WorldWideScience

Sample records for raveshe electroanbasht bar

  1. Double-Barred Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    I present a brief review of what is known about double-barred galaxies, where a small ("inner") bar is nested inside a larger ("outer") bar; the review is focused primarily on their demographics and photometric properties. Roughly 20% of S0--Sb galaxies are double-barred; they may be rarer in later Hubble types. Inner bars are typically ~ 500 pc in radius (~ 12% the size of outer bars), but sizes range from ~ 100 pc to > 1 kpc. The structure of at least some inner bars appears very similar to...

  2. Barred Owl [ds8

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These data define the current range of Barred and hybrid Barred/Spotted Owls in California. The current range includes the coastal mountains of northern California...

  3. Tow Bar Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    rounded edges to simulate a female bare human hand, assuming a one-hand bar design. If mechanical assist aids (i.e. narrow hook UNCLASSIFIED...UNCLASSIFIED for hoisting ) will be used to pick up the tow bar from the grab handles, the more severe load application shall be tested. (Reference... Hook Up Compatibility: Using the -10 operator manuals as guidance and the validated tow bars from step 12 of the laboratory testing, perform the

  4. Bar and Theta Hyperoperations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Vougiouklis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In questionnaires the replacement of the scale of Likert by a bar was suggested in 2008 by Vougiouklis & Vougiouklis. The use of the bar was rapidly accepted in social sciences. The bar is closely related with fuzzy theory and has several advantages during both the filling-in questionnaires and mainly in the research processing. In this paper we relate hyperstructure theory with questionnaires and we study the obtained hyperstructures which are used as an organising device of the problem.

  5. Lightweight Composite Tow Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Flexural Property ASTM D740 Horizontal Shear ASTM D2344 Tensile Properties ASTM D3039 Compression Properties ASTM D3410 The data from the material tests...8E It M eeeay idenftfty by block nnmber) This program was initiated to develop a lightweight military standard heavy duty tow bar manufactured from...organic composites. A tow bar weighing 125 lbs (vs 340 lbs for standard tow bar) was successfully designed and fabricated from graphite reinforced epoxy

  6. Raising the bar (5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, P.; Abreu, M.; Amaral, P.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Corrado, L.; Fingleton, B.; Fuerst, F.; Garretsen, H.; Igliori, D.; Le Gallo, J.; McCann, P.; Monastiriotis, V.; Yu, J.

    Raising the bar (5). Spatial Economic Analysis. This editorial summarizes and comments on the papers published in this issue 12(1) so as to raise the bar in applied spatial economic research and highlight new trends. The first paper examines the impact of the level of education on the decision to

  7. Raising the bar (2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, Paul; Abreu, M.; Amaral, P.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Corrado, L.; Fingleton, B.; Fuerst, F.; Garretsen, H.; Igliori, D.; Le Gallo, J.; McCann, P.; Monastiriotis, V.; Pryce, G.; Yu, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this editorial we summarise and comment on the papers published in issue 11.2 so as to raise the bar in applied spatial economic research and highlight new trends. The first paper analyses which regions in Europe were resilient to the great Recession and which ones were not. The second and the

  8. Raising the Bar (3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, Paul; Abreu, M.; Amaral, P.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Corrado, L.; Fingleton, B.; Fuerst, F.; Garretsen, H.; Igliori, D.; Le Gallo, J.; McCann, P.; Monastiriotis, V.; Pryce, G.; Yu, J.

    This editorial summarizes and comments on the papers published in issue 11(3) so as to raise the bar in applied spatial economic research and highlight new trends. The first paper proposes spatial and a-spatial indicators to describe the networks of airline companies around the world. The second

  9. Breaking through the Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Katti

    2011-01-01

    Howard University School of Law had a problem, and school officials knew it. Over a 20-year period, 40 percent of its graduates who took the Maryland bar exam failed it on their first try. During the next 24 months--the time frame required to determine its "eventual pass rate"--almost 90 percent of the students did pass. What they did…

  10. Behind No Bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, Charlotte, H.; Hayes, Margaret L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Behind No Bars program at the Cambria County Prison in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, which was funded by Head Start. Children visited with a jailed parent in pleasant, child-oriented areas. Parenting classes and family counseling were offered to all inmates who were parents of young children. (BB)

  11. The IPG BAR project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Timmeren, A.; Stolk, E.; Kleijn, R.; Mentink, B.; Henriquez, L.; Van Niekerk, L.; Verheul, R.

    2013-01-01

    The booklets 'Making Patterns' and 'Using Patterns' describe two aspects of the the pattern method within the urban design process. The accompanying IPG BAR Pattern Library is a small pattern library of urban-airport symbiosis patterns. These documents are the result of the Interdisciplinary Project

  12. Flexi-Bar-harjoittelu

    OpenAIRE

    Männikkö, Anu

    2007-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on testata uuden harjoitteluvälineen, Flexi-Barin, merkitystä lantionpohjan lihasten maksimi-, nopeus- ja kestävyysvoimaan ja näin ollen löytää uusi harjoitteluväline lantionpohjan lihasten harjoittamiseen. Tarkoituksena on selvittää, miten lantionpohjan lihasten maksimi-, nopeus- ja kestävyysvoimat muuttuvat kahdeksan viikon Flexi-Bar-harjoittelun aikana. Syvien lihasten aktivointiin ja stabiloivaan vaikutukseen kiinnitetään terapeuttisessa harjoittelussa nyky...

  13. Ukola Club. Bar americano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azpiazu, J. R.

    1961-03-01

    Full Text Available En la calle de Serrano, aprovechando un semisótano dedicado a otro negocio anteriormente, se ha instalado un bar americano, de cuyo interior ofrecemos algunos pormenores. Se han cuidado, especialmente, las condiciones acústicas, resueltas por medio de un techo de escayola perforada, con vitrofib en su parte superior, y paredes de madera, que contribuyen a darle un ambiente cálido y acogedor. El soporte de hierro laminado existente en el centro del local, cuya supresión hubiera sido costosa, se ha revestido con lajas de mármol que le convierten en un elemento decorativo.

  14. Implementation of viscoelastic Hopkinson bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govender R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the properties of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates are important in furthering our understanding of their role during blast or impact events. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. Implementing polymeric Hopkinson bars requires characterization of the viscoelastic properties of the material used. In this paper, 30 mm diameter Polymethyl Methacrylate bars are used as Hopkinson pressure bars. This testing technique is applied to polymeric foam called Divinycell H80 and H200. Although there is a large body of of literature containing compressive data, this rarely deals with strain rates above 250s−1 which becomes increasingly important when looking at the design of composite structures where energy absorption during impact events is high on the list of priorities. Testing of polymeric foams at high strain rates allows for the development of better constitutive models.

  15. Implementation of viscoelastic Hopkinson bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, R.; Cloete, T.; Govender, R.

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge of the properties of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates are important in furthering our understanding of their role during blast or impact events. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. Implementing polymeric Hopkinson bars requires characterization of the viscoelastic properties of the material used. In this paper, 30 mm diameter Polymethyl Methacrylate bars are used as Hopkinson pressure bars. This testing technique is applied to polymeric foam called Divinycell H80 and H200. Although there is a large body of of literature containing compressive data, this rarely deals with strain rates above 250s-1 which becomes increasingly important when looking at the design of composite structures where energy absorption during impact events is high on the list of priorities. Testing of polymeric foams at high strain rates allows for the development of better constitutive models.

  16. Double-Barred Galaxies: I. A Catalog of Barred Galaxies with Stellar Secondary Bars and Inner Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin, Peter

    2003-01-01

    I present a catalog of 67 barred galaxies which contain distinct, elliptical stellar structures inside their bars. Fifty of these are double-barred galaxies: a small-scale, "inner" or "secondary" bar is embedded within a large-scale, "outer" or "primary" bar. I provide homogenized measurements of the sizes, ellipticities, and orientations of both inner and outer bars, along with with global parameters for the galaxies. The other 17 are classified as "inner-disk" galaxies, where a large-scale ...

  17. Bar Coliseo, en Sevilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Peña Neila, Antonio

    1963-10-01

    Full Text Available This bar is situated inside the «Coliseo» building, which houses a cinema, as well as a number of commercial establishments. In order not to break the unity of the total project, no attempt has been made to alter the exterior aspect of the bar. No attempt was made, either, to make it into an intimate, club type of bar, now so much in fashion. Rather has it been given a diaphanous style, seeking the best possible use of the floor space. The windows of the building are elongated, and there is an intermediate floor level, whose detailed structure is metallic. A cleverly designed staircase, of folded sheet metal connects the ground floor, the intermediate floor level and the restaurant. Materials were carefully chosen in accordance with their function. The colour scheme has a sustained unity throughout the building, and care has been taken to avoid surprising or vivid chromatic patterns. Ceramic enamels by the painter Santiago del Campo provide a feature of decoration on the ground floor, and also serve to cover up the return air ducts. On the top floor, the restaurant is fitted with coloured tile facings, the work of the Seville painters Maria Josefa Sánchez, María Dolores Sánchez and Emilio García Ortiz. The bottom joints of the timber beams, in conjunction with the tile patterns, is reminiscent of the traditional Sevillian habit of placing ceramic units between the timber framework of buildings. The initial problem of the architect was to combine the optimum functional efficiency and aesthetic quality of the project, and the final solution is undoubtedly successful.El establecimiento está situado dentro del edificio «Coliseo», complejo formado por una sala de cine, y con la parte lateral destinada a locales comerciales. Formando un conjunto único no se pensó nunca en transformar los revestimientos y molduras de fachada. Tampoco presidió la idea de conseguir un establecimiento íntimo «tipo Club», tan en boga actualmente, sino un

  18. The BaBar Mini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David N.

    2003-07-11

    BaBar has recently deployed a new event data format referred to as the Mini. The mini uses efficient packing and aggressive noise suppression to represent the average reconstructed BaBar event in under 7 KBytes. The Mini packs detector information into simple transient data objects, which are then aggregated into roughly 10 composite persistent objects per event. The Mini currently uses Objectivity persistence, and it is being ported to use Root persistence. The Mini contains enough information to support detailed detector studies, while remaining small and fast enough to be used directly in physics analysis. Mini output is customizable, allowing users to both truncate unnecessary content or add content, depending on their needs. The Mini has now replaced three older formats as the primary output of BaBar event reconstruction. A reduced form of the Mini will soon replace the physics analysis format as well, giving BaBar a single, flexible event data format covering all its needs.

  19. Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Dowel Bar Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) dowel bars were installed on one new construction project and two dowel bar : retrofit projects to evaluate the performance of this type of dowel bar in comparison to steel dowel bars installed on the same : cont...

  20. Field observations of nearshore bar formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2008-01-01

      The formation of an inner nearshore bar was observed during a high-energy event at the sandy beach of Vejers, Denmark. The bar accreted in situ during surf zone conditions and the growth of the bar was associated with the development of a trough landward of the bar. Measurements of hydrodynamics...

  1. Dynamically possible pattern speeds of double bars

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejewski, Witold

    2009-01-01

    The method to study oscillating potentials of double bars, based on invariant loops, is introduced here in a new way, intended to be more intelligible. Using this method, I show how the orbital structure of a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) changes with the variation of nuclear bar's pattern speed. Not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappears, w...

  2. Star Formation Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunbin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Chung, Haeun; Lee, Gwang-Ho; Park, Changbom; Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2017-08-01

    We study the star formation activity of nearby galaxies with bars using a sample of late-type galaxies at 0.02≤slant z≤slant 0.05489 and {M}rgas in strongly barred galaxies are smaller than those in non-barred galaxies, and the gas metallicity is higher in strongly barred galaxies than in non-barred galaxies. The gas properties of weakly barred galaxies again show no difference from those of non-barred galaxies. We stack the optical spectra of barred and non-barred galaxies in several mass bins and fit to the stacked spectra with a spectral fitting code, STARLIGHT. We find no significant difference in stellar populations between barred and non-barred galaxies for both strongly and weakly barred galaxies. Our results are consistent with the idea that the star formation activity of barred galaxies was enhanced in the past along with significant gas consumption, and is currently lower than or similar to that of non-barred galaxies. The past star formation enhancement depends on the strength of bars.

  3. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  4. Orbital Support of Fast and Slow Inner Bars in Double Barred Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejewski, Witold; Small, Emma E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze how the orbital support of the inner bar in a double-barred galaxy (nested bars) depends on the angular velocity (i.e. pattern speed) of this bar. We study orbits in seven models of double bars using the method of invariant loops. The range of pattern speed is covered exhaustively. We find that not all pattern speeds are allowed when the inner bar rotates in the same direction as the outer bar. Below a certain minimum pattern speed orbital support for the inner bar abruptly disappe...

  5. Observations of offshore bar decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    the upper shoreface, and finally a stage of decaying bar form through loss of sediment volume at the outer boundary of the upper shoreface. The phenomenon has been previously documented in the Netherlands, the USA, the Canadian Great Lakes, and in New Zealand, but our present understanding...

  6. Hidden bars and boxy bulges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrifield, MR; Kuijken, K

    It has been suggested that the boxy and peanut-shaped bulges found in some edge-on galaxies are galactic bars viewed from the side. We investigate this hypothesis by presenting emission-line spectra for a sample of 10 edge-on galaxies that display a variety of bulge morphologies. To avoid potential

  7. Going Smokefree Matters - Bars and Restaurants Infographic

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Going Smokefree Matters – Bars and Restaurants Infographic which outlines key facts related to the effects of secondhand smoke exposure in bars and...

  8. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  9. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lintott, Chris [Oxford Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Schawinski, Kevin [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Skibba, Ramin A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, 9500 Gilman Drive, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Willett, Kyle W., E-mail: ec2250@gmail.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  10. Jackson Bar Training Structure Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    comparison of the one-dimensional bridge hydraulic routines from: HEC - RAS , HEC -2, and WSPRO. Davis, CA: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hydrologic Engineering...ER D C/ CH L TR -1 5- 4 Jackson Bar Training Structure Study Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Jeremy A. Sharp and...Leroy Gage), a previously constructed HEC -2 model, and a previously constructed WES physical model from 1987. Three alternatives were modeled in an

  11. BaBar Data Aquisition

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, I; Grosso, P; Hamilton, R T; Huffer, M E; O'Grady, C; Russell, J J

    1998-01-01

    The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is designed to perform a search for CP violation by analysing the decays of a very large sample of B and Bbar mesons produced at the high luminosity PEP-11 accelerator. The data acquisition system must cope with a sustained high event rate, while supporting real time feature extraction and data compression with minimal dead time. The BaBar data acquisition system is based around a common VME interface to the electronics read-out of the separate detector subsystems. Data from the front end electronics is read into commercial VME processors via a custom "personality card" and PCI interface. The commercial CPUs run the Tornado operating system to provide a platform for detector subsystem code to perform the necessary data processing. The data are read out via a non-blocking network switch to a farm of commercial UNIX processors. Careful design of the core data acquisition code has enabled us to sustain events rates in excess of 20 kHz while maintaini...

  12. Nuss bar migrations: occurrence and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkovitz, Lauren E.; Binkovitz, Larry A. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Zendejas, Benjamin; Moir, Christopher R. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Pectus excavatum results from dorsal deviation of the sternum causing narrowing of the anterior-posterior diameter of the chest. It can result in significant cosmetic deformities and cardiopulmonary compromise if severe. The Nuss procedure is a minimally invasive technique that involves placing a thin horizontally oriented metal bar below the dorsal sternal apex for correction of the pectus deformity. To identify the frequency and types of Nuss bar migrations, to present a new categorization of bar migrations, and to present examples of true migrations and pseudomigrations. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records and all pertinent radiologic studies of 311 pediatric patients who underwent a Nuss procedure. We evaluated the frequency and type of bar migrations. Bar migration was demonstrated in 23 of 311 patients (7%) and occurred within a mean period of 26 days after surgery. Bar migrations were subjectively defined as deviation of the bar from the position demonstrated on the immediate postoperative radiographs and categorized as superior, inferior, rotation, lateral or flipped using a new classification system. Sixteen of the 23 migrations required re-operation. Nuss bar migration can be diagnosed with careful evaluation of serial radiographs. Nuss bar migration has a wide variety of appearances and requires exclusion of pseudomigration resulting from changes in patient positioning between radiologic examinations. (orig.)

  13. NGC 4340: Double Bar + Fossil Nuclear Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin, P.; Beltran, J. C. Vega; Beckman, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    NGC 4340 is a double-barred SB0 galaxy in the Virgo cluster (Wozniak et al. 1995). Here, we present evidence that this galaxy also posseses a luminous stellar nuclear ring of relatively old stars with little or no gas. The ring lies just outside the inner bar, at the probable inner inner Lindblad resonance (IILR) of the outer bar. Careful inspection of the isophotes and unsharp masks shows that the two bars are slightly misaligned, which suggests they may be independently rotating.

  14. submitter Performance simulation of BaBar DIRC bar boxes in TORCH

    CERN Document Server

    Föhl, K; Castillo García, L; Cussans, D; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gao, R; Gys, T; Harnew, N; Piedigrossi, D; Rademacker, J; Ros García, A; van Dijk, M

    2017-01-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector based on the DIRC principle. The DIRC bar boxes of the BaBar experiment at SLAC could possibly be reused to form a part of the TORCH detector time-of-flight wall area, proposed to provide positive particle identification of low momentum kaons in the LHCb experiment at CERN. For a potential integration of BaBar bar boxes into TORCH, new imaging readout optics are required. From the several designs of readout optics that have been considered, two are used in this paper to study the effect of BaBar bar optical imperfections on the detector reconstruction performance. The kaon-pion separation powers obtained from analysing simulated photon hit patterns show the performance reduction for a BaBar bar of non-square geometry compared to a perfectly rectangular cross section.

  15. Search for CP Violation in Hyperon Decay: $\\Xi^- / \\bar{\\Xi}^+$ and $\\Lambda / \\bar{\\Lambda}$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leros, Nicolas [Lausanne U.

    2001-06-01

    The HyperCP(EB71) experiment, performed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, provides a primary search for direct OP violation in the decays of $\\Xi^-/\\bar{\\Xi}^+$ and $\\Lambda/ \\bar{\\Lambda}$ hyperons....

  16. Bar pattern speeds in CALIFA galaxies. I. Fast bars across the Hubble sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguerri, J. A. L.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Amorin, A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Cid Fernandes, R.; García-Benito, R.; García-Lorenzo, B.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husemann, B.; Kalinova, V.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Márquez, I.; Mast, D.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez, S. F.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, C. J.; Backsmann, N.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; del Olmo, A.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Pérez, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.

    Context. The bar pattern speed (Ωb) is defined as the rotational frequency of the bar, and it determines the bar dynamics. Several methods have been proposed for measuring Ωb. The non-parametric method proposed by Tremaine & Weinberg (1984, ApJ, 282, L5; TW) and based on stellar kinematics is the

  17. Bank pull or bar push: What drives scroll-bar formation in meandering rivers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Lageweg, W. I.; van Dijk, W. M.; Baar, A. W.; Rutten, J.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most striking features of meandering rivers are quasi-regular ridges of the point bar, evidence of a pulsed lateral migration of meander bends. Scroll bars formed on the inner bend are preserved on the point-bar surface as a series of ridges as meanders migrate, and in the subsurface of

  18. Stabilizer bars: Part 3. Production methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam-Markus WITTEK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the methods of stabilizer bar production as well as selected issues concerning the theory of cold roll forming. A proper construction and the selection of parameters are fundamental factors influencing the selection of a suitable production process. The selection of the manufacturing process has a fundamental impact on the quality and durability of the stabilizer bars.

  19. Development of an effective pinch bar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ottermann, RW

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available an impact in addressing rock fall fatalities and injuries associated with making safe or barring activities. The tools will also improve the overall quality of barring, especially in excavations requiring a lot of work, and this will reduce the rock fall...

  20. Bar Study Stories. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on the impact of the availability of drinks in licensed establishments, such as bars and taverns on student drinking. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Cheap Drinks at College Bars Can Escalate Student Drinking (John D. Clapp); (2) High Alcohol Outlet Density: A Problem for Campuses and…

  1. Characterization of Bars Induced by Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inma Martinez-Valpuesta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether the formation of bars is triggered by interactions or by internal processes has been discussed for many decades. In this work, we study differences between both mechanisms by means of numerical simulations. We relate our analysis to fly-by interactions in different mass groups or clusters according to the velocity of the encounters. We find that once the bar is created, the interaction does not much affect its evolution. We also find that bars can be triggered purely by a slow interaction. Those bars affected or triggered by interaction stay for a longer time in the slow regime, i.e., the corotation radius is more than 1.4 times the bar radius.

  2. Orbits in weak and strong bars

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    The authors study the plane orbits in simple bar models embedded in an axisymmetric background when the bar density is about 1% (weak), 10% (intermediate) or 100% (strong bar) of the axisymmetric density. Most orbits follow the stable periodic orbits. The basic families of periodic orbits are described. In weak bars with two Inner Lindblad Resonances there is a family of stable orbits extending from the center up to the Outer Lindblad Resonance. This family contains the long period orbits near corotation. Other stable families appear between the Inner Lindblad Resonances, outside the Outer Lindblad Resonance, around corotation (short period orbits) and around the center (retrograde). Some families become unstable or disappear in strong bars. A comparison is made with cases having one or no Inner Lindblad Resonance. (12 refs).

  3. Measurement of the asymmetry parameter for $\\bar\\Lambda$ in $J/\\psi \\to \\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Based on a sample of $58\\times10^6J/\\psi$ decays collected with the BESII detector at the BEPC, the $\\bar\\Lambda$ decay parameter $\\alpha_{\\bar\\Lambda}$ for $\\bar\\Lambda\\to \\bar p \\pi^+$ is measured using about 9000 $J/\\psi\\to\\Lambda\\bar\\Lambda\\to p \\bar p \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays. A fit to the joint angular distributions yields $\\alpha_{\\bar\\Lambda}(\\bar\\Lambda\\to \\bar p\\pi^+)=-0.755\\pm0.083\\pm0.063$, where the first error is statistical, and the second systematic.

  4. A Modern Picture of Barred Galaxy Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Michael; Weinberg, Martin; Katz, Neal

    2018-01-01

    Observations of disk galaxies suggest that bars are responsible for altering global galaxy parameters (e.g. structures, gas fraction, star formation rate). The canonical understanding of the mechanisms underpinning bar-driven secular dynamics in disk galaxies has been largely built upon the analysis of linear theory, despite galactic bars being clearly demonstrated to be nonlinear phenomena in n-body simulations. We present simulations of barred Milky Way-like galaxy models designed to elucidate nonlinear barred galaxy dynamics. We have developed two new methodologies for analyzing n-body simulations that give the best of both powerful analytic linear theory and brute force simulation analysis: orbit family identification and multicomponent torque analysis. The software will be offered publicly to the community for their own simulation analysis.The orbit classifier reveals that the details of kinematic components in galactic disks (e.g. the bar, bulge, thin disk, and thick disk components) are powerful discriminators of evolutionary paradigms (i.e. violent instabilities and secular evolution) as well as the basic parameters of the dark matter halo (mass distribution, angular momentum distribution). Multicomponent torque analysis provides a thorough accounting of the transfer of angular momentum between orbits, global patterns, and distinct components in order to better explain the underlying physics which govern the secular evolution of barred disk galaxies.Using these methodologies, we are able to identify the successes and failures of linear theory and traditional n-body simulations en route to a detailed understanding of the control bars exhibit over secular evolution in galaxies. We present explanations for observed physical and velocity structures in observations of barred galaxies alongside predictions for how structures will vary with dynamical properties from galaxy to galaxy as well as over the lifetime of a galaxy, finding that the transfer of angular

  5. First Measurement of σ(gg → t$\\bar{t}$)/σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamdari, Shabnaz Pashapour [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2008-01-01

    The work presented here is the first measurement of the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion. We use an integrated luminosity of 0.96 ± 0.06 fb-1 of p{bar p} collisions at √s of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. We select t$\\bar{t}$ candidates by identifying a high-pT lepton candidate, a large missing ET as evidence for a neutrino candidate and at least four high ET jets, one of which has to be identified as originating from a b quark. The challenge is to discriminate between the two production processes with the identical final state, gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$. We take advantage of the fact that compared to a quark, a gluon is more likely to radiate a low momentum gluon and therefore, one expects a larger number of charged particles with low pT in a process involving more gluons. Given the large uncertainties associated with the modeling of the low pT charged particle multiplicity, a data-driven technique was employed. Using calibration data samples, we show there exists a clear correlation between the observed average number of low pT charged particles and the average number of gluons involved in the production process predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Given the correlation, one can identify low pT charged particle multiplicity distributions associated with specific average number of gluons. The W + 0 jet sample and dijets sample with leading jet ET in the range of 80-100 GeV are used to find no-gluon and gluon-rich low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity distributions, respectively. Using these no-gluon and gluon-rich distributions in a likelihood fit, we find the fraction of gluon-rich events in t{bar t} candidates. This fraction has contributions from the signal and background events. Taking into account these contributions and the gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar

  6. What Makes the Family of Barred Disc Galaxies So Rich: Damping Stellar Bars in Spinning Haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Angela; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton

    2018-02-01

    We model and analyze the secular evolution of stellar bars in spinning dark matter (DM) haloes with the cosmological spin λ ˜ 0 - 0.09. Using high-resolution stellar and DM numerical simulations, we focus on angular momentum exchange between stellar discs and DM haloes of various axisymmetric shapes — spherical, oblate and prolate. We find that stellar bars experience a diverse evolution which is guided by the ability of parent haloes to absorb angular momentum, J, lost by the disc through the action of gravitational torques, resonant and non-resonant. We confirm that dynamical bar instability is accelerated via resonant J-transfer to the halo. Our main findings relate to the long-term, secular evolution of disc-halo systems: with an increasing λ, bars experience less growth and basically dissolve after they pass through vertical buckling instability. Specifically, with increasing λ, (1) The vertical buckling instability in stellar bars colludes with inability of the inner halo to absorb J — this emerges as the main factor weakening or destroying bars in spinning haloes; (2) Bars lose progressively less J, and their pattern speeds level off; (3) Bars are smaller, and for λ ≳ 0.06 cease their growth completely following buckling; (4) Bars in λ > 0.03 halos have ratio of corotation-to-bar radii, RCR/Rb > 2, and represent so-called slow bars without offset dust lanes. We provide a quantitative analysis of J-transfer in disc-halo systems, and explain the reasons for absence of growth in fast spinning haloes and its observational corollaries. We conclude that stellar bar evolution is substantially more complex than anticipated, and bars are not as resilient as has been considered so far.

  7. Magnetorheological stabilizer bar for ground vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Xu, Shi-Xu; Shen, Sheng

    2017-04-01

    Aim at simultaneously improving the safety (anti-roll performance) and ride comfort of vehicles during fast cornering or over road irregularities, the principle and configuration of magnetorheological (MR) semi-active stabilizer bar is proposed in this paper. The MR stabilizer bar featuring a rotary MR damper is used to provide small torsional torque at low speed to improve ride comfort, while large torsional torque to enhance the safety at high speed cornering. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed MR stabilizer bar, the mathematical model of the dynamic system is established, and the passive-on control performance of a specific full vehicle is studied via a dynamics simulation software ADAMS, and the performance is compared with the conventional passive stabilizer bar for ground vehicle dynamic system.

  8. Raising the Bar for Microbiologists | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-09

    Dec 9, 2010 ... SEE ALSO... Audio: Raising the bar for Microbiologists Professor Ana Sanchez and Professor Lourdes Enriquez explain why zoonotic diseases, transfered from animals to humans, require multidisciplinary, integrated solutions.

  9. Barring intervention? Lesbian and gay bars as an underutilized venue for tobacco interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibel, Katherine; Lee, Joseph G L; Goldstein, Adam O; Ranney, Leah M

    2011-07-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities are at high risk for tobacco use. While LGBT communities have historically considered bars to be safe places to socialize and congregate, these spaces are often tobacco-friendly environments and may have potential as sites for much needed intervention. Only a few public health interventions have attempted to work through bars and clubs to decrease tobacco use in the LGBT populations. Evidence from HIV prevention suggests some potential interventions in bars, and the tobacco industry has worked extensively (and successfully) to utilize bars in marketing efforts. Lesbian and gay bars are underutilized in tobacco control, suggesting missed avenues for chronic disease prevention programs. Researchers and communities should continue to recognize the importance of clean indoor air laws covering bars and develop additional strategies for reaching LGBT populations with disparities.

  10. Intelligent Bar Chart Plagiarism Detection in Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mumtaz Al-Dabbagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR. By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts.

  11. Intelligent Bar Chart Plagiarism Detection in Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts. PMID:25309952

  12. Chocolate Bars Based on Human Nutritional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Anthony,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Key Points * The nutritional value of chocolate bars should be based on the nutritional value of the low energy dense late Paleolithic human diet to help reduce mental ill health, obesity, and other postprandial insults. * Current chocolate bars have a high energy density (>2 kcal/g). * Cocoa can be sweetened by the addition of calorie-free Purefruit™ (Tate & Lyle) monk fruit ( Siraitia grosvenorii ) extract. PUREFRUIT™ is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar and...

  13. Intelligent bar chart plagiarism detection in documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Rehman, Amjad; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts.

  14. Delamination stresses in semicircular laminated composite bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Using anisotropic elasticity theory, delamination stresses in a semicircular laminated composite curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments were calculated, and their radial locations determined. A family of design curves was presented, showing variation of the intensity of delamination stresses and their radial locations with different geometry and different degrees of anisotropy of the curved bar. The effect of anisotropy on the location of peak delamination stress was found to be small.

  15. Companions of Bright Barred Shapley Ames Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Barreto, J. Antonio; Carrillo, Rene; Vera-Villamizar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Companion galaxy environment for a subset of 78 bright and nearby barred galaxies from the Shapley Ames Catalog is presented. Among spiral barred galaxies there are Seyfert galaxies, galaxies with circumnuclear structures, galaxies not associated with any large scale galaxy cloud structure, galaxies with peculiar disk morphology (crooked arms) and galaxies with normal disk morphology; the list includes all Hubble types. The companion galaxy list includes number of companion galaxies within 20...

  16. Preparation of a Breadfruit Flour Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nochera, Carmen L.; Ragone, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Breadfruit is a nutritious, high energy food with a low quantity of protein but excellent protein quality. It has the potential to be developed into desired products which will help increase its utilization and add value to the crop. The overall purposes of this investigation were to develop a portable, nutritious, ready-to-eat breadfruit product (bar), test the sensory qualities of the product, and evaluate the nutritional properties of the product. Flour made from the Micronesian variety, Meinpadahk (Artocarpus altilis × Artocarpus mariannensis), was utilized for the development of the breadfruit bar. Breadfruit is a rich source of fiber, vitamins such as vitamin C, minerals such as potassium, and phytochemicals such as flavonoids. Nutritional labeling indicates that the breadfruit bar is high in carbohydrates and low in fat, and sensory evaluation indicates that 81% of the panelists found the bar acceptable while 19% disliked the bar. The breadfruit bar can provide an appealing and inexpensive gluten-free food source based on locally available breadfruit. PMID:28231132

  17. Optimized surgical tool for pectus bar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechowicz, Krzysztof J; McKenzie, Frederic D; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Obermeyer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Surgeons on a daily basis improve or rescue human lives. Therefore, they should be provided with the most optimal tools so their skills are fully utilized. In this paper, we present such an optimized tool for surgeons who employ the Nuss procedure to correct pectus excavatum - a congenital chest wall deformity. The Nuss procedure is a minimally invasive procedure that results in the placement of a metal bar inside the chest cavity. The bar is removed after approximately two years. Surgeons have been reporting that the currently available tools for the bar extraction do not provide the most optimal functionality. Therefore, we have proposed an optimized and improved design of the tool for the bar extraction. The improved design tool is further analyzed using finite element techniques. Additionally, we have built a physical prototype to ensure that the new tool to seamlessly integrate with the bar and to further evaluate by the surgeons who routinely practice the Nuss procedure. In order to validate in the future the final design, we have manufactured wax models that will serve as the patterns in the casting process of metal prototypes. They should provide enough strength to withstand stresses present in the bar straightening process.

  18. Boxy Orbital Structures in Rotating Bar Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Velasquez, L.; Patsis, P. A.; Puerari, I.; Skokos, Ch.; Manos, T.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate regular and chaotic two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) orbits of stars in models of a galactic potential consisting of a disk, a halo, and a bar to find the origin of boxy components that are part of the bar or (almost) the bar itself. Our models originate in snapshots of an N-body simulation, which develops a strong bar. We consider three snapshots of the simulation, and, for the orbital study, we treat each snapshot independently, as an autonomous Hamiltonian system. The calculated corotation–to–bar length ratios indicate that in all three cases, the bar rotates slowly, while the orientation of the orbits of the main family of periodic orbits changes along its characteristic. We characterize the orbits as regular, sticky, or chaotic after integrating them for a 10 Gyr period by using the GALI2 index. Boxiness in the equatorial plane is associated either with quasi-periodic orbits in the outer parts of stability islands or with sticky orbits around them, which can be found in a large range of energies. We indicate the location of such orbits in diagrams, which include the characteristic of the main family. They are always found about the transition region from order to chaos. By perturbing such orbits in the vertical direction, we find a class of 3D nonperiodic orbits, which have boxy projections both in their face-on and side-on views.

  19. $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamu, Yusupujiang [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Ji, Chueng -Ryong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Melnitchouk, W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, P. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, CAS, Beijing (China)

    2015-03-25

    We compute the $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory, including both nucleon and Δ degrees of freedom, within both relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. In addition to the distribution at $x>0$, we estimate the correction to the integrated asymmetry arising from zero momentum contributions from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at $x=0$, which have not been accounted for in previous analyses. In conclusion, we find that the empirical $x$ dependence of $\\bar d - \\bar u$ as well as the integrated asymmetry can be well reproduced in terms of a transverse momentum cutoff parameter.

  20. Cultural Factors Related to Smoking in San Francisco's Irish Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M. J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In…

  1. Spontaneous formation of double bars in dark matter dominated galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Kanak; Maciejewski, Witold

    2013-01-01

    Although nearly one-third of barred galaxies host an inner, secondary bar, the formation and evolution of double barred galaxies remain unclear. We show here an example model of a galaxy, dominated by a live dark matter halo, in which double bars form naturally, without requiring gas, and we follow its evolution for a Hubble time. The inner bar in our model galaxy rotates almost as slowly as the outer bar, and it can reach up to half of its length. The route to the formation of a double bar m...

  2. Developing fruit-based nutritious snack bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Edson P; Siqueira, Heloisa H; do Lago, Rafael Carvalho; Rosell, Cristina M; Vilas Boas, Eduardo V de Barros

    2014-01-15

    Marolo (Annona crassiflora Mart) is a typical savannah fruit that is very nutritious and highly appreciated. However, its consumption has been limited to fresh fruit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential use of marolo flour in the production of healthy snack bars to valorise this fruit and provide an alternative ready-to-eat nutritious product. Snack bars containing increasing amounts of marolo flour (5 g 100 g(-1), 10 g 100 g(-1), 15 g 100 g(-1), 20 g 100 g(-1), expressed in w/w) were produced and the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics were determined. Levels up to 20% marolo flour can be incorporated in snack bars with some minor changes in pH and moisture content but with an increase of 2.4-fold in dietary fibre content and also 1.3-fold of vitamin C, minerals and antioxidant activity. In addition, up to 10% marolo flour improves significantly the sensory properties of the snack bars, namely appearance, taste, texture and overall acceptance. Marolo flour can be considered an alternative flour for obtaining healthy snack bars, with increased nutritional and sensory quality. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Subsurface flow in lowland river gravel bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, E. N.; Dunne, T.

    2017-09-01

    Geomorphic and hydraulic processes, which form gravel bars in large lowland rivers, have distinctive characteristics that control the magnitude and spatial patterns of infiltration and exfiltration between rivers and their immediate subsurface environments. We present a bedform-infiltration relation together with a set of field measurements along two reaches of the San Joaquin River, CA to illustrate the conditions required for infiltration and exfiltration of flow between a stream and its undulating bed, and a numerical model to investigate the factors that affect paths and residence times of flow through barforms at different discharges. It is shown that asymmetry of bar morphology is a first-order control on the extent and location of infiltration, which would otherwise produce equal areas of infiltration and exfiltration under the assumption of sinusoidal bedforms. Hydraulic conductivity varies by orders of magnitude due to fine sediment accumulation and downstream coarsening related to the process of bar evolution. This systematic variability not only controls the magnitude of infiltration, but also the residence time of flow through the bed. The lowest hydraulic conductivity along the reach occurred where the difference between the topographic gradient and the water-surface gradient is at a maximum and thus where infiltration would be greatest into a homogeneous bar, indicating the importance of managing sand supply to maintain the ventilation and flow through salmon spawning riffles. Numerical simulations corroborate our interpretation that infiltration patterns and rates are controlled by distinctive features of bar morphology.

  4. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in long bars with application to Kolsky bar testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Material testing using the Kolsky bar, or split Hopkinson bar, technique has proven instrumental to conduct measurements of material behavior at strain rates in the order of 103 s-1. Test design and data reduction, however, remain empirical endeavors based on the experimentalist's experience. Issues such as wave propagation across discontinuities, the effect of the deformation of the bar surfaces in contact with the specimen, the effect of geometric features in tensile specimens (dog-bone shape), wave dispersion in the bars and other particulars are generally treated using simplified models. The work presented here was conducted in Q3 and Q4 of FY14. The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of numerical simulations of Kolsky bar tests, which was done successfully.

  5. Results from the KARMEN nu-bar submu -> nu-bar sub e neutrino oscillation search

    CERN Document Server

    Eitel, K

    1999-01-01

    The neutrino experiment KARMEN is situated at the beam stop neutrino source ISIS. It provides nu submu's, nu sub e 's and nu-bar's in equal intensities from the pi sup + -mu sup + -decay at rest (DAR). The oscillation channel nu-bar submu -> nu-bar sub e is investigated in the appearance mode with a 56 t liquid scintillation calorimeter at a mean distance of 17.7 m from the nu-source looking for p (nu-bar sub e , e sup +) n reactions. In the data collected through 1997 and 1998 no potential oscillation event was observed. Using a unified approach to small signals as recommended by the PDG, this leads to an upper limit for the mixing angle of sin sup 2 (2 THETA) nu-bar sub e evidence.

  6. B Counting at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  7. Newtorites in bar detectors of gravitational wave

    CERN Document Server

    Ronga, F

    2016-01-01

    The detection of particles with only gravitational interactions (Newtorites) in gravitational bar detectors was studied in 1984 by Bernard, De Rujula and Lautrup. The negative results of dark matter searches suggest to look to exotic possibilities like Newtorites. The limits obtained with the Nautilus bar detector will be presented and the possible improvements will be discussed. Since the gravitational coupling is very weak, the possible limits are very far from what is needed for dark matter, but for large masses are the best limits obtained on the Earth. An update of limits for MACRO particles will be given.

  8. Imaging of physeal bars in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, David C. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Deeney, Vincent; Roach, James W. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Orthopedics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Shah, Amisha J. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The growth plate, also known as the physis or epiphyseal plate, is essential for longitudinal growth of bones in the immature skeleton. A variety of insults to the growth plate from trauma to infection to idiopathic causes can lead to physeal bar formation, an interruption in normal growth plate cartilage, where a bony or fibrous bridge develops between the metaphysis and epiphysis. This bridge restricts subsequent bone growth, leading to limb shortening and/or angular deformities. Early recognition of the presence of a physeal bar can help direct appropriate surgical management to restore linear growth of the bone. (orig.)

  9. Developing fruit-based nutritious snack bars

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, E. P. da; Siqueira, H. H.; Lago, R. C. do; Rosell, Cristina M.; Vilas Boas, E. V. D. B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Marolo (Annona crassiflora Mart) is a typical savannah fruit that is very nutritious and highly appreciated. However, its consumption has been limited to fresh fruit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential use of marolo flour in the production of healthy snack bars to valorise this fruit and provide an alternative ready-to-eat nutritious product. Snack bars containing increasing amounts of marolo flour (5 g 100 g-1, 10 g 100 g-1, 15 g 100 g-1, 20 g 100 g-1, expr...

  10. Four Experiments on the Perception of Bar Charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Justin; Setlur, Vidya; Anand, Anushka

    2014-12-01

    Bar charts are one of the most common visualization types. In a classic graphical perception paper, Cleveland & McGill studied how different bar chart designs impact the accuracy with which viewers can complete simple perceptual tasks. They found that people perform substantially worse on stacked bar charts than on aligned bar charts, and that comparisons between adjacent bars are more accurate than between widely separated bars. However, the study did not explore why these differences occur. In this paper, we describe a series of follow-up experiments to further explore and explain their results. While our results generally confirm Cleveland & McGill's ranking of various bar chart configurations, we provide additional insight into the bar chart reading task and the sources of participants' errors. We use our results to propose new hypotheses on the perception of bar charts.

  11. Observation of B+ --> K0bar K+ and B0 --> K0 K0bar

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del, P; Amo Sanchez; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo, M; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del, L; Buono; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We report observations of the b --> d penguin-dominated decays B+ --> K0bar K+ and B0 --> K0 K0bar in approximately 350 million Upsilon(4S) --> BBbar decays collected with the BaBar detector. We measure the branching fractions B(B+ --> K0bar K+) = (1.61 +/- 0.44 +/- 0.09) * 10^-6 and B(B0 --> K0 K0bar) = (1.08 +/- 0.28 +/- 0.11) * 10^-6, and the CP-violating charge asymmetry A_{CP}(K0bar K+) = 0.10 +/- 0.26 +/- 0.03. Using a vertexing technique previously employed in several analyses of all-neutral final states containing kaons, we report the first measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B0 --> K0 K0bar, obtaining S = -1.28 +0.80/-0.73 +0.11/-0.16 and C = -0.40 +/- 0.41 +/- 0.06. We also report improved measurements of the branching fraction B(B0 --> K0 pi+) = (23.9 +/- 1.1 +/- 1.0) * 10^-6 and CP-violating charge asymmetry A_{CP}(K0 pi+) = -0.029 +/- 0.039 +/- 0.010.

  12. Barred galaxy formation in the EAGLE cosmological simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, M. G.; Algorry, D. G.

    2017-07-01

    We present results about the formation and evolution of stellar bars in Milky-Way sized galaxies using the EAGLE ΛCDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. In agreement with observational results, this simulation shows that ˜ 40% of our simulated disk galaxies have a stellar bar with a wide variety of bar strengths. Typical bar lengths are ˜ 6.5 kpc also comparing favourably to observed ones. Our unbarred disks are more gas-rich and star-forming than those having a strong bar. In concordance with previous work, bars develop in galaxies where the disk is gravitationally dominant over the dark matter halo.

  13. Measurement of the Diameters of Deformed Bars in Concrete Using an Electromagnetic Wave Radar (in the Presence of Cross Bars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shogo; Begum, Halima

    The authors previously proposed a method to measure the diameter of the deformed reinforcing bars in concrete structures nondestructively using an electromagnetic wave radar. The method estimates the periodicity of the knots of the inspected bar and utilizes the standard relationship between the knot's pitch and the diameter of the bar to measure the diameter indirectly. The effectiveness of the method was verified using test specimens where the bars were placed parallel to each other. However, in practical case, where other reinforcing bars cross the inspected bar perpendicularly, the stronger reflections from the cross bars influence the reflection from the inspected bar. This paper thus proposes a general method which eliminates such unwanted influences from the cross bars and measures the diameter accurately even in practical environment.

  14. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cuth, Jakub; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Anatoly V; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Franc, Jiri; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schott, Matthias; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    We study $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production asymmetries in $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$, $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$, and $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. We find an excess of $\\Lambda$'s ($\\bar{\\Lambda}$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.

  15. Star formation history of barred disc galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Ocvirk, P.; Gibson, B. K.; Perez, I.; Peletier, R. F.

    We present the first results of a pilot study aimed at understanding the influence of bars on the evolution of galaxy discs through the study of their stellar content. We examine here the kinematics, star formation history, mass-weighted, luminosity-weighted and single stellar population (SSP)

  16. BaBar Explores CP Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karyotakis, Jean Yannis

    2003-05-16

    The most recent results obtained by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC on CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions for neutral and charged B decays are presented here. The analysis was performed on a data sample of {approx} 88 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2002. Using b {yields} c{bar c}s decays, we measure sin2{beta} = 0.741 {+-} 0.067(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst). We also present sin2{beta} measurements from, b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} c{bar c}d processes. From neutral B meson decays to two-body final states of charged pions and kaons, we derive for the CP violating parameters, S{sub {pi}{pi}} = 0.02 {+-} 0.34 {+-} 0.05 [-0.54, +0.58] and C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.30 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.04 [-0.72, +0.12]. First results for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0} final states dominated by the {rho}{sup {+-}} resonance, are also presented.

  17. Should an infected Nuss bar be removed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Renterghem, KM; von Bismarck, S; Bax, NMA; Fleer, A; Hollwarth, ME

    Background: The Nuss procedure is a minimally invasive procedure for correction of pectus excavatum. It involves insertion of a substernal metal bar. A feared complication of any implanted device is infection, which often necessitates removal. The purpose of this report is to describe the authors'

  18. The BaBar Data Acquisition System

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, I; Grosso, P; Huffer, M E; O'Grady, C; Russell, J J

    1999-01-01

    The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is designed to perform a search for CP violation by ana-lyzing the decays of a very large sample of B and B(Bar) mesons produced at the high luminosity PEP-II accelerator. The data acquisition system must cope with a sustained high event rate, while supporting real time feature extraction and data compression with minimal dead time. The BaBar data acquisition system is based around a common VME interface to the electronics read-out of the separate detec-tor subsystems. Data from the front end electronics is read into commercial VME processors via a custom "Personality Card" and PCI interface. The commercial CPUs run the Tornado operating system to provide a platform for detector subsystem code to perform the necessary data processing. The data is read out via a non-blocking network switch to a farm of commercial UNIX processors. The current implementation of the BaBar data acquisition sys-tem has been shown to sustain a Level 1 trigger rate of 1.3...

  19. Adaptive Virtual Tow Bar, research results 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, D.M.C.; Hueting, T.F.; Joosten, B.; Uittenbogaard, J.; Martens, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    This document reports the advances made in 2016 for the Early Research Program (ERP) Human Enhancement: Adaptive Automation, sub-project Adaptive Virtual Tow Bar. The ambition of the large scale TNO Early Research Program (ERP) Human Enhancement is to develop a transparent (human-in-the-loop)

  20. The MTL Torsional Split-Hopkinson Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    34K"!INP PRO "Bar and Spec. dimensions from file or keyboard -inches (F/K): ":AS 360 IF AS=-"PTHEN 370 INPUT #7:DoutDi.Lspec 380 ELSE IF AS="K" THEN 21...J. Duffy, Brown University, Division of Engineering, Providence, RI 02912 I Prof. G. J. Dvorak , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Civil

  1. Lectura en barómetro

    OpenAIRE

    Cháfer, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Elaboración de material digital y recursos en la red para el tercer curso de la titulación de Química y nuevos grados. El objetivo de este vídeo es aprender a medir la presión atmosférica en un barómetro.

  2. Trichomoniasis in the Hawaiian barred dove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R.M.; Banko, W.

    1974-01-01

    Two barred doves found in the south Kona district of the island of Hawaii were diagnosed as having trichomoniasis on the basis of gross and microscopic lesions. This brings the confirmed list of columbid species susceptible to natural trichomoniasis to four and is the first report of the disease from columbids in the Hawaiian Islands.

  3. Laboratory and workplace assessments of rivet bucking bar vibration emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Thomas W; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G

    2015-04-01

    Sheet metal workers operating rivet bucking bars are at risk of developing hand and wrist musculoskeletal disorders associated with exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations and forceful exertions required to operate these hand tools. New bucking bar technologies have been introduced in efforts to reduce workplace vibration exposures to these workers. However, the efficacy of these new bucking bar designs has not been well documented. While there are standardized laboratory-based methodologies for assessing the vibration emissions of many types of powered hand tools, no such standard exists for rivet bucking bars. Therefore, this study included the development of a laboratory-based method for assessing bucking bar vibrations which utilizes a simulated riveting task. With this method, this study evaluated three traditional steel bucking bars, three similarly shaped tungsten alloy bars, and three bars featuring spring-dampeners. For comparison the bucking bar vibrations were also assessed during three typical riveting tasks at a large aircraft maintenance facility. The bucking bars were rank-ordered in terms of unweighted and frequency-weighted acceleration measured at the hand-tool interface. The results suggest that the developed laboratory method is a reasonable technique for ranking bucking bar vibration emissions; the lab-based riveting simulations produced similar rankings to the workplace rankings. However, the laboratory-based acceleration averages were considerably lower than the workplace measurements. These observations suggest that the laboratory test results are acceptable for comparing and screening bucking bars, but the laboratory measurements should not be directly used for assessing the risk of workplace bucking bar vibration exposures. The newer bucking bar technologies exhibited significantly reduced vibrations compared to the traditional steel bars. The results of this study, together with other information such as rivet quality, productivity, tool

  4. Stability of cassava flour-based food bars

    OpenAIRE

    Erica Caroline da Silva; Viviane dos Santos Sobrinho; Marney Pascoli Cereda

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of Brazilian cassava has been reduced due to a lack of adjustment to the modern lifestyle. To reverse this trend, new products could be developed specifically targeted to high-value niche markets. Cereal bars stand out as fast food high in nutritional value. A bar formula mimicking cereal bars was prepared using a mixture of Brazilian cassava flour, hydrogenated vegetable fat, dried bananas, ground cashew nuts, and glucose syrup. After being pressed, the bars were dried for 1 ...

  5. Development of omega-3 rich energy bar with flaxseed

    OpenAIRE

    Mridula, D.; Singh, K K; Barnwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    Energy bar sample were prepared with different levels of flaxseed (0–20%) in addition to cereals and pulses with varying levels of sweeteners (45, 50, and 55%) to deliver a nutritious food to the consumer. The developed bars were evaluated for textural, colour, nutritional quality, sensory attributes and total microbial load. Different levels of flaxseed and sweeteners significantly affected the hue and chroma values of the energy bar. In general the level of flaxseed in energy bar did not af...

  6. Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Shlosman, Isaac

    2004-01-01

    Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the...

  7. Orthogonal Vertical Velocity Dispersion Distributions Produced by Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana

    2017-02-01

    In barred galaxies, the contours of stellar velocity dispersions (σ) are generally expected to be oval and aligned with the orientation of bars. However, many double-barred (S2B) galaxies exhibit distinct σ peaks on the minor axis of the inner bar, which we termed “σ-humps,” while two local σ minima are present close to the ends of inner bars, I.e., “σ-hollows.” Analysis of numerical simulations shows that {σ }z-humps or hollows should play an important role in generating the observed σ-humps+hollows in low-inclination galaxies. In order to systematically investigate the properties of {σ }z in barred galaxies, we apply the vertical Jeans equation to a group of well-designed three-dimensional bar+disk(+bulge) models. A vertically thin bar can lower {σ }z along the bar and enhance it perpendicular to the bar, thus generating {σ }z-humps+hollows. Such a result suggests that {σ }z-humps+hollows can be generated by the purely dynamical response of stars in the presence of a sufficiently massive, vertically thin bar, even without an outer bar. Using self-consistent N-body simulations, we verify the existence of vertically thin bars in the nuclear-barred and S2B models that generate prominent σ-humps+hollows. Thus, the ubiquitous presence of σ-humps+hollows in S2Bs implies that inner bars are vertically thin. The addition of a bulge makes the {σ }z-humps more ambiguous and thus tends to somewhat hide the {σ }z-humps+hollows. We show that {σ }z may be used as a kinematic diagnostic of stellar components that have different thicknesses, providing a direct perspective on the morphology and thickness of nearly face-on bars and bulges with integral field unit spectroscopy.

  8. Membrane-Sculpting BAR Domains Generate Stable Lipid Microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by “freezing” phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved role for BAR superfamily proteins in regulating lipid dynamics within membranes. Stable microdomains induced by BAR domain scaffolds and specific lipids can generate phase boundaries and diffusion barriers, which may have profound impacts on diverse cellular processes.

  9. Access to Bathtub Grab Bars: Evidence of a Policy Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Nicholas; Nair, Rama; Murphy, Maureen; Roberge, Ginette; Lockett, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines access to bathtub grab bars in privately and publicly owned apartment buildings and explores the profile of seniors who have access to bathtub grab bars. Results indicate that bathtub grab bars were significantly more prevalent in apartments that were publicly owned (91.3%) as compared to privately owned (37.8%) (p lesser than…

  10. Illusory rotation in the haptic perception of a moving bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07445370X; Kluit, Z.M.

    2011-01-01

    Haptic matching of the orientation of bars separated by a horizontal distance leads to large systematic deviations (eg Kappers and Koenderink, 1999 Perception 28 781–795). A bar on the right side has to be rotated clockwise in order to be perceived as parallel to a bar at the left side. This finding

  11. Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement Bars: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was conducted into the level of conformance of ribbed steel bars used in Nigeria's structural concrete practice to relevant international and local provisions. In this research, all bars imported into Nigeria from member countries of ISO as well as bars marked with the identity of the local producing mill are ...

  12. Prediction of Vibration Transmission within Periodic Bar Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    The present analysis focuses on vibration transmission within semi-infinite bar structure. The bar is consisting of two different materials in a periodic manner. A periodic bar model is generated using two various methods: The Finite Element method (FEM) and a Floquet theory approach. A parameter...

  13. Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement Bars: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement. Bars: Nigeria as Case Study. Arum, C. Abstract. An investigation was conducted into the level of conformance of ribbed steel bars used in Nigeria's structural concrete practice to relevant international and local provisions. In this research, all bars imported into Nigeria ...

  14. $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ As the Lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ State

    CERN Document Server

    Lebed, Richard F.

    2016-05-23

    The state $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ has recently been demoted by the Particle Data Group from its previous status as the conventional $c\\bar c$ $2 {}^3P_0$ state, largely due to the absence of expected $D\\bar D$ decays. We propose that $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ is actually the lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state, and calculate the spectrum of such states using the diquark model, identifying many of the observed charmoniumlike states that lack open-charm decay modes as $c\\bar c s \\bar s$. Among other results, we argue that $Y(4140)$ is a $J^{PC} = 1^{++}$ $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state that has been not been seen in two-photon fusion largely as a consequence of the Landau-Yang theorem.

  15. A train for the bus(bars)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On 8 April, the first SMACC (Superconducting Magnets and Circuits Consolidation) teams began work in the LHC tunnel. They are responsible for opening the interconnects between the magnets, laying the groundwork for the series of operations that will be performed by the team riding the ‘consolidation train’.   A technician installs the machine tool that allows them to prepare the surface of the section of the bar where the shunt will be fixed. The LHC’s 1,670 dipoles and quadrupoles are powered by power converters and connected by copper 'busbars’. The superconducting cables run through these bars, carrying a current of up to 11,850 amps. Six superconducting cables meet at each interconnect, where they are held together by a soldered (see box) electrical connection sandwiched between two pieces of copper, forming the splice between the busbars of the neighbouring magnets. The integrity of the electrical circuit is depen...

  16. Solving Problems with The Percentage Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans van Galen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At the end of primary school all children more of less know what a percentage is, but yet they often struggle with percentage problems. This article describes a study in which students of 13 and 14 years old were given a written test with percentage problems and a week later were interviewed about the way they solved some of these problems. In a teaching experiment the students were then taught the use of the percentage bar. Although the teaching experiment was very short - just one lesson  -  the results confirm that the percentage bar is a powerful model that deserves a central place in the teaching of percentages.Keywords: percentage, model, design research DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.4.1.558.1-8

  17. Delamination Analysis Of Composite Curved Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1990-01-01

    Classical anisotropic elasticity theory used to construct "multilayer" composite semicircular curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments. Radial location and intensity of open-mode delamination stress calculated and compared with results obtained from anisotropic continuum theory and from finite element method. Multilayer theory gave more accurate predictions of location and intensity of open-mode delamination stress. Currently being applied to predict open-mode delamination stress concentrations in horse-shoe-shaped composite test coupons.

  18. (D3)-bar and dS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A. [Van Swinderen Institute for Particle Physics and Gravity,University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Dasgupta, Keshav [Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University,3600 University Street, Montréal QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kallosh, Renata [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Proeyen, Antoine Van [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, KU Leuven,Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Wrase, Timm [Institute for Theoretical Physics, TU Wien,Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-12

    The role of the (D3)-bar brane in providing de Sitter vacua with spontaneously broken supersymmetry in the KKLT construction is clarified. The first step in this direction was explained in (http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.68.046005, http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/10/013): it was shown there that in the GKP background the bosonic contributions to the vacuum energy from the DBI and WZ term cancel for a D3 brane, but double for a (D3)-bar brane, leading to de Sitter vacua. The next step was taken in (http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP12(2014)117) where the analogous mechanism of the doubling (cancelation) of the (D3)-bar (D3) DBI and WZ terms was discovered in the presence of Volkov-Akulov fermions living on the brane, in a flat supergravity background. Here we confirm this mechanism of doubling/cancelation for the (D3)-bar /D3 brane in the GKP supergravity background preserving N=1, d=4 supersymmetry. We find that imaginary self-dual G{sub (3)} flux of type (2,1) nicely removes the SU(3) fermion triplet by giving it a large mass, while leaving the Volkov-Akulov goldstino, which is the SU(3) singlet, massless. This makes the de Sitter landscape in D-brane physics clearly related to de Sitter vacua in effective d=4 supergravity with a nilpotent multiplet and spontaneously broken supersymmetry.

  19. Bifurcations in the regularized Ericksen bar model

    OpenAIRE

    Grinfeld, M.; Lord, G. J. (Gabriel J.)

    2007-01-01

    We consider the regularized Ericksen model of an elastic bar on an elastic foundation on an interval with Dirichlet boundary conditions as a two-parameter bifurcation problem. We explore, using local bifurcation analysis and continuation methods, the structure of bifurcations from double zero eigenvalues. Our results provide evidence in support of M\\"uller's conjecture \\cite{Muller} concerning the symmetry of local minimizers of the associated energy functional and describe in detail the stru...

  20. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  1. New Spectroscopy at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoni, M.A.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-18

    The Babar experiment at the SLAC B factory has accumulated a high luminosity that offers the possibility of systematic studies of quarkonium spectroscopy and of investigating rare new phenomena. Recent results in this field are presented. In recent times spectroscopy has become exciting again, after the discovery of new states that are not easily explained by conventional models. States such as the X(3872) and the Y(4260) could be new excited charmonium states, but require precise measurements for positive identification. The BaBar experiment [1] is installed at the asymmetric storage ring PEP-II. 90% of the data accumulated by BaBar are taken at the Y(4S) (10.58 GeV) and 10% just below (10.54 GeV). The BaBar detector includes a 5-layer, double-sided silicon vertex tracker and a 40-layer drift chamber in a 1.5 T solenoidal magnetic field, which detect charged particles and measures their momenta and ionization energy losses. Photons, electrons, and neutral hadrons are detected with a CsI(Tl)-crystal electromagnetic calorimeter. An internally reflecting ring-imaging Cherenkov is also used for particle id. Penetrating muon and neutral hadrons are identified by an array of resistive-plate chambers embedded in the steel of the flux return. The detector allows good track and vertex resolution, good particle id and good photon detection so it is especially suited for spectroscopy studies.

  2. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  3. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  4. Antihydrogen Production in $ \\bar{p} $ Z - interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS210 \\\\ \\\\ The production of the antihydrogen atom $ \\bar {H}^0 \\equiv \\bar{p}e $ as the simplest atomic bound state of antimatter has been studied. Nine $ \\bar {H}^0 $ have been observed.\\\\ \\\\ The production of $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is predominantly mediated by the two-photon mechanism in the antiproton-nucleus interaction. In principle $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is well suited for investigations of fundamental CPT violation studies under different forces, however, in the present experiment we concentrated on the production of this antimatter object, since so far it never had been observed.

  5. How can double-barred galaxies be long-lived?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Context. Double-barred galaxies account for almost one third of all barred galaxies, suggesting that secondary stellar bars, which are embedded in large-scale primary bars, are long-lived structures. However, up to now it has been hard to self-consistently simulate a disc galaxy that sustains two nested stellar bars for longer than a few rotation periods. Aims: The dynamical and physical requirements for long-lived triaxiality in the central region of galaxies still need to be clarified. Methods: N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including star formation recipes have been performed. Their properties (bar lengths, pattern speeds, age of stellar population, and gas content) have been compared with the most recent observational data in order to prove that they are representative of double-barred galaxies, even SB0. Overlaps in dynamical resonances and bar modes have been looked for using Fourier spectrograms. Results: Double-barred galaxies have been successfully simulated with lifetimes as long as 7 Gyr. The stellar and gaseous distributions in the central regions are time dependent and display many observed morphological features (circumnuclear rings, pseudo-bulges, triaxial bulges, ovals, etc.) typical of barred galaxies, even early-type. The stellar population of the secondary bar is younger on average than for the primary large-scale bar. An important feature of these simulations is the absence of any resonance overlap for several Gyr. In particular, there is no overlap between the primary bar inner Lindblad resonance and the secondary bar corotation. Therefore, mode coupling cannot sustain the secondary bar mode. Star formation is identified here as possibly being responsible for bringing energy to the nuclear mode. Star formation is also responsible for limiting the amount of gas in the central region which prevents the orbits sustaining the secondary bar from being destroyed. Therefore, the secondary bar can dissolve but reappear after ≈1 Gyr as the

  6. Snack bar compositions and their acute glycaemic and satiety effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mary R; Parsons, Andrew; Whalley, Gillian A; Kelleher, John; Rush, Elaine C

    Maintaining blood glucose within homeostatic limits and eating foods that sup-press hunger and promote satiety have beneficial impacts for health. This study investigated the glycaemic re-sponse and satiety effects of a serving size of a healthier snack bar, branded Nothing Else, that met the required nutrient profiling score criteria for a health claim, in comparison to two top-selling commercial snack bars. In an experimental study, 24 participants aged >=50 years were recruited. On three different days blood glucose concentration was measured twice at baseline and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after consumption of a serving size of each bar. Satiety effects were self-reported hunger, fullness, desire to eat, and amount could eat ratings on visual analogue scales. The incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (iAUC) over two hours for the Nothing Else bar was 30% lower than commercial Bar 2 (psnack bars. At two hours, fullness induced by the Nothing Else bar was twice that of Bar 2 (p=0.019), but not different to Bar 1 (p=0.212). The Nothing Else snack bar developed using the nutrient profiling scheme as a guideline, with its high protein and dietary fibre contents, had a lower glycaemic impact and induced a higher subjective satiety than the two commercial snack bars of equal weight.

  7. A Study of {bar B}{sup 0} --> D(*){sup 0} {bar K}(*){sup 0} Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2004-08-13

    The authors presented evidence for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} --> D*{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0} as well as new measurements of the branching fractions for the decays {bar B}{sup 0} --> D{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}{bar K}*{sup 0}. Their measurements are in agreement with the expectation derived from a cited reference and with previous measurements. They use the central value of their measurement for B({bar B}{sup 0} --> {bar D}{sup 0}K*{sup 0}) and obtain {tau} < 0.8 at the 90% C.L. from a central value of {tau} = 0.4 {+-} 0.2 (stat.) {+-} 0.2 (syst.). The main contribution to the systematic uncertainty is from the estimated peaking background since most systematic uncertainties on the branching fractions cancel in the ratio.

  8. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  9. Search for the decay of a B0 or B0bar meson to K*0bar K0 or K*0 K0bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-06-27

    The authors present a search for the decay of a B{sup 0} or {bar B}{sup 0} meson to a {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0} or K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0} final state, using a sample of approximately 232 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. The measured branching fraction is {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) = (0.2{sub -0.8, -0.3}{sup +0.9, +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. They obtain the following upper limit for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) < 1.9 x 10{sup -6}. They use our result to constrain the Standard Model prediction for the deviation of the CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sup 0} from sin 2{beta}.

  10. {barP}ANDA at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, G.

    The {barP}ANDA experiment represents the central part of the hadron physics branch of the antiproton program of the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt/Germany. It will investigate antiproton annihilations with an almost 4π acceptance from two sequent spectrometer in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. The gluon rich reaction product of antiproton-proton and antiproton-nucleus collisions on one hand and the high intensity and phase space cooled antiproton beam of the HESR on the other hand constitutes an ideal environment to study the sector of non-conventional hadronic states.

  11. Predicting Error Bars for QSAR Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Timon; Schwaighofer, Anton; Mika, Sebastian; Ter Laak, Antonius; Suelzle, Detlev; Ganzer, Ursula; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2007-09-01

    Unfavorable physicochemical properties often cause drug failures. It is therefore important to take lipophilicity and water solubility into account early on in lead discovery. This study presents log D7 models built using Gaussian Process regression, Support Vector Machines, decision trees and ridge regression algorithms based on 14556 drug discovery compounds of Bayer Schering Pharma. A blind test was conducted using 7013 new measurements from the last months. We also present independent evaluations using public data. Apart from accuracy, we discuss the quality of error bars that can be computed by Gaussian Process models, and ensemble and distance based techniques for the other modelling approaches.

  12. Strong Interactions Physics at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioppi, M.

    2005-03-14

    Recent results obtained by BABAR experiment and related to strong interactions physics are presented, with particular attention to the extraction of the first four hadronic-mass moments and the first three lepton-energy moments in semileptonic decays. From a simultaneous fit to the moments, the CKM element |V{sub cb}|, the inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}lv and other heavy quark parameters are derived. The second topic is the ambiguity-free measurement of cos(2{beta}) in B {yields} J/{Psi}K* decays. With approximately 88 million of B{bar B} pairs, negative solutions for cos(2{beta}) are excluded at 89%.

  13. CP Violation at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeche, Christophe; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-15

    We report recent measurements of the three CKM angles of the Unitarity Triangle using about 383 millions b{bar b} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. The results of the angles ({beta}, {alpha}, {gamma}) of the unitarity triangle are consistent with Belle results, and with other CKM constraints such as the measurement of {epsilon}{sub K}, the length of the sides of the unitarity triangle determined from the measurements of {Delta}m{sub d}, {Delta}m{sub s}, |V{sub ub}|. This is an impressive confirmation of Standard Model in quark-flavor sector.

  14. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance.

  15. The LHCb pentaquark as a $\\bar{D}^*\\Sigma_c-\\bar{D}^*\\Sigma_c^*$ molecular state

    CERN Document Server

    Roca, L.; Oset, E.

    2015-01-01

    We perform a theoretical analysis of the $\\Lambda_b \\to J/\\psi K^- p$ reaction from where a recent LHCb experiment extracts a $\\Lambda(1405)$ contribution in the $K^- p$ spectrum close to threshold and two baryon states of hidden charm in the $J/\\psi\\,p$ spectrum. We recall that baryon states of this type have been theoretically predicted matching the mass, width and $J^P$ of the experiment, concretely some states built up from the $J/\\psi\\, N$, $\\bar D^* \\Lambda_c$, $\\bar D^* \\Sigma_c$, $\\bar D \\Sigma^*_c$ and $\\bar D^* \\Sigma^*_c$ coupled channels. We assume that the observed narrow state around 4450 MeV has this nature and we are able to describe simultaneously the shapes and relative strength of the the $K^- p$ mass distribution close to threshold and the peak of the $J/\\psi\\,p$ distribution, with values of the $J/\\psi\\, p$ coupling to the resonance in line with the theoretical ones. The non trivial matching of many properties gives support to a $J^P=3/2^-$ assignment to this state and to its nature as a ...

  16. Extraction of m{sub s} and vertical bar V{sub us} vertical bar from Hadronic Tau Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamiz, Elvira [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jamin, Matthias [Physik Department, Technische Universitat Miinchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Pich, Antonio [Departament de Fisica Teorica, IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Apt. Correus 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Prades, Joaquim [CAFPE and Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuente Nueva, E-18002 Granada (Spain); Schwab, Felix [Physik Department, Technische Universitat Miinchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik - Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, D-80805 Munich (Germany)

    2005-07-15

    We review recent work to determine the strange quark mass m{sub s} as well as the proposal to determine vertical bar V{sub us} vertical bar using hadronic {tau} decay data. The recent update of the strange spectral function by OPAL and their moments of the invariant mass distribution are employed. Our results are vertical bar V{sub us} vertical bar=0.2208+/-0.0034 and m{sub s}(2GeV)=81+/-22 MeV. Our result is already competitive to the standard extraction of vertical bar V{sub us} vertical bar from K{sub e3} decays and to the new proposals to determine it. The error on vertical bar V{sub us} vertical bar is dominated by experiment and will be eventually much improved by the B-factories hadronic {tau} data. Ultimately, a simultaneous fit to both m{sub s} and vertical bar V{sub us} vertical bar to a set of moments of the hadronic {tau} decays invariant mass distribution will provide one of the most accurate determinations of these Standard Model parameters.

  17. Analysis of FRP bars used as reinforcement in concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Brózda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the design and construction of building and engineering structures, it is of utmost importance to provide their reliability and safety. The use of FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymers bars as reinforcement of structural concrete elements could help reducing the typical defects of reinforced concrete and increase its strength parameters. In the paper the selected FRP bar characteristic properties are presented and advantages derived therefrom are specified. Furthermore, the most commonly used in construction types of FRP bars, depending on the raw material used during the production process are listed. In addition, the possibility of recycling of elements reinforced with FRP bars is presented and compared with traditional reinforced concrete (reinforced with steel bars. The production method of FRP bars (pultrusion is shown. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of using this method are discussed.

  18. Barómetro industrial LEON 50

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Álvarez Martínez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El Barómetro indusrial LEON 50 es un trabajo de investigación que tiene como objetivo esencial identificar características patrimoniales, financieras y económicas de una muestra de empresas que actúan dentro de la industria leonesa. El soporte de este estudio empírico es la información contable anual auditada que depositan en el Registro Mercantil las empresas integrantes de la muestra, recogida básicamente en el balance de situación, la cuenta de pérdidas y ganacias y el cuadro de finaciación referidos al bienio 2001-02. En esencia, el Barómetro Industrial LEON 50 pretende ser un avance en el análisis, diagnóstico y mejor conocimiento de la industria regional, aportando una visión actualizada sobre estrategias y pautas de actuación empresarial que serán objeto de observación en períodos

  19. Fault bars and the risk of feather damage in cranes

    OpenAIRE

    Jovani, Roger; Blas, Julio; Stoffel, M.J.; Bortolotti, L.E.; Bortolotti, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Fault bars are translucent areas across feathers grown under stressful conditions. They are ubiquitous across avian species and feather tracts. Because fault bars weaken feather structure and can lead to feather breakage, they may reduce flight performance and lower fitness. Therefore, natural selection might prime mechan- isms aimed at reducing the cost of fault bars, penalizing their occurrence in those feathers more relevant for flight. Here, we tested one prediction of this ‘fault...

  20. Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a Generalised El Farol Bar Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

  1. Barred galaxies in the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algorry, David G.; Navarro, Julio F.; Abadi, Mario G.; Sales, Laura V.; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Frenk, Carlos S.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2017-07-01

    We examine the properties of barred disc galaxies in a ΛCDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulation from the EAGLE project. Our study follows the formation of 269 discs identified at z = 0 in the stellar mass range 10.6 < log M*/M⊙ < 11. These discs show a wide range of bar strengths, from unbarred discs (≈60 per cent) to weak bars (≈20 per cent) and to strongly barred systems (≈20 per cent). Bars in these systems develop after redshift ≈1.3, on time-scales that depend sensitively on the strength of the pattern. Strong bars develop relatively quickly (in a few Gyr, or roughly ∼10 disc rotation periods) in systems that are disc dominated, gas poor, and have declining rotation curves. Weak bars develop more slowly in systems where the disc is less gravitationally important, and are still growing at z = 0. Unbarred galaxies are comparatively gas-rich discs whose rotation speeds do not exceed the maximum circular velocity of the haloes they inhabit. Bar lengths compare favourably with observations, ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 times the radius containing 90 per cent of the stars. Bars slow down remarkably quickly as they grow, causing the inner regions of the surrounding dark halo to expand. At z = 0 strong bars in simulated galaxies have corotation radii roughly 10 times the bar length. Such slow bars are inconsistent with the few cases where pattern speeds have been measured or inferred observationally, a discrepancy that, if confirmed, might prove a challenge for disc galaxy formation in ΛCDM.

  2. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Song Bo; Nelson Kevin; Lipinski Ronald; Bignell John; Ulrich G.B.; George E.P.

    2015-01-01

    Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was appl...

  3. The K2K SciBar Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, K

    2004-01-01

    A new near detector, SciBar, for the K2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation expe riment was installed to improve the measurement of neutrino energy spectrum and to study neutrino interactions in the energy region around 1 GeV. SciBar is a 'fully active' tracking detector with fine segmentation consisting of plastic scintillator bars. The detector was constructed in summer 2003 and is taking data since October 2003. The basic design and initial performance is presented.

  4. Concrete Cover Influence on Inelastic Buckling of Longitudinal Reinforcing Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korentz, Jacek; Kucharczyk, Anna

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical analyses of post yielding behaviour of compressed reinforcing bars, taking into account the impact of concrete cover on static equilibrium path. Concrete cover was modelled as a transverse ties with characteristics like for the tensioned concrete. The calculations were performed for various parameters of concrete cover and bar slenderness, with the use commercial system Abaqus/CAE. The results of analysis showed that the concrete cover has a significant impact on inelastic buckling of reinforcing bars.

  5. On the bar formation mechanism in galaxies with cuspy bulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyachenko, E. V.; Berczik, P.; Just, A.

    2016-11-01

    We show by numerical simulations that a purely stellar dynamical model composed of an exponential disc, a cuspy bulge, and a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with parameters relevant to the Milky Way is subject to bar formation. Taking into account the finite disc thickness, the bar formation can be explained by the usual bar instability, in spite of the presence of an inner Lindblad resonance, that is believed to damp any global modes. The effect of replacing the live halo and bulge by a fixed external axisymmetric potential (rigid models) is studied. It is shown that while the e-folding time of bar instability increases significantly (from 250 to 500 Myr), the bar pattern speed remains almost the same. For the latter, our average value of 55 km s-1 kpc-1 agrees with the assumption that the Hercules stream in the solar neighbourhood is an imprint of the bar-disc interaction at the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar. Vertical averaging of the radial force in the central disc region comparable to the characteristic scale length allows us to reproduce the bar pattern speed and the growth rate of the rigid models, using normal mode analysis of linear perturbation theory in a razor-thin disc. The strong increase of the e-folding time with decreasing disc mass predicted by the mode analysis suggests that bars in galaxies similar to the Milky Way have formed only recently.

  6. Stability of cassava flour-based food bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Caroline da Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of Brazilian cassava has been reduced due to a lack of adjustment to the modern lifestyle. To reverse this trend, new products could be developed specifically targeted to high-value niche markets. Cereal bars stand out as fast food high in nutritional value. A bar formula mimicking cereal bars was prepared using a mixture of Brazilian cassava flour, hydrogenated vegetable fat, dried bananas, ground cashew nuts, and glucose syrup. After being pressed, the bars were dried for 1 hour at 65 °C, packaged in films, and stored under ambient conditions. Its stability was continuously monitored for 210 days in order to ensure its safety and enable its introduction to the market. Texture loss was observed in the packed bars after 90 days of storage, but the sensory characteristics allowed the testers to perceive this tendency after only 30 days of storage. However, chemical, physical, and microbial analyses confirmed that the bars were safe for consumption for 180 days. The results showed that a 45 g cassava flour-based bar enriched with nuts and dried fruits can meet 6% of the recommended daily fiber intake with a caloric value between that of the common cereal bar and that of an energy bar. Adapting the formula with ingredients (fruits, nuts from different regions of Brazil may add value to this traditional product as a fast food.

  7. Measurement of the B0-bar Lifetime and the B0B0-bar Oscillation Frequency Using Partially Reconstructed B0-bar to D*+ l- nu-bar Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-27

    The authors present a simultaneous measurement of the {bar B}{sup 0} lifetime {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d}. We use a sample of about 50,000 partially reconstructed {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays identified with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at SLAC. The flavor of the other B meson in the event is determined from the charge of another high-momentum lepton.

  8. A Preliminary Study on Detecting Fake Gold Bars Using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis: Simulation of Neutron Transmission in Gold Bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. M.; Sun, G. M. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop fake gold bar detecting method by using Prompt-gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). PGAA is an established nuclear analytical technique for non-destructive determination of elemental and isotopic compositions. For a preliminary study on detecting fake gold bar, Monte Carlo simulation of neutron transmission in gold bar was conducted and the possibility for detecting fake gold bar was confirmed. Under the gold bullion standard, it guaranteed the government would redeem any amount of currency for its value in gold. After the gold bullion standard ended, gold bars have been the target for investment as ever. But it is well known that fake gold bar exist in the gold market. This cannot be identified easily without performing a testing as it has the same appearance as the pure gold bar. In order to avoid the trading of fake gold bar in the market, they should be monitored thoroughly. Although the transmissivity of cold neutrons are low comparing that of thermal neutrons, the slower neutrons are more apt to be absorbed in a target, and can increase the prompt gamma emission rate. Also the flux of both thermal and cold neutron beam is high enough to activate thick target. If the neutron beam is irradiated on the front and the reverse side of gold bar, all insides of it can be detected.

  9. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  10. Alcohol price and intoxication in college bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ryan J; Thombs, Dennis L; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Rossheim, Matthew E; Merves, Michele L; Hou, Wei; Dodd, Virginia J; Pokorny, Steven B; Weiler, Robert M; Goldberger, Bruce A

    2009-11-01

    Many population studies find that alcohol prices are inversely related to alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems, including among college students and young adults. Yet, little is known about the "micro-level" effects of alcohol price on the behavior of individual consumers in natural drinking settings such as college bars. Therefore, we assessed patron's cost per gram of ethanol consumed at on-premise drinking establishments and its association with intoxication upon leaving an establishment. On 4 consecutive nights during April 2008, data were collected from 804 patrons exiting 7 on-premise establishments in a bar district located adjacent to a large university campus in the southeastern United States. Anonymous interview and survey data were collected as well as breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) readings. We calculated each patron's expenditures per unit of ethanol consumed based on self-reported information regarding the type, size, number, and cost of consumed drinks. A multivariable model revealed that a 10-cent increase in cost per gram of ethanol at on-premise establishments was associated with a 30% reduction in the risk of exiting an establishment intoxicated (i.e., BrAC > or = 0.08 g/210 l). The results are consistent with economic theory and population-level research regarding the price elasticity of alcoholic beverages, which show that increases in alcohol prices are accompanied by less alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that stricter regulation of the drink discounting practices of on-premise drinking establishments would be an effective strategy for reducing the intoxication levels of exiting patrons.

  11. Antiproton Annihilation in Hydrogen at Rest. I. Reaction p-bar+p-->K+K-bar+ pi

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsch, L; Franzini, P; Miller, D; Tan, T H; Steinberger, J; Plano, R; Yaeger, P

    1965-01-01

    In a study of 735 000 antiproton annihilations at rest in the hydrogen bubble chamber, 182 examples of the reaction K1K1 pi 0 and 851 examples of the reaction K1K± pi ± were recorded. The distributions in the internal variables of these reactions are presented. A substantial fraction of the latter reaction proceeds through an intermediate K* state; p-bar+p-->K+K*. The theory of the interference effects in this reaction is presented and compared with the experimental result. It is concluded that the KK* annihilation proceeds dominantly from the 3S, I=1 state of the N-barN system. The fraction of p-barp annihilations into KK* is given as fKK*=(2.1±0.3) x 10-3.

  12. THE PATTERN SPEED OF THE BAR IN NGC-936

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERRIFIELD, MR; KUIJKEN, K

    1995-01-01

    We have used the Tremaine-Weinberg method to measure the angular speed of rotation for the bar in the SBO galaxy NGC 936. With this technique, the bar's pattern speed, Omega(p), can be derived from the luminosity and stellar-kinematic information in long-slit spectral observations taken parallel to

  13. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG Postinfective physeal bars – MRI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tem of a growing child and survivors are at high risk of developing per- manent effects.5 Nine patients with physeal bars as a result of meningo- coccaemia have been reported but no MRI features have been described. Postinfective physeal bars – MRI features and choice of management. Murray Hayes, MB ChB.

  15. Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Energy Drinks and Food Bars: Power or Hype? KidsHealth / ... nutritivas: ¿Energía o mera exageración? The Buzz on Energy Foods Energy drinks and nutrition bars often make ...

  16. STELLAR, GAS, AND DARK MATTER CONTENT OF BARRED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo, E-mail: b.cervantes@crya.unam.mx [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia, A.P. 3-72, C.P. 58089 Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2017-01-20

    We select a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) where galaxies are classified, through visual inspection, as hosting strong bars, weak bars, or as unbarred galaxies, and make use of H i mass and kinematic information from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey catalog, to study the stellar, atomic gas, and dark matter content of barred disk galaxies. We find, in agreement with previous studies, that the bar fraction increases with increasing stellar mass. A similar trend is found with total baryonic mass, although the dependence is not as strong as with stellar mass, due to the contribution of gas. The bar fraction shows a decrease with increasing gas mass fraction. This anticorrelation between the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar with the gas richness of the galaxy results from the inhibiting effect the gas has in the formation of bars. We also find that for massive galaxies with stellar masses larger than 10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙}, at fixed stellar mass, the bar fraction decreases with increasing global halo mass (i.e., halo mass measured up to a radius of the order of the H i disk extent).

  17. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or the Public Health Service Act are subject to these bar code... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) What drugs are subject to these bar code requirements? The... Number/Uniform Code Council (EAN.UCC) or Health Industry Business Communications Council (HIBCC...

  18. The BAR Domain Superfamily: Membrane-Molding Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Adam; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Camilli, Pietro De

    2009-01-01

    Membrane-shaping proteins of the BAR domain superfamily are determinants of organelle biogenesis, membrane trafficking, cell division, and cell migration. An upsurge of research now reveals new principles of BAR domain-mediated membrane remodeling, enhancing our understanding of membrane curvature-mediated information processing.

  19. effects of flexural rigidity of reinforcement bars on the fundamental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    2009-09-02

    Sep 2, 2009 ... numerical method, and the results show that the flexural rigidity of the bars has significant effect on the fundamental natural frequency of heavily reinforced concrete sections. KEYWORDS: Fundamental Natural Frequency, Reinforced Concrete Slab, Flexural Rigidity,. Reinforcement Bars. INTRODUCTION.

  20. Behavior of Reworked Steel Reinforcement Bars in Reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steel reinforcement bars are a key component in reinforced concrete and are mainly employed to carry tensile stresses since concrete on its own is weak in tension. Sometimes these bars are wrongly bent, straightened and re bent, resulting in the altering of their original characteristics. Some of such steel has been used ...

  1. HCN and HCO+ images of the Orion Bar photodissociation region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owl, RCY; Meixner, MM; Wolfire, M; Tielens, AGGM; Tauber, J

    2000-01-01

    The Orion Bar is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying photodissociation regions because of its nearly edge-on orientation in the observer's line of sight. High angular resolution (similar to 9") maps of the Orion Bar in the J = 1-0 emission lines of HCO+ and HCN have been made by combining

  2. Gas inflow patterns and nuclear rings in barred galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juntai; Li, Zhi

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear rings, dust lanes, and nuclear spirals are common structures in the inner region of barred galaxies, with their shapes and properties linked to the physical parameters of the galaxies. We use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations to study gas inflow patterns in barred galaxies, with special attention on the nuclear rings. The location and thickness of nuclear ringsare tightly correlated with galactic properties, such as the bar pattern speed and bulge central density, within certain ranges. We identify the backbone of nuclear rings with a major orbital family of bars. The rings form exactly at the radius where the residual angular momentum of inflowing gas balances the centrifugal force. We propose a new simple method to predict the bar pattern speed for barred galaxies possessing a nuclear ring, without actually doing simulations. We apply this method to some real galaxies and find that our predicted bar pattern speed compare reasonably well with other estimates. Our study may have important implications for using nuclear ringsto measure the parameters of real barred galaxies with detailed gas kinematics. We have also extended current hydrodynamical simulations to model gas features in the Milky Way.

  3. River bar vegetation mowing response in the Middle Rio Grande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban Muldavin; Elizabeth Milford; Yvonne Chauvin

    1999-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation routinely mows vegetation on side bars along the Rio Grande to assist with river flow management. To address the question of how such mowing affects vegetation composition and structure, three bars in the middle Rio Grande near Albuquerque, New Mexico were selected in 1994 for an experimental mowing program. Three 50-foot-wide strips on each...

  4. Microbial contamination of "In use" bar soap in dental clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bar soap from 18 different dental clinics were investigated for microbial contamination, while it was "in-use". Of the 32 samples obtained from the bar soap, 100% yielded positive culture. A total of 8 different genera of organisms were isolated. Each bar soap was found to harbor 2-5 different genera of micro organisms. Heavily used soap had more micro organisms compared to less used soap. The microbial load of the "in-use" bar soap constituted a mixed flora of gram positive, gram negative, aerobes, anaerobes, and fungi. The results indicate that the bar soap under "in-use" condition is a reservoir of microorganisms and handwashing with such a soap may lead to spread of infection.

  5. qqq-barq-bar system in a potential model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J.; Isgur, N.

    1983-02-01

    We have examined the qqq-barq-bar system in a nonrelativistic potential model with color-dependent confinement forces and hyperfine interactions by solving the four-particle Schroedinger equation variationally. We find that normally the ground state of this system consists of two free mesons, but that exceptions to this rule probably occur for KK-bar systems, where we find weakly bound 0/sup + +/ states with a meson-meson structure reminiscent of the nucleon-nucleon structure of the deuteron. We show that these states may be identified with the S* and delta just below KK-bar threshold. We further argue that the qqq-barq-bar system is not only nearly barren of bound states, but that it is unlikely to support any resonances. Finally, independent of their identification with observed states, we note that the qqq-barq-bar bound states are a model for the weak binding and color-singlet clustering observed in nuclei.

  6. Linear diode laser bar optical stretchers for cell deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sraj, Ihab; Marr, David W.M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the use of linear diode laser bars to optically stretch cells and measure their mechanical properties, we present numerical simulations using the immersed boundary method (IBM) coupled with classic ray optics. Cells are considered as three-dimensional (3D) spherical elastic capsules immersed in a fluid subjected to both optical and hydrodynamic forces in a periodic domain. We simulate cell deformation induced by both single and dual diode laser bar configurations and show that a single diode laser bar induces significant stretching but also induces cell translation of speed diode laser bar configuration, however, can be used to both stretch and optically trap cells at a fixed position. The net cell deformation was found to be a function of the total laser power and not the power distribution between single or dual diode laser bar configurations. PMID:21258483

  7. On The Lash Bar Count Algorithm Based on Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pan-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper solved the problem that lash bars were difficult to be quickly and accurately counted,and proposed a kind of lash bar count algorithm based on image recognition through observation and study of the morphology of lash bars, namely the algorithm that combines cross type algorithm and flexible T type algorithm. Firstly,the color image is processed by graying and threshold method binarization. Secondly,the cross type discriminance is used in the middle section of the binary image. Thirdly,the flexible T type discriminance is used to detect on the boundary. Experimental analysis indicates that the detection algorithm saves time, which can be identified and gives the number of bars in a time less than 3s. The accuracy of bar count is as high as 98%. After joining the artificial modification, it can reach 100%.

  8. Tobacco related bar promotions: insights from tobacco industry documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, S K; Lavack, A M

    2002-03-01

    To examine the tobacco industry's use of bar promotions, including their target groups, objectives, strategies, techniques, and results. Over 2000 tobacco industry documents available as a result of the Master Settlement Agreement were reviewed on the internet at several key web sites using keyword searches that included "bar", "night", "pub", "party", and "club". The majority of the documents deal with the US market, with a minor emphasis on Canadian and overseas markets. The documents indicate that bar promotions are important for creating and maintaining brand image, and are generally targeted at a young adult audience. Several measures of the success of these promotions are used, including number of individuals exposed to the promotion, number of promotional items given away, and increased sales of a particular brand during and after the promotion. Bar promotions position cigarettes as being part of a glamorous lifestyle that includes attendance at nightclubs and bars, and appear to be highly successful in increasing sales of particular brands.

  9. Observation of Exclusive \\bar B --> D^(*)K*^- Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Mahapatra, R

    2002-01-01

    We report the first observation of the exclusive decays \\bar B\\to D^{(*)}K*^-, using 9.66 x 10^{6} B\\bar{B} pairs collected at the \\Upsilon(4S) with the CLEO detector. We measure the following branching fractions: {\\cal B}(B^- --> D^0 K*^-)=(6.1 +- 1.6 +- 1.7) x 10^{-4}, {\\cal B}(\\bar{B^0}--> D^+K*^-)=(3.7 +- 1.5 +- 1.0) x 10^{-4}, {\\cal B}(\\bar{B^0}--> D*^+K*^-)=(3.8 +- 1.3 +- 0.8) x 10^{-4} and {\\cal B}(B^- --> D*^0 K*^-)=(7.7 +- 2.2 +- 2.6) x 10^{-4}. The \\bar B --> D^*K*^- branching ratios are the averages of those corresponding to the 00 and 11 helicity states. The errors shown are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  10. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barooji, Younes F; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    domains can efficiently deform negatively charged membranes into tubules without any other proteins present. Here, we show that the IM domain (also called I-BAR domain) from the protein ABBA, forms semi-flexible nanotubes protruding into Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). By simultaneous...... quantification of tube intensity and tubular shape we find both the diameter and stiffness of the nanotubes. I-BAR decorated tubes were quantified to have a diameter of ~50 nm and exhibit no stiffening relative to protein free tubes of the same diameter. At high protein density the tubes are immobile whereas...... at lower density the tubes diffuse freely on the surface of the GUV. Bleaching experiments of the fluorescently tagged I-BAR confirmed that the mobility of the tubes correlates with the mobility of the I-BAR on the GUV membrane. Finally, at low density of I-BAR the protein upconcentrates within tubes...

  11. Nearshore bars and the break-point hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenger, A.H.; Howd, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The set of hypotheses calling for bar formation at the break point was tested with field data. During two different experiments, waves were measured across the surf zone coincident with the development of a nearshore bar. We use a criterion, based on the wave height to depth ratio, to determine the offshore limit of the inner surf zone. During the first experiment, the bar became better developed and migrated offshore while remaining well within the inner surf zone. During the second experiment, the surf zone was narrower and we cannot rule out the possibility of break point processes contributing to bar development. We conclude that bars are not necessarily coupled with the break point and can become better developed and migrate offshore while being in the inner surf zone landward from initial wave breaking in the outer surf zone. ?? 1989.

  12. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame 14a Figures 14a and 14b to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL...

  13. Nuss procedure: Technical modifications to ease bending of the support bar and lateral stabilizer placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Zeki Karakus

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative bending of the support bar according to anthropometric measurements and fixation of the lateral stabilizers to the support bar in inverted position facilitates bar shaping and lateral stabilizer placement.

  14. Computer modeling of dynamic necking in bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partom, Yehuda; Lindenfeld, Avishay

    2017-06-01

    Necking of thin bodies (bars, plates, shells) is one form of strain localization in ductile materials that may lead to fracture. The phenomenon of necking has been studied extensively, initially for quasistatic loading and then also for dynamic loading. Nevertheless, many issues concerning necking are still unclear. Among these are: 1) is necking a random or deterministic process; 2) how does the specimen choose the final neck location; 3) to what extent do perturbations (material or geometrical) influence the neck forming process; and 4) how do various parameters (material, geometrical, loading) influence the neck forming process. Here we address these issues and others using computer simulations with a hydrocode. Among other things we find that: 1) neck formation is a deterministic process, and by changing one of the parameters influencing it monotonously, the final neck location moves monotonously as well; 2) the final neck location is sensitive to the radial velocity of the end boundaries, and as motion of these boundaries is not fully controlled in tests, this may be the reason why neck formation is sometimes regarded as a random process; and 3) neck formation is insensitive to small perturbations, which is probably why it is a deterministic process.

  15. Dehydration kinetics of talc at 1 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, J.; Bose, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on the dehydration kinetics of talc, which is likely to be a major potential resource for water and hydrogen in carbonaceous chondrites, is presented. The rate of dehydration of an essentially pure Mg-end member natural talc, (Mg(.99)Fe(.01))3Si4O10(OH)2, was studied by measuring in situ weight change under isothermal condition at 1 bar as a function of time in the temperature range 775 to 985 C. The grain size of the starting material was 0.7 to 1 micron. It was found that the data up to 50 to 60 percent dehydration can be fitted by an equation of the form alpha = exp(-Kt(exp n)), where alpha is the weight fraction of talc remaining, K is a rate constant and n is a numerical constant for a given temperature. For any set of isothermal data, there is a major change in the value of n for larger dehydration. For up to approximately 50 percent dehydration, all rate constants can be described by an Arrheniun relation with an activation energy of 432 (+/- 30) kJ/mol; n has a nearly constant value of 0.54 between 775 and 875 C, but increases almost linearly according to n = -10.77 + 0.012T C at T greater than or equal to 875 C.

  16. Numerical Simulations of the Kolsky Compression Bar Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Kolsky compression bar, or split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), is an ex- perimental apparatus used to obtain the stress-strain response of material specimens at strain rates in the order of 10 2 to 10 4 1/s. Its operation and associated data re- duction are based on principles of one-dimensional wave propagation in rods. Second order effects such as indentation of the bars by the specimen and wave dispersion in the bars, however, can significantly affect aspects of the measured material response. Finite element models of the experimental apparatus were used here to demonstrate these two effects. A procedure proposed by Safa and Gary (2010) to account for bar indentation was also evaluated and shown to improve the estimation of the strain in the bars significantly. The use of pulse shapers was also shown to alleviate the effects of wave dispersion. Combining the two can lead to more reliable results in Kolsky compression bar testing.

  17. Shepherding tidal debris with the Galactic bar: the Ophiuchus stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kohei; Erkal, Denis; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of stellar streams in rotating barred potentials is explained for the first time. Naturally, neighbouring stream stars reach pericentre at slightly different times. In the presence of a rotating bar, these neighbouring stream stars experience different bar orientations during pericentric passage and hence each star receives a different torque from the bar. These differing torques reshape the angular momentum and energy distribution of stars in the stream, which in turn changes the growth rate of the stream. For a progenitor orbiting in the same sense as the bar's rotation and satisfying a resonance condition, the resultant stream can be substantially shorter or longer than expected, depending on whether the pericentric passages of the progenitor occur along the bar's minor or major axis, respectively. We present a full discussion of this phenomenon focusing mainly on streams confined to the Galactic plane. In stark contrast with the evolution in static potentials, which give rise to streams that grow steadily in time, rotating barred potentials can produce dynamically old, short streams. This challenges the traditional viewpoint that the inner halo necessarily consists of well phase-mixed material whilst the tidally disrupted structures in the outer halo are more spatially coherent. We argue that this mechanism may play an important role in explaining the mysteriously short Ophiuchus stream that was recently discovered near the bulge region of the Milky Way.

  18. Impact of Alcohol Use and Bar Attendance on Smoking and Quit Attempts Among Young Adult Bar Patrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined cigarette smoking and quit attempts in the context of alcohol use and bar attendance among young adult bar patrons with different smoking patterns. Methods. We used randomized time location sampling to collect data among adult bar patrons aged 21 to 26 years in San Diego, California (n = 1235; response rate = 73%). We used multinomial and multivariate logistic regression models to analyze the association between smoking and quit attempts and both drinking and binge drinking among occasional, regular, very light, and heavier smokers, controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education. Results. Young adult bar patrons reported high rates of smoking and co-use of cigarettes and alcohol. Binge drinking predicted smoking status, especially occasional and very light smoking. All types of smokers reported alcohol use, and bar attendance made it harder to quit. Alcohol use was negatively associated with quit attempts for very light smokers, but positively associated with quitting among heavier smokers. Conclusions. Smoking and co-use of cigarettes and alcohol are common among young adult bar patrons, but there are important differences by smoking patterns. Tobacco interventions for young adults should prioritize bars and address alcohol use. PMID:23488485

  19. Nondestructive Method for Bulk Chemical Characterization of Barred Olivine Chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Perez, M. A.; Cervantes-de la Cruz, K. E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.

    2017-05-01

    This work develops a bulk chemical characterization of barred olivine chondrules based on the XRF analysis using a portable equipment at the National Research and Conservation Science Laboratory of Cultural Heritage (LANCIC-IF) in Mexico City.

  20. Deterioration of J-bar reinforcement in abutments and piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    Deterioration and necking of J-bars has been reportedly observed at the interface of the footing and stem wall during the demolition : of older retaining walls and bridge abutments. Similar deterioration has been reportedly observed between the pier ...

  1. Transorbital orbitocranial penetrating injury caused by a metal bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Arslan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transorbital intracranial injury is uncommon, representing 0.04% of penetrating head trauma with a high mortality rate. Orbital penetrating injuries may cause severe brain injury if the cranium is entered, typically via the orbital roof, the superior orbital fissure, or the optic canal. A 13-year-old male sustained a severe brain injury due to penetration of the right orbit with an iron bar. The bar entered the inferiomedial aspect of the orbit and emerged from the left occipital bone. Neurological examination revealed deep coma (GCS: E1M2V1 with fixed, dilated, and non-reactive pupils. The bar followed an intracranial trajectory, through the third ventricle and suprasellar cistern. The patient underwent an immediate exploration with removal of the bar. Unfortunately, he died 10 days postoperatively due to severe diencephalic injury with brainstem herniation. In this case report, we discuss the radiologic diagnosis and surgical management of transorbital orbitocranial injury by foreign body penetration.

  2. Transorbital orbitocranial penetrating injury caused by a metal bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Mehmet; Eseoğlu, Metehan; Güdü, Burhan Oral; Demir, Ismail

    2012-05-01

    Transorbital intracranial injury is uncommon, representing 0.04% of penetrating head trauma with a high mortality rate. Orbital penetrating injuries may cause severe brain injury if the cranium is entered, typically via the orbital roof, the superior orbital fissure, or the optic canal. A 13-year-old male sustained a severe brain injury due to penetration of the right orbit with an iron bar. The bar entered the inferiomedial aspect of the orbit and emerged from the left occipital bone. Neurological examination revealed deep coma (GCS: E1M2V1) with fixed, dilated, and non-reactive pupils. The bar followed an intracranial trajectory, through the third ventricle and suprasellar cistern. The patient underwent an immediate exploration with removal of the bar. Unfortunately, he died 10 days postoperatively due to severe diencephalic injury with brainstem herniation. In this case report, we discuss the radiologic diagnosis and surgical management of transorbital orbitocranial injury by foreign body penetration.

  3. Black silicon solar cells with black bus-bar strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Tang, Peter Torben; Mizushima, Io

    2016-01-01

    We present the combination of black silicon texturing and blackened bus-bar strings as a potential method for obtaining all-black solar panels, while using conventional, front-contacted solar cells. Black silicon was realized by maskless reactive ion etching resulting in total, average reflectance...... below 0.5% across a 156x156 mm2 silicon wafer. Four different methods to obtain blackened bus-bar strings were compared with respect to reflectance, and two of these methods (i.e., oxidized copper and etched solder) were used to fabricate functional allblack solar 9-cell panels. The black bus-bars (e.......g., by oxidized copper) have a reflectance below 3% in the entire visible wavelength range. The combination of black silicon cells and blackened bus-bars results in aesthetic, all-black panels based on conventional, front-contacted solar cells without compromising efficiency....

  4. Inner Lindblad resonance in galaxies Nonlinear theory II Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1977-01-01

    For pt.I see Astrophys. J., vol.201, no.3, p.566 (1975). The properties of the orbits in a galaxy composed of an axisymmetric background and a weak bar are derived theoretically, by means of a new integral besides the Hamiltonian. Inside the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) there is only one periodic orbit, while outside the resonance there are one unstable and two stable periodic orbits. The non periodic orbits surround one of the stable periodic orbits, or both of them. Unless the amplitude of the wave increases considerably inwards the orbits inside the ILR are oriented perpendicularly to the bar; the majority of the orbits outside the ILR and inside corotation are elongated along the bar, and the orbits outside corotation and inside the outer Lindblad resonance are oriented mainly perpendicularly to the bar. A comparison with numerical calculations of orbits in various models shows very good agreement. (8 refs).

  5. Heavy-quark symmetry implies stable heavy tetraquark mesons $Q_iQ_j \\bar q_k \\bar q_l$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichten, Estia J.; Quigg, Chris

    2017-07-29

    For very heavy quarks $Q$, relations derived from heavy-quark symmetry predict the existence of novel narrow doubly heavy tetraquark states of the form $Q_iQ_j \\bar q_k \\bar q_l$ (subscripts label flavors), where $q$ designates a light quark. By evaluating finite-mass corrections, we predict that double-beauty states composed of $bb\\bar u \\bar d$, $bb\\bar u \\bar s$, and $bb\\bar d \\bar s$ will be stable against strong decays, whereas the double-charm states $cc \\bar q_k \\bar q_l$, mixed beauty+charm states $bc \\bar q_k \\bar q_l$, and heavier $bb \\bar q_k \\bar q_l$ states will dissociate into pairs of heavy-light mesons. Observation of a new double-beauty state through its weak decays would establish the existence of tetraquarks and illuminate the role of heavy color-antitriplet diquarks as hadron constituents.

  6. Galaxy Zoo: finding offset discs and bars in SDSS galaxies★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Sandor J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Bamford, Steven P.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Fortson, Lucy; Hart, Ross E.; Häußler, Boris; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Smethurst, Rebecca J.

    2017-08-01

    We use multiwavelength Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images and Galaxy Zoo morphologies to identify a sample of ˜270 late-type galaxies with an off-centre bar. We measure offsets in the range 0.2-2.5 kpc between the photometric centres of the stellar disc and stellar bar. The measured offsets correlate with global asymmetries of the galaxies, with those with largest offsets showing higher lopsidedness. These findings are in good agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf-dwarf tidal interactions producing off-centre bars. We find that the majority of galaxies with off-centre bars are of Magellanic type, with a median mass of 109.6 M⊙, and 91 per cent of them having M⋆ < 3 × 1010 M⊙, the characteristic mass at which galaxies start having higher central concentrations attributed to the presence of bulges. We conduct a search for companions to test the hypothesis of tidal interactions, but find that a similar fraction of galaxies with offset bars have companions within 100 kpc as galaxies with centred bars. Although this may be due to the incompleteness of the SDSS spectroscopic survey at the faint end, alternative scenarios that give rise to offset bars such as interactions with dark companions or the effect of lopsided halo potentials should be considered. Future observations are needed to confirm possible low-mass companion candidates and to determine the shape of the dark matter halo, in order to find the explanation for the off-centre bars in these galaxies.

  7. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of D-vertical bar -> (K)over-bar(0)e(vertical bar) nu(e) via (K)over-bar(0) -> pi(0)pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettonin, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Caleaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fedorov, O.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolc, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupse, A.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuangig, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing 2.93 fb(-1) data collected at the center-of-mass energy root s = 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the absolute branching fraction of the semileptonic decay D+ -> (K) over bar (0)e(+)nu(e) to be B(D (+) -> (K) over bar (0)e(+)nu(e)) = (8.59 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.21)% using (K)

  8. Development of omega-3 rich energy bar with flaxseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridula, D; Singh, K K; Barnwal, P

    2013-10-01

    Energy bar sample were prepared with different levels of flaxseed (0-20%) in addition to cereals and pulses with varying levels of sweeteners (45, 50, and 55%) to deliver a nutritious food to the consumer. The developed bars were evaluated for textural, colour, nutritional quality, sensory attributes and total microbial load. Different levels of flaxseed and sweeteners significantly affected the hue and chroma values of the energy bar. In general the level of flaxseed in energy bar did not affect the hardness but it was decreased with increasing level of sweeteners except in control sample. The total calories obtained from the energy bar showed significant increase with the increasing levels of flaxseed, the maximum (397.95 kcal) being for bars with 20% flaxseed and 45% sweeteners. This energy bar sample also showed the maximum protein (12.41%), crude fat (11.86%), ash (1.65%), iron (3.77 mg/100 g), crude fiber (2.18%) and omega-3 as alpha-linolenic acid (22.50%, fatty acid basis) content. The overall mean sensory score for overall acceptability for samples with 10% flaxseed and 55% sweeteners and 15% flaxseed and 45% sweeteners were at par but the omega-3 and other nutrients in the later sample was higher than the former sample, hence, 15% flaxseed and 45% sweeteners along with other ingredients may be considered for production of acceptable quality omega-3 fatty acid rich energy bar at commercial scale, which also stored well at refrigerated condition.

  9. THE MASS PROFILE AND SHAPE OF BARS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): SEARCH FOR AN AGE INDICATOR FOR BARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Zaritsky, Dennis [University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, 13388 Marseille (France); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, FIN-90014 (Finland); Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hinz, Joannah L. [MMTO, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Buta, Ronald J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Kim, Minjin [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 μm image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T > 0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T ∼ 0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disks, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile that evolves over time, trapping more disk stars to boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z > 1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.

  10. Davies bar as the reference for impact acceleration metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Akira; Ueda, Kazunaga

    1996-09-01

    The mass production of silicon accelerometers has clarified that the current acceleration standard is not perfect. The acceleration standard is usually transferred by a reference accelerometer with the so-called back-to-back connection technique. Manufacturers, however do not explain what sort of calibration technique is applied to the reference accelerometer in the impact acceleration range. This paper proposes a novel impact technique for accelerometers calibration. The input acceleration to an accelerometer to be tested is generated by the reflection of an elastic pulse at one end surface of a bar. The bar is called Davies Bar, after Prof. Davies, who measured the dynamic displacement of the end surface of a metal bar by electrodes. The experiment was the comparison between the calibration of RION PV-44A accelerometer by ENDEVCO 2270 and that by NRLM method. The paper concludes that Davies' Bar should be used as the reference for the impact acceleration, ranging from roughly 200 [m/s2] to 1000,000 [m/s2] for mainly following reasons: (1) NRLM method is based on laser interferometer measurement with the reliable accuracy. (2) The frequency bandwidth of the impact acceleration generated using Davies bar is much wider than that of reference accelerometers. (3) Back to back connection does not always enable the comparison between the measurement of the connecting surface motion and the accelerometers' outputs.

  11. El Barón de Humboldt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Academia Nacional de Medicina

    1979-10-01

    Full Text Available

    No llegaron los viajeros científicos enviados a la Nueva Granada por el emperador de Austria, aquéllos en cuya prevención había procedido Caballero y Góngora a fundar la Expedición del Nuevo Reino.
    Pero vino - y en plena oportunidad y con todas las condiciones previstas y buscada por el arzobispo virrey - otro explorador, el mayor de la América Equinoccial, quien había de consagrar para el mundo científico europeo y para la posteridad, dándole toda su trascendencia humana y nacional, la obra de Mutis y de su escuela: Federico Enrique Alejandro, Barón de Humboldt.

    Había nacido en Berlin el 14 de septiembre de 1769 y en los 90 años que había de durarle lá vida no tendrían las ciencias naturales otra personificación tan completa ni otro ejemplar tan audaz, tan resuelto, tan codicioso y afortunado, los exploradores; ni la naturaleza americana contaría con un admirador tan convencido, ni los americanos con un profeta de sus destinos tan inspirado, como este hombre descrito en su pasaporte para América como de edad veintiocho años, cabello ligeramente rojizo, ojos grises, nariz larga, boca más bien grande, barbilla bien conformada, frente espaciosa, picado de viruela .... que viajaba con el
    fin de adquirir conocimientos.

    El encuentro en la retirada Santa Fe, de Mutis y Humboldt, juntó dos órbitas tan dispares como eran la ciencia ibérica y la alemana en el siglo XIX, pero que coincidían en su pasión por los estudios positivos, en su altivez nacionalista, en su tesón titánico y en la trascendencia que pretendían dar a sus lucubraciones.
    Humboldt es para las ciencias alemanas, el alfa que para nosotros representa José Celestino Mutis...

  12. A Study of B→c$\\bar{c}$γK in the BaBar Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulsom, Brian Gregory [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-04-01

    The BABAR Collaboration is a high energy physics experiment located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The primary goal of the experiment is to study charge and parity violation in the B-meson sector, however the copious production of B mesons decaying to other final states allows for a wide-ranging physics program. In particular, one can access the charmonium system via colour-suppressed b → c decays of the type B → c$\\bar{c}$K. This thesis presents a study of B →c$\\bar{c}$γK decays where c$\\bar{c}$ includes J/Ψ and Ψ(2S), and K includes K±, KS0 and K*(892). The particular emphasis is on a search for the radiative decays X(3872) → J/Ψγ and X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ. The X(3872) state is a recently-discovered resonance of undetermined quark composition, speculatively a conventional charmonium state or exotic four-quark di-meson molecule. This research is also sensitive to the well-known radiative charmonium decays B → χc1,2K, which are used as verification for the analysis technique. This dissertation sets the best B → χc1K branching fraction measurements to date, and sees the first evidence for factorization-suppressed B0 → χc2}K*0 decay at a level of 3.6σ. It also provides evidence for X(3872) → J/Ψγ and X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ with 3.6σ and 3.3σ significance, respectively. The product of branching fractions β(B± → X(3872)K±) • β(X(3872) → J/Ψγ) = (2.8 ± 0.8(stat.) ± 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and β(B{± → X(3872)K±) → β(X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ) = (9.5 ± 2.7(stat.) ± 0.9(syst.)) x 10-6 are measured. These results improve upon previous X(3872) → J/Ψγ measurements, and represent the first evidence for X(3872) → Ψ(2S)γ.

  13. The origin of the LMC stellar bar: clues from the SFH of the bar and inner disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, L.; Gallart, C.; Monelli, M.; Bernard, E. J.; Stetson, P. B.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stellar bar by comparing the star formation histories (SFHs) obtained from deep colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) in the bar and in a number of fields in different directions within the inner disc. The CMDs, reaching the oldest main-sequence turn-offs in these very crowded fields, have been obtained with VIMOS on the Very Large Telescope in the service mode, under very good seeing conditions. We show that the SFHs of all fields share the same patterns, with consistent variations of the star formation rate as a function of time in all of them. We therefore conclude that no specific event of star formation can be identified with the formation of the LMC bar, which instead likely formed from a redistribution of disc material which occurred when the LMC disc became bar unstable, and shared a common SFH with the inner disc thereafter. The strong similarity between the SFH of the centre and edge of the bar rules out the expected significant spatial variations of the SFH across the bar.

  14. Multiwavelength study of the star-formation in the bar of NGC 2903

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, G.; Perez, I.; Zurita, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. The nearby barred spiral NGC 2903 has an active starburst at its centre and HII regions distributed along its bar. We analyse the star-formation properties in the bar region of NGC 2903 and study its links to the typical bar morphological features. Methods. We combine space and ground-based

  15. 76 FR 1599 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... results of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Brazil. The... stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. See Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of...

  16. Measurement of Lepton Momentum Moments in the Decay bar{B} \\to X \\ell \\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmood, A H

    2003-01-01

    We measure the primary lepton momentum spectrum in B-bar to X l nu decays, for p_l > 1.5 GeV/c in the B rest frame. From this, we calculate various moments of the spectrum. In particular, we find R_0 = [int(E_l>1.7) (dGam/dE_sl)*dE_l] / [int(E_l>1.5) (dGam/dE_sl)*dE_l] = 0.6187 +/- 0.0014_stat +/- 0.0016_sys and R_1 = [int(E_l>1.5) E_l(dGam/dE_sl)*dE_l] / [int(E_l>1.5) (dGam/dE_sl)*dE_l] = (1.7810 +/- 0.0007_stat +/- 0.0009_sys) GeV. We use these moments to determine non-perturbative parameters governing the semileptonic width. In particular, we extract the Heavy Quark Expansion parameters Lambda-bar = (0.39 +/- 0.03_stat +/- 0.06_sys +/- 0.12_th) GeV and lambda_1 = (-0.25 +/- 0.02_stat +/- 0.05_sys +/- 0.14_th) GeV^2. The theoretical constraints used are evaluated through order 1/M_B^3 in the non-perturbative expansion and beta_0*alpha__s^2 in the perturbative expansion. We use these parameters to extract |V_cb| from the world average of the semileptonic width and find |V_cb| = (40.8 +/- 0.5_Gam-sl +/- 0.4_(...

  17. Developments and trends in fruit bar production and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, C E; Salgado, N; Botero, C A

    2014-01-01

    Fruits serve as a source of energy, vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. One of the barriers in increasing fruit and vegetables consumption is time required to prepare them. Overall, fruit bars have a far greater nutritional value than the fresh fruits because all nutrients are concentrated and, therefore, would be a convenience food assortment to benefit from the health benefits of fruits. The consumers prefer fruit bars that are more tasted followed by proper textural features that could be obtained by establishing the equilibrium of ingredients, the proper choosing of manufacturing stages and the control of the product final moisture content. Fruit bar preparations may include a mixture of pulps, fresh or dried fruit, sugar, binders, and a variety of minor ingredients. Additionally to the conventional steps of manufacturing (pulping, homogenizing, heating, concentrating, and drying) there have been proposed the use of gelled fruit matrices, dried gels or sponges, and extruders as new trends for processing fruit bars. Different single-type dehydration or combined methods include, in order of increasing process time, air-infrared, vacuum and vacuum-microwave drying convective-solar drying, convective drying, and freeze drying are also suggested as alternative to solar traditional drying stage. The dehydration methods that use vacuum exhibited not only higher retention of antioxidants but also better color, texture, and rehydration capacity. Antioxidant activity resulting from the presence of phenolic compounds in the bars is well established. Besides this, fruit bars are also important sources of carbohydrates and minerals. Given the wide range of bioactive factors in fresh fruits that are preserved in fruit bars, it is plausible that their uptake consumption have a positive effect in reducing the risk of many diseases.

  18. Potential trophic cascades triggered by the barred owl range expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Samantha R.; Noon, Barry R.; Wiens, David; Ripple, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the barred owl (Strix varia) has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest of the United States resulting in pronounced effects on the demography and behavior of the northern spotted owl (S. occidentalis caurina). The range expansion has brought together historically allopatric species, creating the potential for significant changes in the avian predator community with possible cascading effects on food-web dynamics. The adverse effects of the barred owl on the behavior and demography of the northern spotted owl are well-documented, but little is known about the immediate and long-term effects changes in the predator community may have on native species composition and ecosystem processes. Based on northern spotted owl and barred owl selection for diet and habitat resources, there is a potential for trophic cascades within the region's predator and prey communities, differing responses by their shared and unique prey species, and possible direct and indirect effects on ecosystem processes. We explored the possible ecological consequences of the barred owl range expansion to wildlife communities of the Pacific Northwest based on the theoretical underpinnings of predator–prey relationships, interspecific competition, intraguild predation, and potential cascading trophic interactions. Negative effects on fitness of northern spotted owls because of interspecific competition with barred owls are strong selection forces that may contribute to the regional extinction of the northern spotted owl. In addition, we posit that shared prey species and those uniquely consumed by barred owls, along with other competing native predators, may experience changes in behavior, abundance, and distribution as a result of increased rates of predation by rapidly expanding populations of barred owls.

  19. Alongshore Variability of Nearshore Morphology during Net Offshore Bar Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, T.; Dionísio António, S.; Van Kuik, N.; De Wit, L.; Ruessink, G.

    2016-12-01

    On spatial scales from tens of metres to a few kilometres, wave-dominated sandy coasts often exhibit morphological variations with a striking alongshore rhythmicity. A regular alongshore variation of shallower (more landward) and deeper (more seaward) sandbar crests, known as horns and bays, respectively, may drive the patterning of onshore morphology, such as alongshore variations in beach width and dune development. It remains unclear, however, how sandbar morphology affects the beach-dune system on the timescale of months to years, which is often characterised by a cyclic net offshore directed migration of the bar. We used a 15-year data set of planview time-exposure images and the corresponding offshore hydrodynamic data from Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands, to investigate the coupled development of bar, beach and dune variability during an entire net offshore migration (NOM) cycle. Our observations show a decrease in temporal variation of alongshore variability in sandbar morphology when a bar becomes the outer bar during the NOM-cycle. Whereas the inner-bar morphology developed more freely, the alongshore positions of the outer-bar horns remained relatively fixed. Moreover, the video data reveal that these outer-bar horns regularly shed a so-called Shoreward Propagating Accretionary Wave (SPAW). Accordingly, these SPAWs regularly brought a volume of sand to the same positions along the beach, locally increasing beach width and corresponding to locations of embryo dune abundance. On the long term, the NOM-cycle thus introduces a spatiotemporal periodicity in the development of alongshore variable morphology across the entire nearshore zone.

  20. Fatigue of reinforcing bars during hydro-demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, C. W. K.; Ouwejan, A.

    2017-05-01

    Reinforcing steel fractured during hydro-demolition of a reinforced concrete pier head due to low cycle flexural fatigue from vibration caused by impact of the high pressure water jet on the exposed length of the bars. Research into the fatigue performance of steel reinforcing steel tends to focus on the high cycle axial performance in reinforced concrete members and re-bending behaviour. However with the increasing use of hydro-demolition of concrete structures as part of remediation works care is required to ensure the steel reinforcement exposed to the high pressure jet of water is not going to suffer relatively low cycle flexural damage that may compromise the designed performance of the completed reinforced concrete structure. This paper describes the failure assessment, fatigue analysis, and metallographic examination that was undertaken. It was found that the rib to flank transition radius on the reinforcement steel was small enough to cause a significant stress concentration effect and was the location of fatigue crack growth. A relatively simple analysis using the maximum unrestrained cantilevered bar length and force exerted by the water jet was used to calculate the maximum expected bending moment. This was compared to the bending capacity at initiation of yielding at the rib flank transition accounting for stress concentration effects. This showed that the observed cyclic reversing ductile crack growth and fracture of the H25 bars was consistent with the loading applied. A method is proposed based on these observations to assess suitable limits for unrestrained bar lengths or maximum working offset of the water jet from the point of bar restraint when undertaking hydro-demolition work. The fatigue critical performance requirements of AS/NZS4671 500E bars are also therefore compared with those of BS4449:2005 and PN EN/ISO 15630-1:2011 for comparable 500C bars

  1. Blood alcohol concentrations among bar patrons: A multi-level study of drinking behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, John D.; Reed, Mark B.; Min, Jong W.; Shillington, Audrey M.; Croff, Julie M.; Holmes, Megan R.; Trim, Ryan S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents data from a study that collected observational data, survey data, and breath samples to estimate blood alcohol concentrations (BrAC) from patrons attending 30 bars. The study examines: 1) drinking behavior and settings prior to going to a bar; 2) characteristics of the bar where respondents are drinking; 3) person and environmental predictors of BrAC change (entrance to exit). Purposive sampling of bars that cater to young adults gave a sample of 30 bars. Patrons were randomly selected from bars (n=839). Approximately half of the sample was female (48.7%). Nearly three-quarters of participants reported drinking before attending the bar. Serving practices of the bars were observed; majority of bars served excessive amounts of alcohol in short periods of time. On average, those who drank before attending the bar had BrACs at approximately half the legal limit. Implications for responsible beverage service coupled with law enforcement strategies are discussed. PMID:19250775

  2. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar compression testing of an aluminum alloy: Effect of lubricant type

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Ian W.; Güden, Mustafa

    2003-01-01

    The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB), or Kolsky Bar, is widely used for studying the dynamic mechanical properties of metals and other materials. A cylindrical specimen is sandwiched between the incident and transmitter bars, Fig. 1, and a constant amplitude elastic wave is generated by the striker bar. Strain gages mounted on the incident and transmitter bars allow the compressive stress-strain response of the specimen to be established using uniaxial elastic wave theory [1]. A more detai...

  3. [Amaranth bars enriched with fructans: acceptability and nutritional value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Capriles, Vanessa; Gomes Arêas, José Alfredo

    2010-09-01

    There is an increasing appeal for convenience foods with potential health benefits to the consumer. Raw materials with high nutritional value and functional properties must be used on the development of these food products. Amaranth is a gluten-free grain with high nutrition value. Inulin and oligofructose are prebiotic ingredients presenting effects as the enhancement of calcium absorption. Amaranth bars enriched with inulin and oligofructose were developed in the flavors: banana, Brazilian nuts and dried grape, coconut, peach, strawberry and wall nut. The proximate composition were determined and compared to commercial cereal bars, available in traditional (n=59), light (n=60), diet (n=8), with soy (n=10) and quinoa (n=1) categories. Amaranth bars present mean global acceptance values from 6.3 to 7.6 on a 9-point hedonic scale, nutritional advantages as compared to commercial cereal bars (caloric reduction and higher levels of dietary fiber). Although amaranth is an unknown raw material in Brazil, it shows good potential to be used in the manufacturing of ready-to-eat products. As they are gluten free, these amaranth bars are also an alternative product for celiacs, also contributing to the enhancement of calcium absorption, a problem frequently observed in these patients.

  4. Behavior of reinforced concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Tavares

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars is one of the alternatives presented in recent studies to prevent the drawbacks related to the steel reinforcement in specific reinforced concrete members. In this work, six reinforced concrete beams were submitted to four point bending tests. One beam was reinforced with CA-50 steel bars and five with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP bars. The tests were carried out in the Department of Structural Engineering in São Carlos Engineering School, São Paulo University. The objective of the test program was to compare strength, reinforcement deformation, displacement, and some anchorage aspects between the GFRP-reinforced concrete beams and the steel-reinforced concrete beam. The results show that, even though four GFRP-reinforced concrete beams were designed with the same internal tension force as that with steel reinforcement, their capacity was lower than that of the steel-reinforced beam. The results also show that similar flexural capacity can be achieved for the steel- and for the GFRP-reinforced concrete beams by controlling the stiffness (reinforcement modulus of elasticity multiplied by the bar cross-sectional area - EA and the tension force of the GFRP bars.

  5. Unstoppable brane-flux decay of (D6)-bar branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielsson, UniversityH. [Institutionen för Fysik och Astronomi, Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala (Sweden); Gautason, F.F. [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Riet, T. Van [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, K.University Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-03-27

    We investigate p (D6)-bar branes inside a flux throat that carries K×M D6 charges with K the 3-form flux quantum and M the Romans mass. In such a setup brane-flux annihilation can proceed through the nucleation of KK5 branes. We find that within the calculable supergravity regime where g{sub s}p is large, the (D6)-bar branes annihilate immediately against the fluxes despite the existence of a metastable state at small p/M in the probe approximation. The crucial property that causes this naive conflict with effective field theory is a singularity in the 3-form flux, which we cut off at string scale. Our result explains the absence of regular solutions at finite temperature and suggests there should be a smooth time-dependent solution. We also discuss the qualitative differences between (D6)-bar branes and (D3)-bar branes, which makes it a priori not obvious to conclude the same instability for (D3)-bar branes.

  6. Observation of $B^{0} \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{(*)-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Y -Y; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adamczyk, K; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Greenwald, D; Grzymkowska, O; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Hsu, C -L; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lai, Y -T; Lee, I S; Li, L; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Luki, P; Masuda, M; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Rauch, J; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Senyo, K; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yelton, J; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report the first observation of the decays $B^0 \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{(*)-}$. The data sample of $711$ fb$^{-1}$ used in this analysis corresponds to $772$ million $B\\bar{B}$ pairs, collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider. We observe $19.8\\sigma$ and $10.8\\sigma$ excesses of events for the two decay modes and measure the branching fractions of $B^0 \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{-}$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow p\\bar{\\Lambda} D^{*-}$ to be $(25.1\\pm2.6\\pm3.5)\\times10^{-6}$ and $(33.6\\pm6.3\\pm4.4)\\times10^{-6}$, respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. These results are not compatible with the predictions based on the generalized factorization approach. In addition, a threshold enhancement in the di-baryon ($p\\bar{\\Lambda}$) system is observed, consistent with that observed in similar $B$ decays.

  7. Adaptive Access Class Barring Method for Machine Generated Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaesung Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular network is provisioned to serve traffic demands generated by human being. The random access channel used for nodes to compete for a connection with an eNB is limited. Even though machines generate very small amount of data traffic, the signaling channel of a network becomes overloaded and collisions occur to fail the access if too many MTC (Machine Type Communication devices attempt to access network. To tackle the issue, 3GPP specifies an access class barring but leaves a specific algorithm as an implementation issue. In this paper, we propose an adaptive access barring method. Generally, an eNB does not know the number of MTC devices in its coverage area. Thus, it is difficult to control the barring factor by predicting the number of MTC devices in a service area of a cell. On the contrary, we control the barring factor based on the prediction of access intensity which can be measured at an eNB. Simulation results show that since the proposed method can manipulate the barring factor autonomously according to the access intensity, it is superior to the original method in terms of the access success probability and the collision probability.

  8. Experimental Study on Bond Behavior between Plain Reinforcing Bars and Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the bond behavior between the reinforcing bar and surrounding concrete, a total of six-group pullout specimens with plain steel bars and two-group specimens with deformed steel bars, serving as a reference, are experimentally investigated and presented in this study. The main test parameters of this investigation include embedment length, surface type of reinforcing bars, and bar diameter. In particular, the bond mechanism of plain steel reinforcing bars against the surrounding concrete was analyzed by comparing with six-group pullout specimens with aluminium alloy bars. The results indicated that the bond stress experienced by plain bars is quite lower than that of the deformed bars given equal structural characteristics and details. Averagely, plain bars appeared to develop only 18.3% of the bond stress of deformed bars. Differing from the bond strength of plain steel bars, which is based primarily on chemical adhesion and friction force, the bond stress of aluminium alloy bars is mainly experienced by chemical adhesion and about 0.21~0.56 MPa, which is just one-tenth of that of plain steel bars. Based on the test results, a bond-slip model at the interface between concrete and plain bars is put forward.

  9. Corrosion of reinforcement bars in steel ibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe

    Steel fibres have been known as an alternative to traditional reinforcement bars for special applications of structural concrete for decades and the use of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) has gradually increased in recent years. Steel fibres lead to reduced crack widths in concrete formed......, among other reasons, due to shrinkage and/or mechanical loading. Steel fibres are nowadays also used in combination with traditional reinforcement for structural concrete, where the role of the fibres is to minimize the crack widths whereas the traditional reinforcement bars are used for structural....... The aim of the work presented in this Ph.D. thesis was to quantify the influence of steel fibres on corrosion of traditional reinforcement bars embedded in uncracked concrete as well as cracked concrete. Focus of the work was set on the impact of steel fibres on corrosion propagation in uncracked concrete...

  10. The BaBar instrumented flux return performance: lessons learned

    CERN Document Server

    Anulli, F; Baldini, R; Band, H R; Bionta, R; Brau, J E; Brigljevic, V; Buzzo, A; Calcaterra, A; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Crosetti, G; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Eichenbaum, A; Fabozzi, F; Falciai, D; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, F; Frey, R; Gatto, C; Graug; Iakovlev, N I; Iwasaki, M; Johnson, J R; Lange, D J; Lista, L; Lo Vetere, M; Lü, C; Macri, M; Messner, R; Moore, T B; Morganti, S; Neal, H; Neri, N; Palano, A; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piredda, G; Robutti, E; Roodman, A; Santroni, A; Sciacca, C; Sinev, N B; Soha, A; Strom, D; Tosi, S; Vavra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A

    2002-01-01

    The BaBar Collaboration has operated an instrumented flux return (IFR) system covering over 2000 m sup 2 with resistive plate chambers (RPCs) for nearly 3 years. The chambers are constructed of bakelite sheets separated by 2 mm. The inner surfaces are coated with linseed oil. This system provides muon and neutral hadron detection for BaBar. Installation and commissioning were completed in 1998, and operation began mid-year 1999. While initial performance of the system reached design, over time, a significant fraction of the RPCs demonstrated significant degradation, marked by increased currents and reduced efficiency. A coordinated effort of investigations have identified many of the elements responsible for the degradation. This article presents our current understanding of the aging process of the BaBar RPCs along with the action plan to combat performance degradation of the IFR system.

  11. On split Hopkinson pressure bar testing of rubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, John

    2011-06-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) studies of rubber materials are difficult due to their ability to undergo large deformations at low levels of stress. Analytical, numerical and experimental investigations are reported. The tests were performed using polymer bars. A key stage in this is the experimental determination of the propagation coefficient. An analytical investigation of the experimental arrangements used to ascertain the propagation coefficient is reported. A finite element (FE) simulation of longitudinal stress waves in solid, circular, polymer bars is presented also. The viscoelastic material definition employed in the FE simulations is obtained by curve fitting Prony series expansions to the experimentally derived elastic modulus. In order to assess the accuracy of the experimental arrangement, an FE model of the full viscoelastic SHPB set-up is then used to simulate tests on hyper-elastic materials with specified properties. Finally, experimental data for rubber materials at strain rates of the order of 1000 s-1 are presented.

  12. Optimization of steel bar manufacturing process using six sigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Khawar; Ullah, Misbah; Tariq, Adnan; Maqsood, Shahid; Akhtar, Rehman; Nawaz, Rashid; Hussain, Iftikhar

    2016-03-01

    Optimization of a manufacturing process results in higher productivity and reduced wastes. Production parameters of a local steel bar manufacturing industry of Pakistan is optimized by using six Sigma-Define, measure, analyze, improve, and controlmethodology. Production data is collected and analyzed. After analysis, experimental design result is used to identify significant factors affecting process performance. The significant factors are controlled to optimized level using two-level factorial design method. A regression model is developed that helps in the estimation of response under multi variable input values. Model is tested, verified, and validated by using industrial data collected at a local steel bar manufacturing industry of Peshawar(Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan). The sigma level of the manufacturing process is improved to 4.01 from 3.58. The novelty of the research is the identification of the significant factors along with the optimum levels that affects the process yield, and the methodology to optimize the steel bar manufacturing process.

  13. Quality and Sensorial Characteristics of Raw-Vegan Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Claudia Salanţă

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumer interest in healthier food products is driven by a variety of factors including growing awareness of the link between diet and health, the desire to age ‘gracefully’ by maintaining good health, greater convenience in meeting nutritional needs and preventing chronic diseases. In raw food diet, food is consumed predominantly or exclusively as uncooked and unprocessed raw food; the main components of the diet are fruits, nuts, seeds, and sprouted grains and beans. The aim of this study was to obtain two raw-vegan bars using dry raw materials and to establish the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of the products. Raw-vegan bars were formulated using fruits and seeds (cranberries, figs, raisins, raspberries, cashew, chia seeds, etc. and binding agents (honey. Raw-vegan bars stands out among fast foods due to their balanced nutritional content and convenience.  

  14. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section using dilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. We consider final states with at least two jets and two leptons (ee, e{mu}, {mu}{mu}), and events with one jet for the the e{mu} final state as well. The measured cross section is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.36{sub -0.79}{sup +0.90} (stat + syst) pb. This result combined with the cross section measurement in the lepton + jets final state yields {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.56{sub -0.56}{sup +0.63}(stat + syst) pb, which agrees with the standard model expectation. The relative precision of 8% of this measurement is comparable to the latest theoretical calculations.

  15. Megascale rhythmic shoreline forms on a beach with multiple bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Pruszak

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study, carried out in 2003 and 2006 at the Lubiatowo Coastal ResearchStation (Poland, located on the non-tidal southern Baltic coast(tidal range < 0.06 m, focused on larger rhythmic forms (mega-cusps withwavelengths in the interval 500 m > Lc > 20 m. Statistical analyses of detailed shoreline configurations were performed mostly with the Discrete Wavelet Transformmethod (DWT. The beach is composed of fine sand with grain diameter D50 ≈ 0.22 mm, which produces 4 longshore sandbars and a gently sloping seabed with β = 0.015. The analysis confirms the key role of bars in hydro- and morphodynamic surf zone processes.The hypothesis was therefore set up that, in a surf zone with multiple bars, the bars and mega-scale shoreline rhythmic forms form one integrated physical system; experimental evidence to substantiate this hypothesis was also sought.In such a system not only do self-regulation processes include swash zone phenomena, they also incorporate processes in offshore surf zone locations.The longshore dimensions of large cusps are thus related to the distances between periodically active large bed forms (bars. The spatial dimension of bar system activity (number of active bars depends, at a given time scale, on the associated hydrodynamic conditions. It was assumed that such a time scale could include either the development and duration of a storm, or a period of stable, yet distinct waves, capable of remodelling the beach configuration.The indentation to wavelength ratio of mega-cusps for the studied non-tidal dissipative environment may be one order of magnitude greater than for mesotidal, reflective beaches.

  16. Comparison of Failure Process of Bended Beams Reinforced with Steel Bars and GFRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszyńska, Maria; Błyszko, Jarosław; Olczyk, Norbert

    2017-10-01

    load were tested. Both types of beams were designed to have the same bearing capacity. Beams reinforced with GFRP rebar exhibited much bigger cracking than traditionally reinforced bars. The width of cracks appearing in beams reinforced with GFRP bars was equal or greater than limit values (0.4 mm) even though the ratio of moment of resistance and cracking moment was greater than 3. The composite rebar exhibits many significant advantages over steel rebar, but its rather low Young’s modulus comparing to steel causes exceeded deflection and cracking of bended concrete elements.

  17. Submicrometer grating light bar for a color-separation backlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Wei; Lee, Chi-Hung; Yang, Tzu-Chun; Ting, Chia-Jen; Lin, Tsung-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2013-05-20

    A light bar patterned using a submicrometer grating was designed to replace conventional dye color filters for color liquid crystal displays. The light bar generates color rays by transmitting them from side-lit color light-emitting diodes through the submicrometer grating. These angular color rays are then redirected by a V-grooved light guide, and then converged by a lens array and mapped to corresponding subpixel positions to efficiently display color images. The results show that 106% of the National Television System Committee (NTSC) color space in a blue-green-red-green (B-G-R-G) repeating pattern display pixel layout can be achieved.

  18. Spectral narrowing of a 980 nm tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Lucas Leclin, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    in wavelength specific applications and hence, it is vital to stabilize the emission spectrum of these devices. In our experiment, we describe the wavelength narrowing of a 12 element 980 nm tapered diode laser bar using a simple Littman configuration. The tapered laser bar which suffered from a big smile has......, a slow axis focusing cylindrical lens of 40 mm focal length and an output coupler which is 10% reflective. In the free running mode, the laser emission spectrum was 5.5 nm wide at an operating current of 30A. The output power was measured to be in excess of 12W. Under the external cavity operation...

  19. Black silicon with black bus-bar strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Tang, Peter Torben; Mizushima, Io

    2016-01-01

    We present the combination of black silicon texturing and blackened bus-bar strings as a potential method for obtaining all-black solar panels, while using conventional, front-contacted solar cells. Black silicon was realized by mask-less reactive ion etching resulting in total, average reflectance...... below 0.5% across a 156x156 mm2 silicon wafer. Black bus-bars were realized by oxidized copper resulting in reflectance below 3% in the entire visible wavelength range. The combination of these two technologies may result in aesthetic, all-black panels based on conventional, front-contacted solar cells...

  20. "The fans' complot": soccer and masculine performance in bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édison Gastaldo

    Full Text Available This paper issues some topics of the social interaction occurrant in bars where football matches are transmitted, particularly aspects of gender performance. The data analysed refer to an ethnographic fieldwork being held since the beginning of 2004 in bars of the Greater Porto Alegre area, in Brazil. Three performatic modalities are discussed: the presence on the setting as performance, verbal challenges between the participants and joking dramatizations. I consider that these elements - among others - reveal part of the complex field of meanings related to masculinity in Brazilian society, being a constitutive part of the phenomenon that I call "football joking relationships".

  1. Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome (with a posterior midline unsegmented bar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaissi, A. Al; Ghachem, M. Ben; Nassib, N.; Chehida, F. Ben [Hospital d' Enfants, Service d' orthopedie infantile, Tunis (Tunisia); Kozlowski, K. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sydney (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis syndrome (SSS) is characterised by malsegmentation of the thoracic spine and carpal/tarsal fusions. A unilateral or bilateral unsegmented bar may be present in the thoracic spine. Presenting clinical signs are congenital scoliosis early in life, and shortening of the trunk with scoliosis and/or lordosis in older children. We report a 13-year-old girl with SSS and a midline unsegmented bar running along the spinal processes of T3 to L2 and extending into the posterior vertebral elements. (orig.)

  2. Results on conventional and exotic charmonium at BaBar

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The B factories provide a unique playground for studying the properties of conventional and exotic charmonium states. We present recent results in initial state radiation and two-photon fusion, obtained using the full data set collected by the BaBar experiment. Amongst BaBar 's harvest presented in this talk, the determination of the quantum numbers of the X(3915) resonance, a body of concording evidence pointing to JPC = 1++ for the X(3872), and updates on the family of the Y resonance to the full integrated luminosity.

  3. On wave dark matter in spiral and barred galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F., México. (Mexico); Bray, Hubert L., E-mail: lmedina@fis.cinvestav.mx, E-mail: bray@math.duke.edu, E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx [Mathematics Department, Duke University, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We recover spiral and barred spiral patterns in disk galaxy simulations with a Wave Dark Matter (WDM) background (also known as Scalar Field Dark Matter (SFDM), Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) dark matter, and Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) dark matter). Here we show how the interaction between a baryonic disk and its Dark Matter Halo triggers the formation of spiral structures when the halo is allowed to have a triaxial shape and angular momentum. This is a more realistic picture within the WDM model since a non-spherical rotating halo seems to be more natural. By performing hydrodynamic simulations, along with earlier test particles simulations, we demonstrate another important way in which wave dark matter is consistent with observations. The common existence of bars in these simulations is particularly noteworthy. This may have consequences when trying to obtain information about the dark matter distribution in a galaxy, the mere presence of spiral arms or a bar usually indicates that baryonic matter dominates the central region and therefore observations, like rotation curves, may not tell us what the DM distribution is at the halo center. But here we show that spiral arms and bars can develop in DM dominated galaxies with a central density core without supposing its origin on mechanisms intrinsic to the baryonic matter.

  4. Laying performances and egg quality of local barred hens under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study was designated to evaluate the laying performances and egg traits in local barred hens. Sixteen (16) hens and 4 cocks were used, divided into 4 experimental units of 4 hens and 1 cock per unit. Methodology and Results: The following parameters were studied: feed intake (g/bird/day), egg production ...

  5. Verification of Properties of Concrete Reinforcement Bars: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    National Workshop on the theme: Preventing Incidences of Collapsed. Buildings and Structures in Nigeria, Lagos. Daodu O.F.(2005) “Determination of strength and ductility characteristics of steel reinforcement bars produced in Nigeria” Unpublished Post. Graduate Diploma Thesis, Federal University of Technology, Akure.

  6. Bars to Jars: Bamboo Value Chains in Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingram, V.J.; Tieguhong, C.

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a well know and versatile material, which is a common sight across Cameroon's diverse ecosystems, from dry to humid tropical and Afromontane forests. Its numerous uses range from storage jars to decorating restaurant-bars, beehives to knives, fences, fodder, and fuel. Responding to the

  7. Bars to jars: bamboo value chains in Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingram, V.; Tieguhong, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a well know and versatile material, which is a common sight across Cameroon's diverse ecosystems, from dry to humid tropical and Afromontane forests. Its numerous uses range from storage jars to decorating restaurant-bars, beehives to knives, fences, fodder, and fuel. Responding to the

  8. The BaBar detector: Upgrades, operation and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Gaillard, J. -M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Garra Tico, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Clark, A. R.; Day, C. T.; Furman, M.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Merchant, A. M.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Suzuki, A.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zisman, M.; Barrett, M.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; O' Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Smith, D.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Fella, A.; Antonioli, E.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Walker, D.; Abe, K.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Randle-Conde, A.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Telnov, V. I.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Atmacan, H.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Wang, K.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, L.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Echenard, B.; Erwin, R. J.; Fang, F.; Flood, K.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Narsky, I.; Oyang, J.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Antillon, E. A.; Barillari, T.; Becker, J.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Clifton, Z. C.; Derrington, I. M.; Destree, J.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Gilman, J. D.; Hachtel, J.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Wagner, S. R.; West, C. G.; Zhang, J.; Ayad, R.; Blouw, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q. L.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kaiser, S.; Kobel, M. J.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Mader, W. F.; Maly, E.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Dohou, F.; Ferrag, S.; Latour, E.; Mathieu, A.; Renard, C.; Schrenk, S.; T' Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Clark, P. J.; Lavin, D. R.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Swain, J. E.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Landi, L.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Negrini, M.; Padoan, C.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Sarti, A.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; de Sangro, R.; Santoni, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musico, P.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Adametz, A.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Taylor, G. P.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Grenier, G. J.; Hamilton, R.; Lee, S. -J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Fischer, P. -A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Schott, G.; Albert, J. N.; Arnaud, N.; Beigbeder, C.; Breton, D.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Dû, S.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Nief, J. Y.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Tocut, V.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wang, L. L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Bellodi, G.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; Cormack, C. M.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dixon, P.; George, K. A.; Menges, W.; Potter, R. J. L.; Sacco, R.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Sigamani, M.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Allison, J.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Jackson, G.; Kelly, M. P.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Naisbit, M. T.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; West, T. J.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S. Y.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Koeneke, K.; Lang, M. I.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yi, M.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; Klemetti, M.; Lindemann, D.; Mangeol, D. J. J.; Mclachlin, S. E.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Cerizza, G.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Pellegrini, R.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Godang, R.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Brau, B.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Smith, D. S.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Iwasaki, M.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Borsato, E.; Castelli, G.; Colecchia, F.; Crescente, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Fanin, C.; Furano, F.; Gagliardi, N.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Solagna, P.; Stevanato, E.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Akar, S.; Bailly, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Lebbolo, H.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Marchiori, G.; Martin, L.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Pivk, M.; Prendki, J.; Roos, L.; Sitt, S.; Stark, J.; Thérin, G.; Vallereau, A.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Pennazzi, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Fernholz, R. E.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Sands, W. R.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Bulfon, C.; Buccheri, E.; Cavoto, G.; D' Orazio, A.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Li Gioi, L.; Lunadei, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; del Re, D.; Renga, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Bünger, C.; Christ, S.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Condurache, C.; De Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Ricciardi, S.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Bourgeois, P.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P. -F.; Georgette, Z.; Graziani, G.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Akre, R.; Aston, D.; Azemoon, T.; Bard, D. J.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Becla, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Berger, N.; Bertsche, K.; Boeheim, C. T.; Bouldin, K.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Browne, M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Burgess, W.; Cai, Y.; Cartaro, C.; Ceseracciu, A.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Craddock, W. W.; Crane, G.; Cristinziani, M.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F. J.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Donald, M.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gaponenko, I.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, J.; Hanushevsky, A.; Hasan, A.; Hast, C.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Hryn' ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Iverson, R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kharakh, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Krasnykh, A.; Krebs, J.; Kroeger, W.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lüth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; McCulloch, M.; McDonald, J.; Melen, R.; Menke, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Messner, R.; Moss, L. J.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nelson, S.; Nordby, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; O' Grady, C. P.; O' Neill, F. G.; Ofte, I.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Piemontese, M.; Pierson, S.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Ratkovsky, S.; Reif, R.; Rivetta, C.; Rodriguez, R.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwarz, H.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Smith, D.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stanek, M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Teytelman, D.; Thompson, J. M.; Tinslay, J. S.; Trunov, A.; Turner, J.; van Bakel, N.; van Winkle, D.; Va' vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Weber, T.; West, C. A.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wittmer, W.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yan, Y.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Yocky, G.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Meyer, T. I.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Liu, J.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.; Soffer, A.; De Silva, A.; Lund, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Rashevskaya, I.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Agarwal, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Brown, C. M.; Choi, H. H. F.; Fortin, D.; Fransham, K. B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hollar, J. J.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Tan, P.; Vuosalo, C. O.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Greene, M. G.; Kordich, T. M. B.

    2013-11-01

    The BaBar detector operated successfully at the PEP-II asymmetric e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from 1999 to 2008. This report covers upgrades, operation, and performance of the collider and the detector systems, as well as the trigger, online and offline computing, and aspects of event reconstruction since the beginning of data taking.

  9. Static balancing of an inverted pendulum with prestressed torsion bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radaelli, G.; Buskermolen, R; Barents, R; Herder, J.L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the design of a statically balanced inverted pendulum. The non-linear moment-rotation characteristic of the pendulum's weight is approximated by a piecewise linear characteristic. Each transition is realized by engaging or disengaging one or more torsion bars, by

  10. studies of radiative penguin decays at BaBar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We summarize results on a number of observations of penguin dominated radiative decays of the meson. Such decays are forbidden at tree level and proceed via electroweak loops. As such they may be sensitive to physics beyond the standard model. The observations have been made at the BaBar experiment at PEP-II, ...

  11. Science Behind Bars: Reaching Inmates from Rikers Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocsy, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    I report on the project ``Science Behind Bars: Reaching Inmates on Rikers Island'' partially funded through an APS Public Outreach and Informing the Public grant. This project involves developing leave-behind materials and setting up meetings to speak with Rikers Island inmates about science, evidence-based reasoning, and the dangers of stereotype threat. APS Mini Grant.

  12. Measurements of Form Factors with the BaBar Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Selina Z.; /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Selected recent results on measurements of form factors by the BaBar Collaboration are reviewed, including e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}{gamma}, leptonic and semileptonic charm decays from data collected at or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance.

  13. ANALYSIS OF INDUCTION MOTOR WITH BROKEN BARS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sensitivity and noise protection. For that, a model ... In the present work the bars are coupled to the end ring resistance through the massive conductor ... resistance. Coupled stator coil winding elements. Voltage source. Fig.1. Stator electric circuit model. Fig.2. FE Magnetic circuit model. Stator winding coupled to the FE ...

  14. Age and growth of narrow-barred Spanish mackerel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The narrow-barred Spanish mackerel Scomberomorus commerson is one of the most important linefish species caught in KwaZulu-Natal and southern Mozambique waters, forming the basis of important commercial, artisanal and recreational fisheries. A total of 439 S. commerson were sampled along the east coast of ...

  15. Inherently balanced 4R four-bar based linkages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Herder, Justus Laurens; Lenarcis, J.; Husty, M.

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of mechanisms with their center of mass (CoM) at an invariant point on one of the elements is useful for the design of statically balanced and shaking-force balanced mechanisms and manipulators. For this purpose, a kinematic architecture based on a general 4R four-bar linkage is found by

  16. Phenological Characteristics of the Barred Chicken in Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Between May and June 2011, the growth performance and phenological characteristics of local barred chicken of the Western Highland Cameroon was carried out in the Teaching and Research Farm of the University of Dschang. The data on body weight, body measurements and carcass characteristics were collected on ...

  17. Phenological Characteristics of Local Barred Chicken in Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Between May and June 2011, the growth performance and phenological characteristics of local barred chicken of the Western Highland Cameroon was carried out in the Teaching and Research Farm of the University of Dschang. The data on body weight, body measurements and carcass characteristics were collected on ...

  18. Single neutral pion production by charged-current $\\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, L; Bercellie, A; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Brooks, W K; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Miller, J; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Yepes-Ramirez, H; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2015-01-01

    Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the \\minerva detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for $\\bar{\

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG Postinfective physeal bars – MRI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of this entity and an explanation of how these features affect the choice of management. Aim. Our aim is to demonstrate any distinctive magnetic resonance imaging. (MRI) features of ... tem of a growing child and survivors are at high risk of developing per- ... Overall 4 of the 13 bars showed involvement of 50% or more of ...

  20. Technical Note. A Clamped Bar Model for the Sompoton Vibrator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tee Hao Wong; Jedol Dayou; M.C.D. Ngu; Jackson H.W. Chang; Willey Y.H. Liew

    2013-01-01

    .... In this paper, the vibrator is modeled as a clamped bar with a uniformly distributed mass. By means of this model, the fundamental frequency is analyzed with the use of an equivalent single degree of freedom system (SDOF) and exact analysis...

  1. Measurement of the location of tie-bar shoulders

    CERN Multimedia

    Hubert Gerwig

    2001-01-01

    The inner vactank is machined on a length of 13m at the location of the rails for HCAL. in addition at one side the inner vactank has shoulders to lodge the M48 tie-bars that will guarantee the fixation to the swivelling platform actually produced at HANJUNG Company in South Korea

  2. Study of the decay B0bar -> D* omega pi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-24

    We report on a study of the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -} with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Based on a sample of 232 million B{bar B} decays, we measure the branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -}) = (2.88 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We study the invariant mass spectrum of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} system in this decay. This spectrum is in good agreement with expectations based on factorization and the measured spectrum in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}. We also measure the polarization of the D*{sup +} as a function of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} mass. In the mass region 1.1 to 1.9 GeV we measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization of the D*{sup +} to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda} = 0.654 {+-} 0.042(stat.) {+-} 0.016(syst.). This is in agreement with the expectations from heavy-quark effective theory and factorization assuming that the decay proceeds as {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{rho}(1450), {rho}(1450) {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}.

  3. CERN access card: Introduction of a bar code

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    Before the latest version of the implementation measures relating to Operational Circular No. 2 comes into force, we would like to inform you that, in future, CERN access cards may bear a bar code to transcribe the holder's identification number. Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ Tel. 72848

  4. CERN access cards - Introduction of a bar code (Reminder)

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    In accordance with the latest revised version of the implementation measures relating to Operational Circular No. 2, CERN access cards may bear a bar code transcribing the holder's identification number (the revised version of this subsidiary document to the aforementioned Circular will be published shortly). Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ relations.secretariat@cern.ch Tel. 72848

  5. Kinematic signature of a rotating bar near a resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    Recent work based on H I, star count and emission data suggests that the Milky Way has rotating bar-like features. In this paper, I show that such features cause distinctive stellar kinematic signatures near Outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) and Inner Lindblad Resonance (ILR). The effect of these resonances may be observable far from the peak density of the pattern and relatively nearby the solar position. The details of the kinematic signatures depend on the evolutionary history of the 'bar' and therefore velocity data, both systematic and velocity dispersion, may be used to probe the evolutionary history as well as the present state of Galaxy. Kinematic models for a variety of sample scenarios are presented. Models with evolving pattern speeds show significantly stronger dispersion signatures than those with static pattern speeds, suggesting that useful observational constraints are possible. The models are applied to the proposed rotating spheroid and bar models; we find (1) none of these models chosen to represent the proposed large-scale rotating spheroid are consistent with the stellar kinematics and (2) a Galactic bar with semimajor axis of 3 kpc will cause a large increase in velocity dispersion in the vicinity of OLR (approximately 5 kpc) with little change in the net radial motion and such a signature is suggested by K-giant velocity data. Potential future observations and analyses are discussed.

  6. Two-Photon Interactions at Belle and BaBar

    CERN Document Server

    Eidelman, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Results on two-photon physics obtained in experiments at the B factories are discussed. BaBar used single-tag collisions to measure the transition form factor of the 0 meson. Belle studied no-tag collisions to measure cross sections of exclusive production of two baryons and two mesons. Experimental results are confronted with QCD predictions.

  7. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Bo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. As an example, the high-temperature Kolsky tension bar was used to characterize a DOP-26 iridium alloy in high-strain-rate tension at 860 s−1/1030 ∘C.

  8. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. As an example, the high-temperature Kolsky tension bar was used to characterize a DOP-26 iridium alloy in high-strain-rate tension at 860 s-1/1030 ∘C.

  9. REGULARIZED D-BAR METHOD FOR THE INVERSE CONDUCTIVITY PROBLEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kim; Lassas, Matti; Mueller, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    A strategy for regularizing the inversion procedure for the two-dimensional D-bar reconstruction algorithm based on the global uniqueness proof of Nachman [Ann. Math. 143 (1996)] for the ill-posed inverse conductivity problem is presented. The strategy utilizes truncation of the boundary integral...

  10. Bars in dark matter-dominated dwarf galaxy discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, A.; Oman, K. A.; Navarro, J. F.; Frenk, C. S.; Oosterloo, T.

    2018-02-01

    We study the shape and kinematics of simulated dwarf galaxy discs in the APOSTLE suite of ΛCDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We find that a large fraction of these gas-rich, star-forming discs show weak bars in their stellar component, despite being dark matter-dominated systems. The bar pattern shape and orientation reflect the ellipticity of the dark matter potential, and its rotation is locked to the slow figure rotation of the triaxial dark halo. The bar-like nature of the potential induces non-circular motions in the gas component, including strong bisymmetric flows that can be readily seen as m = 3 harmonic perturbations in the H I line-of-sight velocity fields. Similar bisymmetric flows are seen in many galaxies of the THINGS and LITTLE THINGS surveys, although on average their amplitudes are a factor of ˜2 weaker than in our simulated discs. Our results indicate that bar-like patterns may arise even when baryons are not dominant, and that they are common enough to warrant careful consideration when analyzing the gas kinematics of dwarf galaxy discs.

  11. Measurement of the Time Reversal Asymmetry for the Decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}$ and Observation of the Decay $\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow\\Lambda\\bar{p}K^{+}$ with the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00000638

    This Analysis presents the measurement of the time reversal asymmetry in the decay $\\bar{B}{}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}$ based on a triple product given by \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{O} = \\vec{s}_{\\Lambda} \\cdot \\left( \\vec{p}_\\Lambda \\times \\vec{p}_\\pi \\right) \\quad , \\end{equation*} where $\\vec{s}_{\\Lambda}$ is the \\Lambda spin vector, $\\vec{p}_\\Lambda$ and $\\vec{p}_\\pi$ are the momentum vectors of the $\\Lambda$ and $\\pi$, respectively. The triple product is evaluated in the $\\bar{B}{}^{0}$ rest frame. The Time reversal asymmetry is determined to be \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{A}_T = (7.6 \\pm 27.0(\\mathrm{stat} )\\pm 1.1(\\mathrm{syst}))\\% \\quad . \\end{equation*} Allowing for CP violation in the $\\Lambda$ decay, the asymmetry is determined to be \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{A}_T^{\\rm CPV} = ({4.3}^{22.1}_{22.0}(\\mathrm{stat}) \\pm 1.2(\\mathrm{syst}))\\% \\quad . \\end{equation*} Both are in agreement with the theoretical predictions but also with $\\mathcal{A}_T = 0$. The decays $\\bar{B}{}^{0}_{s}\\ri...

  12. INFLUENCE OF BROKEN ROTOR BARS LOCATION IN THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-30

    Jun 30, 2013 ... Key words: Induction motor, time stepping finite elements (TSFE) method, broken bars. 1. INTRODUCTION ... In works, where the machine inductances are calculated and the machine performance is ... several assumptions and approximations of the actual machine layout are made, like the effects of stator ...

  13. Mihhail Barõshnikov voshol v mirovuju pjatjorku

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    23ndat korda anti välja Kennedy Keskuse auhinnad kõige väljapaistvamatele kunsti interpreetidele. Teiste hulgas said auhinna näitleja ja režissöör Clint Eastwood, teatri- ja filminäitleja Angela Lansbury ja balletitantsija ning filminäitleja Mihhail Barõshnikov

  14. Quality and Sensorial Characteristics of Raw-Vegan Bars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liana Claudia Salanţă; Maria Tofană; Sonia Socaci; Cristina Barta; Carmen Pop

    2015-01-01

    ...; the main components of the diet are fruits, nuts, seeds, and sprouted grains and beans. The aim of this study was to obtain two raw-vegan bars using dry raw materials and to establish the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of the products...

  15. Torsion of bars with regular polygonal sections | Zongo | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, the study of the torsion of cylindrical bars using large singular finite elements method leads to the resolution of the system of linear equations using MATLAB software. Particularly, the numerical solution of the problem of beams with regular section shows clearly the precision of the method depending upon the ...

  16. 5 CFR 9701.305 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 9701.305 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration General § 9701.305 Bar on collective...

  17. 5 CFR 9701.205 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 9701.205 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification General § 9701.205 Bar on collective bargaining. As...

  18. Using a Spreadsheet Scroll Bar to Solve Equilibrium Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviolo, Andres

    2012-01-01

    A simple, conceptual method is described for using the spreadsheet scroll bar to find the composition of a system at chemical equilibrium. Simulation of any kind of chemical equilibrium can be carried out using this method, and the effects of different disturbances can be predicted. This simulation, which can be used in general chemistry…

  19. Content-Based Art Retrieval (C-BAR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Boonstra, Onno; Beurne, Leen; Kok, Thijs; Doorn, Peter; Hoenkamp, Eduard; Schouten, Theo E.; van den Herik, Jaap; Petiet, Peter J.; de Nil, Bart; Vuurpijl, Louis G.; Witkamp, Paula

    2005-01-01

    The prototype of an online Content-Based Art Retrieval (C-BAR) system is introduced that provides entrance to the digitized collection of the National Gallery of the Netherlands (the Rijksmuseum). The current online system of the Rijksmuseum is text-based and requires expert knowledge concerning the

  20. Single centre experience on short bar technique for pectus excavatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Pectus excavatum (PE) is the most frequent anomaly of the anterior chest wall. Before 2001, all patients in Denmark were referred to the plastic and reconstructive surgeon for implantation of a subcutaneous silicone prosthesis, because the modified Ravitch procedure was not used. Since 2001, all patients have been treated with a modified Nuss procedure, which today has become the gold standard for correction of PE. Methods From September 2001 to March 2016, 1,713 patients have been operated by a modified Nuss procedure using the short bar at Aarhus University Hospital with a male-female ratio 6:1. The median age was 16 years (range 7–58 years). All operations were done in general anesthesia with epidural analgesia and all patients were operated by the same surgeon. All patients were seen routinely 6 weeks after surgery and the bars were removed after 3 years. Results Patients were younger than 18 years in 1,109 cases (65%). The number of bars needed for optimal correction was one in 1,209 patients, two in 486 patients and three in 18 patients. The median length of bar changed from 11 inches to 10 inches during the study period. The annual number of procedures continued to rise during the study period [833 patients during the first 10 years and 880 patients in the last 6 years, though more patients received two bars in the later period, (34%) versus (24%)] and the proportion of patients older than 30 years increased from 7.7% to 10%. The average duration of the operation was 36 minutes (range 12–270 minutes) and did not change significantly during the study period, change in operation time which was around half an hour. The median postoperative hospital stay decreased over time from 6 to 2 days. There was no mortality. Conclusions The modified Nuss procedure with the short bar technique is effective for the correction of PE. The results are stable with a low rate of bar malrotations, and in may most cases can be done in less than an hour in

  1. Towards understanding the dynamics of the bar/bulge region in our Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassoula E.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available I review some of the work on bars which is closely linked to the bar/bulge system in our Galaxy. Several independent studies, using totally independent methods, come to the same results about the 3D structure of a bar, i.e., that a bar is composed of a vertically thick inner part and a vertically thin outer part. I give examples of this from simulations and substantiate the discussion with input from orbital structure analysis and from observations. The thick part has a considerably shorter radial extent than the thin part. I then see how this applies to our Galaxy, where two bars have been reported, the COBE/DIRBE bar and the Long bar. Comparing their extents and making the reasonable and necessary assumption that our Galaxy has properties similar to those of other galaxies of similar type, leads to the conclusion that these two bars can not form a standard double bar system. I then discuss arguments in favour of the two bars being simply different parts of the same bar, the COBE/DIRBE bar being the thick inner part and the Long bar being the thin outer part of this bar. I also very briefly discuss some related new results. I first consider bar formation and evolution in disc galaxies with a gaseous component – including star formation, feedback and evolution – and a triaxial halo. Then I consider bar formation in a fully cosmological context using hydrodynamical LCDM simulations, where the host galaxies grow, accrete matter and significantly evolve during the formation and evolution of the bar.

  2. Oblique wave motion over multiple submerged porous bars near a vertical wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yong; Li, Huajun; Chang, Anteng

    2017-08-01

    This study examines oblique wave motion over multiple submerged porous bars in front of a vertical wall. Based on linear potential theory, an analytical solution for the present problem is developed using matched eigenfunction expansions. A complex dispersion relation is adopted to describe the wave elevation and energy dissipation over submerged porous bars. In the analytical solution, no limitations on the bar number, bar size, and spacing between adjacent bars are set. The convergence of the analytical solution is satisfactory, and the correctness of the analytical solution is confirmed by an independently developed multi-domain BEM (boundary element method) solution. Numerical examples are presented to examine the reflection and transmission coefficients of porous bars, C R and C T , respectively, for engineering applications. The calculation results show that when the sum of widths for all the porous bars is fixed, increasing the bar number can significantly improve the sheltering function of the bars. Increasing the bar height can cause more wave energy dissipation and lower C R and C T . The spacing between adjacent bars and the spacing between the last bar and the vertical wall are the key parameters affecting C R and C T . The proposed analytical method may be used to analyze the hydrodynamic performance of submerged porous bars in preliminary engineering designs.

  3. Secondhand smoke in Israeli bars, pubs and cafes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Laura J; Zucker, David; Rosenberg, Hoshea; Connolly, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Secondhand smoke poses a serious health hazard. In Israel the recent passage of a law designed to protect people from secondhand smoke in public places was greeted with controversy. The debate is taking place without data on actual levels of pollution for secondhand smoke in public places. To estimate levels of small respirable suspended particles, atmospheric markers of secondhand smoke, in Israeli bars, pubs and cafes, to compare them with levels in other countries, and to analyze RSP determinants. This study was conducted in bars, pubs and cafes in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv prior to passage of the enforcement bill. Venues were randomly sampled from lists available in the local mass media. The average level of RSPs across all venues, 283 microg/m3, was nearly identical to levels in countries without enforced smoking bans. Bars and pubs had higher values than cafes (P = 0.0101). The effect of smoker concentration was borderline significant (P = 0.0540), with RSP levels increasing as smoker concentration increased. The effect of venue height was also borderline significant (P = 0.0642), with RSP levels decreasing as venue height increased. Levels of indoor air pollution from secondhand smoke in Israeli bars, pubs and cafes prior to the recent passage of the enforcement bill were similar to levels in countries without enforced smoking bans, and roughly 10 times as high as countries with enforced smoking bans. Whether the new law will successfully promote clean air in Israeli bars, pubs, cafes, and other indoor places is yet to be seen.

  4. Medium-term dynamics of a middle Adriatic barred beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Postacchini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, attention has been paid to beach protection by means of soft and hard defenses. Along the Italian coast of the Adriatic Sea, sandy beaches are the most common landscape feature and around 70 % of the Marche region's coast (central Adriatic is protected by defense structures. The longest free-from-obstacle nearshore area in the region includes the beach of Senigallia, frequently monitored in the last decades and characterized by a multiple bar system, which represents a natural beach defense. The bathymetries surveyed in 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 show long-term stability, confirmed by a good adaptation of an analyzed stretch of the beach to the Dean-type equilibrium profile, though a strong short- to medium-term variability of the wave climate has been observed during the monitored periods. The medium-term dynamics of the beach, which deal with the evolution of submerged bars and are of the order of years or seasons, have been related to the wave climate collected, during the analyzed temporal windows, by a wave buoy located about 40 km off Senigallia. An overall interpretation of the hydrodynamics, sediment characteristics and seabed morphology suggests that the wave climate is fundamental for the morphodynamic changes of the beach in the medium term. These medium-term time ranges during which waves mainly come from NNE/ESE are characterized by a larger/smaller steepness and by a larger/smaller relative wave height, and seem to induce seaward/shoreward bar migration as well as bar smoothing/steepening. Moving southeastward, the bar dimension increases, while the equilibrium profile shape suggests the adaptation to a decreasing sediment size in the submerged beach. This is probably due to the presence of both the harbor jetty and river mouth north of the investigated area.

  5. Medium-term dynamics of a middle Adriatic barred beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postacchini, Matteo; Soldini, Luciano; Lorenzoni, Carlo; Mancinelli, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, attention has been paid to beach protection by means of soft and hard defenses. Along the Italian coast of the Adriatic Sea, sandy beaches are the most common landscape feature and around 70 % of the Marche region's coast (central Adriatic) is protected by defense structures. The longest free-from-obstacle nearshore area in the region includes the beach of Senigallia, frequently monitored in the last decades and characterized by a multiple bar system, which represents a natural beach defense. The bathymetries surveyed in 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 show long-term stability, confirmed by a good adaptation of an analyzed stretch of the beach to the Dean-type equilibrium profile, though a strong short- to medium-term variability of the wave climate has been observed during the monitored periods. The medium-term dynamics of the beach, which deal with the evolution of submerged bars and are of the order of years or seasons, have been related to the wave climate collected, during the analyzed temporal windows, by a wave buoy located about 40 km off Senigallia. An overall interpretation of the hydrodynamics, sediment characteristics and seabed morphology suggests that the wave climate is fundamental for the morphodynamic changes of the beach in the medium term. These medium-term time ranges during which waves mainly come from NNE/ESE are characterized by a larger/smaller steepness and by a larger/smaller relative wave height, and seem to induce seaward/shoreward bar migration as well as bar smoothing/steepening. Moving southeastward, the bar dimension increases, while the equilibrium profile shape suggests the adaptation to a decreasing sediment size in the submerged beach. This is probably due to the presence of both the harbor jetty and river mouth north of the investigated area.

  6. Metal/polymer composite Nuss bar for minimally invasive bar removal after Pectus Excavatum treatment: FEM simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Ciuti, Gastone; Ghionzoli, Marco; Messineo, Antonio; Menciassi, Arianna

    2014-12-01

    This study aims at assessing the mechanical behavior of a composite metal/polymer bar to be implanted in the retrosternal position, in order to correct chest wall deformities, such as Pectus Excavatum. A 300-mm-long, 12.7-mm-wide, and 3.5-mm-thick Nuss bar was considered, made of different metals and biodegradable polymers, fixed at its extremities, and with a constant force of 250 N applied on its center. Two different geometries for the metal elements to be embedded in the polymeric matrix were tested: in the former, thin metal sheets and in the latter, cylindrical metal reinforcing rods were considered. Finite element method simulation results are reported, in terms of maximum stress and strain of the bar. Furthermore, the maximum stress values obtained by varying metal sheet thickness or rod diameter (and therefore the volumetric percentage of metal within the matrix) for different material combinations are also shown; optimal configuration for the Pectus Excavatum treatment was finally identified for a composite Nuss bar. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. First observations of $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^+D^-$, $D_s^+D^-$ and $D^0\\bar{D}^0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    First observations and measurements of the branching fractions of the $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^+D^-$, $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^+D^-$ and $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^0\\bar{D}^0$ decays are presented using $1.0$~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment. These branching fractions are normalized to those of $\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+D^-$, $B^0\\to D_s^+D^-$ and $B^-\\to D^0D_s^-$, respectively. An excess of events consistent with the decay $\\bar{B}^0\\to D^0\\bar{D}^0$ is also seen, and its branching fraction is measured relative to that of $B^-\\to D^0D_s^-$. Improved measurements of the branching fractions ${\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^+D_s^-)$ and ${\\cal{B}}(B^-\\to D^0D_s^-)$ are reported, each relative to ${\\cal{B}}(B^0\\to D_s^+D^-)$. The ratios of branching fractions are \\begin{align*} {{\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^+D^-)\\over {\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+D^-)} &= 1.08\\pm 0.20\\pm0.10, \

  8. Study of $ \\bar{p} $ and $ \\bar{n} $ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    % PS201 Study of $\\bar{p}$ and $\\bar{n}$ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer \\\\ \\\\OBELIX is designed to study exclusive final states of antiproton and antineutron annihilations at low energies with protons and nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The physics motivations of the experiment are:\\\\ \\\\\\begin{itemize} \\item (gg, ggg), hybrids ($ q \\bar{q} g $), multiquarks ($ q q \\bar{q} \\bar{q} $) and light mesons ($ q \\bar{q} $) produced in $ N \\bar{N} $ annihilations and study of their spectroscopy and decays. Also broad structures will be searched for by comparing identical decay modes in exclusive final states of the same type occuring from initial states with different angular momentum or isospin. \\item Study of the dynamics of $ N \\bar{N} $ interactions and of the dependence of the final and intermediate resonant states of annihilation upon the quantum numbers of the initial $ N \\bar{N} $ state (angular momentum: S and P-wave in $\\bar{p}p $ at...

  9. Engineering studies on joint bar integrity, part II : finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-02

    This paper is the second in a two-part series describing : research sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration : (FRA) to study the structural integrity of joint bars. In Part I, : observations from field surveys of joint bar inspections : cond...

  10. Research on deformation characteristics and design method of concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M. X.; Xu, X. S.

    2017-04-01

    Two different glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars were produced to reinforce concrete beams, including plain GFRP bars and ribbed surface GFRP bars. The flexural property of GFRP reinforced concrete beams was studied by testing four specimen beams under two point vertical loads. The crack development and stain distribution of beam cross section during loading were recorded, and the deformation characteristics and failure mode were also analyzed in this experiment. According to the test results, the bond property of plain GFRP bars was too poor to serve as reinforcement bars, while the ribbed surface GFRP bars showed good bond performance and worked well with concrete before final failure. The test beam reinforced with ribbed surface GFRP bars exhibited a uniform crack distribution, and the strain agreed with the assumption of plane cross section. Moreover, calculation method for bending capacity of concrete beam strengthened with GFRP bars was deducted based on this experiment.

  11. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka (Helsinki); (Penn)

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  12. Health monitoring of precast bridge deck panels reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The present research project investigates monitoring concrete precast panels for bridge decks that are reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars. Due to the lack of long term research on concrete members reinforced with GFRP bars, lo...

  13. Implementation of a workplace smoking ban in bars: The limits of local discretion

    OpenAIRE

    Montini, Theresa; Bero, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In January 1998, the California state legislature extended a workplace smoking ban to bars. The purpose of this study was to explore the conditions that facilitate or hinder compliance with a smoking ban in bars. Methods We studied the implementation of the smoking ban in bars by interviewing three sets of policy participants: bar employers responsible for complying with the law; local government officials responsible for enforcing the law; and tobacco control activists wh...

  14. 78 FR 68090 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, provided for in... reinforcing bar that are allegedly subsidized by the government of Turkey.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec...

  15. Prevalence and Implementation Practices of School Salad Bars Across Grade Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Meg; Adams, Marc A; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Hurley, Jane

    2017-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of school salad bars in Arizona and to describe common practices of salad bar use among school nutrition managers across grade level. Cross-sectional web-based surveys. School nutrition managers from elementary, middle, high, and K-12 schools (N = 648). Prevalence of salad bars; implementation practices such as years with salad bar, salad bar type, location, monitor, and reimbursement practices; and food-related components of salad bars including frequency of items, popular items, and sources of food. Descriptive analyses were conducted including Fisher exact test, analysis of variance, and the Kruskal-Wallis test comparing practices across grade level (elementary, middle, high, and K-12 schools). Overall, 61.1% of respondents had a salad bar; there were significant differences in the prevalence across grade level: elementary, middle, high, and K-12 schools had prevalence of 67.3%, 75.0%, 45.5%, and 51.1%, respectively ( P related components of salad bars across grade levels including type, salad bar location, sources of food, and frequency of serving cut vegetables. This study provides insights on the prevalence of salad bars and is the first to report on implementation practices of school salad bars. These results may also guide the development of interventions for nutrition educators to use for the promotion fruit and vegetable consumption via school salad bars.

  16. 78 FR 35989 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Environmental Statement, Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN), Unit 2'' (SFES). ADDRESSES... option of issuing the operating license for Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2. This recommendation is based...

  17. Quasi-three-dimensional modelling of the morphology of longshore bars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dronen, N.; Deigaard, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    A morphological quasi-three-dimensional (Q3D) area model for bar-red coasts has been developed. The model combines a two-dimensional depth integrated model for wave-driven currents with a model for under-tow circulation currents. The combined model makes a simultaneous simulation of the bar...

  18. THE OCCURRENCE OF FAULT BARS IN THE PLUMAGE OF NESTLING OSPREYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MACHMER, MM; ESSELINK, H; STEEGER, C; YDENBERG, RC

    1992-01-01

    We document the occurrence of fault bars in a population of nestling Ospreys Pandion haliaetus under natural conditions. Ospreys had an average of 9.9 fault bars on their rectrices, however variation was large. Fault bar formation declined linearly with age and increased symmetrically from outer to

  19. Genderedness of Bar Drinking Culture and Alcohol-Related Harms: A Multi-Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah C. M.; Bond, Jason; Korcha, Rachael; Greenfield, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores whether associations between consuming alcohol in bars and alcohol-related harms are consistent across countries and whether country-level characteristics modify associations. We hypothesized that genderedness of bar drinking modifies associations, such that odds of harms associated with bar drinking increase more rapidly in…

  20. 77 FR 64127 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from Belarus... concrete reinforcing bar from Latvia and Moldova. The Commission found that the respondent interested party...

  1. 77 FR 70140 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ...] Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, People's Republic of...'') initiated the second Sunset Reviews of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bars from.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bars from...

  2. 78 FR 60831 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty... (``CVD'') petition \\1\\ concerning imports of steel concrete reinforcing bar (``rebar'') from the Republic... Countervailing Duties on Imports of Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from the Republic of Turkey, dated September 4...

  3. Consideration of Correction Method for Compressive Strength of Core Specimen Within Deformed Bar

    OpenAIRE

    大塚, 秀三; 中田, 善久; 大木, 崇輔

    2013-01-01

    In rare occasions, there is core specimen that cut off deformed bar in structural concrete. However, there is not the correction method for compressive strength of core specimen within deformed bar that corresponds to the current concrete. This study proposed a simple correction method for compressive strength of core specimen within deformed bar, regardless of type of cement.

  4. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics of no-bake wheat-soy snack bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramouni, Fadi M; Abu-Ghoush, Mahmoud H

    2011-01-15

    Health and wellness is a trend observed throughout ready-to-eat cereals, cereal health bars. Therefore, the main objectives of this research were to produce a low cost, acceptable, nutritious and healthy wheat- and soy-based bar under no-bake conditions. Also, the physical, chemical, microbial, acceptability and the nutritional value of this product were studied. Six different bars were produced: a wheat bar (WB), a wheat bar with coating (WBC), a wheat and soy bar with coating (WSBC), a soy bar with coating (SBC), a wheat bar with 3% glycerin (WB3%), and a wheat bar with 6% glycerine (WB6%). WB and WBC had the highest water activities while WSBC had the lowest. The three bars with coating had higher L and lower b values, which indicates that they were lighter and not as highly yellow coloured as the wheat samples. WSBC had the lowest value for hardness while the SBC and WBC had the highest. SBC received the highest scores for overall acceptability, appearance, sweetness, flavour and texture while WSBC received the second highest score in all categories. It appears that consumers prefer the soy varieties to the wheat bars. These types of bars can aid in feeding the general population, which is becoming increasingly concerned with nutrition and convenience. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. 77 FR 45239 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bar Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bar Harbor, ME AGENCY... airspace area at Bar Harbor, ME, as the Surry Non-Directional Radio Beacon (NDB) has been decommissioned... rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Bar Harbor, ME (77 FR 27666) Docket No. FAA-2011-1366. Interested...

  6. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer.

  7. 78 FR 4383 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. The period of review (POR) is... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil'' dated concurrently with this notice...

  8. 77 FR 39467 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty... the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India. The review..., 2012, the Department published Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results and Partial...

  9. 75 FR 67689 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/ exporter of... Department published in the Federal Register an antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from...

  10. 77 FR 45653 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain; Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain; Determination Determination On... U.S.C. 1675(c)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel bar from Brazil... (July 2012), entitled Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain: Investigation Nos. 731...

  11. 75 FR 39663 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil... results of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from...

  12. 76 FR 34964 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty... opportunity to request an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from... Corp.; Electralloy Co., a division of G.O. Carlson, Inc.; Outokumpu Stainless Bar, Inc.; Universal...

  13. 75 FR 12514 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/ exporter of... Department published in the Federal Register an antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from...

  14. 75 FR 54090 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ...] Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (``SSB'') from India for the period February 1, 2008, through January 31, 2009. See Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

  15. 78 FR 7395 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from India. The period of review (POR) is... Review: Stainless Steel Bar from India'' dated concurrently with this notice (``Preliminary Decision...

  16. Tables or bar graphs? Presenting test results in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Noel T; Gilkey, Melissa B; Lillie, Sarah E; Hesse, Bradford W; Sheridan, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    Electronic personal health records offer a promising way to communicate medical test results to patients. We compared the usability of tables and horizontal bar graphs for presenting medical test results electronically. We conducted experiments with a convenience sample of 106 community-dwelling adults. In the first experiment, participants viewed either table or bar graph formats (between subjects) that presented medical test results with normal and abnormal findings. In a second experiment, participants viewed table and bar graph formats (within subjects) that presented test results with normal, borderline, and abnormal findings. Participants required less viewing time when using bar graphs rather than tables. This overall difference was due to superior performance of bar graphs in vignettes with many test results. Bar graphs and tables performed equally well with regard to recall accuracy and understanding. In terms of ease of use, participants did not prefer bar graphs to tables when they viewed only one format. When participants viewed both formats, those with experience with bar graphs preferred bar graphs, and those with experience with tables found bar graphs equally easy to use. Preference for bar graphs was strongest when viewing tests with borderline results. Compared to horizontal bar graphs, tables required more time and experience to achieve the same results, suggesting that tables can be a more burdensome format to use. The current practice of presenting medical test results in a tabular format merits reconsideration.

  17. 76 FR 48802 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final... antidumping duty order on certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and...

  18. 75 FR 27925 - Use of Turkey Shackle in Bar-Type Cut Operations; Correcting Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 381 Use of Turkey Shackle in Bar-Type Cut Operations... regulations to correct an inadvertent error in the required shackle width for Bar-type cut turkey operations... 10-inch shackle width for Bar-type cut turkey operations that use J-type cut maximum line speeds...

  19. 40 CFR 417.70 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of bar soaps subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manufacture of bar soaps subcategory. 417.70 Section 417.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Bar Soaps Subcategory § 417.70 Applicability; description of the manufacture of bar...

  20. Measurement of $\\chi_{cJ}$ decaying into $p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2012-01-01

    Using a data sample of $1.06 \\times 10^{8}$ $\\psip$ events collected with the BESIII detector in 2009, the branching fractions of $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ ($J$=0,1,2) are measured{Throughout the text, inclusion of charge conjugate modes is implied if not stated otherwise.}. The results for $\\chi_{c0}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\chi_{c2}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ are consistent with, but much more precise than those of previous measurements. The decays of $\\chi_{c1}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}$ and $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{n}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ are observed for the first time.

  1. Outbreak of Salmonella napoli infection caused by contaminated chocolate bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, O N; Sockett, P N; Bartlett, C L; Vaile, M S; Rowe, B; Gilbert, R J; Dulake, C; Murrell, H C; Salmaso, S

    1983-03-12

    An outbreak of Salmonella napoli infection in England and Wales in 1982 was detected by the surveillance of routine reports of salmonella infections from hospital and public-health laboratories. Epidemiological investigation quickly identified two types of small chocolate-covered bars, imported from Italy, as the vehicles of infection, and subsequently both were found to be contaminated with the organism. The prompt recognition of this outbreak and rapid identification of the vehicle of infection enabled four-fifths of the consignment of contaminated chocolate to be withdrawn from the market. The 245 reported cases resulted from the sale of 600 000 bars; as these were presumably only a small fraction of the total number of cases, it is likely that many thousands of infections were prevented.

  2. Strengthing of Beams and Columns using GFRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C. B.; Tade, M. K.; Thakare, S. B., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays infrastructure development is raising its pace. Many reinforced high concrete and masonry buildings are constructed annually around the globe. There are large numbers of structures which deteriorate or become unsafe to use because of changes in use, changes in loading condition, change in the design configuration, inferior building material used or natural calamities. Thus repairing and retrofitting of these structures for safe usage of has a great market. There are several situations in which a civil structure would require strengthening due to lack of strength, stiffness, ductility and durability. Beams, columns may be strengthened in flexure by using GFRP in tension zone. In this present work comparative study will be made with and without GFRP circular bars in a beam and column. An experiment study will be carried out to study the change in the structural behavior of beams & columns with GFRP circular bars of different thickness, varying span to depth ratio.

  3. Social branding to decrease smoking among young adults in bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Pamela M; Lee, Youn Ok; Hong, Juliette; Neilands, Torsten B; Jordan, Jeffrey W; Glantz, Stanton A

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated a Social Branding antitobacco intervention for "hipster" young adults that was implemented between 2008 and 2011 in San Diego, California. We conducted repeated cross-sectional surveys of random samples of young adults going to bars at baseline and over a 3-year follow-up. We used multinomial logistic regression to evaluate changes in daily smoking, nondaily smoking, and binge drinking, controlling for demographic characteristics, alcohol use, advertising receptivity, trend sensitivity, and tobacco-related attitudes. During the intervention, current (past 30 day) smoking decreased from 57% (baseline) to 48% (at follow-up 3; P = .002), and daily smoking decreased from 22% to 15% (P Branding campaigns are a promising strategy to decrease smoking in young adult bar patrons.

  4. How bar strength and pattern speed affect galactic spiral structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, M.P. (Monash Univ., Clayton (Australia). Dept. of Mathematics)

    1984-07-01

    The response of a gaseous disc to rotating stellar bars of various strengths and pattern speeds is studied. The arm-to-interarm density contrast and the pitch angle of the induced spiral arms both increase with increasing bar strength. Furthermore, along the sequence there is a widening of a region in which stable periodic orbits are difficult to find until it encompasses the whole annulus between corotation (CR) and the outer Lindblad resonance (OLR). Stars moving in quasi-stochastic orbits originating in this region form an exponential tail in the surface density profile of the stellar disc. As the pattern speed is lowered more structure appears inside CR. In models with pattern speed so low that an inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) exists, spiral arms form there, and as a result gas is moved inward toward the centre.

  5. Occupational noise exposure of nightclub bar employees in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aoife C; Boyd, Sara M; Henehan, Gary T M; Chambers, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Due to the transposition of the EU Directive 2003/10/EC into Irish Law, the entertainment sector was obligated to comply with the requirements of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (General Application) Regulations 2007, Chapter 1 Part 5: Control of Noise at Work since February 2008. Compliance with the Noise Regulations was examined in 9 nightclubs in Ireland. The typical daily noise exposure of 19 bar employees was measured using 2 logging dosimeters and a Type 1 fixed position sound level meter. Physical site inspections identified nightclub noise control measures. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess the managers and employees awareness of the noise legislation. The average bar employee daily noise exposure (L(EX, 8h)) was 92 dBA, almost 4 times more than the accepted legal limit. None of the venues examined were fully compliant with the requirements of the 2007 Noise Regulations, and awareness of this legislation was limited.

  6. Occupational noise exposure of nightclub bar employees in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife C Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the transposition of the EU Directive 2003/10/EC into Irish Law, the entertainment sector was obligated to comply with the requirements of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (General Application Regulations 2007, Chapter 1 Part 5: Control of Noise at Work since February 2008. Compliance with the Noise Regulations was examined in 9 nightclubs in Ireland. The typical daily noise exposure of 19 bar employees was measured using 2 logging dosimeters and a Type 1 fixed position sound level meter. Physical site inspections identified nightclub noise control measures. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess the managers and employees awareness of the noise legislation. The average bar employee daily noise exposure (L EX, 8h was 92 dBA, almost 4 times more than the accepted legal limit. None of the venues examined were fully compliant with the requirements of the 2007 Noise Regulations, and awareness of this legislation was limited.

  7. Evidence of Alpha Emission from Compressed Steel Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, G.; Calbucci, V.; Cardone, F.; Fattorini, G.; Mignani, R.; Petrucci, A.; Ridolfi, F.; Rotili, A.

    2013-09-01

    Four cylindrical steel bars of 2 cm diameter and 20 cm height were subjected to compression cycles each of them consisting of a loading phase at fixed stress rate followed by a rapid stress release. Different compression rates were used for the same sample. The area surrounding the loaded samples was monitored in order to check whether ionizing particles were emitted. To this aim, three ZnS(Ag) detectors, a Geiger counter, and some polycarbonate CR39 detectors of alpha particles were used. An 3He proportional detector of neutrons was also used. The whole set of results is discussed and proposed as an evidence of alpha particles emission from the bars during the compression cycles.

  8. Nanoscale magnetic stirring bars for heterogeneous catalysis in microscopic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuliang; Cao, Changyan; Sun, Yongbin; Huang, Peipei; Wei, Fangfang; Song, Weiguo

    2015-02-23

    Nanometer-sized magnetic stirring bars containing Pd nanoparticles (denoted as Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd) for heterogeneous catalysis in microscopic system were prepared through a facile two-step process. In the hydrogenation of styrene, Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd showed an activity similar to that of the commercial Pd/C catalyst, but much better stability. In microscopic catalytic systems, Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd can effectively stir the reaction solution within microdrops to accelerate mass transfer, and displays far better catalytic activity than the commercial Pd/C for the hydrogenation of methylene blue in an array of microdroplets. These results suggested that the Fe3 O4 -NC-PZS-Pd could be used as nanoscale stirring bars in nanoreactors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The P-bar ANDA Focussing-Lightguide Disc DIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowie, E; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Murray, M; Rosner, G; Seitz, B [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Foehl, K; Glazier, D [School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.hoek@physics.gla.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    P-bar ANDA will be a fixed target experiment internal to the HESR antiproton storage ring at the future FAIR complex. The P-bar ANDA detector requires excellent particle-identification capabilities in order to achieve its scientific potential. Cherenkov counters employing the DIRC principle were chosen as PID detectors for the Target Spectrometer. The proposed Focussing-Lightguide Disc DIRC will cover the forward part of the Target Spectrometer acceptance in the angular range between 5{sup 0} and 22{sup 0}. Its design includes a novel approach to mitigate dispersion effects in the solid radiator of a DIRC counter using optical elements. The dispersion correction will enable the Focussing-Lightguide Disc DIRC to provide pion-kaon identification for momenta well above 3.5 GeV/c.

  10. Social Branding to Decrease Smoking Among Young Adults in Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn Ok; Hong, Juliette; Neilands, Torsten B.; Jordan, Jeffrey W.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated a Social Branding antitobacco intervention for “hipster” young adults that was implemented between 2008 and 2011 in San Diego, California. Methods. We conducted repeated cross-sectional surveys of random samples of young adults going to bars at baseline and over a 3-year follow-up. We used multinomial logistic regression to evaluate changes in daily smoking, nondaily smoking, and binge drinking, controlling for demographic characteristics, alcohol use, advertising receptivity, trend sensitivity, and tobacco-related attitudes. Results. During the intervention, current (past 30 day) smoking decreased from 57% (baseline) to 48% (at follow-up 3; P = .002), and daily smoking decreased from 22% to 15% (P drinking also decreased significantly at follow-up 3 (OR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.53, 0.78). Conclusions. Social Branding campaigns are a promising strategy to decrease smoking in young adult bar patrons. PMID:24524502

  11. Time-dependent Corotation Resonance in Barred Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Pfenniger, Daniel; Taam, Ronald E.

    2016-10-01

    The effective potential neighboring the corotation resonance region in barred galaxies is shown to be strongly time-dependent in any rotating frame, due to the competition of nearby perturbations of similar strengths with differing rotation speeds. Contrary to the generally adopted assumption that in the bar rotating frame the corotation region should possess four stationary equilibrium points (Lagrange points), with high quality N-body simulations, we localize the instantaneous equilibrium points (EPs) and find that they circulate or oscillate broadly in azimuth with respect to the pattern speeds of the inner or outer perturbations. This implies that at the particle level the Jacobi integral is not well conserved around the corotation radius. That is, angular momentum exchanges decouple from energy exchanges, enhancing the chaotic diffusion of stars through the corotation region.

  12. A program evaluation of classroom data collection with bar codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, M D; Saunders, J L; Saunders, R R

    1993-01-01

    A technology incorporating bar code symbols and hand-held optical scanners was evaluated for its utility for routine data collection in a special education classroom. A different bar code symbol was created for each Individualized Educational Plan objective, each type of response occurrence, and each student in the first author's classroom. These symbols were organized by activity and printed as data sheets. The teacher and paraprofessionals scanned relevant codes with scanners when the students emitted targeted behaviors. The codes, dates, and approximate times of the scans were retained in the scanner's electronic memory until they could be transferred by communication software to a computer file. The data from the computer file were organized weekly into a printed report of student performance using a program written with commercially available database software. Advantages, disadvantages, and costs of using the system are discussed.

  13. Performances of RPCs in the BaBar Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, Robert

    2003-09-26

    The BaBar experiment uses a big system based on RPC detectors to discriminate muons from pions and to identify neutral hadrons. About 2000 m{sup 2} of RPC chambers have been working at SLAC since the end of 1998. We report on the performances of the RPC chambers focusing on new problems discovered in the RPC behavior. These problems started very soon after the installation of the chambers on the detector when the high ambient temperature triggered an increase of dark currents inside the chambers and a reduction of the efficiency. Careful analysis of the BaBar data and dedicated R&D efforts in the laboratory have helped to identify the main source of the trouble in the linseed oil varnish on the bakelite electrodes.

  14. Consequences of R-parity violating interactions for anomalies in {bar{B}}→ D^{(*)} τ {bar{ν }} and b→ s μ ^+μ ^-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the possibility of explaining the enhancement in semileptonic decays of {bar{B}} → D^{(*)} τ {bar{ν }}, the anomalies induced by b→ sμ ^+μ ^- in {bar{B}}→ (K, K^*, φ )μ ^+μ ^- and violation of lepton universality in R_K = Br({bar{B}}→ K μ ^+μ ^-)/Br({bar{B}}→ K e^+e^-) within the framework of R-parity violating MSSM. The exchange of down type right-handed squark coupled to quarks and leptons yields interactions which are similar to leptoquark induced interactions that have been proposed to explain the {bar{B}} → D^{(*)} τ {bar{ν }} by tree level interactions and b→ s μ ^+μ ^- anomalies by loop induced interactions, simultaneously. However, the Yukawa couplings in such theories have severe constraints from other rare processes in B and D decays. Although this interaction can provide a viable solution to the R(D^{(*)}) anomaly, we show that with the severe constraint from {bar{B}} → K ν {bar{ν }}, it is impossible to solve the anomalies in the b→ s μ ^+μ ^- process simultaneously.

  15. Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-26

    Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  16. Manufacturing cereal bars with high nutritional value through experimental design

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Covino; Antonio Roberto Giriboni Monteiro; Mônica Regina Silva Scapim; Diego Rodrigues Marques; Lívia Benossi; Cláudia Cirineo Ferreira Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Organizations responsible for public health throughout the world have been increasingly worrying about how to feed populations encouraging a nutritious and balanced diet in order to decrease the occurrence of chronic diseases, which are constantly related to an inadequate diet. Still, due to matters of modern lifestyle consumers are increasingly seeking convenient products. This being so, cereal bars have been an option when the matter is low calorie fast food which is also source of fiber. T...

  17. Cross-shore sediment transport on a naturally barred beach

    OpenAIRE

    Humiston, Randall T.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Bailard's sediment transport model (1981) is evaluated using field data obtained on a naturally barred beach. Principal field measurements consist of a cross-shore array of bi-directional current meters spanning the surf zone and daily bathymetic surveys. The model predicts bed and suspended Load transport separately based on various velocity moments. The velocities are partitioned into mean currents, long waves (< 0.05 Hz) and short w...

  18. X-ray scattering on quantum cross-bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, Igor [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: igorkuz@bgumail.bgu.ac.il

    2005-04-30

    X-ray scattering on quantum cross-bars (QCB) leads to creation of QCB plasmon. Such a process corresponds to a sharp peak of frequency dependence of the differential scattering cross-section. The peak frequency strongly depends on the direction of the scattered light. As a result, 1D->2D cross-over can be observed in the scattering spectrum. It manifests itself in special directions as an appearance of doublets instead of a single line.

  19. Overdenture retaining bar stress distribution: a finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Conrado Reinoldes; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes

    2015-05-01

    Evaluate the stress distribution on the peri-implant bone tissue and prosthetic components of bar-clip retaining systems for overdentures presenting different implant inclinations, vertical misfit and framework material. Three-dimensional models of a jaw and an overdenture retained by two implants and a bar-clip attachment were modeled using specific software (SolidWorks 2010). The studied variables were: latero-lateral inclination of one implant (-10°, -5°, 0°, +5°, +10°); vertical misfit on the other implant (50, 100, 200 µm); and framework material (Au type IV, Ag-Pd, Ti cp, Co-Cr). Solid models were imported into mechanical simulation software (ANSYS Workbench 11). All nodes on the bone's external surface were constrained and a displacement was applied to simulate the settling of the framework on the ill-fitted component. Von Mises stress for the prosthetic components and maximum principal stress to the bone tissue were evaluated. The +10° inclination presented the worst biomechanical behavior, promoting the highest stress values on the bar framework and peri-implant bone tissue. The -5° group presented the lowest stress values on the prosthetic components and the lowest stress value on peri-implant bone tissue was observed in -10°. Increased vertical misfit caused an increase on the stress values in all evaluated structures. Stiffer framework materials caused a considerable stress increase in the framework itself, prosthetic screw of the fitted component and peri-implant bone tissue. Inclination of one implant associated with vertical misfit caused a relevant effect on the stress distribution in bar-clip retained overdentures. Different framework materials promoted increased levels of stress in all the evaluated structures.

  20. Effects of the bench shirt on sagittal bar path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Tobin; Fortenbaugh, Dave; Williams, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Powerlifting, like many sports, uses specialized equipment to enhance performance and decrease the chance of injury. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine whether wearing a bench press shirt would alter the natural mechanics of the bench press, causing a more efficient lift when pressing the same weight as without the bench shirt. Participants (n = 5) completed 2 series of 1-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press tests, with 1 week of rest in between 1 series without the bench shirt (no-shirt), and 1 series with a bench shirt (bench shirt). Results revealed that the vertical bar path ranges were significantly less in the bench shirt condition (35.7 +/- 4.8 cm) compared with the no-shirt condition (40.2 +/- 7.0 cm) (p < 0.05). Significant differences were found between the bar's optimal (81.4 +/- 14.2 cm) and observed (96.7 +/- 19.1 cm) total distances traveled in the no-shirt condition (p < 0.01), but no significant differences were found between the bar's optimal (71.6 +/- 12.7 cm) and observed (86.3 +/- 10.5 cm) total distances traveled in the bench shirt condition. These findings suggest that the bar path in bench shirt trials is more efficient and consistent than in the no-shirt trials. This pattern demonstrates that a bench shirt can improve load capacity. It is also possible that the bench shirt decreases the forces that act on the shoulder for a given weight and, thus, may decrease the risk of injury.

  1. Durability of GFRP reinforcing bars and their bond in concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Rolland, Arnaud; Chataigner, Sylvain; Quiertant, Marc; Benzarti, Karim; Argoul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite reinforcing bars (rebars) for the reinforcement of concrete appears as an attractive solution to prevent corrosion, which is the main pathology encountered on concrete structures. Although such rebars are being used for more than ten years, there is a clear lack of knowledge regarding their durability, especially under alkaline environment. This paper aims at investigating the evolutions of tensile properties and bond in concrete of GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer...

  2. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management.

  3. Bar and Sleeve Attachment: A Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Yogesh; Yadav, Pankaj; D’Souza, Mariette; Singh, Jagjeet; Jain, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    Patients with the anterior defects either due to trauma, congenital or pathological can be treated with conventional removable or fixed partial denture. The lost soft tissue structures are not replaced by the conventional treatment option. Andrews bridge is combination of both removable and fixed partial denture and fulfills all the requirements like phonetics, hygiene, aesthetics and comfort. This article describes the bar and sleeve attachment as the best treatment option in these types of ...

  4. Quark nuggets search using gravitational waves aluminum bar detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronga, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Up to now there is no evidence of supersymmetric WIMPS dark matter. This may suggests to look for more exotic possibilities, for example compact ultra-dense quark nuggets. Nuclearites are an example of compact objects that could be constituent of the dark matter. After a short discussion on nuclearites, the result of a nuclearite search with the gravitational wave bar detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER is reported.

  5. Quark nuggets search using gravitational waves aluminum bar detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronga Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to now there is no evidence of supersymmetric WIMPS dark matter. This may suggests to look for more exotic possibilities, for example compact ultra-dense quark nuggets. Nuclearites are an example of compact objects that could be constituent of the dark matter. After a short discussion on nuclearites, the result of a nuclearite search with the gravitational wave bar detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER is reported.

  6. Effect of SMA bars on cyclic behaviour of low-rise shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, W. I.; Effendy, E.; Song, G.; Mo, Y. L.; Hsu, T. T. C.; Loh, C. H.

    2006-03-01

    Past RC panel tests performed at the University of Houston show that reinforced concrete membrane elements under reversed cyclic loading have much greater ductility when steel bars are provided in the direction of principal tensile stress. In order to improve the ductility of low-rise shear walls under earthquake loading, high seismic performance shear walls have been proposed to have steel bars in the same direction as the tensile principal direction of applied stresses in the critical region of shear walls. This paper presents the results of reversed cyclic tests on three low-rise shear walls with SMA bars. The height, width, and thickness of the designed shear walls are 1.0 m, 2.0 m, and 0.12 m, respectively. SMA bars are provided in the directions of 27 degrees to the horizontal that are in the diagonal direction. The reinforcing bars of the shear walls are in vertical and horizontal directions. The ratios of both SMA and reinforcing bars are 0.24%. The main parameter used in the study is the type of SMA bar, namely Superelastic and Martensite SMA bars. The test results from the walls with SMA bars are also compared to a conventional wall without SMA bars. Test results also show that the maximum shear strengths of the tested walls are affected by the SMA bars. It was found that the shear wall with Martensite SMA bars has greater residual displacement. In contrast, the shear wall with superelastic SMA bars has less residual displacement. At the ultimate state, one of the four superelastic SMA bars buckled, resulting in less energy dissipation capacity than the expected value. Preventing buckling of SMA bars is the research focus in the near future.

  7. Acceptability of beehive products as ingredients in quinoa bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Francisco; Lobo, Manuel; Samman, Norma

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a puffed quinoa bar with beehive products of high content of phenolic compounds, based on acceptability and perception of consumers. A rotational central composite design of three variables (honey, pollen and propolis) was used for food product formulation. The responses to optimize were sensorial acceptability and polyphenol content. Next to acceptability a check-all-that-apply (CATA) test was performed with 115 consumers. Preference maps were used to relate acceptability and sensorial attributes of bars that cause rejection or acceptance. The experimental design determined that pollen and propolis significantly increased phenolic content but decreased acceptability of formulations. Preference maps established that attributes like astringency, bitter flavor, pungency and intense yellow color were associated with the low acceptability while attributes of sweetness and weak astringency were related to high acceptance of products. Range of polyphenol content determined in the widely accepted formulations was 2.15-2.91 g kg-1 , significantly higher than commercial products. The incorporation of beehive products, in quinoa bars, increased the total polyphenol content and the functional properties, but at the same time reduced the consumer acceptability. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Introduction to the Mechanics of Deformable Solids Bars and Beams

    CERN Document Server

    H Allen, David

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to the Mechanics of Deformable Solids: Bars and Beams introduces the theory of beams and bars, including axial, torsion, and bending loading and analysis of bars that are subjected to combined loadings, including resulting complex stress states using Mohr’s circle. The book  provides failure analysis based on maximum stress criteria and introduces design using models developed in the text. Throughout the book, the author emphasizes fundamentals, including consistent mathematical notation. The author also presents the fundamentals of the mechanics of solids in such a way that the beginning student is able to progress directly to a follow-up course that utilizes two- and three-dimensional finite element codes imbedded within modern software packages for structural design purposes. As such, excessive details included in the previous generation of textbooks on the subject are obviated due to their obsolescence with the availability of today’s finite element software packages. This book also:...

  9. Reference bars for the alignment of the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Amelung, C; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Hashemi, K S; Palestini, S; Rothberg, J E; Schricker, A; Trigger, I

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS forward, or endcap, muon spectrometer covers the rapidity region of 1.0 <|eta|< 2.8 and extends over a volume of approximately two times 5000m^3. High-precision muon tracking chambers are used to measure track sagittas with 50\\mu m accuracy. An optical alignment system will monitor the relative spatial positions of these chambers with an accuracy of 30\\mu m such that the contribution of the chamber location to the global sagitta error remains below 40\\mu m. The alignment concept relies on devices called alignment bars; these are long tubes (up to 9.6m) whose shape is constantly monitored at the level of 20\\mu m by internal alignement sensors, and on which further alignment sensors are mounted in order to determine the positions of the nearby chambers. In order to derive the shape of an alignment bar from the readings of the internal sensors monitoring it, a model to describe deformations and a calibration procedure are required. This paper describes the design of the alignment bars, the method...

  10. Sound quality assessment of wood for xylophone bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Mitsuko; Baillères, Henri; Brancheriau, Loïc; Kronland-Martinet, Richard; Ystad, Sølvi

    2007-04-01

    Xylophone sounds produced by striking wooden bars with a mallet are strongly influenced by the mechanical properties of the wood species chosen by the xylophone maker. In this paper, we address the relationship between the sound quality based on the timbre attribute of impacted wooden bars and the physical parameters characterizing wood species. For this, a methodology is proposed that associates an analysis-synthesis process and a perceptual classification test. Sounds generated by impacting 59 wooden bars of different species but with the same geometry were recorded and classified by a renowned instrument maker. The sounds were further digitally processed and adjusted to the same pitch before being once again classified. The processing is based on a physical model ensuring the main characteristics of the wood are preserved during the sound transformation. Statistical analysis of both classifications showed the influence of the pitch in the xylophone maker judgement and pointed out the importance of two timbre descriptors: the frequency-dependent damping and the spectral bandwidth. These descriptors are linked with physical and anatomical characteristics of wood species, providing new clues in the choice of attractive wood species from a musical point of view.

  11. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of the Decays \\bar{B}^0 to Lambda_c^+ \\bar{p} and B^- to Lambda_c^+ \\bar{p} pi^-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC,

    2006-12-06

    The authors present studies of two-body and three-body charmed baryonic B decays in a sample of 232 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The branching fractions of the decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p} and B{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar p}{pi}{sup -} are measured to be (2.15 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.56) x 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.92) x 10{sup -4}, respectively. The uncertainties quoted are statistical, systematic, and from the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} branching fraction. They observe a baryon-antibaryon threshold enhancement in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p} invariant mass spectrum of the three-body mode and measure the ratio of the branching fractions to be {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}) = 16.4 {+-} 2.9 {+-} 1.4. These results are preliminary.

  12. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of the Decays $\\bar{B}^{0} \\to \\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p}$ and $B^{-} \\to \\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p} \\pi^{-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Y G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present studies of two-body and three-body charmed baryonic B decays in a sample of 232 million $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II $e^+e^-$ storage ring. The branching fractions of the decays $\\bar{B}^{0} \\to \\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p}$ and $B^{-} \\to \\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p} \\pi^{-}$ are measured to be $(2.15 \\pm 0.36 \\pm 0.13 \\pm 0.56) \\times 10^{-5}$ and $(3.53 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.31 \\pm 0.92)\\times10^{-4}$, respectively. The uncertainties quoted are statistical, systematic, and from the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\to p K^- \\pi^+$ branching fraction. We observe a baryon-antibaryon threshold enhancement in the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p}$ invariant mass spectrum of the three-body mode and measure the ratio of the branching fractions to be ${\\cal B}(B^{-} \\to \\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p} \\pi^{-})/{\\cal B}(\\bar{B}^{0} \\to \\Lambda_{c}^{+} \\bar{p}) = 16.4 \\pm 2.9 \\pm 1.4$. These results are preliminary.

  13. Interactive SIGHT: textual access to simple bar charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Seniz; Oliver, David; Schwartz, Edward; Elzer, Stephanie; Carberry, Sandra; Mccoy, Kathleen F.; Chester, Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Information graphics, such as bar charts and line graphs, are an important component of many articles from popular media. The majority of such graphics have an intention (a high-level message) to communicate to the graph viewer. Since the intended message of a graphic is often not repeated in the accompanying text, graphics together with the textual segments contribute to the overall purpose of an article and cannot be ignored. Unfortunately, these visual displays are provided in a format which is not readily accessible to everyone. For example, individuals with sight impairments who use screen readers to listen to documents have limited access to the graphics. This article presents a new accessibility tool, the Interactive SIGHT (Summarizing Information GrapHics Textually) system, that is intended to enable visually impaired users to access the knowledge that one would gain from viewing information graphics found on the web. The current system, which is implemented as a browser extension that works on simple bar charts, can be invoked by a user via a keystroke combination while navigating the web. Once launched, Interactive SIGHT first provides a brief summary that conveys the underlying intention of a bar chart along with the chart's most significant and salient features, and then produces history-aware follow-up responses to provide further information about the chart upon request from the user. We present two user studies that were conducted with sighted and visually impaired users to determine how effective the initial summary and follow-up responses are in conveying the informational content of bar charts, and to evaluate how easy it is to use the system interface. The evaluation results are promising and indicate that the system responses are well-structured and enable visually impaired users to answer key questions about bar charts in an easy-to-use manner. Post-experimental interviews revealed that visually impaired participants were very satisfied with

  14. The company they keep: drinking group attitudes and male bar aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Tara M; Graham, Kathryn; Wells, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess (a) similarities in self-reported bar-aggression-related attitudes and behaviors among members of young male groups recruited on their way to bars and (b) group-level variables associated with individual members' self-reported likelihood of perpetrating physical bar aggression in the past year, controlling for individual attitudes. Young, male, natural drinking groups recruited on their way to a bar district Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights (n = 167, 53 groups) completed an online survey that measured whether they had perpetrated physical aggression at a bar in the past year and constructs associated with bar aggression, including attitudes toward male bar aggression and frequency of heavy episodic drinking in the past year. Intraclass correlations and chi-square tests demonstrated significant within-group similarity on bar-aggression-related attitudes and behaviors (ps aggression were significantly associated with individuals' likelihood of perpetrating physical bar aggression, controlling for individual attitudes (p aggression was nonsignificant in the full model. This study suggests that the most important group influence on young men's bar aggression is the attitudes of other group members. These attitudes were associated with group members' likelihood of engaging in bar aggression over and above individuals' own attitudes. A better understanding of how group attitudes and behavior affect the behavior of individual group members is needed to inform aggression-prevention programming.

  15. Short-term dynamical evolution of grand-design spirals in barred galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Junichi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the short-term dynamical evolution of stellar grand-design spiral arms in barred spiral galaxiesusing a three-dimensional (3D) N-body/hydrodynamic simulation. Similar to previous numerical simulations of unbarred, multiple-arm spirals, we find that grand-design spiral arms in barred galaxies are not stationary, but rather dynamic. This means that the amplitudes, pitch angles, and rotational frequencies of the spiral arms are not constant, but change within a few hundred million years (i.e. the typical rotational period of a galaxy). We also find that the clear grand-design spirals in barred galaxies appear only when the spirals connect with the ends of the bar. Furthermore, we find that the short-term behaviour of spiral arms in the outer regions (R > 1.5-2 bar radius) can be explained by the swing amplification theory and that the effects of the bar are not negligible in the inner regions (R bar radius). These results suggest that although grand-design spiral arms in barred galaxies are affected by the stellar bar, the grand-design spiral arms essentially originate not as bar-driven stationary density waves, but rather as self-excited dynamic patterns. We imply that a rigidly rotating grand-design spiral could not be a reasonable dynamical model for investigating gas flows and cloud formation even in barred spiral galaxies.

  16. 25 tooli : Euroopa Nõukogu kohvik "Bar Europe" = 25 Chairs : Council of Europe Cafe "Bar Europe" / Maria Orlova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Orlova, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Euroopa Nõukogu - Justus Lipsius - hoonest Brüsselis. Kohviku "Bar Europe" kujundusest, mille tegi Hollandi büroo Droog Design. Kohviku interjöör põhineb Hollandi 17. sajandi kultuuripärandi interpreteerimisel. Lisaks tavalistele toolidele on ruumi toodud 25 tooli 25 EL-i liikmesriigist. Eestit esindava tooli "John" autoriks on Toivo Raidmets. 5 värv. sisevaadet

  17. Unit-bar migration and bar-trough deposition: impacts on hydraulic conductivity and grain size heterogeneity in a sandy streambed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korus, Jesse T.; Gilmore, Troy E.; Waszgis, Michele M.; Mittelstet, Aaron R.

    2017-09-01

    The hydrologic function of riverbeds is greatly dependent upon the spatiotemporal distribution of hydraulic conductivity and grain size. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (K v) is highly variable in space and time, and controls the rate of stream-aquifer interaction. Links between sedimentary processes, deposits, and K v heterogeneity have not been well established from field studies. Unit bars are building blocks of fluvial deposits and are key to understanding controls on heterogeneity. This study links unit bar migration to K v and grain size variability in a sand-dominated, low-sinuosity stream in Nebraska (USA) during a single 10-day hydrologic event. An incipient bar formed parallel to the thalweg and was highly permeable and homogenous. During high flow, this bar was submerged under 10-20 cm of water and migrated 100 m downstream and toward the channel margin, where it became markedly heterogeneous. Low-K v zones formed in the subsequent heterogeneous bar downstream of the original 15-40-cm-thick bar front and past abandoned bridge pilings. These low-K v zones correspond to a discontinuous 1-cm layer of fine sand and silt deposited in the bar trough. Findings show that K v heterogeneity relates chiefly to the deposition of suspended materials in low-velocity zones downstream of the bar and obstructions, and to their subsequent burial by migration of the bar during high flow. Deposition of the unit bar itself, although it emplaced the vast majority of the sediment volume, was secondary to bar-trough deposition as a control on the overall pattern of heterogeneity.

  18. Sensitivity study of the Hb$\\bar{b}$ and Hc$\\bar{c}$ couplings for e$^+$- e$^-$ collisions at FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Heckmann, Lea Alina

    2017-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) is one of the possible future projects proposed at CERN. With a circumference of 80 - 100km it should initially serve as an e$^+$- e$^-$ collider reaching energies between 90 - 350 GeV. While operating at centre of mass energies of 240 GeV and luminosities of 5*10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ FCC should be used as a Higgs factory with the aim of validating standard model predictions. Therefore, it should be able to measure the Higgs couplings with precisions around 1%. In order to estimate the sensitivity of the branching ratio for $H\\rightarrow c\\bar{c}$ (BR(Hcc)) a simultaneous simulation and analysis of Hb$\\bar{b}$ and Hc$\\bar{c}$ is necessary. Therefore, events were generated for both cases and afterwards the CMS detector with an added c-tagging method was used to simulate the detector response. Relevant events were selected and afterwards used for optimising a simultaneous fit determining BR(Hbb) and BR(Hcc) and its uncertainties. The same procedure was applied while chang...

  19. Prevalence of and Differences in Salad Bar Implementation in Rural Versus Urban Arizona Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenschine, Michelle; Adams, Marc; Bruening, Meg

    2017-11-30

    Rural children consume more calories per day on average than urban children, and they are less likely to consume fruit. Self-service salad bars have been proposed as an effective approach to better meet the National School Lunch Program's fruit and vegetable recommendations. No studies have examined how rural and urban schools differ in the implementation of school salad bars. To compare the prevalence of school-lunch salad bars and differences in implementation between urban and rural Arizona schools. Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional web-based survey. School nutrition managers (N=596) in the state of Arizona. National Center for Education Statistics locale codes defined rural and urban classifications. Barriers to salad bar implementation were examined among schools that have never had, once had, and currently have a school salad bar. Promotional practices were examined among schools that once had and currently have a school salad bar. Generalized estimating equation models were used to compare urban and rural differences in presence and implementation of salad bars, adjusting for school-level demographics and the clustering of schools within districts. After adjustment, the prevalence of salad bars did not differ between urban and rural schools (46.9%±4.3% vs 46.8%±8.5%, respectively). Rural schools without salad bars more often reported perceived food waste and cost of produce as barriers to implementing salad bars, and funding was a necessary resource for offering a salad bar in the future, as compared with urban schools (P<0.05). No other geographic differences were observed in reported salad bar promotion, challenges, or resources among schools that currently have or once had a salad bar. After adjustment, salad bar prevalence, implementation practices, and concerns are similar across geographic settings. Future research is needed to investigate methods to address cost and food waste concerns in rural areas. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and

  20. Searches for $B^0_{(s)} \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}$ and $B^+ \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}\\pi^+$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The results of searches for $B^0_{(s)} \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}$ and $B^+ \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}\\pi^+$ decays are reported. The analysis is based on a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions, collected with the LHCb detector. An excess with 2.8 $\\sigma$ significance is seen for the decay $B^0_{s} \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}$ and an upper limit on the branching fraction is set at the 90% confidence level: $B(B^0_s \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}) \\lt$ 4.8 x 10$^{-6}$, which is the first such limit. No significant signals are seen for $B^0 \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}$ and $B^+ \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}\\pi^+$ decays, for which the corresponding limits are set: $B(B^0 \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}) \\lt$ 5.2 x 10$^{-7}$, which significantly improves the existing limit; and $B(B^+ \\to J/\\psi p\\bar{p}\\pi^+) \\lt$ 5.0 x 10$^{-7}$, which is the first limit on this branching fraction.

  1. $\\Lambda^0$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}^0$ production in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 Tev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesson, Dennis Keith [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of $\\Lambda^0$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ have been studied from data obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV during the first running period of experiment E735 from January to May of 1987.

  2. Measurements of partial widths and forward-backward asymmetries in Z sup 0 decays into ss-bar, cc-bar and bb-bar-preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Axelsson, M G

    1999-01-01

    Measurements are reported of partial widths and forward-backward asymmetries in flavour-identified quark final states based on the full LEP1 statistics, corresponding to 3x10 sup 6 hadronic Z sup 0 decays collected by the DELPHI experiment from 1992 to 1995. Particle identification provided by the Ring Imaging Cherenkov counters and the Time Projection Chamber is used to obtain clear D sup 0 , D sup + , D sub s sup + and LAMBDA sub c sup + signatures. A measurement of the charm multiplicity in bb-bar events is also presented. Identification of high-energy charged kaons is used to tag the s quark. Two methods for determination of the forward-backward asymmetry of the s quark are presented.

  3. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ channel in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Abhinav [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2011-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is performed in 5.2 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at p √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The final state considered is a pair of b jets with large missing transverse energy, as expected from p$\\bar{p}$→ ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ production. The search is also sensitive to the WH → ℓvb$\\bar{b}$ channel, where the charged lepton is not identified. Boosted decision trees are used to discriminate signal from background. Good agreement is observed between data and expected backgrounds, and, for a Higgs-boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction of (p$\\bar{p}$ → (Z/W)H) × (H → b$\\bar{b}$) that is a factor 4.57 expected and 3.73 observed larger than the value expected from the standard model.

  4. Combined Effects of Curing Temperatures and Alkaline Concrete on Tensile Properties of GFRP Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-rui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of studies have been conducted on the tensile properties of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under different environments. However, most of these studies have been experimentally based on the environmental immersion test after standard-curing and the lack of influence on the tensile properties of GFRP bars embedded in concrete during the curing process of concrete. This paper presents the results of the microscopic structures through scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and tensile properties of GFRP bars, which were employed to investigate the combined effects of curing temperatures and alkaline concrete on tensile properties of GFRP bars. The results showed that the higher curing temperature aggravated the influence of the alkaline concrete environment on GFRP bars but did not change the mechanisms of mechanical degradation of the GFRP bars. The influence of different curing temperatures on the tensile strength of GFRP bars was different between the bare bar and bars in concrete. Finally, the exponential correlation equation of two different test methods was established, and the attenuation ratio of the tensile strength of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under different curing temperatures was predicted by the bare test.

  5. Measurements of the branching fractions of $B^{+} \\to p \\bar{p} K^{+}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The branching fractions of the decay $B^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+}$ for different intermediate states are measured using data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The total branching fraction, its charmless component $(M_{p\\bar p} <2.85 $ $ GeV/c^{2})$ and the branching fractions via the resonant $c\\bar c$ states $\\eta_{c}(1S)$ and $\\psi(2S)$ relative to the decay via a $J/\\psi$ intermediate state are \\begin{align*} \\frac{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+})_{total}}{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+})}=& \\, 4.91 \\pm 0.19 \\, {(\\rm stat)} \\pm 0.14 \\, {(\\rm syst)},\\\\ \\frac{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+})_{M_{p\\bar p} <2.85 {GeV/}c^{2}}}{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+})}=& \\, 2.02 \\pm 0.10 \\, {(\\rm stat)}\\pm 0.08 \\, {(\\rm syst)},\\\\ \\frac{{\\mathcal B} (B^{+} \\to \\eta_{c}(1S) K^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+})}{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+} \\to p \\bar p K^{+})} = & \\, 0.578 \\pm 0.03...

  6. Implementation of a workplace smoking ban in bars: the limits of local discretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montini, Theresa; Bero, Lisa A

    2008-12-08

    In January 1998, the California state legislature extended a workplace smoking ban to bars. The purpose of this study was to explore the conditions that facilitate or hinder compliance with a smoking ban in bars. We studied the implementation of the smoking ban in bars by interviewing three sets of policy participants: bar employers responsible for complying with the law; local government officials responsible for enforcing the law; and tobacco control activists who facilitated implementation. We transcribed the interviews and did a qualitative analysis of the text. The conditions that facilitated bar owners' compliance with a smoking ban in bars included: if the cost to comply was minimal; if the bars with which they were in competition were in compliance with the smoking ban; and if there was authoritative, consistent, coordinated, and uniform enforcement. Conversely, the conditions that hindered compliance included: if the law had minimal sanctions; if competing bars in the area allowed smoking; and if enforcement was delayed or inadequate. Many local enforcers wished to forfeit their local discretion and believed the workplace smoking ban in bars would be best implemented by a state agency. The potential implication of this study is that, given the complex nature of local politics, smoking bans in bars are best implemented at a broader provincial or national level.

  7. Implementation of a workplace smoking ban in bars: The limits of local discretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bero Lisa A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In January 1998, the California state legislature extended a workplace smoking ban to bars. The purpose of this study was to explore the conditions that facilitate or hinder compliance with a smoking ban in bars. Methods We studied the implementation of the smoking ban in bars by interviewing three sets of policy participants: bar employers responsible for complying with the law; local government officials responsible for enforcing the law; and tobacco control activists who facilitated implementation. We transcribed the interviews and did a qualitative analysis of the text. Results The conditions that facilitated bar owners' compliance with a smoking ban in bars included: if the cost to comply was minimal; if the bars with which they were in competition were in compliance with the smoking ban; and if there was authoritative, consistent, coordinated, and uniform enforcement. Conversely, the conditions that hindered compliance included: if the law had minimal sanctions; if competing bars in the area allowed smoking; and if enforcement was delayed or inadequate. Conclusion Many local enforcers wished to forfeit their local discretion and believed the workplace smoking ban in bars would be best implemented by a state agency. The potential implication of this study is that, given the complex nature of local politics, smoking bans in bars are best implemented at a broader provincial or national level.

  8. Observation of the baryonic B-decay B0bar -> LambdaC antiproton K- pi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-20

    The authors report the observation of the baryonic B-decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, excluding contributions from the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar {Lambda}}K{sup -}. Using a data sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC, the measured branching fraction is (4.33 {+-} 0.82){sub stat} {+-} 0.33{sub syst} {+-} 1.13{sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}} x 10{sup -5}. In addition they find evidence for the resonant decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{bar p}K{sup -} and determine its branching fraction to be (1.11 {+-} 0.30{sub stat} {+-} 0.09{sub syst} {+-} 0.29{sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The errors are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. For the resonant decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}{bar K}*{sup 0} we obtain an upper limit of 2.42 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

  9. The B→ \\bar{K}π ℓ ℓ distribution at low hadronic recoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Diganta

    2017-10-01

    The four-body non-resonant rare \\bar{B}→ \\bar{K}π ℓ ℓ decay is important both as a background to the benchmark resonant mode \\bar{B}→ \\bar{K}^*ℓ ℓ and as sensitive probe for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). We show that in the SM the branching ratio of \\bar{B}→ \\bar{K}π ℓ ℓ is of the order few 10^{-8}, which is only an order of magnitude smaller than the \\bar{B}→ \\bar{K}^*ℓ ℓ decay. Nevertheless, the non-resonant mode is the dominant background to \\bar{B}→ \\bar{K}^*ℓ ℓ compared to other low mass scalars. We study the angular distributions of the non-resonant mode and show that the decay offers new combinations of short-distance couplings that are absent in the resonant decay. We explore interesting phenomenology in the interference of the resonant and non-resonant modes and discuss methods to extract the relative strong phase. The new physics sensitivity in the light of interference is also discussed.

  10. The effect of colored crowding bars on the HOTV visual acuity test in amblyopic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttum, Mark S; Covert, Douglas J

    2008-08-01

    Colored versus black crowding bars surrounding a black optotype may induce a greater level of interest in visual acuity testing in young children. To evaluate the adequacy of colored bars for a satisfactory crowding effect in children with amblyopia, we compared visual acuity measurements using black versus red, green, or yellow bars. To choose the best color to compare with black, 53 patients with amblyopia were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 crowding bar colors. Subjects had the visual acuity of each eye measured with black HOTV optotypes and bars and then with black optotypes and either red, green, or yellow bars. In a second phase of the study red crowding bars were compared with black in a group of 48 different patients with amblyopia. The difference in logMAR visual acuity between amblyopic eyes tested with red versus black crowding bars was not statistically significant (mean visual acuities of -0.24 and -0.26, respectively; p = 0.315), but the difference was significant with either green (-0.30 and -0.34; p = 0.047) or yellow (-0.14 and -0.24; p = 0.0003). In the nonamblyopic eyes none of the colored crowding bars yielded significantly different visual acuity measurements compared with black. In the second phase of the study red crowding bars yielded an average of one letter worse visual acuity than black bars, but the difference was not statistically significant. Red crowding bars surrounding black optotypes are an acceptable alternative to black crowding bars for the measurement of visual acuity in amblyopic eyes.

  11. {barP}ANDA at FAIR. Physics and detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, G.

    2012-12-01

    The {barP}ANDA experiment represents the central part of the hadron physics branch of the antiproton program of the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt/Germany. It will investigate antiproton annihilations with an almost 4 π acceptance from two sequent spectrometer in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. The gluon rich reaction product of antiproton-proton and antiproton-nucleus collisions on one hand and the high intensity and phase space cooled antiproton beam of the HESR on the other hand constitutes an ideal environment to study the sector of non-conventional hadronic states.

  12. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  13. Stampless fabrication of sheet bars using disposable templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, V. P.; Safonov, S. V.; Smolentsev, E. V.; Fedonin, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The article is devoted to the new method of small-scale fabrication of sheet bars. The procedure is performed by using disposable overlay templates, or those associated with a sheet, which parameters are obtained directly from the drawing. The proposed method used as a substitution of die cutting enables to intensify the preparatory technological process, which is particularly effective when launching the market-oriented items into production. It significantly increases the competitiveness of mechanical engineering and creates the conditions for technical support of present-day flexible production systems.

  14. D0-D bar 0 mixing and rare charm decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdman, Gustavo; Shipsey, Ian

    2003-10-08

    We review the current status of flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector. We focus on the standard-model predictions and identify the main sources of theoretical uncertainties in both D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing and rare charm decays. The potential of these observables for constraining short-distance physics in the standard model and its extensions is compromised by the presence of large nonperturbative effects. We examine the possible discovery windows in which short-distance physics can be tested and study the effects of various extensions of the standard model. The current experimental situation and future prospects are reviewed.

  15. Poly-SiGe-based MEMS Xylophone Bar Magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    Rochus, Véronique; Jansen, R.; Tilmans, H. A. C.; Rottenberg, X.; Chen, C.; Ranvier, S.; Lamy, Hervé; Rochus, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary characterization of highly sensitive MEMS-based Xylophone Bar Magnetometers (XBMs) realized in imec’s poly-SiGe MEMS technology. Key for our Lorentz force driven capacitively sensed resonant sensor are the combination of reasonably high Q-factor and conductivity of imec’s poly-SiGe, our optimized multiphysics sensor design targeting the maximization of the Q-factor in a wide temperature range as well as our proprietary monolithic abo...

  16. Torsion bar antenna in the proper reference frame with rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Kouji

    2014-01-01

    The resultant response of the rotating torsion bar antenna for gravitational waves discussed in [M. Ando et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 105} (2010), 161101.] is re-investigate from a general-relativistic point of view. To do this, the equation of motion of a free falling particle in the proper reference frame of a rotating observer is used. As a result, the resultant response derived in the above paper is also valid even when $\\omega_{g}\\sim\\Omega$, where $\\omega_{g}$ and $\\Omega$ are the angular frequencies of gravitational waves and the rotation of the antenna, respectively.

  17. How bar-headed geese fly over the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham R; Hawkes, Lucy A; Frappell, Peter B; Butler, Patrick J; Bishop, Charles M; Milsom, William K

    2015-03-01

    Bar-headed geese cross the Himalayas on one of the most iconic high-altitude migrations in the world. Heart rates and metabolic costs of flight increase with elevation and can be near maximal during steep climbs. Their ability to sustain the high oxygen demands of flight in air that is exceedingly oxygen-thin depends on the unique cardiorespiratory physiology of birds in general along with several evolved specializations across the O2 transport cascade. ©2015 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  18. Investigating learners’ meta-representational competencies when constructing bar graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mhlolo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Current views in the teaching and learning of data handling suggest that learners should create graphs of data they collect themselves and not just use textbook data. It is presumed real-world data creates an ideal environment for learners to tap from their pool of stored knowledge and demonstrate their meta-representational competences. Although prior knowledge is acknowledged as a critical resource out of which expertise is constructed, empirical evidence shows that new levels of mathematical thinking do not always build logically and consistently on previous experience. This suggests that researchers should analyse this resource in more detail in order to understand where prior knowledge could be supportive and where it could be problematic in the process of learning. This article analyses Grade 11 learners’meta-representational competences when constructing bar graphs. The basic premise was that by examining the process of graph construction and how learners respond to a variety of stages thereof, it was possible to create a description of a graphical frame or a knowledge representation structure that was stored in the learner’s memory. Errors could then be described and explained in terms of the inadequacies of the frame, that is: ‘Is the learner making good use of the stored prior knowledge?’ A total of 43 learners were observed over a week in a classroom environment whilst they attempted to draw graphs for data they had collected for a mathematics project. Four units of analysis are used to focus on how learners created a frequency table, axes, bars and the overall representativeness of the graph vis-à-vis the data. Results show that learners had an inadequate graphical frame as they drew a graph that had elements of a value bar graph, distribution bar graph and a histogram all representing the same data set. This inability to distinguish between these graphs and the types of data they represent implies that learners were likely

  19. The Bleacher Bar at Fenway Park: Transforming a Former Indoor Batting Cage Into a Unique Eatery and Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ruggie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As one of the oldest cities in the United States, Boston is steeped in rich history. Many of the city’s most successful restaurants and hotels embrace the architectural heritage, while still providing modern conveniences including The Liberty Hotel, The Kendall Hotel, and Chart House restaurant. In fact, Boston’s Fenway Park offers one of the best examples of the “adaptive reuse” of iconic space. This is the story behind the design and construction of the Bleacher Bar; an area once used as an indoor batting cage for our beloved Red Sox baseball team.

  20. The SNX-PX-BAR family in macropinocytosis: the regulation of macropinosome formation by SNX-PX-BAR proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack T H Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macropinocytosis is an actin-driven endocytic process, whereby membrane ruffles fold back onto the plasma membrane to form large (>0.2 µm in diameter endocytic organelles called macropinosomes. Relative to other endocytic pathways, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in macropinocytosis. Recently, members of the Sorting Nexin (SNX family have been localized to the cell surface and early macropinosomes, and implicated in macropinosome formation. SNX-PX-BAR proteins form a subset of the SNX family and their lipid-binding (PX and membrane-curvature sensing (BAR domain architecture further implicates their functional involvement in macropinosome formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exploited the tractability of macropinosomes through image-based screening and systematic overexpression of SNX-PX-BAR proteins to quantitate their effect on macropinosome formation. SNX1 (40.9+/-3.19 macropinosomes, SNX5 (36.99+/-4.48 macropinosomes, SNX9 (37.55+/-2.4 macropinosomes, SNX18 (88.2+/-8 macropinosomes, SNX33 (65.25+/-6.95 macropinosomes all exhibited statistically significant (p<0.05 increases in average macropinosome numbers per 100 transfected cells as compared to control cells (24.44+/-1.81 macropinosomes. SNX1, SNX5, SNX9, and SNX18 were also found to associate with early-stage macropinosomes within 5 minutes following organelle formation. The modulation of intracellular PI(3,4,5P(3 levels through overexpression of PTEN or a lipid phosphatase-deficient mutant PTEN(G129E was also observed to significantly reduce or elevate macropinosome formation respectively; coexpression of PTEN(G129E with SNX9 or SNX18 synergistically elevated macropinosome formation to 119.4+/-7.13 and 91.4+/-6.37 macropinosomes respectively (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SNX1, SNX5, SNX9, SNX18, and SNX33 were all found to elevate macropinosome formation and (with the exception of SNX33 associate with early-stage macropinosomes. Moreover

  1. Analysis of Al-Cu Bimetallic Bars Properties After Explosive Welding and Rolling in Modified Passes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mróz S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the experimental tests of Al-Cu bimetallic bars rolling process in multi-radial modified passes. The bimetallic bars consist of aluminium core, grade 1050A and copper outer layer, grade M1E. The stocks were round bars with diameter 22 mm with a copper layer share of 15 and 30%. As a result of rolling in four passes, bars of a diameter of about 16.0 mm were obtained. A bimetallic stock was manufactured using an explosive welding method. The use of the designed arrangement of multi-radial modified stretching passes resulted in obtaining Al-Cu bimetallic bars with the required lateral dimensions, an uniform distribution of the cladding layer over the bar perimeter and high quality of shear strength between individual layers.

  2. INFLUENCE OF BROKEN ROTOR BARS LOCATION IN THE SQUIRREL CAGE INDUCTION MOTOR USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Halem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the number of broken bars and varying load affect on the amplitudes of specific harmonic components  in the process analysis of induction motors under broken rotor bars. The location of broken bars is an important factor which affects the diagnosis of the broken bars defect. In this paper the simulation is determinate for different cases for distribution of broken bars under induction motor pole in order to show the impact of broken bars location upon the amplitude of harmonic fault. The simulation results are obtained by using time stepping finite elements (TSFE method. The geometrical characteristics of motor, the effects of slotting and the magnetic saturation of lamination core are included in induction motor model.

  3. INFLUENCE OF BROKEN ROTOR BARS LOCATION IN THE SQUIRREL CAGE INDUCTION MOTOR USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Halem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the number of broken bars and varying load affect on the amplitudes of specific harmonic components in the process analysis of induction motors under broken rotor bars. The location of broken bars is an important factor which affects the diagnosis of the broken bars defect. In this paper the simulation is determinate for different cases for distribution of broken bars under induction motor pole in order to show the impact of broken bars location upon the amplitude of harmonic fault. The simulation results are obtained by using time stepping finite elements (TSFE method. The geometrical characteristics of motor, the effects of slotting and the magnetic saturation of lamination core are included in induction motor model.

  4. Optimal design of a bar with an attached mass for maximizing the heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris P. Belinskiy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We maximize, with respect to the cross sectional area, the rate of heat transfer through a bar of given mass. The bar serves as an extended surface to enhance the heat transfer surface of a larger heated known mass to which the bar is attached. In this paper we neglect heat transfer from the sides of the bar and consider only conduction through its length. The rate of cooling is defined by the first eigenvalue of the corresponding Sturm-Liouville problem. We establish existence of an optimal design via rearrangement techniques. The necessary conditions of optimality admit a unique optimal design. We compare the rate of heat transfer for that bar with the rate for the bar of the same mass but of a constant cross-section area.

  5. BaBar computing - From collisions to physics results

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The BaBar experiment at SLAC studies B-physics at the Upsilon(4S) resonance using the high-luminosity e+e- collider PEP-II at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Taking, processing and analyzing the very large data samples is a significant computing challenge. This presentation will describe the entire BaBar computing chain and illustrate the solutions chosen as well as their evolution with the ever higher luminosity being delivered by PEP-II. This will include data acquisition and software triggering in a high availability, low-deadtime online environment, a prompt, automated calibration pass through the data SLAC and then the full reconstruction of the data that takes place at INFN-Padova within 24 hours. Monte Carlo production takes place in a highly automated fashion in 25+ sites. The resulting real and simulated data is distributed and made available at SLAC and other computing centers. For analysis a much more sophisticated skimming pass has been introduced in the past year, ...

  6. Manufacturing cereal bars with high nutritional value through experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Covino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizations responsible for public health throughout the world have been increasingly worrying about how to feed populations encouraging a nutritious and balanced diet in order to decrease the occurrence of chronic diseases, which are constantly related to an inadequate diet. Still, due to matters of modern lifestyle consumers are increasingly seeking convenient products. This being so, cereal bars have been an option when the matter is low calorie fast food which is also source of fiber. This study aimed at developing a cereal bar with high dietary fiber, iron, vitamins A and vitamin E, in order to easily enable adult population achieve the daily recommendation for such nutrients. Eight formulations plus the focal point were conducted through experimental planning; sensory analysis with 110 tasters for each block and texture. Afterwards, we conducted centesimal analysis for all three formulations presenting the best sensory results. After statistical analysis and comparison to the means for products available in the market, it was possible to conclude that the product developed presented great acceptance and fiber level more than twice as much as the means for commercial products.

  7. Hall Potential Distribution in Anti-Hall bar Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquini, Vinicio; Knighton, Talbot; Wu, Zhe; Huang, Jian; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    A high quality system has been fabricated in an Anti-Hall bar geometry, by opening a 1.4 x 2.0 mm rectangular window using wet etching in the middle of a 2.4 x 3.0 mm two-dimensional high-mobility (μ = 2 . 6 × 106 cm2/(V .s)) hole system confined in a 20 nm wide (100) GaAs quantum well. Topologically this system is equivalent to a normal Hall bar even though there is an extra set of edges in the center. This configuration allows us to probe the Hall potential distribution in relation to the formation of edge channels. The Quantum Hall measurements at 30 mK show a standard behavior of the outer edges. At each Hall plateau the inner edge becomes an equipotential and the Hall voltage between the inner and outer edges exhibits a drastic asymmetry for the upper and lower arms of the sample. At various integer fillings, depending on the chirality, the voltage drop across one of the arms measures 0 while the drop across the other one is equal to the Hall voltage. This behavior will be explained in terms of the dynamical process of forming the edge channels which also will account for the more irregular behavior of the Hall potential in more disordered systems. NSF DMR-1410302.

  8. Observation of $B^0_s\\to\\bar{D}^0 K^0_S$ and evidence for $B^0_s\\to\\bar{D}^{*0} K^0_S$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-04-21

    The first observation of the $B^0_s\\to\\bar{D}^0 K^0_S$ decay mode and evidence for the $B^0_s\\to\\bar{D}^{*0} K^0_S$ decay mode are reported. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ collected in $pp$ collisions by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fractions are measured to be \\begin{align*} \\mathcal{B}(B^0_s\\to\\bar{D}^0 \\bar{K}^0) &= (4.3\\pm0.5(\\text{stat})\\pm0.3(\\text{syst})\\pm0.3(\\text{frag})\\pm0.6(\\text{norm}))\\times10^{-4},\\\\ \\mathcal{B}(B^0_s\\to\\bar{D}^{*0} \\bar{K}^0) &= (2.8\\pm1.0(\\text{stat})\\pm0.3(\\text{syst})\\pm0.2(\\text{frag})\\pm0.4(\\text{norm}))\\times10^{-4}, \\end{align*} where the uncertainties are due to contributions coming from statistical precision, systematic effects, and the precision of two external inputs, the ratio $f_s/f_d$ and the branching fraction of $B^0\\to\\bar{D}^0 K^0_S$, which is used as a calibration channel.

  9. The location of late night bars and alcohol-related crashes in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ned

    2017-10-01

    A study in the City of Houston, Texas, related the location of establishments primarily serving alcohol ("bars") after midnight to late night alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes. There were three data sets for 2007-09: 1) 764bars that were open after midnight; 2) 1660 alcohol-related crashes that occurred within the City of Houston between midnight and 6 am; and 3) 4689 modeling network road segments to which bars and alcohol-related crashes were assigned. Forty-five percent of the late night alcohol-related crashes were within a quarter mile of a late night bar. The bars were highly concentrated in 17 small bar clusters. Using the modeling network, Poisson-Gamma-CAR and Poisson-Lognormal-CAR spatial regression models showed a positive exponential relationship between late night alcohol-related crashes and the number of late nights bars and bar clusters, and a negative exponential relationship to distance to the nearest late night bar controlling for the type of road segment (freeway, principal arterial, minor arterial). A more general model dropped the bar cluster variable. Further, the Poisson-Gamma-CAR model appeared to produce a better representation than the Poisson-Lognormal-CAR model though the errors were different. The general Poisson-Gamma-CAR model showed that each late night bar increased the frequency of alcohol-related crashes on a segment by approximately 190%. For each mile closer a segment was to a late night bar, the likelihood increased by 42%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proposed fault diagnostics of a broken rotor bar induction motor fed from PWM inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeka M.H. Khater

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fault diagnostics technique for a three-phase squirrel cage induction motor. The method is developed using a simplified model affected by bar resistance variation. Based on 3-phase time domain model, the rotor broken bar with different conditions has been simulated to investigate the resulting torque speed characteristic in each condition. The developed fault diagnostics system is capable of identifying the type of the broken-bar faults in the squirrel cage induction machines.

  11. Elastic Wave Propagation for Condition Assessment of Steel Bar Embedded in Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Rucka M.; Zima B.

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with experimental and numerical investigations of elastic wave propagation in steel bars partially embedded in mortar. The bars with different bonding lengths were tested. Two types of damage were considered: damage of the steel bar and damage of the mortar. Longitudinal waves were excited by a piezoelectric actuator and a vibrometer was used to non-contact measurements of velocity signals. Numerical calculations were performed using the finite elements method. As a result, t...

  12. KL -> pi0 nu nu-bar as a Probe of New Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Bryman, Douglas; Buras, Andrzej J.; Isidori, Gino; Littenberg, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    We summarize the theoretical virtues of the rare K -> pi nu nu-bar decays and emphasize the unique role of KL -> pi0 nu nu-bar in probing the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular concerning possible new sources of CP violation and flavor-symmetry breaking. A brief summary of the prospects for the measurement of the KL -> pi0 nu nu-bar rate is also given.

  13. K L-> π 0ν bar ν as a Probe of New Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas; Buras, Andrzej J.; Isidori, Gino; Littenberg, Laurence

    We summarize the theoretical virtues of the rare K->π ν bar ν decays and emphasize the unique role of K L ->π 0ν bar ν in probing the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular concerning possible new sources of CP violation and flavor-symmetry breaking. A brief summary of the prospects for the measurement of the K L -> π 0ν bar ν rate is also given.

  14. Destruction of intertidal bar morphology during a summer storm surge event: Example of positive morphodynamic feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masselink, Gerd; Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart

    2011-01-01

    . The measurements demonstrated an example of positive morphodynamic feedback. Once the bar crest elevation started to decrease because of wave overtopping and sediment transport into the runnel on the rising tide, the bar crest lowered and overwash frequency increased, leading to enhanced crest erosion, even under...... conditions of constant or slowly falling tide conditions. Due to the relatively small spatial scale of slip-face bar systems and the occurrence of positive feedback, they can be destroyed over a single tidal cycle....

  15. In-situ Monitoring of Sub-cooled Nucleate Boiling on Fuel Cladding Surface in Water at 1 bar and 130 bars using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Heon; Wu, Kaige; Shim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Crud deposition increases through a sufficient corrosion product supply around the steam-liquid interface of a boiling bubble. Therefore, the understanding of this SNB phenomenon is important for effective and safe operation of nuclear plants. The experimental SNB studies have been performed in visible conditions at a low pressure using a high speed video camera. Meanwhile, an acoustic emission (AE) method is an on-line non-destructive evaluation method to sense transient elastic wave resulting from a rapid release of energy within a dynamic process. Some researchers have investigated boiling phenomena using the AE method. However, their works were performed at atmospheric pressure conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work is for the first time to detect and monitor SNB on fuel cladding surface in simulated PWR primary water at 325 .deg. C and 130 bars using an AE technique. We successfully observed the boiling AE signals in primary water at 1 bar and 130 bars using AE technique. Visualization test was performed effectively to identify a correlation between water boiling phenomenon and AE signals in a transparent glass cell at 1 bar, and the boiling AE signals were in good agreement with the boiling behavior. Based on the obtained correlations at 1 bar, the AE signals obtained at 130 bars were analyzed. The boiling density and size of the AE signals at 130 bars were decreased by the flow parameters. However, overall AE signals showed characteristics and a trend similar to the AE signals at 1 bar. This indicates that boiling AE signals are detected successfully at 130 bars, and the AE technique can be effectively implemented in non-visualized condition at high pressures.

  16. Grating lobe reduction in 1-D transducer arrays by driving a bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian E.; Hughes, W. Jack

    2005-09-01

    This presentation investigates the effect of placing a finite-length bar between eight transducer elements and water in order to reduce undesirable grating lobes. The transducer elements are mounted to the bar, with a thin polyurethane layer between the elements and the bar, and force the bar to approximate the radiation of a continuous line source (i.e., no grating lobes). Reductions in the grating lobe with the insertion of a bar, compared to the unmodified array, have been found numerically and experimentally. In addition the transducer array can still be steered and amplitude shaded, and the bar geometry may be scaled according to the design frequency. Freely vibrating bending modes in the bar create undesirable additional radiation. The benefits and limitations of retrofitting existing array systems with a bar for grating lobe reduction, in frequency and steer angle, will be presented. The insertion of the bar provides a very inexpensive and easily implemented approach to reduce grating lobes without increasing the number of array elements. [Work sponsored by ONR Code 333, Dr. David Drumheller.

  17. Cereal bars produced with banana peel flour: evaluation of acceptability and sensory profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Vania Silva; Conti-Silva, Ana Carolina

    2018-01-01

    A mixture design was used to investigate the effects of banana peel flour, rice flakes and oat flour on sensory acceptability of cereal bars, with subsequent evaluation of sensory profile of products identified as having high acceptability. Regions of greater response for acceptability of the cereal bars, which are dependent on the three investigated components, were found. Although having good acceptability, sensory profiles of cereal bars were different. A cereal bar with the lowest quantity of banana peel flour was described as having a higher amount of rice flakes, chewiness and crispness, while formulations with intermediate and highest quantities of banana peel flour were described by darker color, higher banana aroma and bitter taste. Contrary to expectations, banana flavor of cereal bar with highest quantity of banana peel flour was lower than cereal bars with intermediate quantities. Cereal bars were not different in terms of hardness and adhesiveness and they also had a similar sweet taste and oat flavor. The use of banana peel flour in production of cereal bars is feasible and, even with different sensory profiles, cereal bars with banana peel flour are acceptable, which may favor the development of new products for different market niches. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Statistical Decay of Excited ΛΛ Hypernuclei and γ-SPECTROSCOPY at bar P Anda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, A. Sanchez; Pochodzalla, J.; Botvina, A.

    2010-10-01

    Hypernuclear physics is currently attracting renewed attention. Thanks to the use of stored bar p beams, copious production of double Λ hypernuclei is expected at the bar P anda experiment which will enable high precision γ-spectroscopy of such nuclei for the first time. In the present work we have studied the population of particle stable, excited states in double hypernuclei after the capture of a Ξ- within a statistical decay model. In order to check the feasibility of producing and performing γ-spectroscopy of double hypernuclei at bar P ANDA, an event generator based on these calculations has been implemented in the bar P ANDA simulation framework PANDAROOT.

  19. Control of Glucosylceramide Production and Morphogenesis by the Bar1 Ceramide Synthase in Fusarium graminearum

    OpenAIRE

    Rittenour, William R.; Ming Chen; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Harris, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of plasma membrane proteins to the virulence of plant pathogenic fungi is poorly understood. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to characterize the acyl-CoA dependent ceramide synthase Bar1 (previously implicated in plasma membrane organization) in the wheat pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The role of Bar1 in mediating cell membrane organization was confirmed as ΔBAR1 mutants failed to display a distinct sterol-rich domain at the hyphal tip. The ΔBAR1 mutants were no...

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations on the use of polymer Hopkinson pressure bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, John J; Ahonsi, Bright; Palamidi, Elisavet; Reid, Steve R

    2014-08-28

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing has traditionally been carried out using metal bars. For testing low stiffness materials such as rubbers or low strength materials such as low density cellular solids considered primarily herein, there are many advantages to replacing the metal bars with polymer bars. An investigation of a number of aspects associated with the accuracy of SHPB testing of these materials is reported. Test data are used to provide qualitative comparisons of accuracy using different bar materials and wave-separation techniques. Sample results from SHPB tests are provided for balsa, Rohacell foam and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene. The techniques used are verified by finite-element (FE) analysis. Experimentally, the material properties of the bars are determined from impact tests in the form of a complex elastic modulus without curve fitting to a rheological model. For the simulations, a rheological model is used to define the bar properties by curve fitting to the experimentally derived properties. Wave propagation in a polymer bar owing to axial impact of a steel bearing ball is simulated. The results indicate that the strain histories can be used to determine accurately the viscoelastic properties of polymer bars. An FE model of the full viscoelastic SHPB set-up is then used to simulate tests on hyperelastic materials. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Monolithic fiber coupler for high power diode laser bars: results of prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, T.; Bagschik, K.; Kalkusinki, A.

    2017-02-01

    A novel micro optical element is introduced, allowing coupling of light from several emitters of a laser diode bar into an optical fiber at high brightness. The monolithic fiber coupler is designed with individual segments for each emitter of the laser diode bar, providing two refractive surfaces for each emitter. By means of the monolithic fiber coupler, very cost effective fiber coupled laser diode modules based on bars are feasible. Consequently, approaches based on laser diodes bars can also compete with single emitter solutions for pumping application. Further applications of laser modules with monolithic fiber couplers may also be for direct material processing or as components in projection and illumination systems.

  2. Formation of membrane ridges and scallops by the F-BAR protein Nervous Wreck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becalska, Agata N; Kelley, Charlotte F; Berciu, Cristina; Stanishneva-Konovalova, Tatiana B; Fu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shiyu; Sokolova, Olga S; Nicastro, Daniela; Rodal, Avital A

    2013-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells are defined by extensive intracellular compartmentalization, which requires dynamic membrane remodeling. FER/Cip4 homology-Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain family proteins form crescent-shaped dimers, which can bend membranes into buds and tubules of defined geometry and lipid composition. However, these proteins exhibit an unexplained wide diversity of membrane-deforming activities in vitro and functions in vivo. We find that the F-BAR domain of the neuronal protein Nervous Wreck (Nwk) has a novel higher-order structure and membrane-deforming activity that distinguishes it from previously described F-BAR proteins. The Nwk F-BAR domain assembles into zigzags, creating ridges and periodic scallops on membranes in vitro. This activity depends on structural determinants at the tips of the F-BAR dimer and on electrostatic interactions of the membrane with the F-BAR concave surface. In cells, Nwk-induced scallops can be extended by cytoskeletal forces to produce protrusions at the plasma membrane. Our results define a new F-BAR membrane-deforming activity and illustrate a molecular mechanism by which positively curved F-BAR domains can produce a variety of membrane curvatures. These findings expand the repertoire of F-BAR domain mediated membrane deformation and suggest that unique modes of higher-order assembly can define how these proteins sculpt the membrane.

  3. Elastic Wave Propagation for Condition Assessment of Steel Bar Embedded in Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucka, M.; Zima, B.

    2015-02-01

    This study deals with experimental and numerical investigations of elastic wave propagation in steel bars partially embedded in mortar. The bars with different bonding lengths were tested. Two types of damage were considered: damage of the steel bar and damage of the mortar. Longitudinal waves were excited by a piezoelectric actuator and a vibrometer was used to non-contact measurements of velocity signals. Numerical calculations were performed using the finite elements method. As a result, this paper discusses the possibility of condition assessment in bars embedded in mortar by means of elastic waves.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of IPS –Empress II Ceramic Bridge Reinforced by Zirconia Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Geramy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of trenched zirconia bar on the von Mises stress distribution of IPS –Empress II core ceramics.Material and Methods: The three-dimensional model including a three-unit bridge from the second premolar to the second molar was designed. The model was reinforced with zirconia bar (ZB, zirconia bar with vertical trench (VZB, and zirconia bar with horizontal trench (HZB (cross sections of these bars were circular. The model without zirconia bar was designed as the control. The bridges were loaded by 200 N and 500 N on the occlusal surface at the middle of the pontic component, and Von-Mises stresses were evaluated along a defined path.Result: In the connector area, VonMises stress in MPa were approximately identical in the specimens with ZB (at molar connector (MC: 4.75, and at premolar connector (PC: 6.40 and without ZB (MC: 5.50, PC: 6.68, and considerable differences were not recognized. Whereas, Von-Mises stress (MPa in the specimens with horizontal trenched Zirconia bar (HZB (MC: 3.91, PC: 2.44 and Vertical trenched Zirconia bar (VZB (MC: 2.53, PC: 2.56 was decreased considerably.Conclusion: Embeded trenched zirconia bar could reinforce IPS-Empress II at the connector area which is a main failure region in all ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  5. Towards understanding the dynamics of the bar/bulge region in our Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Athanassoula E.

    2012-01-01

    I review some of the work on bars which is closely linked to the bar/bulge system in our Galaxy. Several independent studies, using totally independent methods, come to the same results about the 3D structure of a bar, i.e., that a bar is composed of a vertically thick inner part and a vertically thin outer part. I give examples of this from simulations and substantiate the discussion with input from orbital structure analysis and from observations. The thick part has a considerably shorter r...

  6. Study of the behavior of corroded steel bar and convenient method of repairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Abdelhamid Taha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the residual strength and mechanical properties of corroded reinforcing bare bars. An attempt has been made to describe firstly the impressed current technique which is commonly used for accelerating reinforcement corrosion. The study compared between two methods of repairing the corroded steel bar, the first one which mostly used by painting the half surface area of corroded bar; and the another one by coating the full surface area of corroded bar. The experimental results show that, the corrosion process alters the external surface of steel bar due to pitting, the residual cross-section of the corroded bar is no longer round and varies considerably along its circumference and its length so the residual diameter is better defined by loss of weight. The rate of corrosion has been calculated by two terms, the term of mass loss rate (MR and the term of penetration rate (CR. The mass loss rate decreased for fully coated bars by 1.7–2 times than half coated bars showing the importance of fully coating bars in corrosion repair. Finally, the reliability of using the galvanostatic method in research work was represented by comparing between the real time and the accelerated time to reach a certain degree of corrosion.

  7. DAMPING OF THE MILKY WAY BAR BY MANIFOLD-DRIVEN SPIRALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łokas, Ewa L. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-10-10

    We describe a new phenomenon of “bar damping” that may have played an important role in shaping the Milky Way bar and bulge as well as its spiral structure. We use a collisionless N -body simulation of a Milky Way–like galaxy initially composed of a dark matter halo and an exponential disk with a Toomre parameter slightly above unity. In this configuration, dominated by the disk in the center, a bar forms relatively quickly, after 1 Gyr of evolution. This is immediately followed by the formation of two manifold-driven spiral arms and the outflow of stars that modifies the potential in the vicinity of the bar, apparently shifting the position of the L {sub 1}/ L {sub 2} Lagrange points. This modification leads to the shortening of the bar and the creation of a next generation of manifold-driven spiral arms at a smaller radius. The process repeats itself a few times over the next 0.5 Gyr resulting in further substantial weakening and shortening of the bar. The time when the damping comes to an end coincides with the first buckling episode in the bar that rebuilds the orbital structure so that no more new spiral arms are formed. The morphology of the bar and the spiral structure at this time show remarkable similarity to the present properties of the Milky Way. Later on, the bar starts to grow rather steadily again, weakened only by subsequent buckling episodes occurring at more distant parts of the disk.

  8. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Lewis J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  9. BDTs in the Search for $\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} H}$ Production with Higgs Decays to $\\mathrm{b\\bar{b}}$ at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Glaysher, Paul; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An observation of Higgs boson production in association with a top quark pair ($\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} H}$) provides a direct measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling and probes the Standard Model. The ATLAS search for $\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} H}$, $\\mathrm{H\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}}$ relies on Boosted Decision Trees for Higgs reconstruction and signal-background discrimination, which is presented for the preliminary results on the $\\sqrt{s}=$~13~TeV dataset.

  10. Measurement of the cross section ratio $\\sigma_\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b}} / \\sigma_\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} jj }$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Song; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fanzago, Federica; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Trapani, Pier Paolo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-30

    The first measurement of the cross section ratio $\\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b}} / \\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} jj }$ is presented using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb$^{-1}$ collected in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events with two leptons ($\\mathrm{e}$ or $\\mu$) and four reconstructed jets, including two identified as b quark jets, in the final state are selected. The ratio is determined for a minimum jet transverse momentum $p_\\mathrm{T}$ of both 20 and 40 GeV/$c$. The measured ratio is 0.022 $\\pm$ 0.003 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.005 (syst) for $p_\\mathrm{T}$ greater than 20 GeV/$c$. The absolute cross sections $\\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b}}$ and $\\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} jj }$ are also measured. The measured ratio for $p_\\mathrm{T}$ greater than 40 GeV/$c$ is compatible with a theoretical quantum chromodynamics calculation at next-to-leading order.

  11. Dynamics of 30 large channel bars in the Lower Mississippi River in response to river engineering from 1985 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xu, Y. Jun

    2018-01-01

    Channel bars are a major depositional feature in alluvial rivers and their morphodynamics has been investigated intensively in the past several decades. However, relatively less is known about how channel bars in alluvial rivers respond to river engineering and regulations. In this study, we assessed 30-yr morphologic changes of 30 large emerged bars located in a 223 km reach of the highly regulated Lower Mississippi River from Vicksburg, Mississippi, to the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River diversion. Landsat imagery and river stage data between 1985 and 2015 were utilized to characterize bar morphologic features and quantify decadal changes. Based on bar surface areas estimated with the satellite images at different river stages, a rating curve was developed for each of the 30 bars to determine their volumes. Results from this study show that the highly regulated river reach favored the growth of mid-channel and attached bars, while more than half of the point bars showed degradation. Currently, the mid-channel and attached bars accounted for 38% and 34% of the total volume of the 30 bars. The average volume of a single mid-channel bar is over two times that of an attached bar and over four times that of a point bar. Overall, in the past three decades, the total volume of the studied 30 bars increased by 110,118,000 m3 (41%). Total dike length in a dike field was found mostly contributing to the bar volume increase. Currently, the emerged volume of the 30 bars was estimated approximately 378,183,000 m3. The total bar volume is equivalent to 530 million metric tons of coarse sand, based on an average measured bulk density of 1.4 t/m3 for the bar sediment. The findings show that these bars are large sediment reservoirs.

  12. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to

  13. 3-D Warping in Four-Bar Laminated Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2010-09-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of the component-laminate load-carrying capacity, i.e., to calculate the loads that cause the failure of the individual layers and the component-laminate as a whole in four-bar mechanism. The component-laminate load-carrying capacity is evaluated using the Tsai-Wu-Hahn failure criterion for various layups. The reserve factor of each ply in the component-laminate is calculated by using the maximum resultant force and the maximum resultant moment occurring at different time steps at the joints of the mechanism. Here, all component bars of the mechanism are made of fiber reinforced laminates and have thin rectangular cross-sections. They could, in general, be pre-twisted and/or possess initial curvature, either by design or by defect. They are linked to each other by means of revolute joints. We restrict ourselves to linear materials with small strains within each elastic body (beam). Each component of the mechanism is modeled as a beam based on geometrically nonlinear 3-D elasticity theory. The component problems are thus split into 2-D analyses of reference beam cross-sections and nonlinear 1-D analyses along the three beam reference curves. For the thin rectangular cross-sections considered here, the 2-D cross-sectional nonlinearity is also overwhelming. This can be perceived from the fact that such sections constitute a limiting case between thin-walled open and closed sections, thus inviting the nonlinear phenomena observed in both. The strong elastic couplings of anisotropic composite laminates complicate the model further. However, a powerful mathematical tool called the Variational Asymptotic Method (VAM) not only enables such a dimensional reduction, but also provides asymptotically correct analytical solutions to the nonlinear cross-sectional analysis. Such closed-form solutions are used here in conjunction with numerical techniques for the rest of the problem to predict more quickly and accurately than would otherwise be

  14. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Lambda-bar Polarization in B0 -> Lambda-par p pi-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-08-03

    We present a measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -} branching fraction performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Based on a sample of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs we measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -}) [3.07 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. The measured differential spectrum as a function of the dibaryon invariant mass m({bar {Lambda}}p) shows a near-threshold enhancement similar to that observed in other baryonic B decays. We study the {bar {Lambda}} polarization as a function of {bar {Lambda}} energy in the B{sup 0} rest frame (E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}) and compare it with theoretical expectations of fully longitudinally right-polarized {bar {Lambda}} at large E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}.

  15. Studies of identified hadrons in qq-bar events at LEPI, in W sup + W sup - and qq-bar events at LEPII and search for stable and long-lived heavy charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, N

    1999-01-01

    The use of RICH detectors allows the identification of charged pions, kaons and protons, covering the full momentum range 0.7qq-bar, Z sup 0->bb-bar and Z sup 0->uu-bar, dd-bar, ss-bar, selected from approx 1,400,000 Z sup 0 decays collected by DELPHI in 1994. This study has been extended to high-energy qq-bar events at LEPII. New heavy particles from 2 GeV/c sup 2 to the kinematic limit at LEPII have been searched using the RICH detectors.

  16. Influence of optimization constraints in uneven parallel bar dismount swing simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Alison L; Hubbard, Mont

    2009-08-07

    Forward dynamics simulations of a dismount preparation swing on the uneven parallel bars were optimized to investigate the sensitivity of dismount revolution potential to the maximum bar force before slipping, and to low-bar avoidance. All optimization constraints were classified as 1-anatomical/physiological; limiting maximum hand force on the high bar before slipping, joint ranges of motion and maximum torques, muscle activation/deactivation timing and 2-geometric; avoiding low-bar contact, and requiring minimum landing distance. The gymnast model included torso/head, arm and two leg segments connected by a planar rotating, compliant shoulder and frictionless ball-and-socket hip joints. Maximum shoulder and hip torques were measured as functions of joint angle and angular velocity. Motions were driven by scaling maximum torques by a joint torque activation function of time which approximated the average activation of all muscles crossing the joint causing extension/flexion, or adduction/abduction. Ten joint torque activation values, and bar release times were optimized to maximize dismount revolutions using the downhill simplex method. Low-bar avoidance and maximum bar-force constraints are necessary because they reduce dismount revolution potential. Compared with the no low-bar performance, optimally avoiding the low bar by piking and straddling (abducting) the hips reduces dismount revolutions by 1.8%. Using previously reported experimentally measured peak uneven bar-force values of 3.6 and 4.0 body weight (BW) as optimization constraints, 1.40 and 1.55 revolutions with the body extended and arms overhead were possible, respectively. The bar-force constraint is not active if larger than 6.9 BW, and instead performances are limited only by maximum shoulder and hip torques. Bar forces accelerate the mass center (CM) when performing muscular work to flex/extend the joints, and increase gymnast mechanical energy. Therefore, the bar-force constraint inherently

  17. How do spiral arm contrasts relate to bars, disc breaks and other fundamental galaxy properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Adrian; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, Evangelie; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Bosma, Albert; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos

    2017-10-01

    We investigate how the properties of spiral arms relate to other fundamental galaxy properties, including bars and disc breaks. We use previously published measurements of those properties, and our own measurements of arm and bar contrasts for a large sample of galaxies, using 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Flocculent galaxies are clearly distinguished from other spiral arm classes, especially by their lower stellar mass and surface density. Multi-armed and grand-design galaxies are similar in most of their fundamental parameters, excluding some bar properties and the bulge-to-total ratio. Based on these results, we revisit the sequence of spiral arm classes, and discuss classical bulges as a necessary condition for standing spiral wave modes in grand-design galaxies. We find a strong correlation between bulge-to-total ratio and bar contrast, and a weaker correlation between arm and bar contrasts. Barred and unbarred galaxies exhibit similar arm contrasts, but the highest arm contrasts are found exclusively in barred galaxies. Interestingly, the bar contrast, and its increase from flocculent to grand-design galaxies, is systematically more significant than that of the arm contrast. We corroborate previous findings concerning a connection between bars and disc breaks. In particular, in grand-design galaxies, the bar contrast correlates with the normalized disc break radius. This does not hold for other spiral arm classes or the arm contrast. Our measurements of arm and bar contrast and radial contrast profiles are publicly available.

  18. Effects of a groyne field on inner bar dynamics: Anglet, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santiago, Inaki; Morichon, Denis; Arnould, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Groynes are usually designed to limit beach erosion by mitigating longshore sediment transport. However, little is known about their side effects on inner-bar morphodynamics in double sandbar systems. While most of the studies are focused on natural systems where the outer-bar morphology drives inner-bar dynamics (offshore to nearshore process), this work focuses on the role of groynes on the inner bar dynamics (nearshore to offshore process). The study is based on 3-years field observations carried out at the beach of Anglet in the south-west of France. This engineered beach is 4 km long, limited by a rocky headland in the south and a 1 km long jetty at the entrance of the Adour river in the North. The study area concerns the south part of the beach and includes a series of four groynes, unevenly spaced and extending about 100 m seaward. Morphology changes observations were derived from images collected with a video system (http://sirena.univ-pau.fr/), and bi-annual topo-Bathymetric surveys. A special attention was paid to study the mechanisms controlling the observed morphology changes using the XBeach numerical model. Data analysis reveals that the study site is dominated by a double sandbar system. Both bars can evolve from reasonably alongshore-uniform to crescentic bars. Surprisingly, the beach may show episodes where the inner bar evolves from alonghsore uniform to non-uniform despite an alongshore uniform outer bar. Numerical results corroborate that the formation of inner bar crescentic features can be formed without the presence of an outer non-uniform bar under certain wave conditions for the study site. This study shows that inner bar evolution in the presence of groynes can be controlled by topographic rip channels and not only by morphological coupling as usually observed on natural double sandbar systems.

  19. Bars to jars: bamboo value chains in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Verina; Tieguhong, Julius Chupezi

    2013-04-01

    Bamboo is a well know and versatile material, which is a common sight across Cameroon's diverse ecosystems, from dry to humid tropical and Afromontane forests. Its numerous uses range from storage jars to decorating restaurant-bars, beehives to knives, fences, fodder, and fuel. Responding to the paucity of data on species and uses, the value chain for bamboo in Cameroon was analyzed. Based on 171 interviews and field observations, two African indigenous species (alpine Yushania alpina and savannah Oxytenanthera abyssinica) and exotic (Bambusa vulgaris spp.) bamboos were identified as most utilized. They were tracked from major production zones to final consumers. The ecological, socio-economic, institutional, and governance contexts and impacts are described and analyzed. Issues for research, conservation, and development are highlighted. These include the ambiguous regulatory status, the relationship between tenure and management, threats and conservation of African species and options to increase the sustainable livelihoods for stakeholders dependent upon bamboo.

  20. Watts Bar Unit 2 Startup Results with VERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gentry, Cole A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stimpson, Shane G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ritchie, John A. [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    CASL members TVA, Westinghouse, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have successfully completed a detailed simulation of the initial startup of Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 2 (WBN2) using the advanced reactor simulation tools known as VERA. WBN2 is the first commercial power reactor to join the nation’s electrical grid in over two decades, and the modern core design and availability of data make it an excellent benchmark for CASL. Calculations were performed three months prior to the startup, and in the first blind application of VERA to a new reactor, predicted criticality and physics parameters very close to those later measured by TVA. Subsequent calculations with the latest version of VERA and using exact measurement conditions improved the results even further.

  1. The business of desire: "Russian" bars in Amman, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beňová, Lenka

    2017-10-01

    This paper discusses the type of work migrant women from the former Eastern European countries perform in nightclubs in Amman, Jordan. The fieldwork for this qualitative study was conducted in 2010 and is based on in-depth interviews with 13 women. The topic is approached from the perspective of describing women's choices and journeys to this work. It juxtaposes the sexualised nature of their work with their yearning for a "normal" family life, which they imagine, yet know, is impossible to achieve with the men they meet in their workplaces. Layered on top of these private desires among both women and their clients is the business strategy of the clubs, which operate in the lucrative but marginal space of selling exotic but respectable seduction. I draw on the literature about female migration to the Middle East in order to argue that hostesses in these bars perform affective labour akin to care work, within the neoliberal global economy that individualises risk.

  2. The New BaBar Data Reconstruction Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceseracciu, Antonio

    2003-06-02

    The BaBar experiment is characterized by extremely high luminosity, a complex detector, and a huge data volume, with increasing requirements each year. To fulfill these requirements a new control system has been designed and developed for the offline data reconstruction system. The new control system described in this paper provides the performance and flexibility needed to manage a large number of small computing farms, and takes full benefit of OO design. The infrastructure is well isolated from the processing layer, it is generic and flexible, based on a light framework providing message passing and cooperative multitasking. The system is actively distributed, enforces the separation between different processing tiers by using different naming domains, and glues them together by dedicated brokers. It provides a powerful Finite State Machine framework to describe custom processing models in a simple regular language. This paper describes this new control system, currently in use at SLAC and Padova on {approx}450 CPUs organized in 12 farms.

  3. Application of stir bar sorptive extraction for wine analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Yoji; MacNamara, Kevin; Baldock, Gayle A; Taylor, Randell L; Pollnitz, Alan P

    2003-04-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyse wine samples for three applications: flavour and compositional analysis; 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), a common off-aroma in wine; and agrochemicals. SBSE was found to be orders of magnitude more sensitive than modern conventional methodology, allowing for lower detection and quantitation levels, and improved confirmation of identity; SBSE often gave better signal to noise in scan mode than other methods in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. With the help of their characteristic mass spectra all agrochemicals could be identified unambiguously at concentrations of 10 microg L(-1) in wine and a further 100 constituents were detected in a Cabernet Sauvignon sample. Thus it is now possible to analyse complex samples such as wine by scan mode, with better confirmation of identity, and without sacrificing sensitivity, where previously SIM methodology had to be used.

  4. Cracking and Strain Analysis of Beams Reinforced with Composite Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Timinskas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of experimental and numerical modelling using two beams reinforced with GFRP bars. One beam was made of plain concrete while the other contained short steel fibres. The influence of steel fibres on deflection and cracking behaviour was studied. A comparative analysis of experimental results has shown that steel fibres significantly reduce deflections and average crack width of the beam. Moreover, an addition of steel fibres to the concrete mix led to a more ductile failure mode of the beam. Numerical analysis employing nonlinear finite element software ATENA has revealed that a good agreement between calculated and experimental results regarding an ordinary concrete GFRP reinforced beam can be obtained.

  5. Measurements of psi -> K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c. and psi -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Duan, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events produced in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s = 3.686 GeV and collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present studies of the decays psi(3686) -> K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c.

  6. Measurement of |V{sub cb}| using {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Ricca, Giuseppe

    2003-08-12

    A preliminary measurement of |V{sub cb}| and the branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) has been performed based on a sample of about 55,700 {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays recorded with the BABAR detector. The decays are identified in the D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} final state, with the D{sup 0} reconstructed in three different decay modes. The differential decay rate is measured as a function of the relativistic boost of the D*{sup +} in the {bar B}{sup 0} rest frame. The value of the differential decay rate at ''zero recoil'', namely the point at which the D*{sup +} is at rest in the {bar B}{sup 0} frame, is predicted in Heavy Quark Effective Theory as a kinematic factor times F(1)|V{sub cb}|, where F is the unique form factor governing the decay. We extrapolate the measured differential decay rate to the zero recoil point and obtain F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (34.03 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 1.31) x 10{sup -3}. Using a theoretical calculation for F(1) we extract |V{sub cb}| = (37.27 {+-} 0.26(stat.) {+-} 1.43(syst.){sub -1.2}{sup +1.5}(theo.)) x 10{sup -3}. From the integrated decay rate we obtain {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = (4.68 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.29)%.

  7. Measurement of the $\\bar{B}$0 → D*+-$\\bar{v}$ Branching Fraction with a Partial Reconstruction Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnek, Peter [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Presented is a precise measurement of the $\\bar{B}$0 → D*+-$\\bar{v}$ branching fraction using 81.47 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The measurement was performed by partially reconstructing the D*+ meson from $\\bar{B}$0 → D*+-$\\bar{v}$ decays using only the soft pion of the D*+ → D0π+ decay to reconstruct its four vector. The branching fraction was measured to be β($\\bar{B}$0 → D*+-$\\bar{v}$) = (4.91 ± 0.01stat ± 0.15syst)%.

  8. Observation of $\\eta_{c}(2S) \\to p \\bar p$ and search for $X(3872) \\to p \\bar p$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2017-01-01

    The first observation of the decay $\\eta_{c}(2S) \\to p \\bar p$ is reported using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\rm \\, fb^{-1}$ recorded by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The $\\eta_{c}(2S)$ resonance is produced in the decay $B^{+} \\to [c\\bar c] K^{+}$. The product of branching fractions normalised to that for the $J/\\psi$ intermediate state, ${\\cal R}_{\\eta_{c}(2S)}$, is measured to be \\begin{align*} {\\cal R}_{\\eta_{c}(2S)}\\equiv\\frac{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to \\eta_{c}(2S) K^{+}) \\times {\\mathcal B}(\\eta_{c}(2S) \\to p \\bar p)}{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+}) \\times {\\mathcal B}(J/\\psi\\to p \\bar p)} =~& (1.58 \\pm 0.33 \\pm 0.09)\\times 10^{-2}, \\end{align*} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. No signals for the decays $B^{+} \\to X(3872) (\\to p \\bar p) K^{+}$ and $B^{+} \\to \\psi(3770) (\\to p \\bar p) K^{+}$ are seen, and the 95\\% confidence level upper limits on their relative branching ratios ar...

  9. Machine learning techniques in searches for $t\\bar{t}h$ in the $h \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$ decay channel

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Roberto; Ryu, Soo; Adelman, Jahred; Chekanov, Sergei; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Study of the production of pairs of top quarks in association with a Higgs boson is one of the primary goals of the Large Hadron Collider over the next decade, as measurements of this process may help us to understand whether the uniquely large mass of the top quark plays a special role in electroweak symmetry breaking. Higgs bosons decay predominantly to $b\\bar{b}$, yielding signatures for the signal that are similar to $t\\bar{t}$ + jets with heavy flavor. Though particularly challenging to study due to the similar kinematics between signal and background events, such final states ($t\\bar{t} b\\bar{b}$) are an important channel for studying the top quark Yukawa coupling. This paper presents a systematic study of machine learning (ML) methods for detecting $t\\bar{t}h$ in the $h \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$ decay channel. Among the seven ML methods tested, we show that neural network models outperform alternative methods. In addition, two neural models used in this paper outperform NeuroBayes, one of the standard algo...

  10. Measurement of |V sub c sub b | using (bar B) sup 0 -> D* sup + (ell) sup - (bar nu) sub e sub l sub l Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Della Ricca, G

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary measurement of |V sub c sub b | and the branching fraction BETA((bar B) sup 0 -> D* sup + (ell) sup - (bar nu) sub e sub l sub l) has been performed based on a sample of about 55,700 (bar B) sup 0 -> D* sup + (ell) sup - (bar nu) sub e sub l sub l decays recorded with the BABAR detector. The decays are identified in the D* sup + -> D sup 0 pi sup + final state, with the D sup 0 reconstructed in three different decay modes. The differential decay rate is measured as a function of the relativistic boost of the D* sup + in the (bar B) sup 0 rest frame. The value of the differential decay rate at ''zero recoil'', namely the point at which the D* sup + is at rest in the (bar B) sup 0 frame, is predicted in Heavy Quark Effective Theory as a kinematic factor times F(1)|V sub c sub b |, where F is the unique form factor governing the decay. We extrapolate the measured differential decay rate to the zero recoil point and obtain F(1)|V sub c sub b | = (34.03 +- 0.24 +- 1.31) x 10 sup - sup 3. Using a theo...

  11. Measurement of the $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^-D_s^+$ and $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^-D_s^+$ effective lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Garcia, L.Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Farber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grunberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T.W.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M.J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B.K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D.A.; Rodrigues, A.B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A.Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P.Ruiz; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V.K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J.A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Warrington, N.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S.A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the $\\bar{B}_s^0$ meson in the decay $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^-D_s^+$ is reported using a proton-proton collision dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D_s^-D_s^+$ effective lifetime is $1.379\\pm0.026\\pm0.017$ ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light $\\bar{B}_s^0$ mass eigenstate of $\\Gamma_L = 0.725 \\pm 0.014 \\pm 0.009$ ps$^{-1}$. The $\\bar{B}_s^0$ lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific $\\bar{B}_s^0\\to D^-D_s^+$ decay to be $1.52\\pm 0.15 \\pm 0.01~{\\rm ps}$.

  12. Flexural strengthening of reinforced lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete beams with near-surface mounted GFRP bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.C.; Balendran, R.V.; Nadeem, A.; Leung, H.Y. [City University of Hong Kong (China). Department of Building and Construction

    2006-10-15

    Application of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is emerging as a promising technology for increasing flexural and shear strength of deficient reinforced concrete (RC) members. In order for this technique to perform effectively, the structural behaviour of RC elements strengthened with NSM FRP bars needs to be fully characterized. This paper focuses on the characterization of flexural behaviour of RC members strengthened with NSM glass-FRP bars. Totally, 10 beams were tested using symmetrical two-point loads test. The parameters examined under the beam tests were type of concretes (lightweight polystyrene aggregate concrete and normal concrete), type of reinforcing bars (GFRP and steel), and type of adhesives. Flexural performance of the tested beams including modes of failure, moment-deflection response and ultimate moment capacity are presented and discussed in this paper. Results of this investigation showed that beams with NSM GFRP bars showed a reduction in ultimate deflection and an improvement in flexural stiffness and bending capacity, depending on the PA content of the beams. In general, beams strengthened with NSM GFRP bars overall showed a significant increase in ultimate moment ranging from 23% to 53% over the corresponding beams without NSM GFRP bars. The influence of epoxy type was found conspicuously dominated the moment-deflection response up to the peak moment. Besides, the ultimate moment of concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars could be predicted satisfactorily using the equation provided in ACI 318-95 Building Code. (author)

  13. 75 FR 12314 - Tennessee Valley Authority: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption 1.0 Background..., which authorizes operation of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN), Unit 1. TVA obtained construction... the rule's compliance date for all operating nuclear power plants, but noted that the Commission's...

  14. [Use of mesquite cotyledon (Prosopis chilensis (Mol) Shuntz) in the manufacturing of cereal bars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, A M; Escobar, B; Ugarte, V

    2000-06-01

    Cereal bars with peanut and walnut has shown to be snack foods of good organoleptic characteristics and high caloric value, due to their content of protein, lipids and carbohydrates. Cotyledons of mezquite seeds have a high protein content which biological quality improves with thermal processing like toasting, microwave or moist heat under pressure. The purposes of this research were to study the use of mezquite cotyledon (Prosopis chilensis (Mol) Stuntz) in cereal bars with two different levels of peanut or walnut; and to determine the effect of two thermal treatment applied on the cotyledon upon the bar characteristics. Twelve different kind of bars were developed through the combination of two levels of peanut or walnut (15% and 18%); the use of mezquite cotyledon (0% and 6%); and the application of two thermal processing to the cotyledon (microwave and toasting). Cereal bars were analysed for chemical, physical and sensory characteristics: moisture, water activity, proximate chemical composition, sensory quality and acceptability. Moisture content of bars with peanut ranged between 10.4% and 10.9%; and for those with walnut, between 10.5% and 12.3%. Protein content was higher in the bars with mezquite cotiledon, being higher those with peanut. Thermal processing did not have any effect on the chemical composition. Bars with mezquite cotyledon treated by microwave showed a higher acceptability.

  15. The Comparative Observational Study of Timescale of Feedback by Bar Structure in Late-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woong-bae Woong-bae Zee, Galaxy; Yoon, Suk-jin

    2018-01-01

    We investigate star formation activities of ~400 barred and ~1400 unbarred faced-on late-type galaxies from the SDSS DR13. We find that gas-poor and barred galaxies are considerably show enhanced high central star formation activities, while there is no difference among gas-rich barred and unbarred galaxies regardless of their HI gas content. This seems counter-intuitive given that gas contents simply represent the total star formation rate of galaxies and suggests that there is a time delation between the central gas migration/consumption through bar structures and the enhancement of star formation activity at the centre. We analysed the distribution of the stellar population of specific galaxies with MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) IFU survey among the total samples. The gas-poor and barred galaxies show the flatter gradient in metallicity and age with respect to the stellar mass than other types of galaxies, in that their centre is more metal-rich and younger. There is an age difference, about 5-6 Gyrs, between centrally star-forming gas-poor barred galaxies and gas-rich galaxies and this value is a plausible candidate of the longevity of bar feedback. The results indicate that the gas migration/mixing driven by bar structure plays a significant role in the evolution of galaxies in a specific of timescale.

  16. Theoretical And Experimental Analysis Of Aluminium Bars Rolling Process In Three-High Skew Rolling Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanik A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology of round bars rolling on a three-high skew rolling mills allows rolling of standard materials such as steel and aluminum, as well as new materials, especially hard deformable materials. The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental rolling process of aluminum bars with a diameter of 20 mm. As the stock round bars with a diameter of 25 mm made of aluminum grade 1050A and aluminum alloy grade 2017A were used. The rolling process of aluminum bars has been carried out in a single pass. The numerical analysis was carried out by using computer program Forge2011®. On the basis of theoretical research it has been determined the state of deformation, stress and temperature distribution during rolling of aluminum bars. In addition, the results of theoretical research allowed to determine the schema of the metal plastic flow in the roll gap. Verification of the theoretical research was carried out during the rolling of aluminum bars on the RSP 40/14 laboratory three-high skew rolling mill. From the finished bars were taken the samples to set the shape and compared with the results of theoretical research. Finished aluminum round bars were characterized by low ovality and good surface quality.

  17. $t\\bar{t}$ Production in Multijet Events at CDF (RunII)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresele, Ambra Alessia [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2003-03-14

    This thesis describes the all hadronic $t\\bar{t}$ analysis on the ~100 pb-1 of data collected so far by the CDF experiment (chapter 2 and chapter 3) in the $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 2 TeV of Tevatron (Fermilab).

  18. Students' Understanding of Bar Graphs and Histograms: Results from the LOCUS Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Douglas; Jacobbe, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Bar graphs and histograms are core statistical tools that are widely used in statistical practice and commonly taught in classrooms. Despite their importance and the instructional time devoted to them, many students demonstrate misunderstandings when asked to read and interpret bar graphs and histograms. Much of the research that has been…

  19. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector beam test results from quartz and acrylic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Sugaya, Y; Yoshimura, Y; Kanda, S; Olsen, S; Ueno, K; Varner, G S; Bergfeld, T; Bialek, J J; Lorenc, J; Palmer, M; Rudnick, G; Selen, M; Auran, T; Boyer, V; Honscheid, K; Tamura, N; Yoshimura, K; Lü, C; Marlow, D R; Mindas, C R; Prebys, E J; Asai, M; Kimura, A; Hayashi, S

    1995-01-01

    Several prototypes of a Cherenkov Correlated Timing (CCT) Detector have been tested at the KEK-PS test beam line. We describe the results for Cherenkov light yields and timing characteristics from quartz and acrylic bar prototypes. A Cherenkov angle resolution is found to be 15 mrad at a propagation distance of 100 cm with a 2 cm thick quartz bar prototype.

  20. Observation of the decay psi -> Lambda(Sigma)over-bar(+/-) pi(-/+) + c.c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. J.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, H. L.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, G. G.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. B.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 1:06 X 10(8) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of psi(3686) -> Lambda(Sigma) over bar (+) pi(-) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> Lambda(Sigma) over bar (-) pi(+) + c.c. The branching fractions are measured to be B(psi(3686)

  1. Study of c -> omega K(K)over-bar pi decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, M.L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J.P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guler, N.; Guo, A.Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J.S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X.T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y.P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L.L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.S.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y.T.; Liao, G.R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, Cheng; Liu, C.X.; Liu, F.H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C.L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F.E.; Maggior, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J.W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Sazak, H.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W.M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J.F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y.J.; Sun, Y.Z.; Sun, Z.J.; Sun, Z.T.; Tang, C.J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z.Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J.B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L.H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S.X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y. X.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q.J.; Xu, Q.N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zengin, B.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, LiLi; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S.J.; Zhao, T.C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X.R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.H.; Zhu, Stuart; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.M.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Based on 106 million c d3686_ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII, the decay psi(3686) -> omega K (K) over bar pi is studied. Enhancements around 1.44 GeV/c(2) and the f1(1285) are observed in the mass spectrum of K (K) over bar pi, and the corresponding branching fraction (

  2. Searches for low-mass Higgs and dark bosons at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberhof, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.oberhof@pi.infn.it [INFN sezione di Pisa and Universitá di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci - Edificio C, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56125 - Pisa (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    We present BaBar latest results for the direct search of a light CP-odd Higgs boson using radiative decays of the ϒ(nS) (n=1,2,3) resonances in different final states. We also present the results for the search of a hidden sector gauge and Higgs bosons using the full BaBar datasample.

  3. Adapting and Validating the BarOn EQ?i:YV in the Lebanese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hassan, Karma; El Sader, Maliha

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (BarOn EQ?i:YV), a measure of emotional intelligence, in the Lebanese context. The scale was translated and adapted into Arabic using a 3-step process involving judgmental, logical, and empirical methods. It was then administered to a…

  4. 78 FR 73838 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary... Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated a countervailing duty investigation on steel concrete... December 16, 2013.\\3\\ \\1\\ See Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty...

  5. 78 FR 55755 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and... from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, primarily provided for in subheadings 7213.10...

  6. 77 FR 71631 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Steel Concrete...) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from...

  7. Acceptance of Nordic snack bars in children aged 8–11 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Holmer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A health promoting diet is suggested to be tailored to regional circumstances to preserve the cultural diversity in eating habits, as well as contribute to more environmentally friendly eating. It may influence consumer acceptance, however, if the components of the diet differs considerably from their habitual food. Objective: This study aimed to investigate whether snack bars composed of Nordic ingredients were accepted by 8–11 year-old Danish (n=134 and Swedish (n=109 children.Design: A seven-point hedonic scale was used to measure the children's acceptance of five snack bars that varied in their composition of whole grains, berries and nuts. A preference rank ordering of the five bars was also performed. Results: The results showed that samples that were rated highest in liking and were most preferred in both countries were a kamut/pumpkin bar and an oat/cranberry bar. The sample with the lowest rating that was also least preferred was a pumpernickel/sea buckthorn bar. Flavour was the most important determinant of overall liking followed by texture, odour and appearance. Conclusions: Children's acceptances and preferences were highly influenced by the sensory characteristics of the bars, mainly flavour. In agreement with earlier studies, the novel food ingredients seemed to influence children's preferences. The Nordic snack bars may have a potential to be a snack option for Danish and Swedish school children, but repeated exposures to the products are recommended to increase children's acceptance.

  8. Effect of flaxseed flour incorporation on the physical properties and consumer acceptability of cereal bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouryieh, H; Aramouni, F

    2013-12-01

    Extensive research has revealed numerous nutritional and health benefits of flaxseed due primarily to its nutrients content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of flaxseed flour addition on the physical and sensory characteristics of cereal bars. Four formulations of the flaxseed cereal bars were prepared by partially replacing oats with flaxseed flour added at levels of 0 (control), 6%, 12% and 18%. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in water activity, moisture and firmness values between the flaxseed bars and control. Flaxseed addition significantly (p  0.05) between the 12% flax cereal bars and the control with respect to sensory attributes and overall acceptability. The overall acceptability for both 12% flax bars and the control was in between 'like moderately' and 'like slightly' on the 9-point hedonic scale. The overall acceptability was most highly correlated with flavor acceptability for both control (r = 0.80) and 12% flax (r = 0.82) cereal bars. Flaxseed bars provided 12% dietary fiber of the daily recommended value. These results indicated that flaxseed flour incorporation up to 12% substantially enhanced the nutritional qualities of the cereal bars without affecting their sensory and quality properties.

  9. Numerical Study on Deflection Behaviour of Concrete Beams Reinforced with GFRP Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Osama A.; Khattab, Rania; Hawat, Waddah Al

    2017-10-01

    Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars are gaining popularity as sustainable alternatives to conventional reinforcing steel bars in reinforced concrete applications. The production of FRP bars has lower environmental impact compared to steel reinforcing bars. In addition, the non-corroding FRP materials can potentially decrease the cost or need for maintenance of reinforced concrete structural elements, especially in harsh environmental conditions that can impact both concrete and reinforcement. FRP bars offer additional favourable properties including high tensile strength and low unit weight. However, the mechanical properties of FRP bars can lead to large crack widths and deflections. The objective of this study is to investigate the deflection behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with Glass FRP (GFRP) bars as a longitudinal main reinforcement. Six concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars were modelled using the finite element computer program ANSYS. The main variable considered in the study is the reinforcement ratio. The deflection equations in current North American codes including ACI 440.1R-06, ACI 440.1R-15 and CSA S806-12 are used to compute deflections, and these are compared to numerical results. It was concluded in this paper that deflections predicted by ACI 440.1R-06 equations are lower than the numerical analysis results while ACI 440.1R-15 is in agreement with numerical analysis with tendency to be conservative. The values of deflections estimated by CSA S806-12 formulas are consistent with results of numerical analysis.

  10. Bond of reinforcing bars in self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Braam, C.R.; Uijl, J.A. den; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Pull-out tests were performed on 10 mm diameter ribbed bars embedded along three times the bar diameter in 200 mm cubes made of plain and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) of normal strength (B45). The fiber content was 60 and 120 kg/m3, respectively, the aspect ratio of the fibers was 45 and

  11. Long-duration laboratory experiment of slow development of steady alternate bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crosato, A.; Getaneh, A.A.; Desta, F.B.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.; Le, U.

    2010-01-01

    The current view is that migrating bars are the result of morphodynamic instability in straight or mildly-sinuous alluvial channels and are therefore an inevitable feature of alluvial river beds. Steady bars, instead, require some external forcing or specific morphodynamic conditions to develop.

  12. 77 FR 41969 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative...) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Japan (the... review of the Order with respect to Misumi. See Letter from Suruga to the Secretary, ``Stainless Steel...

  13. Feasibility and acceptability of a bar-based sexual risk reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A responsible server sub-component that had also been planned was not delivered as it was not feasible to train the staff in the two participating bars. Over the eight-month period the counsellors were approached by and provided advice and counselling for alcohol and sexual risk-related problems to 111 bar patrons.

  14. Further Evidence for the Decay K+ -->π+ννbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bergbusch, P. C.; Blackmore, E. W.; Bryman, D. A.; Chen, S.; Chiang, I.-H.; Diwan, M. V.; Frank, J. S.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hu, J.; Inagaki, T.; Ito, M.; Jain, V.; Kabe, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, M.; Komatsubara, T. K.; Konaka, A.; Kuno, Y.; Kuriki, M.; Li, K. K.; Littenberg, L. S.; MacDonald, J. A.; Meyers, P. D.; Mildenberger, J.; Miyajima, M.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, T.; Ng, C.; Ng, S.; Numao, T.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Redlinger, G.; Sato, T.; Shimada, K.; Shimoyama, T.; Shinkawa, T.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Stone, J. R.; Strand, R. C.; Sugimoto, S.; Tamagawa, Y.; Witzig, C.; Yoshimura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Additional evidence for the rare kaon decay K+-->π+ννbar has been found in a new data set with comparable sensitivity to the previously reported result. One new event was observed in the pion momentum region examined, 211π+ννbar) = 1.57+1.75-0.82×10-10.

  15. Longer Bars for Bigger Numbers? Children's Usage and Understanding of Graphical Representations of Algebraic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry; Khng, Kiat Hui; Ng, Swee Fong; Ng Lan Kong, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    In Singapore, primary school students are taught to use bar diagrams to represent known and unknown values in algebraic word problems. However, little is known about students' understanding of these graphical representations. We investigated whether students use and think of the bar diagrams in a concrete or a more abstract fashion. We also…

  16. The effect of edge orientation and movement direction on the apparent misalignment of collinear bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, R H; Stecher, E J; Parker, A L

    1993-06-01

    Four experiments on apparent misalignment of oblique collinear bars are reported. The data from the first three experiments showed that the misalignment was slight but significant when no direction other than that of the bars themselves was delineated and about double when the vertical was delineated by movements of the adjustable bar. When the vertical was delineated by both these movements and the ends of the bars (or by vertical parallel lines), the misalignment was more than six times greater. Conversely, it was reduced when the bar ends delineated the vertical and bar movements delineated the direction at right angles to the bars. The data from a fourth experiment showed that the inner pair of edges were closely involved in apparent misalignment and that the outer ends were not. The relationship between the misalignment effect with bars and the Poggendorff figure (oblique lines separated by parallels), the delineation of direction by edges and movement, and the implications of these data for an explanation are discussed.

  17. Synthesis, Analysis And Simulation Of a Four-Bar Mechanism Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper considers synthesis, analysis and simulation of the four-bar linkage analytically for three and four precision positions of the motion generation problem. Kinematic synthesis of the four-bar mechanism using the complex number method is presented. The results of the synthesis process are analyzed to determine ...

  18. Study of the stellar line-strength indices and kinematics along bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, I.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Zurita, A.

    Aims. This is the first paper of a series that aims to understand the formation and evolution of bars in early-type spirals and their influence in the evolution of the galaxy. Methods. Optical long-slit spectra along the bar major-axis of a sample of 20 galaxies are analyzed. Velocity and velocity

  19. Statistical and numerical methods to improve the transient divided bar method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Nielsen, S.B.; Balling, N.

    The divided bar method is a commonly used method to measure thermal conductivity of rock samples in laboratory. We present improvements to this method that allows for simultaneous measurements of both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The divided bar setup is run in a transient mode...

  20. Ethanol adsorption on the {10(1)over-bar4} calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Karina Krarup; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Hassenkam, Tue

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary atomic force microscopy investigations of the {10 (1) over bar4} calcite Surface cleaved in ethanol indicate a different surface behaviour than that of the {10 (1) over bar4} surface cleaved in air. The results are consistent with recent theoretical studies and suggest strong ordering...

  1. 76 FR 66235 - Bar Code Technologies for Drugs and Biological Products; Retrospective Review Under Executive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... technology as an alternative to the linear bar code further reduce medication errors in hospitals and health...? 7. For hospitals and other health-care facilities that have adopted bar code technologies using... problems have you experienced with the technology? 8. For hospitals and other health-care facilities that...

  2. Search for new particles decaying to dijets, b{bar b}, and t{bar t} at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.M.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-06-15

    We present three searches for new particles at CDF. First, using 70 pb{sup {minus}1} of data we search the dijet mass spectrum for resonances. There is an upward fluctuation near 550 GeV/c{sup 2} (2.6{sigma}) with an angular distribution that is adequately described by either QCD alone or QCD plus 5% signal. There is insufficient evidence to claim a signal, but we set the most stringent mass limits on the hadronic decays of axigluons, excited quarks, technirhos, W{prime}, Z{prime}, and E6 diquarks. Second, using 19 pb{sup {minus}1} of data we search the b-tagged dijet mass spectrum for b{bar b} resonances. Again, an upward fluctuation near 600 GeV/c{sup 2} (2{sigma}) is not significant enough to claim a signal, so we set the first mass limits on topcolor bosons. Finally, using 67 pb{sup {minus}1} of data we search the top quark sample for t{bar t} resonances like a topcolor Z{prime}. Other than an insignificant shoulder of 6 events on a background of 2.4 in the mass region 475--550 GeV/c{sup 2}, there is no evidence for new particle production. Mass limits, currently in progress, should be sensitive to a topcolor Z{prime} near 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. In all three searches there is insufficient evidence to claim new particle production, yet there is an exciting possibility that the upward fluctuations are the first signs of new physics beyond the standard model.

  3. Experimental determinations of the eigenmodes for composite bars made with carbon and Kevlar-carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriţoiu, C. M.; Stănescu, M. M.; Burada, C. O.; Bolcu, D.; Roşca, V.

    2015-11-01

    For modal identification, the single-point excitation method has been widely used in modal tests and it consists in applying a force in a given point and recording the vibratory structure response in all interest points, including the excitation point. There will be presented the experimental recordings for the studied bars (with Kevlar-carbon or carbon fibers), the frequency response function in Cartesian and polar coordinates. By using the frequency response functions we determine the eigenparameters for each bar. We present the final panel of the eigenmodes (with the damping factors, eigenfrequencies and critical damping) for each considered bar. Using the eigenfrequency of the first determined eigenmode, the bars stiffness has been determined. The presented bars can be used in practical engineering for: car or bus body parts, planes body parts, bullet-proof vests, reinforcements for sandwich beams, and so on.

  4. Intra-abdominal pectus bar migration – a rare clinical entity: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasiou Thanos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of a 20-year-old male who underwent successful surgical correction of pectus excavatum with the Highly Modified Ravitch Repair (HMRR. At 29 months the attempted operative removal of the Ravitch bar was unsuccessful despite the impression of adequate bar location on chest x-ray. Subsequent imaging with computed tomography was unclear in determining whether the bar was supra or infra-diaphragmatic due to the tissue distortion subsequent to initial surgery. Video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS successfully retrieved the bar and revealed that it was not in the thorax, but had migrated to the intra-abdominal bare area of the liver, with no evidence of associated diaphragmatic defect or hernia. Intra-abdominal pectus bar migration is a rare clinical entity, and safe removal can be facilitated by the use of the VATS technique.

  5. Observation of B-→$\\bar{p}$ΛD0 at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.; Wang, M. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Chang, M-C; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, I- S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Fast, James E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, Vipin; Goh, Y. M.; Haba, J.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, Masaya; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Krizan, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Peters, M.; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, Z. P.

    2011-10-10

    We study B- meson decays to $\\bar{p}$ΛD(*)0final states using a sample of 657×106B$\\bar{B}$ events collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The observed branching fraction for B-→$\\bar{p}$ΛD0 is (1.43$+0.28\\atop{-0.25}$±0.18)×10-5 with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. Most of the signal events have the $\\bar{p}$ Λ mass peaking near threshold. No significant signal is observed for $\\bar{p}$ΛD(*)0 and the corresponding upper limit on the branching fraction is 4.8×10-5 at the 90% confidence level.

  6. Correlates of Persistent Smoking in Bars Subject to Smokefree Workplace Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Chul Chu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study’s goal was to characterize physical and social environments of stand-alone bars associated with indoor smoking despite California’s smokefree workplace law. In a random sample of 121 stand-alone bars in San Francisco, trained observers collected data on patrons, staff, neighborhood, indoor settings and smoking behaviors. Using bivariate (chi-square and hierarchical linear modeling analyses, we identified four correlates of patrons’ indoor smoking: 1 bars serving predominantly Asian or Irish patrons, 2 ashtrays, 3 bartender smoking, and 4 female bartenders. Public health officials charged with enforcement of smokefree bar policies may need to attend to social practices within bars, and heighten perceptions of consistent enforcement of smokefree workplace laws.

  7. Amphipathic motifs in BAR domains are essential for membrane curvature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram K; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    nanosized liposomes of different diameters and therefore membrane curvature. Characterization of members of the three BAR domain families showed surprisingly that the crescent-shaped BAR dimer with its positively charged concave face is not able to sense membrane curvature. Mutagenesis on BAR domains showed...... that membrane curvature sensing critically depends on the N-terminal AH and furthermore that BAR domains sense membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion in lipid packing defects and not through electrostatics. Consequently, amphipathic motifs, such as AHs, that are often associated with BAR domains...... emerge as an important means for a protein to sense membrane curvature. Measurements on single liposomes allowed us to document heterogeneous binding behaviour within the ensemble and quantify the influence of liposome polydispersity on bulk membrane curvature sensing experiments. The latter results...

  8. Measurement of the $\\bar{B}_s^0$ meson lifetime in $D_s^+\\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-10-24

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the $\\bar{B}_s^0$ meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to $D_s^+\\pi^-$, to that of the $\\bar{B}^0$ meson. The $pp$ collision data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$, collected with the LHCb detector, at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Combining our measured value of 1.010 +/- 0.010 +/- 0.008 for this ratio with the known $\\bar{B}^0$ lifetime, we determine the flavor-specific $\\bar{B}_s^0$ lifetime to be $\\tau(\\bar{B}_s^0)$ = 1.535 +/- 0.015 +/- 0.014 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This is the most precise measurement to date, and is consistent with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  9. 2D finite element analysis and force calculations for induction motors with broken bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafy Hassan Hanafy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an ABC transient model of the three phase induction motor is developed that depends on self- and mutual inductance calculations based on accurate finite element analysis (FEA. This model can represent both healthy and broken bars’ conditions. The effects of that type of fault on the stator current, rotor bar currents distribution, the forces exerted on the rotor bars, the motor speed and motor torque are studied. It was observed that broken bar faults will cause fluctuations in the stator peak current and in the motor speed and torque. It was found that the asymmetry in the rotor bar currents will lead to asymmetrical distribution of the radial and tangential forces affecting the bars. The asymmetry in the tangential forces causes the fluctuations in the motor torque, while the asymmetry in the radial forces will increase the mechanical stresses on the rotor shaft.

  10. Storage and residence time of suspended sediment in gravel bars of Difficult Run, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J.; Benthem, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Skalak, K.

    2016-12-01

    Reducing the export of suspended sediment is an important consideration for restoring water quality to the Chesapeake Bay, but sediment budgets for in-channel landforms are poorly constrained. We quantified fine (mapped in a 150m headwater reach at Miller Heights (bankfull width 11m; total bar volume 114 m3) and 6 gravel bars were mapped in a 160m reach downstream near Leesburg Pike (bankfull width 19m; total bar volume 210 m3). Grain size analyses of surface and subsurface samples from 2 bars at each reach indicate an average suspended sediment content of 55%, suggesting a total volume of suspended sediment stored in the mapped bars to be 178 m3, or 283000 kg, comprising 5% of the average annual suspended sediment load of the two study reaches. Estimates of the annual bedload flux at Miller Heights based on stream gaging records and the Wilcock-Crowe bedload transport equation imply that the bars are entirely reworked at least annually. Scour chains installed in 2 bars at each site (a total of 50 chains) recorded scour and fill events during the winter and spring of 2016. These data indicate that 38% of the total volume of the bars is exchanged per year, for a residence time of 2.6 ± 1.2 years, a value we interpret as the residence time of suspended sediment stored in the bars. These results are supported by mapping of topographic changes derived from structure-from-motion analyses of digital aerial imagery. Storage in alluvial bars therefore represents a significant component of the suspended sediment budget of mid-Atlantic streams.

  11. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  12. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, I.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  13. Black Hole Growth in Disk Galaxies Mediated by the Secular Evolution of Short Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Ho, Luis C.; Erwin, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The growth of black holes (BHs) in disk galaxies lacking classical bulges, which implies an absence of significant mergers, appears to be driven by secular processes. Short bars of sub-kiloparsec radius have been hypothesized to be an important mechanism for driving gas inflows to small scale, feeding central BHs. In order to quantify the maximum BH mass allowed by this mechanism, we examine the robustness of short bars to the dynamical influence of BHs. Large-scale bars are expected to be robust, long-lived structures; extremely massive BHs, which are rare, are needed to completely destroy such bars. However, we find that short bars, which are generally embedded in large-scale outer bars, can be destroyed quickly when BHs of mass {M}{bh}˜ 0.05 % {--}0.2 % of the total stellar mass ({M}\\star ) are present. In agreement with this prediction, all galaxies observed to host short bars have BHs with a mass fraction less than 0.2 % {M}\\star . Thus, the dissolution of short inner bars is possible, perhaps even frequent, in the universe. An important implication of this result is that inner-bar-driven gas inflows may be terminated when BHs grow to ˜ 0.1 % {M}\\star . We predict that 0.2 % {M}\\star is the maximum mass of BHs allowed if they are fed predominately via inner bars. This value matches well the maximum ratio of BH-to-host-galaxy stellar mass observed in galaxies with pseudo-bulges and most nearby active galactic nucleus host galaxies. This hypothesis provides a novel explanation for the lower {M}{bh}/{M}\\star in galaxies that have avoided significant mergers compared with galaxies with classical bulges.

  14. Bar workers' health and environmental tobacco smoke exposure (BHETSE): symptomatic improvement in bar staff following smoke-free legislation in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, J G; Semple, S; MacCalman, L; Dempsey, S; Hilton, S; Hurley, J F; Miller, B G; Naji, A; Petticrew, M

    2009-05-01

    To examine changes in the health of bar workers after smoke-free legislation was introduced. Longitudinal study following bar workers from before legislation introduction, at 2 months after introduction and at 1 year to control for seasonal differences. Bars across a range of socio-economic settings in Scotland. 371 bar workers recruited from 72 bars. Introduction of smoke-free legislation prohibiting smoking in enclosed public places, including bars. Change in prevalence of self-reported respiratory and sensory symptoms. Of the 191 (51%) workers seen at 1-year follow-up, the percentage reporting any respiratory symptom fell from 69% to 57% (p = 0.02) and for sensory symptoms from 75% to 64% (p = 0.02) following reductions in exposure, effects being greater at 2 months, probably partly due to seasonal effects. Excluding respondents who reported having a cold at either baseline or 1 year, the reduction in respiratory symptoms was similar although greater for "any" sensory symptom (69% falling to 54%, p = 0.011). For non-smokers (n = 57) the reductions in reported symptoms were significant for phlegm production (32% to 14%, p = 0.011) and red/irritated eyes (44% to 18%, p = 0.001). Wheeze (48% to 31%, p = 0.006) and breathlessness (42% to 29%, p = 0.038) improved significantly in smokers. There was no relationship between change in salivary cotinine levels and change in symptoms. Bar workers in Scotland reported significantly fewer respiratory and sensory symptoms 1 year after their working environment became smoke free. As these improvements, controlled for seasonal variations, were seen in both non-smokers and smokers, smoke-free working environments may have potentially important benefits even for smokers.

  15. Investigation of the resistance of several new metallic reinforcing bars to chloride-induced corrosion in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Transportation recently initiated a search for metallic reinforcing bars that are not only more durable and corrosion resistant than the epoxy-coated bars currently used, but also economical. In the last few years, several ...

  16. Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Peter; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma......Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma...

  17. Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Peter; Bendix, Knud; Honoré, Bent

    Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma......Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma...

  18. Study of e+e- => B(*) B(*)-bar pi+- at sqrt(s)=10.866 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Garmash, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Aziz, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Behera, P; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chervenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Dolezal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Li, C; Li, H; Li, L; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petric, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Ribezl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Solovieva, E; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yelton, J; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report the analysis of the three-body e+e- => B B-bar pi, B B*-bar pi, and B* B*-bar pi processes, including the first observation of the Zb+-(10610) =>[B B*-bar+c.c.]+- and Zb+-(10650) => [B*B*-bar]+- transitions. We measure visible cross sections for the three-body production of sigma_vis(e+e- => [B B*-bar+c.c.]+-pi-+=(11.2+-1.0(stat.)+-1.2(syst.)) pb and sigma_vis(e+e- => [B*B*-bar]+-pi-+)=(5.61+-0.73(stat.)+-0.66(syst.)) pb and set a 90% C.L. upper limit of sigma_vis(e+e- => [BB-bar]+-pi-+)<2.1 pb. The results are based on a 121.4 1/fb data sample collected with the Belle detector at a center-of-mass energy near the Y(5S) peak.

  19. Quarkonium Spectroscopy And Search for New States at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cibinetto, G.

    2011-11-04

    The BaBar experiment at the PEP-II B-factory gives excellent opportunities for the quarkonium spectroscopy. Investigation of the properties of new states like the X(3872), Y(3940) and Y(4260) are performed aiming to understand their nature. Recent BaBar results will be presented in this paper. At the B-factories charmonium and charmonium-like states are copiously produced via several mechanisms: in B decay (color suppressed b {yields} c transition), double charmonium production (e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} + c{bar c}), two photons production ({gamma}*{gamma}* {yields} c{bar c}, where the c{bar c} state has positive C-parity) and in initial state radiation (ISR) when the e{sup {+-}} in its initial state emits a photon lowering the effective center of mass energy of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction (e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR} + c{bar c}, where the charmonium state has the quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -2}). Many new states have been recently discovered at the B-factories, BaBar and Belle, above the D{bar D} threshold in the charmonium energy region. While some of them appear to be consistent with conventional c{sub c} states others do not fit with any expectation. Several interpretations for these states have been proposed: for some of them the mass values suggest that they could be conventional charmonia, but also other interpretations like D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule or diquark-antidiquark states among many other models have been advanced. Reviews can be found in Refs. [1][2]. In all cases the picture is not completely clear. This situation could be remedied by a coherent search of the decay pattern to D{bar D}, search for production in two-photon fusion and ISR, and of course improving the statistical precision upon the current measurements. The BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric collider, designed to perform precision measurement of CP violation in the B meson system, has an extensive quarkonium spectroscopy program. Recent

  20. Stability of cassava flour-based food bars Estabilidade de alimento em barra à base de farinha de mandioca

    OpenAIRE

    Erica Caroline da Silva; Viviane dos Santos Sobrinho; Marney Pascoli Cereda

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of Brazilian cassava has been reduced due to a lack of adjustment to the modern lifestyle. To reverse this trend, new products could be developed specifically targeted to high-value niche markets. Cereal bars stand out as fast food high in nutritional value. A bar formula mimicking cereal bars was prepared using a mixture of Brazilian cassava flour, hydrogenated vegetable fat, dried bananas, ground cashew nuts, and glucose syrup. After being pressed, the bars were dried for 1 ...

  1. X-RAY NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN S{sup 4}G BARRED GALAXIES: NO LINK BETWEEN BAR STRENGTH AND CO-OCCURRENT SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FUELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H.; González-Martín, Omaira; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Díaz-García, Simón; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Gil de Paz, Armando [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Holwerda, Benne W., E-mail: mauricio@iac.es [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); and others

    2013-10-10

    Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d < 35 Mpc) barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We use Chandra observations to measure nuclear 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6 μm imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q{sub b} , taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing the presence of both stellar bars and nuclear activity, we are able to account for the continuum of bar strengths and degrees of AGN activity. We find nuclear X-ray sources in 31 out of 41 galaxies with median X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio of L{sub X} = 4.3 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1} and L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 6.9 × 10{sup –6}, respectively, consistent with low-luminosity AGN activity. Including upper limits for those galaxies without nuclear detections, we find no significant correlation between any of the bar strength indicators and the degree of nuclear activity, irrespective of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, Hubble type, or bulge size. Strong bars do not favor brighter or more efficient nuclear activity, implying that at least for the low-luminosity regime, supermassive black hole fueling is not closely connected to large-scale features.

  2. Complex modulus estimation respecting causality: Application to viscoelastic bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, P.; Gary, G.; Lundberg, B.; Mohr, D.

    2012-08-01

    The identification of linear visco-elasticity models mostly focuses on the real and imaginary parts of the Young's modulus. Many methods have been proposed in the past to identify these material model parameters from experiments. However, when these parameters are determined independently, they are likely to violate the principle of causality. The present work presents a method that accounts for the constraints of causality and positivity of dissipation rate. The proposed method is based on a finite set of n measured angular frequencies and complex moduli. It includes a noise reduction procedure and provides a rheological 2p + 1)-parameter model with p modulus on the positive imaginary frequency axis are determined by p parameters which are obtained as the common positive zeros of a special class of rational functions, while the remaining parameters are obtained from a least squares fit. The level of refinement of the rheological model, expressed by p, is not an assumed value but a result of the method. The method is applied to an impact test with a Nylon bar specimen. In this case, data at the n = 29 lowest resonance frequencies resulted in a rheological model with 14 parameters (p = 6). The validity of the method is checked through supplementary experimental results at low frequencies.

  3. Weldability, mechanical and corrosion properties of microalloyed reinforcing bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico]|[UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Hernandez, G.; Carpio, J.J. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico; Arganis, C. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The first Mexican specification of low alloy reinforcing bars of weldable grade and optimal mechanical response during plastic deformation caused by earthquakes was issued in 1987. The modifications of the Construction Code of Mexico City after the 1985 earthquakes included the recommendation of using low alloy rebars as a first option for the reinforced concrete building main structural components. The low alloy rebars are fabricated employing low carbon steels microalloyed with niobium or vanadium in order to combine the weldability and high ductility of the low carbon steels with the high strength provided by the, microalloying elements. The present paper reports the results of a comparative study of standard (medium carbon) and microalloyed rebars considering features of microstructure, mechanical behavior, weldability and the electrochemical properties of these two materials embedded in plain and chloride contaminated concrete. The main differences were observed in microstructural features, mechanical behavior and weldability. The corrosion rate measurements of standard and microalloyed rebars are similar. The weldability of the rebars is discussed in terms of the better electrical connectivity of the reinforcement and cathodic protection.

  4. Tensile Strength of GFRP Reinforcing Bars with Hollow Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP has been proposed to replace steel as a reinforcing bar (rebar due to its high tensile strength and noncorrosive material properties. One obstacle in using FRP rebars is high price. Generally FRP is more expensive than conventional steel rebar. There are mainly two ways to reduce the cost. For example, one is making the price of each composition cost of FRP rebar (e.g., fibers, resin, etc. lower than steel rebar. Another is making an optimized design for cross section and reducing the material cost. The former approach is not easy because the steel price is very low in comparison with component materials of FRP. For the latter approach, the cost could be cut down by reducing the material cost. Therefore, an idea of making hollow section over the cross section of FRP rebar was proposed in this study by optimizing the cross section design with acceptable tensile performance in comparison with steel rebar. In this study, glass reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars with hollow section and 19 mm of outer diameter were manufactured and tested to evaluate the tensile performance in accordance with the hollowness ratio. From the test results, it was observed that the tensile strength decreased almost linearly with increase of hollowness ratio and the elastic modulus decreased nonlinearly.

  5. The BaBar Data Reconstruction Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceseracciu, A

    2005-04-20

    The BaBar experiment is characterized by extremely high luminosity and very large volume of data produced and stored, with increasing computing requirements each year. To fulfill these requirements a Control System has been designed and developed for the offline distributed data reconstruction system. The control system described in this paper provides the performance and flexibility needed to manage a large number of small computing farms, and takes full benefit of OO design. The infrastructure is well isolated from the processing layer, it is generic and flexible, based on a light framework providing message passing and cooperative multitasking. The system is distributed in a hierarchical way: the top-level system is organized in farms, farms in services, and services in subservices or code modules. It provides a powerful Finite State Machine framework to describe custom processing models in a simple regular language. This paper describes the design and evolution of this control system, currently in use at SLAC and Padova on {approx}450 CPUs organized in 9 farms.

  6. Optimum Path Synthesis of a Geared Five-Bar Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yi Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most studies on path synthesis problems are to trace simple or smooth trajectories. In this work, an optimum synthesis for several special trajectories generated by a geared five-bar mechanism is studied using the one-phase synthesis method. The synthesis problem for the special trajectories, which is originally studied using the two-phase synthesis method discussed in the literature, is a real challenge due to very few dimensionally proportioned mechanisms that can generate the special trajectories. The challenging special trajectories with up to 41 discrete points include a self-overlapping curve, nonsmooth curves with straight segments and vertices, and sophisticated shapes. The error function of the square deviation of positions is used as the objective function and the GA-DE evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the optimization problems. Findings show that the proposed method can obtain approximately matched trajectories at the cost of a tremendous number of evaluations of the objective function. Therefore, the challenging problems may serve as the benchmark problems to test the effectiveness and efficiency of synthesis methods and/or optimization algorithms. All the synthesized solutions have been validated using the animation of the SolidWorks assembly so that the obtained mechanisms are sound and usable.

  7. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  8. APPLICATIONS OF SPACERS MADE WITH DOUBLE BAR RASCHEL MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DÍAZ-GARCÍA Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, textile technologies develop to adapt their different techniques for creating new products for the different sectors of application every day. Particularly, warp knitted fabrics and warp-knitting technology have applications in all different groups of technical textiles. It could be the most applied technique, the most versatile technology to develop new textile products for the new textile market. Warp knitted fabrics play the most important role among the technical textile fabrics. This technology is used in different product groups such as mobile textiles (car seat covers, dashboard cover, industrial textiles (composites, medical textiles (anti-decubitus blankets, sports textiles and foundation garments (bra cups, pads for swimwear. This study presents some examples of the application of this technology in some markets Within the market of technical textile, medical textile has an increasing relevance and knitted fabrics and knitting technology, at the same time, play a very important role in the fields of technical and medical textiles. Studies have demonstrated that knitted structures possess excellent mechanical properties and can promote more effective regenerative medicine, tissue repair, ligament, tendon cartilage, reconstruction, etc. The aim of this paper is to present different possibilities of textiles developed with this kind of structures, to present different alternatives, different examples of products obtained with this kind of textile structure combined with the correct kind of textile fiber. In this kind of technology, double-bar Raschel machines used for producing three-dimensional textiles, spacers, play an important role.

  9. Neuroendocrine correlates of sex-role reversal in barred buttonquails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Cornelia

    2016-11-30

    Sex differences in brain structure and behaviour are well documented among vertebrates. An excellent model exploring the neural mechanisms of sex differences in behaviour is represented by sex-role-reversed species. In the majority of bird species, males compete over access to mates and resources more strongly than do females. It is thought that the responsible brain regions are therefore more developed in males than in females. Because these behaviours and brain regions are activated by androgens, males usually have increased testosterone levels during breeding. Therefore, in species with sex-role reversal, certain areas of the female brain should be more developed or steroid hormone profiles should be sexually reversed. Here, I studied circulating hormone levels and gene expression of steroid hormone receptors and aromatase in a captive population of barred buttonquails (Turnix suscitator). While females performed courtship and agonistic behaviours, there was no evidence for sexually reversed hormone profiles. However, I found female-biased sex differences in gene expression of androgen receptors in several hypothalamic and limbic brain regions that were already in place at hatching. Such sex differences are not known from non-sex-role-reversed species. These data suggest that increased neural sensitivity to androgens could be involved in the mechanisms mediating sex-role-reversed behaviours. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Design study of a bar-type EMR device

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-05-01

    It is well known that extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) depends on the geometric parameters of the EMR device and the locations of the electrodes. In this paper, the performance of a bar-type EMR device is simulated with respect to the device geometry and electrode locations. The performance is evaluated with regards to the output sensitivity of the device, rather than the often analyzed EMR ratio, since it is more relevant than the EMR ratio for potential applications ranging from read heads to smart biomedical sensors. The results obtained with the finite element method show the dependence of the output sensitivity on the device geometry the placements of the electric contacts as well as the strength of the applied magnetic field in different configurations and allow finding the optimum parameters. Within the studied range of -1 to 1 T both IVVI and VIIV configurations show very similar behavior. For EMR sensors of high sensitivity, the results suggest that a simple two-contact device would provide the best performance replacing the conventional four-contact design. © 2012 IEEE.

  11. Avoiding DWI among Bar-room Drinkers: Strategies and Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry D. Caudill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prevalence and predictors of 11strategies to avoid driving when feeling intoxicated among 561 bar-room patrons in two medium-sized Maryland communities. Logistic regression analyses identified demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal predictors of avoidance strategies and interactions among predictors. Overall, 89% reported one or more DWI avoidance actions in the past year, and 38% reported driving intoxicated during that time. Average frequencies of avoidance behavior and intoxicated driving increased significantly as drinking level increased. However, the higher the drinking level, the smaller the ratio of avoidance actions to DWI experiences, highlighting the vulnerability of heavy drinkers who had driven intoxicated. Using a sober driver or one who allegedly drank less than the respondent were the most popular and frequent strategies, but paying for a cab, walking, and using a bus or free cab were relatively unpopular. Higher drinking levels predicted significantly higher odds of using avoidance approaches, as did intoxicated driving. Confidence in driving safely when intoxicated was positively related to drinking level and intoxicated driving, but it tended to predict lower odds of avoidance actions. Similarly, marital status, age, gender, and location influenced the odds of avoidance behaviors. Interventions should be strategically tailored to exploit or counter drinker predilections among avoidance options.

  12. Elderly population in the prison system: a look behind bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hércules de Oliveira Carmo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is a present reality in this century, and that is demanding attention, especially in the context of public health and human rights - the elderly-con. A complex problem that arose for our consideration is that the person who, besides being old, and the inmate is most often in pain, due to a pathological condition related to organic factors, mental or subjective, in old age, worsens. Without being accompanied by public policies, these realities are not provided before, we now gain a greater complexity in the prison context, reveal an increase of HIV / AIDS, the presence of sexually transmitted disease, increased depression and neuropsychiatric diseases. The questions posed in this research, which attempted to answer here may well be subsumed: - How to think the nursing practices before the issue of the growing aging population with its pathologies further complexizadas in prison? The objective, therefore, this study: (i to investigate the growing presence of the elderly Brazilian penitentiary system, based on existing literature, (ii verify the potential risk factors on the health of the elderly population in the Brazilian prison system, and the weight the presence of a nursing team in this context. Urgent attention, therefore, it is required of health professionals, authorities and civil society to the complexity of aging silenced behind bars.

  13. Effect of Shot Peening on the Fatigue Strength of Automotive Tubular Stabilizer Bars DC 218

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittek A.M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns issues related to the development of designs of stabilizer bars for new motor vehicle models. It involves not only the designing of a stabilizer bar with the shape required by the manufacturer, but also the preparation of bending and heat treatment processes as well as the performance of strength and fatigue tests. In the prototype development phase, the simulations techniques (FEM may be used to assess the design. The article contains a detailed analysis of a stabilizer bar designated with the DC 218 VA symbol. Performed numerical strength and fatigue calculations showed that the developed stabilizer bar design with the desired shape did not achieve the required number of fatigue cycles. It was also proven at the test stand by testing a prototype stabilizer bar. Therefore, it was suggested to supplement the technological process with an additional shot peening operation whose main aim was to reduce the length of microcracks on the stabilizer bar’s surface. This effect was confirmed during comparative metallographic tests of not shot – peened and shot – peened stabilizer bars. After shot peening, the analysed stabilizer bar reached a fatigue strength which exceeded the limits set by the manufacturer.

  14. Control of glucosylceramide production and morphogenesis by the Bar1 ceramide synthase in Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rittenour

    Full Text Available The contribution of plasma membrane proteins to the virulence of plant pathogenic fungi is poorly understood. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to characterize the acyl-CoA dependent ceramide synthase Bar1 (previously implicated in plasma membrane organization in the wheat pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The role of Bar1 in mediating cell membrane organization was confirmed as ΔBAR1 mutants failed to display a distinct sterol-rich domain at the hyphal tip. The ΔBAR1 mutants were non-pathogenic when inoculated onto wheat heads, and their in vitro growth also was severely perturbed. ΔBAR1 mutants were incapable of producing perithecia (sexual fruiting structures and only produced macroconidia (asexual spores in the presence of NaCl. Sphingolipid analyses indicated that Bar1 is specifically necessary for the production of glucosylceramides in both F. graminearum and Aspergillus nidulans. Interestingly, glucosylceramides appear to mediate sensitivity to heat stable antifungal factor (HSAF, as, in addition to ΔBAR1 mutants, a glucosylceramide synthase deficient mutant of Yarrowia lipolytica is also resistant to HSAF.

  15. Control of glucosylceramide production and morphogenesis by the Bar1 ceramide synthase in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenour, William R; Chen, Ming; Cahoon, Edgar B; Harris, Steven D

    2011-04-29

    The contribution of plasma membrane proteins to the virulence of plant pathogenic fungi is poorly understood. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to characterize the acyl-CoA dependent ceramide synthase Bar1 (previously implicated in plasma membrane organization) in the wheat pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The role of Bar1 in mediating cell membrane organization was confirmed as ΔBAR1 mutants failed to display a distinct sterol-rich domain at the hyphal tip. The ΔBAR1 mutants were non-pathogenic when inoculated onto wheat heads, and their in vitro growth also was severely perturbed. ΔBAR1 mutants were incapable of producing perithecia (sexual fruiting structures) and only produced macroconidia (asexual spores) in the presence of NaCl. Sphingolipid analyses indicated that Bar1 is specifically necessary for the production of glucosylceramides in both F. graminearum and Aspergillus nidulans. Interestingly, glucosylceramides appear to mediate sensitivity to heat stable antifungal factor (HSAF), as, in addition to ΔBAR1 mutants, a glucosylceramide synthase deficient mutant of Yarrowia lipolytica is also resistant to HSAF.

  16. Implant-supported overdenture with prefabricated bar attachment system in mandibular edentulous patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seung-Ryong; Song, Seung-Il; Hong, Seong-Tae; Kim, Gy-Young

    2012-01-01

    Implant-supported overdenture is a reliable treatment option for the patients with edentulous mandible when they have difficulty in using complete dentures. Several options have been used for implant-supported overdenture attachments. Among these, bar attachment system has greater retention and better maintainability than others. SFI-Bar® is prefabricated and can be adjustable at chairside. Therefore, laboratory procedures such as soldering and welding are unnecessary, which leads to fewer errors and lower costs. A 67-year-old female patient presented, complaining of mobility of lower anterior teeth with old denture. She had been wearing complete denture in the maxilla and removable partial denture in the mandible with severe bone loss. After extracting the teeth, two implants were placed in front of mental foramen, and SFI-Bar® was connected. A tube bar was seated to two adapters through large ball joints and fixation screws, connecting each implant. The length of the tube bar was adjusted according to inter-implant distance. Then, a female part was attached to the bar beneath the new denture. This clinical report describes two-implant-supported overdenture using the SFI-Bar® system in a mandibular edentulous patient. PMID:23236580

  17. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Brantley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  18. Evaluation of a nontoxic rigid polymer as connecting bar in external skeletal fixators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störk, Christoph K; Canivet, Philippe; Baidak, Alexandre A; Balligand, Marc H

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the mechanical characteristics of a nontoxic, low-cost, rigid polymer (RP) and to compare the structural and mechanical properties of a full-frame external skeletal fixator (ESF) with either RP connecting bars, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) connecting bars, or stainless-steel (SS) clamps and connecting bars. In vitro mechanical evaluation. Mechanical properties were assessed using an in vitro bone fracture model with a bilateral uniplanar ESF (type II). Identical ESF were built with connecting bars using RP (n = 8), PMMA (n = 8), and SS connecting bars and clamps (System Meynard; n = 3). Nondestructive mechanical tests were performed in uniaxial compression (AC) and craniocaudal (CC) 4-point bending, as well as fatigue AC. Composite stiffness for each specimen and for each loading mode was calculated from 6 replicate measures using the slope of the load displacement curve at small displacements. RP, PMMA, and SS ESF constructs yielded mean +/- SD composite stiffness values of 227 +/- 15, 381 +/- 30, and 394 +/- 9 N/mm in AC and of 35 +/- 2, 24 +/- 2, and 15 +/- 0 N/mm in CC, respectively. Structural and mechanical properties of RP are satisfactorily rigid and fatigue resistant for its use as a connecting bar in ESF. RP connecting bars in an ESF are a reliable, versatile, nontoxic and inexpensive option for the veterinary surgeon. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  19. Behaviour of axially and eccentrically loaded short columns reinforced with GFRP bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, S.; Balaji, S.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The corrosion of steel reinforcing bars is a predominant factor in limiting the life expectancy of Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC) structures. Corrosion resistant Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars can be an effective alternative to steel bars in this context. Recent investigations reported the flexural behaviour of RCC beams reinforced with Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars. This study is meant to investigate the suitability of Sand Coated GFRP reinforcement bars in short square columns which when loaded axially and loaded with a minimum eccentricity. Standard tests to assess mechanical properties of GFRP bars and pullout test to quantify the bond strength between the bars and concrete were conducted. GFRP reinforced column specimens with a cross-sectional dimension of 100mm X 100mm and of length 1000mm were cast and tested under axial and eccentric loading. The assessed load carrying capacity was compared with that of conventional steel reinforced columns of the same size. The yield load and ultimate load at failure withstood by the steel reinforced columns were considerably more than that of GFRP reinforced columns. The energy absorption capacity of GFRP reinforced columns was also poor compared to steel reinforced columns. Both the columns exhibited nearly the same ductile behaviour. Hence GFRP reinforcements are not recommendable for compression members.

  20. Vision-based fast location of multi-bar code in any direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Xin; Zhao, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Hua-Zhu

    2017-07-01

    The automatic location of the bar code is a key step in the bar code image recognition system. It is extremely confined that the generalization of the traditional bar code localization algorithms due to the requirements of both direction and quality of bar code, and most of them are only aimed at the single barcode localization. In this paper, we have proposed a novel multi-barcode location algorithm in arbitrary direction based on the accumulation of the linear gray value. First, the line coordinates of the barcode region is determined by the image normalized cross-correlation algorithm. Then the center line of gray value of cumulative distribution is used to analyze the barcode boundary and to determine the number of bar code within the region. Finally, the precise positioning of the barcode region is obtained. The experiments have demonstrated that our proposed method can be used to identify all the bar codes in any area, and automatically locate the bar codes in any direction.

  1. A Search for the Decay B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Steven H

    2003-04-15

    We present a search for the rare flavour-changing neutral-current decay B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}} based on a sample of (86.9 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected in the BABAR experiment at the SLAC B-factory. Signal candidate events are selected by fully reconstructing a B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}X{sup +} decay, where X{sup +} represents a combination of up to three charged pions or kaons and up to two {pi}0 candidates. The charged tracks and calorimeter clusters not used in the B{sup +} reconstruction are required to be compatible with a B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay. We observe a total of three signal candidate events with an expected background of 2.7 {+-} 0.8, resulting in a preliminary limit of {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 1.05 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level. This search is combined with the results of a previous and statistically independent preliminary BABAR search for B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}} to give a limit of {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}}) at the 90% confidence level.

  2. Coupled channel Faddeev calculations of a K-bar N{pi} quasibound state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, A., E-mail: avragal@vms.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Garcilazo, H., E-mail: humberto@esfm.ipn.mx [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-08-01

    The K-bar N{pi} system is studied using separable interactions fitted to data available on the s-wave K-bar N-{pi}Y subsystem and the p-wave {pi}N, {pi}Y, {pi}{pi} and {pi}K-bar subsystems. Three-body K-bar N{pi}-{pi}Y{pi} coupled channel Faddeev equations with relativistic kinematics are solved in search for poles in the complex energy plane. A K-bar N{pi} quasibound pole with quantum numbers I(J{sup P})=1(3/2{sup -}) is found near and below the K-bar N{pi} threshold, its precise location depending sensitively on the poorly known shape of the p-wave {pi}Y interaction. This K-bar N{pi} quasibound state suggests the existence of a D{sub 13{Sigma}} resonance with width about 60 MeV near threshold (M{approx}1570 MeV), excluding meson absorption contributions.

  3. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chequers, Matthew H.; Spekkens, Kristine; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-12-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a `slow' bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of R ≡ R_c/a_b ˜ 2. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self-gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation, there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon-dominated inner and dark matter-dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter dominated everywhere. Our model nonetheless implies that UGC 628 falls on the same relationship between dark matter fraction and rotation velocity found for high surface brightness galaxies, and lends credence to the argument that the disc mass fraction measured at the location where its contribution to the potential peaks is not a reliable indicator of its dynamical importance at all radii.

  4. Secondhand Smoke Exposure Among Young Adult Sexual Minority Bar and Nightclub Patrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallin, Amanda; Neilands, Torsten B.; Jordan, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We compared exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) and attitudes toward smoke-free bar and nightclub policies among patrons of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) and non-LGBT bars and nightclubs. Methods. We conducted randomized time–location sampling surveys of young adults (aged 21–30 years) in 7 LGBT (n = 1113 patrons) and 12 non-LGBT (n = 1068 patrons) venues in Las Vegas, Nevada, in 2011, as part of a cross-sectional study of a social branding intervention to promote a tobacco-free lifestyle and environment in bars and nightclubs. Results. Compared with non-LGBT bars and nightclubs, patrons of LGBT venues had 38% higher adjusted odds of having been exposed to SHS in a bar or nightclub in the past 7 days but were no less likely to support smoke-free policies and intended to go out at least as frequently if a smoke-free bar and nightclub law was passed. Conclusions. The policy environment in LGBT bars and nightclubs appears favorable for the enactment of smoke-free policies, which would protect patrons from SHS and promote a smoke-free social norm. PMID:24328626

  5. Influence of package and health-related claims on perception and sensory acceptability of snack bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Vinícius Rodrigues Arruda; Freitas, Tamara Beatriz de Oliveira; Dantas, Maria Inês de Souza; Della Lucia, Suzana Maria; Melo, Laura Fernandes; Minim, Valéria Paula Rodrigues; Bressan, Josefina

    2017-11-01

    Concerns for health can lead to healthier food choices, especially if the consumer is well informed. This study aimed to evaluate the importance of package and health-related claims on Brazilian consumers' acceptance of snack bars. In order to evaluate package attributes, in focus groups discussions, 19 consumers chose the most important factors that influence their purchase decisions. Next, 102 consumers evaluated six commercial brands of snack bars in a three-session acceptance test: the first with no information about the product, the second containing the product package and the third with information on health-related claims associated with consumption of the bar. In general, package attributes, price and flavor were the most important factors that influence the purchase of snack bars. Health claims positively influenced consumer acceptance, but information concerning the absence of gluten and lactose did not significantly alter sensory acceptance. The presence of omega-3s, sugars, preservatives, flavorings and colorings have the potential to improve acceptability, because they were able to raise the acceptance of the seed bar, removing it from the rejection region. Protein and nut bars are not well known to the general public and the lower mean acceptance of the seed and protein bars demonstrated the need for sensorial improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tests of CP Violation with $\\bar{K^0}$ and $ K^{0} $ at LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS195 Tests of CP Violation with &bar.K$^0$ and K$^0$ at LEAR \\\\ \\\\The aim of the experiment is to carry out precision tests of CP, T and CPT on the neutral kaon system through $ K ^0 - $\\bar{K}^0 $ interferometry using LEAR as an intense source. A beam of $ ~10^{6}~\\bar{p}$~events/second is brought to rest in a hydrogen target producing $ K ^0 $ and $ $\\bar{K}^0 $ events through the reaction channels : \\\\ \\\\ \\begin{center} $\\bar{p}p~~~~~\\rightarrow~~~~K^0~+~(K^-\\pi^+$) \\\\ \\\\~~~~~~~~$\\rightarrow~~~~\\bar{K}^0~+~(K^+\\pi^-$) \\end{center}\\\\ \\\\The neutral strange particles and their antiparticles are tagged by detecting in the magnetic field the sign of the accompanying charged kaons identified via Cerenkovs and scintillators. The experiment has the unique feature that the decays from particles and antiparticles are recorded under the same operating conditions using tracking chambers and a gas sampling electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured time-dependent $ K ^0 $-$ $\\bar{K}^0 $ asymmetries for non-lepton...

  7. Effect of -bar 2 grain boundaries on plastic deformation of WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostberg, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)]. E-mail: gusto@fy.chalmers.se; Farooq, M.U. [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Christensen, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Andren, H.-O. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Klement, U. [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Wahnstroem, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2006-01-25

    Cutting inserts of WC-6wt.% Co were investigated before and after plastic deformation. The deformation tests were performed with a turning operation under realistic, yet controlled, conditions. SEM studies showed that after deformation the WC skeleton structure had broken up and thin lamellae of binder phase had formed in less than 10% of the grain boundaries. Ab initio calculations showed that -bar 2 twist WC/WC boundaries have a high work of separation and the interface energy is not lowered by forming two Co/WC boundaries. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements showed an apparent increase in the relative occurrence of -bar 2 boundaries due to poor indexing of the deformed material. The accumulation of dislocations in general boundaries is held responsible for the difficulty in identifying them compared with -bar 2 boundaries. At the -bar 2 tilt boundary the grains have the glide planes {l_brace}101-bar 0{r_brace} in common and at the -bar 2 twist boundary there are three glide planes intersecting, which facilitate dislocation movements across the -bar 2 boundaries.

  8. The Bialaphos Resistance Gene (bar) Plays a Role in Both Self-Defense and Bialaphos Biosynthesis in Streptomyces hygroscopicus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Yoichi; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Takano, Eriko; Murakami, Takeshi; Hara, Osamu; Itoh, Reiko; Imai, Satoshi; Satoh, Atsuyuki; Nagaoka, Kozo

    1988-01-01

    We inactivated the bialaphos (BA) resistance gene (bar) of a BA producer, Streptomyces hygroscopicus, by the gene replacement technique. The resulting BA-sensitive mutant (Bar-) was able to produce little BA but considerable amount of an intermediate demethylphosphinothricin (DMPT). The Bar- mutant

  9. 78 FR 59712 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the 3 Bars Ecosystem and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the 3 Bars Ecosystem and Landscape Restoration... Impact Statement (EIS) for the 3 Bars Ecosystem and Landscape Restoration Project (3 Bars Project) and by... human impacts. The BLM is proposing a comprehensive treatment program for dramatically improving the...

  10. 75 FR 7562 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision... certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey covering the period of review (POR) of April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final Results...

  11. 78 FR 22227 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB..., through January 31, 2012. \\1\\ See Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

  12. 77 FR 38271 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed-Circumstances Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed... changed-circumstances review with intent to revoke in part the order on stainless steel bar (SSBar) from... February 1, 2010. \\1\\ See Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Initiation and Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

  13. 76 FR 74807 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain; Institution of Five-Year Reviews AGENCY...)) (the Act) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel bar from... Department of Commerce issued antidumping duty orders on imports of stainless steel bar from Brazil, India...

  14. 75 FR 4044 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil... until January 29, 2010. See Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

  15. On the role of impermeable groins on barred beach morphodynamics: Example of Matalascañas beach, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrati, Mouncef; Morales González, Juan Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Several studies on barred beaches in settings with mesotidal to macrotidal regimes have focused on cross-shore and alongshore bar mobility. Whereas the general link between hydrodynamics, sediment transport and the response of the intertidal bars and shoreline evolution has been recognized in the literature, the role of coastal defense structures (Breakwaters, groins, seawalls) on bar-trough systems morphodynamics have received more much less attention and the field-based experimental studies of these environments are rare. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the contrasting behavior of a natural and protected barred beach under several hydrodynamics conditions. This paper presents detailed hydrodynamic and morphological data from a field experiment spanning 10 days undertaken in Matalascañas beach, a mesotidal protected vs natural barred beach in the Southern Spanish coast. This mesotidal beach experienced intense erosion in the recent past and therefore it has been partially protected by groins (protection of sea-front touristic residences). During the fieldwork, an intertidal bars in the protected and non-protected areas highlighted contrasting morphological behaviour. The non-protected barred beach shows a less pronounced bar-trough system than the protected zone. Under low energy conditions (significant wave height 1m), the protected and non-protected zones show a flattening bars processes. The findings of the present study suggest that cross-shore vs longshore bar mobility may even be mitigated by the presence of the groins, which favour onshore than longshore bar migration.

  16. 75 FR 22552 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final... Department) in the 2003-2004 administrative review of certain steel concrete of reinforcing bars (rebar) from...) of April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey...

  17. The BaLROG project - II. Quantifying the influence of bars on the stellar populations of nearby galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Pérez, I.; Peletier, R.; Vazdekis, A.

    2016-01-01

    We continue the exploration of the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample: 16 large mosaics of barred galaxies observed with the integral field unit Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae. We quantify the influence of bars on the composition of the stellar

  18. Event-Specific Analyses of Poly-Drug Abuse and Concomitant Risk Behavior in a College Bar District in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Dennis L.; O'Mara, Ryan; Dodd, Virginia J.; Merves, Michele L.; Weiler, Robert M.; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Moore, Christine; Reingle, Jennifer; Gullet, Sara E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the epidemiology of risk behavior associated with poly-drug use in a college bar district of a large campus community. Participants: A total of 469 bar patrons participated in the study. Methods: The authors used self-report data and biological measures collected from patrons outside bars in July and August of…

  19. Growth of river mouth bars in sheltered bays in the presence of frontal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardin, W.; Mariotti, G.; Edmonds, D. A.; Guercio, R.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2013-06-01

    of the key processes for the formation of deltas and their fluvial networks is the deposition of mouth bars in front of prograding distributaries. Waves influence mouth bar growth, but it is not clear how and to what extent. Toward this end, we conduct a modeling study on deltas forming in sheltered bays, where waves are locally generated and both longshore currents and surf zone are absent. We focus on the simplified case of a homopycnal river plume subject to frontal wave attack, and we begin by isolating the effects of waves on jet spreading. An analytical model for the hydrodynamic interaction between incoming waves and a turbulent expanding jet is developed and tested with the numerical model Delft3D coupled to the wave model SWAN. Both the analytical model and Delft3D predict that incoming surface gravity waves increase the spreading of the jet and the interaction between wave and current boundary layers causes an increase in bottom friction. To investigate how waves influence mouth bar morphodynamics, a set of numerical simulations is run with Delft3D-SWAN utilizing a geometry and wave characteristics typical of sheltered bays. Our numerical results show that in the presence of waves, mouth bars form up to 35% closer to the river mouth and 40% faster when compared to cases without waves. The distance from the river mouth to the stagnated mouth bar decreases with increasing wave height and wave period. The timescale of bar formation is inversely proportional to wave height and directly proportional to wave period. Our modeling study suggests that wave influence on mouth bar growth is complex. Small waves, like the ones modeled here, promote mouth bar formation via increased jet spreading and faster formation time, which in turn should create deltas with more distributary channels. On the other hand, large waves suppress mouth bar formation, as seen in other studies, leading to fewer distributary channels.

  20. The Role of Bars in AGN Fueling in Disk Galaxies Over the Last Seven Billion Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisternas, Mauricio; Sheth, Kartik; Salvato, Mara; Knapen, Johan H.; Civano, Francesca; Santini, Paola

    2015-04-01

    We present empirical constraints on the influence of stellar bars on the fueling of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 0.84 using a sample of X-ray-selected AGNs hosted in luminous non-interacting face-on and moderately inclined disk galaxies from the Chandra COSMOS survey. Using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging to identify bars, we find that the fraction of barred active galaxies displays a similar behavior as that of inactive spirals, declining with redshift from 71% at z∼ 0.3, to 35% at z∼ 0.8. With active galaxies being typically massive, we compare them against a mass-matched sample of inactive spirals and show that, while at face value the AGN bar fraction is slightly higher at all redshifts, we cannot rule out that the bar fractions of active and inactive galaxies are the same. The presence of a bar has no influence on the AGN strength, with barred and unbarred active galaxies showing equivalent X-ray luminosity distributions. From our results, we conclude that the occurrence and the efficiency of the fueling process is independent of the large scale structure of a galaxy. The role of bars, if any, may be restricted to providing the suitable conditions for black hole fueling to occur, i.e., bring a fresh supply of gas to the central 100 pc. At the high-redshift end, we find that roughly 60% of active disk galaxies are unbarred. We speculate this to be related with the known dynamical state of disks at higher redshifts—more gas-rich and prone to instabilities than local spirals—which could also lead to gas inflows without the need of bars.

  1. The environment of barred galaxies in the low-redshift universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ye; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Li, Cheng; Wang, Lixin; Wang, Enci, E-mail: sodi@kias.re.kr, E-mail: leech@shao.ac.cn [Partner Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics at the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-12-01

    We present a study of the environment of barred galaxies using a volume-limited sample of over 30,000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use four different statistics to quantify the environment: the projected two-point cross-correlation function, the background-subtracted number count of neighbor galaxies, the overdensity of the local environment, and the membership of our galaxies to galaxy groups to segregate central and satellite systems. For barred galaxies as a whole, we find a very weak difference in all the quantities compared to unbarred galaxies of the control sample. When we split our sample into early- and late-type galaxies, we see a weak but significant trend for early-type galaxies with a bar to be more strongly clustered on scales from a few 100 kpc to 1 Mpc when compared to unbarred early-type galaxies. This indicates that the presence of a bar in early-type galaxies depends on the location within their host dark matter halos. This is confirmed by the group catalog in the sense that for early-types, the fraction of central galaxies is smaller if they have a bar. For late-type galaxies, we find fewer neighbors within ∼50 kpc around the barred galaxies when compared to unbarred galaxies from the control sample, suggesting that tidal forces from close companions suppress the formation/growth of bars. Finally, we find no obvious correlation between overdensity and the bars in our sample, showing that galactic bars are not obviously linked to the large-scale structure of the universe.

  2. The effect of price reduction on salad bar purchases at a corporate cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Thomas E; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Katz, Abigail S; Tillema, Juliana O; Flottemesch, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a price reduction on salad bar purchases in a corporate cafeteria. We reduced the price of salad bar purchases by 50% during March 2012 and analyzed sales data by month for February through June 2012. We also conducted an anonymous survey. Salad bar sales by weight more than tripled during the price reduction and returned to baseline afterward. Survey respondents reported that the high price of salad relative to other choices is a barrier to purchases. Policies that make the price of salads equal to other choices in cafeterias may significantly increase healthful food consumption.

  3. Modified Ravitch procedure: using a pectus bar for posttraumatic pectus excavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Koo; Choi, Young Ho; Shim, Jae Hoon; Baek, Man-Jong; Sohn, Young-Sang; Kim, Hark Jei

    2007-08-01

    Guidelines for surgical management of posttraumatic pectus excavatum have not been established due to the variable clinical manifestations and limited number of cases. A 34-year-old man who was involved in a truck-mixer vehicle crash 6 months previously complained of a depressed anterior chest wall deformity. The patient had successfully undergone subperichondral resection, sternal osteotomy, and pectus bar insertion placed under the depressed sternum, followed by bar rotation for elevation of the chest wall. This case illustrates that a modified Ravitch procedure, using a pectus bar, may be an alternative for posttraumatic pectus excavatum.

  4. The d-bar Neumann problem and Schrödinger operators

    CERN Document Server

    Haslinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    The topic of this bookis located at the intersection of complex analysis, operator theory and partial differential equations. First we investigate the canonical solution operator to d-bar restricted to Bergman spaces of holomorphic L2 functions in one and several complex variables. These operators are Hankel operators of special type. In the following we consider the general d-bar-complex and derive properties of the complex Laplacian on L2 spaces of bounded pseudoconvex domains and on weighted L2 spaces.The main part is devoted to compactness of the d-bar-Neumann operator. The last part will

  5. Measurement of the {bar B}{sup 0} --> D*{sup +} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} Decay Rate and |V{sub cb}|

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2004-08-11

    The authors present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub cb}| based on a sample of about 53,700 {bar B}{sup 0} --> D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} = (4.90 {+-} 0.07(stat.){sub -0.35}{sup +0.36}(syst.))%. They measure the differential decay rate as a function of w, the relativistic boost {gamma} of the D*{sup +} in the {bar B}{sup 0} rest frame. By extrapolating d{Gamma}/dw to the kinematic limit w {yields} 1, the authors extract the product of |V{sub cb}| and the axial form factor A{sub 1}(w = 1) to determine |V{sub cb}| = (38.7 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.){sub -1.3}{sup +1.5}(theory)) x 10{sup -3}.

  6. Local and Global Parsing with Functional (FX-bar Theory and SCD Linguistic Strategy (I. Part I. FX-bar Schemes and Theory. Local and Global FX-bar Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neculai Curteanu

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys latest developments of SCD (Segmentation-Cohesion-Dependency linguistic strategy, with its basic components: FX-bar theory with local and (two extensions to global structures, the hierarchy graph of SCD marker classes, and improved versions of SCD algorithms for segmentation and parsing of local and global text structures. Briefly, Part I brings theoretical support (predicational feature and semantic diathesis for handing down the predication from syntactic to lexical level, introduces the new local / global FX-bar schemes (graphs for clause-level and discourse-level, the (global extension of dependency graph for SCD marker classes, the problem of (direct and inverse local FX-bar projection of the verbal group (verbal complex, and the FX-bar global projections, with the special case of sub-clausal discourse segments. Part II discusses the implications of the functional generativity concept for local and global markers, with a novel understanding on the taxonomy of text parsing algorithms, specifies the SCD marker classes, both at clause and discourse level, and presents (variants of SCD local and global segmentation / parsing algorithms, along with their latest running results.

  7. The Stellar Structure of the Milky Way: Mapping The Non-Axisymmetric Structure of the Bulge, Disk, and Bar(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Robert

    Over the last 20 years, six major infrared Galactic surveys (2MASS, Spitzer/GLIMPSE, UKIDSS-Galactic Plane Survey, VVV, WISE, and APOGEE) have yielded an enormous wealth of information on the stellar and star-forming content of the disk, bulge, and bar(s) of the Milky Way. Using data from these surveys, we will create photometrically-selected catalogs of red clump and red giants candidates to trace the stellar mass of the Milky Way Galaxy. We will validate these samples using spectroscopic information from APOGEE and parallax information from Gaia. A second catalog of stellar proper motions will also be created using two epochs of Spitzer observations along the Galactic plane taken a decade apart to search for nonaxisymmetric stellar motions due to the Galactic bar(s). These catalogs will be used to produce non-parametric three-dimensional maps of the stellar mass of the disk, bulge, and bar(s) of the Galaxy. These maps will then be used to address the following unresolved questions of Milky Way Galactic structure: (1) what is the amplitude and distribution of non-axisymmetric stellar density in the inner Galactic disk due to spiral structure; (2) what is the density structure of the stellar disk interior to 4 kpc where gas tracers show a hole ; (3) does the Milky Way have an inner or outer stellar ring; (4) what is the three dimensional structure of the truncated" and warped stellar disk and the outer exponential (?) scale-length of the stellar disk beyond the truncation distance. The results of this research will be used to inform the planning of future NASA missions, principally SPHEREx and WFIRST.

  8. Bad nights or bad bars? Multi-level analysis of environmental predictors of aggression in late-night large-capacity bars and clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kathryn; Bernards, Sharon; Osgood, D Wayne; Wells, Samantha

    2006-11-01

    To clarify environmental predictors of bar-room aggression by differentiating relationships due to nightly variations versus across bar variations, frequency versus severity of aggression and patron versus staff aggression. Male-female pairs of researcher-observers conducted 1334 observations in 118 large capacity (> 300) bars and clubs in Toronto, Canada. Observers independently rated aspects of the environment (e.g. crowding) at every visit and wrote detailed narratives of each incident of aggression that occurred. Measures of severity of aggression for the visit were calculated by aggregating ratings for each person in aggressive incidents. Although bivariate analyses confirmed the significance of most environmental predictors of aggression identified in previous research, multivariate analyses identified the following key visit-level predictors (controlling for bar-level relationships): rowdiness/permissive environment and people hanging around after closing predicted both frequency and severity of aggression; sexual activity, contact and competition and people with two or more drinks at closing predicted frequency but not severity of aggression; lack of staff monitoring predicted more severe patron aggression, while having more and better coordinated staff predicted more severe staff aggression. Intoxication of patrons was significantly associated with more frequent and severe patron aggression at the bar level (but not at the visit level) in the multivariate analyses and negatively associated with severity of staff aggression at the visit level. The results demonstrate clearly the importance of the immediate environment (not just the type of bar or characteristics of usual patrons) and the importance of specific environmental factors, including staff behaviour, in predicting both frequency and severity of aggression.

  9. The Influence Of Brand Positioning Fun, Art And Education Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan Toward Visit Decision In Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vany Octaviany

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan is one tourist attraction (DTW art which is located in Kota Baru Parahyangan, Padalarang. Number of tourists visiting Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan from year to year has increased, but did not meet the expected targets visit the manager. Building a strong Brand Positioning able to provide a reference for tourists in choosing DTW to be addressed which can then influence the decision of tourists to visit a DTW. Therefore Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan trying to build a strategy Brand Positioning Fun, Art and Education in order to position itself as DTW which offers attractions and tourist activity-laden art education but still fun for tourists. This study aims to find out about how much influence the Brand Positioning Fun, Art and Education against the decision of visiting tourists in Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan. In this study, the independent variable (X is the Brand Positioning and the dependent variable was the decision to visit, with a sample of 100 respondents, data collection techniques using a questionnaire (questionnaire, interviews, documentary studies and literature studies, while data analysis techniques using simple regression. The results showed that the influence strategy Brand Positioning Fun, Art and Education on the decision been run Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan have a strong influence, which amounted to 83%. This shows that when Brand Positioning Fun, Art and Education implemented properly, then the decision to tourists visiting Bale Seni Barli-Kota Baru Parahyangan will increase.

  10. Search for $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow WZ \\rightarrow l\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pani, Priscilla; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2010-07-01

    The high energy physics has made huge steps forward the comprehension of the inner most nature of our universe and the matter we are composed of. The experimental discoveries, and the theories of the last 50 years that the experimental discoveries had confirmed or inspired, made possible to build a theory of the interactions. Weak interactions have been discovered and unified with the Electromagnetic ones in the Standard Model, which is the most widely experimentally tested and confirmed model of this century. The only prediction which is still unconfirmed is the existence of a particle, the Higgs boson, which provides particles with mass, interacting with them, in a spontaneous symmetry breakdown that doesn't violate the natural gauge symmetry of the Lagrangian of the system. One of the ways in which the Standard Model has been tested during the last 20 years is by accelerating e{sup +}e{sup -} (LEP) or p{bar p} (Tevatron) particles in a circular ring and colliding them inside a detector which is designed to reveal the final reaction products. We now have two operating hadron colliders in the world. The Tevatron at Fermilab laboratory of Chicago, collides protons against anti-protons since 1989 and has reached its maximum energy in the mass center of 1.96 TeV since 2001. It has collected approximately 7 fb{sup -1} of data so far, that allowed important discoveries, as the top quark one, B{sub s} mixing, precision measurements of some of the Standard Model free parameters, e.g. the W mass, and search for New Phenomena. The LHC at CERN in Geneva is a proton proton collider and has started the data acquisition in March 2010, at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, thus beating the world record of the Tevatron. LHC however has not yet either the integrated luminosity nor the detailed understanding of the detectors to start investigating Higgs or di-boson production. The purpose of this work is to analyse the data of the CDF experiment at Tevatron to search for the

  11. Wave Transformation and Undertow Over a Barred Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, E.; Özkan-Haller, H.; Long, J.

    2004-12-01

    The mean cross-shore flow (undertow) over a barred beach is examined by calibrating an existing wave and circulation model which will provide predictions that will be compared to in-situ measurements. The wave model applied to the experiment is a linear shoaling model with wave breaking dissipation according to Dally, Dean, and Dalrymple (2002); following the calibration of the wave model the undertow model by Garcez Faria et al. (2000) is calibrated. The experiment was conducted in the long wave flume at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University (OSU). Regular waves with a wave height of 0.60 meters and a frequency of 0.25 Hz were generated and vertical velocity profiles were collected at seven different cross-shore locations each with eight to nine points per profile. Three Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters(ADV) were used to collect the cross-shore flow velocities and six fixed wave gauges were used to measure the water surface elevation. The data collected from the wave gauges were processed using a zero-upcrossing analysis followed by ensemble averaging the waves to determine the average wave height of each cross-shore gage. This approach was taken since regular waves are assumed to be similar to one another and would yield higher numbers of realizations, making it a more statistically reliable estimate. In total, 49 different time series were analyzed for each wave gage, yielding a reliable wave height estimate. The calibration of the wave model was accomplished by altering the three free parameters: higher breaking threshold γ , lower breaking threshold γ s, and an empirical constant κ , until the wave model best fit the data. Subsequently, the undertow model was calibrated by varying the eddy viscosity (μ ) for each profile. The presented work was performed as part of the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program during the summer of 2004 at OSU.

  12. Thiocyanate ligands as crucial elements for regeneration and photo-degradation in TiO{sub 2} vertical bar dye vertical bar CuI solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirimanne, P.M. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Department Solare Energetik, Glienicker Str. 100, Alemania 14109 Berlin (Germany); Tributsch, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Department Solare Energetik, Glienicker Str. 100, Alemania 14109 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: tributsch@hmi.de

    2006-09-10

    Size control of CuI grains and thus better-matched interfaces were observed in the presence of crystal growth inhibitors in the CuI coating solution for TiO{sub 2} vertical bar dye vertical bar CuI solar cells. Evidence is given that these growth inhibitor molecules simultaneously act as an electron transfer mediator between the CuI and dye molecules via thiocyanate bridges. A reverse reaction of injected electrons from TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles electrochemically inactivates the thiocyanate electron transfer bridge in the illuminated cells causing photo-degradation.

  13. Rare B sub s -> nu nu-bar gamma Decay beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    Using the most general model independent form of the effective Hamiltonian the rare decay B sub s -> nu nu-bar gamma is studied. The sensitivity of the photon energy distribution and branching ratio to new Wilson coefficients are investigated.

  14. PULLING THE TRIGGER: AN ANALYSIS OF CIRCUIT COURT REVIEW OF THE "PERSECUTOR BAR"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martine Forneret

    2013-01-01

    .... Use of the persecutor bar by the Board of Immigration Appeals and circuit courts leads to situations of legal complexity because neither the judiciary nor the legislature has concretely defined "persecution...

  15. One long tie bar broken after 3 days because of hydrogen contamination.

    CERN Multimedia

    H. Gerwig

    2000-01-01

    The tie bars have been produced with a high yield strength. As known for these type of high strength bolts, and hydrogen contamination during manufacture or heat treatment could lead to rupture under stress after several days.

  16. CP violation and B{sup 0}-(B{sup 0})-bar mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksan, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1996-01-01

    The status of CP violation and B{sup 0}-(B{sup 0})-bar mixing is given and the subsequent constraints in the framework of the Standard Model are discussed. Recent result on CP violation in the kaon system and related topics are reviewed, including the status of T violation and the tests of the CPT symmetry. The results on B{sup 0}-(B{sup 0})-bar mixing are presented followed by the studies on B{sub d}{sup 0}-(B{sub d}{sup 0})-bar and B{sub s}{sup 0}-(B{sub s}{sup 0})-bar oscillations. Finally, the prospects of progress on understanding CP violation are discussed in framework of the new projects expected to produce results at the turn of the century. (author). 76 refs.

  17. Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers...

  18. Repair of earthquake-damaged bridge columns with interlocking spirals and fractured bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    During earthquakes, reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns may experience different levels of damage such as cracking, spalling, or crushing of concrete and yielding, buckling, or fracture of reinforcing bars. Although several repair options exist f...

  19. Effect of environmental condition on ventilation rate of special standard bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard bar of ventilation is the equipment extensively used in the tobacco industry to calibrate the variety of testing machines. The bar’s performance that is usually affected by ambient conditions is numerically studied in this paper. Firstly, the geometry of standard bar is obtained by an optical microscopic 3-D measurement. Then, Solidworks is used to build the 3-D model of standard bar and Gambit is used to mesh the model. Finally, the performance of standard bar under variant ambient conditions is analyzed by Fluent. Compared with the experimental data, the numerical results are found to be quite accurate, and it is found that the ventilation rate increases linearly as temperature rise and decreases non-linearly with the growth of pressure.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of (Bi,Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (2223) bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudzik, M.P.; Polzin, B.J.; Thayer, R.; Picciolo, J.J.; Fisher, B.L.; Lanagan, M.T.

    1996-08-01

    Bulk bars for current lead applications were fabricated from (Bi,Pb)- Sr-Ca-Cu-O (Bi-2223) for low thermal conductivity and high critical current. Bars measuring 17.8 cm in length were made by uniaxially pressing Bi-2223 powder of controlled (1.7/0.34)223 and (1.8/0.4)223 phase composition. The bulk bars were densified by subjecting them to a schedule of alternate liquid-phase sintering and cold isostatic pressing. Liquid phase sintering temperatures were optimized from differential thermal analysis and microstructure morphology. Phase purity and microstructure were evaluated by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Low-resistance silver contacts were applied to the bars by hot-pressing at 820{degrees}C and 3 MPa. Critical current densities {approx} 1000 A/cm{sup 3} (critical currents of 750 A at 77 K in self-field conditions) were achieved.