WorldWideScience

Sample records for ratio turbofan engines

  1. Development trend of high bypass ratio turbofan engines. Ko baipasu hi tabo fan engine no kaihatsu doko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonomura, Y [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-03-10

    The turbofan engines for private aircrafts have come to have a high bypass ratio because a performance improvement is always requested. Because a turbofan engine is always required for a thrust reinforcement to correspond the stretch and weight increase of a fuselage after acquiring a type approval, making them a series to cover a certain thrust range becomes necessary. The concrete methods to reinforce a thrust are being achieved by an increase of fan diameter, a partial modification of high pressure compressor, a temperature rise of high pressure turbine inlet, a stage number increase of low pressure turbine, and a combination of these items just mentioned above. The PW 4000 series, CF6 series and RB211 series currently under production are being reinforced in a thrust by these methods. In this paper, as the representatives of some turbofan engines incorporating the most advanced technologies, as for 3 kinds of the large scale turbofan engine presently under development for the B777, namely GE90, PW4084, and TRENT800, their distinctive futures are summarized. 25 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Development trend of low bypass ratio turbofan engines. Tei baipasu hi tabo fan engine no kaihatsu doko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashima, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-03-10

    As a turbojet engine gets a thrust by blowing out the exhaust of a gas generator, for decreasing the fuel consumption ratio is more advantageous when a bypass air quantity is made as much as possible. Therefore in the subsonic speed passenger aircrafts putting an economy in the first place, the high bypass ratio turbofan engines are used. Even in case of the subsonic speed aircrafts, in addition, for the trainer airplanes and fighters, a type to be built in the engines in the fuselages, the low bypass ratio engines with small front areas are used. When a turbofan engine with a low bypass ratio is picked up, therefore recently, it is general that a military engine with a bypass ratio under 1 (about 0.5 is frequent) is pointed, as for a development trend also from a viewpoint of the performance improvement as a military engine, an improvement of the thrust-weight ratio and specific thrust are attached importance to. In this paper, these performance parameters, a trend to make them lighter weight, and the elementary technologies peculiar to a low bypass ratio engine are described, and moreover the study and development state in Europe, America and Japan are put in order. 8 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Separated core turbofan engine; Core bunrigata turbofan engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y; Endo, M; Matsuda, Y; Sugiyama, N; Sugahara, N; Yamamoto, K [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    This report outlines the separated core turbofan engine. This engine is featured by parallel separated arrangement of a fan and core engine which are integrated into one unit in the conventional turbofan engine. In general, cruising efficiency improvement and noise reduction are achieved by low fan pressure ratio and low exhaust speed due to high bypass ratio, however, it causes various problems such as large fan and nacelle weight due to large air flow rate of a fan, and shift of an operating point affected by flight speed. The parallel separated arrangement is thus adopted. The stable operation of a fan and core engine is easily retained by independently operating air inlet unaffected by fan. The large degree of freedom of combustion control is also obtained by independent combustor. Fast response, simple structure and optimum aerodynamic design are easily achieved. This arrangement is also featured by flexibility of development and easy maintenance, and by various merits superior to conventional turbofan engines. It has no technological problems difficult to be overcome, and is also suitable for high-speed VTOL transport aircraft. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Application of laminar flow control to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engine nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Y. S.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept of the application of hybrid laminar flow to modern commercial transport aircraft was successfully flight tested on a Boeing 757 aircraft. In this limited demonstration, in which only part of the upper surface of the swept wing was designed for the attainment of laminar flow, significant local drag reduction was measured. This paper addresses the potential application of this technology to laminarize the external surface of large, modern turbofan engine nacelles which may comprise as much as 5-10 percent of the total wetted area of future commercial transports. A hybrid-laminar-flow-control (HLFC) pressure distribution is specified and the corresponding nacelle geometry is computed utilizing a predictor/corrector design method. Linear stability calculations are conducted to provide predictions of the extent of the laminar boundary layer. Performance studies are presented to determine potential benefits in terms of reduced fuel consumption.

  5. Windmilling of turbofan engine; calculation of performance characteristics of a turbofan engine under windmilling

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, A.

    2014-01-01

    The turbofan is a type of air breathing jet engine that finds wide use in aircraft propulsion. During the normal operation of a turbofan engine installed in aircraft, the combustor is supplied with fuel, flow to the combustor is cut off and the engine runs under so called Windmilling conditions being driven only by the ram pressure ratio by producing drag. In-depth analysis is done to study the performance characteristics at this state.

  6. A methodology for noise prediction of turbofan engines.

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Di Fiore dos Santos

    2006-01-01

    A computional model is developed for prediction of noise emission from na existing or new turbofan engine. This model allows the simulation of noise generation from high bypass ratio turbofan engines, appropriate for use with computational programs for gas turbine performance developed at ITA. Analytical and empirical methods are used for spectrum shape, spectrum level, overall noise and free-field directivity noise. The most significant noise sources in turbofan engines are modeled: fan, com...

  7. Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines describes the operational performance requirements of turbofan (commercial)engines from a controls systems perspective, covering industry-standard methods and research-edge advances. This book allows the reader to design controllers and produce realistic simulations using public-domain software like CMAPSS: Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation, whose versions are released to the public by NASA. The scope of the book is centered on the design of thrust controllers for both steady flight and transient maneuvers. Classical control theory is not dwelled on, but instead an introduction to general undergraduate control techniques is provided. This book also: Develops a thorough understanding of the challenges associated with engine operability from a control systems perspective, describing performance demands and operational constraints into the framework and language of modern control theory Presents solid theoretical support for classical and advanced engine co...

  8. 78 FR 5710 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... all Engine Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive...) Applicability This AD applies to all Engine Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines with a high-pressure...

  9. Online Normalization Algorithm for Engine Turbofan Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Online Normalization Algorithm for Engine Turbofan Monitoring Jérôme Lacaille 1 , Anastasios Bellas 2 1 Snecma, 77550 Moissy-Cramayel, France...understand the behavior of a turbofan engine, one first needs to deal with the variety of data acquisition contexts. Each time a set of measurements is...it auto-adapts itself with piecewise linear models. 1. INTRODUCTION Turbofan engine abnormality diagnosis uses three steps: reduction of

  10. 78 FR 35747 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by damage to the high-pressure compressor... Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines with a high-pressure compressor (HPC) stage 6 disk, part number...

  11. 78 FR 9003 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by damage to the high-pressure... GP7277 turbofan engines with a high-pressure compressor (HPC) stage 6 disk, part number (P/N) 382-100-505...

  12. 76 FR 77108 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...-D5, V2530-A5, and V2533-A5 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by three reports of high- pressure..., V2524-A5, V2525-D5, V2527-A5, V2527E-A5, V2527M-A5, V2528- D5, V2530-A5, and V2533-A5 turbofan engines...

  13. Windmilling of turbofan engine; calculation of performance characteristics of a turbofan engine under windmilling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanathan, A.

    2014-01-01

    The turbofan is a type of air breathing jet engine that finds wide use in aircraft propulsion. During the normal operation of a turbofan engine installed in aircraft, the combustor is supplied with fuel, flow to the combustor is cut off and the engine runs under so called Windmilling conditions

  14. 77 FR 51695 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... Honeywell International Inc. TFE731-20R, -20AR, -20BR, -40, -40AR, - 40R, -50R, and -60 turbofan engines... Inc. TFE731-20R, -20AR, -20BR, -40, -40AR, -40R, -50R, and -60 turbofan engines: (i) With an engine...

  15. 77 FR 23637 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... directive (AD) for certain Pratt & Whitney Division PW4000-94'' and PW4000-100'' turbofan engines having a...-flight engine shutdowns, in certain PW4000-94'' and PW4000-100'' turbofan engines. Pratt & Whitney's...

  16. 78 FR 44899 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and -115B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by multiple...) 2165M22P01, installed on GE90-110B1 and -115B turbofan engines. One of the leaks led to an under cowl engine...

  17. 77 FR 1043 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... International Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Honeywell International Inc. TFE731-20R, -20AR, -20BR, -40, -40AR, -40R, -50R, and -60 turbofan engines. (i...

  18. 78 FR 16620 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Division (PW) turbofan engine models PW4074, PW4074D, PW4077, PW4077D, PW4084D, PW4090, and PW4090-3 with a... proposed AD. Discussion We propose to adopt a new AD for all PW turbofan engine models PW4074, PW4074D...

  19. 77 FR 67763 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., PW4156A, PW4158, PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines, including models with any dash... PW4650 turbofan engines, including models with any dash number suffix, with 3rd stage low-pressure...

  20. 77 FR 4650 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... General Electric Company (GE) CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines with certain low-pressure turbine... Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect 387 CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines installed on...

  1. 77 FR 16139 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... & Whitney (PW) PW2037, PW2037(M), and PW2040 turbofan engines with certain fan blades with a cutback leading..., PW2040, PW2240, PW2337 Turbofan Engine Manual, Part No. 1A6231, Chapter/Section 72-31-12, Repair-14 and...

  2. 77 FR 12448 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines, including models with any dash number suffix. This..., PW4062, PW4062A, PW4152, PW4156, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines...

  3. 77 FR 16967 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., PW4164C, PW4164C/B, PW4168, and PW4168A turbofan engines with certain high- pressure turbine (HPT) stage 1...) Applicability This AD applies to the following Pratt & Whitney Division turbofan engines: (1) PW4052, PW4152...

  4. 78 FR 72567 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and -115B turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by multiple... turbofan engines with variable bypass valve (VBV) actuator fuel supply tube, part number (P/N) 2165M22P01...

  5. 77 FR 15939 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... & Whitney (PW) JT9D series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires revisions to the Airworthiness..., -7R4E, - 7R4E1, -7R4E4, -7R4G2, and -7R4H1 series turbofan engines. (d) Unsafe Condition This AD results...

  6. 77 FR 74125 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Company (GE) CF34-8C and CF34-8E turbofan engines with certain part numbers (P/N) of operability bleed... received reports of three failure events of OBV ring lock fuel fittings on GE CF34-8C turbofan engines. Two...

  7. 78 FR 19983 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Electric Company (GE) CF34-8C and CF34-8E turbofan engines with certain part numbers (P/N) of operability...-8E6, and CF34-8E6A1 turbofan engines, with an operability bleed valve (OBV) part number (P/N...

  8. 78 FR 72552 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... General Electric Company model GEnx-2B67 and GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by the... certain serial number General Electric Company (GE) model GEnx-2B67 and GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. The...

  9. 77 FR 54791 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... & Whitney Division PW4000-94'' and PW4000-100'' turbofan engines having a 1st stage high-pressure turbine... AD will affect 446 P&W PW4000-94'' and PW4000-100'' turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S...

  10. 76 FR 64844 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... General Electric Company (GE) CF6-45 and CF6-50 series turbofan engines with certain low-pressure turbine... series turbofan engines with certain LPT rotor stage 3 disks installed. That AD requires initial and...

  11. 76 FR 73489 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...-1F, and LF507-IH turbofan engines. This AD requires removing from service certain second stage high... International Inc. ALF502L-2C, ALF502R-3, ALF502R-3A, ALF502R-5, LF507-1F, and LF507-IH turbofan engines, with...

  12. 78 FR 64419 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by a rupture of the diffuser-to-high-pressure turbine (HPT... turbofan engines. (d) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by a rupture of the diffuser-to-high- pressure...

  13. 77 FR 57007 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... turbofan engines. That AD currently requires initial and repetitive fluorescent penetrant inspections (FPI... applies to the following Pratt & Whitney Division (Pratt & Whitney) turbofan engines: (1) PW4000-94...

  14. 78 FR 49111 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... & Whitney Division (PW) turbofan engine model PW4074, PW4074D, PW4077, PW4077D, PW4084D, PW4090, and PW4090...) Applicability This AD applies to all Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) turbofan engine models PW4074, PW4074D...

  15. 77 FR 51892 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... Honeywell International Inc. models TFE731-4, -4R, -5, -5R, -5AR, and - 5BR series turbofan engines. This AD... International Inc.: (1) Model TFE731-5 series turbofan engines, with a first stage low-pressure turbine (LPT1...

  16. 78 FR 76045 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... (AD) for General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines with certain high... turbofan engines with high pressure compressor (HPC) rotor stage 2-5 spools, part numbers (P/Ns) 351-103...

  17. 78 FR 38195 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... all General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines. This emergency AD was.... owners and operators of these GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines. This action was prompted by...

  18. 77 FR 9868 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... -5BR series turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of a rim/web separation of a..., -4R, -5AR, -5BR, and -5R series turbofan engines, with an LPT1 rotor assembly, P/N 3074748-4, 3074748...

  19. 78 FR 19628 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Electric Company (GE) GE90-76B, -85B, -90B, -94B, - 110B1, and -115B turbofan engines. This proposed AD was... of stage 1 HPT stator shroud distress resulting in engine removals on airplanes with GE90 turbofan...

  20. 77 FR 16921 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines, including models with any dash number suffix. This... Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect 44 turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry...

  1. 77 FR 30926 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... turbofan engines. The existing AD currently requires initial and repetitive fluorescent penetrant... turbofan engines. That AD requires initial and repetitive FPI for cracks in the blade locking and loading...

  2. 77 FR 58471 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA.../P1, GEnx-1B75/P1, GEnx- 2B67, and GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and... this AD will affect 11 GE GEnx turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We also...

  3. 78 FR 50320 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Electric Company (GE) model GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines with booster anti-ice (BAI) air duct, part number...-2B67 turbofan engine be removed from the Applicability section of this AD. The commenters noted that...

  4. 76 FR 72353 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking...), PW4156A, PW4158, PW4158(-3), PW4460, PW4460(-3), PW4462, and PW4462(-3) turbofan engines. This proposed AD... PW4462(-3) turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it would take...

  5. 77 FR 3088 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Electric Company (GE) CF34-10E series turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by a report of heavy wear... turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 8 work...

  6. 77 FR 51459 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., PW4460, PW4462, PW4164, PW4164C, PW4164C/B, PW4168, and PW4168A turbofan engines with certain high... ADs None. (c) Applicability This AD applies to the following Pratt & Whitney Division turbofan engines...

  7. 77 FR 48110 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. The existing AD requires... 2000-04-14, Amendment 39-11597 (65 FR 10698, February 29, 2000), for all GE CF6-80C2 series turbofan...

  8. 77 FR 40822 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Division Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines, including models with any dash number suffix. This..., PW4060C, PW4062, PW4062A, PW4152, PW4156, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan...

  9. 78 FR 56594 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... General Electric Company (GE) GE90-76B, -85B, -90B, -94B, -110B1, and - 115B turbofan engines. This AD was...) Applicability This AD applies to General Electric Company (GE): (1) GE90-76B, -85B, -90B, and -94B turbofan...

  10. 77 FR 42424 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... & Whitney Division PW4074 and PW4077 turbofan engines. That AD currently requires removing the 15th stage..., August 4, 2011). (c) Applicability This AD applies to Pratt & Whitney Division PW4074 and PW4077 turbofan...

  11. 77 FR 76977 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Supplemental notice... proposed airworthiness directive (AD) for certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan... part 39 to include an AD that would apply to certain GE CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. That NPRM...

  12. Effect of temperature change at inlet of engine on the corrected performance of turbofan engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozu, Masao; Yajima, Satoshi [Defence Agency, Tokyo, JapanIshikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1989-06-10

    Theoretical consideration on the effect of inlet temperature change of engine on the engine performance was conducted, and soundness of the result was appreciated by applying it to the experimental result of turbofan engine. As the theoretical consideration, premises of Buckingham's fundamental theorem was corrected by Reynolds Number and by the consideration on the effect of inlet temperature on gas constant and specific heat ratio. By using the result, correction factors were calculated from the experimental result of an actual turbo-fan engine. The correction factors were applied to the other engine test result and confirmed satisfactory soundness. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  13. 76 FR 72348 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking..., -7R4D1, -7R4E, -7R4E1, -7R4G2, -7R4H1, and - 7R4E4 turbofan engines. This proposed AD would establish a... turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it would take about 28.8...

  14. 78 FR 47534 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... directive (AD) 2013-14-51 for General Electric Company (GE) GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines with... all known U.S. owners and operators of GE90-110B1 and GE90-115B turbofan engines. AD 2013-14-51...

  15. 78 FR 24671 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... certain General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2 series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires.../B1F/B2F/B4F/B6F/B7F/D1F turbofan engines with any of the following installed: (1) Fuel tube, part...

  16. 78 FR 21578 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Company (GE) model GEnx-2B67 and GEnx-2B67B turbofan engines with booster anti-ice (BAI) air duct, part... GE model GEnx-2B67 and GEnx- 2B67B turbofan engines with BAI air duct, P/N 2469M32G01, and support...

  17. 77 FR 71085 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive general inspections and ultrasonic inspections...

  18. Advanced Control Considerations for Turbofan Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the application of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model for an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. The nonlinear engine model is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the advanced control methodology over a wide range of operating points and life cycle conditions. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from the nonlinear engine model and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. MBEC is used here to show how advanced control architectures can improve efficiency during the design phase of a turbofan engine by reducing conservative operability margins. The operability margins that can be reduced, such as stall margin, can expand the engine design space and offer potential for efficiency improvements. Application of MBEC architecture to a nonlinear engine simulation is shown to reduce the thrust specific fuel consumption by approximately 1% over the baseline design, while maintaining safe operation of the engine across the flight envelope.

  19. 77 FR 14312 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... International, Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Honeywell International, Inc. ALF502L-2C; ALF502R-3; ALF502R-3A; ALF502R-5; LF507-1F; and LF507-1H turbofan...; ALF502R-3A; ALF502R-5; LF507-1F; and LF507-1H turbofan engines, installed on airplanes of U.S. registry...

  20. 77 FR 32009 - Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International, Inc. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... Honeywell International, Inc. ALF502L-2C; ALF502R-3; ALF502R-3A; ALF502R-5; LF507-1F; and LF507-1H turbofan...; ALF502R-3A; ALF502R-5; LF507-1F; and LF507- 1H turbofan engines, installed on airplanes of U.S. registry...

  1. 78 FR 22168 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... International Aero Engines AG (IAE), V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, with a certain No. 4 bearing... turbofan engines, serial numbers V20001 through V20285, with No. 4 bearing internal scavenge tube, part...

  2. 78 FR 1776 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Aero Engines AG (IAE), V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, with a certain number (No.) 4 bearing... proposed AD. Discussion We received a report of a fire warning on an IAE V2525 turbofan engine shortly...

  3. Exergetic optimization of turbofan engine with genetic algorithm method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turan, Onder [Anadolu University, School of Civil Aviation (Turkey)], e-mail: onderturan@anadolu.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    With the growth of passenger numbers, emissions from the aeronautics sector are increasing and the industry is now working on improving engine efficiency to reduce fuel consumption. The aim of this study is to present the use of genetic algorithms, an optimization method based on biological principles, to optimize the exergetic performance of turbofan engines. The optimization was carried out using exergy efficiency, overall efficiency and specific thrust of the engine as evaluation criteria and playing on pressure and bypass ratio, turbine inlet temperature and flight altitude. Results showed exergy efficiency can be maximized with higher altitudes, fan pressure ratio and turbine inlet temperature; the turbine inlet temperature is the most important parameter for increased exergy efficiency. This study demonstrated that genetic algorithms are effective in optimizing complex systems in a short time.

  4. Control Design for an Advanced Geared Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the design process for the control system of an advanced geared turbofan engine. This process is applied to a simulation that is representative of a 30,000 lbf thrust class concept engine with two main spools, ultra-high bypass ratio, and a variable area fan nozzle. Control system requirements constrain the non-linear engine model as it operates throughout its flight envelope of sea level to 40,000 ft and from 0 to 0.8 Mach. The control architecture selected for this project was developed from literature and reflects a configuration that utilizes a proportional integral controller integrated with sets of limiters that enable the engine to operate safely throughout its flight envelope. Simulation results show the overall system meets performance requirements without exceeding system operational limits.

  5. Research and development of turbofan engine for supersonic aircraft. Choonsokukiyo turbofan engine no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashima, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1992-01-01

    This paper described the researched results of the demonstrator of a turbofan engine for supersonic aircraft (IHI-17). A turbofan engine with an afterburner was experimentally fabricated and various engine tests have been carried out since 1988. Although the engine size is small, the fighter engine specifications were applied to its design and the prior or simultaneous research on each component was carried out. As a result, the system integration technique by which an engine was assembled by integrating each component could be established. New materials and new manufacturing techniques such as turbine blades of single crystal, turbine disks of powder metallurgy and deep chemical milling for a duct were developed to use for the long term engine test and the prospect to commercialization could be obtained. The following techniques have been established and the results satisfying target specifications could be achieved: the three dimensional aerodynamic design of compressor and turbine, the adoption of air blast fuel atomizer to suppress the smoke generation, an afterburner of spray bar system and the mounting type FADEC (full authority digital electronic control) to control the engine with the afterburner. 4 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. 76 FR 68634 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6 Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... ``(c) This AD applies to * * * and CF6-80A3 turbofan engines with left-hand links * * *.'' to ``(c) This AD applies to * * * and CF6-80A3 turbofan engines, including engines marked on the engine data...

  7. 76 FR 82202 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, and certain serial numbers (S/Ns) of IAE V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2527-A5, V2527E-A5, V2527M-A5, V2530-A5, and V2533-A5 turbofan...

  8. Propulsion Controls Modeling for a Small Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy; Franco, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model and propulsion controller are developed for a small-scale turbofan engine. The small-scale turbofan engine is based on the Price Induction company's DGEN 380, one of the few turbofan engines targeted for the personal light jet category. Comparisons of the nonlinear dynamic turbofan engine model to actual DGEN 380 engine test data and a Price Induction simulation are provided. During engine transients, the nonlinear model typically agrees within 10 percent error, even though the nonlinear model was developed from limited available engine data. A gain scheduled proportional integral low speed shaft controller with limiter safety logic is created to replicate the baseline DGEN 380 controller. The new controller provides desired gain and phase margins and is verified to meet Federal Aviation Administration transient propulsion system requirements. In understanding benefits, there is a need to move beyond simulation for the demonstration of advanced control architectures and technologies by using real-time systems and hardware. The small-scale DGEN 380 provides a cost effective means to accomplish advanced controls testing on a relevant turbofan engine platform.

  9. 77 FR 73268 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... certain Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 900 series turbofan engines. This AD requires inspection of the... turbofan engines, all serial numbers. (d) Reason This AD was prompted by a Trent 900 engine experiencing a...

  10. 78 FR 79295 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International S.A. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; CFM International S.A. Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... International (CFM) S.A. CFM56-3 and CFM56-7B series turbofan engines with certain accessory gearboxes (AGBs... of total loss of engine oil from CFM56 series turbofan engines while in flight. This AD requires an...

  11. 75 FR 14375 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ...) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of..., PW4156, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4164, PW4168, PW4168A, PW4460, and PW4462 turbofan engines. This proposed AD..., PW4156, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4164, PW4168, PW4168A, PW4460, and PW4462 turbofan engines. These engines are...

  12. 78 FR 6206 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT..., RB211-Trent 977-84, RB211-Trent 977B-84 and RB211-Trent 980-84 turbofan engines. This AD requires on...

  13. 77 FR 20987 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... the Federal Register. That AD applies to RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. The last comment...

  14. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  15. Software Development for EECU Platform of Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Gyoung; Kwak, Dohyup; Kim, Byunghyun; Choi, Hee ju; Kong, Changduk

    2017-04-01

    The turbofan engine operation consists of a number of hardware and software. The engine is controlled by Electronic Engine Control Unit (EECU). In order to control the engine, EECU communicates with an aircraft system, Actuator Drive Unit (ADU), Engine Power Unit (EPU) and sensors on the engine. This paper tried to investigate the process form starting to taking-off and aims to design the EECU software mode and defined communication data format. The software is implemented according to the designed software mode.

  16. 77 FR 32007 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. This AD requires removal from...-17, 877- 17, 884-17, 884B-17, 892-17, 892B-17, and 895-17 turbofan engines. (d) Reason This AD was...

  17. 78 FR 17297 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211 Trent 500 series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires... 9, 2012), for all RR RB211 Trent 500 series turbofan engines. That AD requires a one-time inspection...

  18. 78 FR 20509 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking...) RB211-535E4-B-37 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by recalculating the life of.... (c) Applicability This AD applies to Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535E4-B-37 series turbofan engines...

  19. 75 FR 55459 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation..., PW4152, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4164, PW4168, PW4168A, PW4460, and PW4462 turbofan engines. This AD requires... series turbofan engines. We published the proposed AD in the Federal Register on March 25, 2010 (75 FR...

  20. 78 FR 70487 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... turbofan engines. This AD requires removal of certain high-pressure (HP) and intermediate-pressure (IP..., RB211 Trent 768-60, 772-60, and 772B-60 turbofan engines with turbine disc part numbers (P/Ns) and...

  1. 77 FR 39157 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...-84, and 980-84 turbofan engines. That AD currently requires inspecting the intermediate-pressure (IP... RR model RB211-Trent 970-84, 970B-84, 972-84, 972B-84, 977-84, 977B-84, and 980-84 turbofan engines...

  2. 78 FR 6749 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) models RB211 Trent 768-60, 772-60, and 772B-60 turbofan engines... 772B-60 turbofan engines. (d) Reason This AD was prompted by low-pressure (LP) compressor blade partial...

  3. 78 FR 17300 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking..., 772-60, 772B-60, 875-17, 877-17, 884-17, 884B-17, 892-17, 892B-17, and 895-17 turbofan engines. The..., 892-17, 892B-17, and 895-17 turbofan engines. That AD requires continuing initial inspections, adding...

  4. 78 FR 5 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...-535E4-C-37 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by an investigation by RR concluding that certain...- 535E4-B-37; RB211-535E4-B-75; and RB211-535E4-C-37 turbofan engines with intermediate-pressure (IP...

  5. 78 FR 37703 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (RR) model RB211 Trent 768-60, 772-60, and 772B-60 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by low...) model RB211 Trent 768-60, 772-60, and 772B-60 turbofan engines. (d) Reason This AD was prompted by low...

  6. 77 FR 40820 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by an investigation by RR concluding that certain...; RB211-535E4-B-75; and RB211-535E4-C-37 turbofan engines. (d) Reason This AD was prompted by an...

  7. 78 FR 70489 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT..., and 560A2-61 turbofan engines. This AD requires replacement or repair of the low-pressure (LP...-61, 556B2-61, 560-61, and 560A2-61 turbofan engines. (d) Reason This AD was prompted by reports of...

  8. 78 FR 22180 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... 972B-84, RB211-Trent 977-84, RB211-Trent 977B-84, and RB211-Trent 980-84 turbofan engines. This AD... 977B-84, and RB211-Trent 980-84 turbofan engines that incorporate RR production Modification 72-G585 or...

  9. 77 FR 26216 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking..., RB211- Trent 892-17, RB211-Trent 892B-17, and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. The existing AD...-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. That AD requires initial and repetitive UIs of certain LP compressor...

  10. 77 FR 20508 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...-Trent 884B-17, RB211-Trent 892-17, RB211- Trent 892B-17, and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. That...-17, RB211- Trent 892B-17, and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. On September 9, 2011, we also...

  11. 77 FR 58762 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...-Trent 892-17, RB211- Trent 892B-17, and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. That AD currently requires...-17, RB211-Trent 892B-17, and RB211-Trent 895-17 turbofan engines. (d) Unsafe Condition This AD was...

  12. 78 FR 17079 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... certain Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) models Tay 620-15 and Tay 650-15 turbofan engines. This... Tay 620-15 and Tay 650-15 turbofan engines with a low-pressure compressor (LPC) rotor disc assembly...

  13. 76 FR 68660 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Division (PW) PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... airworthiness directive (AD) for PW4000 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD would require replacing the..., PW4152, PW4156, PW4156A, PW4158, PW4160, PW4460, PW4462, and PW4650 turbofan engines, including models...

  14. 78 FR 17075 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... certain Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) Tay 611-8 turbofan engines. This AD requires inspection... (RRD) Tay 611-8 turbofan engines, serial numbers 16245, 16256, 16417, 16418, 16584, 16585, 16639, 16640...

  15. 77 FR 6668 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... all Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 500 series turbofan engines. This AD requires a one-time inspection of... RB211- Trent 560A2-61 turbofan engines that have not complied with Rolls- Royce plc Service Bulletin No...

  16. 77 FR 56760 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. This AD requires removing from...-17, 892-17, 892B-17, and 895-17 turbofan engines that have an intermediate pressure (IP) turbine disc...

  17. 78 FR 28161 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... turbofan engines that have a high-pressure (HP) compressor stage 1 to 4 rotor disc installed, with a..., -524H-T-36, and -524H2-T-19 turbofan engines that have a HP compressor stage 1 to 4 rotor disc installed...

  18. 78 FR 68360 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... turbofan engines. The AD number is incorrect in the Regulatory text. This document corrects that error. In... turbofan engines. As published, the AD number 2013-19-17 under Sec. 39.13 [Amended], is incorrect. No other...

  19. 78 FR 61171 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (RR) RB211-535E4-B-37 series turbofan engines. This AD requires removal of affected parts using a...-B-37 series turbofan engines. (d) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by recalculating the lives...

  20. 77 FR 13485 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... series turbofan engines. This AD requires inspecting the front combustion liner head section for cracking.... (c) Applicability This AD applies to Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 turbofan engines, all...

  1. 78 FR 5126 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... turbofan engines. This AD requires replacement of the fuel oil heat exchanger (FOHE). This AD was prompted...-84 turbofan engines with a fuel oil heat exchanger (FOHE), part number 47111-1241, installed. (d...

  2. 78 FR 35574 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) model Tay 650-15 turbofan engines... Compliance We estimate that this proposed AD affects 52 Tay turbofan engines installed on airplanes of U.S...

  3. 78 FR 17080 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... certain Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710 series turbofan engines. This AD requires... applies to Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710A1-10 and BR700-710A2-20 turbofan engines...

  4. 14 CFR 23.934 - Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.934 Turbojet and turbofan engine thrust reverser systems tests. Thrust reverser systems of turbojet or turbofan engines must meet the requirements of § 33.97 of this...

  5. 78 FR 11976 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-524 series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires...-16724 (76 FR 40217, July 8, 2011), for all RR plc RB211-524 series turbofan engines. That AD required...

  6. 78 FR 71532 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. [[Page 71533... (AD) 2007-03- 02 for all Rolls-Royce Deutschland (RRD) Tay 620-15, Tay 650-15, and Tay 651-54 turbofan..., January 29, 2007) (``AD 2007-03-02'') for certain RRD Tay 611-8 and Tay 620-15 turbofan engines with LP...

  7. Simulating the Use of Alternative Fuels in a Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Chin, Jeffrey Chevoor; Liu, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The interest in alternative fuels for aviation has created a need to evaluate their effect on engine performance. The use of dynamic turbofan engine simulations enables the comparative modeling of the performance of these fuels on a realistic test bed in terms of dynamic response and control compared to traditional fuels. The analysis of overall engine performance and response characteristics can lead to a determination of the practicality of using specific alternative fuels in commercial aircraft. This paper describes a procedure to model the use of alternative fuels in a large commercial turbofan engine, and quantifies their effects on engine and vehicle performance. In addition, the modeling effort notionally demonstrates that engine performance may be maintained by modifying engine control system software parameters to account for the alternative fuel.

  8. Hierarchy of simulation models for a turbofan gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenbaker, W. E.; Leake, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Steady-state and transient performance of an F-100-like turbofan gas engine are modeled by a computer program, DYNGEN, developed by NASA. The model employs block data maps and includes about 25 states. Low-order nonlinear analytical and linear techniques are described in terms of their application to the model. Experimental comparisons illustrating the accuracy of each model are presented.

  9. 78 FR 47235 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... cycle counts of those LLPs to account for the additional low cycle fatigue (LCF) life consumed during... Boeing 747-8 flight tests had consumed more cyclic life than they would have in revenue flight cycles... Company Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  10. The completion of the mathematical model by parameter identification for simulating a turbofan engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Carmen ANDREI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to set up a method to determine the missing engine design parameters (turbine inlet temperature T3T, airflow rate which significantly influence the jet engines thrust. The authors have introduced a new non-linear equation connecting the fan specific work with the temperature T3T, customized for turbofan. The method of chords, since it converges unconditionally, has been used for solving the non-linear equation of variable temperature T3T. An alternate method, based for the same relation between fan specific work and T3T, has been presented in purpose to determine airflow rate and fan pressure ratio. Two mixed flows turbofans have been considered as study cases. For case #1 it was determined a value comparable to the Turbomeca Larzac turbofan series 04-C6 and 04-C20 which power the AlphaJet machines (series A - Luftwaffe, series E - Dassault Dornier. For the F100-PW229 turbofan, as case #2, being given T3T, then have been determined the airflow rate, fan pressure ratio and fan specific work. After completing the mathematical model with the missing parameters, the performances of the engines at off-design regimes and the operational envelopes revealing i.e. the variations of thrust, specific thrust and fuel specific consumption with altitude and Mach number have been calculated.

  11. Energy Efficient Engine program advanced turbofan nacelle definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, David C.; Wynosky, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced, low drag, nacelle configurations were defined for some of the more promising propulsion systems identified in the earlier Benefit/Cost Study, to assess the benefits associated with these advanced technology nacelles and formulate programs for developing these nacelles and low volume thrust reversers/spoilers to a state of technology readiness in the early 1990's. The study results established the design feasibility of advanced technology, slim line nacelles applicable to advanced technology, high bypass ratio turbofan engines. Design feasibility was also established for two low volume thrust reverse/spoiler concepts that meet or exceed the required effectiveness for these engines. These nacelle and thrust reverse/spoiler designs were shown to be applicable in engines with takeoff thrust sizes ranging from 24,000 to 60,000 pounds. The reduced weight, drag, and cost of the advanced technology nacelle installations relative to current technology nacelles offer a mission fuel burn savings ranging from 3.0 to 4.5 percent and direct operating cost plus interest improvements from 1.6 to 2.2 percent.

  12. Effects of Reynold's number on flight performance of turbofan engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozu, Masao; Yajima, Satoshi [Defense Agency Tokyo (Japan); Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-12-10

    Concerning the performance of the F3-30 turbofan engine which is carried on the intermediate trainer XT-4 of the Air Self Defense Force, tests simulating its flight conditions were conducted at the Altitude Test Facility (ATF) of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), U.S. Air Force in order to adjust the effect of Reynold's number corresponding to the flight condition. This report summarizes the results of the above tests. As the results of the tests, it was revealed that in order to calculate with precision the flight performance of the F3-30 turbofan engine, it was required to adjust Reynold's number against the following figures, namely the fan air flow, compressor air flow, compressor adiabatic efficiency, low pressure turbine gas flow and low pressure turbine adiabatic efficiency. The engine performance calculated by using the above adjustments agreed well with the measured values of the ATF tests. 7 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  13. System Noise Prediction of the DGEN 380 Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The DGEN 380 is a small, separate-flow, geared turbofan. Its manufacturer, Price Induction, is promoting it for a small twinjet application in the emerging personal light jet market. Smaller, and producing less thrust than other entries in the industry, Price Induction is seeking to apply the engine to a 4- to 5-place twinjet designed to compete in an area currently dominated by propeller-driven airplanes. NASA is considering purchasing a DGEN 380 turbofan to test new propulsion noise reduction technologies in a relevant engine environment. To explore this possibility, NASA and Price Induction have signed a Space Act Agreement and have agreed to cooperate on engine acoustic testing. Static acoustic measurements of the engine were made by NASA researchers during July, 2014 at the Glenn Research Center. In the event that a DGEN turbofan becomes a NASA noise technology research testbed, it is in the interest of NASA to develop procedures to evaluate engine system noise metrics. This report documents the procedures used to project the DGEN static noise measurements to flight conditions and the prediction of system noise of a notional airplane powered by twin DGEN engines.

  14. Preliminary study of optimum ductburning turbofan engine cycle design parameters for supersonic cruising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of turbofan engine overall pressure ratio, fan pressure ratio, and ductburner temperature rise on the engine weight and cruise fuel consumption for a mach 2.4 supersonic transport was investigated. Design point engines, optimized purely for the supersonic cruising portion of the flight where the bulk of the fuel is consumed, are considered. Based on constant thrust requirements at cruise, fuel consumption considerations would favor medium by pass ratio engines (1.5 to 1.8) of overall pressure ratio of about 16. Engine weight considerations favor low bypass ratio (0.6 or less) and low wverall pressure ratio (8). Combination of both effects results in bypass ratios of 0.6 to 0.8 and overall pressure ratio of 12 being the overall optimum.

  15. Sustainability assessment of turbofan engine with mixed exhaust through exergetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadon, S.; Redzuan, M. S. Mohd

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the theory, methods and example application are described for a CF6 high-bypass turbofan engine with mixed exhaust flow based on exergo-sustainable point of view. To determine exergetic sustainability index, the turbofan engine has to undergo detailed exergy analysis. The sustainability indicators reviewed here are the overall exergy efficiency of the system, waste exergy ratio, exergy destruction factor, environmental effect factor and the exergetic sustainability index. The results obtained for these parameters are 26.9%, 73.1%, 38.6%, 2.72 and 0.37, respectively, for the maximum take-off condition of the engine. These results would be useful to better understand the connection between the propulsion system parameters and their impact to the environment in order to make it more sustainable for future development.

  16. 78 FR 20507 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking...) RB211-535E4-37, RB211-535E4-B-37, RB211-535E4-C- 37, and RB211-535E4-B-75 turbofan engines. This...-535E4-C-37, and RB211-535E4-B-75 turbofan engines. (d) Reason This AD was prompted by RR updating the...

  17. 78 FR 54152 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...; -535C-37; -535E4-37; - 535E4-B-37, and -535E4-B-75 turbofan engines, and all RB211-524G2-19; - 524G3-19; -524H2-19; and -524H-36 turbofan engines. This AD requires a one-time inspection of the front combustion...

  18. 78 FR 20505 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking...; - 535E4-37; -535E4-B-37, and -535E4-B-75 turbofan engines, and all RB211- 524G2-19; -524G3-19; -524H2-19; and -524H-36 turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by the discovery of a cracked and...

  19. 78 FR 61168 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (RR) RB211-535E4-37, RB211-535E4-B-37, RB211-535E4-C- 37, and RB211-535E4-B-75 turbofan engines. This...-37, RB211-535E4-B-37, RB211-535E4-C-37, and RB211-535E4-B-75 turbofan engines. (d) Unsafe Condition...

  20. 77 FR 16916 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW)Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW)Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... and -7R4H1 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by the determination that a new lower life limit for... PW JT9D-7R4G2 and -7R4H1 turbofan engine models. We agree. In addition to the JT9D-7R4G2 and -7R4H1...

  1. 76 FR 67591 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... 3007A1P, and AE 3007A3 turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive eddy current inspections... 3007A, AE 3007A1/1, AE 3007A1, AE 3007A1/3, AE 3007A1E, AE 3007A1P, and AE 3007A3 turbofan engines...

  2. 78 FR 77382 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-715A1-30, BR700-715B1- 30, and BR700-715C1-30 turbofan engines... turbofan engines installed on aircraft of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it would take about 24 hours...

  3. Turbulent measurements in the lobe mixer of a turbofan engine. Turbofan engine lobe mixer nagare no ranryu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuji; Arakawa, Chuichi; Tagori, Tetsuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd., Tokyo, (Japan) Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo, (Japan) The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, (Japan). Faculty of Engineering The Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, (Japan)

    1990-01-25

    In order to examine the flow generated by the lobe mixer of a turbofan engine precisely, after measuring a three dimensional turbulent flow by a hot-wire anemometer, the mixing process of a bypass flow and a core flow with cross-sectional vortexes, and factors generating the vortex were clarified experimentally using the scale model of an exhaust duct with the lobe mixer. As a result, the mixing process was strongly affected by a lobe tip figure and a lobe figure near a center-body, and affected by the minimum gap between the lobe and center-body. The subsequent mixing process was scarcely affected by the ratio of a core flow velocity to a bypass flow one, although strongly affected by flow conditions on a lobe surface. Since the lobe mixer promoted the mixing around a center axis shifting a fast core flow outwards, it was unfavorable to mixing, however, it was expected to be useful for reducing engine jet noise. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  4. An Assessment of Gas Foil Bearing Scalability and the Potential Benefits to Civilian Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years the term oil-free turbomachinery has been used to describe a rotor support system for high speed turbomachinery that does not require oil for lubrication, damping, or cooling. The foundation technology for oil-free turbomachinery is the compliant foil bearing. This technology can replace the conventional rolling element bearings found in current engines. Two major benefits are realized with this technology. The primary benefit is the elimination of the oil lubrication system, accessory gearbox, tower shaft, and one turbine frame. These components account for 8 to 13 percent of the turbofan engine weight. The second benefit that compliant foil bearings offer to turbofan engines is the capability to operate at higher rotational speeds and shaft diameters. While traditional rolling element bearings have diminished life, reliability, and load capacity with increasing speeds, the foil bearing has a load capacity proportional to speed. The traditional applications for foil bearings have been in small, lightweight machines. However, recent advancements in the design and manufacturing of foil bearings have increased their potential size. An analysis, grounded in experimentally proven operation, is performed to assess the scalability of the modern foil bearing. This analysis was coupled to the requirements of civilian turbofan engines. The application of the foil bearing to larger, high bypass ratio engines nominally at the 120 kN (approx.25000 lb) thrust class has been examined. The application of this advanced technology to this system was found to reduce mission fuel burn by 3.05 percent.

  5. The Design and Testing of a Miniature Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Gary B.; Murray, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf jet propulsion in the 50 - 500 lb thrust class sparse. A true twin-spool turbofan in this range does not exist. Adapting an off-the-shelf turboshaft engine is feasible. However the approx.10 Hp SPT5 can t quite make 50 lbs. of thrust. Packaging and integration is challenging, especially the exhaust. Building on our engine using a 25 Hp turboshaft seems promising if the engine becomes available. Test techniques used, though low cost, adequate for the purpose.

  6. 77 FR 75831 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... certain serial numbers (S/Ns) of Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 768-60, 772- 60, and 772B-60 turbofan... use any of the RB211-Trent 768-60, 772-60, and 772B-60 turbofan engines listed by S/N in this AD...

  7. 78 FR 60658 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT..., 892-17, 892B-17, and 895-17; and RB211-524G2-T-19, -524G3-T- 19, -524H-T-36, and -524H2-T-19 turbofan... (RR) model turbofan engines that have a high-pressure (HP) compressor stage 1 to 4 rotor disc...

  8. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  9. Turbofan gas turbine engine with variable fan outlet guide vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Peter John (Inventor); LaChapelle, Donald George (Inventor); Grant, Carl (Inventor); Zenon, Ruby Lasandra (Inventor); Mielke, Mark Joseph (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan gas turbine engine includes a forward fan section with a row of fan rotor blades, a core engine, and a fan bypass duct downstream of the forward fan section and radially outwardly of the core engine. The forward fan section has only a single stage of variable fan guide vanes which are variable fan outlet guide vanes downstream of the forward fan rotor blades. An exemplary embodiment of the engine includes an afterburner downstream of the fan bypass duct between the core engine and an exhaust nozzle. The variable fan outlet guide vanes are operable to pivot from a nominal OGV position at take-off to an open OGV position at a high flight Mach Number which may be in a range of between about 2.5-4+. Struts extend radially across a radially inwardly curved portion of a flowpath of the engine between the forward fan section and the core engine.

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of a Turbine/Rotary Combustion Compound Engine for a Subsonic Transport. [fuel consumption and engine tests of turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civinskas, K. C.; Kraft, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The fuel consumption of a modern compound engine with that of an advanced high pressure ratio turbofan was compared. The compound engine was derived from a turbofan engine by replacing the combustor with a rotary combustion (RC) engine. A number of boost pressure ratios and compression ratios were examined. Cooling of the RC engine was accomplished by heat exchanging to the fan duct. Performance was estimated with an Otto-cycle for two levels of energy lost to cooling. The effects of added complexity on cost and maintainability were not examined and the comparison was solely in terms of cruise performance and weight. Assuming a 25 percent Otto-cycle cooling loss (representative of current experience), the best compound engine gave a 1.2 percent improvement in cruise. Engine weight increased by 23 percent. For a 10 percent Otto-cycle cooling loss (representing advanced insulation/high temperature materials technology), a compound engine with a boost PR of 10 and a compression ratio of 10 gave an 8.1 percent lower cruise than the reference turbofan.

  11. Modeling Techniques for a Computational Efficient Dynamic Turbofan Engine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory A. Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A transient two-stream engine model has been developed. Individual component models developed exclusively in MATLAB/Simulink including the fan, high pressure compressor, combustor, high pressure turbine, low pressure turbine, plenum volumes, and exit nozzle have been combined to investigate the behavior of a turbofan two-stream engine. Special attention has been paid to the development of transient capabilities throughout the model, increasing physics model, eliminating algebraic constraints, and reducing simulation time through enabling the use of advanced numerical solvers. The lessening of computation time is paramount for conducting future aircraft system-level design trade studies and optimization. The new engine model is simulated for a fuel perturbation and a specified mission while tracking critical parameters. These results, as well as the simulation times, are presented. The new approach significantly reduces the simulation time.

  12. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  13. Turbofan engine mathematic model for its static and dynamic characteristics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Є. Карпов

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  Demands to mathematical model of the turbofan engine are determined in the article. The mathematical model is used for calculations static and dynamic parameters, which are required for estimation of engine technical state in operation. There are the mathematical model of the turbofan engine AИ-25 and the results of calculations static and dynamic parameters at initial condition in the article.

  14. A Method to Predict Compressor Stall in the TF34-100 Turbofan Engine Utilizing Real-Time Performance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A METHOD TO PREDICT COMPRESSOR STALL IN THE TF34-100 TURBOFAN ENGINE UTILIZING REAL-TIME PERFORMANCE...THE TF34-100 TURBOFAN ENGINE UTILIZING REAL-TIME PERFORMANCE DATA THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Systems Engineering and...036 A METHOD TO PREDICT COMPRESSOR STALL IN THE TF34-100 TURBOFAN ENGINE UTILIZING REAL-TIME PERFORMANCE DATA Shuxiang ‘Albert’ Li, BS

  15. Study of turbofan engines designed for low energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    The near-term technology improvements which can reduce the fuel consumed in the JT9D, JT8D, and JT3D turbofans in commercial fleet operation through the 1980's are identified. Projected technology advances are identified and evaluated for new turbofans to be developed after 1985. Programs are recommended for developing the necessary technology.

  16. F3 turbofan engine. Overview of research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozu, Masao

    1986-12-10

    The development of XF3-30 Turbofan Engine (static propulsion 1670 kgf), to be equipped in the next exercise plane (XT-4) of the Air Self-Defense Force, was launched in FY 1975 and completed in FY 1985 in terms of certificate testing. This engine is the second national product after the first J3 in Japan. During the development work, technical gaps are avoided as far as possible while also noting cost control in mass production. Important items, felt during the development work for smoothly proceeding with the plan and early achieving the target, include optimum decision of low-fuel consumption rate, complete testing, careful study on the interface, long-term test run for detecting problems, frank attitude to accept facts, incentive of persons in charge and cooperation of related people. This report describes an outline of the plan from research to development, except for technical details that will be reported separately. (20 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs, 5 photos)

  17. Kalman Filter Constraint Tuning for Turbofan Engine Health Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dan; Simon, Donald L.

    2005-01-01

    Kalman filters are often used to estimate the state variables of a dynamic system. However, in the application of Kalman filters some known signal information is often either ignored or dealt with heuristically. For instance, state variable constraints are often neglected because they do not fit easily into the structure of the Kalman filter. Recently published work has shown a new method for incorporating state variable inequality constraints in the Kalman filter, which has been shown to generally improve the filter s estimation accuracy. However, the incorporation of inequality constraints poses some risk to the estimation accuracy as the Kalman filter is theoretically optimal. This paper proposes a way to tune the filter constraints so that the state estimates follow the unconstrained (theoretically optimal) filter when the confidence in the unconstrained filter is high. When confidence in the unconstrained filter is not so high, then we use our heuristic knowledge to constrain the state estimates. The confidence measure is based on the agreement of measurement residuals with their theoretical values. The algorithm is demonstrated on a linearized simulation of a turbofan engine to estimate engine health.

  18. 75 FR 27973 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-524C2 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... RB211-524C2 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... Rolls-Royce plc (RR) model RB211-524C2-19 and RB211-524C2-B-19 turbofan engines. These engines are...

  19. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine With Ice Crystal Ingestion: Follow-On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  20. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine with Ice Crystal Ingestion; Follow-On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  1. CLASSIFICATION OF NEURAL NETWORK FOR TECHNICAL CONDITION OF TURBOFAN ENGINES BASED ON HYBRID ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Potapov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work presents a method of diagnosing the technical condition of turbofan engines using hybrid neural network algorithm based on software developed for the analysis of data obtained in the aircraft life. Methods: allows the engine diagnostics with deep recognition to the structural assembly in the presence of single structural damage components of the engine running and the multifaceted damage. Results: of the optimization of neural network structure to solve the problems of evaluating technical state of the bypass turbofan engine, when used with genetic algorithms.

  2. System Would Detect Foreign-Object Damage in Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed data-fusion system, to be implemented mostly in software, would further process the digitized and preprocessed outputs of sensors in a turbofan engine to detect foreign-object damage (FOD) [more precisely, damage caused by impingement of such foreign objects as birds, pieces of ice, and runway debris]. The proposed system could help a flight crew to decide what, if any, response is necessary to complete a flight safely, and could aid mechanics in deciding what post-flight maintenance action might be needed. The sensory information to be utilized by the proposed system would consist of (1) the output of an accelerometer in an engine-vibration-monitoring subsystem and (2) features extracted from a gas path analysis. ["Gas path analysis" (GPA) is a term of art that denotes comprehensive analysis of engine performance derived from readings of fuel-flow meters, shaft-speed sensors, temperature sensors, and the like.] The acceleration signal would first be processed by a wavelet-transform-based algorithm, using a wavelet created for the specific purpose of finding abrupt FOD-induced changes in noisy accelerometer signals. Two additional features extracted would be the amplitude of vibration (determined via a single- frequency Fourier transform calculated at the rotational speed of the engine), and the rate of change in amplitude due to an FOD-induced rotor imbalance. This system would utilize two GPA features: the fan efficiency and the rate of change of fan efficiency with time. The selected GPA and vibrational features would be assessed by two fuzzy-logic inference engines, denoted the "Gas Path Expert" and the "Vibration Expert," respectively (see Figure 1). Each of these inference engines would generate a "possibility" distribution for occurrence of an FOD event: Each inference engine would assign, to its input information, degrees of membership, which would subsequently be transformed into basic probability assignments for the gas path and vibration

  3. Performance Estimation and Fault Diagnosis Based on Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm for a Turbofan Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the schemes of accurate and computationally efficient performance estimation and fault diagnosis for turbofan engines has become a new research focus and challenges. It is able to increase reliability and stability of turbofan engine and reduce the life cycle costs. Accurate estimation of turbofan engine performance counts on thoroughly understanding the components’ performance, which is described by component characteristic maps and the fault of each component can be regarded as the change of characteristic maps. In this paper, a novel method based on a Levenberg–Marquardt (LM algorithm is proposed to enhance the fidelity of the performance estimation and the credibility of the fault diagnosis for the turbofan engine. The presented method utilizes the LM algorithm to figure out the operating point in the characteristic maps, preparing for performance estimation and fault diagnosis. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated for estimating performance parameters in the transient case with Rayleigh process noise and Gaussian measurement noise. The comparison among the extended Kalman filter (EKF method, the particle filter (PF method and the proposed method is implemented in the abrupt fault case and the gradual degeneration case and it has been shown that the proposed method has the capability to lead to more accurate result for performance estimation and fault diagnosis of turbofan engine than current popular EKF and PF diagnosis methods.

  4. Research on Turbofan Engine Model above Idle State Based on NARX Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Shu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear model for turbofan engine above idle state based on NARX is studied. Above all, the data sets for the JT9D engine from existing model are obtained via simulation. Then, a nonlinear modeling scheme based on NARX is proposed and several models with different parameters are built according to the former data sets. Finally, the simulations have been taken to verify the precise and dynamic performance the models, the results show that the NARX model can well reflect the dynamics characteristic of the turbofan engine with high accuracy.

  5. 76 FR 78805 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines. This AD results from mandatory... inspection of the FOHE mounts. We did not change the AD based on this comment. Request To Add Requirement To...

  6. Eulerian method for ice crystal icing in turbofan engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The newer generations of high-bypass-ratio engines are susceptible to the ingestion of small ice crystals which may cause engine power loss or damage. The research presented in this thesis focusses on the development of a computational method for in-engine ice crystal accretion. The work has been

  7. 75 FR 15321 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... Based on the service information, we estimate that this AD will affect about 138 RB211 Trent 800 series... will cost about $2,000 per engine. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of the AD on U.S...

  8. 78 FR 54149 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... service information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31... per hour. Replacement parts are estimated to cost about $2,271 per engine. Based on these figures, we...

  9. Off-wing fleet maintenance study of a CFM56-3B turbofan engine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An off wing fleet maintenance study of the CFM56-3B Turbofan engine that propels the Boeing 737-300 aircraft is presented. The engine performance and deteriorating behavior was modeled with a view to estimate the creep life consumption and operating severity. The predicted severity factor of each degradation was ...

  10. Passive Techniques for Fan Noise Reduction in New Turbofan Engines: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Gorj-Bandpy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the various environmental concerns, the aircraft noise item has been constantly growing in importance over the past years. Measures for its reduction at the source as well its mitigation around airports must take into account aspects of medicine and technical design as well as legal and land use planning aspects. Fan noise is one of the principal noise sources in turbofan aero-engines. In this paper a review of the main technologies employed for the reduction of fan noise turbofan engines is presented.

  11. 75 FR 801 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 500, 700, and 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ...The FAA proposes to supersede an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. That AD currently requires replacing the fuel-to-oil heat exchanger (FOHE). This proposed AD would require replacing the FOHE on the RB211-Trent 500 and RB211-Trent 700 series turbofan engines in addition to the RB211-Trent 800 series turbofan engines. This proposed AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product, and results from the risk of engine FOHE blockage. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as:

  12. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  13. 75 FR 61114 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation.... Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, England, DE248BJ; telephone: 011-44... AD. We will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this proposed AD based...

  14. 76 FR 2605 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, DERBY, DE24 8BJ, UK; telephone 44 (0... AD. We will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this proposed AD based...

  15. 76 FR 24796 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation.... Request To Revise the Compliance Times Four commenters, American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Rolls-Royce plc... SNPRM were developed to minimize the risk of uncontained disc failure, based on the age of the parts in...

  16. 76 FR 65136 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31, Derby... 8, 2011, to perform the inspection. Costs of Compliance Based on the service information, we...

  17. Effect of reference environment on the turbofan engine with the aid of specific-exergy based methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turan, Onder [Anadolu University, School of Civil Aviation (Turkey)], e-mail: onderturan@anadolu.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    Research is being carried out in the aeronautics sector on improving engine efficiency, and thereby increasing engine power, while reducing fuel consumption. The aim of this study was to determine the performance and efficiency of a turbofan engine and assess the impact of altitude on its performance. An exergetic analysis was carried out at different altitudes on a simple turbofan engine composed of inlet, fan, high pressure compressor and turbine, fan nozzle, compression chamber and exhaust. Exergy analysis allows the loss locations to be assessed and efficiencies evaluated in a meaningful way. Results showed that the turbofan engine has an efficiency of 25.68% to 28.11% and an exergy efficiency of 48.91% to 50.34%. It was found, moreover, that the combustion chamber was where the greatest efficiency losses occurred. This study permitted the exergy performance of a turbofan engine to be determined and identified the components where the greater losses occurred.

  18. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  19. Preliminary Study on Acoustic Detection of Faults Experienced by a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle integrated propulsion research (VIPR) effort conducted by NASA and several partners provided an unparalleled opportunity to test a relatively low TRL concept regarding the use of far field acoustics to identify faults occurring in a high bypass turbofan engine. Though VIPR Phase II ground based aircraft installed engine testing wherein a multitude of research sensors and methods were evaluated, an array of acoustic microphones was used to determine the viability of such an array to detect failures occurring in a commercially representative high bypass turbofan engine. The failures introduced during VIPR testing included commanding the engine's low pressure compressor (LPC) exit and high pressure compressor (HPC) 14th stage bleed values abruptly to their failsafe positions during steady state

  20. Comparative performance analysis of combined-cycle pulse detonation turbofan engines (PDTEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Bhattrai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined-cycle pulse detonation engines are promising contenders for hypersonic propulsion systems. In the present study, design and propulsive performance analysis of combined-cycle pulse detonation turbofan engines (PDTEs is presented. Analysis is done with respect to Mach number at two consecutive modes of operation: (1 Combined-cycle PDTE using a pulse detonation afterburner mode (PDA-mode and (2 combined-cycle PDTE in pulse detonation ramjet engine mode (PDRE-mode. The performance of combined-cycle PDTEs is compared with baseline afterburning turbofan and ramjet engines. The comparison of afterburning modes is done for Mach numbers from 0 to 3 at 15.24 km altitude conditions, while that of pulse detonation ramjet engine (PDRE is done for Mach 1.5 to Mach 6 at 18.3 km altitude conditions. The analysis shows that the propulsive performance of a turbine engine can be greatly improved by replacing the conventional afterburner with a pulse detonation afterburner (PDA. The PDRE also outperforms its ramjet counterpart at all flight conditions considered herein. The gains obtained are outstanding for both the combined-cycle PDTE modes compared to baseline turbofan and ramjet engines.

  1. The trigeneration cycle as a way to create multipurpose stationary power plants based on conversion of aeroderivative turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaksin, A. Yu.; Arbekov, A. N.; Inozemtsev, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    A schematic cycle is considered, and thermodynamic analysis is performed to substantiate the possibility of creating multipurpose industrial power plants, operating on a trigeneration cycle, based on production-type turbofan engines.

  2. Investigation of a Verification and Validation Tool with a Turbofan Aircraft Engine Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uth, Peter; Narang-Siddarth, Anshu; Wong, Edmond

    2018-01-01

    The development of more advanced control architectures for turbofan aircraft engines can yield gains in performance and efficiency over the lifetime of an engine. However, the implementation of these increasingly complex controllers is contingent on their ability to provide safe, reliable engine operation. Therefore, having the means to verify the safety of new control algorithms is crucial. As a step towards this goal, CoCoSim, a publicly available verification tool for Simulink, is used to analyze C-MAPSS40k, a 40,000 lbf class turbo-fan engine model developed at NASA for testing new control algorithms. Due to current limitations of the verification software, several modifications are made to C-MAPSS40k to achieve compatibility with CoCoSim. Some of these modifications sacrifice fidelity to the original model. Several safety and performance requirements typical for turbofan engines are identified and constructed into a verification framework. Preliminary results using an industry standard baseline controller for these requirements are presented. While verification capabilities are demonstrated, a truly comprehensive analysis will require further development of the verification tool.

  3. Modeling of a Turbofan Engine with Ice Crystal Ingestion in the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Jones, Scott M.; Nili, Samaun

    2017-01-01

    The main focus of this study is to apply a computational tool for the flow analysis of the turbine engine that has been tested with ice crystal ingestion in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has been used to test a highly instrumented Honeywell ALF502R-5A (LF11) turbofan engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. Test data analysis with an engine cycle code and a compressor flow code was conducted to determine the values of key icing parameters, that can indicate the risk of ice accretion, which can lead to engine rollback (un-commanded loss of engine thrust). The full engine aerothermodynamic performance was modeled with the Honeywell Customer Deck specifically created for the ALF502R-5A engine. The mean-line compressor flow analysis code, which includes a code that models the state of the ice crystal, was used to model the air flow through the fan-core and low pressure compressor. The results of the compressor flow analyses included calculations of the ice-water flow rate to air flow rate ratio (IWAR), the local static wet bulb temperature, and the particle melt ratio throughout the flow field. It was found that the assumed particle size had a large effect on the particle melt ratio, and on the local wet bulb temperature. In this study the particle size was varied parametrically to produce a non-zero calculated melt ratio in the exit guide vane (EGV) region of the low pressure compressor (LPC) for the data points that experienced a growth of blockage there, and a subsequent engine called rollback (CRB). At data points where the engine experienced a CRB having the lowest wet bulb temperature of 492 degrees Rankine at the EGV trailing edge, the smallest particle size that produced a non-zero melt ratio (between 3 percent - 4 percent) was on the order of 1 micron. This value of melt ratio was utilized as the target for all other subsequent data points analyzed, while the particle size was varied from 1 micron - 9

  4. Turbofan Engine Core Compartment Vent Aerodynamic Configuration Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Leonard J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design methodology used in the development of the aerodynamic configuration of the nacelle core compartment vent for a typical Boeing commercial airplane together with design challenges for future design efforts. Core compartment vents exhaust engine subsystem flows from the space contained between the engine case and the nacelle of an airplane propulsion system. These subsystem flows typically consist of precooler, oil cooler, turbine case cooling, compartment cooling and nacelle leakage air. The design of core compartment vents is challenging due to stringent design requirements, mass flow sensitivity of the system to small changes in vent exit pressure ratio, and the need to maximize overall exhaust system performance at cruise conditions.

  5. Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model identification for turbofan aero-engines with guaranteed stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruichao LI

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with identifying a Takagi-Sugeno (TS fuzzy model for turbofan aero-engines working under the maximum power status (non-afterburning. To establish the fuzzy system, theoretical contributions are made as follows. First, by fixing antecedent parameters, the estimation of consequent parameters in state-space representations is formulated as minimizing a quadratic cost function. Second, to avoid obtaining unstable identified models, a new theorem is proposed to transform the prior-knowledge of stability into constraints. Then based on the aforementioned work, the identification problem is synthesized as a constrained quadratic optimization. By solving the constrained optimization, a TS fuzzy system is identified with guaranteed stability. Finally, the proposed method is applied to the turbofan aero-engine using simulation data generated from an aerothermodynamics component-level model. Results show the identified fuzzy model achieves a high fitting accuracy while stabilities of the overall fuzzy system and all its local models are also guaranteed. Keywords: Constrained optimization, Fuzzy system, Stability, System identification, Turbofan engine

  6. Spatial Correlation in the Ambient Core Noise Field of a Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic transfer function relating combustion noise and turbine exit noise in the presence of enclosed ambient core noise is investigated using a dynamic system model and an acoustic system model for the particular turbofan engine studied and for a range of operating conditions. Measurements of cross-spectra magnitude and phase between the combustor and turbine exit and auto-spectra at the turbine exit and combustor are used to show the presence of indirect and direct combustion noise over the frequency range of 0 400 Hz. The procedure used evaluates the ratio of direct to indirect combustion noise. The procedure used also evaluates the post-combustion residence time in the combustor which is a factor in the formation of thermal NOx and soot in this region. These measurements are masked by the ambient core noise sound field in this frequency range which is observable since the transducers are situated within an acoustic wavelength of one another. An ambient core noise field model based on one and two dimensional spatial correlation functions is used to replicate the spatially correlated response of the pair of transducers. The spatial correlation function increases measured attenuation due to destructive interference and masks the true attenuation of the turbine.

  7. Real-time simulation of an F110/STOVL turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Ouzts, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    A traditional F110-type turbofan engine model was extended to include a ventral nozzle and two thrust-augmenting ejectors for Short Take-Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft applications. Development of the real-time F110/STOVL simulation required special attention to the modeling approach to component performance maps, the low pressure turbine exit mixing region, and the tailpipe dynamic approximation. Simulation validation derives by comparing output from the ADSIM simulation with the output for a validated F110/STOVL General Electric Aircraft Engines FORTRAN deck. General Electric substantiated basic engine component characteristics through factory testing and full scale ejector data.

  8. 76 FR 20229 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 768-60 and Trent 772-60 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... inspections of the MCD. We are issuing this AD to prevent in-flight engine shutdowns caused by step aside... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 768-60 and Trent 772-60 Turbofan Engines AGENCY... superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for RR RB211-Trent 700 series turbofan engines. That AD...

  9. Fuselage boundary-layer refraction of fan tones radiated from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, James; McAlpine, Alan; Kingan, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    A distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is extended to include the refraction effects caused by the fuselage boundary layer. The model is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where fan tones are represented in terms of spinning modes radiated from a semi-infinite circular duct, and the aircraft's fuselage is represented by an infinitely long, rigid cylinder. The distributed source is a disk, formed by integrating infinitesimal volume sources located on the intake duct termination. The cylinder is located adjacent to the disk. There is uniform axial flow, aligned with the axis of the cylinder, everywhere except close to the cylinder where there is a constant thickness boundary layer. The aim is to predict the near-field acoustic pressure, and in particular, to predict the pressure on the cylindrical fuselage which is relevant to assess cabin noise. Thus no far-field approximations are included in the modelling. The effect of the boundary layer is quantified by calculating the area-averaged mean square pressure over the cylinder's surface with and without the boundary layer included in the prediction model. The sound propagation through the boundary layer is calculated by solving the Pridmore-Brown equation. Results from the theoretical method show that the boundary layer has a significant effect on the predicted sound pressure levels on the cylindrical fuselage, owing to sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

  10. Design and evaluation of an integrated Quiet, Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) engine and aircraft propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, J.; Fogel, P.; Wilson, C.

    1980-01-01

    The design was based on the LTS-101 engine family for the core engine. A high bypass fan design (BPR=9.4) was incorporated to provide reduced fuel consumption for the design mission. All acoustic and pollutant emissions goals were achieved. A discussion of the preliminary design of a business jet suitable for the developed propulsion system is included. It is concluded that large engine technology can be successfully applied to small turbofans, and noise or pollutant levels need not be constraints for the design of future small general aviation turbofan engines.

  11. Exergy analysis of a turbofan engine for an unmanned aerial vehicle during a surveillance mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şöhret, Yasin; Dinç, Ali; Karakoç, T. Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an exergy analysis of a turbofan engine, being the main power unit of an UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) over the course of a surveillance mission flight, is presented. In this framework, an engine model is firstly developed, based upon engine design parameters and conditions using a genuine code. Next, the exergy analysis is performed according to thermodynamic laws. At the end of the study, the combustion chamber is identified as the most irreversible component of the engine, while the high pressure turbine and compressor are identified as the most efficient components throughout the flight. The minimum exergy efficiency is 58.24% for the combustion chamber at the end of the ingress flight phase, while the maximum exergy efficiency is found to be 99.09% for the high pressure turbine at the start of the ingress flight phase and landing loiter. The highest exergy destruction within the engine occurs at landing loiter, take-off and start of climb, with rates of 16998.768 kW, 16820.317 kW and 16564.378 kW respectively. - Highlights: • This study reveals the exergy parameters of a turbofan engine for an UAV. • Exergy analysis is conducted for a complete surveillance mission flight. • Variation of exergy parameters of engine components during the flight is presented. • The impact of the environment conditions on exergy parameters is proven.

  12. Stimulation of a turbofan engine for evaluation of multivariable optimal control concepts. [(computerized simulation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldner, K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of control systems for jet engines requires a real-time computer simulation. The simulation provides an effective tool for evaluating control concepts and problem areas prior to actual engine testing. The development and use of a real-time simulation of the Pratt and Whitney F100-PW100 turbofan engine is described. The simulation was used in a multi-variable optimal controls research program using linear quadratic regulator theory. The simulation is used to generate linear engine models at selected operating points and evaluate the control algorithm. To reduce the complexity of the design, it is desirable to reduce the order of the linear model. A technique to reduce the order of the model; is discussed. Selected results between high and low order models are compared. The LQR control algorithms can be programmed on digital computer. This computer will control the engine simulation over the desired flight envelope.

  13. 77 FR 10355 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... service of certain critical engine parts based on reduced life limits. This new AD reduces the life limits... effective March 28, 2012. ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc...

  14. Demonstration of a Packaged Capacitive Pressure Sensor System Suitable for Jet Turbofan Engine Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Meredith, Roger D.; Harsh, Kevin; Pilant, Evan; Usrey, Michael W.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of a packaged pressure sensor system suitable for jet engine health monitoring is demonstrated. The sensing system operates from 97 to 117 MHz over a pressure range from 0 to 350 psi and a temperature range from 25 to 500 deg. The sensing system consists of a Clapp-type oscillator that is fabricated on an alumina substrate and is comprised of a Cree SiC MESFET, MIM capacitors, a wire-wound inductor, chip resistors and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. The pressure sensor is located in the LC tank circuit of the oscillator so that a change in pressure causes a change in capacitance, thus changing the resonant frequency of the sensing system. The chip resistors, wire-wound inductors and MIM capacitors have all been characterized at temperature and operational frequency, and perform with less than 5% variance in electrical performance. The measured capacitive pressure sensing system agrees very well with simulated results. The packaged pressure sensing system is specifically designed to measure the pressure on a jet turbofan engine. The packaged system can be installed by way of borescope plug adaptor fitted to a borescope port exposed to the gas path of a turbofan engine.

  15. A Foreign Object Damage Event Detector Data Fusion System for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A Data Fusion System designed to provide a reliable assessment of the occurrence of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in a turbofan engine is presented. The FOD-event feature level fusion scheme combines knowledge of shifts in engine gas path performance obtained using a Kalman filter, with bearing accelerometer signal features extracted via wavelet analysis, to positively identify a FOD event. A fuzzy inference system provides basic probability assignments (bpa) based on features extracted from the gas path analysis and bearing accelerometers to a fusion algorithm based on the Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence. Details are provided on the wavelet transforms used to extract the foreign object strike features from the noisy data and on the Kalman filter-based gas path analysis. The system is demonstrated using a turbofan engine combined-effects model (CEM), providing both gas path and rotor dynamic structural response, and is suitable for rapid-prototyping of control and diagnostic systems. The fusion of the disparate data can provide significantly more reliable detection of a FOD event than the use of either method alone. The use of fuzzy inference techniques combined with Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence provides a theoretical justification for drawing conclusions based on imprecise or incomplete data.

  16. A Comparison of Hybrid Approaches for Turbofan Engine Gas Path Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Feng; Wang, Yafan; Huang, Jinquan; Wang, Qihang

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid diagnostic method utilizing Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA) is presented for performance degradation estimation and sensor anomaly detection of turbofan engine. The EKF is used to estimate engine component performance degradation for gas path fault diagnosis. The AGA is introduced in the integrated architecture and applied for sensor bias detection. The contributions of this work are the comparisons of Kalman Filters (KF)-AGA algorithms and Neural Networks (NN)-AGA algorithms with a unified framework for gas path fault diagnosis. The NN needs to be trained off-line with a large number of prior fault mode data. When new fault mode occurs, estimation accuracy by the NN evidently decreases. However, the application of the Linearized Kalman Filter (LKF) and EKF will not be restricted in such case. The crossover factor and the mutation factor are adapted to the fitness function at each generation in the AGA, and it consumes less time to search for the optimal sensor bias value compared to the Genetic Algorithm (GA). In a word, we conclude that the hybrid EKF-AGA algorithm is the best choice for gas path fault diagnosis of turbofan engine among the algorithms discussed.

  17. Numerical Investigation of the Influence of the Input Air Irregularity on the Performance of Turbofan Jet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Y.; Zubanov, V.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the numerical investigation of the input air irregularity influence of turbofan engine on its characteristics. The investigated fan has a wide-blade, an inlet diameter about 2 meters, a pressure ratio about 1.6 and the bypass ratio about 4.8. The flow irregularity was simulated by the flap input in the fan inlet channel. Input of flap was carried out by an amount of 10 to 22,5% of the input channel diameter with increments of 2,5%. A nonlinear harmonic analysis (NLH-analysis) of NUMECA Fine/Turbo software was used to study the flow irregularity. The behavior of the calculated LPC characteristics repeats the experiment behavior, but there is a quantitative difference: the calculated efficiency and pressure ratio of booster consistent with the experimental data within 3% and 2% respectively, the calculated efficiency and pressure ratio of fan duct - within 4% and 2.5% respectively. An increasing the level of air irregularity in the input stage of the fan reduces the calculated mass flow, maximum pressure ratio and efficiency. With the value of flap input 12.5%, reducing the maximum air flow is 1.44%, lowering the maximum pressure ratio is 2.6%, efficiency decreasing is 3.1%.

  18. Load Sharing Behavior of Star Gearing Reducer for Geared Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Shuai; Zhang, Yidu; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Feiming; Matsumura, Shigeki; Houjoh, Haruo

    2017-07-01

    Load sharing behavior is very important for power-split gearing system, star gearing reducer as a new type and special transmission system can be used in many industry fields. However, there is few literature regarding the key multiple-split load sharing issue in main gearbox used in new type geared turbofan engine. Further mechanism analysis are made on load sharing behavior among star gears of star gearing reducer for geared turbofan engine. Comprehensive meshing error analysis are conducted on eccentricity error, gear thickness error, base pitch error, assembly error, and bearing error of star gearing reducer respectively. Floating meshing error resulting from meshing clearance variation caused by the simultaneous floating of sun gear and annular gear are taken into account. A refined mathematical model for load sharing coefficient calculation is established in consideration of different meshing stiffness and supporting stiffness for components. The regular curves of load sharing coefficient under the influence of interactions, single action and single variation of various component errors are obtained. The accurate sensitivity of load sharing coefficient toward different errors is mastered. The load sharing coefficient of star gearing reducer is 1.033 and the maximum meshing force in gear tooth is about 3010 N. This paper provides scientific theory evidences for optimal parameter design and proper tolerance distribution in advanced development and manufacturing process, so as to achieve optimal effects in economy and technology.

  19. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  20. Impact of alternative fuels on the operational and environmental performance of a small turbofan engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, R.M.P.; Sousa, J.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A wide range of alternative fuels is studied in a small two-spool turbofan engine. • Impact of fuel properties on flame temperature and droplet evaporation considered. • Performance and pollutant emissions at different operating conditions are analyzed. • Use of alternative fuels generally leads to an improved performance of the engine. • Mostly reductions in soot emissions, but also cuts in NO_x and CO, are obtained. - Abstract: A wide range of alternative jet fuels is studied in this work for use in a small two-spool turbofan engine. These embrace the five production pathways currently approved by the American Society for Testing and Materials. Both neat products and blends (within certified limits) have been considered. The present analysis is based on a 0-D thermodynamic modeling of the aero-engine for off-design and transient simulations. In addition, the selected approach incorporates fuel effects on combustion and the impact of fuel properties on the flame temperature, as well as on the droplet evaporation rate. Predicted performance and pollutant emission outputs for the alternative fuels are presented at different operating conditions, namely: take-off, top of climb, cruise, low power and ground idle. The results are discussed and comprehensively compared with data available in the literature. It was concluded that the combustion of alternative fuels generally leads to enhancements in engine performance with respect to the use of conventional kerosene. Reductions in pollutant emissions occur mostly in soot, but also in nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide, depending on the fuel and operating conditions. In contrast, increased emissions of unburned hydrocarbons are generally observed. Concerns about the aero-engine dynamic response are raised only in very few cases, involving the use of neat products.

  1. 75 FR 58290 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211 Trent 700 and Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211 Trent 700 and Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal... or increase the scope of the AD. Costs of Compliance Based on the service information, we estimate.... Required parts would cost about $15,000 per product. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of the AD...

  2. 75 FR 50877 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-524C2 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-524C2 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... require adopting the AD as proposed. Costs of Compliance Based on the service information, we estimate.... Required parts will cost about $25,000 per product. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of the AD...

  3. 77 FR 4648 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535 Series Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535 Series Turbofan Engine AGENCY: Federal Aviation... identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom; phone: 011 44... parts are required. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of this AD on U.S. operators to be $1...

  4. 77 FR 1009 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation... 5, 2005). ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O...,000. Based on these figures, we estimate the total cost of the AD to U.S. operators to be $4,206,960...

  5. Gas Path Health Monitoring for a Turbofan Engine Based on a Nonlinear Filtering Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqiu Lv

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Different approaches for gas path performance estimation of dynamic systems are commonly used, the most common being the variants of the Kalman filter. The extended Kalman filter (EKF method is a popular approach for nonlinear systems which combines the traditional Kalman filtering and linearization techniques to effectively deal with weakly nonlinear and non-Gaussian problems. Its mathematical formulation is based on the assumption that the probability density function (PDF of the state vector can be approximated to be Gaussian. Recent investigations have focused on the particle filter (PF based on Monte Carlo sampling algorithms for tackling strong nonlinear and non-Gaussian models. Considering the aircraft engine is a complicated machine, operating under a harsh environment, and polluted by complex noises, the PF might be an available way to monitor gas path health for aircraft engines. Up to this point in time a number of Kalman filtering approaches have been used for aircraft turbofan engine gas path health estimation, but the particle filters have not been used for this purpose and a systematic comparison has not been published. This paper presents gas path health monitoring based on the PF and the constrained extend Kalman particle filter (cEKPF, and then compares the estimation accuracy and computational effort of these filters to the EKF for aircraft engine performance estimation under rapid faults and general deterioration. Finally, the effects of the constraint mechanism and particle number on the cEKPF are discussed. We show in this paper that the cEKPF outperforms the EKF, PF and EKPF, and conclude that the cEKPF is the best choice for turbofan engine health monitoring.

  6. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  7. Theoretical aspects of an electrostatic aerosol filter for civilian turbofan engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of aerosol filtration in turbofan engines. The current problem of very fine aerosol admission is the impossibility for mechanical filtration; another aspect of the problem is the high mass flow of air to be filtered. Non-attended, the aerosol admission can -and usually does- lead to clogging of turbine cooling passages and can damage the engine completely. The approach is theoretical and relies on the principles of electrostatic dust collectors known in other industries. An estimative equation is deduced in order to quantify the electrical charge required to obtain the desired filtration. Although the device still needs more theoretical and experimental work, it could one day be used as a means of increasing the safety of airplanes passing trough an aerosol laden mass of air.

  8. Model-based Acceleration Control of Turbofan Engines with a Hammerstein-Wiener Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiqiang; Ye, Zhifeng; Hu, Zhongzhi; Wu, Xin; Dimirovsky, Georgi; Yue, Hong

    2017-05-01

    Acceleration control of turbofan engines is conventionally designed through either schedule-based or acceleration-based approach. With the widespread acceptance of model-based design in aviation industry, it becomes necessary to investigate the issues associated with model-based design for acceleration control. In this paper, the challenges for implementing model-based acceleration control are explained; a novel Hammerstein-Wiener representation of engine models is introduced; based on the Hammerstein-Wiener model, a nonlinear generalized minimum variance type of optimal control law is derived; the feature of the proposed approach is that it does not require the inversion operation that usually upsets those nonlinear control techniques. The effectiveness of the proposed control design method is validated through a detailed numerical study.

  9. Certain Type Turbofan Engine Whole Vibration Model with Support Looseness Fault and Casing Response Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Support looseness fault is a type of common fault in aeroengine. Serious looseness fault would emerge under larger unbalanced force, which would cause excessive vibration and even lead to rubbing fault, so it is important to analyze and recognize looseness fault effectively. In this paper, based on certain type turbofan engine structural features, a rotor-support-casing whole model for certain type turbofan aeroengine is established. The rotor and casing systems are modeled by means of the finite element beam method; the support systems are modeled by lumped-mass model; the support looseness fault model is also introduced. The coupled system response is obtained by numerical integral method. In this paper, based on the casing acceleration signals, the impact characteristics of symmetrical stiffness and asymmetric stiffness models are analyzed, finding that the looseness fault would lead to the longitudinal asymmetrical characteristics of acceleration time domain wave and the multiple frequency characteristics, which is consistent with the real trial running vibration signals. Asymmetric stiffness looseness model is verified to be fit for aeroengine looseness fault model.

  10. Dynamic Analysis for a Geared Turbofan Engine with Variable Area Fan Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Thomas, George L.

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive design goals have been set for future aero-propulsion systems with regards to fuel economy, noise, and emissions. To meet these challenging goals, advanced propulsion concepts are being explored and current operating margins are being re-evaluated to find additional concessions that can be made. One advanced propulsion concept being evaluated is a geared turbofan with a variable area fan nozzle (VAFN), developed by NASA. This engine features a small core, a fan driven by the low pressure turbine through a reduction gearbox, and a shape memory alloy (SMA)-actuated VAFN. The VAFN is designed to allow both a small exit area for efficient operation at cruise, while being able to open wider at high power conditions to reduce backpressure on the fan and ensure a safe level of stall margin is maintained. The VAFN is actuated via a SMA-based system instead of a conventional system to decrease overall weight of the system, however, SMA-based actuators respond relatively slowly, which introduces dynamic issues that are investigated in this work. This paper describes both a control system designed specifically for issues associated with SMAs, and dynamic analysis of the geared turbofan VAFN with the SMA actuators. Also, some future recommendations are provided for this type of propulsion system.

  11. On-Board Real-Time Optimization Control for Turbo-Fan Engine Life Extending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiangang; Zhang, Haibo; Miao, Lizhen; Sun, Fengyong

    2017-11-01

    A real-time optimization control method is proposed to extend turbo-fan engine service life. This real-time optimization control is based on an on-board engine mode, which is devised by a MRR-LSSVR (multi-input multi-output recursive reduced least squares support vector regression method). To solve the optimization problem, a FSQP (feasible sequential quadratic programming) algorithm is utilized. The thermal mechanical fatigue is taken into account during the optimization process. Furthermore, to describe the engine life decaying, a thermal mechanical fatigue model of engine acceleration process is established. The optimization objective function not only contains the sub-item which can get fast response of the engine, but also concludes the sub-item of the total mechanical strain range which has positive relationship to engine fatigue life. Finally, the simulations of the conventional optimization control which just consider engine acceleration performance or the proposed optimization method have been conducted. The simulations demonstrate that the time of the two control methods from idle to 99.5 % of the maximum power are equal. However, the engine life using the proposed optimization method could be surprisingly increased by 36.17 % compared with that using conventional optimization control.

  12. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier (Refs. 1 and 2) from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test (Ref. 3) conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  13. Optimal design and installation of ultra high bypass ratio turbofan nacelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Andrey; Zlenko, Nikolay; Matyash, Evgeniy; Mikhaylov, Sergey; Shenkin, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of designing and optimizing the nacelle of turbojet bypass engine with high bypass ratio and high thrust. An optimization algorithm EGO based on development of surrogate models and the method for maximizing the probability of improving the objective function has been used. The designing methodology has been based on the numerical solution of the Reynolds equations system. Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model has been chosen for RANS closure. The effective thrust losses has been uses as an objective function in optimizing the engine nacelle. As a result of optimization, effective thrust has been increased by 1.5 %. The Blended wing body aircraft configuration has been studied as a possible application. Two variants of the engine layout arrangement have been considered. It has been shown that the power plant changes the pressure distribution on the aircraft surface. It results in essential diminishing the configuration lift-drag ratio.

  14. Analytical investigation of adaptive control of radiated inlet noise from turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risi, John D.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the resulting far field radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. A feedforward control algorithm was simulated to predict the controlled far field radiation from the destructive combination of fan noise and secondary control sources. Numerical results were developed for two system configurations, with the resulting controlled far field radiation patterns showing varying degrees of attenuation and spillover. With one axial station of twelve control sources and error sensors with equal relative angular positions, nearly global attenuation is achieved. Shifting the angular position of one error sensor resulted in an increase of spillover to the extreme sidelines. The complex control inputs for each configuration was investigated to identify the structure of the wave pattern created by the control sources, giving an indication of performance of the system configuration. It is deduced that the locations of the error sensors and the control source configuration are equally critical to the operation of the active noise control system.

  15. Investigation of HP Turbine Blade Failure in a Military Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, R. K.; Thomas, Johny; Srinivasan, K.; Nandi, Vaishakhi; Bhatt, R. Raghavendra

    2017-04-01

    Failure of a high pressure (HP) turbine blade in a military turbofan engine is investigated to determine the root cause of failure. Forensic and metallurgical investigations are carried out on the affected blades. The loss of coating and the presence of heavily oxidized intergranular fracture features including substrate material aging and airfoil curling in the trailing edge of a representative blade indicate that the coating is not providing adequate oxidation protection and the blade material substrate is not suitable for the application at hand. Coating spallation followed by substrate oxidation and aging leading to intergranular cracking and localized trailing edge curling is the root cause of the blade failure. The remaining portion of the blade fracture surface showed ductile overload features in the final failure. The damage observed in downstream components is due to secondary effects.

  16. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low

  17. Development in Geared Turbofan Aeroengine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Tobi, A. L.; Ismail, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper looks into the implementation of epicyclic gear system to the aeroengine in order to increase the efficiency of the engine. The improvement made is in the direction of improving fuel consumption, reduction in pollutant gasses and perceived noise. Introduction of epicyclic gear system is capable to achieve bypass ratio of up to 15:1 with the benefits of weight and noise reduction. Radical new aircraft designs and engine installation are being studied to overcome some of the challenges associated with the future geared turbofan and open-rotor engine.

  18. A kernel principal component analysis–based degradation model and remaining useful life estimation for the turbofan engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong Feng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Remaining useful life estimation of the prognostics and health management technique is a complicated and difficult research question for maintenance. In this article, we consider the problem of prognostics modeling and estimation of the turbofan engine under complicated circumstances and propose a kernel principal component analysis–based degradation model and remaining useful life estimation method for such aircraft engine. We first analyze the output data created by the turbofan engine thermodynamic simulation that is based on the kernel principal component analysis method and then distinguish the qualitative and quantitative relationships between the key factors. Next, we build a degradation model for the engine fault based on the following assumptions: the engine has only had constant failure (i.e. no sudden failure is included, and the engine has a Wiener process, which is a covariate stand for the engine system drift. To predict the remaining useful life of the turbofan engine, we built a health index based on the degradation model and used the method of maximum likelihood and the data from the thermodynamic simulation model to estimate the parameters of this degradation model. Through the data analysis, we obtained a trend model of the regression curve line that fits with the actual statistical data. Based on the predicted health index model and the data trend model, we estimate the remaining useful life of the aircraft engine as the index reaches zero. At last, a case study involving engine simulation data demonstrates the precision and performance advantages of this prediction method that we propose. At last, a case study involving engine simulation data demonstrates the precision and performance advantages of this proposed method, the precision of the method can reach to 98.9% and the average precision is 95.8%.

  19. Improvement on Main/backup Controller Switching Device of the Nozzle Throat Area Control System for a Turbofan Aero Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Duan, Minghu; Yan, Maode; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaohui

    2014-06-01

    A full authority digital electronic controller (FADEC) equipped with a full authority hydro-mechanical backup controller (FAHMBC) is adopted as the nozzle throat area control system (NTACS) of a turbofan aero engine. In order to ensure the switching reliability of the main/backup controller, the nozzle throat area control switching valve was improved from three-way convex desktop slide valve to six-way convex desktop slide valve. Simulation results show that, if malfunctions of FAEDC occur and abnormal signals are outputted from FADEC, NTACS will be seriously influenced by the main/backup controller switching in several working states, while NTACS will not be influenced by using the improved nozzle throat area control switching valve, thus the controller switching process will become safer and smoother and the working reliability of this turbofan aero engine is improved by the controller switching device improvement.

  20. Full-Scale Turbofan Engine Noise-Source Separation Using a Four-Signal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Arechiga, Rene O.

    2016-01-01

    Contributions from the combustor to the overall propulsion noise of civilian transport aircraft are starting to become important due to turbofan design trends and expected advances in mitigation of other noise sources. During on-ground, static-engine acoustic tests, combustor noise is generally sub-dominant to other engine noise sources because of the absence of in-flight effects. Consequently, noise-source separation techniques are needed to extract combustor-noise information from the total noise signature in order to further progress. A novel four-signal source-separation method is applied to data from a static, full-scale engine test and compared to previous methods. The new method is, in a sense, a combination of two- and three-signal techniques and represents an attempt to alleviate some of the weaknesses of each of those approaches. This work is supported by the NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject and the NASA Glenn Faculty Fellowship Program.

  1. Estimation of Signal Coherence Threshold and Concealed Spectral Lines Applied to Detection of Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise. Copyright 2011 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

  2. Application of the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy for Turbofan Engine Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, T. Shane; Kopasakis, George; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    The data acquired from available system sensors forms the foundation upon which any health management system is based, and the available sensor suite directly impacts the overall diagnostic performance that can be achieved. While additional sensors may provide improved fault diagnostic performance, there are other factors that also need to be considered such as instrumentation cost, weight, and reliability. A systematic sensor selection approach is desired to perform sensor selection from a holistic system-level perspective as opposed to performing decisions in an ad hoc or heuristic fashion. The Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy is a methodology that optimally selects a sensor suite from a pool of sensors based on the system fault diagnostic approach, with the ability of taking cost, weight, and reliability into consideration. This procedure was applied to a large commercial turbofan engine simulation. In this initial study, sensor suites tailored for improved diagnostic performance are constructed from a prescribed collection of candidate sensors. The diagnostic performance of the best performing sensor suites in terms of fault detection and identification are demonstrated, with a discussion of the results and implications for future research.

  3. Core Noise Diagnostics of Turbofan Engine Noise Using Correlation and Coherence Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Cross-correlation and coherence functions are used to look for periodic acoustic components in turbofan engine combustor time histories, to investigate direct and indirect combustion noise source separation based on signal propagation time delays, and to provide information on combustor acoustics. Using the cross-correlation function, time delays were identified in all cases, clearly indicating the combustor is the source of the noise. In addition, unfiltered and low-pass filtered at 400 Hz signals had a cross-correlation time delay near 90 ms, while the low-pass filtered at less than 400 Hz signals had a cross-correlation time delay longer than 90 ms. Low-pass filtering at frequencies less than 400 Hz partially removes the direct combustion noise signals. The remainder includes the indirect combustion noise signal, which travels more slowly because of the dependence on the entropy convection velocity in the combustor. Source separation of direct and indirect combustion noise is demonstrated by proper use of low-pass filters with the cross-correlation function for a range of operating conditions. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting direct and indirect combustion noise.

  4. Attenuation of FJ44 Turbofan Engine Noise with a Foam-Metal Liner Installed Over-the-Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Elliott, Dave M.; Jones, Michael G.; Hartley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was used as a demonstrator for a Foam-Metal Liner (FML) installed in close proximity to the fan. Two FML designs were tested and compared to the hardwall baseline. Traditional single degree-of-freedom liner designs were also evaluated to provide a comparison. Farfield acoustic levels and limited engine performance results are presented in this paper. The results show that the FML achieved up to 5 dB Acoustic Power Level (PWL) overall attenuation in the forward quadrant, equivalent to the traditional liner design. An earlier report presented the test set-up and conditions.

  5. Robust fault detection of turbofan engines subject to adaptive controllers via a Total Measurable Fault Information Residual (ToMFIR) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chowdhury, Fahmida N; Djuric, Ana; Yeh, Chih-Ping

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides a new design of robust fault detection for turbofan engines with adaptive controllers. The critical issue is that the adaptive controllers can depress the faulty effects such that the actual system outputs remain the pre-specified values, making it difficult to detect faults/failures. To solve this problem, a Total Measurable Fault Information Residual (ToMFIR) technique with the aid of system transformation is adopted to detect faults in turbofan engines with adaptive controllers. This design is a ToMFIR-redundancy-based robust fault detection. The ToMFIR is first introduced and existing results are also summarized. The Detailed design process of the ToMFIRs is presented and a turbofan engine model is simulated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed ToMFIR-based fault-detection strategy. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential disturbance interactions with a single IGV in an F109 turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Joel F.

    A common cause of aircraft engine failure is the high cycle fatigue of engine blades and stators. One of the primary causes of these failures is due to blade row interactions, which cause an aerodynamic excitation to be resonant with a mechanical natural frequency. Traditionally, the primary source of such aerodynamic excitations has been practically limited to viscous wakes from upstream components. However, more advanced designs require that blade rows be very highly loaded and closely spaced. This results in aerodynamic excitation from potential fields of down stream engine components, in addition to the known wake excitations. An experimental investigation of the potential field from the fan of a Honeywell F109 turbofan engine has been completed. The investigation included velocity measurements upstream of the fan, addition of an airfoil shaped probe upstream of the fan on which surface pressure measurements were acquired, and measurement of the velocity in the interaction region between the probe and the fan. This investigation sought to characterize the response on the upstream probe due to the fan potential field and the interaction between a viscous wake and the potential field; as such, all test conditions were for subsonic fan speeds. The results from the collected data show that fan-induced potential disturbances propagate upstream at acoustic velocities, to produce vane surface-pressure amplitudes as high as 40 percent Joel F. Kirk of the inlet, mean total pressure. Further, these fan-induced pressure amplitudes display large variations between the two vane surfaces. An argument is made that the structure of the pressure response is consistent with the presence of two distinct sources of unsteady forcing disturbances. The disturbances on the incoming-rotation-facing surface of the IGV propagated upstream at a different speed than those on the outgoing-rotation-facing surface, indicating that one originated from a rotating source and the other from a

  7. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 3; Validation and Test Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the third volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by validation studies that were done on three fan rigs. It concludes with recommended improvements and additional studies for BFaNS.

  8. The Aerodynamic Performance of an Over-the-Rotor Liner With Circumferential Grooves on a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Buckley, James

    2013-01-01

    While liners have been utilized throughout turbofan ducts to attenuate fan noise, additional attenuation is obtainable by placing an acoustic liner over-the-rotor. Previous experiments have shown significant fan performance losses when acoustic liners are installed over-the-rotor. The fan blades induce an oscillating flow in the acoustic liners which results in a performance loss near the blade tip. An over-the-rotor liner was designed with circumferential grooves between the fan blade tips and the acoustic liner to reduce the oscillating flow in the acoustic liner. An experiment was conducted in the W-8 Single-Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center on a 1.5 pressure ratio fan to evaluate the impact of this over-the-rotor treatment design on fan aerodynamic performance. The addition of a circumferentially grooved over-the-rotor design between the fan blades and the acoustic liner reduced the performance loss, in terms of fan adiabatic efficiency, to less than 1 percent which is within the repeatability of this experiment.

  9. Acoustic Database for Turbofan Engine Core-Noise Sources. I; Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Grant

    2015-01-01

    In this program, a database of dynamic temperature and dynamic pressure measurements were acquired inside the core of a TECH977 turbofan engine to support investigations of indirect combustion noise. Dynamic temperature and pressure measurements were recorded for engine gas dynamics up to temperatures of 3100 degrees Fahrenheit and transient responses as high as 1000 hertz. These measurements were made at the entrance of the high pressure turbine (HPT) and at the entrance and exit of the low pressure turbine (LPT). Measurements were made at two circumferential clocking positions. In the combustor and inter-turbine duct (ITD), measurements were made at two axial locations to enable the exploration of time delays. The dynamic temperature measurements were made using dual thin-wire thermocouple probes. The dynamic pressure measurements were made using semi-infinite probes. Prior to the engine test, a series of bench, oven, and combustor rig tests were conducted to characterize the performance of the dual wire temperature probes and to define and characterize the data acquisition systems. A measurement solution for acquiring dynamic temperature and pressure data on the engine was defined. A suite of hardware modifications were designed to incorporate the dynamic temperature and pressure instrumentation into the TECH977 engine. In particular, a probe actuation system was developed to protect the delicate temperature probes during engine startup and transients in order to maximize sensor life. A set of temperature probes was procured and the TECH977 engine was assembled with the suite of new and modified hardware. The engine was tested at four steady state operating speeds, with repeats. Dynamic pressure and temperature data were acquired at each condition for at least one minute. At the two highest power settings, temperature data could not be obtained at the forward probe locations since the mean temperatures exceeded the capability of the probes. The temperature data

  10. 75 FR 51654 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-22B and RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-22B and RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal... that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD as proposed. Costs of Compliance Based... labor rate is $85 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $15,000 per product. Based on these...

  11. Parameterization of a Conventional and Regenerated UHB Turbofan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Fábio; Brójo, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The attempt to improve aircraft engines efficiency resulted in the evolution from turbojets to the first generation low bypass ratio turbofans. Today, high bypass ratio turbofans are the most traditional type of engine in commercial aviation. Following many years of technological developments and improvements, this type of engine has proved to be the most reliable facing the commercial aviation requirements. In search of more efficiency, the engine manufacturers tend to increase the bypass ratio leading to ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system like reducing the specific fuel consumption. This study is aimed at a parametric analysis of a UHB turbofan engine focused on short haul flights. Two cycle configurations (conventional and regenerated) were studied, and estimated values of their specific fuel consumption (TSFC) and specific thrust (Fs) were determined. Results demonstrate that the regenerated cycle may contribute towards a more economic and friendly aero engines in a higher range of bypass ratio.

  12. An analytical study on the performance of the organic Rankine cycle for turbofan engine exhaust heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadon, S.; Abu Talib, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    Due to energy shortage and global warming, issues of energy saving have become more important. To increase the energy efficiency and reduce the fuel consumption, waste heat recovery is a significant method for energy saving. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) has great potential to recover the waste heat from the core jet exhaust of a turbofan engine and use it to produce power. Preliminary study of the design concept and thermodynamic performance of this ORC system would assist researchers to predict the benefits of using the ORC system to extract the exhaust heat engine. In addition, a mathematical model of the heat transfer of this ORC system is studied and developed. The results show that with the increment of exhaust heat temperature, the mass flow rate of the working fluid, net power output and the system thermal efficiency will also increase. Consequently, total consumption of jet fuel could be significantly saved as well.

  13. FUEL CONSUMPTION EFFECT OF COMMERCIAL TURBOFANS ON GLOBAL WARMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onder Turan; T. Hikmet Karakoc [School of Civil Aviation, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2008-09-30

    The main objective pursued in this study is to parametrically investigate the fuel consumption effect of commercial turbofans on global warming. In this regard, Of the important parameters, specific fuel consumption of a commercial turbofans is taken into consideration. In order to minimize the effect of fuel consumption on global warming, the values of engine design parameters are optimized for maintaining minimum specific fuel consumption of high bypass turbofan engine under different flight conditions and design criteria. The backbones of optimization approach consisted of elitism-based genetic algorithm coupled with real parametric cycle analysis of a turbofan engine. For solving optimization problem a new software program is developed in MATLAB, while objective function is determined for minimizing the specific fuel consumption by considering the following parameters such as the fan pressure ratio ({pi}{sub f}), bypass ratio ({alpha}) and the fuel heating value [h{sub PR}-(kJ/kg)]. Accordingly, it may be concluded that the software program developed can successfully solve optimization problems at 1.2{le}{pi}{sub f}{le}2, 2{le}{alpha}{le}10 and 23000{le}h{sub PR}{le}120000 with aircraft flight Mach number {le}0.8. Fuel types used in preliminary engine cycle analysis were JP-4, JP-5, JP-8 and hydrogen in this paper.

  14. High-fidelity simulation of turbofan engine. ; Verification and improvement of model's dynamical characteristics in linear operating range. Turbofan engine no koseito simulation. ; Senkei sado han'i ni okeru model dotokusei no kensho to seido kojo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, H; Kagiyama, S [Defence Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-09-25

    This paper describes providing pulse inputs to a fuel supply in trial operation of a turbofan engine, measurement of its response, and calculation of the frequency characteristics and time constants to acquire dynamic characteristics of the engine on the ground. The resultant engine characteristics were compared with the model characteristics of numerically analyzing a mathematical simulation model, and corrected to develop a high-accuracy simulation model. An element model and a dynamics model were prepared in detail on the main engine components, such as fans, a compressor, a combustor, and a turbine, along a flow diagram from the air intake opening to the exhaust nozzle. The pulses were inputted into the fuel supply by opening and closing an electromagnetic valve. Closing of the illustrated electromagnetic valve for about 0.7 second caused a difference (of phase and trend) in both characteristics of high and low frequencies as a result of pulse-like change in the flow rate. To correct the model characteristics, the combustion delay tie was set to 0.02 second upon considering the combustion delay time relative to the heat capacity of the combustor. Improvement in the model was verified as the phase characteristics was approximated to the engine characteristics. 13 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. 77 FR 6666 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S.A. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Adler, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 12 New....adler@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM... this AD, contact Martin Adler, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller...

  16. Modeling of Highly Instrumented Honeywell Turbofan Engine Tested with Ice Crystal Ingestion in the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Jones, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL), an altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, has been used to test a highly instrumented turbine engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. This is a continuation of the PSL testing that successfully duplicated the icing events that were experienced in a previous engine (serial LF01) during flight through ice crystal clouds, which was the first turbofan engine tested in PSL. This second model of the ALF502R-5A serial number LF11 is a highly instrumented version of the previous engine. The PSL facility provides a continuous cloud of ice crystals with controlled characteristics of size and concentration, which are ingested by the engine during operation at simulated altitudes. Several of the previous operating points tested in the LF01 engine were duplicated to confirm repeatability in LF11. The instrumentation included video cameras to visually illustrate the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor (LPC) exit guide vane region in order to confirm the ice accretion, which was suspected during the testing of the LF01. Traditional instrumentation included static pressure taps in the low pressure compressor inner and outer flow path walls, as well as total pressure and temperature rakes in the low pressure compressor region. The test data was utilized to determine the losses and blockages due to accretion in the exit guide vane region of the LPC. Multiple data points were analyzed with the Honeywell Customer Deck. A full engine roll back point was modeled with the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code. The mean line compressor flow analysis code with ice crystal modeling was utilized to estimate the parameters that indicate the risk of accretion, as well as to estimate the degree of blockage and losses caused by accretion during a full engine roll back point. The analysis provided additional validation of the icing risk parameters within the LPC, as well as the creation of models for

  17. Numerical modeling of turbulent evaporating gas-droplet two-phase flows in an afterburner diffusor of turbo-fan jet engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lixing; Zhang, Jian [Qinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1990-11-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent evaporating gas-droplet two-phase flows in an afterburner diffusor of turbofan jet engines are simulated here by a k-epsilon turbulence model and a particle trajectory model. Comparison of predicted gas velocity and temperature distributions with experimental results for the cases without liquid spray shows good agreement. Gas-droplet two-phase flow predictions give plausible droplet trajectories, fuel-vapor concentration distribution, gas-phase velocity and temperature field in the presence of liquid droplets. One run of computation with this method is made for a particular afterburner. The results indicate that the location of the atomizers is not favorable to flame stabilization and combustion efficiency. The proposed numerical modeling can also be adopted for optimization design and performance evaluation of afterburner combustors of turbofan jet engines. 7 refs.

  18. Design and analysis of annular combustion chamber of a low bypass turbofan engine in a jet trainer aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Priyant Mark

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The design of an annular combustion chamber in a gas turbine engine is the backbone of this paper. It is specifically designed for a low bypass turbofan engine in a jet trainer aircraft. The combustion chamber is positioned in between the compressor and turbine. It has to be designed based on the constant pressure, enthalpy addition process. The present methodology deals with the computation of the initial design parameters from benchmarking of real-time industry standards and arriving at optimized values. It is then studied for feasibility and finalized. Then the various dimensions of the combustor are calculated based on different empirical formulas. The air mass flow is then distributed across the zones of the combustor. The cooling requirement is met using the cooling holes. Finally the variations of parameters at different points are calculated. The whole combustion chamber is modeled using Siemens NX 8.0, a modeling software and presented. The model is then analyzed using various parameters at various stages and levels to determine the optimized design. The aerodynamic flow characteristics is simulated numerically by means of ANSYS 14.5 software suite. The air-fuel mixture, combustion-turbulence, thermal and cooling analysis is carried out. The analysis is performed at various scenarios and compared. The results are then presented in image outputs and graphs.

  19. A New Robust Tracking Control Design for Turbofan Engines: H∞/Leitmann Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muxuan Pan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a H ∞ /Leitmann approach to the robust tracking control design is presented for an uncertain dynamic system. This new method is developed in the following two steps. Firstly, a tracking dynamic system with simultaneous consideration of parameter uncertainty and noise is modeled based on a linear system and a reference model. Accordingly, a “nominal system” from the tracking system is defined and controlled by a H ∞ control to obtain the asymptotical stability and noise resistance. Secondly, by making use of a Lyapunov function and the norm boundedness, a new robust control with the “Leitmann approach” is designed to cope with the uncertainty. The two controls collaborate with each other to achieve “uniform tracking boundedness” and “uniform ultimate tracking boundedness”. The new approach is then applied to an aircraft turbofan control design, and the numerical simulation results show the prescribed performances of the closed-loop system and the advantage of the developed approach.

  20. 77 FR 10950 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ...- commanded engine IFSD of one or more engines, leading to an emergency or forced landing of the airplane... perform a removal and replacement of the ECU, and that the average labor rate is $85 per work-hour. A... or more engines, leading to an emergency or forced landing of the airplane. (f) Compliance Comply...

  1. 76 FR 64291 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... shop visit, but not later than 5,500 cycles-in-service (CIS) since the last engine shop visit where the... next engine shop visit, but not later than 5,500 cycles-in- service (CIS) since the last engine shop... than a ``CORRECT FLOW'' packing using paragraph 3.A.(1).(b) of the Accomplishment Instructions of SB No...

  2. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  3. 76 FR 72130 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT9D Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen Sheely, Aerospace Engineer, Engine & Propeller Directorate, FAA, 12...: stephen[email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited We invite you to send any written....'' (g) Except as provided in paragraph (h) of this AD, and notwithstanding contrary provisions in...

  4. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 1; Setup_BFaNS User's Manual and Developer's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the first volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User's Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by step-by-step instructions for installing and running Setup_BFaNS. It concludes with technical documentation of the Setup_BFaNS computer program.

  5. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 2; BFaNS User's Manual and Developer's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the second volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by step-by-step instructions for installing and running BFaNS. It concludes with technical documentation of the BFaNS computer program.

  6. Analysis of Uncertainties in Infrared Camera Measurements of a Turbofan Engine in an Altitude Test Cell

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morris, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    ... from the facility structure, hot exhaust gases, and the measurement equipment itself. The atmosphere and a protective ZnSe window that shields the camera from the hot engine exhaust also introduce measurement uncertainty due to attenuation...

  7. Continuous-Scan Phased Array Measurement Methods for Turbofan Engine Acoustic Testing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes an SBIR project to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of a method for measuring phased array acoustic data for...

  8. Continuous-Scan Phased Array Measurement Methods for Turbofan Engine Acoustic Testing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To allow aviation growth to continue in the face of increasingly stringent noise pollution standards, new aircraft engines must be designed with noise performance as...

  9. Parallel Hybrid Gas-Electric Geared Turbofan Engine Conceptual Design and Benefits Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lents, Charles; Hardin, Larry; Rheaume, Jonathan; Kohlman, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design of a parallel gas-electric hybrid propulsion system for a conventional single aisle twin engine tube and wing vehicle has been developed. The study baseline vehicle and engine technology are discussed, followed by results of the hybrid propulsion system sizing and performance analysis. The weights analysis for the electric energy storage & conversion system and thermal management system is described. Finally, the potential system benefits are assessed.

  10. Analysis of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. It is possible that future designs will continue this trend, leading to very-high or ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. Regardless of the engine architecture chosen, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  11. Full-Scale Turbofan-Engine Turbine-Transfer Function Determination Using Three Internal Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques, using three engine-internal sensors, are applied to existing static-engine test data to determine the turbine transfer function for the currently subdominant combustion noise. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) and an improvement to the combustion-noise module GECOR is suggested. The work was carried out in response to the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Program s Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF SPECIFIC FUEL CONSUMPTION OF HYDROGEN IN COMMERCIAL TURBOFANS FOR REDUCING GLOBAL WARMING EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Hikmet Karakoc; Onder Turan [School of Civil Aviation, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2008-09-30

    The main objective of the present study is to perform minimizing specific fuel consumption of a non afterburning high bypass turbofan engine with separate exhaust streams and unmixed flow for reducing global effect. The values of engine design parameters are optimized for maintaining minimum specific fuel consumption of high bypass turbofan engine under different flight conditions, different fuel types and design criteria. The backbones of optimization approach consisted of elitism-based genetic algorithm coupled with real parametric cycle analysis of a turbofan engine. For solving optimization problem a new software program is developed in MATLAB programming language, while objective function is determined for minimizing the specific fuel consumption. The input variables included the compressor pressure ratio ({pi}{sub c}), bypass ratio ({alpha}) and the fuel heating value [h{sub PR}-(kJ/kg)]. Hydrogen was selected as fuel type in real parametric cycle analysis of commercial turbofans. It may be concluded that the software program developed can successfully solve optimization problems at 10{le}{pi}{sub c}{le}20, 2{le}{alpha}{le}10 and h{sub PR} 120,000 with aircraft flight Mach number {le}0.8.

  13. 75 FR 31330 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... bearing oil pressure tubes found cracked that led to unscheduled engine removals, and one report of a test... Web site, anyone can find and read the comments in any of our dockets, including, if provided, the... bearing oil pressure tube, and that the tube was previously weld- repaired. That fire led to failure of...

  14. A comparison of optimum JP and LH2 turbofan engines designed for two subsonic transport missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civinskas, K. C.

    1974-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen fuel instead of JP fuel for two subsonic commercial transports was examined. The following determinations which are important to meeting noise reduction requirements were calculated: (1) take off gross weight, (2) energy consumption, and (3) direct operating costs. The optimum engine cycles were found to be the same for both fuels.

  15. 78 FR 2195 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... of silver chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking of the HP compressor stages 1 to 6 rotor disc...: Silver chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking was identified during overhaul of a BR700-715 engine... send any written relevant data, views, or arguments about this AD. Send your comments to an address...

  16. 77 FR 2932 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ...-pressure (IP) compressor rotor shaft rear balance land for cracks, which could lead to engine failure. This...; fax: 011-44-1332-245418 or email from http://www.rolls-royce.com/contact/civil_team.jsp . You may..., 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA; phone: (781) 238-7143; fax: (781) 238-7199; email...

  17. Assessment of engine noise shielding by the wings of current turbofan aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Vieira, A.E.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.; Gibbs, B.

    2017-01-01

    The shielding of engine noise by the aircraft wings and fuselage can lead to a significant reduction on perceived noise on ground. Most research on noise shielding is focused on BlendedWing Body (BWB) configurations because of the large dimension of the fuselage. However, noise shielding is also

  18. Thrust Performance Evaluation of a Turbofan Engine Based on Exergetic Approach and Thrust Management in Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Enver

    2017-05-01

    The environmental parameters such as temperature and air pressure which are changing depending on altitudes are effective on thrust and fuel consumption of aircraft engines. In flights with long routes, thrust management function in airplane information system has a structure that ensures altitude and performance management. This study focused on thrust changes throughout all flight were examined by taking into consideration their energy and exergy performances for fuel consumption of an aircraft engine used in flight with long route were taken as reference. The energetic and exergetic performance evaluations were made under the various altitude conditions. The thrust changes for different altitude conditions were obtained to be at 86.53 % in descending direction and at 142.58 % in ascending direction while the energy and exergy efficiency changes for the referenced engine were found to be at 80.77 % and 84.45 %, respectively. The results revealed here can be helpful to manage thrust and reduce fuel consumption, but engine performance will be in accordance with operation requirements.

  19. Particle Trajectory and Icing Analysis of the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Particle trajectory and ice shape calculations were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The particle trajectory and icing computations were performed using the new "block-to-block" collection efficiency method which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for three drop sizes and two drop distributions typically used in aircraft design and certification. Particle trajectory computations were made for water drop sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns. Particle trajectory and ice shape predictions were made for a 20 micron Langmuir-D distribution and for a 92 mm Super-cooled Large Droplet (SLD) distribution with and without splashing effects for a Liquid Water Content (LWC) of 0.3 g/cu m and an icing time of 30 min. The E3 fan and spinner combination proved to be an effective ice removal mechanism as they removed greater than 36 percent of the mass entering the inlet for the icing cases. The maximum free stream catch fraction for the fan and spinner combination was 0.60 while that on the elements downstream of the fan was 0.03. The non-splashing trajectory and collection efficiency results showed that as drop size increased impingement rates increased on the spinner and fan leaving less mass to impinge on downstream components. The SLD splashing case yielded more mass downstream of the fan than the SLD non-splashing case due to mass being splashed from the upstream inlet lip, spinner and fan components. The ice shapes generated downstream of the fan were either small or nonexistent due to the small available mass

  20. Review of Turbofan-Engine Combustion and Jet-Noise Research and Related Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Induction-Motor Research Vehicle at DOT’s High-Speed Ground Test Center m44r Pueblo, Colorado; the other was the Bertin Aerotrain developed by the French...noise level at probable microphone locations and because the maximum vehicle speed was significantly less than desired. The Aerotrain was not considered...an ideal facility because (1) the test hardware would have to be sized for the nozzle of the J-85 engine used to propel the Aerotrain along the track

  1. Validation of an Integrated Airframe and Turbofan Engine Simulation for Evaluation of Propulsion Control Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T Shane; Liu, Yuan; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed independent airframe and engine models that have been integrated into a single real-time aircraft simulation for piloted evaluation of propulsion control algorithms. In order to have confidence in the results of these evaluations, the integrated simulation must be validated to demonstrate that its behavior is realistic and that it meets the appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requirements for aircraft. The paper describes the test procedures and results, demonstrating that the integrated simulation generally meets the FAA requirements and is thus a valid testbed for evaluation of propulsion control modes.

  2. Health Parameter Estimation with Second-Order Sliding Mode Observer for a Turbofan Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Chang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of health parameter estimation in an aero-engine is investigated by using an unknown input observer-based methodology, implemented by a second-order sliding mode observer (SOSMO. Unlike the conventional state estimator-based schemes, such as Kalman filters (KF and sliding mode observers (SMO, the proposed scheme uses a “reconstruction signal” to estimate health parameters modeled as artificial inputs, and is not only applicable to long-time health degradation, but reacts much quicker in handling abrupt fault cases. In view of the inevitable uncertainties in engine dynamics and modeling, a weighting matrix is created to minimize such effect on estimation by using the linear matrix inequalities (LMI. A big step toward uncertainty modeling is taken compared with our previous SMO-based work, in that uncertainties are considered in a more practical form. Moreover, to avoid chattering in sliding modes, the super-twisting algorithm (STA is employed in observer design. Various simulations are carried out, based on the comparisons between the KF-based scheme, the SMO-based scheme in our earlier research, and the proposed method. The results consistently demonstrate the capabilities and advantages of the proposed approach in health parameter estimation.

  3. Extending the Operational Envelope of a Turbofan Engine Simulation into the Sub-Idle Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jeffryes Walter; Hamley, Andrew J.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    In many non-linear gas turbine simulations, operation in the sub-idle region can lead to model instability. This paper lays out a method for extending the operational envelope of a map based gas turbine simulation to include the sub-idle region. This method develops a multi-simulation solution where the baseline component maps are extrapolated below the idle level and an alternate model is developed to serve as a safety net when the baseline model becomes unstable or unreliable. Sub-idle model development takes place in two distinct operational areas, windmilling/shutdown and purge/cranking/startup. These models are based on derived steady state operating points with transient values extrapolated between initial (known) and final (assumed) states. Model transitioning logic is developed to predict baseline model sub-idle instability, and transition smoothly and stably to the backup sub-idle model. Results from the simulation show a realistic approximation of sub-idle behavior as compared to generic sub-idle engine performance that allows the engine to operate continuously and stably from shutdown to full power.

  4. Turbofan engine diagnostics neuron network size optimization method which takes into account overlaerning effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.С. Якушенко

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article is devoted to the problem of gas turbine engine (GTE technical state class automatic recognition with operation parameters by neuron networks. The one of main problems for creation the neuron networks is determination of their optimal structures size (amount of layers in network and count of neurons in each layer.The method of neuron network size optimization intended for classification of GTE technical state is considered in the article. Optimization is cared out with taking into account of overlearning effect possibility when a learning network loses property of generalization and begins strictly describing educational data set. To determinate a moment when overlearning effect is appeared in learning neuron network the method  of three data sets is used. The method is based on the comparison of recognition quality parameters changes which were calculated during recognition of educational and control data sets. As the moment when network overlearning effect is appeared the moment when control data set recognition quality begins deteriorating but educational data set recognition quality continues still improving is used. To determinate this moment learning process periodically is terminated and simulation of network with education and control data sets is fulfilled. The optimization of two-, three- and four-layer networks is conducted and some results of optimization are shown. Also the extended educational set is created and shown. The set describes 16 GTE technical state classes and each class is represented with 200 points (200 possible technical state class realizations instead of 20 points using in the former articles. It was done to increase representativeness of data set.In the article the algorithm of optimization is considered and some results which were obtained with it are shown. The results of experiments were analyzed to determinate most optimal neuron network structure. This structure provides most high-quality GTE

  5. Development of a Twin-Spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3% of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  6. Development of a Twin-spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Johathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3 of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  7. Separating Direct and Indirect Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise While Estimating Post-Combustion (Post-Flame) Residence Time Using the Correlation Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-01-01

    A previous investigation on the presence of direct and indirect combustion noise for a full-scale turbofan engine using a far-field microphone at 130 is extended by also examining signals obtained at two additional downstream directions using far-field microphones at 110 deg and 160 deg. A generalized cross-correlation function technique is used to study the change in propagation time to the far field of the combined direct and indirect combustion noise signal as a sequence of low-pass filters are applied. The filtering procedure used produces no phase distortion. As the low-pass filter frequency is decreased, the travel time increases because the relative amount of direct combustion noise is reduced. The indirect combustion noise signal travels more slowly because in the combustor entropy fluctuations move with the flow velocity, which is slow compared to the local speed of sound. The indirect combustion noise signal travels at acoustic velocities after reaching the turbine and being converted into an acoustic signal. The direct combustion noise is always propagating at acoustic velocities. The results show that the estimated indirect combustion noise time delay values (post-combustion residence times) measured at each angle are fairly consistent with one another for a relevant range of operating conditions and demonstrate source separation of a mixture of direct and indirect combustion noise. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting turbofan engine core noise.

  8. BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO AT DIESEL ENGINES

    OpenAIRE

    Radivoje B Pešić; Saša T Milojević; Stevan P Veinović

    2010-01-01

    The compression ratio strongly affects the working process and provides an exceptional degree of control over engine performance. In conventional internal combustion engines, the compression ratio is fixed and their performance is therefore a compromise between conflicting requirements. One fundamental problem is that drive units in the vehicles must successfully operate at variable speeds and loads and in different ambient conditions. If a diesel engine has a fixed compression ratio, a minim...

  9. Canadian Forces Experience with Turbofan HCF - Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinart, Corey; Theriault, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) cracking of a Canadian Forces (CF) turbofan engine fuel tube resulted in a six year, multinational effort to identify the root cause and to ultimately develop and implement a solution...

  10. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  11. Development of FJR710 turbofan engine and its operation with STOL research aircraft ASUKA''. FJR710 turbofan engine no kaihatsu to STOL jikkenki asuka ni yoru un prime yo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, H; Morita, M; Sasaki, M [National Aerospace Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

    1990-07-05

    Flight experiment of ASUKA, STOL experimental m/c ended in March, 1990. In order to successively meet the future airplane development, operations have been operated to collect the technical results obtained from the development of experimental machines, flight experiment and related ground tests to form a data base. This report outlines the process of development of the FJR engines, and outlined the aerial engine test, the status of engine operation and the result of developing the reliability enhancement which has been conducted also after the end of the operations. It was demonstrated by the flight experiment of the experimental machine that such methods as the engine matching adopted in the engine mounting, nacelle design and engine mounting design were appropriate. The results of the technical development for the reliability improvement which had been in parallel were applied to the mounted engine and controlled to the safe and efficient flight experiments. 11 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO AT DIESEL ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoje B Pešić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The compression ratio strongly affects the working process and provides an exceptional degree of control over engine performance. In conventional internal combustion engines, the compression ratio is fixed and their performance is therefore a compromise between conflicting requirements. One fundamental problem is that drive units in the vehicles must successfully operate at variable speeds and loads and in different ambient conditions. If a diesel engine has a fixed compression ratio, a minimal value must be chosen that can achieve a reliable self-ignition when starting the engine in cold start conditions. In diesel engines, variable compression ratio provides control of peak cylinder pressure, improves cold start ability and low load operation, enabling the multi-fuel capability, increase of fuel economy and reduction of emissions. This paper contains both theoretical and experimental investigation of the impact that automatic variable compression ratios has on working process parameters in experimental diesel engine. Alternative methods of implementing variable compression ratio are illustrated and critically examined.

  13. 76 FR 77107 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Corp. (PW) JT9D-7R4H1 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen K. Sheely, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office...; email: stephen[email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed... AD, remove the HPC shaft from service before exceeding 5,000 CSN. (h) Engines With an HPC Shaft, P/N...

  14. 76 FR 8620 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... inspection AD 97-17-04R1, and to allow automatic eddy current inspection per engine manual Section 72-33-31.... That AD currently requires revisions to the engine manufacturer's time limits section (TLS) to include... modifies the TLS of the manufacturer's engine manual and an air carrier's approved continuous airworthiness...

  15. Hige Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heywood, John [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Jo, Young Suk [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lewis, Raymond [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Bromberg, Leslie [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Heywood, John [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-01-29

    The overall objective of this project was to quantify the potential for improving the performance and efficiency of gasoline engine technology by use of alcohols to suppress knock. Knock-free operation is obtained by direct injection of a second “anti-knock” fuel such as ethanol, which suppresses knock when, with gasoline fuel, knock would occur. Suppressing knock enables increased turbocharging, engine downsizing, and use of higher compression ratios throughout the engine’s operating map. This project combined engine testing and simulation to define knock onset conditions, with different mixtures of gasoline and alcohol, and with this information quantify the potential for improving the efficiency of turbocharged gasoline spark-ignition engines, and the on-vehicle fuel consumption reductions that could then be realized. The more focused objectives of this project were therefore to: Determine engine efficiency with aggressive turbocharging and downsizing and high compression ratio (up to a compression ratio of 13.5:1) over the engine’s operating range; Determine the knock limits of a turbocharged and downsized engine as a function of engine speed and load; Determine the amount of the knock-suppressing alcohol fuel consumed, through the use of various alcohol-gasoline and alcohol-water gasoline blends, for different driving cycles, relative to the gasoline consumed; Determine implications of using alcohol-boosted engines, with their higher efficiency operation, in both light-duty and medium-duty vehicle sectors.

  16. A new approach to the design of the large turbofan power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, G L [Economobile Projects Ltd., Belper (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01

    The lower direct operating costs of the Big Twin subsonic transports encourage the building of ever larger turbofan engines installed on the wings. The steadily improving reliability of the turbofan and the good safety statistics of twin-engined aircraft over many years encourages this trend. Fuel economy is still the dominant factor in determining the design layout of turbofan engines. It requires the combination of the highest possible thermal efficiency of the gas generator core of the engine with optimum propulsion efficiency of the power plant as a whole in cruise flight, allowing for engine nacelle drag and nacelle to wing interference drag. The paper presents two possible turbofan design layouts intended to overcome the limitation of current turbofan power plant designs. The aim is to design a power plant with the highest thrust per unit frontal area combined with the highest air miles per gallon in cruise flight. (author)

  17. Výhody a nevýhody motoru koncepce "Geared Turbofan"

    OpenAIRE

    Marko, Libor

    2012-01-01

    Práca popisuje historický vývoj turbodúchadlových motorov, ktorý súvisí zo zvyšovaním hodnoty obtokového pomeru. Obsahuje základné charakteristiky turbodúchadlových motorov a princíp práce komponentov motora. Súčasťou práce je popis výhod a nevýhod motora koncepcie Geared Turbofan v porovnaní s konvenčnými turbodúchadlovými motormi rovnakej triedy ťahu. The thesis describes the historical development of turbofan engines, which relates to the increase in amount of bypass ratio. It contains ...

  18. 76 FR 30529 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... Compliance One commenter, American Airlines, asked us to change the Costs of Compliance Section of the... engine shop visit.'' Request To Clarify the Compliance Time One commenter, American Airlines, asked us to... installed engines were on U.S. registered airplanes. We changed the Costs of Compliance Section from ``90...

  19. Alternative Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Poulsen, Jannik; Olsen, Mads Bruun

    1996-01-01

    In earlier work it has been shown that a nonlinear observer based on the use of the manifold pressure state equation and a nonlinear fuel film compensator can maintain accurate A/F ratio control during both steady state and transient operation. This observer may be called a manifold absolute pres...... engine control system designer with a variety of robust control systems which can easily be made redundant in order to satisfy newer engine emissions and diagnosis requirements and legislation...

  20. Modeling the Effects of Ice Accretion on the Low Pressure Compressor and the Overall Turbofan Engine System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wright, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on utilizing a mean line compressor flow analysis code coupled to an engine system thermodynamic code, to estimate the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper a temperature range in which engine icing would occur was assumed. This provided a mechanism to locate potential component icing sites and allow the computational tools to add blockages due to ice accretion in a parametric fashion. Ultimately the location and level of blockage due to icing would be provided by an ice accretion code. To proceed, an engine system modeling code and a mean line compressor flow analysis code were utilized to calculate the flow conditions in the fan-core and low pressure compressor and to identify potential locations within the compressor where ice may accrete. In this study, an "additional blockage" due to the accretion of ice on the metal surfaces, has been added to the baseline aerodynamic blockage due to boundary layer, as well as the blade metal blockage. Once the potential locations of ice accretion are identified, the levels of additional blockage due to accretion were parametrically varied to estimate the effects on the low pressure compressor blade row performance operating within the engine system environment. This study includes detailed analysis of compressor and engine performance during cruise and descent operating conditions at several altitudes within the notional flight trajectory. The purpose of this effort is to develop the computer codes to provide a predictive capability to forecast the onset of engine icing events, such that they could ultimately help in the avoidance of these events.

  1. Alvar engine. An engine with variable compression ratio. Experiments and tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, Olof

    1998-09-01

    This report is focused on tests with Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engines, according to the Alvar engine principle. Variable compression ratio means an engine design where it is possible to change the nominal compression ratio. The purpose is to increase the fuel efficiency at part load by increasing the compression ratio. At maximum load, and maybe supercharging with for example turbocharger, it is not possible to keep a high compression ratio because of the knock phenomena. Knock is a shock wave caused by self-ignition of the fuel-air mix. If knock occurs, the engine will be exposed to a destructive load. Because of the reasons mentioned it would be an advantage if it would be possible to change the compression ratio continuously when the load changes. The Alvar engine provides a solution for variable compression ratio based on well-known engine components. This paper provides information about efficiency and emission characteristics from tests with two Alvar engines. Results from tests with a phase shift mechanism (for automatic compression ratio control) for the Alvar engine are also reviewed Examination paper. 5 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs, 5 appendices

  2. Noise-Source Separation Using Internal and Far-Field Sensors for a Full-Scale Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Miles, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-source separation techniques for the extraction of the sub-dominant combustion noise from the total noise signatures obtained in static-engine tests are described. Three methods are applied to data from a static, full-scale engine test. Both 1/3-octave and narrow-band results are discussed. The results are used to assess the combustion-noise prediction capability of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). A new additional phase-angle-based discriminator for the three-signal method is also introduced.

  3. A Parametric Study of Actuator Requirements for Active Turbine Tip Clearance Control of a Modern High Bypass Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jonathan L.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of aircraft gas turbine engines is sensitive to the distance between the tips of its turbine blades and its shroud, which serves as its containment structure. Maintaining tighter clearance between these components has been shown to increase turbine efficiency, increase fuel efficiency, and reduce the turbine inlet temperature, and this correlates to a longer time-on-wing for the engine. Therefore, there is a desire to maintain a tight clearance in the turbine, which requires fast response active clearance control. Fast response active tip clearance control will require an actuator to modify the physical or effective tip clearance in the turbine. This paper evaluates the requirements of a generic active turbine tip clearance actuator for a modern commercial aircraft engine using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software that has previously been integrated with a dynamic tip clearance model. A parametric study was performed in an attempt to evaluate requirements for control actuators in terms of bandwidth, rate limits, saturation limits, and deadband. Constraints on the weight of the actuation system and some considerations as to the force which the actuator must be capable of exerting and maintaining are also investigated. From the results, the relevant range of the evaluated actuator parameters can be extracted. Some additional discussion is provided on the challenges posed by the tip clearance control problem and the implications for future small core aircraft engines.

  4. 75 FR 45560 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ...-0755; Directorate Identifier 2010-NE-12-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR... based on engine thrust rating but now based on operating shaft speeds) introduced by Rolls- Royce. The...-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom: Telephone 44 (0) 1332 242424; fax 44 (0) 1332...

  5. 75 FR 15326 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 500, 700, and 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... ambient conditions, ice can accumulate on the walls of the fuel pipes within the aircraft fuel system... aircraft in combination with Rolls-Royce engines that feature similar fuel systems to the RB211-Trent 800... the aircraft fuel system, which can then be released downstream when fuel flow demand is increased...

  6. THE EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO VARIATIONS ON THE ENGINE PERFORMANCE PARAMETRES IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of the spark ignition engines may be increased by changing the geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging in cylinders. The designed geometrical compression ratio can be realized as an effective compression ratio under the full load and full open throttle conditions since the effective compression ratio changes with the amount of charging into the cylinder in spark ignition engines. So, this condition of the spark ignition engines forces designers to change their geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging into the cylinder for improvement of performance and fuel economy. In order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy, power output, exhaust emissions at partial loads, compression ratio must be increased; but, under high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running the compression ratio must be decreased gradually. In this paper, relation of the performance parameters to compression ratio such as power, torque, specific fuel consumption, cylindir pressure, exhaust gas temperature, combustion chamber surface area/volume ratio, thermal efficiency, spark timing etc. in spark ignition engines have been investigated and using of engines with variable compression ratio is suggested to fuel economy and more clear environment.

  7. Tamanu oil. An alternative fuel for variable compression ratio engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Mohan T. [SASTRA Univ., Thanjavur, Tamilnadu (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kandasamy, Murugumohan Kumar K. [Pavendar Bharathidasan College of Engineering and Technology, Trichy, Tamilnadu (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2012-11-01

    Biodiesel can be produced from vegetable oils and also from waste fats. Biodiesel is a monoalkyl- ester of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable feedstock such as vegetable oils by transesterification process. The esterified cotton seed oil, pungam oil, rice bran oil, and tamanu oil are chosen as the alternative fuels. Among these oils, tamanu oil is considered for the first time as an alternative fuel. An experiment is conducted to obtain the operating characteristics of the variable compression ratio (VCR) engine run by chosen esterified oils, and the results are compared with esterified tamanu oil. From the comparison of results, it is inferred that the engine performance is improved with significant reduction in emissions for the chosen oils without any engine modification. The effective compression ratio can be fixed based on the experimental results obtained in the engine since the findings of the present research work infer that the biodiesel obtained from tamanu oil is a promising alternative fuel for direct-injection four-stroke VCR engine. (orig.)

  8. Trend of supersonic aircraft engine. Choonsokukiyo engine no doko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashima, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-05-01

    The present paper explained the R and D trend of supersonic aircraft engine in Europe, USA and Japan. Taking the high speed flight resistance into consideration, the engine must be characterized by its high exhaust gas speed and high specific thrust (ratio of thrust to the airflow rate) to secure strong thrust by a low airflow rate. Therefore, the turbojet is appropriate. However to reduce the fuel consumption during the cruising flight, the turbofan is normally used with a low by-pass ratio of 0.2 to 0.9. The thrust-to-weight ratio (thrust per unit weight) of low by-pass ratio turbofan engine equipped with afterburner is 7 to 8 in case of stronger thrust than 70kN. Its target value of development is 10. The specific thrust which is a performance parameter of engine exceeds 120s for the fighter engine and is about 30s for the passenger plane engine. The turbine inlet temperature is 2073K at the stage of element research. The overall pressure ratio ranges from 25 to 30. The reheating turbofan engine experimentally built for the research in Japan is 34kN in thrust and 7 in thrust-to-weight ratio. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Combustion engine variable compression ratio apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence,; Keith, E [Peoria, IL; Strawbridge, Bryan E [Dunlap, IL; Dutart, Charles H [Washington, IL

    2006-06-06

    An apparatus and method for varying a compression ratio of an engine having a block and a head mounted thereto. The apparatus and method includes a cylinder having a block portion and a head portion, a piston linearly movable in the block portion of the cylinder, a cylinder plug linearly movable in the head portion of the cylinder, and a valve located in the cylinder plug and operable to provide controlled fluid communication with the block portion of the cylinder.

  10. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  11. The Promise and Challenges of Ultra High Bypass Ratio Engine Technology and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, an overview of the research being conducted by the ERA Project in Ultra High Bypass aircraft propulsion and in partnership with Pratt & Whitney with their Geared TurboFan (GTF) is given. The ERA goals are shown followed by a discussion of what areas need to be addressed on the engine to achieve the goals and how the GTF is uniquely qualified to meet the goals through a discussion of what benefits the cycle provides. The first generation GTF architecture is then shown highlighting the areas of collaboration with NASA, and the fuel burn, noise and emissions reductions possible based on initial static ground test and flight test data of the first GTF engine. Finally, a 5 year technology roadmap is presented focusing on Ultra High Bypass propulsion technology research areas that are being pursued and being planned by ERA and P&W under their GTF program.

  12. Dynamic Performance of High Bypass Ratio Turbine Engines With Water Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1996-01-01

    The research on dynamic performance of high bypass turbofan engines includes studies on inlets, turbomachinery and the total engine system operating with air-water mixture; the water may be in vapor, droplet, or film form, and their combinations. Prediction codes (WISGS, WINCOF, WINCOF-1, WINCLR, and Transient Engine Performance Code) for performance changes, as well as changes in blade-casing clearance, have been established and demonstrated in application to actual, generic engines. In view of the continuous changes in water distribution in turbomachinery, the performance of both components and the total engine system must be determined in a time-dependent mode; hence, the determination of clearance changes also requires a time-dependent approach. In general, the performance and clearances changes cannot be scaled either with respect to operating or ingestion conditions. Removal of water prior to phase change is the most effective means of avoiding ingestion effects. Sufficient background has been established to perform definitive, full scale tests on a set of components and a complete engine to establish engine control and operability with various air-water vapor-water mixtures.

  13. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  14. Efficient, Low Pressure Ratio Propulsor for Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Monzon, Byron R. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a bypass flow passage that has an inlet and defines a bypass ratio in a range of approximately 8.5 to 13.5. A fan is arranged within the bypass flow passage. A first turbine is a 5-stage turbine and is coupled with a first shaft, which is coupled with the fan. A first compressor is coupled with the first shaft and is a 3-stage compressor. A second turbine is coupled with a second shaft and is a 2-stage turbine. The fan includes a row of fan blades that extend from a hub. The row includes a number (N) of the fan blades, a solidity value (R) at tips of the fab blades, and a ratio of N/R that is from 14 to 16.

  15. A Study on the Effects of Compression Ratio, Engine Speed and Equivalence Ratio on HCCI Combustion of DME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion of Dimethyl Ether (DME). The study was performed as a parameter variation of engine speed and compression ratio on excess air ratios of approximately 2.5, 3 and 4. The compression ratio...... was adjusted in steps to find suitable regions of operation, and the effect of engine speed was studied at 1000, 2000 and 3000 RPM. It was found that leaner excess air ratios require higher compression ratios to achieve satisfactory combustion. Engine speed also affects operation significantly....

  16. A Model to Assess the Risk of Ice Accretion Due to Ice Crystal Ingestion in a Turbofan Engine and its Effects on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Wright, William B.; Struk, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that were attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was one or more of the following anomalies: degraded engine performance, engine roll back, compressor surge and stall, and flameout of the combustor. The main focus of this research is the development of a computational tool that can estimate whether there is a risk of ice accretion by tracking key parameters through the compression system blade rows at all engine operating points within the flight trajectory. The tool has an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, coupled with a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor blade rows. Assumptions are made to predict the complex physics involved in engine icing. Specifically, the code does not directly estimate ice accretion and does not have models for particle breakup or erosion. Two key parameters have been suggested as conditions that must be met at the same location for ice accretion to occur: the local wet-bulb temperature to be near freezing or below and the local melt ratio must be above 10%. These parameters were deduced from analyzing laboratory icing test data and are the criteria used to predict the possibility of ice accretion within an engine including the specific blade row where it could occur. Once the possibility of accretion is determined from these parameters, the degree of blockage due to ice accretion on the local stator vane can be estimated from an empirical model of ice growth rate and time spent at that operating point in the flight trajectory. The computational tool can be used to assess specific turbine engines to their susceptibility to

  17. Preliminary study of advanced turbofans for low energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knip, G.

    1975-01-01

    This analysis determines the effect of higher overall engine pressure ratios (OPR's), bypass ratios (BPR's), and turbine rotor-inlet temperature on a Mach-0.85 transport having a range of 5556 km (3000 nmi) and carrying a payload of 18144 kg (40,000 lbs-200 passengers). Sideline noises (jet plus fan) of between 91 and 106 EPNdB (FAR36) are considered. Takeoff gross weight (TOGW), fuel consumption (kg/pass. km) and direct operating cost (DOC) are used at the figures of merit. Based on predicted 1985 levels of engine technology and a noise goal of 96 EPNdB, the higher-OPR engine results in an airplane that is 18 percent lighter in terms of TOGW, uses 22.3 percent less fuel, and has a 14.7 percent lower DOC than a comparable airplane powered by a current turbofan. Cooling the compressor bleed air and lowering the cruise Mach number appear attractive in terms of further improving the figures of merit.

  18. Computational Method for Ice Crystal Trajectories in a Turbofan Compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, E.J.; Norde, Ellen; van der Weide, Edwin Theodorus Antonius; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this study the characteristics of ice crystals on their trajectory in a single stage of a turbofan engine compressor are determined. The particle trajectories are calculated with a Lagrangian method employing a classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta time integration scheme. The air flow field is

  19. Numerical simulations on increasing turbojet engines exhaust mixture ratio using fluidic chevrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian GRUZEA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper refers to some aspects regarding the terms “chevron” and “fluidic chevron” and to the process of increasing the jet engines exhaust mixing rate towards achieving noise reduction. One of the noise reduction methods consists in covering the high velocity main flow with a secondary one, having a much lower velocity, similar to the turbofan engines. The fluidic chevrons try to accomplish these requirements, being used just in particular moments of the flight. This study will be based on numerical simulations carried using the commercial software ANSYS. The geometry used will the based on the micro jet engine JetCat P80, equipping the turbines laboratory from the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering. A research based on the measured geometric, gasodynamic and cinematic parameters will be carried varying the mass flow and keeping the immersion angle constant. As a result of these simulations we’ll observe the influence of the mentioned parameters on the jet’s flow field.

  20. A Study on the Effects of Compression Ratio, Engine Speed and Equivalence Ratio on HCCI Combustion of DME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion of Dimethyl Ether (DME). The study was performed as a parameter variation of engine speed and compression ratio on excess air ratios of approximately 2.5, 3 and 4. The compression ratio was...

  1. Trends in aircraft engines. Trends in aircraft gas turbines and subsonic engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murashima, Kanji

    1988-06-10

    While the emphasis of commercial, large aircraft engines is placed on low fuel consumption at high subsonic flight and the turbofan engines with high bypass ratio are dominating, high speed turboprop (ATP) of Mach 0.85 class with low fuel consumption are emerging. UHB with bypass ratio of 15 - 20 are planned with expection for application to intermediate size commercial planes. The pressure ratio is continuously rizing for improved cycle efficiency, reaching 35 - 40 in highest cases. Trends in design technique include: Use of computational aerodynamics and application of two-dimensional structural analysis and the digital simulation of engine characteristics. In the field of large, high bypass turbofan, serious competition is seen between GE and PNA at the thrust level of 5 - 60,000 pounds. Several engines for fighting planes have been approved in the type test and accepted as candidates for next generation of fighting planes including Japan. (15 figs, 36 refs)

  2. Turbofan compressor dynamics during afterburner transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of afterburner light-off and shut-down transients on the compressor stability are investigated. The reported experimental results are based on detailed high response pressure and temperature measurements on the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine. The tests were performed in an altitude test chamber simulating high altitude engine operation. It is shown that during both types of transients, flow breaks down in the forward part of the fan bypass duct. At a sufficiently low engine inlet pressure this resulted in a compressor stall. Complete flow breakdown within the compressor was preceded by a rotating stall. At some locations in the compressor, rotating stall cells initially extended only through part of the blade span. For the shutdown transient the time between first and last detected occurrence of rotating stall is related to the flow Reynolds number. An attempt was made to deduce the number and speed of propagation of rotating stall cells.

  3. Engineering feasibility of tight aspect ratio Tokamak (spherical torus) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y-K.M.; Hicks, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Engineering solutions are identified and analyzed for key high-power-density components of tight aspect ratio tokamak reactors (spherical torus reactors). The potentially extreme divertor heat loads can be reduced to about 3 MW/m 2 in expanded divertors using coils inside the demountable toroidal field coils. Given the long and narrow divertor channels, gaseous divertor targets become possible, which eliminate sputtering and increase the divertor life. The unshielded centre conductor post (CCP) of the toroidal field coil can be made of a single dispersion strengthened copper conductor cooled by high-velocity pressurized water to maintain acceptable copper temperature and strength. Damage and activation of the CCP at a neutron fluence of 10 MW-a/m 2 are also tolerable. Annual replacement of the centre post, the divertor assemblies and the blanket can be accomplished with vertical access for all torus components, which are modularized to reduce size and weight. The technical requirements of these solutions are shown to be comparable with, if not less demanding than, those estimated for conventional tokamak reactors. (author)

  4. Technique for Selecting Optimum Fan Compression Ratio based on the Effective Power Plant Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Kondrashov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, civilian aircrafts occupy the major share of global aviation industry market. As to medium and long - haul aircrafts, turbofans with separate exhaust streams are widely used. Here, fuel efficiency is the main criterion of this engine. The paper presents the research results of the mutual influence of fan pressure ratio and bypass ratio on the effective specific fuel consumption. Shows the increasing bypass ratio to be a rational step for reducing the fuel consumption. Also considers the basic features of engines with a high bypass ratio. Among the other working process parameters, fan pressure ratio and bypass ratio are the most relevant for consideration as they are the most structural variables at a given level of technical excellence. The paper presents the dependence of the nacelle drag coefficient on the engine bypass ratio. For computation were adopted the projected parameters of prospective turbofans to be used in the power plant of the 180-seat medium-haul aircraft. Computation of the engine cycle was performed in Mathcad using these data, with fan pressure ratio and bypass ratio being varied. The combustion chamber gas temperature, the overall pressure ratio and engine thrust remained constant. Pressure loss coefficients, the efficiency of the engine components and the amount of air taken for cooling also remained constant. The optimal parameters corresponding to the minimum effective specific fuel consumption were found as the result of computation. The paper gives recommendations for adjusting optimal parameters, depending on the considered external factors, such as weight of engine and required fuel reserve. The obtained data can be used to estimate parameters of future turbofan engines with high bypass ratio.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF INCREASE THE COMPRESSION RATIO ON PERFORMANCE OF A DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan PARLAK

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimisation of the Diesel cycle has been performed for power output and thermal efficiency with respect to compression ratio for various extreme temperature ratio. The relation between compression ratio and extreme temperature ratio, which gives optimum performance is derived. As the compression ratio of the diesel engine is increased in comparison to the optimum value of the engine, it is shown that the performance of the engine is decreased. The experimental study agrees with these results. In this study, compression ratio of a single cylinder pre-combustion chamber variable compression ratio Ricardo E6 type engine with the optimum compression ratio of 18.20 was increased to 19.60. As a results of this increase, specific fuel consumption was increased about 8 % and brake thermal efficiency was decreased about 7.5 %.

  6. Effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the performance and emission characteristics of a spark ignition engine using hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, M.A.R. [University of Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The present energy situation has stimulated active research interest in non-petroleum and non-polluting fuels, particularly for transportation, power generation, and agricultural sectors. Researchers have found that hydrogen presents the best and an unprecedented solution to the energy crises and pollution problems, due to its superior combustion qualities and availability. This paper discusses analytically and provides data on the effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the engine performance, emissions and pre-ignition limits of a spark ignition engine operating on hydrogen fuel. These data are important in order to understand the interaction between engine performance and emission parameters, which will help engine designers when designing for hydrogen. (author)

  7. Current switching ratio optimization using dual pocket doping engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sidhartha; Sahoo, Girija Shankar; Mishra, Guru Prasad

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a smart idea to maximize current switching ratio of cylindrical gate tunnel FET (CGT) by growing pocket layers in both source and channel region. The pocket layers positioned in the source and channel of the device provides significant improvement in ON-state and OFF-state current respectively. The dual pocket doped cylindrical gate TFET (DP-CGT) exhibits much superior performance in term of drain current, transconductance and current ratio as compared to conventional CGT, channel pocket doped CGT (CP-CGT) and source pocket doped CGT (SP-CGT). Further, the current ratio has been optimized w.r.t. width and instantaneous position both the pocket layers. The much improved current ratio and low power consumption makes the proposed device suitable for low-power and high speed application. The simulation work of DP-CGT is done using 3D Sentaurus TCAD device simulator from Synopsys.

  8. Effect Of Compression Ratio On The Performance Of Diesel Engine At Different Loads.

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Reddy G; Nirmal Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    Variable compression ratio (VCR) technology has long been recognized as a method for improving the automobile engine performance, efficiency, fuel economy with reduced emission. The main feature of the VCR engine is to operate at different compression ratio, by changing the combustion chamber volume, depending on the vehicle performance needs .The need to improve the performance characteristics of the IC Engine has necessitated the present research. Increasing the compression rati...

  9. Refined Exploration of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the turbofan engine design space for an advanced technology single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) was conducted previously by the authors and is documented in a prior report. Through the course of that study and in a subsequent evaluation of the approach and results, a number of enhancements to the engine design ground rules and assumptions were identified. A follow-on effort was initiated to investigate the impacts of these changes on the original study results. The fundamental conclusions of the prior study were found to still be valid with the revised engine designs. The most significant impact of the design changes was a reduction in the aircraft weight and block fuel penalties incurred with low fan pressure ratio, ultra-high bypass ratio designs. This enables lower noise levels to be pursued (through lower fan pressure ratio) with minor negative impacts on aircraft weight and fuel efficiency. Regardless of the engine design selected, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  10. Variable compression ratio device for internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.

    2004-03-23

    An internal combustion engine, particularly suitable for use in a work machine, is provided with a combustion cylinder, a cylinder head at an end of the combustion cylinder and a primary piston reciprocally disposed within the combustion cylinder. The cylinder head includes a secondary cylinder and a secondary piston reciprocally disposed within the secondary cylinder. An actuator is coupled with the secondary piston for controlling the position of the secondary piston dependent upon the position of the primary piston. A communication port establishes fluid flow communication between the combustion cylinder and the secondary cylinder.

  11. 75 FR 27972 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9, -9A, -11, -15, -17, and -17R Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ..., MAN- JT8D-2-06 and the Engine Manual Chapter/Section 72-33-21, Inspection 00. Definitions (i) For the... the technical contents of PW JT8D Maintenance Advisory Notice MAN-JT8D-2-06, dated November 20, 2006... Advisory Notice, MAN-JT8D-2-06 and the Engine Manual Chapter/Section 72-33-21, Inspection 00. (g) For...

  12. Parametric analysis of diffuser requirements for high expansion ratio space engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Anderson, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    A supersonic diffuser ejector design computer program was developed. Using empirically modified one dimensional flow methods the diffuser ejector geometry is specified by the code. The design code results for calculations up to the end of the diffuser second throat were verified. Diffuser requirements for sea level testing of high expansion ratio space engines were defined. The feasibility of an ejector system using two commonly available turbojet engines feeding two variable area ratio ejectors was demonstrated.

  13. Particular mechanism for continuously varying the compression ratio for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raţiu, S.; Cătălinoiu, R.; Alexa, V.; Miklos, I.; Cioată, V.

    2018-01-01

    Variable compression ratio (VCR) is a technology to adjust the compression ratio of an internal combustion engine while the engine is in operation. The paper proposes the presentation of a particular mechanism allowing the position of the top dead centre to be changed, while the position of the bottom dead centre remains fixed. The kinematics of the mechanism is studied and its trajectories are graphically represented for different positions of operation.

  14. The Application of Advanced Technique of Fan Frame Unit on High Bypass Ratio Aero Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High bypass ratio aero-engine was widely used on military and civil aviation domain, as the power of larger aircraft. Fan frame unit was the main bearing frame of high bypass ratio aero-engine, which composed of strut, HUB MID BOX and external bypass parts. Resin/composite was used on external bypass parts(acoustic liner, containment ring, fan outlet guide vane and fan case skin fillets, which not only reduced the weight and manufacturing cost, but also improved the noise absorption, containment and anti-fatigue ability of engine. The design of composite was becoming a key technique for high bypass ratio aero-engine. In special test of the core engine, nitrogen cooling system was designed to cool the cavity of spool. The nitrogen pipeline passed through the inner cavity of fan frame, then inserted into NO. 3 bearing seal, so nitrogen gas was sent into the cavity of core engine spool. On high bypass ratio aero-engine, the external bypass and fan frame inner cavity were the design platform for advanced technique, such as composite and pipeline system, and also provided guarantee for reliable operation of engine.

  15. Ratios performance indicator evaluation of selected engineering enterprises in the northeast cohesion region

    OpenAIRE

    Šenec, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the performance indicator evaluation of selected industrial companies with a predominance of engineering production. Ratio indicators were used in order to measure business performance per unit of fixed assets and per employee. Analyzed data were obtained from companies annual reports. Trends ratio indicators were intended with the help of mathematical and statistical methods. These ratios indicator assessing the level of performance, value added and operating profit p...

  16. Optimized Matching Lift Unit Transmission Ratio of Engine Driven Ducted Fan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Senlin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a kind of VTOL technology, ducted fan is not only used by many kinds of aircrafts, but also one of the trends of the future aircraft lift system, and attracts more and more attention. For an engine driven ducted fan lift unit, involving the engine and ducted fan matching problem, the form of transmission and transmission ratio are the key design parameters. In order to design and develop a ducted fan aircraft reasonably, a thrust test platform was set up to connect the engine with the ducted fan through the belt driving. The matching relationship between the engine and the transmission system was experimentally studied and the optimal transmission ratio was determined. The results showed that the optimal transmission ratio for the engine 1 is 2.2:1, and for the engine 2, the optimal transmission ratio should be 2.95:1 based on the current ducted and movable blade aerofoil design. At this time, the lift will exceed 130 kg•f, meeting the aircraft's original design requirements.

  17. Air-fuel ratio control of a lean burn Si engine using fuzzy self tuning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhlaghi, M.; Bakhtiari Nejad, F.; Azadi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Reducing the exhaust emission of an spark ignition engine by means of engine modifications requires consideration of the effects of these modifications on the variations of crankshaft torque and the engine roughness respectively. Only if the roughness does not exceed a certain level the vehicle do not begin to surge. This paper presents a method for controlling the air-fuel ratio for a lean burn engine. Fuzzy rules and reasoning are utilized on-line to determine the control parameters. The main advantages of this method are simple structure and robust performance in a wide range of operating conditions. A non-linear model of an Si engine with the engine torque irregularity simulation is used in this study

  18. THE EFFECT OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO ON FUEL CONSUMPTION IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to lack of energy sources in the world, we are obliged to use our current energy sources in the most efficient way. Therefore, in the automotive industry, research works to manufacture more economic cars in terms of fuelconsumption and environmental friendly cars, at the same time satisfying the required performance have been intensively increasing. Some positive results have been obtained by the studies, aimed to change the compression ratio according to the operating conditions of engine. In spark ignition engines in order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy and exhaust emission in the partial loads, the compression ratio must be increased; but, under the high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running compression ratio must be decreased slightly. In this paper, various research works on the variable compression ratio with spark ignition engines, the effects on fuel economy, power output and thermal efficiency have been investigated. According to the results of the experiments performed with engines having variable compression ratio under the partial and mid-load conditions, an increase in engine power, a decrease in fuel consumption, particularly in partial loads up to 30 percent of fuel economy, and also severe reductions of some exhaust emission values were determined.

  19. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  20. Deriving metabolic engineering strategies from genome-scale modeling with flux ratio constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jiun Y; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Freedman, Benjamin G; Athamneh, Ahmad I M; Senger, Ryan S

    2013-05-01

    Optimized production of bio-based fuels and chemicals from microbial cell factories is a central goal of systems metabolic engineering. To achieve this goal, a new computational method of using flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio) was further developed in this research and applied to five case studies to evaluate and design metabolic engineering strategies. The approach was implemented using publicly available genome-scale metabolic flux models. Synthetic pathways were added to these models along with flux ratio constraints by FBrAtio to achieve increased (i) cellulose production from Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) isobutanol production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) acetone production from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803; (iv) H2 production from Escherichia coli MG1655; and (v) isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) production from engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum. The FBrAtio approach was applied to each case to simulate a metabolic engineering strategy already implemented experimentally, and flux ratios were continually adjusted to find (i) the end-limit of increased production using the existing strategy, (ii) new potential strategies to increase production, and (iii) the impact of these metabolic engineering strategies on product yield and culture growth. The FBrAtio approach has the potential to design "fine-tuned" metabolic engineering strategies in silico that can be implemented directly with available genomic tools. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Optimization of suitable ethanol blend ratio for motorcycle engine using response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Chen, Suming; Tsai, Jin-Ming; Tsai, Chao-Yin; Fang, Hsin-Hsiung; Yang, I-Chang; Liu, Sen-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In view of energy shortage and air pollution, ethanol-gasoline blended fuel used for motorcycle engine was studied in this work. The emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) and engine performance of a 125 cc four-stroke motorcycle engine with original carburetor using ethanol-gasoline fuels were investigated. The model of three-variable Box Behnken design (BBD) was used for experimental design, the ethanol blend ratios were prepared at 0, 10, 20 vol%; the speeds of motorcycle were selected as 30, 45, 60 km/h; and the throttle positions were set at 30, 60, 90 %. Both engine performance and air pollutant emissions were then analyzed by response surface method (RSM) to yield optimum operation parameters for tolerable pollutant emissions and maximum engine performance. The RSM optimization analysis indicated that the most suitable ethanol-gasoline blended ratio was found at the range of 3.92-4.12 vol% to yield a comparable fuel conversion efficiency, while considerable reductions of exhaust pollutant emissions of CO (-29 %) and NO(X) (-12 %) when compared to pure gasoline fuel. This study demonstrated low ethanol-gasoline blended fuels could be used in motorcycle carburetor engines without any modification to keep engine power while reducing exhaust pollutants.

  2. A study to estimate and compare the total particulate matter emission indices (EIN) between traditional jet fuel and two blends of Jet A/Camelina biofuel used in a high by-pass turbofan engine: A case study of Honeywell TFE-109 engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shila, Jacob Joshua Howard

    and JT15D engines' families as representatives of other engines with rated thrust of 6000 pounds or below. The results of this study may be used to add to the knowledge of PM emission data that has been collected in other research studies. This study was quantitative in nature. Three factors were designated which were the types of fuels studied. The TFE-109 turbofan engine was the experimental subject. The independent variable was the engine thrust setting while the response variable was the emission index. Four engine runs were conducted for each fuel. In each engine run, four engine thrust settings were observed. The four engine thrust levels were 10%, 30%, 85%, and 100% rated thrusts levels. Therefore, for each engine thrust settings, there four replicates. The experiments were conducted using a TFE-109 engine test cell located in the Niswonger Aviation Technology building at the Purdue University Airport. The testing facility has the capability to conduct the aircraft PM emissions tests. Due to the equipment limitations, the study was limited to observe total PM emissions instead of specifically measuring the non-volatile PM emissions. The results indicate that the emissions indices of the blended biofuels were not statistically significantly lower compared to the emissions of the traditional jet fuel at rated thrust levels of 100% and 85% of TFE-109 turbofan engine. However, the emission indices for the 50%Jet A - 50%Camelina biofuel blend were statistically significantly lower compared to the emission indices of the 100% Jet A fuel at 10% and 30% engine rated thrusts levels of TFE-109 engine. The emission indices of the 50%-50% biofuel blend were lower by reductions of 15% and 17% at engine rated thrusts of 10% and 30% respectively compared to the emissions indices of the traditional jet fuel at the same engine thrust levels. Experimental modifications in future studies may provide estimates of the emissions indices range for this particular engine these

  3. New high expansion ratio gasoline engine for the TOYOTA hybrid system. Improving engine efficiency with high expansion ratio cycle; Hybrid system yo kobochohi gasoline engine. Kobochohi cycle ni yoru engine no kokoritsuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, K; Takaoka, T; Ueda, T; Kobayashi, Y [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    50% reduction of CO2 and fuel consumption have been achieved with the newly developed gasoline engine for the Toyota Hybrid System. This is achieved due to the combination of electric motors and the internal combustion engine which is optimized in the size, swept volume and heat cycle. By delaying the intake valve close timing a high expansion ratio (13.5:1) cycle has been realized. Electricmotor assist enable to cut the maximum engine speed, and friction loss. A best fuel consumption figure better than 230 g/kWh has been achieved. Elimination of lightload firing, motor assisted quick start and improvement of catalyst warm up makes to achieve the clean emission level such as 1/10 of Japanese `78 regulation limit. 10 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Quiet engine program flight engine design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapproth, J. F.; Neitzel, R. E.; Seeley, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a preliminary flight engine design study based on the Quiet Engine Program high-bypass, low-noise turbofan engines. Engine configurations, weight, noise characteristics, and performance over a range of flight conditions typical of a subsonic transport aircraft were considered. High and low tip speed engines in various acoustically treated nacelle configurations were included.

  5. Turbofan Noise Studied in Unique Model Research Program in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive aeroacoustic research program called the Source Diagnostic Test was recently concluded in NASA Glenn Research Center's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The testing involved representatives from Glenn, NASA Langley Research Center, GE Aircraft Engines, and the Boeing Company. The technical objectives of this research were to identify the different source mechanisms of noise in a modern, high-bypass turbofan aircraft engine through scale-model testing and to make detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements to more fully understand the physics of how turbofan noise is generated.

  6. Performance and control study of a low-pressure-ratio turbojet engine for a drone aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldner, K.; Geyser, L. C.; Gold, H.; Walker, D.; Burgner, G.

    1972-01-01

    The results of analog and digital computer studies of a low-pressure-ratio turbojet engine system for use in a drone vehicle are presented. The turbojet engine consists of a four-stage axial compressor, single-stage turbine, and a fixed area exhaust nozzle. Three simplified fuel schedules and a generalized parameter fuel control for the engine system are presented and evaluated. The evaluation is based on the performance of each schedule or control during engine acceleration from a windmill start at Mach 0.8 and 6100 meters to 100 percent corrected speed. It was found that, because of the higher acceleration margin permitted by the control, the generalized parameter control exhibited the best dynamic performance.

  7. Turbofan engine degradation simulation data set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PHM08 Challenge Dataset is now publicly available at the NASA Prognostics Respository + Download An online evaluation utility is also provided to let users evaluate...

  8. A neural network-based estimator for the mixture ratio of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, T. H.; Musgrave, J.

    1992-11-01

    In order to properly utilize the available fuel and oxidizer of a liquid propellant rocket engine, the mixture ratio is closed loop controlled during main stage (65 percent - 109 percent power) operation. However, because of the lack of flight-capable instrumentation for measuring mixture ratio, the value of mixture ratio in the control loop is estimated using available sensor measurements such as the combustion chamber pressure and the volumetric flow, and the temperature and pressure at the exit duct on the low pressure fuel pump. This estimation scheme has two limitations. First, the estimation formula is based on an empirical curve fitting which is accurate only within a narrow operating range. Second, the mixture ratio estimate relies on a few sensor measurements and loss of any of these measurements will make the estimate invalid. In this paper, we propose a neural network-based estimator for the mixture ratio of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The estimator is an extension of a previously developed neural network based sensor failure detection and recovery algorithm (sensor validation). This neural network uses an auto associative structure which utilizes the redundant information of dissimilar sensors to detect inconsistent measurements. Two approaches have been identified for synthesizing mixture ratio from measurement data using a neural network. The first approach uses an auto associative neural network for sensor validation which is modified to include the mixture ratio as an additional output. The second uses a new network for the mixture ratio estimation in addition to the sensor validation network. Although mixture ratio is not directly measured in flight, it is generally available in simulation and in test bed firing data from facility measurements of fuel and oxidizer volumetric flows. The pros and cons of these two approaches will be discussed in terms of robustness to sensor failures and accuracy of the estimate during typical transients using

  9. Full Scale Technology Demonstration of a Modern Counterrotating Unducted Fan Engine Concept. Design Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Unducted Fan engine (UDF trademark) concept is based on an ungeared, counterrotating, unducted, ultra-high-bypass turbofan configuration. This engine is being developed to provide a high thrust-to-weight ratio power plant with exceptional fuel efficiency for subsonic aircraft application. This report covers the design methodology and details for the major components of this engine. The design intent of the engine is to efficiently produce 25,000 pounds of static thrust while meeting life and stress requirements. The engine is required to operate at Mach numbers of 0.8 or above.

  10. A Study of Bird Ingestions Into Large High Bypass Ratio Turbine Aircraft Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    average weights based on ".S _ _ _ L TABLE 2.3 CUMULATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF INCESTION EVENTS FOR REVISED IST and 2ND YEAR Year I Year 2 month £,ant Cue. It...7Q iMIM I MLLS*NIcE r2 UN MU.SA=Yc RSZU54 VIGURI 5-5. IM 31211-524 SWGIM/ ,UVC MOM W 3- ’u bi~ mum riom - * 1-5)5 Us1 CrMN-2 ugh Dowus Turbofan Knein... son time. The following codes refer to entries in Appendix E. AIRCRAFT (AC) WEATHER (WX) 1 - )C8 IFR - Instruent Flight Rules 2 - OClO VFR - Visual

  11. Trade-off analysis of high-aspect-ratio-cooling-channels for rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzarelli, Marco; Nasuti, Francesco; Onofri, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Aspect ratio has a significant effect on cooling efficiency and hydraulic losses. • Minimizing power loss is of paramount importance in liquid rocket engine cooling. • A suitable quasi-2D model is used to get fast cooling system analysis. • Trade-off with assigned weight, temperature, and channel height or wall thickness. • Aspect ratio is found that minimizes power loss in the cooling circuit. -- Abstract: High performance liquid rocket engines are often characterized by rectangular cooling channels with high aspect ratio (channel height-to-width ratio) because of their proven superior cooling efficiency with respect to a conventional design. However, the identification of the optimum aspect ratio is not a trivial task. In the present study a trade-off analysis is performed on a cooling channel system that can be of interest for rocket engines. This analysis requires multiple cooling channel flow calculations and thus cannot be efficiently performed by CFD solvers. Therefore, a proper numerical approach, referred to as quasi-2D model, is used to have fast and accurate predictions of cooling system properties. This approach relies on its capability of describing the thermal stratification that occurs in the coolant and in the wall structure, as well as the coolant warming and pressure drop along the channel length. Validation of the model is carried out by comparison with solutions obtained with a validated CFD solver. Results of the analysis show the existence of an optimum channel aspect ratio that minimizes the requested pump power needed to overcome losses in the cooling circuit

  12. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  13. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  14. Cofactor engineering to regulate NAD+/NADH ratio with its application to phytosterols biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liqiu; Shen, Yanbing; Zhang, Wenkai; Gao, Tian; Shang, Zhihua; Wang, Min

    2017-10-30

    Cofactor engineering is involved in the modification of enzymes related to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NADH and NAD + ) metabolism, which results in a significantly altered spectrum of metabolic products. Cofactor engineering plays an important role in metabolic engineering but is rarely reported in the sterols biotransformation process owing to its use of multi-catabolic enzymes, which promote multiple consecutive reactions. Androst-4-ene-3, 17-dione (AD) and androst-1, 4-diene-3, 17-dione (ADD) are important steroid medicine intermediates that are obtained via the nucleus oxidation and the side chain degradation of phytosterols by Mycobacterium. Given that the biotransformation from phytosterols to AD (D) is supposed to be a NAD + -dependent process, this work utilized cofactor engineering in Mycobacterium neoaurum and investigated the effect on cofactor and phytosterols metabolism. Through the addition of the coenzyme precursor of nicotinic acid in the phytosterols fermentation system, the intracellular NAD + /NADH ratio and the AD (D) production of M. neoaurum TCCC 11978 (MNR M3) were higher than in the control. Moreover, the NADH: flavin oxidoreductase was identified and was supposed to exert a positive effect on cofactor regulation and phytosterols metabolism pathways via comparative proteomic profiling of MNR cultured with and without phytosterols. In addition, the NADH: flavin oxidoreductase and a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus brevis, were successfully overexpressed and heterologously expressed in MNR M3 to improve the intracellular ratio of NAD + /NADH. After 96 h of cultivation, the expression of these two enzymes in MNR M3 resulted in the decrease in intracellular NADH level (by 51 and 67%, respectively) and the increase in NAD + /NADH ratio (by 113 and 192%, respectively). Phytosterols bioconversion revealed that the conversion ratio of engineered stains was ultimately improved by 58 and 147%, respectively. The highest AD (D

  15. Model Predictive Engine Air-Ratio Control Using Online Sequential Relevance Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-cheong Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine power, brake-specific fuel consumption, and emissions relate closely to air ratio (i.e., lambda among all the engine variables. An accurate and adaptive model for lambda prediction is essential to effective lambda control for long term. This paper utilizes an emerging technique, relevance vector machine (RVM, to build a reliable time-dependent lambda model which can be continually updated whenever a sample is added to, or removed from, the estimated lambda model. The paper also presents a new model predictive control (MPC algorithm for air-ratio regulation based on RVM. This study shows that the accuracy, training, and updating time of the RVM model are superior to the latest modelling methods, such as diagonal recurrent neural network (DRNN and decremental least-squares support vector machine (DLSSVM. Moreover, the control algorithm has been implemented on a real car to test. Experimental results reveal that the control performance of the proposed relevance vector machine model predictive controller (RVMMPC is also superior to DRNNMPC, support vector machine-based MPC, and conventional proportional-integral (PI controller in production cars. Therefore, the proposed RVMMPC is a promising scheme to replace conventional PI controller for engine air-ratio control.

  16. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE): The aerodynamic and mechanical design of the QCSEE under-the-wing fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of two experimental high bypass geared turbofan engines and propulsion systems for short haul passenger aircraft are described. The aerodynamic and mechanical design of a variable pitch 1.34 pressure ratio fan for the under the wing (UTW) engine are included. The UTW fan was designed to permit rotation of the 18 composite fan blades into the reverse thrust mode of operation through both flat pitch and stall pitch directions.

  17. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  18. Thermal state of a turbofan rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bileka, B D; Diachenko, A M; Orinichev, I S

    1988-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the thermal state of a combined turbofan rotor consisting of a peripheral turbine stage and a central fan stage are reported. In particular, attention is given to the effect of gas temperature, air flow rate, and rotation speed on temperature distributions at characteristic points of the rotor. The relative dimensionless temperatures of the turbofan rotor are shown to be constant under all the regimes investigated. An approximate method is proposed for calculating the temperature of the rotor elements, and the results of calculations are compared with experimental data.

  19. Solving Some Special Cases of Monomial Ratio Equations Appearing Frequently in Physical and Engineering Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Castillo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We first show that monomial ratio equations are not only very common in Physics and Engineering, but the natural type of equations in many practical problems. More precisely, in the case of models involving scale variables if the used formulas are not of this type they are not physically valid. The consequence is that when estimating the model parameters we are faced with systems of monomial ratio equations that are nonlinear and difficult to solve. In this paper, we provide an original algorithm to obtain the unique solutions of systems of equations made of linear combinations of monomial ratios whose coefficient matrix has a proper null space with low dimension that permits solving the problem in a simple way. Finally, we illustrate the proposed methods by their application to two practical problems from the hydraulic and structural fields.

  20. Energetic and exergetic analyses of a variable compression ratio spark ignition gas engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaheri, A.; Esfahanian, V.; Salavati-Zadeh, A.; Darzi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of CR and λ on CNG SI ICE 1st and 2nd law analyses are experimentally studied. • The performance of pure methane and a real CNG are observed and compared. • The ratio of actual to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is 0.78 for all cases. • At least 25.5% of destructed availability is due to combustion irreversibility. • With decrease in methane content, CNG shows more combustion irreversibility. - Abstract: Considering the significance of obtaining higher efficiencies from internal combustion engines (ICE) along with the growing role of natural gas as a fuel, the present work is set to explore the effects of compression ratio (CR hereafter) and air/fuel equivalence ratio (AFER hereafter) on the energy and exergy potentials in a gas-fueled spark ignition internal combustion engine. Experiments are carried out using a single cylinder, port injection, water cooled, variable compression ratio (VCR hereafter), spark ignition engine at a constant engine speed of 2000 rpm. The study involves CRs of 12, 14 and 16 and 10 AFERs between 0.8 and 1.25. Pure methane is utilized for the analysis. In addition, a natural gas blend with the minimum methane content among Iranian gas sources is also tested in order to investigate the effect of real natural gas on findings. The energy analysis involves input fuel power, indicated power and losses due to high temperature of exhaust gases and their unburned content, blow-by and heat loss. The exergy analysis is carried out for availability input and piston, exhaust, and losses availabilities along with destructed entropy. The analysis indicates an increase in the ratio of thermo-mechanical exhaust availability to fuel availability by CR with a maximum near stoichiometry, whereas it is shown that chemical exhaust exergy is not dependent on CR and reduces with AFER. In addition, it is indicated that the ratio of actual cycle to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is about constant (about 0.784) with changing CR

  1. Engineering Design Study of Quasi-Axisymmetric Stellarator with Low Aspect Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Keisuke; Okamura, Shoichi; Nishimura, Shin; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Suzuki, Chihiro; Shimizu, Akihiro; Tanaka, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Mitsuru; Naito, Hideji; Urata, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Tadanori

    2004-01-01

    The engineering design of the quasi-axisymmetric stellarator CHS-qa is described, having a toroidal period number of 2, major radius of 1.5 m, and plasma aspect ratio of 3.2. Although the entire structure of the machine is highly nonaxisymmetric and deformative, the following major engineering concerns for the modular coils and the vacuum vessel have been resolved: (a) modular coil design (curvature and twist of conductors), (b) supporting structures for modular coils, (c) errors due to electromagnetic forces and misalignment in manufacturing processes (analysis shows that the magnetic surface is robust against such disturbances), (d) construction procedure for vacuum vessel and modular coils, and (e) ports for heating and diagnostics

  2. Efficiency and exhaust gas analysis of variable compression ratio spark ignition engine fuelled with alternative fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshaiah, N. [Mechanical Engineering Department, M.I.T.S, Madanapalle, Angallu-517325, A.P. (India)

    2010-07-01

    Considering energy crises and pollution problems today, investigations have been concentrated on decreasing fuel consumption by using alternative fuels and on lowering the concentration of toxic components in combustion products. In the present work, the variable compression ratio spark ignition engine designed to run on gasoline has been tested with pure gasoline, LPG (Isobutene), and gasoline blended with ethanol 10%, 15%, 25% and 35% by volume. Also, the gasoline mixed with kerosene at 15%, 25% and 35% by volume without any engine modifications has been tested and presented the result. Brake thermal and volumetric efficiency variation with brake load is compared and presented. CO and CO2 emissions have been also compared for all tested fuels.

  3. Dispersion, dissipation and refraction of shock waves in acoustically treated turbofan inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Dilip; Li, Ding; A. Topol, David

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical investigation of the effects of the inlet duct liner on the acoustics of a high-bypass ratio turbofan rotor operating at supersonic tip relative flow conditions. The near field of the blade row is then composed of periodic shocks that evolve spatially both because of the varying mean flow and because of the presence of acoustic treatment. The evolution of this shock system is studied using a Computational Fluid Dynamics-based method incorporating a wall impedance boundary condition. The configuration examined is representative of a fan operating near the takeoff condition. The behavior of the acoustic power and the associated waveforms reveal that significant dispersion occurs to the extent that there are no shocks in the perturbation field leaving the entrance plane of the duct. The effect of wave refraction due to the high degree of shear in the mean flow near the entrance plane of the inlet is examined, and numerical experiments are conducted to show that the incorporation of liners in this region can be highly beneficial. The implications of these results for the design of aircraft engine acoustic liners are discussed.

  4. Acoustic control study of turbofan nozzles with triangular chevrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore CICAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has a small part dealing with the notion of chevron and the process that helps reducing the noise pollution. Based on the gas dynamics and the geometrical parameters of the turbofan jet engine a model of CFD data processing is created. In this process the influence of chevrons on acoustic wave intensity produced by the jet is observed by analyzing this process. A series of tests have been made on 10 si 20 lobed chevrons. The combination between them and the 7 resulting cases have been studied, namely the triangular chevrons in order to settle the influence of the geometrical parameters on the flow and on the jet acoustics. Finally the contribution of the chevrons in noise pollution reduction has been highlighted.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of a variable compression ratio diesel engine running with palm oil methyl ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debnath, Biplab K.; Sahoo, Niranjan; Saha, Ujjwal K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Energy and exergy analysis of palm oil methyl ester (POME) run diesel engine. ► Engine was run at various compression ratios (CRs) and injection timings (ITs). ► POME can recover around 26% of the energy supplied by the fuel. ► CR rise and IT change cause shaft energy per unit fuel supply to increase. ► CR of 18 and IT of 20°BTDC reduce more entropy generation. - Abstract: The present work is set to explore the effect of compression ratio (CR) and injection timing (IT) on energy and exergy potential of a palm oil methyl ester (POME) run diesel engine. Experiments are carried out in a single cylinder, direct injection, water cooled variable compression ratio diesel engine at a constant peed of 1500 rpm under a full load of 4.24 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The study involves four different CRs of 16, 17, 17.5 and 18; and three different ITs of 20°, 23° and 28°BTDC. Here, the CR of 17.5 and IT of 23°BTDC are the standard ones. The energy analysis performed for the experimental data includes shaft power, energy input through fuel, output by cooling water and exhaust, uncounted loss per unit time. Side by side, the effects of varying CR and IT on peak pressure, peak heat release rate, brake thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature are also studied. The exergy analysis is carried out for availability input, shaft, cooling water and exhaust availability, availability destruction and entropy generation. It shows that higher values of CR increase the shaft availability and cooling water availability, however, they decrease the exhaust flow availability. The retardation and advancement of IT give similar results. The exergy analysis also shows that with the increase of CR, the injection retardation and advancement increase the shaft availability and exergy efficiency, while it reduces the exergy destruction. The entropy generation is also reduced for the similar CR and IT modifications.

  6. Estimation of Individual Cylinder Air-Fuel Ratio in Gasoline Engine with Output Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the individual cylinder air-fuel ratio (AFR with a single universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO sensor installed in the exhaust pipe is an important issue for the cylinder-to-cylinder AFR balancing control, which can provide high-quality torque generation and reduce emissions in multicylinder engine. In this paper, the system dynamic for the gas in exhaust pipe including the gas mixing, gas transport, and sensor dynamics is described as an output delay system, and a new method using the output delay system observer is developed to estimate the individual cylinder AFR. With the AFR at confluence point augmented as a system state, an observer for the augmented discrete system with output delay is designed to estimate the AFR at confluence point. Using the gas mixing model, a method with the designed observer to estimate the individual cylinder AFR is presented. The validity of the proposed method is verified by the simulation results from a spark ignition gasoline engine from engine software enDYNA by Tesis.

  7. Influence of Compression Ratio on the Performance and Emission Characteristics of Annona Methyl Ester Operated DI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Ramalingam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find the optimum performance and emission characteristics of single cylinder variable compression ratio (VCR engine with different blends of Annona methyl ester (AME as fuel. The performance parameters such as specific fuel consumption (SFC, brake thermal efficiency (BTE, and emission levels of HC, CO, Smoke, and NOx were compared with the diesel fuel. It is found that, at compression ratio of 17: 1 for A20 blended fuel (20% AME + 80% Diesel shows better performance and lower emission level which is very close to neat diesel fuel. The engine was operated with different values of compression ratio (15, 16, and 17 to find out best possible combination for operating engine with blends of AME. It is also found that the increase of compression ratio increases the BTE and reduces SFC and has lower emission without any engine in design modifications.

  8. The influence of Compression Ratio to Performance of Four Stroke Engine Use of Arak Bali as a Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dewa Made Krishna Muku

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Arak bali is alternative fuel as ethanol. Ethanol has octane number 108. Octane number which was higher can over come adetonation, and can work at higher compression ratio. This experiment has done to now how the effect of compression ratiovariation to the performance four strokes engine by arak bali fuel. This research was done by changing the compressionratio that is 8,8 : 1, 8,9 : 1, 9 : 1 and 9,3 : 1. The change was done by reducing combustion chamber by scrap the cylinderhead. The result, for the used arak bali fuel to the vehicle is, if engine compression ratio to increase can be influence ofengine performance to be increase and engine fuel consumption to be decrease. For premium is, if engine compression ratioto increase to influence of engine performance to be decrease and engine fuel consumption to be increase.

  9. Simulation research on the effect of cooled EGR, supercharging and compression ratio on downsized SI engine knock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Gequn; Pan, Jiaying; Wei, Haiqiao; Shi, Ning

    2013-03-01

    Knock in spark-ignition(SI) engines severely limits engine performance and thermal efficiency. The researches on knock of downsized SI engine have mainly focused on structural design, performance optimization and advanced combustion modes, however there is little for simulation study on the effect of cooled exhaust gas recirculation(EGR) combined with downsizing technologies on SI engine performance. On the basis of mean pressure and oscillating pressure during combustion process, the effect of different levels of cooled EGR ratio, supercharging and compression ratio on engine dynamic and knock characteristic is researched with three-dimensional KIVA-3V program coupled with pressure wave equation. The cylinder pressure, combustion temperature, ignition delay timing, combustion duration, maximum mean pressure, and maximum oscillating pressure at different initial conditions are discussed and analyzed to investigate potential approaches to inhibiting engine knock while improving power output. The calculation results of the effect of just cooled EGR on knock characteristic show that appropriate levels of cooled EGR ratio can effectively suppress cylinder high-frequency pressure oscillations without obvious decrease in mean pressure. Analysis of the synergistic effect of cooled EGR, supercharging and compression ratio on knock characteristic indicates that under the condition of high supercharging and compression ratio, several times more cooled EGR ratio than that under the original condition is necessarily utilized to suppress knock occurrence effectively. The proposed method of synergistic effect of cooled EGR and downsizing technologies on knock characteristic, analyzed from the aspects of mean pressure and oscillating pressure, is an effective way to study downsized SI engine knock and provides knock inhibition approaches in practical engineering.

  10. Potential for using a tyre pyrolysis oil-biodiesel blend in a diesel engine at different compression ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Murugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The possibility of operating a compression ignition engine with a non petroleum diesel fuel. • A possible solution to replace certain amount of biodiesel by tyre pyrolysis oil in a biodiesel fueled diesel engine. • The optimum compression ratio for engine fueled with biodiesel-tyre pyrolysis oil blend. - Abstract: This study is aimed at investigating effects of varying the compression ratio at optimum injection timing and nozzle opening pressure on the behaviour of a diesel engine, using a non-petroleum fuel, i.e. a blend of 80% biodiesel, and 20% oil obtained from pyrolysis of waste tyres. The engine was subjected to one lower (16.5) and one higher (18.5) compression ratio in addition to the standard compression ratio of 17.5. At the higher compression ratio of 18.5 and full load, shorter ignition delay, maximum cylinder pressure and higher heat release rate were found for the blend, compared to those of the original compression ratio. The increase in the compression ratio from 17.5 to 18.5 for the blend improved the brake thermal efficiency by about 8% compared to that of the original compression ratio at full load. The experimental results indicated that for the blend at a higher compression ratio of 18.5, the brake specific carbon monoxide (BSCO), brake specific hydrocarbon emission (BSHC) and smoke opacity were reduced by about 10.5%, 32%, and 17.4% respectively, than those of the original compression ratio at full load

  11. Numerical analysis of knock during HCCI in a high compression ratio methanol engine based on LES with detailed chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Xudong; Wang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Knock during HCCI in a high compression ratio methanol engine was modeled. • A detailed methanol mechanism was used to simulate the knocking combustion. • Compared with the SI engines, the HCCI knocking combustion burnt faster. • The reaction rate of HCO had two obvious peaks, one was positive, and another was negative. • Compared with the SI engines, the values of the reaction rates of CH 2 O, H 2 O 2 , and HO 2 were higher, and it had negative peaks. - Abstract: In this study, knock during HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) was studied based on LES (large eddy simulation) with methanol chemical kinetics (84-reaction, 21-species) in a high compression ratio methanol engine. The non-knocking and knocking combustion of SI (spark ignition) and HCCI engines were compared. The results showed that the auto-ignition spots were initially occurred near the combustion chamber wall. The knocking combustion burnt faster during HCCI than SI methanol engine. The HCO reaction rate was different from SI engine, it had two obvious peaks, one was positive peak, and another was negative peak. Compared with the SI methanol engine, in addition to the concentration of HCO, the concentrations of the other intermediate products and species such as CO, OH, CH 2 O, H 2 O 2 , HO 2 were increased significantly; the reaction rates of CH 2 O, H 2 O 2 , and HO 2 had negative peaks, and whose values were several times higher than SI methanol engine

  12. Performance and emission of generator Diesel engine using methyl esters of palm oil and diesel blends at different compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhaidhawi, M.; Chiriac, R.; Bădescu, V.; Pop, H.; Apostol, V.; Dobrovicescu, A.; Prisecaru, M.; Alfaryjat, A. A.; Ghilvacs, M.; Alexandru, A.

    2016-08-01

    This study proposes engine model to predicate the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a single cylinder four stroke direct injection engine which was fuelled with diesel and palm oil methyl ester of B7 (blends 7% palm oil methyl ester with 93% diesel by volume) and B10. The experiment was conducted at constant engine speed of 3000 rpm and different engine loads operations with compression ratios of 18:1, 20:1 and 22:1. The influence of the compression ratio and fuel typeson specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency has been investigated and presented. The optimum compression ratio which yields better performance has been identified. The result from the present work confirms that biodiesel resulting from palm oil methyl ester could represent a superior alternative to diesel fuel when the engine operates with variable compression ratios. The blends, when used as fuel, result in a reduction of the brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while NOx emissions was increased when the engine is operated with biodiesel blends.

  13. Effect of compression ratio, nozzle opening pressure, engine load, and butanol addition on nanoparticle emissions from a non-road diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Saxena, Mohit Raj; Rai, Piyush; Bhardwaj, Aashish

    2018-05-01

    Currently, diesel engines are more preferred over gasoline engines due to their higher torque output and fuel economy. However, diesel engines confront major challenge of meeting the future stringent emission norms (especially soot particle emissions) while maintaining the same fuel economy. In this study, nanosize range soot particle emission characteristics of a stationary (non-road) diesel engine have been experimentally investigated. Experiments are conducted at a constant speed of 1500 rpm for three compression ratios and nozzle opening pressures at different engine loads. In-cylinder pressure history for 2000 consecutive engine cycles is recorded and averaged data is used for analysis of combustion characteristics. An electrical mobility-based fast particle sizer is used for analyzing particle size and mass distributions of engine exhaust particles at different test conditions. Soot particle distribution from 5 to 1000 nm was recorded. Results show that total particle concentration decreases with an increase in engine operating loads. Moreover, the addition of butanol in the diesel fuel leads to the reduction in soot particle concentration. Regression analysis was also conducted to derive a correlation between combustion parameters and particle number emissions for different compression ratios. Regression analysis shows a strong correlation between cylinder pressure-based combustion parameters and particle number emission.

  14. STUDY OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND EFFECTS OF COMPRESSION RATIO ON THERMAL EFFICIENCY AND ENGINE POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarjito Sarjito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper was a case study during the sabatical program at Kingston University London in February 2007. It has been studied by team of motorsport automotive department Kingston University London and it has been elaborated as a final project on Master Program. This study takes into account some of the issues surrounding the debate about alcohol fuels in Motorsport and the wider automotive sector and is primarily concerned to add data where there seems to be little existing research since Motorsport is a secretive business. Motorsport plays an important part in the automotive industry and is a sport enjoyed worldwide. Racing practice is regarded as using the best available resources and technology as it requires optimal performance. The racing arena gives engineers the opportunity to test valuable technological solutions to prove their merits. Therefore, racing is the natural starting point for introducing new technological solutions to the public and could lead to the wholesale conversion to renewable fuels to meet our automotive energy needs. Alcohol has unique properties that make superior in many ways to ordinary gasoline. The higher knock resistance allows for higher compression ratios to be utilized resulting in higher power outputs and thermal efficiency. The efficient use of energy is of growing concern in all spheres of life and the automotive sector needs to be front runner in these efforts.

  15. Performance and emission characteristics of LPG powered four stroke SI engine under variable stroke length and compression ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, Hakan; Yamin, Jehad A.A.

    2008-01-01

    A computer simulation of a variable stroke length, LPG fuelled, four stroke, single cylinder, water cooled spark ignition engine was done. The engine capacity was varied by varying the stroke length of the engine, which also changed its compression ratio. The simulation model developed was verified with experimental results from the literature for both constant and variable stroke engines. The performance of the engine was simulated at each stroke length/compression ratio combination. The simulation results clearly indicate the advantages and utility of variable stroke engines in fuel economy and power issues. Using the variable stroke technique has significantly improved the engine's performance and emission characteristics within the range studied. The brake torque and power have registered an increase of about 7-54% at low speed and 7-57% at high speed relative to the original engine design and for all stroke lengths and engine speeds studied. The brake specific fuel consumption has registered variations from a reduction of about 6% to an increase of about 3% at low speed and from a reduction of about 6% to an increase of about 8% at high speed relative to the original engine design and for all stroke lengths and engine speeds studied. On the other hand, an increase of pollutants of about 0.65-2% occurred at low speed. Larger stroke lengths resulted in a reduction of the pollutants level of about 1.5% at higher speeds. At lower stroke lengths, on the other hand, an increase of about 2% occurred. Larger stroke lengths resulted in increased exhaust temperature and, hence, make the exhaust valve work under high temperature

  16. Minimum Specific Fuel Consumption of a Liquid-Cooled Multicylinder Aircraft Engine as Affected by Compression Ratio and Engine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Feder, Melvin S.; Harries, Myron L.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a 12-cylinder V-type liquid-cooled aircraft engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement to determine the minimum specific fuel consumption at constant cruising engine speed and compression ratios of 6.65, 7.93, and 9.68. At each compression ratio, the effect.of the following variables was investigated at manifold pressures of 28, 34, 40, and 50 inches of mercury absolute: temperature of the inlet-air to the auxiliary-stage supercharger, fuel-air ratio, and spark advance. Standard sea-level atmospheric pressure was maintained at the auxiliary-stage supercharger inlet and the exhaust pressure was atmospheric. Advancing the spark timing from 34 deg and 28 deg B.T.C. (exhaust and intake, respectively) to 42 deg and 36 deg B.T.C. at a compression ratio of 6.65 resulted in a decrease of approximately 3 percent in brake specific fuel consumption. Further decreases in brake specific fuel consumption of 10.5 to 14.1 percent (depending on power level) were observed as the compression ratio was increased from 6.65 to 9.68, maintaining at each compression ratio the spark advance required for maximum torque at a fuel-air ratio of 0.06. This increase in compression ratio with a power output of 0.585 horsepower per cubic inch required a change from . a fuel- lend of 6-percent triptane with 94-percent 68--R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.65 to a fuel blend of 58-percent, triptane with 42-percent 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 9.68 to provide for knock-free engine operation. As an aid in the evaluation of engine mechanical endurance, peak cylinder pressures were measured on a single-cylinder engine at several operating conditions. Peak cylinder pressures of 1900 pounds per square inch can be expected at a compression ratio of 9.68 and an indicated mean effective pressure of 320 pounds per square inch. The engine durability was considerably reduced at these conditions.

  17. A New Family of Nonlinear Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. B.; Olsen, M. B.; Poulsen, J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper treats a newly developed set of nonlinear observers for advanced spark ignition engine control.......The paper treats a newly developed set of nonlinear observers for advanced spark ignition engine control....

  18. Studying the effect of compression ratio on an engine fueled with waste oil produced biodiesel/diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed EL_Kassaby

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wasted cooking oil from restaurants was used to produce neat (pure biodiesel through transesterification, and then used to prepare biodiesel/diesel blends. The effect of blending ratio and compression ratio on a diesel engine performance has been investigated. Emission and combustion characteristics was studded when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B50 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 14 to 16 to 18. The result shows that the engine torque for all blends increases as the compression ratio increases. The bsfc for all blends decreases as the compression ratio increases and at all compression ratios bsfc remains higher for the higher blends as the biodiesel percent increase. The change of compression ratio from 14 to 18 resulted in, 18.39%, 27.48%, 18.5%, and 19.82% increase in brake thermal efficiency in case of B10, B20, B30, and B50 respectively. On an average, the CO2 emission increased by 14.28%, the HC emission reduced by 52%, CO emission reduced by 37.5% and NOx emission increased by 36.84% when compression ratio was increased from 14 to 18. In spite of the slightly higher viscosity and lower volatility of biodiesel, the ignition delay seems to be lower for biodiesel than for diesel. On average, the delay period decreased by 13.95% when compression ratio was increased from 14 to 18. From this study, increasing the compression ratio had more benefits with biodiesel than that with pure diesel.

  19. Investigations of effects of pilot injection with change in level of compression ratio in a common rail diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajarlawar Nilesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available These day diesel engines are gaining lots of attention as prime movers for various source of transportation. It offers better drive ability, very good low end torque and importantly the lower CO2 emission. Diesel engines are bridging the gap between gasoline and diesel engines. Better noise vibration and harshness levels of gasoline engine are realized to great extent in diesel engine, thanks to common rail direct injection system. Common rail injection system is now well known entity. Its unique advantage is flexible in operation. In common rail injection system, number of injection prior and after main injection at different injection pressure is possible. Due to multiple injections, gain in emission reduction as well as noise has been already experienced and demonstrated by researcher in the past. However, stringent emission norms for diesel engine equipped vehicle demands for further lower emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx and particulate matter (PM. In the present paper, authors attempted to study the effect of multiple injections in combination with two level of compression ratio. The aim was to study the combustion behavior with the reduced compression ratio which is going to be tried out as low temperature combustion concept in near future. The results were compared with the current level of compression ratio. Experiments were carried out in 2.2L cubic capacity engine with two levels of compression ratios. Pilot injection separation and quantities were varied keeping the main injection, rail pressure, boost pressure and EGR rate constant. Cylinder pressure traces and gross heat release rates were measured and analyzed to understand the combustion behavior.

  20. Demonstrating the Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Variable Compression Ratio, Alvar-Cycle Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Erlandsson, Olof; Lundholm, Gunnar; Söderberg, Fredrik; Johansson, Bengt; Wong, Victor W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is a direct continuation of a previous study that addressed the performance and design of a variable compression engine, the Alvar-Cycle Engine [1]. The earlier study was presented at the SAE International Conference and Exposition in Detroit during February 23- 26, 1998 as SAE paper 981027. In the present paper test results from a single cylinder prototype are reviewed and compared with a similar conventional engine. Efficiency and emissions are shown as fu...

  1. Performance and exhaust emission characteristics of variable compression ratio diesel engine fuelled with esters of crude rice bran oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Mohit; Sharma, Sumeet; Mohapatra, S K; Kundu, Krishnendu

    2016-01-01

    As a substitute to petroleum-derived diesel, biodiesel has high potential as a renewable and environment friendly energy source. For petroleum importing countries the choice of feedstock for biodiesel production within the geographical region is a major influential factor. Crude rice bran oil is found to be good and viable feedstock for biodiesel production. A two step esterification is carried out for higher free fatty acid crude rice bran oil. Blends of 10, 20 and 40 % by vol. crude rice bran biodiesel are tested in a variable compression ratio diesel engine at compression ratio 15, 16, 17 and 18. Engine performance and exhaust emission parameters are examined. Cylinder pressure-crank angle variation is also plotted. The increase in compression ratio from 15 to 18 resulted in 18.6 % decrease in brake specific fuel consumption and 14.66 % increase in brake thermal efficiency on an average. Cylinder pressure increases by 15 % when compression ratio is increased. Carbon monoxide emission decreased by 22.27 %, hydrocarbon decreased by 38.4 %, carbon dioxide increased by 17.43 % and oxides of nitrogen as NOx emission increased by 22.76 % on an average when compression ratio is increased from 15 to 18. The blends of crude rice bran biodiesel show better results than diesel with increase in compression ratio.

  2. Numerical analysis on the effect of swirl ratios on swirl chamber combustion system of DI diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shengli; Wang, Feihu; Leng, Xianyin; Liu, Xin; Ji, Kunpeng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A new swirl chamber combustion system of DI diesel engines is proposed. • The appropriate vortex motion can reduce the wall concentration of mixture. • It has best emissions at swirl ratio of 0.8. • Before spray, the turbulent kinetic energy is primarily controlled by the squish. • After spray, the combustion swirl and reverse squish have a great impact on TKE. - Abstract: In order to improve the spray spatial distribution and promote the mixture quality, enhancing airflow movement in a combustion chamber, a new swirl chamber combustion system in direct injection (DI) diesel engines is proposed. The mixture formation and combustion progress in the cylinder are simulated and investigated at several different swirl ratios by using the AVL-FIRE code. The results show that in view of the fuel/air equivalence ratio distribution, the uniformity of mixture with swirl ratio of 0.2 is better. Before spray injection, the turbulent kinetic energy distribution is primarily controlled by the squish. After spray, the combustion swirl and reverse squish swirl have an effect on temperature distribution and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the cylinder. The NO mass fraction is the lowest at swirl ratio of 0.8 and the highest at swirl ratio of 2.7, while Soot mass fraction is the lowest at swirl ratio of 0.2 and the highest at swirl ratio of 3.2. The appropriate swirl is benefit to improve combustion. To sum up, the emissions at swirl ratio of 0.8 has a better performance in the new combustion system

  3. Genome-scale modeling using flux ratio constraints to enable metabolic engineering of clostridial metabolism in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Michael J; Yen, Jiun Y; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S

    2012-05-14

    Genome-scale metabolic networks and flux models are an effective platform for linking an organism genotype to its phenotype. However, few modeling approaches offer predictive capabilities to evaluate potential metabolic engineering strategies in silico. A new method called "flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio)" was developed in this research and applied to a new genome-scale model of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (iCAC490) that contains 707 metabolites and 794 reactions. FBrAtio was used to model wild-type metabolism and metabolically engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum where only flux ratio constraints and thermodynamic reversibility of reactions were required. The FBrAtio approach allowed solutions to be found through standard linear programming. Five flux ratio constraints were required to achieve a qualitative picture of wild-type metabolism for C. acetobutylicum for the production of: (i) acetate, (ii) lactate, (iii) butyrate, (iv) acetone, (v) butanol, (vi) ethanol, (vii) CO2 and (viii) H2. Results of this simulation study coincide with published experimental results and show the knockdown of the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase increases butanol to acetone selectivity, while the simultaneous over-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase greatly increases ethanol production. FBrAtio is a promising new method for constraining genome-scale models using internal flux ratios. The method was effective for modeling wild-type and engineered strains of C. acetobutylicum.

  4. EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO ON ENERGY AND EMISSION OF VCR DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH DUAL BLENDS OF BIODIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. EKNATH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent 10 years biodiesel fuel was studied extensively as an alternative fuel. Most of researchers reported performance and emission of biodiesel and their blends with constant compression ratio. Also all the research was conducted with use of single biodiesel and its blend. Few reports are observed with the use of variable compression ratio and blends of more than one biodiesel. Main aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of compression ratio on the performance and emission of dual blends of biodiesel. In the present study Blends of Jatropha and Karanja with Diesel fuel was tested on single cylinder VCR DI diesel engine for compression ratio 16 and 18. High density of biodiesel fuel causes longer delay period for Jatropha fuel was observed compare with Karanja fuel. However blending of two biodiesel K20J40D results in to low mean gas temperature which is the main reason for low NOx emission.

  5. Deployable Engine Air Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    On approach, next-generation aircraft are likely to have airframe noise levels that are comparable to or in excess of engine noise. ATA Engineering, Inc. (ATA) is developing a novel quiet engine air brake (EAB), a device that generates "equivalent drag" within the engine through stream thrust reduction by creating a swirling outflow in the turbofan exhaust nozzle. Two Phase II projects were conducted to mature this technology: (1) a concept development program (CDP) and (2) a system development program (SDP).

  6. With power comes responsibility: motorcycle engine power and power-to-weight ratio in relation to accident risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Markus; Summala, Heikki

    2010-02-01

    Current European legislation allows the EU member states to restrict the maximum power output of motorcycles to 74 kW even though evidence supporting the limit is scarce and has produced mixed results-perhaps because motorcycle performance has been measured by engine displacement, not engine power, in most of the previous studies. This study investigates the relationship of motorcycle engine power and power-to-weight ratio to risk of fatal and nonfatal crashes in Finland. The fatality rate (number of fatal accidents/number of registered motorbikes) for riders of different ages riding bikes belonging to different power and power-to-weight ratio classes was examined using a comprehensive in-depth database. Data on nonfatal accidents were acquired from a Web questionnaire (N = 2708), which also served as a basis for estimating riders' annual mileage. Mileage data allowed the calculation of accident risk per kilometer ridden for bikes differing in power and power-to-weight ratio. The fatality risk per number of registered motorcycles and per kilometer ridden increases both with power and power-to-weight ratio, independently of rider's age. No relationship between performance and risk of a less severe crash was found. The pre-accident speed of the most powerful bikes was 20 km/h or more over the speed limit in a large proportion of the fatal accidents (odds ratio = 4.8 for > 75 kW motorbikes; odds ratio = 6.2 for > 0.3 kW/kg motorbikes). The risk of being involved in a fatal crash is higher among the riders of powerful motorcycles. However, it is not clear whether the results are related to the riding habits of the riders that choose the most powerful bikes available or whether the high risk is due to the properties of the bikes themselves. Therefore, further research is needed before considering legal limits on motorcycle performance.

  7. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  8. Effect of compression ratio on performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine run on raw biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, Bhaskor J.; Saha, Ujjwal K.; Chatterjee, Soumya; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Maximum brake thermal efficiency of 20.04% was obtained in dual fuel mode. • Compression ratio of 18 produced the maximum brake thermal efficiency. • Maximum replacement of diesel was found to be 79.46% at a compression ratio of 18. • CO gets reduced by 26.22% with the increase of compression ratio from 16 to18. • HC gets reduced by 41.97% with the increase of compression ratio from 16 to18. - Abstract: The energy consumption of the world is increasing at a staggering rate due to population explosion. The extensive use of energy has led to fossil fuel depletion and the rise in pollution. Renewable energy holds the key solution to these aforementioned problems. Biogas, one such renewable fuel, can be used in a diesel engine under dual fuel mode for the generation of power. This work attempts to unfold the effect of compression ratio on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine run on raw biogas. For this investigation, a 3.5 kW single cylinder, direct injection, water cooled, variable compression ratio diesel engine is converted into a biogas run dual fuel diesel engine by connecting a venturi gas mixer at the inlet manifold. Experiments have been conducted at various compression ratios (18, 17.5, 17 and 16) and under different loading conditions fixing the standard injection timing at 23° before top dead centre. At 100% load, the brake thermal efficiencies of the dual fuel mode are found to be 20.04%, 18.25%, 17.07% and 16.42% at compression ratios of 18, 17.5, 17 and 16, respectively, whereas at the same load, the diesel mode shows an efficiency of 27.76% at a compression ratio of 17.5. The maximum replacement of the precious fossil fuel is found to be 79.46%, 76.1%, 74% and 72% at compression ratios of 18, 17.5, 17 and 16, respectively at 100% load. For the dual fuel mode, on an average, there is a reduction in carbon monoxide as well as hydrocarbon emission by 26.22% and 41.97% when compression

  9. Kaner biodiesel production through hybrid reactor and its performance testing on a CI engine at different compression ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Yadav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with development of a hybrid reactor for biodiesel production based on the combined hydrodynamic cavitation and mechanical stirring processes. Biodiesel were produced using Kaner Seed Oil (KSO. The experimental results show that hybrid reactor produces 95% biodiesel yield within 45 min for 0.75% of catalyst and 6:1 M ratio which is significantly higher as compared to mechanical stirring or hydrodynamic cavitation alone. Thus biodiesel production process in hybrid reactor is cheap (high yield, efficient (time saving and environmentally friendly (lower% of catalyst. Performance study on engine shows that an increase in compression ratios (from 16 to 18 improves the engine performance using biodiesel blends as compared to petroleum diesel.

  10. Theoretical modeling of combustion characteristics and performance parameters of biodiesel in DI diesel engine with variable compression ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dawody, Mohamed F.; Bhatti, S.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Andhra University (India)

    2013-07-01

    Increasing of costly and depleting fossil fuels are prompting researchers to use edible as well as non-edible vegetable oils as a promising alternative to petro-diesel fuels. A comprehensive computer code using ''Quick basic'' language was developed for the diesel engine cycle to study the combustion and performance characteristics of a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection diesel engine with variable compression ratio. The engine operates on diesel fuel and 20% (mass basis) of biodiesel (derived from soybean oil) blended with diesel. Combustion characteristics such as cylinder pressure, heat release fraction, heat transfer and performance characteristics such as brake power; and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were analyzed. On the basis of the first law of thermodynamics the properties at each degree crank angle was calculated. Wiebe function is used to calculate the instantaneous heat release rate. The computed results are validated through the results obtained in the simulation Diesel-rk software.

  11. Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Variable Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Jatropha curcas Ethyl Ester Blends at Different Compression Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine performance and emission characteristics of unmodified biodiesel fueled diesel engines are highly influenced by their ignition and combustion behavior. In this study, emission and combustion characteristics were studied when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B40 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 17.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The change of compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1 resulted in 27.1%, 27.29%, 26.38%, 28.48%, and 34.68% increase in cylinder pressure for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions. Higher peak heat release rate increased by 23.19%, 14.03%, 26.32%, 21.87%, and 25.53% for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The delay period decreased by 21.26%, CO emission reduced by 14.28%, and NOx emission increased by 22.84% for B40 blends at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. It is concluded that Jatropha oil ester can be used as fuel in diesel engine by blending it with diesel fuel.

  12. Influence of ethanol admixture on the determination of equivalence ratios in DISI engines by laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Michael; Lind, Susanne; Will, Stefan; Zigan, Lars

    2016-10-20

    In this work, the planar laser-induced fluorescence of a fuel tracer is applied for the analysis of mixture formation for various ethanol/iso-octane blends in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) engine. The tracer triethylamine (TEA) was added to pure iso-octane and ethanol as well as to their blends E20 and E85 for the measurement of the fuel/air ratio. In general, ethanol blending strongly affects the mixture formation process, which is caused by specific physical fuel properties influencing the evaporation process of ethanol in comparison to iso-octane. As interactions of the fuel and tracer fluorescence appear possible, TEA fluorescence was studied for different fuel blends in a cuvette, in a calibration cell under constant conditions, and in an optically accessible internal combustion engine at late injection timing. It was found that ethanol blending strongly affects the fluorescence intensity of TEA in the liquid phase, which can be explained by the interaction of the tracer and ethanol molecules. However, in the gas phase a quantification of the fuel/air ratio is possible for different ethanol fuel blends, which is demonstrated in a DISI engine. Under stratified charge conditions the engine results showed a significant impact of a high amount of ethanol on the mixture formation process, leading to a leaner mixture in comparison to iso-octane.

  13. Control Design for a Generic Commercial Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey; May, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the control algorithms and control design process for a generic commercial aircraft engine simulation of a 40,000 lb thrust class, two spool, high bypass ratio turbofan engine. The aircraft engine is a complex nonlinear system designed to operate over an extreme range of environmental conditions, at temperatures from approximately -60 to 120+ F, and at altitudes from below sea level to 40,000 ft, posing multiple control design constraints. The objective of this paper is to provide the reader an overview of the control design process, design considerations, and justifications as to why the particular architecture and limits have been chosen. The controller architecture contains a gain-scheduled Proportional Integral controller along with logic to protect the aircraft engine from exceeding any limits. Simulation results illustrate that the closed loop system meets the Federal Aviation Administration s thrust response requirements

  14. The influence of air-fuel ratio on mixture parameters in port fuel injection engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Irimescu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, research in the internal combustion engine field is focusing on detailed understanding of the processes that take place in certain parts of the aggregate, and can have a great influence on the engine’s performance and pollution levels. Such research is developed in this paper, in which using a numerical method based on the i-x air-fuel diagram, one can simulate a series of values for pressure, temperature and intake air humidity before and after mixture formation takes place in a spark ignition engine inlet port. The aim is to evaluate the final temperature of the air-fuel mixture near the inlet valve and evaluating the main factors of influence on the homogeneity of the mixture.

  15. Air fuel ratio detector corrector for combustion engines using adaptive neurofuzzy networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Arora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A perfect mix of the air and fuel in internal combustion engines is desirable for proper combustion of fuel with air. The vehicles running on road emit harmful gases due to improper combustion. This problem is severe in heavy vehicles like locomotive engines. To overcome this problem, generally an operator opens or closes the valve of fuel injection pump of locomotive engines to control amount of air going inside the combustion chamber, which requires constant monitoring. A model is proposed in this paper to alleviate combustion process. The method involves recording the time-varying flow of fuel components in combustion chamber. A Fuzzy Neural Network is trained for around 40 fuels to ascertain the required amount of air to form a standard mix to produce non-harmful gases and about 12 fuels are used for testing the network’s performance. The network then adaptively determines the additional/subtractive amount of air required for proper combustion. Mean square error calculation ensures the effectiveness of the network’s performance.

  16. Fast predictive control for air-fuel ratio of SI engines using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper MPC based on an adaptive neural network model is attempted for air fuel ratio (AFR), in which the model is adapted on-line to cope with nonlinear dynamics and parameter uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) network is employed and the recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm is used for weight ...

  17. Cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heats ratio and duration of combustion for spark ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental work were conducted for investigating cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heat ratio and duration of combustion for multi cylinder spark ignition engine (SIE). Ccylinder pressure was measured for gasoline, kerosene and Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) separately as a fuel for SIE. Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) was used to cylinder pressure data transform from time domain into frequency domain to develop empirical correlation for calculating cylinder pressures at different engine speeds and different fuels. In addition, Inverse Fast Fourier Transformations (IFFT) was used to cylinder pressure reconstruct into time domain. The results gave good agreement between the measured cylinder pressure and the reconstructed cylinder pressure in time domain with different engine speeds and different fuels. The measured cylinder pressure and hydraulic dynamotor were the sours of data for calculating engine performance parameters. First law of thermodynamics and single zone heat release model with temperature dependant specific heat ratio γ(T) were the main tools for calculating heat release and heat transfer to cylinder walls. Third order empirical correlation for calculating γ(T) was one of the main gains of the present study. The correlation gave good agreement with other researchers with wide temperatures range. For kerosene, cylinder pressure is higher than for gasoline and LPG due to high volumetric efficiency where kerosene density (mass/volume ratio) is higher than gasoline and LPG. In addition, kerosene heating value is higher than gasoline that contributes in heat release rate and pressure increases. Duration of combustion for different engine speeds was determined using four different methods: (I) Mass fuel burnt, (II) Entropy change, (III) Temperature dependant specific heat ratio γ(T), and (IV) Logarithmic scale of (P and V). The duration of combustion for kerosene is smaller than for gasoline and LPG due to high

  18. Cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heats ratio and duration of combustion for spark ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehata, M.S. [Mechanical Engineering Technology Department, Higher Institute of Technology, Banha University, 4Zagalol Street, Benha, Galubia 1235 Z (Egypt)

    2010-12-15

    An experimental work were conducted for investigating cylinder pressure, performance parameters, heat release, specific heat ratio and duration of combustion for multi cylinder spark ignition engine (SIE). Ccylinder pressure was measured for gasoline, kerosene and Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) separately as a fuel for SIE. Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) was used to cylinder pressure data transform from time domain into frequency domain to develop empirical correlation for calculating cylinder pressures at different engine speeds and different fuels. In addition, Inverse Fast Fourier Transformations (IFFT) was used to cylinder pressure reconstruct into time domain. The results gave good agreement between the measured cylinder pressure and the reconstructed cylinder pressure in time domain with different engine speeds and different fuels. The measured cylinder pressure and hydraulic dynamotor were the source of data for calculating engine performance parameters. First law of thermodynamics and single zone heat release model with temperature dependant specific heat ratio {gamma}(T) were the main tools for calculating heat release and heat transfer to cylinder walls. Third order empirical correlation for calculating {gamma}(T) was one of the main gains of the present study. The correlation gave good agreement with other researchers with wide temperatures range. For kerosene, cylinder pressure is higher than for gasoline and LPG due to high volumetric efficiency where kerosene density (mass/volume ratio) is higher than gasoline and LPG. In addition, kerosene heating value is higher than gasoline that contributes in heat release rate and pressure increases. Duration of combustion for different engine speeds was determined using four different methods: (I) Mass fuel burnt, (II) Entropy change, (III) Temperature dependant specific heat ratio {gamma}(T), and (IV) Logarithmic scale of (P and V). The duration of combustion for kerosene is smaller than for gasoline and

  19. A particle filter for ammonia coverage ratio and input simultaneous estimations in Diesel-engine SCR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kangfeng; Ji, Fenzhu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Shichun

    2018-01-01

    As NOx emissions legislation for Diesel-engines is becoming more stringent than ever before, an aftertreatment system has been widely used in many countries. Specifically, to reduce the NOx emissions, a selective catalytic reduction(SCR) system has become one of the most promising techniques for Diesel-engine vehicle applications. In the SCR system, input ammonia concentration and ammonia coverage ratio are regarded as essential states in the control-oriental model. Currently, an ammonia sensor placed before the SCR Can is a good strategy for the input ammonia concentration value. However, physical sensor would increase the SCR system cost and the ammonia coverage ratio information cannot be directly measured by physical sensor. Aiming to tackle this problem, an observer based on particle filter(PF) is investigated to estimate the input ammonia concentration and ammonia coverage ratio. Simulation results through the experimentally-validated full vehicle simulator cX-Emission show that the performance of observer based on PF is outstanding, and the estimation error is very small.

  20. A Soft Sensor-Based Fault-Tolerant Control on the Air Fuel Ratio of Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air/fuel ratio (AFR regulation for spark-ignition (SI engines has been an essential and challenging control problem for engineers in the automotive industry. The feed-forward and feedback scheme has been investigated in both academic research and industrial application. The aging effect can often cause an AFR sensor fault in the feedback loop, and the AFR control performance will degrade consequently. In this research, a new control scheme on AFR with fault-tolerance is proposed by using an artificial neural network model based on fault detection and compensation, which can provide the satisfactory AFR regulation performance at the stoichiometric value for the combustion process, given a certain level of misreading of the AFR sensor.

  1. A Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation of a Large Commercial Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Frederick, Dean K.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation of a commercial engine has been developed in a graphical environment to meet the increasing need across the controls and health management community for a common research and development platform. This paper describes the Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS), which is representative of a 90,000-lb thrust class two spool, high bypass ratio commercial turbofan engine. A control law resembling the state-of-the-art on board modern aircraft engines is included, consisting of a fan-speed control loop supplemented by relevant engine limit protection regulator loops. The objective of this paper is to provide a top-down overview of the complete engine simulation package.

  2. A RCCI operational limits assessment in a medium duty compression ignition engine using an adapted compression ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; Pastor, José V.; García, Antonio; Boronat, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • RCCI with CR 12.75 reaches up to 80% load fulfilling mechanical limits. • Ultra-low levels in NOx and soot emissions are obtained in the whole engine map. • Ultra-high levels of CO and uHC have been measured overall at low load. • RCCI improves fuel consumption from 25% to 80% engine loads comparing with CDC. - Abstract: Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition concept offers an ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions with a high thermal efficiency. This work investigates the capabilities of this low temperature combustion concept to work on the whole map of a medium duty engine proposing strategies to solve its main challenges. In this sense, an extension to high loads of the concept without exceeding mechanical stress as well as a mitigation of carbon oxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at low load together with a fuel consumption penalty have been identified as main Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition drawbacks. For this purpose, a single cylinder engine derived from commercial four cylinders medium-duty engine with an adapted compression ratio of 12.75 is used. Commercial 95 octane gasoline was used as a low reactivity fuel and commercial diesel as a high reactivity fuel. Thus, the study consists of two different parts. Firstly, the work is focused on the development and evaluation of an engine map trying to achieve the maximum possible load without exceeding a pressure rise rate of 15 bar/CAD. The second part holds on improving fuel consumption and carbon oxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at low load. Results suggest that it is possible to achieve up to 80% of nominal conventional diesel combustion engine load without overpassing the constraints of pressure rise rate (below 15 bar/CAD) and maximum pressure peak (below 190 bar) while obtaining ultra-low levels of nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. Regarding low load challenges, it has developed a particular methodology sweeping the gasoline-diesel blend together

  3. Assessment of an Anomaly Detector for Jet Engine Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Borguet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimation is considered as an appropriate solution to this deficiency. This paper reports the evaluation of the detection capability of an adaptive diagnosis tool on the basis of simulated scenarios that may be encountered during the operation of a commercial turbofan engine. The diagnosis tool combines a Kalman filter and a secondary system that monitors the residuals. This auxiliary component implements a generalised likelihood ratio test in order to detect abrupt events.

  4. Jet engine R and D and I; Watashi to jet engine kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murashima, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-10

    My efforts towards at the development of aeroengines since the end of the war are described. The J3-7 engine propelled the T1 trainer plane, and was installed as booster aboard the P2J antisubmarine patrol aircraft. It was the first jet engine that Japan produced after the end of the war, and had been in use until quite recently. I took part in the construction of a prototype of the JR100 series designed to serve as VTOL (vertical take-off and landing) aircraft lift engines, and in the test thereof. As the shift from turbojet to turbofan proceeded, I participated in the development of the FJR710 engine under the guidance of National Aerospace Laboratory, and the product was installed aboard an experimental STOL (short take-off and landing) aircraft Asuka. I next joined a Defense Agency initiative for a reheat turbofan to replace the J3 aboard trainer plane, and the result was the low bypass ratio/high output F3 engine. In 1989, Ministry of International Trade and Industry decided for a large-scale project of developing an engine for a next-generation supersonic transport, and the HYPR (Super/Hypersonic Transport Propulsion System) project was started. The project was participated in by manufacturers from overseas, which were GE, P and W, RR, and SNECMA. The foreign corporations worked on an equal footing with the Japanese parties, and collaboration between the participants was smooth, with each party endeavoring in the field they were good at. The project will be concluded as scheduled in fiscal 1998. (NEDO)

  5. Design Concepts for Low Aspect Ratio High Pressure Turbines for High Bypass Ratio Turbofans, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The performance gains and weight reductions from using Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) turbine blades in both the High Pressure Turbine(HPT) and Low Pressure...

  6. An Investigation of the Composition of the Flow in and out of a Two-Stroke Diesel Engine and Air Consumption Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the mass, substance and energy flow through two-stroke low speed Diesel engines. For this reason, a zero-dimensional model of the combustion in the engine was developed with a calculated amount and composition of exhaust gases. Due to the large amount of oxygen in the exhaust gases, a ratio of real air consumption and stoichiometric amount of air required for combustion of injected fuel was set. The calculated ratio showed that the engine consumed four times more air than needed for combustion in AFRstoich. In this work, this was called the Air Consumption Factor or Ratio, and has not previously been mentioned in scientific literature. The air consumption ratio is defined as a factor of dry or humid air. To be more comprehensive, a modified diagram of the composition of the flow in and out of a two-stroke fuel injection engine and the cylinder was made.

  7. A method of encountering the ratio of adjacent sides and its applied study in nuclear engineering survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jingqin

    1996-01-01

    The cross side or range net survey method is to compute the average error of the measured lengths of sides. With the increment of the side length, the viewing variance increases greatly. Generally the photo-electrical distance survey equipment has a high inside precision, but it is affected by typical weather error so that the outside precision is decreased, and this weather error similar to systematic error greatly decreases the viewing side precision. To solve this problem, theoretical study and field test were carried out for the correlation of ratios among short sides by photo-electrical survey, and the stability degree of the ratios of sides, a new method of ratio encountering of adjacent sides is put forward. Because of the weights of the ration variance σ γ 2 = 2η 2 γ 2 and the angular variance σ β 2 = 2J 2 ρ 2 match each other, so the systematic error can be eliminated completely, and a survey point co-ordinate of high precision can be obtained. It is easy to operate, as it does not require multi-photo-band survey or to operate at the optimal observation time, and is especially suitable to nuclear engineering survey applications. (3 tabs.)

  8. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    The advent of an era of abundant natural gas is making it an increasingly economical fuel source against incumbents such as crude oil and coal, in end-use sectors such as power generation, transportation and industrial chemical production, while also offering significant environmental benefits over these incumbents. Equipment manufacturers, in turn, are responding to widespread demand for power plants optimized for operation with natural gas. In several applications such as distributed power generation, gas transmission, and water pumping, stationary, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) are the power plant of choice (over turbines) owing to their lower equipment and operational costs, higher thermal efficiencies across a wide load range, and the flexibility afforded to end-users when building fine-resolution horsepower topologies: modular size increments ranging from 100 kW -- 2 MW per ICE power plant compared to 2 -- 5 MW per turbine power plant. Under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (RICE NESHAP) air quality regulations, these natural gas power plants are required to comply with stringent emission limits, with several states mandating even stricter emissions norms. In the case of rich-burn or stoichiometric natural gas ICEs, very high levels of sustained emissions reduction can be achieved through exhaust after-treatment that utilizes Non Selective Catalyst Reduction (NSCR) systems. The primary operational constraint with these systems is the tight air-fuel ratio (AFR) window of operation that needs to be maintained if the NSCR system is to achieve simultaneous reduction of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH 2O). Most commercially available AFR controllers utilizing lambda (oxygen

  9. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    OpenAIRE

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured, The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 degrees C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels t...

  10. Knock-Limited Performance of Triptane and 28-R Fuel Blends as Affected by Changes in Compression Ratio and in Engine Operating Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Feder, Melvin S.; Fisher, William F.

    1947-01-01

    A knock-limited performance investigation was conducted on blends of triptane and 28-P fuel with a 12-cylinder, V-type, liquid-cooled aircraft engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement at three compression ratios: 6.65, 7.93, and 9.68. At each compression ratio, the effect of changes in temperature of the inlet air to the auxiliary-stage supercharger and in fuel-air ratio were investigated at engine speeds of 2280 and. 3000 rpm. The results show that knock-limited engine performance, as improved by the use of triptane, allowed operation at both take-off and cruising power at a compression ratio of 9.68. At an inlet-air temperature of 60 deg F, an engine speed of 3000 rpm ; and a fuel-air ratio of 0,095 (approximately take-off conditions), a knock-limited engine output of 1500 brake horsepower was possible with 100-percent 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.65; 20-percent triptane was required for the same power output at a compression ratio of 7.93, and 75 percent at a compression ratio of 9.68 allowed an output of 1480 brake horsepower. Knock-limited power output was more sensitive to changes in fuel-air ratio as the engine speed was increased from 2280 to 3000 rpm, as the compression ratio is raised from 6.65 to 9.68, or as the inlet-air temperature is raised from 0 deg to 120 deg F.

  11. Experimental investigation of hydrogen energy share improvement in a compression ignition engine using water injection and compression ratio reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy efficiency (EE) increased with increase in hydrogen (H_2) energy share. • H_2 energy share increased from 19% to 79% with combined CR reduction and water. • In-cylinder temperature decreased significantly with water addition and CR reduction. • HC, CO, smoke and NO_x emissions with water and CR are lower than base diesel. - Abstract: This study deals with the effect of water addition on enhancement of maximum hydrogen energy share in a compression ignition engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode. The specific water consumption (SWC) was varied from 130 to 480 g/kW h in step of 70 g/kW h using manifold and port injection methods. Subsequently, the combined effect of reduction of compression ratio (CR) of the engine (from 19.5:1 (base) to 16.5:1 and 15.4:1) along with water addition on further enhancement of hydrogen energy share is investigated. The hydrogen energy share was limited to 18.8% with conventional dual fuel mode due to knocking. However, the energy share increased to 66.5% with water addition (maximum SWC: 480 g/kW h), and 79% with combined control strategies (SWC of 340 g/kW h and CR reduction to 16.5:1). Thermal efficiency of the engine under water added dual fuel mode is higher than base diesel mode (single fuel mode), but it is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode without water. The efficiency of the engine with reduced CR and water addition is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode, however at the CR of 16.5:1 and SWC of 340 g/kW h, the efficiency is comparable with base diesel mode efficiency. Hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, smoke, and oxides of nitrogen emissions of the engine with water addition (340 g/kW h) and CR reduction (to 16.5:1) decreased significantly as compared to base diesel mode, but slightly higher than conventional dual fuel mode.

  12. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 1; Fan Stage Design and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. To this end, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and General Electric (GE) teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10 ), fan speed (7 ), inlet mass flow (3.5 ), inlet pressure (8 ), and inlet temperature (3 ). In this paper, NASA has set out to characterize a TBCC engine fan stage aerodynamic performance and stability limits over a wide operating range including power-on and hypersonic-unique "windmill" operation. Herein, we will present the fan stage design, and the experimental test results of the fan stage operating from 15 to 100 percent corrected design speed. Whereas, in the companion paper, we will provide an assessment of NASA s APNASA code s ability to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speed and bypass ratio.

  13. Pollution reduction technology program for class T4(JT8D) engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Diehl, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The technology required to develop commercial gas turbine engines with reduced exhaust emissions was demonstrated. Can-annular combustor systems for the JT8D engine family (EPA class T4) were investigated. The JT8D turbofan engine is an axial-flow, dual-spool, moderate-bypass-ratio design. It has a two-stage fan, a four-stage low-pressure compressor driven by a three-stage low-pressure turbine, and a seven-stage high-pressure compressor driven by a single-stage high-pressure turbine. A cross section of the JT8D-17 showing the mechanical configuration is given. Key specifications for this engine are listed.

  14. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  15. The Fisher Information Matrix as a Relevant Tool for Sensor Selection in Engine Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borguet

    2008-01-01

    the essential elements of the sensor selection problem is defined from the Fisher information matrix. An example application consisting in a commercial turbofan engine illustrates the enhancement that can be expected from a wise selection of the sensor set.

  16. Effect of Variable Compression Ratio on Performance of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Karanja Biodiesel and its Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rahul Kumar; soota, Tarun, Dr.; singh, Ranjeet

    2017-08-01

    Rapid exploration and lavish consumption of underground petroleum resources have led to the scarcity of underground fossil fuels moreover the toxic emissions from such fuels are pernicious which have increased the health hazards around the world. So the aim was to find an alternative fuel which would meet the requirements of petroleum or fossil fuels. Biodiesel is a clean, renewable and bio-degradable fuel having several advantages, one of the most important of which is being its eco-friendly and better knocking characteristics than diesel fuel. In this work the performance of Karanja oil was analyzed on a four stroke, single cylinder, water cooled, variable compression ratio diesel engine. The fuel used was 5% - 25% karanja oil methyl ester by volume in diesel. The results such obtained are compared with standard diesel fuel. Several properties i.e. Brake Thermal Efficiency, Brake Specific Fuel Consumptions, Exhaust Gas Temperature are determined at all operating conditions & at variable compression ratio 17 and 17.5.

  17. Development of GE90 engine with largest thrust. GE90 engine no kaihatsu jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aono, H [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-05-01

    The present paper explained the turbofan engine GE90 which is being developed by General Electric Co., USA. That engine is to meet the thrust (takeoff thrust) of 300 to 530kN as required for the new-generation wide-fuselage civil transport plane which is being designed for its planned operation in the 1990's. In April, 1991, the world's strongest thrust of 480kN was achieved with engine elements also confirmed through element test. Thereafter, the engine underwent a flying test on board of Boeing 747 to materialize the planned operation in 1995. Made to be 9 in by-pass ratio and about 40 in overall pressure ratio, the GE90 was given the concept that advantage could be secured in both propulsive efficiency and thermal efficiency. That concept could be materialized by the development of composite fan blade technology and energy-efficient technology which were both demonstrated with an unducted fan. In spite of its pressure ratio of 22, the GE90's high pressure compressor demonstrates its polytropic efficiency which is equal to that of the low pressure ratio compressor. 3 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Experimental study on the natural gas dual fuel engine test and the higher the mixture ratio of hydrogen to natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.S.; Lee, Y.S.; Park, C.K. [Cheonnam University, Kwangju (Korea); Masahiro, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-05-28

    One of the unsolved problems of the natural gas dual fuel engine is that there is too much exhaust of Total Hydrogen Carbon(THC) at a low equivalent mixture ratio. To fix it, a natural gas mixed with hydrogen was applied to engine test. The results showed that the higher the mixture ratio of hydrogen to natural gas, the higher the combustion efficiency. And when the amount of the intake air is reached to 90% of WOT, the combustion efficiency was promoted. But, like a case making the injection timing earlier, the equivalent mixture ratio for the nocking limit decreases and the produce of NOx increases. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Study of an advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J. C.; Short, F. R.; Staton, D. V.; Zolezzi, B. A.; Curry, C. E.; Orelup, M. J.; Vaught, J. M.; Humphrey, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The best technology program for a small, economically viable gas turbine engine applicable to the general aviation helicopter and aircraft market for 1985-1990 was studied. Turboshaft and turboprop engines in the 112 to 746 kW (150 to 1000 hp) range and turbofan engines up to 6672 N (1500 lbf) thrust were considered. A good market for new turbine engines was predicted for 1988 providing aircraft are designed to capitalize on the advantages of the turbine engine. Parametric engine families were defined in terms of design and off-design performance, mass, and cost. These were evaluated in aircraft design missions selected to represent important market segments for fixed and rotary-wing applications. Payoff parameters influenced by engine cycle and configuration changes were aircraft gross mass, acquisition cost, total cost of ownership, and cash flow. Significant advantage over a current technology, small gas turbine engines was found especially in cost of ownership and fuel economy for airframes incorporating an air-cooled high-pressure ratio engine. A power class of 373 kW (500 hp) was recommended as the next frontier for technology advance where large improvements in fuel economy and engine mass appear possible through component research and development.

  20. Manufacturing technology for advanced jet engines; Jisedai jetto engine no seizo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, H [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-05

    A part of the latest production technologies for aircraft jet engines is introduced. Outline of the turbofan engine, turbo-prop engine, and turbo-shaft engine are given. Every one of them employs a gas turbine engine comprising a compressor, combustor, and a turbine as the output generator. Increase in the turbine inlet temperature is effective for making the gas turbine engine more efficient. The development tread of heat resisting materials for realizing higher temperature is shown. The current status and future aspect of the manufacturing technology is discussed for each main component of the engine. Technological development for decreasing weight is important because the weight of the fan member increases when the fan diameter is increased to increase the bypass ratio. FRP is adopted for the blades and casing to decrease the weight of the compressor, and studies have been made on fiber reinforced materials to reduce the weight of the disks. The outlines of the latest manufacturing technologies for the combustor and turbine are introduced. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  2. Supercharged two-cycle engines employing novel single element reciprocating shuttle inlet valve mechanisms and with a variable compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to novel reciprocating shuttle inlet valves, effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines, employing spark or compression ignition. Also permitting the elimination of out-of-phase piston arrangements to control scavenging and supercharging of opposed-piston engines. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve (32) and its operating mechanism (34) is constructed as a single and simple uncomplicated member, in combination with the lost-motion abutments, (46) and (48), formed in a piston skirt, obviating the need for any complex mechanisms or auxiliary drives, unaffected by heat, friction, wear or inertial forces. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve retains the simplicity and advantages of two-cycle engines, while permitting an increase in volumetric efficiency and performance, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of two-cycle engines into many areas that are now dominated by the four-cycle engine.

  3. Features of FJR 710 engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatake, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Hideo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1989-03-01

    The FJR 710/600 high by-pass ratio turbofan engine was outlined, which was developed under the National Research and Development Program of Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, MITI dated from 1971. Results of developmental tests and flying tests of the engine were reported, which were performed to install the engine on the quiet STOL research aircraft under development by the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL), the Science and Technology Agency, and the STOL aircraft was also outlined. Developmental tests of FJR 710 (design specification : thrust of 50kN, specific fuel consumption of 37.4g/N.h, turbine inlet temperature of 1.250{degree}C) were performed for 4,800 hours to verify airworthiness, and from those test results, the results of such environmental resistance tests as a foreign object strike test, icing test, inlet distortion test, cross wind test, and noise and exhaust measurement were reported in detail. 20 flying tests by a flying test bed (FTB) aircraft and flight tests by the STOL aircraft were also outlined. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France); Cavadiasa, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France)

    2008-11-15

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured. The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels that were investigated were PRF40 and n-heptane. These three parameters appeared to decrease the ignition delays, with the inlet temperature having the least influence and the compression ratio the most. A previously experimentally validated reduced surrogate mechanism, for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, has been used to explain observations of the auto-ignition process. The same kinetic mechanism is used to better understand the underlying chemical and physical phenomena that make the influence of a certain parameter change according to the operating conditions. This can be useful for the control of the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine. (author)

  5. Numerical Investigation of Injection Timing Influence on Fuel Slip and Influence of Compression Ratio on Knock Occurrence in Conventional Dual Fuel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Sremec

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressed natural gas can be used in diesel engine with great benefits, but because of its low reactivity it is usually used in a so called dual fuel combustion process. Optimal parameters for dual fuel engines are not yet investigated thoroughly which is the motivation for this work. In this work, a numerical study performed in a cycle simulation tool (AVL Boost v2013 on the influence of different injection timings on fuel slip into exhaust and influence of compression ratio on knock phenomena in port injected dual fuel engine was conducted. The introduction of natural gas into the intake port of a diesel engine usually results in some fuel slipping into the exhaust port due to valve overlap. By analysing the simulation results, the injection strategy that significantly decreases the natural gas slip is defined. The knock occurrence study showed that the highest allowed compression ratio that will result in knock free operation of the presented engine is 18 for ambient intake condition, while for charged intake conditions the compression ratio should be lowered to 16.

  6. Engineering excellence at Rolls-Royce; a taste of English culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnelders, J.

    2013-01-01

    Rolls-Royce is one of the most well-known brands in the world and synonymous with the highest engineering quality. Amongst Aerospace Engineers, Rolls-Royce is directly associated with the Trent turbofan aircraft engines. The engines power the world’s newest passenger aircraft, including the Boeing

  7. Performance and emission characteristics of a turbocharged CNG engine fueled by hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas with high hydrogen ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fanhua; Wang, Mingyue; Jiang, Long; Chen, Renzhe; Deng, Jiao; Naeve, Nashay; Zhao, Shuli [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-06-15

    This paper investigates the effect of high hydrogen volumetric ratio of 55% on performance and emission characteristics in a turbocharged lean burn natural gas engine. The experimental data was conducted under various operating conditions including different spark timing, excess air ratio (lambda), and manifold pressure. It is found that the addition of hydrogen at a high volumetric ratio could significantly extend the lean burn limit, improve the engine lean burn ability, decrease burn duration, and yield higher thermal efficiency. The CO, CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced and NO{sub x} emission could be kept an acceptable low level with high hydrogen content under lean burn conditions when ignition timing were optimized. (author)

  8. Combining effect of optimized axial compressor variable guide vanes and bleed air on the thermodynamic performance of aircraft engine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sangjo; Son, Changmin; Kim, Kuisoon

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this work is to provide evidence of the effectiveness of combined use of the variable guide vanes (VGVs) and bleed air on the thermodynamic performance of aircraft engine system. This paper performed the comparative study to evaluate the overall thermal performance of an aircraft engine with optimized VGVs and bleed air, separately or simultaneously. The low-bypass ratio turbofan engine has been modeled with a 0D/1D modeling approach. The genetic algorithm is employed to find the optimum schedule of VGVs and bleed air. There are four types of design variables: (1) the inlet guide vane (IGV) angle, (2) the IGV and 1st stator vane (SV) angles, (3) bleed air mass flow rate at the exit of the axial compressor, and (4) both type 2 and type 3. The optimization is conducted with surge margin constraints of more than 10% and 15% in the axial compressor. The results show that the additional use of the bleed air increases the efficiency of the compressors. Overall, the percentage reductions of the total fuel consumption for the engine with the IGV, 1st SV and bleed air schedule is 1.63% for 15% surge margin constraints when compared with the engine with the IGV schedule. - Highlights: • The effect of combined use of variable guide vanes and bleed air is evaluated. • The genetic algorithm is employed to find the optimum setting angle and bleed air. • A low bypass ratio mixed turbofan engine is analyzed for optimization. • Additional use of the bleed air shows improved overall performance of the engine.

  9. UV Absorption Measurements of Nitric Oxide Compared to Probe Sampling Data for Measurements in a Turbine Engine Exhaust at Simulated Altitude Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howard, R

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide measurements were conducted in the exhaust of a turbofan engine at simulated altitude conditions in a ground-level test cell using both optical nonintrusive and conventional gas sampling techniques...

  10. Experimental Investigation of Diffuser Pressure-ratio Control with Shock-positioning Limit on 28-inch Ram-jet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, William R; Wentworth, Carl B; Crowl, Robert J

    1957-01-01

    The performance of a control system designed for variable thrust applications was determined in an altitude free-jet facility at various Mach numbers, altitudes and angles of attack for a wide range of engine operation. The results are presented as transient response characteristics for step disturbances in fuel flow and stability characteristics as a function of control constants and engine operating conditions. The results indicate that the control is capable of successful operation over the range of conditions tested, although variations in engine gains preclude optimum response characteristics at all conditions with fixed control constants.

  11. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual designs of Quiet Turbofan STOL Short-Haul Transport Aircraft for the mid-1980 time period are developed and analyzed to determine their technical, operational, and economic feasibility. A matrix of aircraft using various high-lift systems and design parameters are considered. Variations in aircraft characteristics, airport geometry and location, and operational techniques are analyzed systematically to determine their effects on the market, operating economics, and community acceptance. In these studies, the total systems approach is considered to be critically important in analyzing the potential of STOL aircraft to reduce noise pollution and alleviate the increasing air corridor and airport congestion.

  12. Experimental evaluation of the effect of compression ratio on performance and emission of SI engine fuelled with gasoline and n-butanol blend at different loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinu Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Never ending demand for efficient and less polluting engines have always inspired newer technologies. Extensive study has been done on variable compression ratio, a promising in-cylinder technology, in the recent past. The present work is an experimental investigation to examine the variation of different parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, exhaust gas temperature and emissions with respect to change in compression ratio in a single-cylinder carbureted SI engine at different loads with two different fuels. Experiments were conducted at three different compression ratios (CR = 7:1, 8.5:1 and 10:1. The fuels used in this study are pure gasoline and 20% n-butanol blend (B20 in gasoline. The results showed that brake thermal efficiency increases with CR at all loads. Further, the experimental results showed the scope of improving the part-load efficiency of SI engine by adopting the concept of variable compression ratio (VCR technology, especially when fuels with better anti-knock characteristics are used. The uncertainty analysis of the experiments based on the specifications of the equipment used is also tabulated.

  13. Experimental investigation of particle emissions under different EGR ratios on a diesel engine fueled by blends of diesel/gasoline/n-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haozhong; Liu, Qingsheng; Wang, Qingxin; Zhou, Chengzhong; Mo, Chunlan; Wang, Xueqiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of EGR and blend fuels on particulate emission were studied in CI engine. • EGR ⩽ 20%, gasoline or n-butanol increases total particulate number concentration. • EGR ⩾ 30%, gasoline or n-butanol reduces total particulate number concentration. • As EGR ratio increased, the particulate mass concentrations of four fuels increased. • Gasoline or n-butanol increases the ratio of sub-25 nm particles number concentration. - Abstract: The particle emission characteristics of a high-pressure common-rail engine under different EGR conditions were investigated, using pure diesel (D100), diesel/gasoline (with a volume ratio of 70:30, D70G30), diesel/n-butanol (with a volume ratio of 70:30, D70B30) and diesel/gasoline/n-butanol (with a volume ratio of 70:15:15, D70G15B15) for combustion. Our results show that, with increasing EGR ratios, the in-cylinder pressure peak decreases and the heat release is delayed for the combustion of each fuel. At an EGR ratio of 30%, the combustion pressure peaks of D70G30, D70B30, D70G15B15 and D100 have similar values; with an EGR ratio of 40%, the combustion pressure peaks and release rate peaks of D70G30 and D70G15B15 are both lower with respect to D100. For small and medium EGR ratios (⩽20%), after the addition of gasoline and/or n-butanol to the fuel, the total particle number concentration (TPNC) increases, while both the soot emissions and the average geometric size of particles decrease. At large EGR ratios (30% and 40%), the TPNC of D70B30, D70G15B15 and D70G20 compared to D100 are reduced by a maximum amount of 74.7%, 66.7% and 28.6%, respectively. As the EGR ratio increases, the total particle mass concentration increases gradually for all four fuels. Blending gasoline or/and n-butanol into diesel induces an increase in the number concentration of sub-25 nm particles (PN25) which may be harmful in terms of health. However, the PN25 decreases with increasing the EGR ratio for all the tested fuels

  14. Combined effects of cooled EGR and a higher geometric compression ratio on thermal efficiency improvement of a downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jianye; Xu, Min; Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments for the effects of cooled EGR and two compression ratios (CR) on fuel efficiency were conducted. • The mechanism for the observed fuel efficiency behaviors by cooled EGR and high CR was clarified. • Cooled EGR offers more fuel efficiency improvement than elevating CR from 9.3 to 10.9. • Combining 18–25% cooled EGR with 10.9 CR lead to 2.1–3.5% brake thermal efficiency improvements. - Abstract: The downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. However, the boosted engine is typically designed at a lower geometric compression ratio (CR) due to the increased knock tendency in comparison to naturally aspirated engines, limiting the potential of improving fuel economy. On the other hand, cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has drawn attention due to the potential to suppress knock and improve fuel economy. Combing the effects of boosting, increased CR and cooled EGR to further improve fuel economy within acceptable knock tolerance has been investigated using a 2.0 L downsized boosted SIDI engine over a wide range of engine operating conditions from 1000 rpm to 3000 rpm at low to high loads. To clarify the mechanism of this complicated effects, the first law of thermodynamics analysis was conducted with the inputs from GT-Power® engine simulation. Experiment results indicate that cooled EGR provides more brake thermal efficiency improvement than increasing geometric CR from 9.3 to 10.9. The benefit of brake thermal efficiency from the higher CR is limited to low load conditions. The attributes for improving brake thermal efficiency by cooled EGR include reduced heat transfer loss, reduced pumping work and increased ratio of specific heats for all the engine operating conditions, as well as higher degree of constant volume heat release only for the knock-limited high load conditions. The combined effects of 18–25% cooled EGR

  15. Influence of swirl ratio on fuel distribution and cyclic variation under flash boiling conditions in a spark ignition direct injection gasoline engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jie; Xu, Min; Hung, David L.S.; Wu, Qiang; Dong, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of swirl on fuel distribution studied using laser induced fluorescence. • Gradient is sufficient for fuel spatial distribution variation analysis. • Close relation between fuel distribution and flame initiation/development. • Quantitative analysis shows high swirl suppresses variation of fuel distribution. • High order modes capable of identifying the distribution fluctuation patterns. - Abstract: One effective way of suppressing the cycle-to-cycle variation in engine is to design a combustion system that is robust to the root causes of engine variation over the entire engine working process. Flash boiling has been demonstrated as an ideal technique to produce stable fuel spray. But the generation of stable intake flow and fuel mixture remains challenging. In this study, to evaluate the capability of enhanced swirl flow to produce repeatable fuel mixture formation, the fuel distribution inside a single cylinder optical engine under two swirl ratios were measured using laser induced fluorescence technique. The swirl ratio was regulated by a swirl control valve installed in one of the intake ports. A 266 nm wavelength laser sheet from a frequency-quadrupled laser was directed into the optical engine through the quartz liner 15 mm below the tip of the spark plug. The fluorescence signal from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in gasoline was collected by applying a 320–420 nm band pass filter mounted in front of an intensified charge coupled device camera. Test results show that the in-cylinder fuel distribution is strongly influenced by the swirl ratio. Specifically, under high swirl condition, the fuel is mainly concentrated on the left side of the combustion chamber. While under the low swirl flow, fuel is distributed more randomly over the observing plane. This agrees well with the measurements of the stable flame location. Additionally, the cycle-to-cycle variation of the fuel distribution were analyzed. Results show that well

  16. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  17. Air to fuel ratio sensor for internal combustion engine control system; Nainen kikan no nensho seigyoyo kunen hi sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuzuki, M.; Kawai, T.; Yamada, T.; Nishio [NGK Spark Plug Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Air to fuel ratio sensor is used for emission control system of three-way catalyst, and constitutes the important functional part of combustion control system. For further precise combustion control application, universal air to fuel ratio heated exhaust gas oxygen sensor (UEGO sensor) has been developed. This paper introduces heater control system for constant element temperature of UEGO sensor. By the heater wattage feedback control of sensing cell impedance, the change of sensor element temperature is decreased. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Adaptation Method for Overall and Local Performances of Gas Turbine Engine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangjo; Kim, Kuisoon; Son, Changmin

    2018-04-01

    An adaptation method was proposed to improve the modeling accuracy of overall and local performances of gas turbine engine. The adaptation method was divided into two steps. First, the overall performance parameters such as engine thrust, thermal efficiency, and pressure ratio were adapted by calibrating compressor maps, and second, the local performance parameters such as temperature of component intersection and shaft speed were adjusted by additional adaptation factors. An optimization technique was used to find the correlation equation of adaptation factors for compressor performance maps. The multi-island genetic algorithm (MIGA) was employed in the present optimization. The correlations of local adaptation factors were generated based on the difference between the first adapted engine model and performance test data. The proposed adaptation method applied to a low-bypass ratio turbofan engine of 12,000 lb thrust. The gas turbine engine model was generated and validated based on the performance test data in the sea-level static condition. In flight condition at 20,000 ft and 0.9 Mach number, the result of adapted engine model showed improved prediction in engine thrust (overall performance parameter) by reducing the difference from 14.5 to 3.3%. Moreover, there was further improvement in the comparison of low-pressure turbine exit temperature (local performance parameter) as the difference is reduced from 3.2 to 0.4%.

  19. Performance assessment of a multi-fuel hybrid engine for future aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, F.; Gangoli Rao, A.; Bhat, Abhishek; Chen, Min

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the performance assessment of a novel turbofan engine using two energy sources: Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and kerosene, called Multi-Fuel Hybrid Engine (MFHE). The MFHE is a new engine concept consisting of several novel features, such as a contra-rotating fan to sustain

  20. Pollution reduction technology program for small jet aircraft engines: Class T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, T. W.; Davis, F. G.; Mongia, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Small jet aircraft engines (EPA class T1, turbojet and turbofan engines of less than 35.6 kN thrust) were evaluated with the objective of attaining emissions reduction consistent with performance constraints. Configurations employing the technological advances were screened and developed through full scale rig testing. The most promising approaches in full-scale engine testing were evaluated.

  1. Effect of yield to tensile (Y/T) ratio on the structural integrity of offshore pipeline: advanced engineering assessment using limit state design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malatesta, G; Mannucci, G; Demofonti, G [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Rome (Italy); Cumino, G [TenarisDalmine (Italy); Izquierdo, A; Tivelli, M [Tenaris Group (Mexico); Quintanilla, H [TENARIS Group (Mexico). TAMSA

    2005-07-01

    Nowadays specifications require strict Yield to Tensile ratio limitation, nevertheless a fully accepted engineering assessment of its influence on pipeline integrity is still lacking. Probabilistic analysis based on structural reliability approach (Limit State Design) aimed at quantifying the Y/T ratio influence on failure probabilities of offshore pipelines was made. In particular, Tenaris seamless pipe data were used as input for the probabilistic failure analysis. The LSD approach has been applied to two actual deep water design cases that have been on purpose selected, and the most relevant failure modes have been considered. Main result of the work is that the quantitative effect of the Y/T ratio on failure probabilities of a deep water pipeline resulted not so big as expected; it has a minor effect, especially when failure modes are governed by Y only. (author)

  2. Base Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Four-Nozzle Clustered Rocket Engine: Effect of Nozzle Pressure Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallasamy, R.; Kandula, M.; Duncil, L.; Schallhorn, P.

    2010-01-01

    The base pressure and heating characteristics of a four-nozzle clustered rocket configuration is studied numerically with the aid of OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes code. A pressure ratio (chamber pressure to freestream static pressure) range of 990 to 5,920 and a freestream Mach number range of 2.5 to 3.5 are studied. The qualitative trends of decreasing base pressure with increasing pressure ratio and increasing base heat flux with increasing pressure ratio are correctly predicted. However, the predictions for base pressure and base heat flux show deviations from the wind tunnel data. The differences in absolute values between the computation and the data are attributed to factors such as perfect gas (thermally and calorically perfect) assumption, turbulence model inaccuracies in the simulation, and lack of grid adaptation.

  3. Response surface methodology based optimization of diesel–n-butanol –cotton oil ternary blend ratios to improve engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmanlı, Alpaslan; Yüksel, Bedri; İleri, Erol; Deniz Karaoglan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RSM based optimization for optimum blend ratio of diesel fuel, n-butanol and cotton oil was done. • 65.5 vol.% diesel fuel, 23.1 vol.% n-butanol and 11.4 vol.% cotton oil (DnBC) was determined. • DnBC decreased brake torque, brake power, BTE and BMEP, while increased BSFC. • DnBC decreased NO x , CO and HC emissions. - Abstract: Many studies declare that 20% biodiesel is the optimum concentration for biodiesel–diesel fuel blends to improve performance. The present work focuses on finding diesel fuel, n-butanol, and cotton oil optimum blend ratios for diesel engine applications by using the response surface method (RSM). Experimental test fuels were prepared by choosing 7 different concentrations, where phase decomposition did not occur in the phase diagram of −10 °C. Experiments were carried out at full load conditions and the constant speed (2200 rpm) of maximum brake torque to determine engine performance and emission parameters. According to the test results of the engine, optimization was done by using RSM considering engine performance and exhaust emissions parameters, to identify the rates of concentrations of components in the optimum blend of three. Confirmation tests were employed to compare the output values of concentrations that were identified by optimization. The real experiment results and the R 2 actual values that show the relation between the outputs from the optimizations and real experiments were determined in high accordance. The optimum component concentration was determined as 65.5 vol.% diesel, 23.1 vol.% n-butanol and 11.4 vol.% cotton oil (DnBC). According to engine performance tests brake torque, brake power, BTE and BMEP of DnBC decreased while BSFC increased compared to those of diesel fuel. NO x , CO and HC emissions of DnBC drastically decreased as 11.33%, 45.17% and 81.45%, respectively

  4. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  5. Model-Based Control of an Aircraft Engine using an Optimal Tuner Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Chicatelli, Amy; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    This paper covers the development of a model-based engine control (MBEC) method- ology applied to an aircraft turbofan engine. Here, a linear model extracted from the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40k) at a cruise operating point serves as the engine and the on-board model. The on-board model is up- dated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. The focus here is on developing a methodology for MBEC with direct control of estimated parameters of interest such as thrust and stall margins. MBEC provides the ability for a tighter control bound of thrust over the entire life cycle of the engine that is not achievable using traditional control feedback, which uses engine pressure ratio or fan speed. CMAPSS40k is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the MBEC tighter thrust control. In addition, investigations of using the MBEC to provide a surge limit for the controller limit logic are presented that could provide benefits over a simple acceleration schedule that is currently used in engine control architectures.

  6. Combustion and emissions characteristics of high n-butanol/diesel ratio blend in a heavy-duty diesel engine and EGR impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Wu, Zhenkuo; Liu, Jingping; Lee, Chiafon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of EGR on high n-butanol/diesel ratio blend (Bu40) were investigated and compared with neat diesel (Bu00). • Bu40 has higher NOx due to wider combustion high-temperature region. • Bu40 has lower soot due to local lower equivalence ratio distribution. • Bu40 has higher CO due to lower gas temperature in the late expansion process. • For Bu40, EGR reduces NOx emissions dramatically with no obvious influence on soot. - Abstract: In this work, the combustion and emission fundamentals of high n-butanol/diesel ratio blend with 40% butanol (i.e., Bu40) in a heavy-duty diesel engine were investigated by experiment and simulation at constant engine speed of 1400 rpm and an IMEP of 1.0 MPa. Additionally, the impact of EGR was evaluated experimentally and compared with neat diesel fuel (i.e., Bu00). The results show that Bu40 has higher cylinder pressure, longer ignition delay, and faster burning rate than Bu00. Compared with Bu00, moreover, Bu40 has higher NOx due to wider combustion high-temperature region, lower soot due to local lower equivalence ratio distribution, and higher CO due to lower gas temperature in the late expansion process. For Bu40, EGR reduces NOx emissions dramatically with no obvious influence on soot. Meanwhile, there is no significant change in HC and CO emissions and indicated thermal efficiency (ITE) with EGR until EGR threshold is reached. When EGR rate exceeds the threshold level, HC and CO emissions increase dramatically, and ITE decreases markedly. Compared with Bu00, the threshold of Bu40 appears at lower EGR rate. Consequently, combining high butanol/diesel ratio blend with medium EGR has the potential to achieve ultra-low NOx and soot emissions simultaneously while maintaining high thermal efficiency level

  7. Study of ignition in a high compression ratio SI (spark ignition) methanol engine using LES (large eddy simulation) with detailed chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Xudong; Wang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Methanol has been recently used as an alternative to conventional fuels for internal combustion engines in order to satisfy some environmental and economical concerns. In this paper, the ignition in a high compression ratio SI (spark ignition) methanol engine was studied by using LES (large eddy simulation) with detailed chemical kinetics. A 21-species, 84-reaction methanol mechanism was adopted to simulate the auto-ignition process of the methanol/air mixture. The MIT (minimum ignition temperature) and MIE (minimum ignition energy) are two important properties for designing safety standards and understanding the ignition process of combustible mixtures. The effects of the flame kernel size, flame kernel temperature and equivalence ratio were also examined on MIT, MIE and IDP (ignition delay period). The methanol mechanism was validated by experimental test. The simulated results showed that the flame kernel size, temperature and energy dramatically affected the values of the MIT, MIE and IDP for a methanol/air mixture, the value of the ignition delay period was not only related to the flame kernel energy, but also to the flame kernel temperature. - Highlights: • We used LES (large eddy simulation) coupled with detailed chemical kinetics to simulate methanol ignition. • The flame kernel size and temperature affected the minimum ignition temperature. • The flame kernel temperature and energy affected the ignition delay period. • The equivalence ratio of methanol–air mixture affected the ignition delay period

  8. Acoustic Performance of Novel Fan Noise Reduction Technologies for a High Bypass Model Turbofan at Simulated Flights Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David M.; Woodward, Richard P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    Two novel fan noise reduction technologies, over the rotor acoustic treatment and soft stator vane technologies, were tested in an ultra-high bypass ratio turbofan model in the NASA Glenn Research Center s 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The performance of these technologies was compared to that of the baseline fan configuration, which did not have these technologies. Sideline acoustic data and hot film flow data were acquired and are used to determine the effectiveness of the various treatments. The material used for the over the rotor treatment was foam metal and two different types were used. The soft stator vanes had several internal cavities tuned to target certain frequencies. In order to accommodate the cavities it was necessary to use a cut-on stator to demonstrate the soft vane concept.

  9. Comparative study of engineering properties of two-lime waste tire particle soil and soil with lime/loess ratio of 3:7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiecheng, Yan; Xingyuan, Zhang; Hongping, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This study describes an analytical comparison of the engineering characteristics of two-lime waste tire particle soil and soil with lime/loess ratio of 3:7 using density measurements, results of indoor consolidation tests, and direct shear tests to examine the strength and deformation characteristics. It investigates the engineering performance of collapsible loess treated with waste tire particles and lime. The results indicate that (1) the shear strength of the two-lime waste tire particle soils increases continuously with soil age; and (2) the two-lime waste tire particle soils are light-weight, strong, and low-deformation soils, and can be applied primarily to improve the foundation soil conditions in areas with collapsible loess soils. This could address the problem of used tire disposal, while providing a new method to consider and manage collapsible loess soils.

  10. Recent progress in fan and compressor for aeroengine. Koku engine yo fan asshukuki no saikin no gijutsu shinpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y [National Aerospace Lab., Chofu, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-03-10

    As the main components of the aeroengine, the fan and compressor reach to extremely high level stage technologically. Also at present when about 50 years passed after the jet engine was applied in practice, however, an effort for a modification is being continued, and furthermore even in the 1990s, the engines that adopted the new technologies are in succession being put in practical application. New engines in the 1990s are being applied in practice by adopting the study results on fan and compressor from the 1970s to the 1980s. Because, which way the future fan and compressor of the aircraft will go to has a relation with an aircraft trend from now on, and even in the 2000s the high subsonic speed aircrafts will be a center of the private air planes. The engine of high subsonic speed aircraft in the next generation will become an ultrahigh bypass ratio engine, the thrust efficiency is raised and noise is lowered, by lowering a fan pressure ratio and by increasing an air flow quantity compared with the current high bypass ratio turbofan engine. 16 figs.

  11. Systematic in vitro nanotoxicity study on anodic alumina nanotubes with engineered aspect ratio: understanding nanotoxicity by a nanomaterial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Kaur, Gagandeep; Zysk, Aneta; Liapis, Vasilios; Hay, Shelley; Santos, Abel; Losic, Dusan; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report a detailed and systematic approach for studying the in vitro nanotoxicity study of high aspect ratio (HAR) nanomaterials using anodic alumina nanotubes (AANTs) as a nanomaterial model. AANTs with bio-inert properties and tailored aspect ratios ranging from 7.8 to 63.3 were synthesized by an electrochemical pulse anodization process. Cytotoxicity studies were conducted with RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells and MDA-MB 231-TXSA human breast cancer cells through several toxicity parameters, including cell viability and morphology, pro-inflammatory response, mitochondrial depolarization, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), induction of autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The resulting toxicity patterns were cell-type dependent and strongly related with AANTs dose, length of time, and importantly the AR of AANTs. Long AANTs triggered enhanced cell death, morphological changes, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) release, LMP and ER stress than short AANTs. The toxic AR window of AANTs was determined to be 7.8, which is shorter than that of other previously reported HAR nanomaterials. This toxic AR window provides a promising opportunity to control the nanotoxicity of HAR nanomaterials for their advanced drug delivery application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Miller cycle effects on improvement of fuel economy in a highly boosted, high compression ratio, direct-injection gasoline engine: EIVC vs. LIVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng; Chen, Ziqian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • At high load, LIVC is superior over EIVC in improving fuel economy. • The improvement with LIVC is due to advanced combustion phasing and increased pumping work. • At low load, EIVC is better than LIVC in improving fuel economy. • Pumping loss with EIVC is smaller than with LIVC at low load. • But heat release rate with EIVC is slower than with LIVC. - Abstract: A combination of downsizing, highly boosting and direct injection (DI) is an effective way to improve fuel economy of gasoline engines without the penalties of reduced torque or power output. At high loads, however, knock problem becomes severer when increasing the intake boosting. As a compromise, geometric compression ratio (CR) is usually reduced to mitigate knock, and the improvement of fuel economy is discounted. Application of Miller cycle, which can be realized by either early or late intake valve closing (EIVC or LIVC), has the potential to reduce the effective CR and suppress knock. In this paper, the effects of EIVC and LIVC on the fuel economy of a boosted DI gasoline production engine reformed with a geometric CR of 12.0 are experimentally compared at low and high loads. Compared to the original production engine with CR 9.3, at the high load operation, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) is improved by 4.7% with CR12.0 and LIVC, while the effect of EIVC on improving BSFC is negligibly small. At the low load operation, combined with CR12.0, LIVC and EIVC improve the fuel economy by 6.8% and 7.4%, respectively, compared to the production engine. The mechanism behind the effects of LIVC and EIVC on improving the fuel economy is discussed. These results will be a valuable reference for engine designers and researchers

  13. Simulation and material testing of jet engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA software engine simulator version U 1.7a beta has been used for simulation and material testing of jet engines. Specifications of Modem Jet Engines are stated, and then engine simulator is applied on these specifications. This simulator can simulate turbojet, afterburner, turbofan and ram jet. The material of many components of engine may be varied. Conventional and advanced materials for jet engines can be simulated and tested. These materials can be actively cooled to increase the operating temperature limit. As soon as temperature of any engine component exceeds the temperature limit of material, a warning message flashes across screen. Temperature Limits Exceeded. This flashing message remainst here until necessaryc hangesa re carried out in engine operationp rocedure. Selection Criteria of Engines is stated for piston prop, turboprop, turbofan, turbojet, and turbojet with afterburner and Ramjet. Several standard engines are modeled in Engine Simulator. These engines can. be compared by several engineering specifications. The design, modeling, simulation and testing of engines helps to better understand different types of materials used in jet engines. (author)

  14. Estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio of an internal combustion engine by the use of pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunestaal, Per

    2000-03-01

    This thesis investigates the use of cylinder pressure measurements for estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio in a spark ignited internal combustion engine. An estimation model which uses the net heat release profile for estimating the cylinder air/fuel ratio of a spark ignition engine is developed. The net heat release profile is computed from the cylinder pressure trace and quantifies the conversion of chemical energy of the reactants in the charge into thermal energy. The net heat release profile does not take heat- or mass transfer into account. Cycle-averaged air/fuel ratio estimates over a range of engine speeds and loads show an RMS error of 4.1% compared to measurements in the exhaust. A thermochemical model of the combustion process in an internal combustion engine is developed. It uses a simple chemical combustion reaction, polynominal fits of internal energy as function of temperature, and the first law of thermodynamics to derive a relationship between measured cylinder pressure and the progress of the combustion process. Simplifying assumptions are made to arrive at an equation which relates the net heat release to the cylinder pressure. Two methods for estimating the sensor offset of a cylinder pressure transducer are developed. Both methods fit the pressure data during the pre-combustion phase of the compression stroke to a polytropic curve. The first method assumes a known polytropic exponent, and the other estimates the polytropic exponent. The first method results in a linear least-squares problem, and the second method results in a nonlinear least-squares problem. The nonlinear least-squares problem is solved by separating out the nonlinear dependence and solving the single-variable minimization problem. For this, a finite difference Newton method is derived. Using this method, the cost of solving the nonlinear least-squares problem is only slightly higher than solving the linear least-squares problem. Both methods show good statistical

  15. Adaptive Control Using Fully Online Sequential-Extreme Learning Machine and a Case Study on Engine Air-Fuel Ratio Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Kin Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most adaptive neural control schemes are based on stochastic gradient-descent backpropagation (SGBP, which suffers from local minima problem. Although the recently proposed regularized online sequential-extreme learning machine (ReOS-ELM can overcome this issue, it requires a batch of representative initial training data to construct a base model before online learning. The initial data is usually difficult to collect in adaptive control applications. Therefore, this paper proposes an improved version of ReOS-ELM, entitled fully online sequential-extreme learning machine (FOS-ELM. While retaining the advantages of ReOS-ELM, FOS-ELM discards the initial training phase, and hence becomes suitable for adaptive control applications. To demonstrate its effectiveness, FOS-ELM was applied to the adaptive control of engine air-fuel ratio based on a simulated engine model. Besides, controller parameters were also analyzed, in which it is found that large hidden node number with small regularization parameter leads to the best performance. A comparison among FOS-ELM and SGBP was also conducted. The result indicates that FOS-ELM achieves better tracking and convergence performance than SGBP, since FOS-ELM tends to learn the unknown engine model globally whereas SGBP tends to “forget” what it has learnt. This implies that FOS-ELM is more preferable for adaptive control applications.

  16. Model Engine Performance Measurement From Force Balance Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeracki, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A large scale model representative of a low-noise, high bypass ratio turbofan engine was tested for acoustics and performance in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. This test was part of NASA's continuing Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. The low tip speed fan, nacelle, and an un-powered core passage (with core inlet guide vanes) were simulated. The fan blades and hub are mounted on a rotating thrust and torque balance. The nacelle, bypass duct stators, and core passage are attached to a six component force balance. The two balance forces, when corrected for internal pressure tares, measure the total thrust-minus-drag of the engine simulator. Corrected for scaling and other effects, it is basically the same force that the engine supports would feel, operating at similar conditions. A control volume is shown and discussed, identifying the various force components of the engine simulator thrust and definitions of net thrust. Several wind tunnel runs with nearly the same hardware installed are compared, to identify the repeatability of the measured thrust-minus-drag. Other wind tunnel runs, with hardware changes that affected fan performance, are compared to the baseline configuration, and the thrust and torque effects are shown. Finally, a thrust comparison between the force balance and nozzle gross thrust methods is shown, and both yield very similar results.

  17. Mode-matching strategies in slowly varying engine ducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovenden, N.C.; Rienstra, S.W.

    2004-01-01

    A matching method is proposed to connect the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) source region to the computational aeroacoustics propagation region of rotor–stator interaction sound produced in a turbofan engine. The method is based on a modal decomposition across three neighbouring axial interfaces

  18. Mode-matching strategies in slowly varying engine ducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovenden, N.C.; Rienstra, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    A matching method is proposed to connect the CFD source region to the CAA propagation region of rotorstator interaction sound produced in a turbofan engine. The method is based on a modal decomposition across three neighbouring axial interfaces adjacent to the matching interface. The modal

  19. Study on afterburner of aircraft engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, T [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-07-01

    Study on the afterburner for aircraft engines was reported which is used as an optimum means to produce the supersonic capability of military aircrafts. The basic principle and types of the afterburner were outlined, and as the major problem concerning turbofan afterburners, a combustion capacity at low temperature in fan air flow was discussed, in particular, flame stabilization and combustion efficiency. Basic studies were conducted by fuel spray test, combustion stability test, sector model combustion test and numerical analysis of afterburner internal flow. As a result, a mixing spray fuel injection system with injection of a small amount of fuel into flameholder wake resulted in broadening of a combustible region, and an original flameholder combined with a scoop and double gutters caused a high combustion efficiency. The prototype afterburner was developed for F3 turbofan engines in association with Japan Defence Agency, and a combustion efficiency of 74% was obtained in on-engine running test. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  20. Influence of fuel type, dilution and equivalence ratio on the emission reduction from the auto-ignition in an Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, TIPs - Fluid Physics, CP165/67, 50 Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Amouroux, Jacques [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    One technology that seems to be promising for automobile pollution reduction is the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). This technology still faces auto-ignition and emission-control problems. This paper focuses on the emission problem, since it is incumbent to realize engines that pollute less. For this purpose, this paper presents results concerning the measurement of the emissions of CO, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbons. HCCI conditions are used, with equivalence ratios between 0.26 and 0.54, inlet temperatures of 70 C and 120 C and compression ratios of 10.2 and 13.5, with different fuel types: gasoline, gasoline surrogate, diesel, diesel surrogate and mixtures of n-heptane/toluene. The effect of dilution is considered for gasoline, while the effect of the equivalence ratio is considered for all the fuels. No significant amount of NO{sub x} has been measured. It appeared that the CO, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbon emissions were reduced by decreasing the toluene content of the fuel and by decreasing the dilution. The opposite holds for CO{sub 2}. The reduction of the hydrocarbon emission appears to compete with the reduction of the CO{sub 2} emission. Diesel seemed to produce less CO and hydrocarbons than gasoline when auto-ignited. An example of emission reduction control is presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  2. 77 FR 30371 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    .... Request To Allow Special Flight Permits United Airlines and TAM Airlines requested that we allow Special... change the AD. Request To Delay USI Start Time and Repeat Inspection Time TAM Airlines requested that we....C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. Sec. 39.13 [Amended] 0 2. The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by removing...

  3. Recent technologies for reduction of aircraft propulsion noise. Kokuki engine soon teigenka no saikin no gijutsu shinpo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, H [National Aerospace Lab., Chofu, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-03-10

    Inside the jet engine, the propulsion engine for an aircraft, a high speed air current is flowing, and the rotors such as the fan, compress or, turbine and so forth are rotating with a high speed in its flowing current. The flow itself in which a high speed exhaust jet is discharged in the air from engine exhaust port, and the aerodynamic noise generated by an interaction of the flow with the material bodies are the main noise sources of the aircraft engine. Because the supersonic planes are necessary to fly with mach number 2 - 3 during cruising, the turbojet engine with a large jet exhaust speed or the low bypass ratio turbofan engine is selected. Since a noise reduction by reducing the jet exhaust speed, which was an effective measure for the high subsonic speed passenger plane, can not be applied, a reduction of the supersonic jet noise, which is hard to be reduced, becomes a necessity. In addition, in recent years, a research and development of the advanced turbo prop (ATP) aircraft with a further higher thrust efficiency are advanced as well. The aerodynamical noise reduction technologies of these engines for supersonic airplanes are summarized. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Turbofan Volume Dynamics Model for Investigations of Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic Effects in a Supersonic Commercial Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Lemon, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan simulation has been developed for use in aero-propulso-servo-elastic coupling studies, on supersonic vehicles. A one-dimensional lumped volume approach is used whereby each component (fan, high-pressure compressor, combustor, etc.) is represented as a single volume using characteristic performance maps and conservation equations for continuity, momentum and energy. The simulation is developed in the MATLAB/SIMULINK (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment in order to facilitate controls development, and ease of integration with a future aero-servo-elastic vehicle model being developed at NASA Langley. The complete simulation demonstrated steady state results that closely match a proposed engine suitable for a supersonic business jet at the cruise condition. Preliminary investigation of the transient simulation revealed expected trends for fuel flow disturbances as well as upstream pressure disturbances. A framework for system identification enables development of linear models for controller design. Utilizing this framework, a transfer function modeling an upstream pressure disturbance s impacts on the engine speed is developed as an illustrative case of the system identification. This work will eventually enable an overall vehicle aero-propulso-servo-elastic model

  5. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Brown, Cliff; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations - a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 inches. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed 4 sweeps, for a total span of 168 inches acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels.

  6. Hybrid Wing Body Shielding Studies Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source Generating Typical Turbofan Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel l.; Brown, Clifford A.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14- by 22-ft wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8 percent scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8 percent rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the test was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting the engine on the upper surface of an HWB aircraft using the projected signature of the engine currently proposed for the HWB. The modal structures at the rating points were generated from inlet and exhaust nacelle configurations--a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface and vertical control surfaces with correct plan form shapes were also tested to determine their additional impact on shielding. Radiated acoustic data were acquired from a traversing linear array of 13 microphones, spanning 36 in. Two planes perpendicular, and two planes parallel, to the axis of the nacelle were acquired from the array sweep. In each plane the linear array traversed four sweeps, for a total span of 168 in. acquired. The resolution of the sweep is variable, so that points closer to the model are taken at a higher resolution. Contour plots of Sound Pressure Levels, and integrated Power Levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations are presented in this paper; as well as the in-duct mode power levels

  7. Aircraft engines. IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffles, P C

    1989-01-01

    Configurational design and thermodynamic performance gain trends are projected into the next 50 years, in view of the growing interest of aircraft manufacturers in both larger and more efficient high-bypass turbofan engines for subsonic flight and variable cycle engines for supersonic flight. Ceramic- and metal-matrix composites are envisioned as the key to achievement of turbine inlet temperatures 300 C higher than the 1400 C which is characteristic of the state-of-the-art, with the requisite high stiffness, strength, and low density. Such fiber-reinforced materials can be readily tailored to furnish greatest strength in a specific direction of loading. Large, low-density engines are critical elements of future 1000-seat aircraft.

  8. Advanced Propfan Engine Technology (APET) and Single-rotation Gearbox/Pitch Change Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargisson, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The projected performance, in the 1990's time period, of the equivalent technology level high bypass ratio turbofan powered aircraft (at the 150 passenger size) is compared with advanced turboprop propulsion systems. Fuel burn analysis, economic analysis, and pollution (noise, emissions) estimates were made. Three different cruise Mach numbers were investigated for both the turbofan and the turboprop systems. Aerodynamic design and performance estimates were made for nacelles, inlets, and exhaust systems. Air to oil heat exchangers were investigated for oil cooling advanced gearboxes at the 12,500 SHP level. The results and conclusions are positive in that high speed turboprop aircraft will exhibit superior fuel burn characteristics and lower operating costs when compared with equivalent technology turbofan aircraft.

  9. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this ...

  10. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Fibonacci numbers, golden ratio, Sanskrit prosody, solar panel. Abstract. Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany ...

  11. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is sym- metrical and in proportion. If a face or a structure is in pro- portion, we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful. The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found in many structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers. In this article, we explore this ...

  12. Investigation the performance of 0-D and 3-d combustion simulation softwares for modelling HCCI engine with high air excess ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Coşkun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, performance of zero and three dimensional simulations codes that used for simulate a homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine fueled with Primary Reference Fuel PRF (85% iso-octane and 15% n-heptane were investigated. 0-D code, called as SRM Suite (Stochastic Reactor Model which can simulate engine combustion by using stochastic reactor model technique were used. Ansys-Fluent which can simulate computational fluid dynamics (CFD was used for 3-D engine combustion simulations. Simulations were evaluated for both commercial codes in terms of combustion, heat transfer and emissions in a HCCI engine. Chemical kinetic mechanisms which developed by Tsurushima including 33 species and 38 reactions for surrogate PRF fuel were used for combustion simulations. Analysis showed that both codes have advantages over each other.

  13. Experimental investigation on the availability, performance, combustion and emission distinctiveness of bael oil/ diesel/ diethyl ether blends powered in a variable compression ratio diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, M.; Malayalamurthi, R.

    2018-02-01

    The present work aims at experimental investigation on the combined effect of injection timing (IT) and injection pressure (IP) on the performance and emissions characteristics, and exergy analysis of a compression-ignition (CI) engine powered with bael oil blends. The tests were conducted using ternary blends of bael oil, diethyl ether (DEE) and neat diesel (D) at various engine loads at a constant engine speed (1500 rpm). With B2 (60%D + 30%bael oil+10%DEE) fuel, the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the engine is augmented by 3.5%, reduction of 4.7% of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission has been observed at 100% engine load with 250 bar IP. B2 fuel exhibits 7% lower scale of HC emissions compared to that of diesel fuel at 100% engine load in 23 °bTDC IT. The increment in both cooling water and exhaust gas availabilities lead to increasing exergy efficiency with increasing load. The exergy efficiency of about 62.17% has been recorded by B2 fuel at an injection pressure of 230 IP bar with 100% load. On the whole, B2 fuel displays the best performance and combustion characteristics. It also exhibits better characteristics of emissions level in terms of lower HC, smoke opacity and NOx.

  14. Sex ratios

    OpenAIRE

    West, Stuart A; Reece, S E; Sheldon, Ben C

    2002-01-01

    Sex ratio theory attempts to explain variation at all levels (species, population, individual, brood) in the proportion of offspring that are male (the sex ratio). In many cases this work has been extremely successful, providing qualitative and even quantitative explanations of sex ratio variation. However, this is not always the situation, and one of the greatest remaining problems is explaining broad taxonomic patterns. Specifically, why do different organisms show so ...

  15. Identification of secondary aerosol precursors emitted by an aircraft turbofan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Doğuşhan; El Haddad, Imad; Brem, Benjamin T.; Bruns, Emily; Bozetti, Carlo; Corbin, Joel; Durdina, Lukas; Huang, Ru-Jin; Jiang, Jianhui; Klein, Felix; Lavi, Avi; Pieber, Simone M.; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Rudich, Yinon; Slowik, Jay G.; Wang, Jing; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, Andre S. H.

    2018-05-01

    Oxidative processing of aircraft turbine-engine exhausts was studied using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber at different engine loads corresponding to typical flight operations. Measurements were conducted at an engine test cell. Organic gases (OGs) and particle emissions pre- and post-PAM were measured. A suite of instruments, including a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) for OGs, a multigas analyzer for CO, CO2, NOx, and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for nonrefractory particulate matter (NR-PM1) were used. Total aerosol mass was dominated by secondary aerosol formation, which was approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the primary aerosol. The chemical composition of both gaseous and particle emissions were also monitored at different engine loads and were thrust-dependent. At idling load (thrust 2.5-7 %), more than 90 % of the secondary particle mass was organic and could mostly be explained by the oxidation of gaseous aromatic species, e.g., benzene; toluene; xylenes; tri-, tetra-, and pentamethyl-benzene; and naphthalene. The oxygenated-aromatics, e.g., phenol, furans, were also included in this aromatic fraction and their oxidation could alone explain up to 25 % of the secondary organic particle mass at idling loads. The organic fraction decreased with thrust level, while the inorganic fraction increased. At an approximated cruise load sulfates comprised 85 % of the total secondary particle mass.

  16. Identification of secondary aerosol precursors emitted by an aircraft turbofan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kılıç

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative processing of aircraft turbine-engine exhausts was studied using a potential aerosol mass (PAM chamber at different engine loads corresponding to typical flight operations. Measurements were conducted at an engine test cell. Organic gases (OGs and particle emissions pre- and post-PAM were measured. A suite of instruments, including a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS for OGs, a multigas analyzer for CO, CO2, NOx, and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS for nonrefractory particulate matter (NR-PM1 were used. Total aerosol mass was dominated by secondary aerosol formation, which was approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the primary aerosol. The chemical composition of both gaseous and particle emissions were also monitored at different engine loads and were thrust-dependent. At idling load (thrust 2.5–7 %, more than 90 % of the secondary particle mass was organic and could mostly be explained by the oxidation of gaseous aromatic species, e.g., benzene; toluene; xylenes; tri-, tetra-, and pentamethyl-benzene; and naphthalene. The oxygenated-aromatics, e.g., phenol, furans, were also included in this aromatic fraction and their oxidation could alone explain up to 25 % of the secondary organic particle mass at idling loads. The organic fraction decreased with thrust level, while the inorganic fraction increased. At an approximated cruise load sulfates comprised 85 % of the total secondary particle mass.

  17. 77 FR 56756 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... booster rotors and rework or replacement of them as terminating action to the repetitive inspections. We... persons on the ground. To address this condition, RRD has developed an inspection program and a rework for... and if any crack is found, replacement with a serviceable part. This AD also requires rework of all...

  18. 75 FR 71351 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney PW4000 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... removals, and one report of a test cell event from a repaired tube that cracked. We are issuing this AD to... regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The address for the Docket Office (phone..., considered the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the...

  19. 78 FR 48339 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Corporation Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... We invite you to send any written relevant data, views, or arguments about this proposed AD. Send... maintain their existing approved life limits. (d) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by stress and...

  20. 77 FR 60288 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (P&W) Division Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Guidance Service Information Pratt & Whitney and United Parcel Service Co. (UPS) requested that we add the... service information. Request To Duplicate the Strip and Recoat Requirements United Airlines requested that... in the AD. We did not add that Special Instruction reference to the AD. Request To Add Service...

  1. 77 FR 16917 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... heat treated after application of silver plating. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the HP... treatment after application of silver plating. This condition, if not corrected, could result in a stage 2... directive (AD): 2012-06-17 Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (Formerly Rolls-Royce plc, Derby, England...

  2. 78 FR 59291 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co. KG Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... received by the closing date and may amend this proposed AD based on those comments. We will post all.... Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of the proposed AD on U.S. operators to be $598,520... Deutschland GmbH, formerly Rolls-Royce plc): Docket No. FAA-2013- 0342; Directorate Identifier 2013-NE-14-AD...

  3. 75 FR 264 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ...-1004; Directorate Identifier 2009-NE-36-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc.... Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, England; telephone: 011-44-1332-249428; fax: 011-44-1332... AD. We will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this proposed AD based...

  4. 76 FR 52288 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ...-0836; Directorate Identifier 2010-NE-38-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR... plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom: telephone 44 (0) 1332 242424; fax 44 (0) 1332... based on those comments. We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations...

  5. 78 FR 45842 - Airworthiness Directives; CFM International, S. A. Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments... Virgin America Airlines requested that use of earlier revisions of the SBs be allowed. Earlier revisions...

  6. 77 FR 12444 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... not agree with unconditional deferral to the next shop visit as unacceptable cooling flow could affect... acceptable flows determined during an optional borescope inspection. Request To Revise Criteria for Shop... bore cooling flow for a specified number of cycles. We are issuing this AD to prevent an uncontained...

  7. 76 FR 47056 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Models PW4074 and PW4077 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ...) of the rim for cracks. This AD was prompted by multiple shop findings of cracked 15th stage HPC disks... Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket... the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of...

  8. 77 FR 11017 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Models PW4074 and PW4077 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... (BSI) or eddy current inspection (ECI) of the disk outer rim front rail for cracks prior to... person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal... this AD, using a drawdown plan that includes a BSI or ECI of the disk outer rim front rail for cracks...

  9. 75 FR 67253 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Models PW4074 and PW4077 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... inspection (BSI) or eddy current inspection (ECI) of the rim for cracks. This proposed AD results from... electronically. Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE..., that describes procedures for performing a BSI or ECI for cracks in the front rail of the outer rim of...

  10. 75 FR 77570 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ...Rulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and follow the instructions for sending your comments... attaching the side link to the fan frame--front high-pressure compressor case or the bolt attaching the side... haven't received any reports of cracks in the new P/N links. However, due to the similarity in design...

  11. Computational modelling of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC waste heat recovery system for an aircraft engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadon S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Escalating fuel prices and carbon dioxide emission are causing new interest in methods to increase the thrust force of an aircraft engine with limitation of fuel consumption. One viable means is the conversion of exhaust engine waste heat to a more useful form of energy or to be used in the aircraft environmental system. A one-dimensional analysis method has been proposed for the organic Rankine cycle (ORC waste heat recovery system for turbofan engine in this paper. The paper contains two main parts: validation of the numerical model and a performance prediction of turbofan engine integrated to an ORC system. The cycle is compared with industrial waste heat recovery system from Hangzhou Chinen Steam Turbine Power CO., Ltd. The results show that thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC of the turbofan engine reach lowest value at 0.91 lbm/lbf.h for 7000 lbf of thrust force. When the system installation weight is applied, the system results in a 2.0% reduction in fuel burn. Hence implementation of ORC system for waste heat recovery to an aircraft engine can bring a great potential to the aviation industry.

  12. Análisis fluidodinámico de un turbofan civil

    OpenAIRE

    Yuste Valero, Borja

    2008-01-01

    Este Trabajo Final de Carrera se centra en un estudio fluidodinámico de un motor a reacción, en este caso un turbofan, de un avión comercial en concreto. El objetivo principal es proponer una mezcla de flujo primario y secundario en un motor que originalmente no los une. Para ello hemos creado una pieza con la que conseguimos esa mezcla. A partir de ahí, y mediante un software de CFD (Computacional Fluid Dynamics), obtener valores de velocidad, presión, temperatura y flujo para hallar el E...

  13. Aircraft Wing for Over-The-Wing Mounting of Engine Nacelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrew S. (Inventor); Kinney, David J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An aircraft wing has an inboard section and an outboard section. The inboard section is attached (i) on one side thereof to the aircraft's fuselage, and (ii) on an opposing side thereof to an inboard side of a turbofan engine nacelle in an over-the-wing mounting position. The outboard section's leading edge has a sweep of at least 20 degrees. The inboard section's leading edge has a sweep between -15 and +15 degrees, and extends from the fuselage to an attachment position on the nacelle that is forward of an index position defined as an imaginary intersection between the sweep of the outboard section's leading edge and the inboard side of the nacelle. In an alternate embodiment, the turbofan engine nacelle is replaced with an open rotor engine nacelle.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  15. Post-Synapse Model Cell for Synaptic Glutamate Receptor (GluR-Based Biosensing: Strategy and Engineering to Maximize Ligand-Gated Ion-Flux Achieving High Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Haruyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based biosensing is a “smart” way to obtain efficacy-information on the effect of applied chemical on cellular biological cascade. We have proposed an engineered post-synapse model cell-based biosensors to investigate the effects of chemicals on ionotropic glutamate receptor (GluR, which is a focus of attention as a molecular target for clinical neural drug discovery. The engineered model cell has several advantages over native cells, including improved ease of handling and better reproducibility in the application of cell-based biosensors. However, in general, cell-based biosensors often have low signal-to-noise (S/N ratios due to the low level of cellular responses. In order to obtain a higher S/N ratio in model cells, we have attempted to design a tactic model cell with elevated cellular response. We have revealed that the increase GluR expression level is not directly connected to the amplification of cellular responses because the saturation of surface expression of GluR, leading to a limit on the total ion influx. Furthermore, coexpression of GluR with a voltage-gated potassium channel increased Ca2+ ion influx beyond levels obtained with saturating amounts of GluR alone. The construction of model cells based on strategy of amplifying ion flux per individual receptors can be used to perform smart cell-based biosensing with an improved S/N ratio.

  16. Assessment of n-pentanol/Calophyllum inophyllum/diesel blends on the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a constant-speed variable compression ratio direct injection diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Purnachandran; Kasimani, Ramesh; Peer, Mohamed Shameer; Rajamohan, Sakthivel

    2018-05-01

    Alcohol is used as an additive for a long time with the petroleum-based fuels. In this study, the higher alcohol, n-pentanol, was used as an additive to Calophyllum inophyllum (CI) biodiesel/diesel blends at 10, 15, and 20% by volume. In all blends, the ratio of CI was maintained at 20% by volume. The engine characteristics of the pentanol fuel blends were compared with the diesel and CI20 (Calophyllum inophyllum 20% and diesel 80%) biodiesel blend. The nitrogen oxide (NO) emission of the pentanol fuel blends showed an increased value than CI20 and neat diesel fuel. The carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) also increased with increase in pentanol addition with the fuel blends than CI20 fuel blend and diesel. The carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were decreased with increase in pentanol proportion in the blend than the CI20 fuel and diesel. The smoke emission was reduced and the combustion characteristics of the engine were also improved by using pentanol blended fuels. From this investigation, it is suggested that 20% pentanol addition with the biodiesel/diesel fuel is suitable for improved performance and combustion characteristics of a diesel engine without any engine modifications, whereas CO 2 and NO emissions increased with addition of pentanol due to effective combustion.

  17. Generation After Next Propulsor Research: Robust Design for Embedded Engine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, David J.; Tillman, Gregory; O'Brien, Walter F.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United Technologies Research Center and Virginia Polytechnic and State University have contracted to pursue multi-disciplinary research into boundary layer ingesting (BLI) propulsors for generation after next environmentally responsible subsonic fixed wing aircraft. This Robust Design for Embedded Engine Systems project first conducted a high-level vehicle system study based on a large commercial transport class hybrid wing body aircraft, which determined that a 3 to 5 percent reduction in fuel burn could be achieved over a 7,500 nanometer mission. Both pylon-mounted baseline and BLI propulsion systems were based on a low-pressure-ratio fan (1.35) in an ultra-high-bypass ratio engine (16), consistent with the next generation of advanced commercial turbofans. An optimized, coupled BLI inlet and fan system was subsequently designed to achieve performance targets identified in the system study. The resulting system possesses an inlet with total pressure losses less than 0.5%, and a fan stage with an efficiency debit of less than 1.5 percent relative to the pylon-mounted, clean-inflow baseline. The subject research project has identified tools and methodologies necessary for the design of next-generation, highly-airframe-integrated propulsion systems. These tools will be validated in future large-scale testing of the BLI inlet / fan system in NASA's 8 foot x 6 foot transonic wind tunnel. In addition, fan unsteady response to screen-generated total pressure distortion is being characterized experimentally in a JT15D engine test rig. These data will document engine sensitivities to distortion magnitude and spatial distribution, providing early insight into key physical processes that will control BLI propulsor design.

  18. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accomodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part I-Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2-Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25.800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3-Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine, two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR

  19. Conceptual study of advanced VTOL transport aircraft engine; Kosoku VTOL kiyo engine no gainen kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y; Endo, M; Matsuda, Y; Sugiyama, N; Watanabe, M; Sugahara, N; Yamamoto, K [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    This report proposes the concept of an ultra-low noise engine for advanced high subsonic VTOL transport aircraft, and discusses its technological feasibility. As one of the applications of the previously reported `separated core turbofan engine,` the conceptual engine is composed of 3 core engines, 2 cruise fan engines for high subsonic cruising and 6 lift fan engines producing thrust of 98kN (10000kgf)/engine. The core turbojet engine bleeds a large amount of air at the outlet of a compressor to supply driving high-pressure air for fans to other engines. The lift fan engine is composed of a lift fan, driving combustor, turbine and speed reduction gear, and is featured by not only high operation stability and thin fan engine like a separated core engine but also ultra-low noise operation. The cruise fan engine adopts the same configuration as the lift fan engine. Since this engine configuration has no technological problems difficult to be overcome, its high technological feasibility is expected. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Influence of Compression Ratio on High Load Performance and Knock Behavior for Gasoline Port-Fuel Injection, Natural Gas Direct Injection and Blended Operation in a Spark Ignition Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamminger, Michael; Sevik, James; Scarcelli, Riccardo; Wallner, Thomas; Hall, Carrie

    2017-03-28

    Natural Gas (NG) is an alternative fuel which has attracted a lot of attention recently, in particular in the US due to shale gas availability. The higher hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio, compared to gasoline, allows for decreasing carbon dioxide emissions throughout the entire engine map. Furthermore, the high knock resistance of NG allows increasing the efficiency at high engine loads compared to fuels with lower knock resistance. NG direct injection (DI) allows for fuel to be added after intake valve closing (IVC) resulting in an increase in power density compared to an injection before IVC. Steady-state engine tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine equipped with gasoline (E10) port-fuel injection (PFI) and NG DI to allow for in-cylinder blending of both fuels. Knock investigations were performed at two discrete compression ratios (CR), 10.5 and 12.5. Operating conditions span mid-load, wide-open-throttle and boosted conditions, depending on the knock response of the fuel blend. Blended operation was performed using E10 gasoline and NG. An additional gasoline type fuel (E85) with higher knock resistance than E10 was used as a high-octane reference fuel, since the octane rating of E10-NG fuel blends is unknown. Spark timing was varied at different loads under stoichiometric conditions in order to study the knock response as well as the effects on performance and efficiency. As anticipated, results suggest that the knock resistance can be increased significantly by increasing the NG amount. Comparing the engine operation with the least knock resistant fuel, E10 PFI, and the fuel blend with the highest knock resistance, 75% NG DI, shows an increase in indicated mean effective pressure of about 9 bar at CR 12.5. The usage of reference fuels with known knock characteristics allowed an assessment of knock characteristic of intermediate E10-NG blend levels. Mathematical correlations were developed allowing characterizing the occurrence of knocking

  1. Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Engine Cycle Analysis for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, James L.; Kim, Hyun Dae; Brown, Gerald V.

    2009-01-01

    Meeting NASA's N+3 goals requires a fundamental shift in approach to aircraft and engine design. Material and design improvements allow higher pressure and higher temperature core engines which improve the thermal efficiency. Propulsive efficiency, the other half of the overall efficiency equation, however, is largely determined by the fan pressure ratio (FPR). Lower FPR increases propulsive efficiency, but also dramatically reduces fan shaft speed through the combination of larger diameter fans and reduced fan tip speed limits. The result is that below an FPR of 1.5 the maximum fan shaft speed makes direct drive turbines problematic. However, it is the low pressure ratio fans that allow the improvement in propulsive efficiency which, along with improvements in thermal efficiency in the core, contributes strongly to meeting the N+3 goals for fuel burn reduction. The lower fan exhaust velocities resulting from lower FPRs are also key to meeting the aircraft noise goals. Adding a gear box to the standard turbofan engine allows acceptable turbine speeds to be maintained. However, development of a 50,000+ hp gearbox required by fans in a large twin engine transport aircraft presents an extreme technical challenge, therefore another approach is needed. This paper presents a propulsion system which transmits power from the turbine to the fan electrically rather than mechanically. Recent and anticipated advances in high temperature superconducting generators, motors, and power lines offer the possibility that such devices can be used to transmit turbine power in aircraft without an excessive weight penalty. Moving to such a power transmission system does more than provide better matching between fan and turbine shaft speeds. The relative ease with which electrical power can be distributed throughout the aircraft opens up numerous other possibilities for new aircraft and propulsion configurations and modes of operation. This paper discusses a number of these new

  2. Fonctionnement transitoire et controle de la richesse des moteurs à allumage commandé à injection multipoint Transient Operation and Air-Fuel Ratio Control of Spark-Ignition Port-Injected Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Moyne L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sur les moteurs à allumage commandé à injection multipoint on observe des désadaptations de richesse lors de fonctionnement transitoire. Ces désadaptations sont dues au dépôt, sous forme de film liquide, du carburant injecté dans le collecteur. Elles peuvent être compensées par une gestion adéquate de la masse injectée. Ainsi, afin d'obtenir la masse de carburant qui maintient la richesse constante, nous avons développé un modèle bidimensionnel des écoulements dans le collecteur au cours du cycle moteur. Ce modèle décrit l'écoulement des gaz frais, des gouttes injectées, des gaz brûlés refoulés vers l'admission et du film sur les parois, sur le principe de la séparation des phases. Nous montrons que le modèle reproduit correctement le signal de richesse et comment il permet de supprimer les désadaptations. La mesure de richesse est faite à l'échappement avec une sonde à oxygène dont nous validons le fonctionnement en transitoire avec une corrélation à la pression maximale du cycle dans le cylindre. Air-fuel ratio excursions are observed on port-injected spark ignition engines during transients. This excursions result from the liquid fuel film deposited on intake port. They can be compensated by controlling the injected fuel mass. In order to have the amount of fuel that keeps air-fuel ratio constant, we have developed a 2D model of flows in the intake port during engine cycle. This separate phases model describes the flow of fresh gases, injected droplets, hot burned gases and film on port walls. We show that the model effectively predicts the equivalence ratio and how it allows to eliminate excursions. Equivalence ratio measures are made with an oxygen sensor which functioning is validated during transients by correlating it to maximal pressure during engine cycle.

  3. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Keith Edward [Kobe, JP; Moser, William Elliott [Peoria, IL; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald [Washington, IL; Knox, Kevin Jay [Peoria, IL

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  4. Application of finite element techniques in predicting the acoustic properties of turbofan inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for predicting the acoustic performance of turbofan inlets carrying a subsonic axisymmetric steady flow. The finite element method combined with the method of weighted residuals is used in predicting the acoustic properties of variable area, annular ducts with or without acoustic treatments along their walls. An approximate solution for the steady inviscid flow field is obtained using an integral method for calculating the incompressible potential flow field in the inlet with a correction to account for compressibility effects. The accuracy of the finite element technique was assessed by comparison with available analytical solutions for the problems of plane and spinning wave propagation through a hard walled annular cylinder with a constant mean flow.

  5. Trends in air-breathing engines for super high speed aircraft engine system and its task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Hiroyuki

    1988-06-10

    The second generation of space plane is under active development as the world only space plane, the Space Shuttle of U.S. will not be able to satisfy the demands in 2000 even if its flight is resumed. Conceptual study was completed in the NASP project of U.S. and the test flight of experimental plane X-30 is scheduled in mid-90's. A variety of proposals have been made by U.K, West Germany and France and the European Space Agency (ESA) is adjusting them. The mini-shuttle is under planning in Japan, which will employ H-2 rocket. Typical air-breathing engines for space planes are: Super-sonic variable cycle turbofan engine, turbo-ram jet engine, and scram jet engine, which reduces the static temperature by making the flow velocity in combustion chamber to be supersonic to fire fuels. (29 figs, 3 tabs, 9 refs)

  6. Engine-integrated solid oxide fuel cells for efficient electrical power generation on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates the use of engine-integrated catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in vehicles with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, CPOx reactors, and three gas turbine (GT) engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed and checked against relevant data and source material. Fuel efficiency is increased by 4% and 8% in the 50 kW and 90 kW separate exhaust turbofan systems respectively at only modest cost in specific power (8% and 13% reductions respectively). Similar results are achieved in other engine types. An additional benefit of hybridization is the ability to provide more electric power (factors of 3 or more in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. A sensitivity analysis shows that the most important parameters affecting the system's performance are operating voltage, percent fuel oxidation, and SOFC assembly air flows. Taken together, this study shows that it is possible to create a GT-SOFC hybrid where the GT mitigates balance of plant losses and the SOFC raises overall system efficiency. The result is a synergistic system with better overall performance than stand-alone components.

  7. Pollution Reduction Technology Program for Small Jet Aircraft Engines, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, T. W.; Davis, F. G.; Kuhn, T. E.; Mongia, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    A series of iterative combustor pressure rig tests were conducted on two combustor concepts applied to the AiResearch TFE731-2 turbofan engine combustion system for the purpose of optimizing combustor performance and operating characteristics consistant with low emissions. The two concepts were an axial air-assisted airblast fuel injection configuration with variable-geometry air swirlers and a staged premix/prevaporization configuration. The iterative rig testing and modification sequence on both concepts was intended to provide operational compatibility with the engine and determine one concept for further evaluation in a TFE731-2 engine.

  8. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  9. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  10. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  11. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 1: Experimental and analytical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, T.; Paterson, R. W.; Skebe, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint analytical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional flowfield development within the lobe region of turbofan forced mixer nozzles is described. The objective was to develop a method for predicting the lobe exit flowfield. In the analytical approach, a linearized inviscid aerodynamical theory was used for representing the axial and secondary flows within the three-dimensional convoluted mixer lobes and three-dimensional boundary layer analysis was applied thereafter to account for viscous effects. The experimental phase of the program employed three planar mixer lobe models having different waveform shapes and lobe heights for which detailed measurements were made of the three-dimensional velocity field and total pressure field at the lobe exit plane. Velocity data was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and total pressure probing and hot wire anemometry were employed to define exit plane total pressure and boundary layer development. Comparison of data and analysis was performed to assess analytical model prediction accuracy. As a result of this study a planar mixed geometry analysis was developed. A principal conclusion is that the global mixer lobe flowfield is inviscid and can be predicted from an inviscid analysis and Kutta condition.

  12. Comparison of gaseous exhaust indices of the F109 turbofan using three different blends of petroleum-based Jet-A and camelina-based Jet-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Brian John

    This research project focused on the collection and comparison of gaseous exhaust emissions of the F109 turbofan engine using petroleum-based Jet-A and two different blends of camelina-based Jet-A. Simulated landing and takeoff cycles were used to collect gaseous exhaust emissions. Unburned hydrocarbon (HC), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon moNOxide (CO) exhaust indices (EIm) were calculated using ICAO Annex 16 Volume II formulae. Statistical analyses were performed on the Elm data. There was no significant difference in HC EIm and CO EI m among the three fuels at takeoff thrust. There were significant differences among the fuels for NOx EIm. 50% Jet-A 50% camelina produced the highest NOx EIm, then 75% Jet-A 25% camelina and finally Jet-A. At climb thrust, both blends of camelina fuel produced higher NOx EIm but no difference in CO EIm and HC EIm as Jet-A. At approach thrust, both blends of camelina fuel produced higher NOx EIm, lower CO EIm, and no difference in HC EIm as Jet-A. At idle thrust, there was no significant difference among the fuels for NOx EIm. There were significant differences among the fuels for HC EIm. Jet-A and 50% Jet-A 50% both produced higher HC EIm as 75% Jet-A 25% camelina. There were significant differences among the fuels for CO EI m. Jet-A produced the highest CO EIm, then 75% Jet-A 25% camelina and finally 50% Jet-A 50% camelina.

  13. Holes at High Blowing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip M. Ligrani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented which describe the development and structure of flow downstream of a single row of holes with compound angle orientations producing film cooling at high blowing ratios. This film cooling configuration is important because similar arrangements are frequently employed on the first stage of rotating blades of operating gas turbine engines. With this configuration, holes are spaced 6d apart in the spanwise direction, with inclination angles of 24 degrees, and angles of orientation of 50.5 degrees. Blowing ratios range from 1.5 to 4.0 and the ratio of injectant to freestream density is near 1.0. Results show that spanwise averaged adiabatic effectiveness, spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios, surveys of streamwise mean velocity, and surveys of injectant distributions change by important amounts as the blowing ratio increases. This is due to injectant lift-off from the test surface just downstream of the holes.

  14. Assessment of community noise for a medium-range airplane with open-rotor engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Shur, M. L.; Travin, A. K.; Belyaev, I. V.; Zamtfort, B. S.; Medvedev, Yu. V.

    2017-11-01

    Community noise of a hypothetical medium-range airplane equipped with open-rotor engines is assessed by numerical modeling of the aeroacoustic characteristics of an isolated open rotor with the simplest blade geometry. Various open-rotor configurations are considered at constant thrust, and the lowest-noise configuration is selected. A two-engine medium-range airplane at known thrust of bypass turbofan engines at different segments of the takeoff-landing trajectory is considered, after the replacement of those engines by the open-rotor engines. It is established that a medium-range airplane with two open-rotor engines meets the requirements of Chapter 4 of the ICAO standard with a significant margin. It is shown that airframe noise makes a significant contribution to the total noise of an airplane with open-rotor engines at landing.

  15. A 3-D discontinuous Galerkin Method for jet engine buzz-saw noise propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remaki, M.; Habashi, W.G.; Ait-Ali-Yahia, D.; Jay, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a 3-D methodology for solving jet engine aero-acoustics problems in the presence of strong shocks and rarefactions. For example, turbofan engines suffer from Multiple Pure Tone noise, also called Buzz-saw noise, generated by the fan when the blade rotational tip speed is supersonic. These waves are composed of a series of shocks and rarefactions produced by a coalescence of shocks due to non-uniformities in the blade spacing and in the blade stagger angles, arising from manufacturing tolerances

  16. RANS Analyses of Turbofan Nozzles with Internal Wedge Deflectors for Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to evaluate the flow field and thrust performance of a promising concept for reducing the noise at take-off of dual-stream turbofan nozzles. The concept, offset stream technology, reduces the jet noise observed on the ground by diverting (offsetting) a portion of the fan flow below the core flow, thickening and lengthening this layer between the high-velocity core flow and the ground observers. In this study a wedge placed in the internal fan stream is used as the diverter. Wind, a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code, was used to analyze the flow field of the exhaust plume and to calculate nozzle performance. Results showed that the wedge diverts all of the fan flow to the lower side of the nozzle, and the turbulent kinetic energy on the observer side of the nozzle is reduced. This reduction in turbulent kinetic energy should correspond to a reduction in noise. However, because all of the fan flow is diverted, the upper portion of the core flow is exposed to the freestream, and the turbulent kinetic energy on the upper side of the nozzle is increased, creating an unintended noise source. The blockage due to the wedge reduces the fan mass flow proportional to its blockage, and the overall thrust is consequently reduced. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with experimental flow field data, demonstrating that RANS CFD can accurately predict the velocity and turbulent kinetic energy fields. While this initial design of a large scale wedge nozzle did not meet noise reduction or thrust goals, this study identified areas for improvement and demonstrated that RANS CFD can be used to improve the concept.

  17. Large aspect ratio tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Sardella, C.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) investigated the potential for producing a viable long burn tokamak reactor through enhanced volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer by employing high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were accessed in the context of extended burn operation. Plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed using a one-dimensional transport code. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the field in the ohmic heating coil and the wave shape of the ohmic heating discharge. A high aspect ratio reference reactor was chosen and configured

  18. Balancing Energy Processes in Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balicki Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the issue of balancing energy processes in turbine engines in operation in aeronautic and marine propulsion systems with the aim to analyse and evaluate basic operating parameters. The first part presents the problem of enormous amounts of energy needed for driving fans and compressors of the largest contemporary turbofan engines commonly used in long-distance aviation. The amounts of the transmitted power and the effect of flow parameters and constructional properties of the engines on their performance and real efficiency are evaluated. The second part of the article, devoted to marine applications of turbine engines, presents the energy balance of the kinetic system of torque transmission from main engine turbines to screw propellers in the combined system of COGAG type. The physical model of energy conversion processes executed in this system is presented, along with the physical model of gasodynamic processes taking place in a separate driving turbine of a reversing engine. These models have made the basis for formulating balance equations, which then were used for analysing static and dynamic properties of the analysed type of propulsion, in particular in the aspect of mechanical loss evaluation in its kinematic system.

  19. 76 FR 40217 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ...;Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each #0;week. #0; #0; #0; #0;#0... by August 8, 2011. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a... regulatory, economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this AD. We will consider all comments received by...

  20. 76 FR 70382 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CF6-80C2B Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... to an emergency or forced landing of the airplane. DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed... an emergency or forced landing of the airplane. FAA's Determination We are proposing this AD because... labor rate is $85 per work-hour. A replacement ECU costs about $4,600. Based on these figures, we...

  1. A new approximation of the dispersion relations occurring in the sound-attenuation problem of turbofan aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert SZABO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion relations, appearing in the analysis of the stability of a gas flow in a straight acoustically-lined duct with respect to perturbations produced by a time harmonic source, beside the wave number and complex frequency contain the solution of a boundary value problem of the Pridmore-Brown equation depending on the wave number and frequency. For this reason, in practice the dispersion relations are rarely simple enough for carried out the zeros. The determination of zeros of these dispersion relations is crucial for the prediction of the perturbation attenuation or amplification. In this paper an approximation of the dispersion relations is given. Our approach preserves the general character of the mean flow, the general Pridmore-Brown equation and it’s only in the shear flow that we replace the exact solution of the boundary value problem with its Taylor polynomial approximate. In this way new approximate dispersion relations are obtained which zero’s can be found by computer.

  2. 75 FR 61361 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ...-0994; Directorate Identifier 2009-NE-39-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR...-Royce plc., P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom; Telephone: 011 44 1332 242424, Fax: 011 44... based on those comments. We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations...

  3. 76 FR 65997 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-535 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ...-0994; Directorate Identifier 2009-NE-39-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR... Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this AD, contact Rolls-Royce plc.... Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of this proposed AD on U.S. operators to be $1,499,400. FAA...

  4. 75 FR 63727 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-524 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ...-0162; Directorate Identifier 2004-NE-19-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR...-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom; telephone: 011-44-1332... would cost $0. Based on these figures, we estimate the total cost of the AD to U.S. operators would be...

  5. 76 FR 68663 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ...-0755; Directorate Identifier 2010-NE-12-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR... Rolls-Royce plc, Corporate Communications, P.O. Box 31, Derby, England, DE248BJ; phone: 011-44-1332... date and may amend this proposed AD based on those comments. We will post all comments we receive...

  6. 75 FR 17630 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc RB211 Trent 700 and Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ...-0364; Directorate Identifier 2009-NE-27-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc... based on those comments. We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations... Service Information Rolls-Royce plc has issued Alert Service Bulletin RB.211-72-AG086, dated December 4...

  7. 76 FR 72650 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211 Trent 800 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ...-0959; Directorate Identifier 2011-NE-25-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR... holidays. Fax: (202) 493-2251. Contact Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby, DE24 8BJ, United Kingdom; phone... AD. We will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this proposed AD based...

  8. A Nonlinear Model for Designing Herschel-Quincke Waveguide Arrays to Attenuate Shock Waves from Transonic Turbofan Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Techsburg is teaming with the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratory of Virginia Tech to propose a non-linear analytical tool for designing Herschel-Quincke (HQ)...

  9. 75 FR 14377 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney (PW) Model PW2037, PW2037(M), and PW2040 Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... removing erosion damage on fan blades with cutback leading edges and restoring the leading edge contour. This proposed AD results from reports from PW that fan blade leading edge erosion can result in a fan... comments electronically. Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New...

  10. 76 FR 14797 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc (RR) RB211-Trent 900 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... initiated a sequence of events leading to rupture of the drive arm of the IP Turbine (IPT) disc and...., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590-0001. Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail...: Discussion The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which is the Technical Agent for the Member States of...

  11. 75 FR 32649 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF6-45 and CF6-50 Series Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... of LPT rotor stage 3 disks and eight reports of cracked LPT rotor stage 3 disks found during shop... a corresponding shift in the trending of fuel flow or fan speed/core speed relationship. You can...

  12. Numerical methods for engine-airframe integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, S.N.B.; Paynter, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on numerical methods for engine-airframe integration are presented. The individual topics considered include: scientific computing environment for the 1980s, overview of prediction of complex turbulent flows, numerical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, elements of computational engine/airframe integrations, computational requirements for efficient engine installation, application of CAE and CFD techniques to complete tactical missile design, CFD applications to engine/airframe integration, and application of a second-generation low-order panel methods to powerplant installation studies. Also addressed are: three-dimensional flow analysis of turboprop inlet and nacelle configurations, application of computational methods to the design of large turbofan engine nacelles, comparison of full potential and Euler solution algorithms for aeropropulsive flow field computations, subsonic/transonic, supersonic nozzle flows and nozzle integration, subsonic/transonic prediction capabilities for nozzle/afterbody configurations, three-dimensional viscous design methodology of supersonic inlet systems for advanced technology aircraft, and a user's technology assessment

  13. Physical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, John S.; Dong, Yuanji; Williams, D. Craig; Logan, Russell

    2010-06-01

    The fine particulate matter (PM) emissions from nine commercial aircraft engine models were determined by plume sampling during the three field campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX). Ground-based measurements were made primarily at 30 m behind the engine for PM mass and number concentration, particle size distribution, and total volatile matter using both time-integrated and continuous sampling techniques. The experimental results showed a PM mass emission index (EI) ranging from 10 to 550 mg kg -1 fuel depending on engine type and test parameters as well as a characteristic U-shaped curve of the mass EI with increasing fuel flow for the turbofan engines tested. Also, the Teflon filter sampling indicated that ˜40-80% of the total PM mass on a test-average basis was comprised of volatile matter (sulfur and organics) for most engines sampled. The number EIs, on the other hand, varied from ˜10 15 to 10 17 particles kg -1 fuel with the turbofan engines exhibiting a logarithmic decay with increasing fuel flow. Finally, the particle size distributions of the emissions exhibited a single primary mode that were lognormally distributed with a minor accumulation mode also observed at higher powers for all engines tested. The geometric (number) mean particle diameter ranged from 9.4 to 37 nm and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 1.3 to 2.3 depending on engine type, fuel flow, and test conditions.

  14. 76 FR 75735 - Certification of Part 23 Turbofan- and Turbojet-Powered Airplanes and Miscellaneous Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ...''--as well as turbopropeller-driven and reciprocating-engine airplanes, to reflect the current needs of... the Final Rule A. 14 CFR Part 1: Clarifying Power and Engine Definitions B. Expanding Commuter... certification of part 23 turbojets. The ARC did not want to impose commuter category takeoff speeds for...

  15. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise and unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 1: Theory development and parametric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Typical analytical models for interaction between rotor and stator in a turbofan analyze the effect of wakes from the rotor impinging on the stator, producing unsteady loading, and thereby generating noise. Reflection/transmission characteristics of the rotor are sometimes added in a separate calculation. In those models, there is a one-to-one relationship between wake harmonics and noise harmonics; that is, the BPF (blade passing frequency) wake harmonic causes only the BPF noise harmonic, etc. This report presents a more complete model in which flow tangency boundary conditions are satisfied on two cascades in relative motion for several harmonics simultaneously. By an extension of S.N. Smith's code for two dimensional flat plate cascades, the noise generation/frequency scattering/blade row reflection problem is solved in a single matrix inversion. It is found that the BPF harmonic excitation of the stator scatters considerable energy in the higher BPF harmonics due to relative motion between the blade rows. Furthermore, when swirl between the rotor and stator is modeled, a 'mode trapping' effect occurs which explains observations on fans operating at rotational speeds below BFP cuton: the BPF mode amplifies between blade rows by multiple reflections but cannot escape to the inlet and exit ducts. However, energy scattered into higher harmonics does propagate and dominates the spectrum at two and three times BPF. This report presents the complete derivation of the theory, comparison with a previous (more limited) coupled rotor/stator interaction theory due to Kaji and Okazaki, exploration of the mode trapping phenomenon, and parametric studies showing the effects of vane/blade ratio and rotor/stator interaction. For generality, the analysis applies to stages where the rotor is either upstream or downstream of the stator and to counter rotation stages. The theory has been coded in a FORTRAN program called CUP2D, documented in Volume 2 of this report. It is

  16. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  17. The NASA Pollution-Reduction Technology Program for small jet aircraft engines - A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fear, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A three-phase experimental program is described which has the objective of enabling EPA Class T1 jet engines to meet the 1979 EPA emissions standards. In Phase I, three advanced combustor concepts, designed for the AiResearch TFE 731-2 turbofan engine, were evaluated in screening tests. Goals for carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were met or closely approached with two of the concepts with relatively modest departures from conventional combustor design practices. A more advanced premixing/prevaporizing combustor, while appearing to have the potential for meeting the oxides of nitrogen goal as well, will require extensive development to make it a practical combustion system. Smoke numbers for the two combustor concepts which will be carried forward into Phase II of the program were well within the EPA smoke standard. Phase II, Combustor-Engine Compatibility Testing, which is in its early stages, and planned Phase III, Combustor-Engine Demonstration Testing, are also described.

  18. Temperature and air-fuel ratio dependent specific heat ratio functions for lean burned and unburned mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, M.A.; Kaymaz, I.

    2005-01-01

    The most important thermodynamic property used in heat release calculations for engines is the specific heat ratio. The functions proposed in the literature for the specific heat ratio are temperature dependent and apply at or near stoichiometric air-fuel ratios. However, the specific heat ratio is also influenced by the gas composition in the engine cylinder and especially becomes important for lean combustion engines. In this study, temperature and air-fuel ratio dependent specific heat ratio functions were derived to minimize the error by using an equilibrium combustion model for burned and unburned mixtures separately. After the error analysis between the equilibrium combustion model and the derived functions is presented, the results of the global specific heat ratio function, as varying with mass fraction burned, were compared with the proposed functions in the literature. The results of the study showed that the derived functions are more feasible at lean operating conditions of a spark ignition engine

  19. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  20. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when