale in electromagnetic modeling of plasma-based accelerators for high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhwiler, D L; Antonsen, T; Cary, J R; Cooley, J; Decyk, V K; Esarey, E; Geddes, C G R; Huang, C; Hakim, A; Katsouleas, T; Messmer, P; Mori, W B; Tsung, F S; Vieira, J; Zhou, M

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-based lepton acceleration concepts are a key element of the long-term R and D portfolio for the U.S. Office of High Energy Physics. There are many such concepts, but we consider only the laser (LWFA) and plasma (PWFA) wakefield accelerators. We present a summary of electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for recent LWFA and PWFA experiments. These simulations, including both time explicit algorithms and reduced models, have effectively used terascale computing resources to support and guide experiments in this rapidly developing field. We briefly discuss the challenges and opportunities posed by the near-term availability of petascale computing hardware

  20. Towards the final BSA modeling for the accelerator-driven BNCT facility at INFN LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceballos, C. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnlogicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, 5ta y30, Miramar, Playa, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Esposito, J., E-mail: juan.esposito@lnl.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), via dell' Universita, 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Agosteo, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colautti, P.; Conte, V.; Moro, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), via dell' Universita, 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Some remarkable advances have been made in the last years on the SPES-BNCT project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) towards the development of the accelerator-driven thermal neutron beam facility at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL), aimed at the BNCT experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma. The compact neutron source will be produced via the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) reactions using the 5 MeV, 30 mA beam driven by the RFQ accelerator, whose modules construction has been recently completed, into a thick beryllium target prototype already available. The Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) final modeling, using both neutron converter and the new, detailed, Be(p,xn) neutron yield spectra at 5 MeV energy recently measured at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator at LNL, is summarized here.

  1. Achievements in ISICs/SAPP collaborations for electromagnetic modeling of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Liequan; Ge Lixin; Li Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Schussman, Greg; Ko, Kwok

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC provides the unique opportunity and the resources for the Electromagnetic System Simulations (ESS) component of High Energy Physics (HEP)'s Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project to work with researchers in the Integrated Software Infrastructure Centres (ISICs) and Scientific Application Pilot Program (SAPP) to overcome challenging barriers in computer science and applied mathematics in order to perform the large-scale simulations required to support the ongoing R and D efforts on accelerators across the Office of Science. This paper presents the resultant achievements made under SciDAC in important areas of computational science relevant to electromagnetic modelling of accelerators which include nonlinear eigensolvers, shape optimization, adaptive mesh refinement, parallel meshing, and visualization

  2. Micron-scale resolution radiography of laser-accelerated and laser-exploded foils using an yttrium x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Celliers, P.; Moreno, J.C.; Mrowka, S.; Perry, T.S.; Wan, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have imaged laser-accelerated foils and exploding foils on the few-micron scale using an yttrium x-ray laser (155 angstrom, 80 eV, ∼200 ps duration) and a multilayer mirror imaging system. At the maximum magnification of 30, resolution was of order one micron. The images were side-on radiographs of the foils. Accelerated foils showed significant filamentation on the rear-side (away from the driving laser) of the foil, although the laser beam was smoothed. In addition to the narrow rear-side filamentation, some shots revealed larger-scale plume-like structures on the front (driven) side of the Al foil. These plumes seem to be little-affected by beam smoothing and are likely a consequence of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The experiments were carried out at the Nova two-beam facility

  3. Recovering the observed b/c ratio in a dynamic spiral-armed cosmic ray model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyamin, David; Piran, Tsvi; Shaviv, Nir J.; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    We develop a fully three-dimensional numerical code describing the diffusion of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Milky Way. It includes the nuclear spallation chain up to oxygen, and allows the study of various CR properties, such as the CR age, grammage traversed, and the ratio between secondary and primary particles. This code enables us to explore a model in which a large fraction of the CR acceleration takes place in the vicinity of galactic spiral arms that are dynamic. We show that the effect of having dynamic spiral arms is to limit the age of CRs at low energies. This is because at low energies the time since the last spiral arm passage governs the CR age, and not diffusion. Using the model, the observed spectral dependence of the secondary to primary ratio is recovered without requiring any further assumptions such as a galactic wind, re-acceleration or various assumptions on the diffusivity. In particular, we obtain a secondary to primary ratio which increases with energy below about 1 GeV.

  4. Development of a RAMI model for LANSCE and high power APT accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Assessment of the reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability (RAMI) of all high power, high cost systems is important to justify and improve the cost effectiveness of these systems. For the very large (over 100 MW) accelerator systems associated with APT, a RAMI model is very valuable in guiding the design and allocation of resources. A RAMI model of an existing machine is also valuable, since machine improvement funds must be allocated to increase the availability by the largest amount. The authors have developed a RAMI model using the critical subsystems of the LANSCE accelerator and beam delivery complex as an example and to evaluate the effectiveness for estimating reliability and beam availability. LAMPF and LANSCE together provide most of the features required for the accelerator and beam delivery part of a high-power APT machine, but LANSCE is pulsed, rather than CW. This complex is capable of a 1-MW average power H - beam, and it is the most powerful proton accelerator in the US built to date

  5. Life prediction of OLED for constant-stress accelerated degradation tests using luminance decaying model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianping, E-mail: jpzhanglzu@163.com [College of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Li, Wenbin [College of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Cheng, Guoliang; Chen, Xiao [Shanghai Tianyi Electric Co., Ltd., Shanghai 201611 (China); Wu, Helen [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Sydney 2751 (Australia); Herman Shen, M.-H. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In order to acquire the life information of organic light emitting diode (OLED), three groups of constant stress accelerated degradation tests are performed to obtain the luminance decaying data of samples under the condition that the luminance and the current are respectively selected as the indicator of performance degradation and the test stress. Weibull function is applied to describe the relationship between luminance decaying and time, least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate the shape parameter and scale parameter, and the life prediction of OLED is achieved. The numerical results indicate that the accelerated degradation test and the luminance decaying model reveal the luminance decaying law of OLED. The luminance decaying formula fits the test data very well, and the average error of fitting value compared with the test data is small. Furthermore, the accuracy of the OLED life predicted by luminance decaying model is high, which enable rapid estimation of OLED life and provide significant guidelines to help engineers make decisions in design and manufacturing strategy from the aspect of reliability life. - Highlights: • We gain luminance decaying data by accelerated degradation tests on OLED. • The luminance decaying model objectively reveals the decaying law of OLED luminance. • The least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate Weibull parameters. • The plan designed for accelerated degradation tests proves to be feasible. • The accuracy of the OLED life and the luminance decaying fitting formula is high.

  6. Life prediction of OLED for constant-stress accelerated degradation tests using luminance decaying model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianping; Li, Wenbin; Cheng, Guoliang; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Helen; Herman Shen, M.-H.

    2014-01-01

    In order to acquire the life information of organic light emitting diode (OLED), three groups of constant stress accelerated degradation tests are performed to obtain the luminance decaying data of samples under the condition that the luminance and the current are respectively selected as the indicator of performance degradation and the test stress. Weibull function is applied to describe the relationship between luminance decaying and time, least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate the shape parameter and scale parameter, and the life prediction of OLED is achieved. The numerical results indicate that the accelerated degradation test and the luminance decaying model reveal the luminance decaying law of OLED. The luminance decaying formula fits the test data very well, and the average error of fitting value compared with the test data is small. Furthermore, the accuracy of the OLED life predicted by luminance decaying model is high, which enable rapid estimation of OLED life and provide significant guidelines to help engineers make decisions in design and manufacturing strategy from the aspect of reliability life. - Highlights: • We gain luminance decaying data by accelerated degradation tests on OLED. • The luminance decaying model objectively reveals the decaying law of OLED luminance. • The least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate Weibull parameters. • The plan designed for accelerated degradation tests proves to be feasible. • The accuracy of the OLED life and the luminance decaying fitting formula is high

  7. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the open-quotes constructionclose quotes of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc

  8. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  9. Testing ion structure models with x-ray Thomson scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wünsch K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of various ionic structure models on the interpretation of the X-ray Thomson scattering signal. For the calculation of the ion structure, classical hypernetted chain equations are used applying different effective inter-particle potentials. It is shown that the different models lead to significant discrepancies in the theoretically predicted weight of the Rayleigh peak, in particular for small k-values where correlation effects are important. Here, we propose conditions which might allow for an experimental verification of the theories under consideration of experimental constraints of k-vector blurring.

  10. Modeling of X-ray beamlines and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray beamlines on synchrotron sources are similar in size and complexity to beamlines at state-of-the-art neutron sources. The design principles, tools, and optimization strategies for synchrotron beamlines are also similar to those of neutron beamlines. The authors describe existing design tools for modeling synchrotron radiation beamlines and describe how these tools have evolved over the last two decades. The development of increasingly powerful modeling tools has been driven by the escalating cost and sophistication of state-of-the-art beamlines and by a world-wide race to exploit advanced synchrotron radiation sources

  11. Thin disk models of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz Eksi, K.; Ali Alpar, M

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the options of the fall-back disk model of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars (AXPs). We argue that the power-law index of the mass inflow rate during the propeller stage can be lower than those employed in earlier models. We take into account the effect of the super-critical mass inflow at the earliest stages on the inner radius of the disk and argue that the system starts as a propeller. Our results show that, assuming a fraction of the mass inflow is accreted onto the neutron star, the fall-back disk scenario can produce AXPs for acceptable parameters.

  12. A One-Dimensional Relativistic Shock Model for the Light Curve of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Yue Su; Yi-Ping Qin; Jun-Hui Fan; Zhang-Yu Han

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the forming of gamma-ray burst pulses with a simple onedimensional relativistic shock model. The mechanism is that a "central engine" drives forward the nearby plasma inside the fireball to generate a series of pressure waves. We give a relativistic geometric recurrence formula that connects the time when the pressure waves are produced and the time when the corresponding shocks occurred. This relation enables us to relate the pulse magnitude with the observation time. Our analysis shows that the evolution of the pressure waves leads to a fast rise and an exponential decay pulses. In determining the width of the pulses, the acceleration time is more important than that of the deceleration.

  13. Particle acceleration and nonthermal radiation in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirakashvili, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic ray acceleration and magnetic amplification in shell-type supernova remnants is shortly reviewed. The results on the modeling of broadband electromagnetic emission from supernova remnants are presented and compared with observations.

  14. Optimal Model-Based Fault Estimation and Correction for Particle Accelerators and Industrial Plants Using Combined Support Vector Machines and First Principles Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    parameters of the beam lifetime model) are physically meaningful. (3) Numerical Efficiency of the Training - We investigated the numerical efficiency of the SVM training. More specifically, for the primal formulation of the training, we have developed a problem formulation that avoids the linear increase in the number of the constraints as a function of the number of data points. (4) Flexibility of Software Architecture - The software framework for the training of the support vector machines was designed to enable experimentation with different solvers. We experimented with two commonly used nonlinear solvers for our simulations. The primary application of interest for this project has been the sustained optimal operation of particle accelerators at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Particle storage rings are used for a variety of applications ranging from 'colliding beam' systems for high-energy physics research to highly collimated x-ray generators for synchrotron radiation science. Linear accelerators are also used for collider research such as International Linear Collider (ILC), as well as for free electron lasers, such as the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. One common theme in the operation of storage rings and linear accelerators is the need to precisely control the particle beams over long periods of time with minimum beam loss and stable, yet challenging, beam parameters. We strongly believe that beyond applications in particle accelerators, the high fidelity and cost benefits of a combined model-based fault estimation/correction system will attract customers from a wide variety of commercial and scientific industries. Even though the acquisition of Pavilion Technologies, Inc. by Rockwell Automation Inc. in 2007 has altered the small business status of the Pavilion and it no longer qualifies for a Phase II funding, our findings in the course of the Phase I research have convinced us that further research will render a workable model

  15. Optimal Model-Based Fault Estimation and Correction for Particle Accelerators and Industrial Plants Using Combined Support Vector Machines and First Principles Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayyar-Rodsari, Bijan; Schweiger, Carl; /SLAC /Pavilion Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX

    2010-08-25

    parameters of the beam lifetime model) are physically meaningful. (3) Numerical Efficiency of the Training - We investigated the numerical efficiency of the SVM training. More specifically, for the primal formulation of the training, we have developed a problem formulation that avoids the linear increase in the number of the constraints as a function of the number of data points. (4) Flexibility of Software Architecture - The software framework for the training of the support vector machines was designed to enable experimentation with different solvers. We experimented with two commonly used nonlinear solvers for our simulations. The primary application of interest for this project has been the sustained optimal operation of particle accelerators at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Particle storage rings are used for a variety of applications ranging from 'colliding beam' systems for high-energy physics research to highly collimated x-ray generators for synchrotron radiation science. Linear accelerators are also used for collider research such as International Linear Collider (ILC), as well as for free electron lasers, such as the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. One common theme in the operation of storage rings and linear accelerators is the need to precisely control the particle beams over long periods of time with minimum beam loss and stable, yet challenging, beam parameters. We strongly believe that beyond applications in particle accelerators, the high fidelity and cost benefits of a combined model-based fault estimation/correction system will attract customers from a wide variety of commercial and scientific industries. Even though the acquisition of Pavilion Technologies, Inc. by Rockwell Automation Inc. in 2007 has altered the small business status of the Pavilion and it no longer qualifies for a Phase II funding, our findings in the course of the Phase I research have convinced us that further research will render a workable

  16. Dark matter properties implied by gamma ray interstellar emission models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong, E-mail: csaba.balazs@monash.edu, E-mail: tong.li@monash.edu [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale, School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2017-02-01

    We infer dark matter properties from gamma ray residuals extracted using eight different interstellar emission scenarios proposed by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration to explain the Galactic Center gamma ray excess. Adopting the most plausible simplified ansatz, we assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion interacting with standard fermions via a scalar mediator. To trivially respect flavor constraints, we only couple the mediator to third generation fermions. Using this theoretical hypothesis, and the Fermi residuals, we calculate Bayesian evidences, including Fermi-LAT exclusion limits from 15 dwarf spheroidal galaxies as well. Our evidence ratios single out one of the Fermi scenarios as most compatible with the simplified dark matter model. In this scenario the dark matter (mediator) mass is in the 25-200 (1-1000) GeV range and its annihilation is dominated by bottom quark final state. Our conclusion is that the properties of dark matter extracted from gamma ray data are highly sensitive to the modeling of the interstellar emission.

  17. A model of tungsten anode x-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, G.; Fernández, F., E-mail: fdz@usal.es [Física Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca 37008 (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A semiempirical model for x-ray production in tungsten thick-targets was evaluated using a new characterization of electron fluence. Methods: Electron fluence is modeled taking into account both the energy and angular distributions, each of them adjusted to Monte Carlo simulated data. Distances were scaled by the CSDA range to reduce the energy dependence. Bremsstrahlung production was found by integrating the cross section with the fluence in a 1D penetration model. Characteristic radiation was added using a semiempirical law whose validity was checked. The results were compared the experimental results of Bhat et al., with the SpekCalc numerical tool, and with MCNPX simulation results from the work of Hernandez and Boone. Results: The model described shows better agreement with the experimental results than the SpekCalc predictions in the sense of area between the spectra. A general improvement of the predictions of half-value layers is also found. The results are also in good agreement with the simulation results in the 50–640 keV energy range. Conclusions: A complete model for x-ray production in thick bremsstrahlung targets has been developed, improving the results of previous works and extending the energy range covered to the 50–640 keV interval.

  18. An analytical reconstruction model of the spread-out Bragg peak using laser-accelerated proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Jungao; Xu, Xiaohan; Lin, Chen; Ma, Wenjun; Lu, Haiyang; Zhao, Yanying; Lu, Yuanrong; Chen, Jia-Er; Yan, Xueqing

    2017-07-07

    With the development of laser technology, laser-driven proton acceleration provides a new method for proton tumor therapy. However, it has not been applied in practice because of the wide and decreasing energy spectrum of laser-accelerated proton beams. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to reconstruct the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) using laser-accelerated proton beams. Firstly, we present a modified weighting formula for protons of different energies. Secondly, a theoretical model for the reconstruction of SOBPs with laser-accelerated proton beams has been built. It can quickly calculate the number of laser shots needed for each energy interval of the laser-accelerated protons. Finally, we show the 2D reconstruction results of SOBPs for laser-accelerated proton beams and the ideal situation. The final results show that our analytical model can give an SOBP reconstruction scheme that can be used for actual tumor therapy.

  19. Predicting Proton-Air Cross Sections at {radical}(s) {approx} 30 TeV Using Accelerator and Cosmic Ray Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, M. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Halzen, Francis [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    1999-12-13

    We use the high-energy predictions of a QCD-inspired parametrization of all accelerator data on forward proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering amplitudes, along with Glauber theory, to predict proton-air cross sections at energies near {radical}(s){approx_equal}30 TeV . The parametrization of the proton-proton cross section incorporates analyticity and unitarity and demands that the asymptotic proton is a black disk of soft partons. By comparing with the p -air cosmic ray measurements, our analysis results in a constraint on the inclusive particle production cross section. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  20. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinati, E.; Diebold, S.; Kendziorra, E.

    2012-01-01

    and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage...... or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper...

  1. A two-zone cosmic ray propagation model and its implication of the surviving fraction of radioactive cosmic ray isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, M.; Scherzer, R.; Enge, W.

    1977-01-01

    In cosmic ray propagation calculations one can usually assume a homogeneous distribution of interstellar matter. The crucial astrophysical parameters in these models are: The path length distribution, the age of the cosmic ray particles and the interstellar matter density. These values are interrelated. The surviving fraction of radioactive cosmic ray isotopes is often used to determine a mean matter density of that region, where the cosmic ray particles may mainly reside. Using a Monte Carlo Propagation Program we calculated the change in the surviving fraction quantitatively assuming a region around the sources with higher matter density. (author)

  2. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results.

  3. An artificial neural network model of energy expenditure using nonintegrated acceleration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothney, Megan P; Neumann, Megan; Béziat, Ashley; Chen, Kong Y

    2007-10-01

    Accelerometers are a promising tool for characterizing physical activity patterns in free living. The major limitation in their widespread use to date has been a lack of precision in estimating energy expenditure (EE), which may be attributed to the oversimplified time-integrated acceleration signals and subsequent use of linear regression models for EE estimation. In this study, we collected biaxial raw (32 Hz) acceleration signals at the hip to develop a relationship between acceleration and minute-to-minute EE in 102 healthy adults using EE data collected for nearly 24 h in a room calorimeter as the reference standard. From each 1 min of acceleration data, we extracted 10 signal characteristics (features) that we felt had the potential to characterize EE intensity. Using these data, we developed a feed-forward/back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) model with one hidden layer (12 x 20 x 1 nodes). Results of the ANN were compared with estimations using the ActiGraph monitor, a uniaxial accelerometer, and the IDEEA monitor, an array of five accelerometers. After training and validation (leave-one-subject out) were completed, the ANN showed significantly reduced mean absolute errors (0.29 +/- 0.10 kcal/min), mean squared errors (0.23 +/- 0.14 kcal(2)/min(2)), and difference in total EE (21 +/- 115 kcal/day), compared with both the IDEEA (P types under free-living conditions.

  4. Nonlinear Monte Carlo model of superdiffusive shock acceleration with magnetic field amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Ellison, Donald C.; Osipov, Sergei M.

    2017-03-01

    Fast collisionless shocks in cosmic plasmas convert their kinetic energy flow into the hot downstream thermal plasma with a substantial fraction of energy going into a broad spectrum of superthermal charged particles and magnetic fluctuations. The superthermal particles can penetrate into the shock upstream region producing an extended shock precursor. The cold upstream plasma flow is decelerated by the force provided by the superthermal particle pressure gradient. In high Mach number collisionless shocks, efficient particle acceleration is likely coupled with turbulent magnetic field amplification (MFA) generated by the anisotropic distribution of accelerated particles. This anisotropy is determined by fast particle transport, making the problem strongly nonlinear and multiscale. Here, we present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of collisionless shock structure with superdiffusive propagation of high-energy Fermi accelerated particles coupled to particle acceleration and MFA, which affords a consistent description of strong shocks. A distinctive feature of the Monte Carlo technique is that it includes the full angular anisotropy of the particle distribution at all precursor positions. The model reveals that the superdiffusive transport of energetic particles (i.e., Lévy-walk propagation) generates a strong quadruple anisotropy in the precursor particle distribution. The resultant pressure anisotropy of the high-energy particles produces a nonresonant mirror-type instability that amplifies compressible wave modes with wavelengths longer than the gyroradii of the highest-energy protons produced by the shock.

  5. OpenFOAM Modeling of Particle Heating and Acceleration in Cold Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, K.-H.; O'Sullivan, M.; Plankensteiner, A.; Kestler, H.; Sigl, L. S.

    2018-01-01

    In cold spraying, a powder material is accelerated and heated in the gas flow of a supersonic nozzle to velocities and temperatures that are sufficient to obtain cohesion of the particles to a substrate. The deposition efficiency of the particles is significantly determined by their velocity and temperature. Particle velocity correlates with the amount of kinetic energy that is converted to plastic deformation and thermal heating. The initial particle temperature significantly influences the mechanical properties of the particle. Velocity and temperature of the particles have nonlinear dependence on the pressure and temperature of the gas at the nozzle entrance. In this contribution, a simulation model based on the reactingParcelFoam solver of OpenFOAM is presented and applied for an analysis of particle velocity and temperature in the cold spray nozzle. The model combines a compressible description of the gas flow in the nozzle with a Lagrangian particle tracking. The predictions of the simulation model are verified based on an analytical description of the gas flow, the particle acceleration and heating in the nozzle. Based on experimental data, the drag model according to Plessis and Masliyah is identified to be best suited for OpenFOAM modeling particle heating and acceleration in cold spraying.

  6. Nuclear models, experiments and data libraries needed for numerical simulation of accelerator-driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, E.; Bersillon, O.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the transparencies of the speech concerning the nuclear models, experiments and data libraries needed for numerical simulation of Accelerator-Driven Systems. The first part concerning the nuclear models defines the spallation process, the corresponding models (intra-nuclear cascade, statistical model, Fermi breakup, fission, transport, decay and macroscopic aspects) and the code systems. The second part devoted to the experiments presents the angular measurements, the integral measurements, the residual nuclei and the energy deposition. In the last part, dealing with the data libraries, the author details the fundamental quantities as the reaction cross-section, the low energy transport databases and the decay libraries. (A.L.B.)

  7. Transmission-line-circuit model of an 85-TW, 25-MA pulsed-power accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    B. T. Hutsel; P. A. Corcoran; M. E. Cuneo; M. R. Gomez; M. H. Hess; D. D. Hinshelwood; C. A. Jennings; G. R. Laity; D. C. Lamppa; R. D. McBride; J. K. Moore; A. Myers; D. V. Rose; S. A. Slutz; W. A. Stygar

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a physics-based transmission-line-circuit model of the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The 33-m-diameter Z machine generates a peak electrical power as high as 85 TW, and delivers as much as 25 MA to a physics load. The circuit model is used to design and analyze experiments conducted on Z. The model consists of 36 networks of transmission-line-circuit elements and resistors that represent each of Zs 36 modules. The model of each module includes a Marx generator, intermediate-en...

  8. Physical models for the description of an electrodynamically accelerated plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambreanu, V.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the models proposed for the description of the plasma sheath dynamics in a coaxial system (of the same type as that operating at the Bucharest Institute of Physics) is presented. A particular attention is paid to the physical structure of the accelerated plasma. It has been shown that a self-consistent model could be derived from a phenomenological description of the sheath structure. The physical models presented so far in the literature have been classified into three groups: the hydrodynamic models, the plasma sheet models and the shock wave models. Each of these models is briefly described. The simplifying assumptions used in the construction of these models have been pointed out. The final conclusion has been that, under these assumptions, none of these models taken separately could completely and correctly describe the dynamical state of the plasma sheath. (author)

  9. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Radtke, M.; Vincze, L.; Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  10. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabici, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by the model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. The main goal of my research is to search for an unambiguous and conclusive observational test for proving (or disproving) the idea that supernova remnants are the sources of galactic cosmic rays with energies up to (at least) the cosmic ray knee. Our present comprehension of the mechanisms of particle acceleration at shocks and of the propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields encourages beliefs that such a conclusive test might come from future observations of supernova remnants and of the Galaxy in the almost unexplored domain of multi-TeV gamma rays. (author)

  11. The Z accelerator as a source of > 100 kJ of x-rays above 4.8 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeney, C.; Coverdale, C.A.; Spielman, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Recent K-shell scaling experiments on the 20 MA Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have shown that large diameter (40 and 55 mm) arrays can be imploded with 80 to 210 wires of titanium or stainless steel. These implosions have produced up to 150 kJ of > 4.5 keV x-rays and 65 kJ of > 6.0 keV x-rays in 7 to 18 ns FWHM pulses. This is a major advance in plasma radiation source (PRS) capability since there is presently limited test capability above 3 keV. In fact, Z produces more > 4.5 keV x-rays than previous aboveground simulators produced at 1.5 keV. Z also produces some 200 kJ of x-rays between 1 and 3 keV in a continuous spectrum for these loads. The measured spectra and yields are consistent with 1-dimensional MHD calculations performed by NRL. Thermoelastic calorimeters, PVDF gauges, and optical impulse gauges have been successfully fielded with these sources

  12. Two-dimensional numerical modeling of the cosmic ray storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadokura, A.; Nishida, A.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical model of the cosmic ray storm in the two-dimensional heliosphere is constructed incorporating the drift effect. We estimate the effect of a flare-associated interplanetary shock and the disturbed region behind it (characterized by enhancement in velocity and magnetic field, and decrease in mean free path) on the density and anisotropy of cosmic rays in the heliosphere. As the disturbance propagates outward, a density enhancement appears on the front side, and a density depression region is produced on the rear side. The effect of drift on the cosmic ray storm appears most clearly in the higher-latitude region. For the parallel (antiparallel) state of the solar magnetic field which corresponds to the pre(post-) 1980 period, the density in the higher-latitude region decreases (increases) before the shock arrival. The maximum density depression near the earth for the parallel state is greater than for the antiparallel state, and the energy spectrum of the density depression in percentage is softer for the parallel state than for the antiparallel state. Prior to the arrival of the shock, the phase of solar diurnal anisotropy begins to shift to the earlier hours, and its amplitude becomes greater for both polarity states. North-south anisotropy also becomes greater because of the enhanced drift for both polarity states

  13. Nuclear Physical Uncertainties in Modeling X-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Eric; Amthor, A. Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Type I x-ray bursts occur when a neutron star accretes material from the surface of another star in a compact binary star system. For certain accretion rates and material compositions, much of the nuclear material is burned in short, explosive bursts. Using a one-dimensional stellar model, Kepler, and a comprehensive nuclear reaction rate library, ReacLib, we have simulated chains of type I x-ray bursts. Unfortunately, there are large remaining uncertainties in the nuclear reaction rates involved, since many of the isotopes reacting are unstable and have not yet been studied experimentally. Some individual reactions, when varied within their estimated uncertainty, alter the light curves dramatically. This limits our ability to understand the structure of the neutron star. Previous studies have looked at the effects of individual reaction rate uncertainties. We have applied a Monte Carlo method ``-simultaneously varying a set of reaction rates'' -in order to probe the expected uncertainty in x-ray burst behaviour due to the total uncertainty in all nuclear reaction rates. Furthermore, we aim to discover any nonlinear effects due to the coupling between different reaction rates. Early results show clear non-linear effects. This research was made possible by NSF-DUE Grant 1317446, BUScholars Program.

  14. A multi-model approach to X-ray pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schönherr G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of X-ray pulsars are governed by magnetospheric accretion within the Alfvén radius, leading to a direct coupling of accretion column properties and interactions at the magnetosphere. The complexity of the physical processes governing the formation of radiation within the accreted, strongly magnetized plasma has led to several sophisticated theoretical modelling efforts over the last decade, dedicated to either the formation of the broad band continuum, the formation of cyclotron resonance scattering features (CRSFs or the formation of pulse profiles. While these individual approaches are powerful in themselves, they quickly reach their limits when aiming at a quantitative comparison to observational data. Too many fundamental parameters, describing the formation of the accretion columns and the systems’ overall geometry are unconstrained and different models are often based on different fundamental assumptions, while everything is intertwined in the observed, highly phase-dependent spectra and energy-dependent pulse profiles. To name just one example: the (phase variable line width of the CRSFs is highly dependent on the plasma temperature, the existence of B-field gradients (geometry and observation angle, parameters which, in turn, drive the continuum radiation and are driven by the overall two-pole geometry for the light bending model respectively. This renders a parallel assessment of all available spectral and timing information by a compatible across-models-approach indispensable. In a collaboration of theoreticians and observers, we have been working on a model unification project over the last years, bringing together theoretical calculations of the Comptonized continuum, Monte Carlo simulations and Radiation Transfer calculations of CRSFs as well as a General Relativity (GR light bending model for ray tracing of the incident emission pattern from both magnetic poles. The ultimate goal is to implement a

  15. Cosmic ray propagation in a diffusion model: a new estimation of the diffusion parameters and of the secondary antiprotons flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurin, D.

    2001-02-01

    Dark matter is present at numerous scale of the universe (galaxy, cluster of galaxies, universe in the whole). This matter plays an important role in cosmology and can not be totally explained by conventional physic. From a particle physic point of view, there exists an extension of the standard model - supersymmetry - which predicts under certain conditions the existence of new stable and massive particles, the latter interacting weakly with ordinary matter. Apart from direct detection in accelerators, various indirect astrophysical detection are possible. This thesis focuses on one particular signature: disintegration of these particles could give antiprotons which should be measurable in cosmic rays. The present study evaluates the background corresponding to this signal i. e. antiprotons produced in the interactions between these cosmic rays and interstellar matter. In particular, uncertainties of this background being correlated to the uncertainties of the diffusion parameter, major part of this thesis is devoted to nuclei propagation. The first third of the thesis introduces propagation of cosmic rays in our galaxy, emphasizing the nuclear reaction responsibles of the nuclei fragmentation. In the second third, different models are reviewed, and in particular links between the leaky box model and the diffusion model are recalled (re-acceleration and convection are also discussed). This leads to a qualitative discussion about information that one can infer from propagation of these nuclei. In the last third, we finally present detailed solutions of the bidimensional diffusion model, along with constrains obtained on the propagation parameters. The latter is applied on the antiprotons background signal and it concludes the work done in this thesis. The propagation code for nuclei and antiprotons used here has proven its ability in data analysis. It would probably be of interest for the analysis of the cosmic ray data which will be taken by the AMS experiment on

  16. A Critical Shock Mach Number for Particle Acceleration in the Absence of Pre-existing Cosmic Rays: M = √5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Yamazaki, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M > √5. The reason is that for M ≤ √5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain.

  17. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  18. The Fluka Linebuilder and Element Database: Tools for Building Complex Models of Accelerators Beam Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, A; Cerutti, F; Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V

    2012-01-01

    Extended FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines can be extremely complex: heavy to manipulate, poorly versatile and prone to mismatched positioning. We developed a framework capable of creating the FLUKA model of an arbitrary portion of a given accelerator, starting from the optics configuration and a few other information provided by the user. The framework includes a builder (LineBuilder), an element database and a series of configuration and analysis scripts. The LineBuilder is a Python program aimed at dynamically assembling complex FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines: positions, magnetic fields and scorings are automatically set up, and geometry details such as apertures of collimators, tilting and misalignment of elements, beam pipes and tunnel geometries can be entered at user’s will. The element database (FEDB) is a collection of detailed FLUKA geometry models of machine elements. This framework has been widely used for recent LHC and SPS beam-machine interaction studies at CERN, and led to a dra...

  19. EURADOS intercomparison exercise on Monte Carlo modelling of a medical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, Barbara; Le Roy, Maïwenn; Blideanu, Valentin; Andenna, Claudio; Arun, Chairmadurai; Czarnecki, Damian; El Bardouni, Tarek; Gschwind, Régine; Huot, Nicolas; Martin, Eric; Zink, Klemens; Zoubair, Mariam; Price, Robert; de Carlan, Loïc

    2017-01-01

    In radiotherapy, Monte Carlo (MC) methods are considered a gold standard to calculate accurate dose distributions, particularly in heterogeneous tissues. EURADOS organized an international comparison with six participants applying different MC models to a real medical linear accelerator and to one homogeneous and four heterogeneous dosimetric phantoms. The aim of this exercise was to identify, by comparison of different MC models with a complete experimental dataset, critical aspects useful for MC users to build and calibrate a simulation and perform a dosimetric analysis. Results show on average a good agreement between simulated and experimental data. However, some significant differences have been observed especially in presence of heterogeneities. Moreover, the results are critically dependent on the different choices of the initial electron source parameters. This intercomparison allowed the participants to identify some critical issues in MC modelling of a medical linear accelerator. Therefore, the complete experimental dataset assembled for this intercomparison will be available to all the MC users, thus providing them an opportunity to build and calibrate a model for a real medical linear accelerator.

  20. Model-dependent estimate on the connection between fast radio bursts and ultra high energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiang; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The existence of fast radio bursts (FRBs), a new type of extragalatic transient, has recently been established, and quite a few models have been proposed. In this work, we discuss the possible connection between the FRB sources and ultra high energy (>10 18 eV) cosmic rays. We show that in the blitzar model and the model of merging binary neutron stars, which includes the huge energy release of each FRB central engine together with the rather high rate of FRBs, the accelerated EeV cosmic rays may contribute significantly to the observed ones. In other FRB models, including, for example, the merger of double white dwarfs and the energetic magnetar radio flares, no significant EeV cosmic ray is expected. We also suggest that the mergers of double neutron stars, even if they are irrelevant to FRBs, may play a nonignorable role in producing EeV cosmic ray protons if supramassive neutron stars are formed in a sufficient fraction of mergers and the merger rate is ≳ 10 3 yr –1 Gpc –3 . Such a possibility will be unambiguously tested in the era of gravitational wave astronomy.

  1. A model for electric field enhancement in lightning leader tips to levels allowing X-ray and γ ray emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.; Neubert, Torsten; Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    A model is proposed capable of accounting for the local electric field increase in front of the lightning stepped leader up to magnitudes allowing front electrons to overcome the runaway energy threshold and thus to initiate relativistic runaway electron avalanches capable of generating X-ray and ray bursts observed in negative lightning leader. The model is based on an idea that an ionization wave, propagating in a preionized channel, is being focused, such that its front remains narrow and ...

  2. Back-reaction and effective acceleration in generic LTB dust models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sussman, Roberto A

    2011-01-01

    We provide a thorough examination of the conditions for the existence of back-reaction and an 'effective' acceleration (in the context of Buchert's averaging formalism) in regular generic spherically symmetric Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models. By considering arbitrary spherical comoving domains,we verify rigorously the fulfillment of these conditions expressed in terms of suitable scalar variables that are evaluated at the boundary of every domain. Effective deceleration necessarily occurs in all domains in (a) the asymptotic radial range of models converging to a FLRW background (b) the asymptotic time range of non-vacuum hyperbolic models (c) LTB self-similar solutions and (d) near a simultaneous big bang. Accelerating domains are proven to exist in the following scenarios: (i) central vacuum regions(ii) central (non-vacuum) density voids (iii) the intermediate radial range of models converging to a FLRW background (iv) the asymptotic radial range of models converging to a Minkowski vacuum and (v) domains near and or intersecting a non-simultaneous big bang. All these scenarios occur in hyperbolic models with negative averaged and local spatial curvature though scenarios (iv) and (v) are also possible in low density regions of a class of elliptic models in which the local spatial curvature is negative but its average is positive. Rough numerical estimates between -0.003 and -0.5 were found for the effective deceleration parameter. While the existence of accelerating domains cannot be ruled out in models converging to an Einstein-de Sitter background and in domains undergoing gravitational collapse the conditions for this are very restrictive. The results obtained may provide important theoretical clues on the effects of back-reaction and averaging in more general non-spherical models. Communicated by L Andersson (paper)

  3. Modeling of inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration with axicon laser-beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romea, R.D.; Kimura, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Acceleration of free electrons by the inverse Cherenkov effect using radially polarized laser light focused through an axicon [J. P. Fontana and R. H. Pantell, J. Appl. Phys. 54, 4285 (1983)] has been studied utilizing a Monte Carlo computer simulation and further theoretical analysis. The model includes effects, such as scattering of the electrons by the gas, and diffraction and interference effects of the axicon laser beam, that were not included in the original analysis of Fontana and Pantell. Its accuracy is validated using available experimental data. The model results show that effective acceleration is possible even with the effects of scattering. Sample results are given. The analysis includes examining the issues of axicon focusing, phase errors, energy gain, phase slippage, focusing of the e beam, and emittance growth

  4. Nuclear reaction models - source term estimation for safety design in accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS) employs proton induced spallation reaction at a few GeV. Safety design of these systems involves source term estimation in two steps - multiple fragmentation of the target and n+γ emission through a fast process followed by statistical decay of the primary fragments. The prompt radiation field is estimated in the framework of quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) theory, intra-nuclear cascade or Monte Carlo calculations. A few nuclear reaction model codes used for this purpose are QMD, JQMD, Bertini, INCL4, PHITS, followed by statistical decay codes like ABLA, GEM, GEMINI, etc. In the case of electron accelerators photons and photoneutrons dominate the prompt radiation field. High energy photon yield through Bremsstrahlung is estimated in the framework of Born approximation while photoneutron production is calculated using giant dipole resonance and quasi-deuteron formation cross section. In this talk hybrid and exciton PEQ models and QMD formalism will be discussed briefly

  5. Error-Rate Estimation Based on Multi-Signal Flow Graph Model and Accelerated Radiation Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    Full Text Available A method of evaluating the single-event effect soft-error vulnerability of space instruments before launched has been an active research topic in recent years. In this paper, a multi-signal flow graph model is introduced to analyze the fault diagnosis and meantime to failure (MTTF for space instruments. A model for the system functional error rate (SFER is proposed. In addition, an experimental method and accelerated radiation testing system for a signal processing platform based on the field programmable gate array (FPGA is presented. Based on experimental results of different ions (O, Si, Cl, Ti under the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, the SFER of the signal processing platform is approximately 10-3(error/particle/cm2, while the MTTF is approximately 110.7 h.

  6. The Use of Conditional Probability Integral Transformation Method for Testing Accelerated Failure Time Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Ahmed Abdel-Ghaly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests the use of the conditional probability integral transformation (CPIT method as a goodness of fit (GOF technique in the field of accelerated life testing (ALT, specifically for validating the underlying distributional assumption in accelerated failure time (AFT model. The method is based on transforming the data into independent and identically distributed (i.i.d Uniform (0, 1 random variables and then applying the modified Watson statistic to test the uniformity of the transformed random variables. This technique is used to validate each of the exponential, Weibull and lognormal distributions' assumptions in AFT model under constant stress and complete sampling. The performance of the CPIT method is investigated via a simulation study. It is concluded that this method performs well in case of exponential and lognormal distributions. Finally, a real life example is provided to illustrate the application of the proposed procedure.

  7. Modeling of X-ray emissions produced by stepping lightning leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Xu , Wei; Celestin , Sebastien; Pasko , Victor P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Intense and brief bursts of X-ray emissions have been measured during the stepping processof both natural cloud-to-ground (CG) and rocket-triggered lightning flashes. In this paper, we investigatetheoretically the energy spectra of X-rays produced by the bremsstrahlung emission of thermal runawayelectrons accelerated in the inhomogeneous electric field produced around lightning leader tips. The X-rayenergy spectrum depends on the physical properties of the associated l...

  8. Calibration of the Nonlinear Accelerator Model at the Diamond Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Riccardo; Rowland, James; Martin, Ian; Schmidt, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The correct implementation of the nonlinear ring model is crucial to achieve the top performance of a synchrotron light source. Several dynamics quantities can be used to compare the real machine with the model and eventually to correct the accelerator. Most of these methods are based on the analysis of turn-by-turn data of excited betatron oscillations. We present the experimental results of the campaign of measurements carried out at the Diamond. A combination of Frequency Map Analysis (FMA) and detuning with momentum measurements has allowed a precise calibration of the nonlinear model capable of reproducing the nonlinear beam dynamics in the storage ring

  9. Proceedings of standard model at the energy of present and future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikor, F.; Pocsik, G.; Toth, E.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Workshop on The Standard Model at the Energy of the Present and Future Accelerators, 27 June - 1 July 1989, Budapest. The Standard Model of strong and electro-weak interactions providing essential insights into the fundamental structure of matter and being the basic building block of further generalizations has a rich content. The Workshop was devoted to discussing topical problems of testing the Standard Model in high energy reactions such as jet physics and fragmentation, new applications and tests of perturbative QCD, CP-violation, B-meson physics and developments in weak decays, some of the future experimental plans and related topics

  10. Semiparametric Bayesian analysis of accelerated failure time models with cluster structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaonan; Xu, Xinyi; Shen, Junshan

    2017-11-10

    In this paper, we develop a Bayesian semiparametric accelerated failure time model for survival data with cluster structures. Our model allows distributional heterogeneity across clusters and accommodates their relationships through a density ratio approach. Moreover, a nonparametric mixture of Dirichlet processes prior is placed on the baseline distribution to yield full distributional flexibility. We illustrate through simulations that our model can greatly improve estimation accuracy by effectively pooling information from multiple clusters, while taking into account the heterogeneity in their random error distributions. We also demonstrate the implementation of our method using analysis of Mayo Clinic Trial in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analytical studies on a modified Nagel-Schreckenberg model with the Fukui-Ishibashi acceleration rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Chuanji; Wang Binghong; Yin Chuanyang; Zhou Tao; Hu Bo; Gao Kun; Hui, P.M.; Hu, C.-K.

    2007-01-01

    We propose and study a one-dimensional traffic flow cellular automaton model of high-speed vehicles with the Fukui-Ishibashi-type (FI) acceleration rule for all cars, and the Nagel-Schreckenberg-type (NS) stochastic delay mechanism. We obtain analytically the fundamental diagrams of the average speed and vehicle flux depending on the vehicle density and stochastic delay probability. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations

  12. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capdessus Remi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  13. A model of polarized-beam AGS in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ahrens, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    A model of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, based on the AGS snapramps, has been developed in the stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It has been used over the past 5 years in a number of accelerator studies aimed at enhancing RHIC proton beam polarization. It is also used to study and optimize proton and Helion beam polarization in view of future RHIC and eRHIC programs. The AGS model in Zgoubi is operational on-line via three different applications, ’ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd’, ’AgsZgoubiModel’ and ’AgsModelViewer’, with the latter two essentially interfaces to the former which is the actual model ’engine’. All three commands are available from the controls system application launcher in the AGS ’StartUp’ menu, or from eponymous commands on shell terminals. Main aspects of the model and of its operation are presented in this technical note, brief excerpts from various studies performed so far are given for illustration, means and methods entering in ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd are developed further in appendix.

  14. Characterizing a Model of Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Based on Wave Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the nature of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration is a key goal in solar and heliospheric research. While there have been many theoretical advances in both topics, including suggestions that they may be intimately related, the inherent scale coupling and complexity of these phenomena limits our ability to construct models that test them on a fundamental level for realistic solar conditions. At the same time, there is an ever increasing impetus to improve our spaceweather models, and incorporating treatments for these processes that capture their basic features while remaining tractable is an important goal. With this in mind, I will give an overview of our exploration of a wave-turbulence driven (WTD) model for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration based on low-frequency Alfvénic turbulence. Here we attempt to bridge the gap between theory and practical modeling by exploring this model in 1D HD and multi-dimensional MHD contexts. The key questions that we explore are: What properties must the model possess to be a viable model for coronal heating? What is the influence of the magnetic field topology (open, closed, rapidly expanding)? And can we simultaneously capture coronal heating and solar wind acceleration with such a quasi-steady formulation? Our initial results suggest that a WTD based formulation performs adequately for a variety of solar and heliospheric conditions, while significantly reducing the number of free parameters when compared to empirical heating and solar wind models. The challenges, applications, and future prospects of this type of approach will also be discussed.

  15. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale target: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, Brian J.; Yin, Lin; Hegelich, Bjoorn M.; Bowers, Kevin J.; Huang, Chengkun; Fernandez, Juan C.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Kwan, Thomas J.T.; Henig, Andreas; Habs, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for the expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness), solid-density target driven by an u.ltraintense laser. In this regime, new ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) (1), emerge with the potential to dramatically improve energy, efficiency, and energy spread of laser-driven ion beams. Such beams have been proposed (2) as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion (3). Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows two dislinct times that bound the period of enhanced acceleration: t 1 , when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t 2 , when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A silllple dynamical model for target expansion has been derived that contains both the early, one-dimensional (lD) expansion of the target as well as three-dimensional (3D) expansion of the plasma at late times, The model assumes that expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  16. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale targets: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, B J; Yin, L; Hegelich, B M; Bowers, K J; Huang, C; Fernandez, J C; Flippo, K A; Gaillard, S A; Kwan, T J T; Henig, A; Tajima, T; Habs, D; Yan, X Q

    2010-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness) target initially of solid density irradiated by an ultraintense laser. In this regime, ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) [1], emerge with the potential for dramatically improved energy, efficiency, and energy spread. Ion beams have been proposed [2] as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion [3]. Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows the period of enhanced acceleration occurs between times t 1 , when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t 2 , when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A simple model for target expansion has been derived that contains early, one-dimensional (1D) expansion of the target and three-dimensional (3D) expansion at late times. The model assumes expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  17. Models of f(R) cosmic acceleration that evade solar system tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wayne; Sawicki, Ignacy

    2007-01-01

    We study a class of metric-variation f(R) models that accelerates the expansion without a cosmological constant and satisfies both cosmological and solar-system tests in the small-field limit of the parameter space. Solar-system tests alone place only weak bounds on these models, since the additional scalar degree of freedom is locked to the high-curvature general-relativistic prediction across more than 25 orders of magnitude in density, out through the solar corona. This agreement requires that the galactic halo be of sufficient extent to maintain the galaxy at high curvature in the presence of the low-curvature cosmological background. If the galactic halo and local environment in f(R) models do not have substantially deeper potentials than expected in ΛCDM, then cosmological field amplitudes |f R | > or approx.10 -6 will cause the galactic interior to evolve to low curvature during the acceleration epoch. Viability of large-deviation models therefore rests on the structure and evolution of the galactic halo, requiring cosmological simulations of f(R) models, and not directly on solar-system tests. Even small deviations that conservatively satisfy both galactic and solar-system constraints can still be tested by future, percent-level measurements of the linear power spectrum, while they remain undetectable to cosmological-distance measures. Although we illustrate these effects in a specific class of models, the requirements on f(R) are phrased in a nearly model-independent manner

  18. A DATA-DRIVEN ANALYTIC MODEL FOR PROTON ACCELERATION BY LARGE-SCALE SOLAR CORONAL SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozarev, Kamen A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Schwadron, Nathan A. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory ’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  19. SU-E-E-01: Commissiong of Linear Accelerator and Beam Modeling in Treatment Planning Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pella, S; Chilukuri, M; Smith, C; Bacala, A; Dumitru, N

    2012-06-01

    Sooner or later every medical physicist is involved with commissioning and beam modeling of a new linear accelerator (linac) and a new treatment planning system (TPS). In spite of all instructions and training offered by the vendors, at the time a new linac is being purchased and added to the present ones the outside help is not so complete. The physicist who has to perform the commissioning job may not even be the one who was trained for that. What we are missing is a good comprehensive set of information and instructions on how to do's. From shielding calculation verifications, surveys, to collecting the beam data, modeling, entering the data into the TPS, and verifications of the goodness of the data we need a lot of support and we don't have it. I will provide a step by step description of the required work with the results we are looking for. Presentation of the shielding calculations, survey required, tools needed to perform them. Detailed beam data collections, scanning system needed, machine set of specs needed, applicator details needed. Importing beam data from the scanning system and beam calculations. Algorithms used in dose calculation, IMRT optimization, heterogeneity corrections presented to be understood before modeling the beam data. At the completion of this course the medical physicist will be able to commission a linear accelerator and a treatment planning system with confidence and very little help from the outside. This compendium of detailed instructions on commissioning a linear accelerator will provide good uidance to every physicist who will be involved with the installation and bringing into safe use for treatment of a new linear accelerator. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. AN AB INITIO MODEL FOR COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A. [Center for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20

    A proper understanding of the effects of turbulence on the diffusion and drift of cosmic rays (CRs) is of vital importance for a better understanding of CR modulation in the heliosphere. This study presents an ab initio model for CR modulation, incorporating for the first time the results yielded by a two-component turbulence transport model. This model is solved for solar minimum heliospheric conditions, utilizing boundary values chosen so that model results are in reasonable agreement with spacecraft observations of turbulence quantities in the solar ecliptic plane and along the out-of-ecliptic trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft. These results are employed as inputs for modeled slab and two-dimensional (2D) turbulence energy spectra. The modeled 2D spectrum is chosen based on physical considerations, with a drop-off at the very lowest wavenumbers. There currently exist no models or observations for the wavenumber where this drop-off occurs, and it is considered to be the only free parameter in this study. The modeled spectra are used as inputs for parallel mean free path expressions based on those derived from quasi-linear theory and perpendicular mean free paths from extended nonlinear guiding center theory. Furthermore, the effects of turbulence on CR drifts are modeled in a self-consistent way, also employing a recently developed model for wavy current sheet drift. The resulting diffusion and drift coefficients are applied to the study of galactic CR protons and antiprotons using a 3D, steady-state CR modulation code, and sample solutions in fair to good agreement with multiple spacecraft observations are presented.

  1. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  2. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  3. Laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  4. Laser acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental idea of LaserWakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wake fields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ∼ c and ultra fastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nano materials is also emerging.

  5. Solving the quasi-static field model of the pulse-line accelerator; relationship to a circuit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA) is a promising approach to high-gradient acceleration of an ion beam at high line charge density. A recent note by R. J. Briggs suggests that a 'sheath helix' model of such a system can be solved numerically in the quasi-static limit. Such a model captures the correct macroscopic behavior from first principles without the need to time-advance the full Maxwell equations on a grid. This note describes numerical methods that may be used to effect such a solution, and their connection to the circuit model that was described in an earlier note by the author. Fine detail of the fields in the vicinity of the helix wires is not obtained by this approach, but for purposes of beam dynamics simulation such detail is not generally needed

  6. Dosimetry and monitoring of X-rays narrow beams produced by linear particle accelerator, for using in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.C.F.; Vizeu, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The main characteristics of X-rays narrow beams dosimetry and monitoring are examined, aiming the introduction of this system in brain radiosurgery. The non-protocolize detectors are used, once that the detectors used in therapy by megavoltage were projected for dosimetry with an irradiation field above 40 mm diameter. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Optimization of ion-optics system for x-ray quasi-monochromatic source on the basis of electrostatic accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Vershynskyi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion-optics system with two doublets of electrostatic quadrupole lenses for X-ray quasimonochromatic source was selected. Two variants of lens excitation for stigmatic focusing with two and four independent power supplies are considered. It is shown that using of four independent power supplies leads to improvement of focused ion beam parameters at converter.

  8. Self-consistent model of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.V.; Golberg, S.M.; Liberman, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A self-consistent approach to the problem of the growth rate of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in laser accelerated targets is developed. The analytical solution of the problem is obtained by solving the complete system of the hydrodynamical equations which include both thermal conductivity and energy release due to absorption of the laser light. The developed theory provides a rigorous justification for the supplementary boundary condition in the limiting case of the discontinuity model. An analysis of the suppression of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability by the ablation flow is done and it is found that there is a good agreement between the obtained solution and the approximate formula σ = 0.9√gk - 3u 1 k, where g is the acceleration, u 1 is the ablation velocity. This paper discusses different regimes of the ablative stabilization and compares them with previous analytical and numerical works

  9. Reduced 3d modeling on injection schemes for laser wakefield acceleration at plasma scale lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Current modelling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) codes which are computationally demanding. In PIC simulations the laser wavelength λ0, in μm-range, has to be resolved over the acceleration lengths in meter-range. A promising approach is the ponderomotive guiding center solver (PGC) by only considering the laser envelope for laser pulse propagation. Therefore only the plasma skin depth λp has to be resolved, leading to speedups of (λp /λ0) 2. This allows to perform a wide-range of parameter studies and use it for λ0 Tecnologia (FCT), Portugal, through Grant No. PTDC/FIS-PLA/2940/2014 and PD/BD/105882/2014.

  10. Solving large-scale sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems of equations for accelerator modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene Golub; Kwok Ko

    2009-01-01

    The solutions of sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems constitute one of the key computational kernels in the discretization of partial differential equations for the modeling of linear accelerators. The computational challenges faced by existing techniques for solving those sparse eigenvalue problems and linear systems call for continuing research to improve on the algorithms so that ever increasing problem size as required by the physics application can be tackled. Under the support of this award, the filter algorithm for solving large sparse eigenvalue problems was developed at Stanford to address the computational difficulties in the previous methods with the goal to enable accelerator simulations on then the world largest unclassified supercomputer at NERSC for this class of problems. Specifically, a new method, the Hemitian skew-Hemitian splitting method, was proposed and researched as an improved method for solving linear systems with non-Hermitian positive definite and semidefinite matrices.

  11. Numerical modeling of time domain 3-D problems in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfoush, F.A.; Jurgens, T.G.

    1990-06-01

    Time domain analysis is relevant in particle accelerators to study the electromagnetic field interaction of a moving source particle on a lagging test particle as the particles pass an accelerating cavity or some other structure. These fields are called wake fields. The travelling beam inside a beam pipe may undergo more complicated interactions with its environment due to the presence of other irregularities like wires, thin slots, joints and other types of obstacles. Analytical solutions of such problems is impossible and one has to resort to a numerical method. In this paper we present results of our first attempt to model these problems in 3-D using our finite difference time domain (FDTD) code. 10 refs., 9 figs

  12. Kinetic modeling of particle acceleration in a solar null point reconnection region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Gisela; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is on the particle acceleration mechanism in solar coronal 3D reconnection null-point regions. Starting from a potential field extrapolation of a SOHO magnetogram taken on 2002 November 16, we first performed MHD simulations with horizontal motions observed by SOHO...... particles and 3.5 billion grid cells of size 17.5\\,km --- these simulations offer a new opportunity to study particle acceleration in solar-like settings....... applied to the photospheric boundary of the computational box. After a build-up of electric current in the fan-plane of the null-point, a sub-section of the evolved MHD data was used as initial and boundary conditions for a kinetic particle-in-cell model of the plasma. We find that sub...

  13. Electron Fermi acceleration in collapsing magnetic traps: Computational and analytical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, G.; Lemons, D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors consider the heating and acceleration of electrons trapped on magnetic field lines between approaching magnetic mirrors. Such a collapsing magnetic trap and consequent electron energization can occur whenever a curved (or straight) flux tube drifts into a relatively straight (or curved) perpendicular shock. The relativistic, three-dimensional, collisionless test particle simulations show that an initial thermal electron distribution is bulk heated while a few individual electrons are accelerated to many times their original energy before they escape the trap. Upstream field-aligned beams and downstream pancake distributions perpendicular to the field are predicted. In the appropriate limit the simulation results agree well with a nonrelativistic analytic model of the distribution of escaping electrons which is based on the first adiabatic invariant and energy conservation between collisions with the mirrors. Space science and astrophysical applications are discussed

  14. An improved cellular automata model for train operation simulation with dynamic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Jun; Nie, Lei

    2018-03-01

    Urban rail transit plays an important role in the urban public traffic because of its advantages of fast speed, large transport capacity, high safety, reliability and low pollution. This study proposes an improved cellular automaton (CA) model by considering the dynamic characteristic of the train acceleration to analyze the energy consumption and train running time. Constructing an effective model for calculating energy consumption to aid train operation improvement is the basis for studying and analyzing energy-saving measures for urban rail transit system operation.

  15. GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST FOR THE ACCELERATED FAILURE TIME MODEL BASED ON MARTINGALE RESIDUALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2013), s. 40-59 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06047 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) SVV 261315/2011 Keywords : accelerated failure time model * survival analysis * goodness-of-fit Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.563, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/SI/novak-goodness-of-fit test for the aft model based on martingale residuals.pdf

  16. A Thin Lens Model for Charged-Particle RF Accelerating Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Christopher K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Presented is a thin-lens model for an RF accelerating gap that considers general axial fields without energy dependence or other a priori assumptions. Both the cosine and sine transit time factors (i.e., Fourier transforms) are required plus two additional functions; the Hilbert transforms the transit-time factors. The combination yields a complex-valued Hamiltonian rotating in the complex plane with synchronous phase. Using Hamiltonians the phase and energy gains are computed independently in the pre-gap and post-gap regions then aligned using the asymptotic values of wave number. Derivations of these results are outlined, examples are shown, and simulations with the model are presented.

  17. Temporal and spatial expansion of a multidimensional model for electron acceleration in the bubble regime

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    An extended analytical model for particle dynamics in fields of a highly-nonlinear plasma wake field (the bubble or blow out regime) is derived. A recently proposed piecewise model (Kostyukov et al., New J. Phys., {\\bf 12}, 045009 (2010)) is generalized to include a time dependent bubble radius and full field solution in the acceleration direction. Incorporation of the cavity dynamics in the model is required to simulate the particle trapping properly. On the other hand, it is shown that the previously reported piecewise model does not reproduce the formation of a mono energetic peak in the particle spectrum. The mono energetic electron beams are recovered only when the full longitudinal field gradient is included in the model.

  18. Lebedev acceleration and comparison of different photometric models in the inversion of lightcurves for asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Xiang-Jie; Ip, Wing-Huen; Hsia, Chi-Hao

    2018-04-01

    In the lightcurve inversion process where asteroid's physical parameters such as rotational period, pole orientation and overall shape are searched, the numerical calculations of the synthetic photometric brightness based on different shape models are frequently implemented. Lebedev quadrature is an efficient method to numerically calculate the surface integral on the unit sphere. By transforming the surface integral on the Cellinoid shape model to that on the unit sphere, the lightcurve inversion process based on the Cellinoid shape model can be remarkably accelerated. Furthermore, Matlab codes of the lightcurve inversion process based on the Cellinoid shape model are available on Github for free downloading. The photometric models, i.e., the scattering laws, also play an important role in the lightcurve inversion process, although the shape variations of asteroids dominate the morphologies of the lightcurves. Derived from the radiative transfer theory, the Hapke model can describe the light reflectance behaviors from the viewpoint of physics, while there are also many empirical models in numerical applications. Numerical simulations are implemented for the comparison of the Hapke model with the other three numerical models, including the Lommel-Seeliger, Minnaert, and Kaasalainen models. The results show that the numerical models with simple function expressions can fit well with the synthetic lightcurves generated based on the Hapke model; this good fit implies that they can be adopted in the lightcurve inversion process for asteroids to improve the numerical efficiency and derive similar results to those of the Hapke model.

  19. Effective Acceleration Model for the Arrival Time of Interplanetary Shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2017-12-01

    In a previous work (Paouris and Mavromichalaki in Solar Phys. 292, 30, 2017), we presented a total of 266 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) with as much information as possible. We developed a new empirical model for estimating the acceleration of these events in the interplanetary medium from this analysis. In this work, we present a new approach on the effective acceleration model (EAM) for predicting the arrival time of the shock that preceds a CME, using data of a total of 214 ICMEs. For the first time, the projection effects of the linear speed of CMEs are taken into account in this empirical model, which significantly improves the prediction of the arrival time of the shock. In particular, the mean value of the time difference between the observed time of the shock and the predicted time was equal to +3.03 hours with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 18.58 hours and a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 22.47 hours. After the improvement of this model, the mean value of the time difference is decreased to -0.28 hours with an MAE of 17.65 hours and an RMSE of 21.55 hours. This improved version was applied to a set of three recent Earth-directed CMEs reported in May, June, and July of 2017, and we compare our results with the values predicted by other related models.

  20. Higher-order ice-sheet modelling accelerated by multigrid on graphics cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brædstrup, Christian; Egholm, David

    2013-04-01

    Higher-order ice flow modelling is a very computer intensive process owing primarily to the nonlinear influence of the horizontal stress coupling. When applied for simulating long-term glacial landscape evolution, the ice-sheet models must consider very long time series, while both high temporal and spatial resolution is needed to resolve small effects. The use of higher-order and full stokes models have therefore seen very limited usage in this field. However, recent advances in graphics card (GPU) technology for high performance computing have proven extremely efficient in accelerating many large-scale scientific computations. The general purpose GPU (GPGPU) technology is cheap, has a low power consumption and fits into a normal desktop computer. It could therefore provide a powerful tool for many glaciologists working on ice flow models. Our current research focuses on utilising the GPU as a tool in ice-sheet and glacier modelling. To this extent we have implemented the Integrated Second-Order Shallow Ice Approximation (iSOSIA) equations on the device using the finite difference method. To accelerate the computations, the GPU solver uses a non-linear Red-Black Gauss-Seidel iterator coupled with a Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) multigrid setup to further aid convergence. The GPU finite difference implementation provides the inherent parallelization that scales from hundreds to several thousands of cores on newer cards. We demonstrate the efficiency of the GPU multigrid solver using benchmark experiments.