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Sample records for rate radiation treatment

  1. Overall response rates to radiation therapy for patients with painful uncomplicated bone metastases undergoing initial treatment and retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedard, Gillian; Hoskin, Peter; Chow, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation therapy has been shown to successfully palliate bone metastases. A number of systematic reviews and large clinical trials have reported response rates for initial treatment and retreatment. Objective: To determine overall response rates of patients with painful uncomplicated bone metastases undergoing initial treatment and retreatment. Methods: Intent-to-treat and evaluable patient statistics from a systematic review of palliative radiotherapy trials for initial treatment of bone metastases and a randomized clinical trial of retreatment were pooled and analyzed to determine the overall response rates for patients receiving initial treatment and retreatment. Results: In the intent-to-treat calculation, 71–73% of patients had an overall response to radiation treatment and in the evaluable patient population; 85–87% of patients did so. Response rates varied slightly whether patients underwent single or multiple fractions in initial treatment or retreatment. Conclusions: Single and multiple fraction radiation treatment yielded very similar overall response rates. Patients treated with a single fraction for both initial and repeat radiation experience almost identical overall response to those patients treated with multiple fraction treatment. It is therefore recommended that patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases be treated with a single 8 Gy fraction of radiation at both the initial treatment and retreatment

  2. Determination of radiation dose rates and urinary activity of patients received Sodium Iodide-131 for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiki, D.; Shahhosseini, S.; Dadashzadeh, S.; Eftekhari, M.; Tayebi, H.; Moosazadeh-Rashti, G.

    2004-01-01

    Sodium Iodide-131 is administrated for treatment of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. Iodine-131 has multiple routs of excretion (urine, saliva, sweat, milk, feces, exhalation) from the body. Patients receiving Sodium Iodide-131 therapy exposes other persons and the environment to unwanted radiation and contamination. The major sources of radiation dose from administration of Iodine-131 is external radiation , also there is a potential for exposure via contamination.Precautions are necessary to limit the radiation dose to family members, nursing staff and members of public and waste treatment workers to less than 1mSv. Patients received Sodium Iodide-131 may come into close contact with other persons. In order to derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured from the anterior mid-trunk of 29 patients in the upright position with 15 minutes post-dose administration at 3 meters and just before they left the nuclear medicine department at 0.5, 1, and 3 meters. We have also measured urinary iodide excretion in 29 patients to estimate Sodium Iodide-131 urinary excretion pattern in iranian patients. Based on results, the maximum cumulative dose to nursing staff was on third day (leaving day) still less than recommended dose bye ICRP. The cumulative dose family members will be more but regarding the time and distance in close contact it will be also less than recommended dose by ICRP.Radiation dose rate was decreased significantly on third day. The urinary excretion patterns in all patients were similar. The urinary excretion rate-time curve in all patients showed multiple peaks due to retention and redistribution of Iodine-131 or enterohepatic cycle of radioiodinated thyroid hormones, which didn't allow calculation of urinary excretion rate constant. The results also showed that 67 hours post administration of Sodium Iodide-131 about 70% of radiopharmaceutical was excreted through urine, 28% physically decayed or eliminated through other biological

  3. Radiation treatment of foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, T.; Huebner, G.

    1990-10-01

    In addition to fundamental demands on radiation and safety engineering of irradiation facilities, the necessity arises to optimize irradiation conditions by using facilities to capacity and thus reducing irradiation costs. The following subjects are dealt with in detail: rehabilitation of a pilot plant for radiation treatment of onions; examination of radiation resistance of components and equipment parts of food irradiation facilities; chemical dosimetry; relative measurement of the intensity of radioactive sources; thermo- and chemiluminescence to prove irradiation of foodstuffs; radiation induced sprout inhibition of potatoes; laboratory tests of delayed maturation of tomatoes; radiation treatment of strawberries; radiation treatment of forage; radiation induced sprout inhibition of acid-treated onions; radiation treatment of starch and potatoe products; radiation treatment of cosmetics; the universal radiation source UNI 88/26 for gamma irradiation facilities; microbiological aspects of food irradiation, and introduction of chicken irradiation on an industrial scale. (BBR) [de

  4. Radiation treatment of esophageal carcinoma using a high-dose-rate remote afterloader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio

    1984-01-01

    Between May 1980 and March 1983, 31 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with a high-dose-rate remote controlled afterloading unit, as a boost therapy of the intracavitary irradiation following the external irradiation. The data of these patients were analyzed by the regression analysis which is one of the multivariate analyses, and following results were obtained. 1) Factors which affect local control achieved by intracavitary irradiation were the existence of deep ulcer or stenosis after external irradiation, age of the patient, dosage of intracavitary irradiation and tumor length. 2) The local control estimation index was determined by these five factors. Local control estimation index=1.38950-0.01571 x age+0.04517 x tumor length+0.62167 x stenosis* + 0.94811 x deep ulcer*-0.02969 x dosage of intracavitary irradiation. * Existence of stenosis/ulcer was represented by 1, and absence was represented by 0. 3) The local control estimation indices obtained in the above formula were then approved by applying internal samples, and also external samples. Indices of 0.5 or more mean local failure, and those of less than 0.5 mean possible local control. Examination was then made as to the local control estimation indices of another group of 30 patients who had been treated by external irradiation alone between November 1974 and April 1980. Comparison of the indices of the two groups showed the following results. 1) Rate of possible local control by external irradiation alone was 23%. 2) Rate of possible local control was increased up to 62% by using intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. (author)

  5. Influence of radiation dose and dose-rate on modification of barley seed radiosensitivity by post-treatment with caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    Influence of radiation doses (100, 150 and 200 Gy) and dose-rates (1.27-0.023 Gy/Sec) on the modification of oxic and anoxic radiation damage by caffeine at different concentrations has been investigated using metabolizing barley seeds as test system. As the radiation dose increases from 100 to 200 Gy, the magnitude of oxic and anoxic damages increase at all the dose-rates. Caffeine is able to afford partial radioprotection against the oxic damage, at the same time potentiating the anoxic damage. However, caffeine effect against the oxic and anoxic components of damage depend largely upon the dose of radiation applied and also on the dose-rate used. The possible mechanism of action of caffeine in bringing about the differential modification of oxic and anoxic damages has been discussed. 19 refs., 2 tables. (author)

  6. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  7. Comparison of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone. The preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, Nivaldo; Novaes, P.E.; Ferrigno, R.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Fogaroli, R.C.; Maia, M.A.C.; Baraldi, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare the results between HDR and LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1992 to December 1993, 65 patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer were randomized to one of the following treatment schedule according to the brachytherapy used to complement the dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT): 1 - High dose rate (HDR) - 36 patients - 4 weekly insertions of 6,0 Gy at point A 2 - Low dose rate (LDR) - 29 patients - 2 insertions two weeks apart of 17,5 Gy at point A The External Beam radiotherapy was performed through a Linac 4MV, in box arrangement for whole pelvis and in AP-PA fields for parametrial complementation of dose. The dose at the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8 Gy and the parametrial dose was 16 Gy. The brachytherapy was realized with Fletcher colpostats and intrauterine tandem, in both arms. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci and started ten days after the beginning of EBRT. The total treatment time was shortened in two weeks for this group. The LDR brachytherapy started only after the end of EBRT. Results: With the minimum follow up of 24 months and medium of 31 months, the disease free survival was 50% among the 36 patients in HDR group and 47,8% among the 29 patients in LDR group. Local failures occurred in 50% and 52,8% respectively. Grade I and II complications were restricted to rectites and cistites and the incidence of them was 8,3% for HDR group and 13% for LDR group. Until the time of evaluation there were no grade III complications in any group. Conclusions: Although the number of patients is small and the time of follow up still short, these preliminary results suggest that the HDR brachytherapy has an equivalent efficiency in local control as the LDR in the treatment of stage IIIB

  8. Radiation treatment of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The techniques involved in the treatment of food by ionising radiation are explained. Radiation plant design, nutrition, microbiology and standards for irradiated foods are discussed. The potential applications for food irradiation in Australia are in the fields of quarantine control to disinfest fruit from fruit fly or mangoes from seed weevil, and decontamination of dried foods such as spices

  9. Radiation dose rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts

  10. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  11. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand (Princess Margaret Hospital, Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto (Canada)), e-mail: gpgiuliari@gmail.com; Sadaka, Ama (Schepens Eye Research Inst., Boston, MA (United States)); Hinkle, David M. (Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    2011-01-15

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  12. Radiation treatment of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitan, J.B.; Flatby, J.; Backe, S.; Lundgren, L.

    1984-01-01

    The report deals with an estimation of the volume of radiation treatment of benign diseases in Norway and gives a survey of the subjective opinion of patients regarding the result of the treatment. Reported subjective recovery after radiation treatment seems to be at the same level as recovery without treatment. For an indication of the objective effect of radiation treatment of benign diseases, the subjective effect of this treatment has to be compared with objective findings

  13. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinji

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1980-06-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population.

  15. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Bruce C.; Knisely, Jonathan P. S.; Kacinski, Barry M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Frank, Alex H.; Peschel, Richard E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Edraki, Babak; Kohorn, Ernest I.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Schwartz, Peter E.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226 Ra or 137 Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192 Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94

  16. Radiation treatment of molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A. S.; Serrano G., J.; Lara R., O.; Reyes L., J.

    Molasses are a by-product of the sugar industry. Their annual production in México in around 1 million tons and are mainly used as a complement for animal feeding and for the production of alcohols. Their value is relatively low compared with another chemicals. When molasses are irradiated with gamma radiation or accelerated electrons, in presence of nitric acid and oxygen, it is obtained oxalic acid and several polymeric compounds. In both cases, the same products are obtained, but the yield is greater with electrons. It has been studied the effect of dose and dose rate in the yields. As example, when mixtures of molasses-nitric acid, with an initial concentration of 26% of total sugar reductors, are irradiated with 1.0 MeV electrons, in a continuous flow reactor, at 0.11 {Gy}/{sec} to a total dose of 30 KGy, the oxalic acid yield is around 44% of the total chemical reductors used. The separations of the radiolytic products was made by successive decantations and concentrations, and purified by recristallizations. From the analytical information, the minimal formula were calculated for the acid product and the polymeric compounds.

  17. Radiation treatment of molasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, S.A.; Serrano, G.J.; Lara, R.O.; Reyes, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    Molasses are a by-product of the sugar industry. Their annual production in Mexico is around 1 million tons and they are mainly used as a complement for animal feeding and for the production of alcohols. Their value is relatively low compared with other chemicals. When molasses are irradiated with gamma radiation or accelerated electrons in the presence of nitric acid and oxygen, oxalic acid and several polymeric compounds are obtained. The same products are obtained in both cases, but the yield is greater with electrons. The effect of dose and dose rate on the yields has been studied. As example, when mixtures of molasses-nitric acid, with an initial concentration of 26% of total sugar reductors, are irradiated with 1.0 MeV electrons, in a continuous flow reactor, at 0.11 Gy/sec to a total dose of 30 KGy, the oxalic acid yield is around 44% of the total chemical reductors used. The separations of the radiolytic products were made by successive decantations and concentrations, and purified by recrystallizations. From the analytical information, the minimal formulae were calculated for the acid product and the polymeric compounds. (author)

  18. SMART, Radiation Dose Rates on Cask Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SMART calculates radiation dose rate at the center of each cask surface by using characteristic functions for radiation shielding ability and for radiation current back-scattered from cask wall and cask cavity of each cask, once cask-type is specified. 2 - Method of solution: Matrix Calculation

  19. Patient treatment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanum, G.; Bruland, Oe.S.; Hjelle, D.; Reitan, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Accidental human injury due to ionizing radiation is rare. Industrial accidents are comparatively the most common. Life saving procedures should always have priority to any concern about radiation injury or contamination. The personal risks for emergency medial personnel is negligible when simple measures are taken. Repeated clinical examinations and blood lymphocyte counts should be performed on all patients with suspected radiation injury to allow a diagnosis. The radiation syndrome develops within days or weeks depending on total radiation dose, dose rate and dose distribution. Damage to the bone marrow and gut are the most important. Local radiation injuries to the hands are common in industrial accidents. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority should always be called when a potential ionizing radiation accident takes place within Norway

  20. Radiation treatment of polymethyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knizhnik, E.I.; Onisko, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    The well-known methods of radiation treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) are reviewed. Described is a new method of the production of decorative articles with the drawing inside the volume. This method permits to obtain the original ''dendritic'' drawing by electron treatment of PMMA. Presented are the technique which permits to obtain the drawing with the increased density of lines and the ways of changing the deposition depth, the drawing volume and the treatment duration. Shown is the possibility of the radiation treatment application for the increase of the specific volume resistance of PMMA

  1. INES rating of radiation protection related events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hort, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, based on the draft Manual, a short review of the use of the INES rating of events concerning radiation protection is given, based on a new INES User's Manual edition. The presentation comprises a brief history of the scale development, general description of the scale and the main principles of the INES rating. Several examples of the use of the scale for radiation protection related events are mentioned. In the presentation, the term 'radiation protection related events' is used for radiation source and transport related events outside the nuclear installations. (authors)

  2. Treatment of dyeing drainage by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimokawa, Toshinari; Sawai, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    Decolorization of artificial dyeing drainage and sewage by radiation treatment. Artifical dyeing drainage was prepared from water, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, urea and several kinds of inorganic salts, and artificial sewage, from water, peptone, broth, urea and several kinds of inorganic salts. The above mentioned sample liquors of artificial dyeing drainage and sewage were exposed to γ-radiation of 5 kCi of 60 Co source by aerating through a ball filter. Absorption spectra, total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were determined after irradiation to evaluate radiation treatment effect. With the experimental data obtained, it was clarified that absorbance, COD and TOC was decreased with the increase of absorbed dose. Decoloring was made effectively and about 95 % of bleaching ratio was obtained at 5 kGy of radiation. COD was decreased also by irradiation rather slower decreasing rate than that of decolorization, and TOC decrease was very slow at the initial stage of radiation but 40 % of TOC was decomposed by 10 kGy radiation. Dye of chemically stable structure was found more resistant to radiation decolorization. Decomposition efficiency was found less for dyes in the artificial sewage but secondary treated sewage showed no adverse effect. With the obtained understandings, a tentative scheme was planned for the radiation decolorization of dyeing drainage after aeration treatment. (Takagi, S.)

  3. Computerized radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laarse, R. van der.

    1981-01-01

    Following a general introduction, a chain consisting of three computer programs which has been developed for treatment planning of external beam radiotherapy without manual intervention is described. New score functions used for determination of optimal incidence directions are presented and the calculation of the position of the isocentre for each optimum combination of incidence directions is explained. A description of how a set of applicators, covering fields with dimensions of 4 to 20 cm, for the 6 to 20 MeV electron beams of a MEL SL75-20 linear accelerator was developed, is given. A computer program for three dimensional electron beam treatment planning is presented. A microprocessor based treatment planning system for the Selectron remote controlled afterloading system for intracavitary radiotherapy is described. The main differences in treatment planning procedures for external beam therapy with neutrons instead of photons is discussed. A microprocessor based densitometer for plotting isodensity lines in film dosimetry is described. A computer program for dose planning of brachytherapy is presented. Finally a general discussion about the different aspects of computerized treatment planning as presented in this thesis is given. (Auth.)

  4. Multibeam radiation therapy treatment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manens, J.P.; Le Gall, G.; Chenal, C.; Ben Hassel, M.; Fresne, F.; Barillot, C.; Gibaud, B.; Lemoine, D.; Bouliou, A.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A software package has been developed for multibeam radiation therapy treatment application. We present in this study a computer-assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: i), an analytical stage for setting up the large volume via 2D and 3D displays; ii), a planning stage for issue of a treatment strategy including dosimetric simulations; and iii), a treatment stage to drive the target volume to the radiation unit isocenter. The combined use of stereotactic methods and multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes target definition and cognition of structure environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (the stereotactic frame) guarantees optimal distribution of the dose, computed by the original 3D volumetric algorithm. A computer-driven chair-framework cluster was designed to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter [fr

  5. Ionizing radiation quarantine treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Hallman, Guy J.

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation is a viable quarantine disinfestation treatment which has been studied for 40 years although it has received very little commercial use. Two principal obstacles to commercial application, 1) the fact that insects are not killed immediately, and 2) consumer opposition to irradiation, have been allayed to some extent, but the remaining impediment to large-scale commercial use is development of approved protocols by government regulatory agencies in importing countries. The United St...

  6. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, M.J.; Frazee, R.C. (Department of General Surgery, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting.

  7. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, M.J.; Frazee, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting

  8. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  9. Radiation in the treatment of meningeal leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    At the present time, a successful regimen for the eradication of occult meningeal leukemia is the combination of cranial radiotherapy in a dose of 1800 rads in 10 fractions in 12 to 14 days with six doses of intrathecal methotrexate. This regimen, when given with prednisone and vincristine can be expected to give a relapse rate for isolated meningeal leukemia of approximately 5% during the first 2 years of follow-up. A modification of this regimen utilizing craniospinal radiation with prior and concurrent intrathecal methotrexate is given for the treatment of overt meningeal leukemia at diagnosis or for an isolated first relapse with meningeal leukemia. Radiation technique and morbidity are discussed

  10. Treatment of radiation burns, 1987 [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    After the accident at Chernobyl, patients with various degrees of radiation burns were given treatment at Moscow hospital No. 6. The video shows the radiation injuries as well as therapy and treatment in detail

  11. Classification and treatment of radiation maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, Noel

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Radiation maculopathy is a sight-limiting consequence of radiotherapy in the management of uveal melanoma and other intraocular tumors. In this review, we consider clinical, fluorescein angiographic and optical coherence tomographic findings, propose a classification for radiation maculopathy and discuss the management of this condition. RECENT FINDINGS: Radiation macular edema (RME) can be classified by optical coherence tomography into noncystoid or cystoid edema, with foveolar or extrafoveolar involvement. Optical coherence tomographic grading of RME has been found to correlate with visual acuity. Focal argon laser might have some limited benefit in the treatment of RME. Intravitreal triamcinolone and intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor agents can be of short-term benefit in the treatment of RME. In a randomized controlled trial, periocular triamcinolone significantly reduced rates of RME and vision loss up to 18 months following plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma. SUMMARY: Currently, there is no proven treatment for established RME, though periocular triamcinolone has been shown to have a preventive benefit. An accepted classification system for radiation maculopathy would be of benefit in planning and comparing future treatment trials.

  12. Ionizing radiation decreases human cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    Information from nine studies with exposed nuclear workers and military observers of atmospheric bomb explosions confirms the results from animal studies which showed that low doses of ionizing radiation are beneficial. The usual ''healthy worker effect'' was eliminated by using carefully selected control populations. The results from 13 million person-years show the cancer mortality rate of exposed persons is only 65.6% that of carefully selected unexposed controls. This overwhelming evidence makes it politically untenable and morally wrong to withhold public health benefits of low dose irradiation. Safe supplementation of ionizing radiation should become a public health service. (author)

  13. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  14. Radiation treatment of solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, W.; Rugg, B.; Rogers, C.

    1977-01-01

    Solid waste is now generally recognized as both a major problem and an underutilized renewable resource for materials and energy recovery. Current methods for dealing with solid wastes are admittedly inadequate for cost effective utilization of the latest material and energy values, especially of cellulose and other organics. Processes for production of energy from organic wastes including incineration, pyrolysis and biodegradation, are receiving considerable attention even though the heating value of dried organic wastes is substantially less than that of fossil fuels. An attractive alternative approach is conversion into chemical feedstocks for use as fuels, intermediates for plastics, rubbers, fibers etc., and in the preparation of foods. Radiation treatment of solid wastes offers attractive possibilities for upgrading the value of such organic waste components as cellulose and putrescible matter. The latter can be cold sterilized by radiation treatments for the production of animal feed supplements. The wide availability of cellulosic wastes warrants their consideration as an alternate feedstock to petrochemicals for fuels, intermediates and synthesis of single cell protein. The crucial step in this developing technology is optimizing the conversion of cellulose to its monomer glucose which can be accomplished by either acid or enzymatic hydrolysis. A combination pretreatment consisting of radiation of hydropulped cellulosic wastes has shown considerable promise in improving the yields of glucose for acid hydrolysis reactions at substantially lower cost than presently used methods such as grinding. Data are presented to compare the effectiveness of this pretreatment with other techniques which have been investigated. (author)

  15. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  16. Age- and time-dependent changes in the rates of radiation-induced cancers in patients with ankylosing spondylitis following a single course of X-ray treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.G.; Doll, R.

    1978-01-01

    The causes of death have been analysed in 14111 patients with ankylosing spondylitis following a single course of X-ray treatment. Patients who were re-treated with X-rays were followed until the end of the year following their second course of treatment and deaths subsequent to this time were ignored. An attempt was made to follow the remaining patients to 1 January 1970, or their date of death or emigration, whichever was the earlier. A total of 7455 (52.8%) patients were re-treated before 1 January 1970, 1759 (12.5%) patients had died and 269 (1.9%) had emigrated. A total of 208 (1.5%) patients were lost to follow-up and the remaining 4420 (31.3%), who had all received one course of treatment, were alive. The number of deaths from all causes was 66% greater than the expected number computed from national age and sex specific mortality rates. There were 31 deaths from leukaemia (6.5 expected), 259 from cancers of ''heavily irradiated'' sites (167.5 expected) and 79 from cancers of ''lightly irradiated'' sites, which was not significantly higher than the 65.6 expected. The ratio of observed to expected deaths and the excess death rate from leukaemia was greatest in the period three to five years after first treatment and subsequently declined. The ratio of observed to expected deaths from cancers of heavily irradiated sites was high in the two years following treatment, fell to a minimum six to eight years after treatment and then rose. Data for individual heavily irradiated sites showed little variation in the ratio of observed to expected numbers of deaths, apart from those due to tumours of the spinal cord. The ratio of observed to expected deaths for both leukaemia and cancers of the heavily irradiated sites showed no apparent change according to the age of the patients at their first treatment but the excess death rate showed a highly significant increase with increasing age at first treatment

  17. Surgical treatment of intestinal radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, J.Ne.; Nevasaari, K.; Kairaluoma, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    A review of 43 consecutive patients requiring operation for serious intestinal radiation injury was undertaken to elucidate the efficacy of surgical treatment. The most common site of radiation injury was the rectum (19 cases), followed by the small bowel (13 cases), the colon (7 cases), and the combination of these (4 cases). The overall operative mortality was 14%; morbidity, 47%; and the postoperative symptom-free period, 18 +/- 30 months. Colostomy (N = 20) carried the lowest risk of mortality, 0%, as compared with resection (N = 17) and bypass procedure (N = 6), which were accompanied by the mortalities of 24% and 33%, respectively. During the follow-up (3-13 years) 12 patients (28%) died of recurrent cancer and 9 patients (21%) of persistent radiation injury, which yielded an overall mortality of 65% after resection and 50% and 65% after bypass and colostomy procedures, respectively. Continuing radiation damage led to 15 late reoperations. Ten of these were performed after colostomy, four after resection, and one after bypass. We conclude that colostomy cannot be regarded as a preferred operative method, because it does not prevent the progression of radiation injury and because it is, for this reason, associated with a higher late-complication rate. A more radical surgery is recommended but with the limitation that the operative method must be adapted to the operative finding

  18. Radiation treatment of combustion gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.; Tokunaga, O.; Nishimura, K.; Hasimoto, S.; Kawakami, W.; Washino, M.; Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Adachi, K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot plant for the radiation treatment of combustion gas in a flow-system was planned and completed in 1974 at the Abara Mfg. Co. Ltd., Central Laboratory in Fujisawa. The plant has been successfully operated for more than one year. The capacity of the pilot plant is 1000 Nm 3 per hour of the gas with the use of an electron accelerator of 60 mA and 0.75 MeV. The objective of this paper is to review a series of the researches including recent unpublished results, and to discuss the characteristics of the process. The outline and typical results of the pilot plant are first reported here. (author)

  19. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  20. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical and practical substantiation of dose fractionation regimes in radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The indications and contraindications to radiotherapy, radiation reactions and complications resulting from the treatment process are considered. The preparation of patients to the application of chemoradiation treatment methods is described. The recommentations for the improvement of immediate and delayed results of treatment of esophagus cancer patients are given. 99 refs.; 15 figs

  1. Surgical treatment of radiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Izumi; Sato, Gohei; Okaue, Toyotake; Isobe, Yoshinari; Ohtsu, Akira; Sugimoto, Yuzo (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Severe radiation proctitis was surgically treated in 8 cases. Colostomy was performed in 2 cases, total resection of the rectum in 2 and proctectomy with colostomy in 4. Perineal abscess developed in the 2 cases with total resection of the rectum. Rather than completely resection of the lesion, a procedure leaving no dead space i.e. proctectomy with colostomy, is desirable for radiation proctitis. Complete preoperative examination of the condition of the underlying disease and possible urinary tract complications is important.

  2. Radiation treatment of toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.; Jung, I.H.; Jo, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were commercially produced from 1920s as complex mixtures containing multiple isomers for a variety of applications. They are very toxic, chemically stable and resist microbial, photochemical, chemical, and thermal degradation. The public, legal, and scientific concerns about PCBs arose from research indicating they were environmental contaminants that had a potential to adversely impact the environment, and, therefore, were undesirable as commercial products. Eventually, most producers reduced or stopped production of PCBs in the 1970s. Stockholm convention on POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants), which was effective on May 2004 and 151 nations including Korea were joined on June 2005, asked to dispose of PCBs by 2028 with environmental friendly methods. Korean government also has declared to conduct by 2015. According to the Environmental law of Korea, over 2 ppm of PCBs has to be decomposed by legal methods of incineration and thermal destruction. But those are inapplicable owing to the environmental groups. KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has recently developed a remarkable technology for radiation treatment of toxic chemicals including chlorides using an electron beam accelerator. Electron beam accelerator of 2.5 MeV energy and 100 kW power capacity was used to decompose of PCBs having been used as a commercial transformer oil for more than 30 years. The oil were irradiated with ∼ 0.1 percent of TEA (Triethyl Amin) to make chloride ion aparted off from the PCBs into precipitate at the conditions of normal temperature and pressure. The concentrations of PCBs were measured by GC (Gas Chromatography) with ECD (Electron Capture Detector) following the KS (Korean Standard) test procedure. Electron beam should be a useful tool for environmental conservation. Residual concentrations of PCBs after irradiation were depended on the absorption dose of electron beam energy. Advantages comparing to other methods such as

  3. Orgotein in radiation treatment of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.S.; Overgaard, J.; Overgaard, M.; Steenholdt, S.; Jakobsen, A.; Sell, A.; Kommunehospitalet, Aarhus

    1987-01-01

    The possible protective effect of orgotein (a superoxide dismutase) an radiation cystitis and proctitis was studied in patients with carcinoma of the urinary bladder. A double-blind study in 60 patients was planned but due to unacceptable side effects only 30 patients were included. Radiation treatment was given with curative intent at a dose of 63 Gy in 30 fractions. Orgotein was injected 15 min after each daily radiation treatment at a dose of 4 or 8 mg. No effect of orgotein on tumour radiation response or on the acute radiation reactions in the bladder and rectum was detected. Marked subcutaneous infiltration and redness was seen at the local injection site in 5 patients. No general symptoms were observed. Intradermal tests and antibody titration tests showed that the local reactions were due to allergic reactions to the drug itself. The lack of radioprotective effect and the high frequency of unaccaptable side effects makes orgotein an unsuitable drug in climical radiation therapy. (orig.)

  4. Photocoagulation treatment of radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Chittum, M.E.; Wells, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the visual and anatomic effects of focal photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular edema in five eyes of four patients and panretinal photocoagulation for proliferative radiation retinopathy in six eyes of three patients. Focal and limited scatter photocoagulation was successful in preventing further vision loss in all five eyes treated for macular edema. Three eyes treated with panretinal photocoagulation had regression of neovascularization. The other three eyes treated for proliferative retinopathy subsequently had dense vitreous hemorrhages that required vitrectomy for restoration of useful vision

  5. Surgical treatment of radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Izumi; Sato, Gohei; Okaue, Toyotake; Isobe, Yoshinari; Ohtsu, Akira; Sugimoto, Yuzo

    1982-01-01

    Severe radiation proctitis was surgically treated in 8 cases. Colostomy was performed in 2 cases, total resection of the rectum in 2 and proctectomy with colostomy in 4. Perineal abscess developed in the 2 cases with total resection of the rectum. Rather than completely resection of the lesion, a procedure leaving no dead space i.e. proctectomy with colostomy, is desirable for radiation proctitis. Complete preoperative examination of the condition of the underlying disease and possible urinary tract complications is important. (Chiba, N.)

  6. Radiation treatment and radiation reactions in dermatology. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizzon, Renato G. [Univ. Hospital CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Dermatology; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich (ed.) [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Explains the use of radiation treatment in the full range of skin cancers and precancerous lesions. Covers physical and radiobiological principles, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. Revised and updated edition that includes new chapters and numerous additional figures. In this book, leading experts in the dermatological and oncological field describe the use of radiation therapy for the treatment of the full range of dermatological malignancies - including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell tumor - as well as those precancerous lesions and non-malignant dermatological disorders which are amenable to radiation therapy. In each case the specific indications for the use of radiotherapy and its application are clearly explained with the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations. In addition, the book provides a concise introduction to physical and radiobiological principles, selection of radiation factors, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect advances in practical knowledge and clinical practice. It will be an invaluable source of information on the management of skin tumors and related non-malignant disorders for both dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  7. Radiation treatment and radiation reactions in dermatology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panizzon, Renato G.

    2015-01-01

    Explains the use of radiation treatment in the full range of skin cancers and precancerous lesions. Covers physical and radiobiological principles, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. Revised and updated edition that includes new chapters and numerous additional figures. In this book, leading experts in the dermatological and oncological field describe the use of radiation therapy for the treatment of the full range of dermatological malignancies - including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell tumor - as well as those precancerous lesions and non-malignant dermatological disorders which are amenable to radiation therapy. In each case the specific indications for the use of radiotherapy and its application are clearly explained with the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations. In addition, the book provides a concise introduction to physical and radiobiological principles, selection of radiation factors, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect advances in practical knowledge and clinical practice. It will be an invaluable source of information on the management of skin tumors and related non-malignant disorders for both dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  8. Nonsurgical treatment for cancer using radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The number of people who are dying from cancer has been increasing in association with population aging. Radiation therapy is now one of the three major cancer treatment methods, along with surgery and chemotherapy. People used to consider radiation therapy only as a ''noninvasive cancer treatment''; however, with the ceaseless effort by medical experts and corporations, different radiation therapy types and techniques including the latest technical advances have come out one after another, and the improvements in radiation therapies have provided treatments that are not only less traumatizing to patients but also as effective and therapeutic as surgery in certain body regions. The importance of radiation therapy has become and will become even greater in the society with more elderly cancer patients who do not have the physical strength to undergo surgery. In this article, the history of radiation therapy, rapidly developed high-precision radiation therapy techniques, and unsolved issues are discussed, and then, ''MHI vero4DRT'', which is the high-precision image-guided radiation therapy equipment developed for solving such issues, is introduced. (author)

  9. Alleviation of acute radiation damages by post-irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Ono, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages in mice were tried to alleviate experimentally by post-treatment. Combined treatment of OK-432 and aztreonam clearly prevented the radiation induced sepsis and elevated the survival rate in mice; the survival was 80% in the OK-432 plus aztreonam group while it was 55% in the group treated with OK-432 alone and 0% with saline. Irsogladine maleate, an anti-ulcer drug, increased the survival rate of jejunal crypt stem cells with a clear dose-related trend. The D 0 for irsogladine maleate was 2.8 Gy although it was 2.3 Gy for saline, These findings suggest that some conventional drugs are effective for radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages and the possibility that they can be applied for people exposed to radiation accidentally. (author)

  10. Treatment and prevention of acute radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benomar, S.; Hassam, B.; Boutayeb, S.; Errihani, H.; Lalya, I.; El Gueddari, B.K.

    2010-01-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common side-effect of radiotherapy which often necessitates interruption of the therapy. Currently, there is no general consensus about its prevention or about the treatment of choice. The goal of this work was to focus on optimal methods to prevent and manage acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy and to determine if there are specific topical or oral agents for the prevention of this acute skin reaction. The prevention and the early treatment are the two focus points of the management of the acute radiation dermatitis. (authors)

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalci, D.; Doerter, G.; Gueclue, I.

    2005-01-01

    This publication is the translation of IAEA Safety Reports Series No.2 ,Diagnosis and Treatment of Radiation Injuries. This report is directed at medical professionals who may be involved in the management of radiation injuries starting from the first few hours or days after an exposure of undefined severity. The principal aim of this publication is to provide guidelines to enable medical professionals to carry out prompt diagnostic measure and to offer emergency treatment. This report provides information in tabulated form on clinical criteria for dose assesment. Additionally, it discusses the appropriate dose-effect relationship in cases of external radiation involving either total body or local exposures, as well as internal contamination

  12. Cutaneous reaction to radiation and their treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Shoji

    1989-01-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis were reported of iridium 172 under poor administration which radiated locally on the skin of hands and fingers of oil company workers. Atomic bomb over Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed many people by total body skin exposure. Many workers and firemen were radiated by beta and gamma rays in the Chernobyl' accident, where 19 of 28 death cases died by radiation burn. 8 patients with 60-100% burn area died in 15-24 days after the explosion. Of 12 patients with 30-60% burn area, 6 died by burn. 21 cases of 30% burn area did not die in spite of mild or severe bone marrow depression. In all these cases, areas of skin ulcers epithelized with dry and wet scales till 50-60 days after the explosion, except large area (20-25cm 2 ) transplanted. In this accident, severe radiation burn due to the beta ray irradiation occured with endogeneous intoxication, renal disturbance, blood biochemical changes and bleeding. Oral, pharyngeal and intestinal membrane were irradiated by beta ray and were ulcerated so they could hardly eat. The treatment of these cases with acute radiation dermatitis should be performed by the procedure of treatment of burn, locally and systematically. Local treatment should be performed by topical application of antibiotic ointment or adrenocortical steroid ointment with antibiotics. In severe burn, systemic treatment with plasma and other fluids for burn shock should be performed, corresponding to the area and depth of radiation burn. (A.Y.)

  13. Radiation treatment of crude drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, A.; Gebhardt, G.; Helle, N.; Schuettler, C.; Boegl, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    It may be necessary to reduce microbiological contamination of crude drugs (medicinal plants or their parts like roots, leaves, flowers). This can be done by treating the drugs with ionizing radiation. Meethods for detection of such an irradiation were developed. It could be pointed out that measurements of luminescence, viscosity and electron spin resonance were suitable for specific drugs, but not for all drugs. (orig.) [de

  14. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  15. Comparison of one and two low dose rate brachytherapy insertions in the treatment of stage IIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Faria, S.L.C.O.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare one and two intracavitary brachytherapy with low dose rate in the management of stage IIB cervix cancer through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1989 to December 1992, 81 patients with stage IIB cervix cancer were randomized in two arms according to the number of intracavitary brachytherapy insertion to be realized. Of these, 34 were treated by two intracavitary insertions (group A) and 47 by one insertion (group B). The external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was realized through a Cobalt unit at whole pelvis with total dose of 40Gy in 20 fractions of 2,0Gy, in box arrangement, followed by parametrial complementation of 10Gy. The brachytherapy was realized right after the end of EBRT. The patients from group A were underwent to two insertions of 25Gy, calculated at point A, defined by the Manchester system. The interval between each insertions was 2 weeks. The patients from group B were underwent to one insertion of 40 Gy at point A. The average dose rate was 60cGy per hour at point A. Results: With the follow up ranging from 36 to 75 months and medium of 55 months, the disease free survival of the patients from group A was not statistically different of those from group B, 70,6% and 72,3% respectively (p=0,711). Local recurrence occurred in four patients from group A (11,7%) and in eight from group B (17%). Distant metastasis occurred in one patient from group A (2,9%) and in two from group B (4,2%). Three patients from group A (8,8%) and three from group B (6,4%) were lost to follow up and considered as dead. The causes of death among patients from group A were progression of local disease in four, distant metastasis in one, complicated diabetes mellitus in one and actinic intestinal complications in other one. The cause of deaths among patients from group B were progression of local disease in eight and distant metastasis in two. The grade I and II rectal complications rate was 5,9% and 6,3% at

  16. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    Indications and contraindications for radiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The role of chemoradiation among esophagus cancer treatment methods is determined.Thechnical, dosimetric and clinical data are sequently delivered. Preparation of a patient for chemoradiation is described. Recommendations on their most efficient use are given

  17. The treatment of radiation burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of high dose accidental irradiations can now combine surgery and stem cell therapy. This treatment has been used successfully on 2 patients with the same protocol: removal of bone marrow from the patient, isolation and cultivation of mesenchymal stem cells, injections of the cells near the wound during surgery and afterwards. The success of this therapy has been stunning: not only the wound has been cured but the scar is painless. These preliminary results must be reinforced through a research program in order to understand how the therapy works and to optimise it in terms of the quantity of cells to inject and the frequency of the injections. (A.C.)

  18. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  19. The cutaneous radiation syndrome: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, R.U.; Steinert, M.; Gottlober, P.

    2001-01-01

    Accidental exposure to ionising radiation may occur during such catastrophic events as the Chernobyl accident in 1986 or for days and weeks as in Goiania in 1987 and in the military camp during the training of soldiers in Lilo/Georgia in 1997 as well as in medical institutions. The cutaneous symptoms after radiation exposure are based on a combination of inflammatory processes and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of transcriptionally activated pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. They follow a time course consisting of prodromal erythema, manifestation, chronic stage, late stage and they are referred to as Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome. The time course depends on several factors such as the applied radiation dose, radiation quality, individual radiation sensitivity, the extent of contamination and absorption and volume of the skin. For diagnostics of the cutaneous radiation syndrome the following procedures are used: 7.5 MHz to 20 MHz-B-scan-sonography, thermography, capillary microscopy, profilometry, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy and histology. Based on the results of experimental and clinical research of the last years pharmacotherapy of the cutaneous radiation syndrome includes topic or systemic application of corticosteroids, gamma-interferon, pentoxifylline and vitamin E and superoxide dismutase. The treatment depends on the stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. Due to the complexity of the clinical manifestations of radiation disease in most patients an interdisciplinary treatment in specialized centres is necessary. Dermatologists are asked to perform in most cases life-long therapy and follow-up of the patients. (author)

  20. Radiation treatment of drugs, biochemicals and vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordheim, W.; Braeuniger, S.; Kirsch, B.; Kotowski, H.; Teupel, D.

    1984-12-01

    The concise and tabulated review reports experimental results on the effects of radiation treatment on drugs, vaccines, biochemicals and adjuvants including enzymes as well. Irradiation was mostly performed by γ-radiation using 60 Co and to a lesser extent by 137 Cs, 182 Ta, X-rays and accelerators. Ionizing radiation proved to be a useful tool for sterilization and inactivation in producing drugs, vaccines, and bioactive agents and will contribute to realize procedures difficultly solvable as to engineering and economy, respectively. 124 refs

  1. The role of radiation treatment in craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, H.W.; Maruyama, Y.; Young, B.

    1983-01-01

    The long natural course of craniopharyngioma and short-term follow-up period in many reports make comparison of various treatment results difficult. Some patients may enjoy virtually symptom-free lives despite known recurrence. Some patients with recurrence may have a good response to retreatment. Such unpredictable behavior and treatment responses have led to considerable disparity in clinical reports concerning the best treatment method. Treatments using surgery alone and/or low dose postoperative radiation treatment could prolong survival time, but may not prevent recurrence leading to ultimate failure. High dose postoperative radiotherapy following radical surgery should be an ideal approach in dealing with this tumor. (orig.) [de

  2. Role of radiation treatment in craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, H.W.; Maruyama, Y.; Young, B.

    1983-12-01

    The long natural course of craniopharyngioma and short-term follow-up period in many reports make comparison of various treatment results difficult. Some patients may enjoy virtually symptom-free lives despite known recurrence. Some patients with recurrence may have a good response to retreatment. Such unpredictable behavior and treatment responses have led to considerable disparity in clinical reports concerning the best treatment method. Treatments using surgery alone and/or low dose postoperative radiation treatment could prolong survival time, but may not prevent recurrence leading to ultimate failure. High dose postoperative radiotherapy following radical surgery should be an ideal approach in dealing with this tumor.

  3. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  4. Residual water treatment for gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, L.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of residual water by means of gamma radiation for its use in agricultural irrigation is evaluated. Measurements of physical, chemical, biological and microbiological contamination indicators were performed. For that, samples from the treatment center of residual water of San Juan de Miraflores were irradiated up to a 52.5 kGy dose. The study concludes that gamma radiation is effective to remove parasites and bacteria, but not for removal of the organic and inorganic matter. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  5. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B.; Fernberg, J.-O.

    1996-01-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author)

  6. Acupuncture treatment of patients with radiation-induced xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, M.; Dawidson, I.; Johnson, G.; Angmar-Maansson, B. [Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden). Dept. of Cardiology; Fernberg, J.-O. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology

    1996-05-01

    Xerostomia is a common and usually irreversible side effect in patients receiving radiation therapy (>50 Gy) for head and neck cancer. Of 38 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia, 20 in the experimental group were treated with classical acupuncture and 18 patients in the control group received superficial acupuncture as placebo. Within both groups the patients showed significantly increased salivary flow rates after the acupuncture treatment. In the experimental group 68% and in the control group 50% of the patients had increased salivary flow rates at the end of the observation period. Among those patients who had had all their salivary glands irradiated, 50% in both groups showed increased salivary flow rates (>20%) by the end of the observation period of 1 year. The study indicates that among the patients who had increased salivary flow rates already after the first 12 acupuncture sessions, the majority had high probability of continual improvement after the completion of acupuncture treatment. (Author).

  7. Three-dimensional radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1989-01-01

    A major aim of radiation therapy is to deliver sufficient dose to the tumour volume to kill the cancer cells while sparing the nearby health organs to prevent complications. With the introduction of devices such as CT and MR scanners, radiation therapy treatment planners have access to full three-dimensional anatomical information to define, simulate, and evaluate treatments. There are a limited number of prototype software systems that allow 3D treatment planning currently in use. In addition, there are more advanced tools under development or still in the planning stages. They require sophisticated graphics and computation equipment, complex physical and mathematical algorithms, and new radiation treatment machines that deliver dose very precisely under computer control. Components of these systems include programs for the identification and delineation of the anatomy and tumour, the definition of radiation beams, the calculation of dose distribution patterns, the display of dose on 2D images and as three dimensional surfaces, and the generation of computer images to verify proper patient positioning in treatment. Some of these functions can be performed more quickly and accurately if artificial intelligence or expert systems techniques are employed. 28 refs., figs

  8. Treatment of coffee wastewater by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, Y.; Consuegra, R.; Rapado, M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation energy can be an important resource in the treatment of wastewaters from different industries both directly and in combination with other processes to improve economics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an ionizing radiation on coffee wastewater in order to decompose chemical organic refractory substances which cannot be degradated by biological treatment. One of the approaches employed in the survey was the chemical treatment followed by the irradiation of the samples since no nuclear changes of the coagulant solution or wastewater samples were expected. Irradiation is a high cost treatment although it has increased its applications nowadays. The method is safe, fast and effective and it does not generate any pollution

  9. Development of Radiation Technique for Environmental Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myun Joo; Kuk, Il Hiun; Jin, Joon Ha

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to development of technologies for 1) the removal of toxic organic chemicals in sewage sludges and the volume reduction of the sewage sludge 2) the recycling/reuse of sewage sludge 3) the reconvey of resource from fishery waste by using radiation technologies. This research project focused on the study of treatment, disposal, and recycling/reuse of sewage sludge by radiation technology, and recovery of highly value-added resources from the wastes. As basic studies with a radiation technology, an enhancement of dewaterbilities of sewage sludge, development of dewatering conditioner, reduction of trace toxic organic chemicals, and the toxicities of the byproducts were studied. Based on the basic experimental results, we developed the pilot-scale system with the continuous e-beam and dewatering unit and the advanced treatment system with the use of carbon source recovered from sewage sludge

  10. Development of Radiation Technique for Environmental Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myun Joo; Kuk, Il Hiun; Jin, Joon Ha [and others

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this research is to development of technologies for 1) the removal of toxic organic chemicals in sewage sludges and the volume reduction of the sewage sludge 2) the recycling/reuse of sewage sludge 3) the reconvey of resource from fishery waste by using radiation technologies. This research project focused on the study of treatment, disposal, and recycling/reuse of sewage sludge by radiation technology, and recovery of highly value-added resources from the wastes. As basic studies with a radiation technology, an enhancement of dewaterbilities of sewage sludge, development of dewatering conditioner, reduction of trace toxic organic chemicals, and the toxicities of the byproducts were studied. Based on the basic experimental results, we developed the pilot-scale system with the continuous e-beam and dewatering unit and the advanced treatment system with the use of carbon source recovered from sewage sludge.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tony Choon Seng; Joseph, David; Oxer, Harry

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective was to assess, retrospectively, the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen treatment in radiation proctitis in all patients who have completed treatment for this disease at the Fremantle Hyperbaric Oxygen Unit. This unit is the only one of its kind in Western Australia. Methods and Materials: Patients were assessed by a review of hospital records, blood bank records, and clinic review (if this was convenient), and all patients responded to a telephone survey. Patients were questioned regarding radiation proctitis symptoms and the degree to which each had improved. Results: Most patients had previously been treated with radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. Patients with proctitis mainly suffered from bleeding, diarrhoea, incontinence, and pain. In more than half of these patients, symptoms partially or completely resolved after hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusion: Radiation-induced proctitis is a difficult clinical problem to treat and will probably become more significant with the rising incidence of diagnosis of prostate cancer. Hyperbaric Oxygen should be considered in the treatment of radiation-induced proctitis. Further prospective trials with strict protocol guidelines are warranted

  12. Circuit arrangement for indicating radiation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virag, Ernoe; Nyari, Istvan; Simon, Jozsef; Styevko, Mihaly; Krampe, Geza.

    1981-01-01

    The invention presents a dosemeter electronic circuit arrangement indicating hazardous dose rate threshold. If the treshold is reached or exceeded, well distinguished sound and light alarm is turned on immidiately. Moreover, certain critical levels can also be indicated by making the intermittent singalling continuous. (A.L.)

  13. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven ... and geological structures of soil and rocks. (Florou and Kritids 1992, ... Selection of Sampling Points and location of. Field Dosimeters.

  14. High energy radiation in cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-10-15

    Certain basic recommendations on the use of supervoltage radiation and radioisotope teletherapy in the treatment of malignant growths have been made by an expert study group which met in Vienna in August this y ear. The group, convened jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, was composed of 20 radiotherapists and radiation physicists from 12 countries. High energy radiation, used in the treatment of malignant tumours, can be either in the form of gamma- or X-rays or in the form of beams of accelerated electrons. The source of radiation is kept at a certain distance from the patient. The study group was agreed on the value of supervoltage radiotherapy, including gamma-ray and high voltage x-ray therapy as well as electron beam therapy. The required gamma radiation can be obtained from large sources of radioactive materials like cobalt 60 or caesium 137, while electron beams are produced by high voltage accelerators. The experts considered the sources in four broad categories: large supervoltage units, intermediate units, small isotope units and units of electron beams or very high energy x-rays. Each group of source was described including its usage. The experts made it clear that while supervoltage radiation should be a part of an organized radiotherapy department, the radiation facilities at any particular establishment should not be of the supervoltage type alone. The high energy facilities could be fruitfully used only when there was a background of general radiotherapy. The group emphasized that supervoltage radiotherapy, in common with other forms of radiotherapy, should be conducted only by adequately trained and qualified personnel, including radiation physicists, and specified the training and qualifications required of such personnel. It was felt that specialized training was one of the main requirements at the present stage and the training programmes of IAEA and WHO should be utilized extensively for this

  15. High energy radiation in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Certain basic recommendations on the use of supervoltage radiation and radioisotope teletherapy in the treatment of malignant growths have been made by an expert study group which met in Vienna in August this y ear. The group, convened jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, was composed of 20 radiotherapists and radiation physicists from 12 countries. High energy radiation, used in the treatment of malignant tumours, can be either in the form of gamma- or X-rays or in the form of beams of accelerated electrons. The source of radiation is kept at a certain distance from the patient. The study group was agreed on the value of supervoltage radiotherapy, including gamma-ray and high voltage x-ray therapy as well as electron beam therapy. The required gamma radiation can be obtained from large sources of radioactive materials like cobalt 60 or caesium 137, while electron beams are produced by high voltage accelerators. The experts considered the sources in four broad categories: large supervoltage units, intermediate units, small isotope units and units of electron beams or very high energy x-rays. Each group of source was described including its usage. The experts made it clear that while supervoltage radiation should be a part of an organized radiotherapy department, the radiation facilities at any particular establishment should not be of the supervoltage type alone. The high energy facilities could be fruitfully used only when there was a background of general radiotherapy. The group emphasized that supervoltage radiotherapy, in common with other forms of radiotherapy, should be conducted only by adequately trained and qualified personnel, including radiation physicists, and specified the training and qualifications required of such personnel. It was felt that specialized training was one of the main requirements at the present stage and the training programmes of IAEA and WHO should be utilized extensively for this

  16. Volume visualization in radiation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzari, C A; Chen, G T

    2000-12-01

    Radiation treatment planning (RTP), historically an image-intensive discipline and one of the first areas in which 3D information from imaging was clinically applied, has become even more critically dependent on accurate 3D definition of target and non-target structures in recent years with the advent of conformal radiation therapy. In addition to the interactive display of wireframe or shaded surface models of anatomic objects, proposed radiation beams, beam modifying devices, and calculated dose distributions, recently significant use has been made of direct visualization of relevant anatomy from image data. Dedicated systems are commercially available for the purpose of geometrically optimizing beam placement, implementing in virtual reality the functionality of standard radiation therapy simulators. Such "CT simulation" systems rely heavily on 3D visualization and on reprojection of image data to produce simulated radiographs for comparison with either diagnostic-quality radiographs made on a simulator or megavoltage images made using the therapeutic beams themselves. Although calculation and analysis of dose distributions is an important component of radiation treatment design, geometric targeting with optimization based on 3D anatomic information is frequently performed as a separate step independent of dose calculations.

  17. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  18. Online external beam radiation treatment simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix G.; Sopin, Ivan; Zeidan, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective and widely accepted form of treatment for many types of cancer that requires extensive computerized planning. Unfortunately, current treatment planning systems have limited or no visual aid that combines patient volumetric models extracted from patient-specific CT data with the treatment device geometry in a 3D interactive simulation. We illustrate the potential of 3D simulation in radiation therapy with a web-based interactive system that combines novel standards and technologies. We discuss related research efforts in this area and present in detail several components of the simulator. An objective assessment of the accuracy of the simulator and a usability study prove the potential of such a system for simulation and training. (orig.)

  19. Treatment of radiation enteritis: a comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loiudice, T.A.; Lang, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with severe radiation injury to the small bowel seen over a 4-year period were randomized to four treatment groups: 1) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po, 2) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, 3) total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, and 4) Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po. Patients received nothing by mouth except water in groups II and III, and only Vivonex-HN in groups I and IV. Patients were treated for 8-wk periods. Improvement was gauged by overall nutritional assessment measurements, nitrogen balance data and by radiological and clinical parameters. No significant difference between groups I, II, III, and IV could be found for age, sex, mean radiation dosage, time of onset after radiation therapy, or initial nutritional assessment data. Differences statistically could be found between groups II and III and I and IV regarding nutritional assessment data, nitrogen balance, radiographic and clinical parameters after therapy, with marked improvement noted in groups II and III. We conclude that a treatment regimen consisting of total parenteral nutrition and bowel rest is beneficial in the treatment of radiation enteritis. Methylprednisolone appears to enhance this effect and indeed, may be responsible for a longer lasting response

  20. Radiative decay rates in Si crystallites with a donor ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbenyova, Natalia V.; Burdov, Vladimir A.

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory, the radiative recombination rates have been calculated for small, ˜1 nm in diameter, hydrogen-passivated silicon crystallites with a single lithium or phosphorus ion. Sharp increase of the radiative recombination rates with increasing temperature was revealed for the crystallites with the lithium ion. No temperature effect was found for the crystallites with the ion of P. It was also shown that the presence of ionized donors in Si crystallites can substantially accelerate the radiative decay compared to the case of pure crystallites.

  1. Radiation treatment of polluted water and wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    Strategies to tackle environmental pollution have been receiving increasing attention throughout the world in recent years. Radiation processing using electron beam accelerators and gamma irradiators has shown very promising results in this area. Radiation processing in wastewater treatment is an additive-free process that uses the short lived reactive species formed during the radiolysis of water for efficient decomposition of pollutants therein. The rapid growth of the global population, together with the increased development of agriculture and industry, have led to the generation of large quantities of polluted industrial and municipal wastewater. The recognition that these polluted waters may pose a serious threat to humans has led technologists to look for cost effective technologies for their treatment. A variety of methods based on biological, chemical, photochemical and electrochemical processes are being explored for decomposing the chemical and biological contaminants present in the wastewaters. Studies in recent years have demonstrated the effectiveness of ionizing radiation such as, gamma rays and electron beams or in combination with other treatments, in the decomposition of refractory organic compounds in aqueous solutions and in the effective removal or inactivation of various microorganisms and parasites. The application of electron beam processing for drinking water, wastewater and groundwater treatment offers the promise of a cost effective process. The installation of the first full scale electron beam plant in Daegu, Republic of Korea, to treat 10 000 m 3 day -1 textile wastewater has demonstrated that the process is a cost effective technology when compared to conventional treatment. The regular operation of this facility provides operational data on reliability and additional data for a detailed economic evaluation. The IAEA has been supporting activities in this area by organizing advisory group meetings, consultants meetings, symposia and

  2. Transperineal high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy in the management of gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itami, Jun; Hara, Ryuseke; Kozuka, Takuyou; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakajima, Kaori; Shibata, Kouji; Abe, Yoshihisa; Fuse, Masashi; Ito, Masashi [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology

    2003-11-01

    Background: High-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy is a newly introduced modality, and its role in the management of gynecologic malignancies remains to be studied. Clinical experience in high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy was retrospectively investigated. Patients and Methods: Eight patients with primary and nine with recurrent gynecologic malignancies underwent high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy with/without external-beam irradiation. Fractional dose of the high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy ranged between 4 and 6 Gy with total doses of 15-54 Gy. Interstitial irradiation was performed twice daily with an interval of > 6 h. Results: 2-year local control rate was 75% for primary treatment and 47% for treatment of recurrence (p = 0.46). Maximum tumor size had a statistically significant impact on local control (p < 0.002). Grade 2 and 4 late complications were seen in five patients, and the incidence was significantly higher in patients with a larger volume enclosed by the prescribed fractional dose of high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy. The incidence of grade 2 and 4 complications at 18 months was 78% and 0% with a volume > 100 cm{sup 3} and {<=} 100 cm{sup 3}, respectively (p < 0.04). Conclusion: Although high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy is a promising modality, it must be applied cautiously to patients with bulky tumors because of the high incidence of serious complications. (orig.)

  3. Dosimetry studies during breast cancer radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. O. M.

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies indicated that breast cancer is wildly spread especially in women as compared to men. It is increased after an age of thirty five years in women so it is important to study the effect of exposure to the radiation on the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer. In this work the scattered doses for the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer were measured and also the probability of inducing cancer in it is also discussed. The study was performed for a group of patients composed of twenty five females. Also the backscattered doses to the intact breast were measured for thirteen female patients. During the treatment using gamma rays from Co-60 source the two tangential fields (lateral and medial) were selected for the measurements. The results of exposure to gamma radiation for the lateral and medial fields showed that the mean scattered and backscattered doses to the intact breast were (241.26 cGY,47.49 cGY) and (371.6 cGY,385.4 cGY), respectively. Beside that the somatic risk of induced cancer to the intact breast was found to be (6 .1X10 -3 ,1.2X10 -3 ) and (9.29X10 -3 , 9.63X10 -3 ), respectively. From the results obtained it was concluded that the intact breast received small amounts of radiation doses which may lead to breast cancer for the healthy breast. The recommendations from the present study are to take care of radiation protection to the patient, and also to take care of the patient treatment conditions like temperature, pressure and humidity during the radiation exposure.(Author)

  4. Radiation shielding and dose rate distribution for the building of the high dose rate accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Koji; Takagaki, Torao; Nakase, Yoshiaki; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-03-01

    A high dose rate electron accelerator was established at Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Takasaki Establishment, JAERI in the fiscal year of 1975. This report shows the fundamental concept for the radiation shielding of the accelerator building and the results of their calculations which were evaluated through the model experiments. After the construction of the building, the leak radiation was measured in order to evaluate the calculating method of radiation shielding. Dose rate distribution of X-rays was also measured in the whole area of the irradiation room as a data base. (author)

  5. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalit, Danielle N., E-mail: dmargalit@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K. [Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique

  6. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)–conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08–0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique

  7. The treatment of late radiation effects with hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plafki, C.; Carl, U.M.; Glag, M.; Hartmann, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Late radiation injuries may impose a negative influence on the quality of life in the affected patients. In several entities, standardized treatment protocols are lacking. Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) has been shown to have beneficial effects in the treatment of late radiation sequelae. Material and methods: The basic principles of HBO are reviewed as well as clinical issues. Current study protocols are presented. Results: During HBO-therapy the patient breathes pure oxygen at pressures above 100 kPa. The oxygen solubility within the fluid phase of the blood is largely increased. Biological effects include an increased oxygen diffusibility, improved collagen synthesis and neoangiogenesis as well as an enhancement of antimicrobial defenses. By decreasing the capillary filtration pressure a reduction of edema becomes possible. HBO has been shown to prevent complications following surgery in irradiated tissues. Its efficacy as an adjunct in the treatment of osteonecroses in radiation patients could be demonstrated. In addition, the loss of osseointegrated implants in the maxillofacial bones of these patients could be significantly reduced. Further indications include soft tissue necroses, hemorrhagic cystitis and proctitis in tumor patients that have been treated by radiotherapy as part of a multimodality approach. Conclusions: HBO in the treatment of late radiation effects is still subject of investigation, but remarkable results have been reported. Optimized treatment protocols need to be determined in various entities. The rate of side effects is acceptable low. (orig.) [de

  8. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-04-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compensate for the genome-destabilizing effect of environmental DNA damage and may be expected to result in a more conserved gene order in radiation-resistant species. However, here we show that rates of genome rearrangements, measured as loss of gene order conservation with time, are higher in radiation-resistant species in multiple, phylogenetically independent groups of bacteria. Comparison of indicators of selection for genome organization between radiation-resistant and phylogenetically matched, nonresistant species argues against tolerance to disruption of genome structure as a strategy for radiation resistance. Interestingly, an important mechanism affecting genome rearrangements in prokaryotes, the symmetrical inversions around the origin of DNA replication, shapes genome structure of both radiation-resistant and nonresistant species. In conclusion, the opposing effects of environmental DNA damage and DNA repair result in elevated rates of genome rearrangements in radiation-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Repar et al.

  9. Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Tokushima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakama, Minoru; Imura, Hiroyoshi; Akou, Natsuki; Takeuchi, Emi; Morihiro, Yukinori

    2004-01-01

    Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Tokushima prefecture has been carried out using a portable NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter and a CsI(Tl) pocket type one. To our knowledge, previous several surveys in Tokushima, for example by Abe et al. (1982) and Yoshino et al. (1991), have remained to report the environmental radiation dose rates merely about the major cities, that is Tokushima City and others along the Pacific. Up to now, there have been few efforts to survey the environmental radiation dose rates about mountain valleys in Tokushima. In this work, it is remarkable that we have for the first time made surveys of environmental radiation dose rates on the 6 routes across the Sanuki mountains and inside the pier of Onaruto Bridge, 'Naruto Uzu-no-michi', in the northern area of Tokushima. In the course of present surveys, the maximum value of the environmental radiation dose rates was 0.117±0.020 μGy/h at Higetouge in Sanuki City, and then it was found that the radiation dose rates across the Sanuki mountains tend to increase slightly with approaching Kagawa area from Tokushima one. Considering geological formation around the northern side of Sanuki mountains, there are mainly geological layers of granodiorite containing in the substantial amount of naturally occurring radionuclides, 40 K, U-series, and Th-series, than other geological rocks and it was found that the terrestrial gamma-rays have effect on the environmental radiation dose rates according to the geological formation. (author)

  10. Radiation treatment of wastes: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feates, F.S.; George, D.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1945 over 70 papers have been published on various applications of radiation to waste treatment. Work carried out up to 1970 showed consistently that radiation is effective in degrading organic matter in wastes, destroying pathogenic organisms, and enhancing the sedimentation and filterability of sludges, but at a cost about ten times that of conventional treatment methods. Increased cost of energy, scarcity of potable water, environmental awareness and consequent legislation, and technical developments may be changing the picture. For example, ozone, already being widely used as an alternative to chlorine for sterilization, is claimed to be produced by gamma-irradiation of air or oxygen at half the cost of electrical methods. Radiation may solve specific problems associated with industrial wastes and evidence is reported of synergistic effects with oxygen and chlorine. In-situ reactivation of carbon used as an absorbent for textile dye wastes has been observed, and is being further studied. Prototype plant for complete sterilization of sewage sludge for use as fertilizer is in operation. Safety precautions necessary if large radiation sources are used by non-technical operatives will also be considered. (author)

  11. Simulation and radiation treatment in external radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, E [Mevaterapia Medical Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1996-08-01

    It is well known that in order to obtain a uniform dose in the treated volume as defined in ICRU 50, there should be a 10% maximum difference between maximum and minimum dose values in treatment planning. Clinical target volume (CTV) should be related to external areas of body sections where tumour is located. These areas are important because different radiation beams enter through them. Therefore, verification of the planning target volume (PTV) through the external areas is highly significant. In this work we point out the importance of controlling that PTV is irradiated as planned considering some error sources usually found in radiotherapy practice with equipment that has been intensively used for a long time. Moreover, I think this experience will be helpful for those centers around the world where radiation treatment is carried out with reconditioned units. (author).

  12. Simulation and radiation treatment in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, E.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that in order to obtain a uniform dose in the treated volume as defined in ICRU 50, there should be a 10% maximum difference between maximum and minimum dose values in treatment planning. Clinical target volume (CTV) should be related to external areas of body sections where tumour is located. These areas are important because different radiation beams enter through them. Therefore, verification of the planning target volume (PTV) through the external areas is highly significant. In this work we point out the importance of controlling that PTV is irradiated as planned considering some error sources usually found in radiotherapy practice with equipment that has been intensively used for a long time. Moreover, I think this experience will be helpful for those centers around the world where radiation treatment is carried out with reconditioned units. (author)

  13. Radiation treatment for sterilization of packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Sampa, Maria Helena O.; Chmielewski, Andrzej G.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with gamma and electron radiation is becoming a common process for the sterilization of packages, mostly made of natural or synthetic plastics, used in the aseptic processing of foods and pharmaceuticals. The effect of irradiation on these materials is crucial for packaging engineering to understand the effects of these new treatments. Packaging material may be irradiated either prior to or after filling. The irradiation prior to filling is usually chosen for dairy products, processed food, beverages, pharmaceutical, and medical device industries in the United States, Europe, and Canada. Radiation effects on packaging material properties still need further investigation. This paper summarizes the work done by different groups and discusses recent developments in regulations and testing procedures in the field of packaging technology

  14. The choice of food consumption rates for radiation dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The practical problem in estimating radiation doses due to radioactive contamination of food is the choice of the appropriate food intakes. To ensure compliance or to compare with dose equivalent limits, higher than average intake rates appropriate to critical groups should be used. However for realistic estimates of health detriment in the whole exposed population, average intake rates are more appropriate. (U.K.)

  15. Information rates of radiation as a photon gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The information rates achievable with a photon-gas model of electromagnetic radiation are studied. At any frequency, information rates over the photon-gas model essentially coincide with the Shannon capacity when the signal-to-noise ratio is below a threshold. Only above the threshold does the

  16. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Teruko; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Sawai, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Toshinari; Tanabe, Hiroko

    1991-01-01

    The water demand of the past several years has increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal waste water is an effective mean of coping with the water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plants. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in the effluent were decomposed and the COD values decreased with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in the effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. In this paper we studied on the fading color and the reducing of order of sewage effluent. (author)

  17. Dose Rate of Environmental Gamma Radiation in Java Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatot Suhariyono; Buchori; Dadong Iskandar

    2007-01-01

    The dose rate Monitoring of environmental gamma radiation at some locations in Java Island in the year 2005 / 2006 has been carried out. The dose rate measurement of gamma radiation is carried out by using the peripheral of Portable Gamma of Ray Spectrometer with detector of NaI(Tl), Merck Exploranium, Model GR-130- MINISPEC, while to determine its geographic position is used by the GPS (Global Positioning System), made in German corporation of GPS III Plus type. The division of measurement region was conducted by dividing Java Island become 66 parts with same distance, except in Jepara area that will built PLTN (Nuclear Energy Power), distance between measurement points is more closed. The results of dose rate measurement are in 66 locations in Java Island the range of (19.24 ± 4.05) nSv/hour until (150.78 ± 12.26) nSv/hour with mean (51.93 ± 36.53) nSv/h. The lowest dose rate was in location of Garut, while highest dose rate was in Ujung Lemah Abang, Jepara location. The data can be used for base line data of dose rate of environmental gamma radiation in Indonesia, specially in Java Island. The mean level of gamma radiation in Java monitoring area (0.46 mSv / year) was still lower than worldwide average effective dose rate of terrestrial gamma rays 0.5 mSv / year (report of UNSCEAR, 2000). (author)

  18. Problems of dose rate in radiation protection regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Some modern problems of Radiation Safety Standards are discussed. It is known that Standards are based on the Linear-Non-Threshold Concept (LNTC) of radiation risk, which is now called by many experts as conservative. It is thought it is necessary to include in the Standards such factor as dose rate or duration of irradiation. Some model of effects of radiation exposure with taking into account the reparation of cell damage is presented. The practical method for assessment of effects of duration of irradiation on detriments is proposed.(author)

  19. Success rate of overfilled root canal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, W.; Sheikh, A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, poor obturation has been considered the primary cause of root canal treatment failures The purpose of this study was to assess the success rate of overfilled root canal treatment cases in order to decide whether a definitive restoration can be placed immediately following treatment in an overfilled case or whether the patient needs to be kept on a follow up prior to the placement of a definitive restoration. Methods: A total of 1242 patients periapical radiographs (1748 teeth) were assessed, out of which 397 teeth (in 285 patients) were found to be overfilled. Out of these 285 patients, 111 (128 cases) agreed to participate in this cross sectional study and were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination. Success was evaluated clinically by absence of symptoms (pain, swelling, tenderness to percussion and sinus tract) and radiograhically by the decrease in size of periapical lesion or no change in size. Increase in size of periapical lesion was deemed to be a failure. Results: Our findings revealed that despite overfill, the treatment was successful in 115 cases and failure was noted in 13 cases showing an overall success rate of 89.8% and failure rate of 10.2%. Out of 13 cases of failure, all 13 showed an increase in periapical lesion size, out of which 10 were accompanied with pain. Conclusion: Based on the results obtained in our study, we have determined that there is no need to delay placement of a permanent restoration on overfilled teeth (ruling out the presence of other procedural errors) nor is there any need to pursue any further surgical or non-surgical endodontic treatment. However we would suggest that patients should be kept on follow-up after placement of permanent restoration. (author)

  20. The limiting dose rate and its importance in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkiam, D.; Sonwani, Swetha; Arul Ananthakumar, A.; Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of defining a low dose of ionizing radiation still remains unclear. Before attempting to define a low dose, it is more important to define a low-dose rate since effects at low dose-rates are different from those observed at higher dose-rates. Hence, it follows that low dose-rates rather than a low dose is an important criteria to determine radio-biological effects and risk factors i.e. stochastic health effects. Chromosomal aberrations induced by ionizing radiations are well fitted by quadratic model Y= áD + âD 2 + C with the linear coefficient of dose predominating for high LET radiations and low doses of low LET. At higher doses and dose rates of sparsely ionizing radiation, break pairs produced by inter-track action leads to the formation of exchange type aberrations and is dependent on dose rate. Whereas at lower doses and dose rates, intra-track action produces break pairs and resulting aberrations are in direct proportion to absorbed dose and independent of dose rate. The dose rate at which inter-track ceases to be observable and where intra-track action effectively becomes the sole contributor of lesion-pair formation is referred to as limiting dose rate (LDR). Once the LDR is reached further reduction in dose rates will not affect the slope of DR since breaks produced by independent charged particle tracks are widely separated in time to interact with each other for aberration yield. This linear dependency is also noticed for acute exposures at very low doses. Existing reports emphasizes the existence of LDR likely to be e6.3cGyh -1 . However no systematic studies have been conducted so far to determine LDR. In the present investigation DR curves were constructed for the dose rates 0.002 and 0.003 Gy/min and to define LDR at which a coefficient approaches zero. Extrapolation of limiting low dose rate data can be used to predict low dose effects regardless of dose rate and its definition ought to serve as a useful index for studies pertaining

  1. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new treatment option permitting dose distribution optimization in interstitial implants. It possesses the advantage of equipment simplification and radiation protection to the staff, compared to the manually afterloading technique. This study pre...

  2. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1996-01-01

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 (by Nordic Association of Clinica Physics) to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ''Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy''. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed

  3. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, P [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-08-01

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ``Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy``. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed dose to the Target Volume is delivered.

  4. Novel tracer for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.; Krause, B.J.; Herrmann, K.; Gaertner, F.; Souvatzoglou, M.; Klaesner, B.

    2011-01-01

    PET and PET/CT with innovative tracers gain increasing importance in diagnosis and therapy management, and radiation treatment planning in radio-oncology besides the widely established FDG. The introduction of [ 18 F]Fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) as marker of proliferation, [ 18 F]Fluoromisonidazole ([ 18 F]FMISO) and [ 18 F]Fluoroazomycin-Arabinoside ([ 18 F]FAZA) as tracer of hypoxia, [ 18 F]Fluoroethyltyrosine ([ 18 F]FET) and [ 11 C]Methionine for brain tumour imaging, [ 68 Ga]DOTATOC for somatostatin receptor imaging, [ 18 F]FDOPA for dopamine synthesis and radioactively labeled choline derivatives for imaging phospholipid metabolism have opened novel approaches to tumour imaging. Some of these tracers have already been implemented into radio-oncology: Amino acid PET and PET/CT have the potential to optimise radiation treatment planning of brain tumours through accurate delineation of tumour tissue from normal tissue, necrosis and edema. Hypoxia represents a major therapeutic problem in radiation therapy. Hypoxia imaging is very attractive as it may allow to increase the dose in hypoxic tumours potentially allowing for a better tumour control. Advances in hybrid imaging, i.e. the introduction of MR/PET, may also have an impact in radio-oncology through synergies related to the combination of molecular signals of PET and a high soft tissue contrast of MRI as well as functional MRI capabilities. (orig.)

  5. Radiation safety program in high dose rate brachytherapy facility at INHS Asvini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy concerns primarily the use of radioactive sealed sources which are inserted into catheters or applicators and placed directly into tissue either inside or very close to the target volume. The use of radiation in treatment of patients involves both benefits and risks. It has been reported that early radiation workers had developed radiation induced cancers. These incidents lead to continuous work for the improvement of radiation safety of patients and personnel The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy needs appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize the risks to both patients and medical staff. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control, quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program developedfor a high dose rate brachytherapy facility at our centre which may serve as a guideline for other centres intending to install a similar facility.

  6. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null...

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This publication is directed at medical professionals who may be involved in the management of radiation injuries starting from the first few hours or days after an exposure of undefined severity (i.e. those handling the emergency situation may not know the extent and severity of the accident). Experience has shown that in addition to occupational physicians, the complete management of an emergency case involves other professionals such as haematologists, oncologists, plastic surgeons, dermatologists, vascular surgeons, psychiatrists and consultants in other medical specialities. The principal aim of this publication is to provide guidelines to enable medical professionals to carry out prompt diagnostic measures and to offer emergency treatment. This report provides information in tabulated form on clinical criteria for dose assessment. Additionally, it discusses the appropriate dose-effect relationship in cases of external radiation involving either total body or local exposures, as well as internal contamination

  8. Therapeutic effect of beta radiation on onychomycosis: An innovative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afroz, S.; Islam, N.; Rashid, H.; Shahidullah, M.; Ali, S.; Islam, S.K.M.; Hossain, S.; Ali, N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Onychomycosis is the most frequent cause of nail disease and the most prevalent type of dermatophytosis in Bangladesh. The humid and warm climate of this tropical country is congenial for the growth of fungi. Therapeutic limitations of conventional antimycotic agents in respect of low cure rates, high relapse rate, inherent side effects, long duration of treatment and high cost in treating onychomycosis have provided clear incentives to explore alternative forms of treatment procedure. The objectives of the present thesis work were: (i) To use beta radiation as a curative therapy for Onychomycosis, optimisation of its dosages and to promote an innovative clinical development in the field of therapeutic application of nuclear medicine; (ii) To assess the efficacy of beta radiation either alone or in combination with conventional antifungal therapy; and (iii) To reduce the duration of drug exposure and cost of treatment for onychomycosis. This is a PhD research work under the University of Dhaka and was sponsored by the Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology, Government of the people's republic of Bangladesh. This study is an open, randomised and controlled trial to verify the efficacy of beta radiation in patients with onychomycosis. Using the appropriate statistical formula, sample size of the study population was determined and in each group 92 patients were assigned. With an assumption of patients drop out and for better statistical analysis, a total of 330 patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criterion having diagnosed to have onychomycosis clinically and mycological were randomly allocated to enter in therapeutic regimen. Study population was randomised in three groups. Group A (n =110) received griseofulvin orally 500 mg once daily for 12-16 weeks; Group B (n=110) received beta radiation, 500 rads bi-weekly for 3 weeks (total 2500 rads); and Group C (n=110) received combined beta radiation (total 2500 rads in 3 weeks) and

  9. Application of radiation for wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bumsoo; Kim Jinkyu; Kim Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of wastewater is non-chemical, and uses fast formation of short-lived reactive radicals that can interact with a wide range of pollutants. Such reactive radicals are strong oxidizing or reducing agents that can transform the pollutants in the liquids wastes. The first studies on the radiation treatment of wastes were carried out in the 1950s principally for disinfection. In the 1960s, these studies were extended to the purification of water and wastewater. After some laboratory research on industrial wastewaters and polluted groundwater in 1970s and 1980s, several pilot plants were built for extended research in the 1990s. The first full-scale application was reported for the purification of wastewater at the Voronezh synthetic rubber plant in Russia. Two accelerators (50 kW each) were used to convert the non-biodegradable emulsifier, 'nekal', present in the wastewater to a biodegradable form . The installation treats up to 2000 m3 of effluent per day. A pilot plant of 1000 m 3 /d for treating textile-dyeing wastewater has been constructed in Daegu, Korea with 1 MeV, 40 kW electron accelerator. High-energy irradiation produces instantaneous radiolytical transformations by energy transfer from accelerated electrons to orbital electrons of water molecules. Absorbed energy disturbs the electron system of the molecule and results in breakage of inter-atomic bonds. Hydrated electron eaq, H atom, . OH and HO 2 . radicals and hydrogen peroxide H 2 O 2 and H 2 are the most important products of the primary interactions (radiolysis products). Generally, radiation processing of wastewater has maximum efficiency at pollutant concentration less than 10 -3 mol/L (∼100 ppm). The treatment of such wastewater is simple, requires low dose (about 1 kGy or less) and gives almost complete elimination of odor, color, taste and turbidity. The radiation processing of polluted water containing specific contaminants may require creation of special conditions to

  10. Radiation treatment of painful degenerative skeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Willich, N.

    1996-01-01

    The study reported was intended to present own experience with irradiation for treatment of painful degenerative skeletal conditions and examine the long-term effects of this treatment. A retrospective study was performed covering the period from 1985 until 1991, examining 157 patients suffering from painful degenerative skeletal conditions who entered information on the success of their radiation treatment in a questionnaire. 94 of the questionnaires could be used for evaluation. Pain anamnesis revealed periods of more than one year in 45% of the cases. 74% of the patients had been treated without success with drug or orthopedic therapy. Immediately after termination of the radiotherapy, 38% of the patients said to be free of pain or to feel essentially relieved, while at the time the questionnaire was distributed, the percentage was 76%. Thus in our patient material, radiotherapy for treatment of painful degenerative skeletal lesions was successful in 76% of the cases and for long post-treatment periods, including those cases whith long pain anamnesis and unsuccessful conventional pre-treatment. (orig./MG) [de

  11. 71: Three dimensional radiation treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.; Wong, J.W.; Harms, W.B.; Drzymala, R.E.; Emami, B.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype 3-dimensional (3-D) radiation treatment planning (RTP) system has been developed and is in use. The system features a real-time display device and an array processor for computer intensive computations. The dose distribution can be displayed as 2-D isodose distributions superimposed on 2-D gray scale images of the patient's anatomy for any arbitrary plane and as a display of isodose surfaces in 3-D. In addition, dose-volume histograms can be generated. 7 refs.; 2 figs

  12. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  13. Movement of the diaphragm during radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Masayuki; Fujioka, Tomio; Sakurai, Makoto; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Onoyama, Yasuto.

    1991-01-01

    Movement of the target volume during the exposure to radiation results in decreased accuracy in radiotherapy. We carried out the quantitative evaluation of the movement of the diaphragm during the radiation therapy. Seventy seven patients, who received radiation therapy for lung cancer from December 1988 to February 1990 at the Osaka-prefectural Habikino Hospital, were studied. The movement was recorded with a sonoprinter at the time of treatment planning for radiotherapy, and the length of movement was evaluated at 6 points on the diaphragm. In a study of 402 points in 77 patients, the average movement was 12 mm, and the maximum movement was 40 mm. At the 17% of the points, the movement exceeded 20 mm. The largest movement was observed at the outer point of the right lung. Movement was greater in men than in women. Performance status was not related to the degree of movement. We concluded that in chest and abdominal irradiation, movement caused by respiration is not negligible, and synchronized radiotherapy should be developed in the future. (author)

  14. Intra-operative radiation treatment of cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Joyeux, H.; Solassol, C.; Pujol, H.

    1986-01-01

    Intra-operative radiation treatment (I.O.R.T.) is concerning the treatment either of an unresectable tumor or of tumor bed after complete excision of a primary tumor and its first draining lymph nodes. We describe X-ray and electrons techniques and we discuss the delivered doses according to experimental and clinical data. According to the residual disease (macroscopic or microscopic), to the healthy tissues in the target volume, and the histological type, single doses from 20 Gy to 40 Gy can be delivered. Our preliminary results are reported: 25 patients with resectable tumors of the cardia, the stomach and the pancreas, 5 patients with pelvic recurrences of colon and rectum carcinomas. Therapeutic results of the I.O.R.T. providing from the literature are discussed. The I.O.R.T. indications are defined as palliative (unresectable tumors) and curative (irradiation of tumor bed after complete excision of the tumor) [fr

  15. Effects of gamma-radiation treatment in somatic cell culture of indica rice Basmati 370 selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaokai, Min; Xiufang, Qi; Zhenmin, Xiong; Chengzhang, Zhao [China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou (China)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Radiation treatment was applied at different doses to germinating embryo, callus, callus with green spots and callus with developing shoots. Results indicate: (1) induction rate of the callus was reduced with increased radiation dose applied to germinating embryos; (2) radiation effect on redifferentiation percentage and/or green plantlets percentage of the callus varied with different treatment dates in the order of callus treatment > treatment of callus with green spots > treatment of callus with developing shoots > treatment of germinating embryo; (3) in vitro irradiation reduced the fertility of regenerated plants, but was able to increase their exerted stigma rate and the frequency of early maturing variation in their progenies; (4) a number of promising mutants including 2 male sterile plants were obtained from the progenies of in vitro irradiation. The radiation treatment with 2.5-5.OkR to callus with green spots or shoots is a method worthy of adoption in rice improvement. (author)

  16. Radiation therapy tolerance doses for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    To adequately plan acceptable dose distributions for radiation therapy treatments it is necessary to ensure that normal structures do not receive unacceptable doses. Acceptable doses are generally those that are below a stated tolerance dose for development of some level of complication. To support the work sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to low-LET radiation has been compiled from a number of sources. These tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD 5 ) or 50% (TD 50 ) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represent doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same end point. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05< p<0.10). Following establishment of defunctioning colostomy on account of rectovaginal fistulae in 25 patients, eight patients developed new fistulae, Significantly more patients with fistulae died of recurrence as compared with patients with other lesions (p<0.01). Defunctioning colostomy in the treatment of rectal fistula is a reasonable form of treatment in elderly patients and in case of recurrence. Younger patients should be assessed in a special department in view of the possibility of a sphincter-preserving procedure following resection of the rectum and restorative anastomosis. (author)

  18. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05treatment of rectal fistula is a reasonable form of treatment in elderly patients and in case of recurrence. Younger patients should be assessed in a special department in view of the possibility of a sphincter-preserving procedure following resection of the rectum and restorative anastomosis. 11 refs.

  19. Preventive treatment of combined radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudagov, R.; Uljanova, L.; Makarov, G.

    1996-01-01

    The risk of sepsis development increases when thermal burns and other trauma occur in combination with exposure to radiation. Only surgical correction of the life-threatening state recommends within 48 hours after irradiation. All other arrangements have to carry out when hemopoiesis recovery will complete. However exposed patients with combined injuries (CI) die during the first two or three weeks mainly due to sepsis. Therefore prophylaxis and preventive therapy of infectious complications are need early. Actual difficulties in choice of valid treatment procedure for acute radiation syndrome (ARS) exhibit additional aggravation under CI. The available facts prove decreasing early therapy efficiency for rather high dose exposure and wound trauma occurrence. The own results showed that bacterial polysaccharide pyrogenal, glycopin (synthetic analogue of muramil-dipeptide), thymus preparations (thymozin, thymotropin, thymogen), tuftsin, heterologic human and bovine immunoglobulins did not modify the low values of 30-day survival under CI (irradiation + thermal burn). Single injection of prodigiozan, zymozan and some other yeast polysaccharides in 1 hr after CI resulted at moderate increasing of survival. The main purpose of this study, which bases upon our understanding of CI pathogenesis, was search more effective means for preventive treatment of combined radiation injuries. Two groups of remedies were under study. The first group included so called 'biological response modifiers' (BRM). These agents may increase host defences to infection, macrophage's activity and hemopoietic growth factor's secretion. The second group included antibiotics that should be directed against the potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens and simultaneously be useful for selective decontamination of gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  20. The treatment progress of radiation dermatitis from external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Wangyang; Liu Yulong

    2009-01-01

    Radiation dermatitis is often seen and is often a complication of radiation therapy of tumors. It is characterized by poor healing, stubborn relapse, and carcinogenesis.. The treatment include drug, physical therapy and surgery. This article describes the treatment progress of radiation dermatitis from external exposure. (authors)

  1. The role of radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with malignant tumors. Radiation pathological stand point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Estimations suggest that about 60% of all cancer patients will require some form of radiation therapy during their lifetime. Although 40 to 50% of cancer patients in Europe and the United States receive radiation therapy, only about 20% of patients with cancer in Japan undergo such treatment. This is largely due to the lack of understanding of the role of radiation therapy by many medical personnel in Japan, as well as to ''''radiation allergy'''' among many of the general population in Japan, a country that has been undergone atomic bombing. From our perspective as specialists in radiation therapy, the chronic shortage of radiation oncologist also poses a serious problem. Although there are approximately 700 hospitals throughout Japan where radiation therapy is available, no more than half this number of medical facilities have a full-time radiation oncologist. Perhaps the reason for this is that radiation therapy is perceived as unnecessary in Japan. However, it is absolutely essential. In our experience, the 5-year relative survival rate of patients with malignant tumors who have undergone radiation therapy in our clinic is 65 percent. Thus, radiation therapy has proven very useful in the treatment of malignant tumors. Moreover, better estimates of prognosis of cancer patients treated with radiation therapy are becoming possible. This article discusses the role of radiation therapy, from a radiation pathological perspective, in a multidisciplinary approach to treatment of cancer patients. I also emphasize the critical importance of training radiation oncologists who can function as part of multidisciplinary teams that care for patients with malignant tumors. (author). 50 refs

  2. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer : Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and

  3. Dose rate effectiveness in radiation-induced teratogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Norimura, T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of p53 gene in tissue repair of teratogenic injury, we compared incidence of radiation-induced malformations in homozygous p53(-/-) mice, heterozygous p53(+/-) mice and wild-type p53(+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy at high dose rate on 9.5 days of gestation, p53(-/-) mice showed higher incidences of anomalies and higher resistance to prenatal deaths than p53(+/+) mice. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and deaths supports the notion that embryos or fetuses have a p53-dependent 'guardian' that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. In fact, after X-irradiation, the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in p53(+/+) fetuses but not in p53(-/-) fetuses. The same dose of γ-ray exposure at low dose rate on 9.5-10.5 day of gestation produced significant reduction of radiation-induced malformation in p53(+/+) and p53(+/-) mice, remained teratogenic for p53(-/-) mice. These results suggest that complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires the concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and the p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. When concerted DNA repair and apoptosis functions efficiently, there is a threshold dose-rate for radiation-induced malformations. (author)

  4. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  5. Pretreatment Growth Rate Predicts Radiation Response in Vestibular Schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Nina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Larvie, Mykol [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Curtin, Hugh [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McKenna, Michael J. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are often followed without initial therapeutic intervention because many tumors do not grow and radiation therapy is associated with potential adverse effects. In an effort to determine whether maximizing initial surveillance predicts for later treatment response, the predictive value of preirradiation growth rate of VS on response to radiation therapy was assessed. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with 65 VS were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiation surgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Pre- and postirradiation linear expansion rates were estimated using volumetric measurements on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs). In addition, postirradiation tumor volume change was classified as demonstrating shrinkage (ratio of volume on last follow-up MRI to MRI immediately preceding irradiation <80%), stability (ratio 80%-120%), or expansion (ratio >120%). The median pre- and postirradiation follow-up was 20.0 and 27.5 months, respectively. Seven tumors from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients were excluded from statistical analyses. Results: In the 58 non-NF2 patients, there was a trend of correlation between pre- and postirradiation volume change rates (slope on linear regression, 0.29; P=.06). Tumors demonstrating postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 89%/year, and those without postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 41%/year (P=.02). As the preirradiation growth rate increased, the probability of postirradiation expansion also increased. Overall, 24.1% of tumors were stable, 53.4% experienced shrinkage, and 22.5% experienced expansion. Predictors of no postirradiation tumor expansion included no prior surgery (P=.01) and slower tumor growth rate (P=.02). The control of tumors in NF2 patients was only 43%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for VS, but tumors that grow quickly preirradiation may be

  6. Pretreatment Growth Rate Predicts Radiation Response in Vestibular Schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Nina N.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Larvie, Mykol; Curtin, Hugh; Loeffler, Jay S.; McKenna, Michael J.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are often followed without initial therapeutic intervention because many tumors do not grow and radiation therapy is associated with potential adverse effects. In an effort to determine whether maximizing initial surveillance predicts for later treatment response, the predictive value of preirradiation growth rate of VS on response to radiation therapy was assessed. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with 65 VS were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiation surgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Pre- and postirradiation linear expansion rates were estimated using volumetric measurements on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs). In addition, postirradiation tumor volume change was classified as demonstrating shrinkage (ratio of volume on last follow-up MRI to MRI immediately preceding irradiation <80%), stability (ratio 80%-120%), or expansion (ratio >120%). The median pre- and postirradiation follow-up was 20.0 and 27.5 months, respectively. Seven tumors from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients were excluded from statistical analyses. Results: In the 58 non-NF2 patients, there was a trend of correlation between pre- and postirradiation volume change rates (slope on linear regression, 0.29; P=.06). Tumors demonstrating postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 89%/year, and those without postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 41%/year (P=.02). As the preirradiation growth rate increased, the probability of postirradiation expansion also increased. Overall, 24.1% of tumors were stable, 53.4% experienced shrinkage, and 22.5% experienced expansion. Predictors of no postirradiation tumor expansion included no prior surgery (P=.01) and slower tumor growth rate (P=.02). The control of tumors in NF2 patients was only 43%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for VS, but tumors that grow quickly preirradiation may be

  7. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  8. L-shell radiative transition rates by selective synchrotron ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonetto, R D; Carreras, A C; Trincavelli, J; Castellano, G

    2004-01-01

    Relative L-shell radiative transition rates were obtained for a number of decays in Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta and Re by means of a method for refining atomic and experimental parameters involved in the spectral analysis of x-ray irradiated samples. For this purpose, pure samples were bombarded with monochromatic synchrotron radiation tuning the incident x-ray energy in order to allow selective ionization of the different atomic shells. The results presented are compared to experimental and theoretical values published by other authors. A good general agreement was found and some particular discrepancies are discussed

  9. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva: Treatment technique and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan James Rao, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: IMRT for vulvar cancer is associated with high rates of LRC in the postoperative setting and limited radiation-related toxicity. Durable LRC of disease after definitive IMRT remains challenging, and several refinements to our treatment technique are suggested.

  10. Radiation treatment of polymers containing isobutylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurpik, A.

    1976-01-01

    Homopolymers of isobutylene and copolymers thereof with isoprene (butyl rubber) are subjected to high energy ionizing radiation in the presence of halogenated hydrocarbon radiation catalysts. 5 claims

  11. Pilocarpine and carbacholine in treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensuu, H.; Bostroem, P.; Makkonen, T.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with radiation-related xerostomia were treated with oral pilocarpine solution 6 mg t.i.d., and after a 4-week drug-free period 16 of these patients were treated with carbacholine 2 mg tablets t.i.d. Basal and stimulated whole saliva flow rates were measured before commencing the drug treatment, and after 1 and 12 weeks on treatment. On a subjective linear scale both pilocarpine (p=0.01) and carbacholine (p=0.02) improved mouth moistness. Only 2 of the 8 patients with no basal or stimulated saliva flow reported some subjective benefit from the drug treatment, whereas all 8 patients with less severe xerostomia improved (p=0.007). However, the salivary flow rates measured 12 h after the last drug dose did not improve with either drug. Both drugs were generally well tolerated. It is concluded that both drugs may be useful in the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia among patients with residual salivary function. (author). 6 refs., tabs

  12. Prevention and treatment of the gastric symptoms of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, A.; Fiala, N.; Boward, C.A.; Bogo, V.

    1988-01-01

    Currently available treatments for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting either are ineffective or reduce performance. The new antiemetic and gastrokinetic agent zacopride was tested in rhesus monkeys to assess its behavioral toxicity and its ability to inhibit radiation-induced emesis. Zacopride (intragastric, 0.3 mg/kg) or a placebo was given blindly and randomly in the basal state and 15 min before a whole-body 800 cGy 60Co gamma-radiation dose (except for the legs which were partially protected to permit survival of some bone marrow). We determined (1) gastric emptying rates; (2) the presence and frequency of retching and vomiting; and (3) the effect of zacopride on the performance of a visual discrimination task in nonirradiated subjects. No vomiting, retching, or decreased performance was observed after either placebo or zacopride in the control state. Following irradiation plus placebo, 70 emeses were observed in 5 of 6 monkeys, and 353 retches were observed in all 6 monkeys. In contrast, only 1 emesis was observed in 1 of 6 monkeys and 173 retches were seen in 4 of 6 monkeys after irradiation plus zacopride (P less than 0.01). Zacopride also significantly inhibited radiation-induced suppression of gastric emptying. When given after the first vomiting episode in a separate group of irradiated monkeys, zacopride completely prevented any subsequent vomiting. The present results demonstrate that intragastric administration of zacopride significantly inhibited radiation-induced retching, vomiting, and suppression of gastric emptying in rhesus monkeys and did not cause detectable behavioral side effects when given to nonradiated monkeys. This observation has important implications in the treatment of radiation sickness

  13. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  14. Radiation damage and rate limitations in tracking devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this note the author briefly discusses radiation damage to wire chambers and silicon strip devices and the electronics that may be associated with each of these. Scintillating fibers and CCD's are not discussed although the former appears to be a potentially radiation-resistant detector. In order to calculate radiation levels and rates the author assumed the following: an inelastic cross section of 100 mb at the SSC - six charged particles per unit of rapidity - photons and neutrons do not contribute to the background (photon conversions are negligible with a thin Be beam pipe) - beam gas interactions and beam losses (except during injection when I assume that the detector is ''off'') are negligible. This is discussed in a later section. - 1 Rad = 3.5 x 10 7 minimum ionizing particlescm 2

  15. Radiation chemical studies on the treatment of waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakumoto, Akihisa; Miyata, Teijiro; Arai, Michimasa; Arai, Hidehiko

    1982-10-01

    The radiation induced reaction in aqueous solution was studied to develope the radiation treatment as a new technique for waste water and to elevate the effectiveness of radiation. The effectiveness of radiation was enhanced by combination of radiation induced reaction with conventional methods such as biological treatment and coagulation treatment. The synergistic effect of radiation and ozone was studied by using phenol and ethylene glycol. The chain reaction was observed in the radiation induced oxidation. The combination of radiation and ozone is considered to be one of the most useful method. In this report, the mechanism of each reaction and the applicability of the reaction to the treatment of waste water are discussed. (author)

  16. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  17. Effects of radiation treatment on foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehne, L.; Boegl, W.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss and compile methods and results of irradiation experiments carried out on 54 plant and animal foodstuffs in order to obtain a survey on chemical changes, in particular as regards the reduction of nutritional value and savoriness of irradiated foodstuffs. According to this task, microbiological aspects as well as an interpretation of the experimental results as to the physiology of nutrition and toxicology were not included. The results published by the authors of the original papers were compiled in a kind of dictionary which contains all relevant information such as radiation sources, irradiation conditions, investigation methods, results of chemical or organoleptical changes etc. The most important results were summarized in tables and can be found at the end of this study. Because of the abundance of existing literature the series 'Effects of radiation treatment on foodstuffs' will be continued in Part IV, and the final discussion of the results will be published separately after further data have been included. (orig.) [de

  18. Radiation treatment planning using a microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunsqui, A.R.; Calil, S.J.; Rocha, J.R.O.; Alexandre, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation treatment planning requires a lenght manipulation of data from isodose charts to obtain the best irradiation technique. Over the past 25 years this tedious operation has been replaced by computerized methods. These can reduce the working time by at least 20 times. It is being developed at the Biomedical Engineering Center a software to generate a polychromatic image of dose distribution. By means of a digitizing board, the patient contour and the beam data are transfered to the computer and stored as polinomial and Fourier series respectively. To calculate the dose distribution, the irradiated region is represented by a variable size bidimensional dot matrix. The dose at each point is calculated by correcting and adding the stored data for each beam. An algorithm for color definition according to the dose intensity was developed to display on a computer monitor the resultant matrix. A hard copy can be obtained be means of a six color plotter. (author)

  19. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  20. Method of radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodes, L.

    1976-01-01

    A technique of radiation therapy treatment planning designed to allow the assignment of dosage limits directly to chosen points in the computer-displayed cross-section of the patient. These dosage limits are used as constraints in a linear programming attempt to solve for beam strengths, minimizing integral dosage. If a feasible plan exists, the optimized plan will be displayed for approval as an isodose pattern. If there is no feasible plan, the operator/therapist can designate some of the point dosage constraints as ''relaxed.'' Linear programming will then optimize for minimum deviation at the relaxed points. This process can be iterated and new points selected until an acceptable plan is realized. In this manner the plan is optimized for uniformity as well as overall low dosage. 6 claims, 6 drawing figures

  1. On radiation treatment of pharmaceutical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukov, V.; Mende, V.

    1976-01-01

    The progress made in the GDR over the past decade in the field of radiosterilization of products of the medical industry, has naturally raised the question of radiosterilization in pharmaceutics. However, because of the diversity and complicated nature of pharmaceutical products and, consequently, longer periods of time required for preliminary studies, their radiosterilization has not yet been applied on an industrial scale, in contrast to the situation in the medical industry. The studies carried out so far have been mainly concerned with ascertaining the permissibility and effectiveness of radiosterilization of individual products under particular conditions rather than with laying down a broad theoretical basis. Accordingly, the present paper does not describe results of special studies but presents a brief rewiev of some studies on radiation treatment of pharmaceutical products undertaken in the GDR. (author)

  2. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  3. Low dose rate radiation favors apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, Albert D.; Rupnow, Brent; Knox, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated promising results in the treatment of chemotherapy refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The radiation associated with this therapy is emitted in a continuous fashion at low dose rates (LDR). Results from studies comparing the relative efficacy of LDR radiation and high dose rate (HDR) radiation on malignant cell killing have been variable. This variability may be due in part to the relative contribution of different mechanisms of cell killing (apoptosis or necrosis) at different dose rates. Materials and Methods: In order to test this hypothesis, the relative efficacy of LDR (16.7 cGy/hr) and HDR radiation (422 cGy/min) were compared using a human B cell lymphoma cell line (PW) and a PW clone (c26) stably transfected to overexpress the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2. The endpoints evaluated included the relative amount of cell killing, the fraction of cell killing attributable to apoptosis versus necrosis, and the impact of Bcl-2 overexpression on both overall cell killing and the fraction of killing attributable to apoptosis. Results: HDR and LDR radiation resulted in similar overall cell killing in the PW wild type cell line. In contrast, killing of clone c26 cells was dose rate dependent. One third less killing was seen following LDR irradiation of c26 cells compared with equivalent doses of HDR radiation. Analysis of the relative mechanisms of killing following LDR irradiation revealed a relative increase in the proportion of killing attributable to apoptosis. Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in PW cells, LDR radiation appears to be highly dependent on apoptosis as a mechanism of cell death. These findings may have implications for the selection of patients for RIT, and for the treatment of tumors that overexpress Bcl-2. They may also help form the basis for future rational design of effective combined modality therapies utilizing RIT

  4. A multigroup treatment of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Laing, E.W.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    A multi-group radiation package is outlined which will accurately handle radiation transfer problems in laser-produced plasmas. Bremsstrahlung, recombination and line radiation are included as well as fast electron Bremsstrahlung radiation. The entire radiation field is divided into a large number of groups (typically 20), which diffuse radiation energy in real space as well as in energy space, the latter occurring via electron-radiation interaction. Using this model a radiation transport code will be developed to be incorporated into MEDUSA. This modified version of MEDUSA will be used to study radiative preheat effects in laser-compression experiments at the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Laboratory. The model is also relevant to heavy ion fusion studies. (author)

  5. 106Ru and 125I radiation dose rate gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.; Swistowski, E.; Do Hoang Cuong

    2002-01-01

    Pulse count rate from plastic scintillator is a measure of the dose rate. Low dead time of measured channel and digital processing of measuring head signal with compensation of dead time enables correct registration of very high pulse count rate. The radiation source is set with an accuracy not worse than 0.1 mm in relation to the scintillator, and the movement of the source in horizontal and vertical direction is done with the accuracy of 0.01 mm. Additionally the gauge permits to measure the source activity and to check the uniform distribution of the radioactive material on the source surface. Random error due to pulse count rate fluctuation is negligible. The error due to instability of PTM gain is approx. 1,5% for 106 Ru and 5% for 125 I. (author)

  6. Advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Influence of preoperative radiation therapy on toxicity and long-term survival rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    The surgical treatment of gastric cancer has better long-term survival rates when performed in patients with early gastric cancer. Worse results are obtained in treatment of advanced gastric cancer. Most patients in west centers are treated in advanced stages. A great number of them go through a surgical treatment unable by itself to cure them. the frequent local recurrence caused by failure of the surgical treatment has been keeping poor survival rates in patients with advanced gastric cancer for decades. The desire of improving survival is the reason of the use of adjuvant therapies. This paper achieved the retrospective study of the influence of preoperative radiation therapy (2000 cGy) in long-term survival rates (120 months) of patients with advanced gastric cancer on stages IIIa, IIIb and IV. The possible injuries caused in the liver and kidney were observed also as well as first group was treated by surgical and radiation therapies and the second received surgical treatment only. There was no statistical difference between the two groups when sex, age, race, occurrence of other diseases, nutritional assessment, TNM stage, occurrence of obstruction or bleeding caused by tumor, surgical procedure and hepatic and renal function were considered. Survival rates and changes on hepatic and renal function were statistically compared. The results showed a statistic improvement on the long-term survival rates of stage IIIa patients treated by preoperative radiation therapy. No statistic difference was observed on hepatic or renal function between the groups. No adverse influence of radiation therapy method was detected by the used parameters. There was no statistical difference between the two groups when immediate surgical complications were considered. (author)

  7. [Awareness rate, treatment rate and control rate of dyslipidemia in Chinese adults, 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-hong; Wang, Li-min; Mi, Sheng-quan; Zhang, Mei; Li, Yi-chong; Jiang, Yong; Xu, Yu; Dai, Meng; Wang, Lin-hong

    2012-08-01

    To explore the awareness, treatment and control rates of dyslipidemia among Chinese adults aged over 18 in 2010, and to analyze the prevalent features. 97 409 subjects aged over 18 were recruited from 162 monitoring sites around 31 provinces in China mainland in 2010, applying multi-stage stratified cluster random sampling method. Information about subjects' history of dyslipidemia, treatment and control were collected by face-to-face interview; and each subject's fasting venous blood was drawn in the morning before having food, to test total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). In total, 51 818 cases of dyslipidemia ever or now, including 2235 subjects who once suffered from dyslipidemia but had their blood lipid controlled to normal, were screened out. And the awareness, treatment and control rates were calculated by complex weighting. The awareness rate of dyslipidemia among Chinese adults was 10.93%, while the stratified rates were 6.00%, 16.75% and 18.74% in the groups of subjects aged 18 - 44, 45 - 59 and over 60 years old, respectively (χ² = 1293.02, P China, respectively (χ² = 117.04, P China, respectively (χ² = 50.71, P control rate of dyslipidemia was 3.53% among total subjects, while whose stratified rates were 1.64%, 5.49% and 6.94% in the groups of subjects aged 18 - 44, 45 - 59 and over 60 years old, respectively (χ² = 554.12, P China, respectively (χ² = 91.45, P control rates of dyslipidemia have been comparatively low among Chinese adults, especially among the population who were young, or who were from rural area or western China.

  8. Portable radiation meters evaluation in high rates of air kerma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damatto, Willian B.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established, specifying their sensitivities and operating characteristics. Applied tests were: reading equipment variation with battery voltage, geotropism effect, energy dependence, the angular dependence and overload. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs). The behavior of 17 portable meters was analyzed and in this study, 10 of them have been tested. It was performed to characterize the gamma irradiating system (radiation dosimetry field) that possesses higher activity in teletectors for testing of larger measuring range. New calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. Therefore, it was made the improvement of the quality control programme of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma calibration laboratory, benefiting the users of such equipment with better consistent calibration measurements. (author)

  9. Grazing rates of Calanus finmarchicus on Thalassiosira weissflogii cultured under different levels of ultraviolet radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Fields

    Full Text Available UVB alters photosynthetic rate, fatty acid profiles and morphological characteristics of phytoplankton. Copepods, important grazers of primary production, select algal cells based upon their size, morphological traits, nutritional status, and motility. We investigated the grazing rates of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus on the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii cultured under 3 levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR only (4 kJ-m(-2/day, and PAR supplemented with UVR radiation at two intensities (24 kJ-m(-2/day and 48 kJ-m(-2/day. There was no significant difference in grazing rates between the PAR only treatment and the lower UVR treatment. However, grazing rates were significantly (∼66% higher for copepods feeding on cells treated with the higher level of UVR. These results suggest that a short-term increase in UVR exposure results in a significant increase in the grazing rate of copepods and, thereby, potentially alters the flow rate of organic matter through this component of the ecosystem.

  10. Current status of radiation treatment of water and wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    This is a brief review of the current status of radiation treatment of surface water, groundwater, wastewaters, and sewage sludges. Sources of ionizing radiation, and combination radiation methods for purification are described in some detail. Special attention is paid to pilot and industrial facilities. (author)

  11. Current problems of prevention diagnosis and treatment of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kova, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Causes of increasing interest to the problems of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of radiation sickness are presented. On the basis of recent publications some new aspects as quantitative criteria in radiobiology, organization problems of medical aid at radiation incidents estimation of efficiency of preventive medicine and radiation sickness therapy, theoretical development of radiotherapy of different organs et al., are characterized

  12. Radiation-thermal degradation of PE and PVC: Mechanism of synergism and dose rate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    Polyethylene insulation and polyvinyl chloride jacketing materials that had been in use in a nuclear application were recently found to be substantially deteriorated. The damage had occurred under conditions where both the total estimated dose (about 2.5 Mrad) and the operating temperatures (about 43°C average) seemed relatively moderate. These results prompted us to initiate a program to study polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene degradation under conditions of combined γ-radiation and elevated temperature environments. A number of interesting aging effects were observed, including 1) a striking synergism between radiation and temperature and 2) strong dose-rate dependent effects which occur over a wide range of dose rates. The aging effects are explained in terms of a chain branching degradation mechanism involving thermally induced breakdown of peroxides which are formed in reactions initiated by the radiation. Evidence for this mechanism is derived from infrared spectra, from sequential radiation-elevated temperature experiments including experiments under inert atmosphere, from activation energy estimates and from a new technique involving treatment of intact samples with PH 3 for chemical reduction of peroxides. The results of our studies raise significant doubts about the utility of earlier compilations which purportedly serve as radiation life expectancy guides by indicating "tolerable radiation doses" for a variety of polymers.

  13. Compatibilization of recycled polymers through radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.; Hargitai, H.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The use of compatibilizers is crucial in composites of apolar, synthetic matrix such as PP and fibrous, polar, natural reinforcement. Radiation treatment using small EB- or gamma dose of about 8 kGy - may enhance the effect of reactive compatibilizer, involving both matrix and reinforcement into a chemically attached system. In the present work we applied byproducts of textile- and woodworking industry as reinforcing additives for polypropylene (PP), reprocessed from waste car-bumpers and recollected bottle-caps. Hemp fibers and waste-wood fibers can be mixed into the PP on a continuously operating twin-screw extruder. Various additives have been tries out in our laboratory including maleic acid anhydride, acrylic-acid grafted compatibilizers, unsaturated oligomers and vinylsilanes. The effect of different compatibilizing methods have been evaluated by comparing mechanical properties (tensile- and flexural strength, modulus of elasticity etc.), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and rheological properties. The ensemble of properties is clearly enhanced by the efficient compatibilization. The reinforced - recycled products can be applied in advanced sandwich molding processing technologies of coextrusion and co-injection molding, where the dark coloured, recycled product forms the inner core of the product, covered on both side with virgin thermoplastic

  14. Truffles decontamination treatment by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, M.; Capitani, D.; Mannina, L.; Cristinzio, M.; Ragni, P.; Tata, A.; Coppola, R.

    2004-01-01

    A research project, funded by the Italian Ministry of Research and the European Union, is in progress aimed to develop processes to enhance, by irradiation, the safety and the wholesomeness of fresh products relevant for Italian food industry. Irradiation was performed on truffles, since the bacterial contamination impairs their trade in foreign countries. The microbial population and the shelf life under refrigeration were studied either on samples untreated or on samples submitted to γ-rays in a 1-2.5 kGy dose range. The effect of the treatment was monitored by UV and NMR techniques. Total microbial population and the shelf life prolongation were investigated. The synergistic effect of the dose, the packaging under vacuum and the storage/irradiation temperature resulted in a direct effect on the microbial load, spoilage and shelf life. After the irradiation, small variations in the intensity of some NMR resonances due to aromatic compounds and other unassigned compounds were observed. As confirmed by UV spectrophotometric data, these phenomena seemed to originate from a small degradation of polyphenols; the induced growth of soluble phenols suggested that the 1.5 kGy dose can be considered as the radiation dose threshold beyond which clear chemical modifications on truffles appear

  15. A comprehensive centralized control system for radiation waste treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive centralized control system is designed for the radiation waste treatment facility that lacking of coordinated operational mechanism for the radiation waste treatment. The centralized control and alarm linkage of various systems is implemented to ensure effectively the safety of nuclear facility and materials, improve the integral control ability through advanced informatization ways. (author)

  16. Radiation Treatment of Wastewater Containing Pharmaceutical Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takács, E.; Wojnárovits, L.; Homlok, R.; Illés, E.; Csay, T.; Szabó, L.; Rácz, G. [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation induced degradation of maleic acid, fumaric acid and 20 aromatic molecules was investigated in air saturated aqueous solutions. Hydroxyl radicals were generated water radiolysis. The decomposition was followed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon content (TOC) measurements. Up to ∼50% decrease of COD the dose dependence was linear. By the ratio of the decrease of COD and the amount of reactive radiolysis intermediates introduced into the solution the oxidation efficiencies were calculated. Efficiencies around 0.5-1 (O{sub 2} molecule built in products/OH) found for most of the compounds show that the one-electron-oxidant OH induces 2-4 electron oxidations. The high oxidation rates were explained by OH addition to unsaturated bonds and subsequent reactions of the dissolved O{sub 2} with organic radicals. In amino substituted molecules or in Acid Red 1 azo dye, O{sub 2} cannot compete efficiently with the unimolecular transformation of organic radicals and the efficiency is lower (0.2-0.5). (author)

  17. Radiation Treatment of Wastewater Containing Pharmaceutical Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takács, E.; Wojnárovits, L.; Homlok, R.; Illés, E.; Csay, T.; Szabó, L.; Rácz, G.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation induced degradation of maleic acid, fumaric acid and 20 aromatic molecules was investigated in air saturated aqueous solutions. Hydroxyl radicals were generated water radiolysis. The decomposition was followed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon content (TOC) measurements. Up to ∼50% decrease of COD the dose dependence was linear. By the ratio of the decrease of COD and the amount of reactive radiolysis intermediates introduced into the solution the oxidation efficiencies were calculated. Efficiencies around 0.5-1 (O 2 molecule built in products/OH) found for most of the compounds show that the one-electron-oxidant OH induces 2-4 electron oxidations. The high oxidation rates were explained by OH addition to unsaturated bonds and subsequent reactions of the dissolved O 2 with organic radicals. In amino substituted molecules or in Acid Red 1 azo dye, O 2 cannot compete efficiently with the unimolecular transformation of organic radicals and the efficiency is lower (0.2-0.5). (author)

  18. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A Loy

    Full Text Available Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011 and after (2013 the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR. After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05. For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008 from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20. These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  19. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Bryan A; Shkedy, Clive I; Powell, Adam C; Happe, Laura E; Royalty, Julie A; Miao, Michael T; Smith, Gary L; Long, James W; Gupta, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05). For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008) from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20). These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  20. Natural radiation monitoring and control treatment in the Hantepe beach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetiner, M. A.; Gunduz, H.; Tukenmez, I.

    2012-01-01

    This work has been carried out to monitor and decrease the natural radiation exposure at the Hantepe beach (Canakkale (Turkey)). A 0.25- to 0.30-m-thick layer of sand was scraped, removed and deposited in a safe place in order to decrease people's exposure to radiation and to relieve relevant radio-phobia. The original mean value of dose rate on the beach was 1.38 μGy h -1 at the contact and 1.0 μGy h -1 at 1 m above the ground. After the scraping process, the mean value of dose rate decreased to 0.98 μGy h -1 at the contact and to 0.78 μGy h -1 at 1 m above the ground. One year later, these values decreased to 0.70 μGy h -1 at the contact and to 0.56 μGy h -1 at 1 m above the ground. The effective original dose rate of 1.2 mSv y -1 decreased to 0.95 mSv y -1 after the surface treatment and to 0.69 mSv y -1 one year later. (authors)

  1. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  2. Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Dose Rate of West Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izham, A.; Ramli, A. T.; Saridan Wan Hassan, W. M.; Idris, H. N.; Basri, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    A study of terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) dose rate was conducted in west of Sarawak, covering Kuching, Samarahan, Serian, Sri Aman, and Betong divisions to construct a baseline TGR dose rate level data of the areas. The total area covered was 20,259.2 km2, where in-situ measurements of TGR dose rate were taken using NaI(Tl) scintillation detector Ludlum 19 micro R meter NaI(Tl) approximately 1 meter above ground level. Twenty-nine soil samples were taken across the 5 divisions covering 26 pairings of 9 geological formations and 7 soil types. A hyperpure Germanium detector was then used to find the samples' 238U, 232Th, and 40K radionuclides concentrations producing a correction factor Cf = 0.544. A total of239 measured data were corrected with Cf resulting in a mean Dm of 47 ± 1 nGy h-1, with a range between 5 nGy h-1 - 103 nGy h-1. A multiple regression analysis was conducted between geological means and soil types means against the corrected TGR dose rate Dm, generating Dg,s= 0.847Dg+ 0.637Ds- 22.313 prediction model with a normalized Beta equation of Dg,s= 0.605Dg+ 0.395Ds. The model has an 84.6% acceptance of Whitney- Mann test null hypothesis when tested against the corrected TGR dose rates.

  3. The treatment of late radiation skin ulcers by laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu.A.; Klimanov, M.E.; Bardychev, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    There are presented the results of laser stimulation of reparation processes in 25 patients with late radiation skin ulcers. Short-term therapeutic results turned out to be favorable in 18 (72%) patients, a complete cicatrization of ulcers was observed in 9 patients, significant improvement in 9

  4. Oscillator strengths and radiative rates for transitions in neutral sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N.C.; Hibbert, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present accurate oscillator strengths and radiative rates for 2173 E1 transitions among the 120 levels belonging to 3s 2 3p 4 , 3s3p 5 , and 3s 2 3p 3 ( 4 S o , 2 D o , 2 P o )nl configurations where nl=4s,5s,6s,4p,5p,6p,3d,4d,4f,5f. A configuration interaction approach is employed through the standard CIV3 program. The 114 LS states included in the present calculation generate 250 fine-structure levels belonging to the above configurations below 100,000 cm -1 . However, results of only 120 fine-structure levels are presented due to the absence of experimental energy values for the remaining levels. Tabulations of oscillator strengths and radiative rates, and their comparison with other calculations, are presented in the first two tables. In a separate table the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, in length and velocity gauges, are presented for 2173 E1 transitions, and are arranged in ascending order of wavelength

  5. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, K M; Keenan, F P; Msezane, A Z

    2013-01-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 ) 3s 2 3p 5 , 3s3p 6 , 3s 2 3p 4 3d, 3s3p 5 3d, 3s 2 3p 3 3d 2 , 3s 2 3p 4 4s, 3s 2 3p 4 4p and 3s 2 3p 4 4d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested. (paper)

  6. Dose rate effect on material aging due to radiation. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Shin-ichi (Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan)); Hayakawa, Chikara; Takeya, Chikashi

    1982-12-01

    Although many reports have been presented on the radiation aging of the organic materials for electric cables, those have been based on the experiments carried out at high dose rate near 1 x 10/sup 6/ rad/h, assuming that aging effect depends on only radiation dose. Therefore, to investigate the aging behaviour in low dose rate range is an important subject to predict their practical life time. In this report, the results of having investigated the aging behaviour of six types of materials are described, (polyethylene for general insulation purpose, chemically cross-linked polyethylene, fire-retardant chemically cross-linked polyethylene, fire-retardant ethylene-propylene rubber, fire-retardant chloro-sulfonated polyethylene for sheaths, and fire-retardant, low hydrochloric acid, special heat-resistant vinyl for insulation purpose or chloroclean). They were irradiated with /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray at the dose from 5 x 10/sup 3/ to 1 x 10/sup 6/ rad/h, and their deterioration was tested for the items of elongation, tensile strength, resistivity, dielectric tangent and gel fraction. The aging mechanism and dose rate effect were also considered. The dose rate effect appeared or did not appear depending on the types of materials and also their properties. The materials that showed the dose rate effect included the typical ones whose characteristics degraded with the decreasing dose rate, and the peculiar ones whose deterioration of characteristics did not appear constantly. Aging mechanism may vary in the case of high dose rate and low dose rate. Also, if the life time at respective dose rate in relatively higher dose rate region is clarified, the life time in low dose rate region may possibly be predicted.

  7. [Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    This is a renewal proposal for an on-going project of the Department of Energy (DOE)/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The objective of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of radiation-cloud in GCMs so that reliable predictions of the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming and regional responses can be made. The ARM Program supports two research areas: (I) The modeling and analysis of data related to the parameterization of clouds and radiation in general circulation models (GCMs); and (II) the development of advanced instrumentation for both mapping the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere and high accuracy/precision radiometric observations. The present project conducts research in area (I) and focuses on GCM treatment of cloud life cycle, optical properties, and vertical overlapping. The project has two tasks: (1) Development and Refinement of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment Using ARM Data; and (2) Validation of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment

  8. Concurrent weekly cisplatin plus external beam radiotherapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer: A control cohort comparison with radiation alone on treatment outcome and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.-W.; Liang, J.-A.; Hung, Y.-C.; Yeh, L.-S.; Chang, W.-C.; Lin, W.-C.; Yang, S.-N.; Lin, F.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test, though a control-cohort study, the hypothesis that concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using weekly cisplatin, plus high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) is superior to radiation (RT) alone in patients with advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 171 patients with Stage IIB-III cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Seventy patients were treated with CCRT and the results were compared with those of 101 patients who had been treated with RT using the same protocol at an early period. RT consisted of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole pelvis, followed by a 12.6-Gy boost to the parametrium. Four courses of HDRICB using 6.0 Gy to Point A were performed. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly cisplatin at a dose of 40 mg/m 2 for 5-6 cycles. Results: The 4-year actuarial survival was 74% for the CCRT group and 68% for the RT group (p = 0.60). The 4-year pelvic relapse-free survival was 87% for the CCRT group and 85% for the RT group (p = 0.37). The 4-year distant metastases-free survival was 75% for the CCRT group and 76% for the RT group (p = 0.44). The cumulative incidence of gastrointestinal and genitourinary injuries of grade 3 or above was 14.3% for the CCRT group and 7.9% for the RT group (p = 0.19). Conclusion: This study did not show a survival benefit of CCRT with weekly cisplatin and HDRICB for Stage II-III cervical cancer, nor did it demonstrate a significant increase of late complications when comparing with RT alone

  9. Predicted Rates of Secondary Malignancies From Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Stage I Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Charles B., E-mail: csimone@alumni.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Kramer, Kevin [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); O' Meara, William P. [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Belard, Arnaud [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); O' Connell, John [Radiation Oncology Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon radiotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for stage I seminoma. Single-dose carboplatin therapy and observation have emerged as alternative options due to concerns for acute toxicities and secondary malignancies from radiation. In this institutional review board-approved study, we compared photon and proton radiotherapy for stage I seminoma and the predicted rates of excess secondary malignancies for both treatment modalities. Methods and Material: Computed tomography images from 10 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapies. Structures reported to be at increased risk for secondary malignancies and in-field critical structures were contoured. Reported models of organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates based on organ equivalent dose were used to determine the excess absolute risk of secondary malignancies. Calculated values were compared with tumor registry reports of excess secondary malignancies among testicular cancer survivors. Results: Photon and proton plans provided comparable target volume coverage. Proton plans delivered significantly lower mean doses to all examined normal tissues, except for the kidneys. The greatest absolute reduction in mean dose was observed for the stomach (119 cGy for proton plans vs. 768 cGy for photon plans; p < 0.0001). Significantly more excess secondary cancers per 10,000 patients/year were predicted for photon radiation than for proton radiation to the stomach (4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.22-5.01), large bowel (0.81; 95% CI, 0.39-1.01), and bladder (0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.58), while no difference was demonstrated for radiation to the pancreas (0.02; 95% CI, -0.01-0.06). Conclusions: For patients with stage I seminoma, proton radiation therapy reduced the predicted secondary cancer risk compared with photon therapy. We predict a reduction of one additional secondary cancer for every 50 patients

  10. Influence of degradation rate of oil on its radiation stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiyeva, S.R.; Samadova, A.A.; Mustafayev, I.I; Guliyeva, N.K.; Melikova, S.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Regularities of radiation-chemical transformations of heavy fractions of Surakhani oil fields of Azerbaijan taken from the surface of the basin were studied. Studies were conducted at the range of absorbed doses of γ-radiation 3,8 - 109,5 kGy at dose rate of P=0,21 Gy/s. It was established radiation-chemical yields of gases obtained within the radiolysis of oil fractions and determined structural-group composition of the components. The research results will allow evaluating the possibility of applying radiation-chemical technology in purification of water from degraded oil products.In terms of negative impact on the environment, the oil industry is in one of the first places among the leading sectors of the economy. The problem of water pollution with oil and oil products are becoming more urgent each year. The last accidents (in the Gulf of Mexico, on Amur, in Azerbaijan) clearly show the need for application of new methods of water purification from oil /1/. Oil and oil products fall into the body of water in different ways: with storm water, within pipeline accidents, dumping of industrial sewage, etc. According to experts, each year about 10 million tons of oil and oil products get in the world ocean /2/. Only Azerbaijan dumps more than 500 mln m3 of normative-treated water in the Caspian Sea every year, as a result of which the sea gets more than 3 thousand tons of oil products, 25 tons of phenols, 28 thousand tons of suspended materials, 520 thousand tons of synthetic surfactant /3/. Within the ingress of oil on the surface of water objects the greatest danger is its spread to large areas, leading to disruption of ecological balance in the environment. Oil consisting of mainly hydrocarbon molecules, insoluble in water, spreads on the surface of the water during a disaster. Under the action of waves and current, the oil patch divided into many parts. Volatile fractions evaporate in the first hours of the accident; further processes occurring within the

  11. Analysis of the payment rates and classification of services on radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, K. H.; Shin, H. S.; Pyo, H. R.; Lee, K. C.; Lee, Y. T.; Myoung, H. B.; Yeom, Y. K.

    1997-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop new payment rates for services of radiation oncology, considering costs of treating patients. A survey of forty hospitals has been conducted in order to analyze the costs of treating patients. Before conducting the survey, we evaluated and reclassified the individual service items currently using as payments units on the fee-for-service reimbursement system. This study embodies the analysis of replies received from the twenty four hospitals. The survey contains information about the hospitals' costs of 1995 for the reclassified service items on radiation oncology. After we adjust the hospital costs by the operating rate of medical equipment, we compare the adjusted costs with the current payment rates of individual services. The current payment rates were 5.05-6.58 times lower than the adjusted costs in treatment planning services, 2.22 times lower in block making service, 1.57-2.86 times lower in external beam irradiation services, 3.82-5.01 times lower in intracavitary and interstitial irradiation and 1.12-2.55 times lower in total body irradiation. We could conclude that the current payment system on radiation oncology does not only reflect the costs of treating patients appropriately but also classify the service items correctly. For an example, when the appropriate costs and classification are applied to TBI, the payment rates of TBI should be increased five times more than current level. (author)

  12. Place of radiation therapy in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, S.; Mauch, P.; Goodman, R.L.; Rosenthal, D.S.; Moloney, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    Between April 1969, and December 1974, 216 successive surgically-staged IA-IIIB Hodgkin's disease patients were seen and treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy. Patients with stages IA and IIA disease received mantle and para-aortic-splenic pedicle irradiation alone and have a probability of relapse-free survival of 97 percent and 80 percent, respectively. Patients with stage IIIA disease were treated with total-nodal irradiation (TNI) alone and have a 51 percent relapse-free and 82 percent overall survival. In spite of the high relapse rate in stage IIIA patients, the majority are currently disease-free following retreatment with MOPP chemotherapy. Stage IIB and IIIB patients received either radiation therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. While the relapse-free survival is similar in stage IIB patients with or without the addition of chemotherapy, combined TNI and MOPP chemotherapy in stage IIIB patients has provided a superior relapse-free survival (74 percent) when compared to patients treated with TNI alone. There have been 3 mantle irradiation-related deaths in 209 patients treated (1.5 percent); in contrast, there have been 6 deaths related to combined-modality treatment in 74 patients at risk (8 percent). We continue to advocate the minimum therapy needed to produce uncomplicated cure. We feel that this is achieved with radiation therapy alone in stages IA and IIA disease without extensive mediastinal involvement and with combined modality therapy in stage IIIB disease. The role of combined modality therapy in place of radiation therapy alone in stage IIB and IIIA disease is less certain

  13. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 x 10 -3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing

  14. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  15. Improved treatment of radiation effects on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandl, E.O.; Kaercher, K.H.; Wandl-Hainberger, I.

    1985-01-01

    The treatment concept developed by K.H. Kaercher was extended by a therapy using Elasten S cream. In the course of a highvoltage therapy using fast electrons or cobalt-60, interesting aspects in the treatment and progression of the radiation reactions of the skin were established. The dermato-therapeutic principles layed down by K.H. Kaercher with the treatment palette used hitherto, have without doubt invariably proven their value. The exclusive powder treatment, however, may be made more practical by application of the new treatment cream in accordance with the intervals in radiation treatment or as a basic treatment towards the end of therapy. Furthermore it is ideally suited for the care and after-treatment of skin, strained by radiation. It reduces considerably the remaining visible radiation reactions. The treatment with powder and emulsion has for more than 10 years proven effective. After the excellent results of the new cream during radiation treatment, additional positive effects are expected in a long-term trial which will be reported on separately. (orig.) [de

  16. Use of ionizing radiation in waste water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, R.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of methods and possibilities of applying ionizing radiation in industrial waste water treatment. The most frequently used radiation sources include the 60 Co and 137 Cs isotopes and the 90 Sr- 90 Y combined source. The results are reported and the methods used are described of waste water treatment by sedimenting impurities and decomposing organic and inorganic compounds by ionizing radiation. It was found that waste water irradiation accelerated sedimentation and decomposition processes. The doses used varied between 50 and 500 krads. Ionizing radiation may also be used in waste water disinfection in which the effects are used of radiation on microorganisms and of the synthesis of ozone which does not smell like normally used chlorine. The described methods are still controversial from the economic point of view but the cost of waste water treatment by irradiation will significantly be reduced by the use of spent fuel elements. (J.B.)

  17. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: first reported treatment in Australasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Joon, D.L.; Hope, G.; Smylie, J.; Henkul, Z.; Wills, J.; Cramb, J.; Towns, S.; Archer, P.

    2002-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an exciting new advance in the practice of radiation oncology. It is the use of non-uniform radiation beams to achieve conformal dose distributions. As a result of the high initial capital costs and the time and complexity of planning, IMRT is not yet a widely available clinical treatment option. We describe the process involved in applying this new technology to a case of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  19. [Effects of reduced solar radiation on winter wheat flag leaf net photosynthetic rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-Fei; Ni, Yan-Li; Mai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Rong-Jun; Feng, Yan; Sun, Jian; Li, Jian; Xu, Jing-Xin

    2011-06-01

    Taking winter wheat Triticum aestivum L. (cv. Yangmai 13) as test material, a field experiment was conducted in Nanjing City to study the effects of simulated reduced solar radiation on the diurnal variation of winter wheat flag leaf photosynthetic rate and the main affecting factors. Five treatments were installed, i. e., 15% (T15), 20% (T20) , 40% (T40), 60% (T60), and 100% (CK) of total incident solar radiation. Reduced solar irradiance increased the chlorophyll and lutein contents significantly, but decreased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn). Under different solar irradiance, the diurnal variation of Pn had greater difference, and the daily maximum Pn was in the order of CK > T60 > T40 > T 20 > T15. In CK, the Pn exhibited a double peak diurnal curve; while in the other four treatments, the Pn showed a single peak curve, and the peak was lagged behind that of CK. Correlation analysis showed that reduced solar irradiance was the main factor affecting the diurnal variation of Pn, but the physiological parameters also played important roles in determining the diurnal variation of Pn. In treatments T60 and T40, the photosynthesis active radiation (PAR), leaf temperature (T1) , stomatal conductance (Gs) , and transpiration rate (Tr) were significantly positively correlated with Pn, suggesting their positive effects on Pn. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and stomatal limitation (Ls) had significant negative correlations with Pn in treatments T60 and T40 but significant positive correlations with Pn in treatments T20 and T15, implying that the Ci and Ls had negative (or positive) effects on Pn when the solar irradiance was higher (or lower) than 40% of incident solar irradiance.

  20. Progresses in studies on radiation treatment of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Min; Shen Zhongqun; Yang Ruiyuan; Ma Hongjuan; Zhao Jun; Wang Wenfeng

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives a review on recent progresses in E-beam purification of flue gases, radiation degra- dation of volatile organic compounds, and radiation treatment of sewerage and industrial wastewater. And research activities in this area at Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics are given in particular details. (authors)

  1. Medical treatment of radiation injuries-Current US status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrett, D.G. [OSA - CBD and CDP, 3050 Defense Pentagon, Room 3C257, Washington, DC 20301-3050 (United States)], E-mail: david.jarrett@us.army.mil; Sedlak, R.G.; Dickerson, W.E. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Reeves, G.I. [Northrop Grumman IT, 8211 Terminal Road, Lorton, VA 22079-1421 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    A nuclear incident or major release of radioactive materials likely would result in vast numbers of patients, many of whom would require novel therapy. Fortunately, the numbers of radiation victims in the United States (USA) have been limited to date. If a mass-casualty situation occurs, there will be a need to perform rapid, accurate dose estimates and to provide appropriate medications and other treatment to ameliorate radiation injury. The medical management of radiation injury is complex. Radiation injury may include acute radiation sickness (ARS) from external and/or internal radiation exposure, internal organ damage from incorporated radioactive isotopes, and cutaneous injury. Human and animal data have shown that optimal medical care may nearly double the survivable dose of ionizing radiation. Current treatment strategies for radiation injuries are discussed with concentration on the medical management of the hematopoietic syndrome. In addition, priority areas for continuing and future research into both acute deterministic injuries and also long-term stochastic sequelae of radiation exposure have been identified. There are several near-term novel therapies that appear to offer excellent prognosis for radiation casualties, and these are also described.

  2. Related radiation effects on the intestine and their treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardychev, M.S.; Kurpeshcheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Late radiation injuries of the intestine are frequent after radiation therapy of malignant tumours of female genitalia and some other tumours due to which the intestine gets into the irradiation field. On the basis of the analysis of 80 patients with late radiation injuries of intestine which developed at remote terms after radiation therapy of cervix uteri cancer and corpus uteri (65 patients) and other tumours, peculiarities of the clinical course and treatment of radiation enterocolitis, rectosigmoidites and rectites are discussed. In 39 patients these injuries were concomitant with late radiation injuries of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissues. The clinical course of radiation unjuries of the intestine was defined by the character of the pathological process in the intestine and was more sharply marked in patients suffering from radiation enterocolites. It was established that one of the pathogenetic mechanisms of late radiation injuries of the intestine was a disorder of the absorption function of the intestine. Local treatment of radiation injuries of the intestine should be combined with a general one the important component of which is a parenteral diet

  3. Radiation processing technology for industrial waste water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Radiation sterilization technology, cross-linked polymers and curing, food and environmental applications of the radiation is widely used for many years. At the same time, drinking water and wastewater treatment are the part of the radiation technology applications. For this purpose, drinking water and wastewater treatment plants in various countries has been established. In this project, gamma / electron beam radiation treatment is intended to be used for the treatment of alkaloid, textiles and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) wastewater. In this regard, the chemical characterization of wastewater, the interaction with radiation, biological treatment and determination of toxicological properties are the laboratory studies milestones. After laboratory studies, the establishment of a pilot scale treatment plant has been planned. Within the framework of the project a series of dye used in textile industry were examined. Besides the irradiation, the changes in treatment efficiency were investigated by using of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in conjunction with the irradiation. Same working methods were implemented in the wastewater treatment of Bolvadin Opium Alkaloid Factory as well. In addition to chemical analysis in this study, aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment process also have been applied. Standard reference materials has been used for the marine sediment study contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls.

  4. Modern Palliative Radiation Treatment: Do Complexity and Workload Contribute to Medical Errors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Neil, E-mail: neil.dsouza@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Holden, Lori [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Robson, Sheila [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mah, Kathy; Di Prospero, Lisa; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward; Spayne, Jacqueline [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether treatment workload and complexity associated with palliative radiation therapy contribute to medical errors. Methods and Materials: In the setting of a large academic health sciences center, patient scheduling and record and verification systems were used to identify patients starting radiation therapy. All records of radiation treatment courses delivered during a 3-month period were retrieved and divided into radical and palliative intent. 'Same day consultation, planning and treatment' was used as a proxy for workload and 'previous treatment' and 'multiple sites' as surrogates for complexity. In addition, all planning and treatment discrepancies (errors and 'near-misses') recorded during the same time frame were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 365 new patients treated with 485 courses of palliative radiation therapy. Of those patients, 128 (35%) were same-day consultation, simulation, and treatment patients; 166 (45%) patients had previous treatment; and 94 (26%) patients had treatment to multiple sites. Four near-misses and 4 errors occurred during the audit period, giving an error per course rate of 0.82%. In comparison, there were 10 near-misses and 5 errors associated with 1100 courses of radical treatment during the audit period. This translated into an error rate of 0.45% per course. An association was found between workload and complexity and increased palliative therapy error rates. Conclusions: Increased complexity and workload may have an impact on palliative radiation treatment discrepancies. This information may help guide the necessary recommendations for process improvement for patients who require palliative radiation therapy.

  5. Quantitative comparison between treatment results for uterine cervix cancer by radiation therapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Arai, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    Treatment results for uterine cervix cancer were evaluated using a new concept named ''Effective Survival Rate''. This rate was calculated by subtracting the weighted sum of incidence rates of various complications from the 5-year survival rate. The numerical values for various complications were assigned as follows: surgical death, 1.0; severe complications, such as fistula ureterovaginalis and ileus, 0.5; mild complications, such as rectum and urinary bladder complications, 0.3 and 0.2. These values were determined with reference to the Karnofsky index of performance status. The effective survival rate was calculated for patients with satage 2 and 3 uterine cervix cancer treated by radiation therapy and surgery, and compared as a function of age between 30 and 70 years. We concluded that the effective survival rate was comparable for radiation therapy and surgery for stage 2 uterine cervix cancer. However, in patients with stage 3, radiation therapy was superior. (author)

  6. Radiation synovectomy: treatment option for haemophilia patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Papers from reputable haematology and radiation medicine journals, as well as conference presentations of the World Federation of Hemophilia were also included. Data selection: The searches for papers, abstracts and reviews were limited to English language, haemophilia, haemarthrosis, synovectomy, RS, ...

  7. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight 99 Tc m studies, an 123 I thyroid, an 111 In leucocyte or a 201 Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 μSv h -1 were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an 111 In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 μSv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a 99 Tc m marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author)

  8. American Society of Radiation Oncology Recommendations for Documenting Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy; Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin Fangfang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided.

  9. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Samuel T.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.; Barnett, Gene H.; Stevens, Glen H.J.; Murphy, Erin S.; Stockham, Abigail L.; Shiue, Kevin; Suh, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis

  10. Main trends of radiation application for food stuff treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsovskij, E.S.; Sakharov, Eh.V.; Dolinin, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The methods of radiation treatment of food stuff using γ, X-rays and electrons are presented. Radiation doses of various products permitted by the Expert Committee of WHO and other international organizations are presented. The problem of grain disinfestation permitted irradiation doses are in the interval between 50 and 100 krad is stiudied. The harmless effect of these doses for products is shown. The experience of raw fish, fish products, raw meat, meat and vegetable products radappertization is reviewed. The intensification of technological processes of food production using radiation treatment is also considered. The advantages and disadvantages of radiation devices with different radiation sources are shown. It is shown that the choice of this or that type should be primarily determined by the parameter of irradiated objects, the periodicity of their coming to the device and conditions of treating these objects [ru

  11. Ultrasound applications and ionizing radiations in water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oraby, M.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Application of ultrasound irradiation is one of the innovative techniques that was used for improvement of water treatment process and lowering levels of contaminants in waste water. The main mechanism of sonication is based on the cavitation phenomenon which includes the whole procedure of creation, expansion and collapsing of micro bubbles throughout liquid phase when negative pressure is applied to the medium during sonication. Consequently, hydroxyl and hydrogen radicals would be formed by thermal dissociation of water and hydrogen. These radicals penetrate into water and oxidize dissolved organic compounds. Hydrogen peroxide is formed as a consequence of hydroxyl and water radical recombination. During the free radical attack, the cell membranes of microorganisms are ruptured physically. The application of ionizing radiation for the removal of odorific substances and organic pollutants from water is an advanced oxidation process based on fast reactions with hydroxyl radicals formed as a result of radiolysis of water. GEO and MIB are the main responsible organic composites for the taste and odor in water. These compounds and other organic pollutants such as herbicide 2,4-DCP can be removed by different doses of gamma rays depending on magnitude, rate of radiation dose, chemical condition of the process and other factors. (author)

  12. Sexuality in gynecological patients undergoing radiation therapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The gynecology patient undergoing radiation therapy treatments may experience physiological and psychological problems related to sexuality. The needs of this group must be met by the radiation oncology staff by their being informed, interested, and experienced in dealing with sexual problems created by radiation therapy treatments. Opportunities to obtain information and for discussion about how the disease and its treatments will affect sexual functioning must be provided for the patient and partner. It is important to remember that the ability to seek and preserve gratifying sexual function is of great importance to almost all women, regardless of age. The patient may feel much personal distress related to the disease, the treatments, and how they affect the way she feels as a sexual human being. Opportunities must be provided to share the feelings created by the treatment process and trained therapists should be available when intensive sexual counseling is needed

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment in radiation reactions; Hyperbar oksygenbehandling ved straalereaksjoner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aanderud, Leif; Thorsen, Einar; Bratteboe, Guttorm; Forland, Martha; Kristensen, Gunnar

    2000-07-01

    Background: A national hyperbaric centre was established in 1994 at Haukeland Hospital with responsibility of all hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment in Norway. In hypoxic tissues with symptomatic radiation reactions, hyperbaric oxygen induces the formation of collagen and angiogenesis resulting in permanently improved local microcirculation. Material and method: 234 patients received elective HBO treatment at Haukeland Hospital in 12997 with total of 4048 treatments. All 47 patients treated for radiation reactions in the pelvic area in 1997 received a questionnaire 3-15 months after HBO therapy, 81% reported. Results: Rectal bleeding and haematuria were reported as much improved in 61% and 55% respectively, while bladder incontinence was much improved in 46%. Interpretation: this treatment modality may be an alternative in symptomatic radiation reactions at the urinary bladder and the bowel when conventional treatment has given unsatisfactory results.

  14. Analytical signals from cancer patients following radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Reinstein, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer patients are treated with high energy (8 to 30 MeV) gamma radiation. This treatment modality provides better depth dose distribution than more conventional low-energy gamma treatments, in particular for deeply located tumors. A by-product of the high-energy treatment is gamma-induced activity in the treatment volume following photonuclear reactions. These reactions are endogenic and require that the gamma radiation energy be above threshold value in order for the reaction to take place. For most elements, the threshold value is above 8 MeV; however, for low Z elements, this threshold may reach 18 MeV as is the case for oxygen. The cross sections for the (γ, n) reactions are few millibarns for low Z elements and increases up to few hundreds of millibarns for the heavy elements. The radionuclides resulting from photonuclear reaction are typically positron emitter or decay by electron capture. Thus, it is possible to monitor either the annihilation radiation (511 KeV) or the characteristic gamma radiation. The present work demonstrates that the activity induced in cancer patients following a single treatment (300 rad) enables the monitoring of nitrogen and phosphorus in the irradiated volume. The results from measurements in phantom, cadavers, and cancer patients from different regions in the body are presented. The hypothesis to be tested is whether there are local changes in these two elements during the course of radiation treatment which might correlate with the efficacy of the treatment

  15. Rapid and Decentralized Human Waste Treatment by Microwave Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tu Anh; Babel, Sandhya; Boonyarattanakalin, Siwarutt; Koottatep, Thammarat

    2017-07-01

      This study evaluates the technical feasibility of using microwave radiation for the rapid treatment of human feces. Human feces of 1000 g were radiated with a commercially available household microwave oven (with rotation) at different exposure time lengths (30, 50, 60, 70, and 75 mins) and powers (600, 800, and 1000 W). Volume reduction over 90% occurred after 1000 W microwave radiation for 75 mins. Pathogen eradiation performances of six log units or more at a high range of microwave powers were achieved. Treatments with the same energy input of 1000 Wh, but at lower powers with prolonged exposure times, significantly enhanced moisture removal and volume reduction. Microwave radiation caused carbonization and resulted in a more stable end product. The energy content of the samples after microwave treatment at 1000 W and 75 mins is 3517 ± 8.85 calories/g of dried sample, and the product can also be used as compost.

  16. Radiation treatment of surface and sewage waters and decontamination of effluents from livestock farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusentseva, S.A.; Dolin, P.I.; Fel', N.S.

    1983-01-01

    The report deals with the use of high level radiation for treatment of surface and sewage waters. The surface water radiation treatment at the dose of 0,1 Mrad produces a complex effect of color, taste and odor control and desinfection of water. In order to reduce the cost of radiation it is necessary to use the synergistic effect and optimization of treatment. Sewage from animal breeding complexes was studied during the introduction of air and ammonia. E. coli, salmonellum and staphylloccocus aureus were used as test microorganisms (10 4 -10 6 cell/ml). The sources of radiation-accelerators (energy 8 and 0.4 MeV, dose rates 0.1-10 2 Krad/s). When air and ammonia are introduced into the sewage the adequate decontamination dose is 4-5 times reduced. (author)

  17. Impact of nitrogen rates on growth, yield and radiation use efficiency of maize under varying environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaliq, T.; Ahmad, A.; Hussain, A.

    2008-01-01

    Growth, yield and radiation use efficiency (RUE) of hybrid maize, in response to different nitrogen rates (150, 200, 250, 300, 350 kg ha/sub -1/ were analyzed for three different locations (Faisalabad, Sargodha and Sahiwal) in Punjab, Pakistan during 2004 and 2005. The results depicted a large yearly variations mainly attributed to more rainfall and incidence of solar radiation in 2005. Maize hybrids respond differently for all variable under study, at all sites except IPAR and radiation use efficiency 919 at different locations. Similar types of differences were noted in GGR and Final TOM. Increasing nitrogen rates had significant effects on CGR, final TOM and grain yield and RUE. The intercepted PAR, RUE/sub TDM/ and RUE/sub Gy/ were significantly affected by hybrid potential and nitrogen application rates. On an average RUE/sub TDM/ varied from 2.45 to 2.73 g MJ/sup -1/ at different locations, while RUE/sub Gy/ was recorded 1.12, 1.14 and 1.03 for Faisalabad, Sargodha and Sahiwal, respectively. Total dry matter and grain yield of different treatments was linearly related to IPAR at all location and the common regression (R/sup 2/) accounted for 94, 68, and 80 % for TDM and 64, 34, and 95% for grain yield at the Faisalabad, Sargodha and sahiwal, respectively. It was concluded that planting of hybrid Bemasal-202 with 300 kg N ha/sup -1/ is the best recommendation for semi-arid areas of Pakistan. (author)

  18. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Bryan A.; Shkedy, Clive I.; Powell, Adam C.; Happe, Laura E.; Royalty, Julie A.; Miao, Michael T.; Smith, Gary L.; Long, James W.; Gupta, Amit K.

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, ppayment model and assess implications in other populations. PMID:26870963

  19. New modalities in radiation therapy for treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term for a large group of diseases characterized by rapid creation of abnormal cells that grow beyond their usual boundaries, and which can then invade adjoining parts of the body and spread to other organs. Cancer mortality is the second and most common cause of death in the USA and in most European countries. In India, it is the fourth leading disease and the major cause of death. Cancer remains one of the most dreadful disease and approximately ten million cases of cancer occur in the world every year. The course of cancer treatment depends on the type of cancer, its location, and its state of advancement. Cancer is treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, biological therapy and targeted therapy. Radiation therapy is an important an affordable modality for cancer treatment with minimal side effects. Radiation kills cancer cells with high-energy rays targeted directly to the tumor. Radiation therapy works by damaging the DNA and preventing its replication: therefore, it preferentially kills cancer cells, which rapidly divides. Radiation therapy is used for cure, control, and palliation of cancers in more than 60% of cancer patients. The goal of radiotherapy is to treat the cancer and spare the normal tissue as much as possible. Advances have been made in radiotherapy that allow delivery of higher doses of radiation to the tumor while sparing a greater amount of surrounding tissue, thus achieving more cures and fewer acute and long-term side effects. Technological advances and research are being continued to result in improvements in the field. Several new devices and techniques are used these days in radiotherapy for accurate treatment of cancer. Teletherapy (external radiation therapy) used focused radiation beams targeting well defined tumor through extremely detailed imaging scans. Conventional external beam radiation therapy (2DXRT) is delivered via two-dimensional beams using linear accelerator machines (X

  20. Status of radiation treatment of liquid sample in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myun-Joo

    2003-01-01

    For the wastewater treatment, electron beam pilot plant for treating 1,000 m 3 /day of wastewater from 60,000 m 3 /day of total dyeing wastewater was constructed and has been successfully operated. In addition to this pilot plant study, construction of commercial scale plant for treatment of dyeing wastewater is being done under TC project organized by IAEA together with E-B Tech. Co., Ltd., Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and dye wastewater treatment station in Korea. On the other hand, several studies using radiation are being carried out in the field of treatment of polluted groundwater, advanced treatment of sewage, sterilization of discharged water from sewage treatment plants. Many researches on water and wastewater treatment using radiation will be carried out under support of long term basis nuclear R and D program by government. (author)

  1. Proton Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouw, Kent W. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan V.; Yeap, Beow Y.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Munzenrider, John E.; Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grabowski, Eric [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mukai, Shizuo [Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term disease and toxicity outcomes for pediatric retinoblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 49 retinoblastoma patients (60 eyes) treated with PRT between 1986 and 2012. Results: The majority (84%) of patients had bilateral disease, and nearly half (45%) had received prior chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 8 years (range, 1-24 years), no patients died of retinoblastoma or developed metastatic disease. The post-PRT enucleation rate was low (18%), especially in patients with early-stage disease (11% for patients with International Classification for Intraocular Retinoblastoma [ICIR] stage A-B disease vs 23% for patients with ICIR stage C-D disease). Post-PRT ophthalmologic follow-up was available for 61% of the preserved eyes (30 of 49): 14 of 30 eyes (47%) had 20/40 visual acuity or better, 7 of 30 (23%) had moderate visual acuity (20/40-20/600), and 9 of 30 (30%) had little or no useful vision (worse than 20/600). Twelve of 60 treated eyes (20%) experienced a post-PRT event requiring intervention, with cataracts the most common (4 eyes). No patients developed an in-field second malignancy. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma patients treated with PRT demonstrates that PRT can achieve high local control rates, even in advanced cases, and many patients retain useful vision in the treated eye. Treatment-related ocular side effects were uncommon, and no radiation-associated malignancies were observed.

  2. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasola, Carolina E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Jones, Jennifer C. [Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Huang, Derek D. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles Olive View, Sylmar, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S., E-mail: sarah2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  3. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse

  4. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  5. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  6. 21 CFR 579.22 - Ionizing radiation for treatment of animal diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ionizing radiation for treatment of animal diets..., AND HANDLING OF ANIMAL FEED AND PET FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 579.22 Ionizing radiation for treatment of animal diets. Ionizing radiation for treatment of complete diets for animals may be...

  7. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantril, S.T. (Children' s Hospital of San Francisco, CA); Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  8. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantril, S.T.; Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N 0 patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease

  9. How can laparoscopic management assist radiation treatment in cervix carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbaulet, A.; Lartigau, E.; Haie-Meder, C.; Castaigne, D.; Morice, P.; Breton, C.; Pautier, P.; Duvillard, P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of laparoscopic lymphadenectomy (pelvis ± para-aortic nodes) and laparoscopic hysterectomy in cervical cancer compared to 'classic radical surgery' in patients undergoing surgery in comparison with modern imaging in patients treated with radiotherapy alone.Materials and methods: The limitations of modern imaging are presented as well as how complication rates can be increased when classic laparotomy is followed by radiation therapy.Laparoscopic procedures are described with particular emphasis on how to provide information on lymph node metastases with the risk of overlooking microscopic involvement. A number of clinical experiences are cited to illustrate this problem and show how treatment approaches can be adapted.Results: The role of laparoscopy is evaluated according to different clinical situations and treatment protocols emphasizing the possibilities offered by this method to the radiotherapist. Conclusion: When developing laparoscopic techniques for the management of cervical carcinoma, caution must be exercised to ensure that these techniques are not detrimental to the prognosis. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Radiation treatment for endocrine disrupters in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2003-01-01

    The radiation-induced decomposition of a trace amount of 17 β-estradiol (E2) in water was studied as a function of the dose of 60Co γ-rays. Concentration of both E2 and E2 activity were estimated by LC-MS and ELISA, and decreased with an increase in the dose of γ-rays. E2 at 1.8-nM in water was degraded almost completely by irradiation at 10 Gy (=J/kg), but the E2 activity of the same sample still remained, and decreased by 30 Gy to be lower than the threshold level of contamination to induce some estrogenic effects on the environmental ecology. (author)

  11. Radiation Induced Treatment of Organic Pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergun, E.; Öztürk, Ş.; Kantoğlu, Ö.

    2012-01-01

    In this period of the research, aerobic and anaerobic digestion, characterization of alkaloids present and radiolysis products formed after irradiation, under different conditions of ambient and additives, optimization of dose to achieve desired end characteristics for discharge of waste water were aimed. In this regard, unirradiated and irradiated wastewaters were subjected to aerobic and anaerobic digestions. Substrate removal efficiencies of unirradiated and irradiated wastewater with various initial COD values were determined with SBR aerobic digestion treatment method. On the other hand Fenton’s advanced oxidation treatment method was also applied for pre-treatment. BMP tests of anaerobic digestion were also completed. LC/MS studies were carried out on unirradiated and irradiated alkaloid standard solutions of morphine, codeine, thebaine, papaverine, and noscapine to determine the degradation mechanisms and byproducts. Dose optimization studies were completed and found to be a lower dose of 5 kGy rather than 40 kGy for ambient irradiation conditions. (author)

  12. Radiation Induced Treatment of Organic Pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergun, E.; Öztürk, Ş.; Kantoğlu, Ö. [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Sarayköy Nuclear research and Training Center, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    In this period of the research, aerobic and anaerobic digestion, characterization of alkaloids present and radiolysis products formed after irradiation, under different conditions of ambient and additives, optimization of dose to achieve desired end characteristics for discharge of waste water were aimed. In this regard, unirradiated and irradiated wastewaters were subjected to aerobic and anaerobic digestions. Substrate removal efficiencies of unirradiated and irradiated wastewater with various initial COD values were determined with SBR aerobic digestion treatment method. On the other hand Fenton’s advanced oxidation treatment method was also applied for pre-treatment. BMP tests of anaerobic digestion were also completed. LC/MS studies were carried out on unirradiated and irradiated alkaloid standard solutions of morphine, codeine, thebaine, papaverine, and noscapine to determine the degradation mechanisms and byproducts. Dose optimization studies were completed and found to be a lower dose of 5 kGy rather than 40 kGy for ambient irradiation conditions. (author)

  13. Radiation proctopathy in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Amit K.; Mai Weiyan; McGary, John E.; Grant, Walter H.; Butler, E. Brian; Teh, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compile and review data on radiation proctopathy in the treatment of prostate cancer with respect to epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, risk factors, and treatment. Methods: Medical literature databases including PubMed and Medline were screened for pertinent reports, and critically analyzed for relevance in the scope of our purpose. Results: Rectal toxicity as a complication of radiotherapy has received attention over the past decade, especially with the advent of dose-escalation in prostate cancer treatment. A number of clinical criteria help to define acute and chronic radiation proctopathy, but lack of a unified grading scale makes comparing studies difficult. A variety of risk factors, related to either radiation delivery or patient, are the subject of intense study. Also, a variety of treatment options, including medical therapy, endoscopic treatments, and surgery have shown varied results, but a lack of large randomized trials evaluating their efficacy prevents forming concrete recommendations. Conclusion: Radiation proctopathy should be an important consideration for the clinician in the treatment of prostate cancer especially with dose escalation. With further study of possible risk factors, the advent of a standardized grading scale, and more randomized trials to evaluate treatments, patients and physicians will be better armed to make appropriate management decisions

  14. The Impact of Advanced Technologies on Treatment Deviations in Radiation Treatment Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Light, Kim L.; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Georgas, Debra L.; Jones, Ellen L.; Wright, Melanie C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of new technologies on deviation rates in radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Treatment delivery deviations in RT were prospectively monitored during a time of technology upgrade. In January 2003, our department had three accelerators, none with 'modern' technologies (e.g., without multileaf collimators [MLC]). In 2003 to 2004, we upgraded to five new accelerators, four with MLC, and associated advanced capabilities. The deviation rates among patients treated on 'high-technology' versus 'low-technology' machines (defined as those with vs. without MLC) were compared over time using the two-tailed Fisher's exact test. Results: In 2003, there was no significant difference between the deviation rate in the 'high-technology' versus 'low-technology' groups (0.16% vs. 0.11%, p = 0.45). In 2005 to 2006, the deviation rate for the 'high-technology' groups was lower than the 'low-technology' (0.083% vs. 0.21%, p = 0.009). This difference was caused by a decline in deviations on the 'high-technology' machines over time (p = 0.053), as well as an unexpected trend toward an increase in deviations over time on the 'low-technology' machines (p = 0.15). Conclusions: Advances in RT delivery systems appear to reduce the rate of treatment deviations. Deviation rates on 'high-technology' machines with MLC decline over time, suggesting a learning curve after the introduction of new technologies. Associated with the adoption of 'high-technology' was an unexpected increase in the deviation rate with 'low-technology' approaches, which may reflect an over-reliance on tools inherent to 'high-technology' machines. With the introduction of new technologies, continued diligence is needed to ensure that staff remain proficient with 'low-technology' approaches

  15. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  16. Application of ionizing radiation in treatment of meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlackova, J.

    1984-01-01

    Processes used for meat treatment for storage (cooling, radurization + cooling, freezing, heat treatment and radappertization) are compared with regard to energy demand. The effect of doses above 10 kGy and below 10 kGy are discussed. Doses of ionizing radiation may be combined with other techniques (heat treatment, the addition of certain chemicals or antibiotics). Czechoslovak experience with irradiation of meat with tapeworm cysticerci is described. (E.F.)

  17. Radiation therapy in the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Jin; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is very rare worldwide. Radical resection is the only prognostic factor for long survival in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Postoperative radiation therapy can improve local control and survival rates for patients with palliative resection, but it remains controversial in patients with radical resection. Biliary drainage can effectively release bile duct obstruction for the majority of patients with locally advanced disease, and may even prolong survival when combined with radiation therapy. Radiation therapy includes extrernal beam therapy alone, external beam therapy with intraluminal brachytheapy and new radiation technique, such as three dimentional conformal therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The propective randomized clinical study is needed for further investigation in the role of combined modality therapy especially for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  18. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part I: Treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, Chandra M.; Mageras, Gikas S.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: In this presentation we will look into the basic components of 3-dimensional conformal treatment planning, and will discuss planning for some selected sites. We will also review some current and future trends in 3-D treatment planning. External beam radiation therapy is one of the arms of cancer treatment. In the recent years 3-D conformal therapy had significant impact on the practice of external beam radiation therapy. Conformal radiation therapy shapes the high-dose volume so as to conform to the target volume while minimizing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues. The advances that have been achieved in conformal therapy are in part due to the development of 3-D treatment planning, which in turn has capitalized on 3-D imaging for tumor and normal tissue localization, as well as on available computational power for the calculation of 3-D dose distributions, visualization of anatomical and dose volumes, and numerical evaluation of treatment plans. In this course we will give an overview of how 3-D conformal treatments are designed and transferred to the patient. Topics will include: 1) description of the major components of a 3-D treatment planning system, 2) techniques for designing treatments, 3) evaluation of treatment plans using dose distribution displays, dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probabilities, 4) implementation of treatments using shaped blocks and multileaf collimators, 5) verification of treatment delivery using portal films and electronic portal imaging devices. We will also discuss some current and future trends in 3-D treatment planning, such as field shaping with multileaf collimation, computerized treatment plan optimization, including the use of nonuniform beam profiles (intensity modulation), and incorporating treatment uncertainties due to patient positioning errors and organ motion into treatment planning process

  19. Case study on utilization of radiation in sludge treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Waichiro

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of radiation to sludge treatment has been studied as a case study of the utilization of radiation to environmental protection by the society for the utilization of radiation in Japan Atomic Industrial Forum Inc., and the result is presented in this paper. The examined radiation sources to sterilize sludge were γ-ray and electron beam, and sludge was irradiated in the forms of slurry or cake. Four treatment conditions by the combination of the radiation sources and the sludge conditions were examined. From the examined results, it was estimated that in the case one (γ-ray and slurry), the output of 25 kW or 1.6 million curie was required for the sludge treatment capacity of 250 tons/day, in the case two (electron beam and slurry), an accelerator of 20 mA or 60 mA was required for the capacity of 250 or 750 tons/day, respectively, in the case three (γ-ray and cake), a radiation source of 0.6 million curie was required for the capacity of 50 tons/day, and in the case four (electron beam and cake), an accelerator of 4 mA or 12 mA was required for the capacity of 50 tons/day or 150 tons/day. (Yoshitake, I.)

  20. Prophylactic iodine treatment in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Prophylactic iodine treatment is to prevent accumulation of radioactive iodine in the thyroid. This is done by administering a large amount of stable iodine before uptake of radioactive iodine so that further accummulation of iodine in the thyroid will be impossible. This blocking effect should be as complete as possible. This is achieved by administering an initial dose of 200 mg potassium iodide. As the release of radioactive iodine may last several hours or even days; for this reason, maintenance doses of 100 mg potassium iodide should be administered in 8-hour intervals. The risk of prophylactiv iodine treatment is rather low; however, provocation of latent hyperthyreoses must be expected in, at the most, 0.2% of the exposed population. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Pathophysiology and surgical treatment for radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Hisashi; Park, Tae Bun; Hasegawa, Masato

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed 23 patients (5 males and 18 females, mean age 60) who had been operated on in our department for radiation enteritis. 1) These patients were divided into two types according to the time of surgery. Sixteen of 23 (79%) patients were operated on a median of 12 months after radiotherapy, while 7 (30%) underwent surgery more than 10 years later. 2) They were also divided according to the dominant symptoms. Fourteen of 23 (60%) complained of nausea and abdominal distension suggestive of small bowel injury, whereas 7 (30%) had tenesmus and anal bleeding indicating proctitis. Two patients developed perforative peritonitis. 3) The operations performed were as follows: extensive intestinal resection and anastomosis (13), pull-through procedure (3), rectal excision (2), ileostomy (3), by-pass operation (2). Two patients with peritonitis died despite open drainage. Nineteen intestinal anastomoses were all successfully performed. Patients who underwent extensive small bowel resection could resume ordinary daily life without symptoms. Our analysis showed that small bowel injury should be treated by generous resection of the affected bowels followed by anastomosis of the disease-free ends, while rectal lesions are best dealt with by restorative proctectomy. This may provide a good quality of life and minimize major postoperative complications such as leakage. (author)

  2. Pathophysiology and surgical treatment for radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Hisashi; Park, Tae Bun; Hasegawa, Masato (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1993-12-01

    We analyzed 23 patients (5 males and 18 females, mean age 60) who had been operated on in our department for radiation enteritis. (1) These patients were divided into two types according to the time of surgery. Sixteen of 23 (79%) patients were operated on a median of 12 months after radiotherapy, while 7 (30%) underwent surgery more than 10 years later. (2) They were also divided according to the dominant symptoms. Fourteen of 23 (60%) complained of nausea and abdominal distension suggestive of small bowel injury, whereas 7 (30%) had tenesmus and anal bleeding indicating proctitis. Two patients developed perforative peritonitis. (3) The operations performed were as follows: extensive intestinal resection and anastomosis (13), pull-through procedure (3), rectal excision (2), ileostomy (3), by-pass operation (2). Two patients with peritonitis died despite open drainage. Nineteen intestinal anastomoses were all successfully performed. Patients who underwent extensive small bowel resection could resume ordinary daily life without symptoms. Our analysis showed that small bowel injury should be treated by generous resection of the affected bowels followed by anastomosis of the disease-free ends, while rectal lesions are best dealt with by restorative proctectomy. This may provide a good quality of life and minimize major postoperative complications such as leakage. (author).

  3. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-01-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compen...

  4. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  6. Application of Ionizing Radiation on the Cork Wastewater Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, R.; Madureira, J.; Verde, S. Cabo; Nunes, I.; Santos, P. M.P.; Silva, T.; Leal, J. P.; Botelho, M. L. [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Sacavém (Portugal)

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the CRP on “Radiation treatment of wastewater for reuse with particular focus on wastewaters containing organic pollutants” Portuguese team is been developed studies on the implementation of ionizing radiation technology as a complementary treatment for industrial effluents and increase the added value of these wastewaters. Based on these assumptions, preliminary studies of the gamma radiation effects on the antioxidant compounds present in cork cooking water were carried out. Radiation studies were performed by using radiation between 20 and 50 kGy at 0.4 kGy/h and 2.4 kGy/h. The radiation effects on organic matter content were evaluated by Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). The antioxidant activity was measured by Ferric Reducing Power (FRAP) assay. The total phenolic content was studied by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Results point out that gamma radiation increases both the amount of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of cork cooking water. By the other hand, the radiolytic degradation by ionizing radiation of gallic acid and esculetin as models for recalcitrants were studied. The objective of this study was to find out if radiolytic degradation, followed by microbial degradation could increase the treatment efficiency. A natural cork wastewater bacterium was selected from the irradiated wastewater at 9 kGy. The applied methodology was based on the evaluation of growth kinetics of the selected bacteria by turbidimetry and colony forming units, in minimal salt medium with non-irradiated and irradiated phenolic as substrate. The overall obtained results highlights the potential of this technology for increase the add value of cork waters and raised some issues to explain by new methodological setup on biodegradation studies. (author)

  7. Application of Ionizing Radiation on the Cork Wastewater Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, R.; Madureira, J.; Verde, S. Cabo; Nunes, I.; Santos, P.M.P.; Silva, T.; Leal, J.P.; Botelho, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the CRP on “Radiation treatment of wastewater for reuse with particular focus on wastewaters containing organic pollutants” Portuguese team is been developed studies on the implementation of ionizing radiation technology as a complementary treatment for industrial effluents and increase the added value of these wastewaters. Based on these assumptions, preliminary studies of the gamma radiation effects on the antioxidant compounds present in cork cooking water were carried out. Radiation studies were performed by using radiation between 20 and 50 kGy at 0.4 kGy/h and 2.4 kGy/h. The radiation effects on organic matter content were evaluated by Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). The antioxidant activity was measured by Ferric Reducing Power (FRAP) assay. The total phenolic content was studied by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Results point out that gamma radiation increases both the amount of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of cork cooking water. By the other hand, the radiolytic degradation by ionizing radiation of gallic acid and esculetin as models for recalcitrants were studied. The objective of this study was to find out if radiolytic degradation, followed by microbial degradation could increase the treatment efficiency. A natural cork wastewater bacterium was selected from the irradiated wastewater at 9 kGy. The applied methodology was based on the evaluation of growth kinetics of the selected bacteria by turbidimetry and colony forming units, in minimal salt medium with non-irradiated and irradiated phenolic as substrate. The overall obtained results highlights the potential of this technology for increase the add value of cork waters and raised some issues to explain by new methodological setup on biodegradation studies. (author)

  8. Audit in radiation therapy: long-term survival and cost of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.; Firth, I.

    1997-01-01

    In order to determine the cost of radiation treatment and the survival rate of a cohort of patients treated in a 6 month period in 1988, estimates of the capital and recurrent costs of this service were made for the calendar year 1988, expressed as $A(1988). Data collected prospectively included workload statistics (including number of attendances), field treated and complexity of treatment. Patient and tumour-related data included tumour site, intent of treatment and survival. The survival rate of patients during this period was determined in June 1995. The cost per field in 1988 was estimated at $A44.32. The 1988 costs of courses of definitive, adjuvant and palliative radiation therapy were estimated at $A2545, $A2482 and $A929, respectively. The major contributor to the cost of salaries and consumables within the Radiation Oncology Department (81.6%), with capital costs accounting for 13.5%, overheads accounting for 4.5% of the costs and planned admissions accounting for 0.2%. The median survival time of 580 patients with malignant disease treated during this period in 1988 was 12.4 months. The overall 5 year survival rate was 27%. For 105 patients treated definitively with radiation therapy, the median and 5 year survival rate figures were 26.0 months and 40%. For 149 patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, the 5 year survival rate was 62% (median survival rate not reached). For 279 patients treated palliatively, median and 5 year survival rate figures were 5.2 months and 3%. The cost per month of survival for all patients with malignancy was $A67; the figures for definitive , adjuvant and palliative treatments being $A74, $A48 and $A105, respectively. A sensitivity analysis indicated that these figures were robust. The cost of radiation treatment per field was comparable to reports for other centres and emphasizes the utility of radiation therapy as a cost-effective cancer treatment modality. 7 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  9. Radiation therapy for hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Impact of fractionation on treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Igaki, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Hisao; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of fractionation on the treatment outcome of radiation therapy for hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Thirty-six inoperable or operation-refused hypopharyngeal patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy between 1976 and May 2001. Seventeen patients were treated with conventional radiation therapy, 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction, totaling 64.0 Gy (conventional fractionation (CF) group), and 19 were treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy, 1.2 Gy per fraction, totaling 74.4 Gy (hyperfractionation (HF) group). The radiation response of the two groups at the end of radiation therapy was almost the same. However, the 2-year local control rates of the HF and CF groups were 59.0% and 26.1% (p=0.012), respectively, a statistically significant differences. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed that HF was an independent prognostic factor for local control. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was superior to conventional radiation therapy for local control. Local control of hypopharyngeal carcinoma correlated with laryngeal preservation, suggesting that hyperfractionated radiation therapy for hypopharyngeal carcinoma could be beneficial for patient quality of life (QOL). (author)

  10. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  11. Biological response of cancer cells to radiation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam eBaskar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth and has the ability to spread or metastasize throughout the body. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development, care and treatment modalities. Radiation therapy or radiotherapy is an important and integral component of cancer management, mostly conferring a survival benefit. Radiation therapy destroys cancer by depositing high-energy radiation on the cancer tissues. Over the years, radiation therapy has been driven by constant technological advances and approximately 50% of all patients with localized malignant tumors are treated with radiation at some point in the course of their disease. In radiation oncology, research and development in the last three decades has led to considerable improvement in our understanding of the differential responses of normal and cancer cells. The biological effectiveness of radiation depends on the linear energy transfer (LET, total dose, number of fractions and radiosensitivity of the targeted cells or tissues. Radiation can either directly or indirectly (by producing free radicals damages the genome of the cell. This has been challenged in recent years by a newly identified phenomenon known as radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE. In RIBE, the non-irradiated cells adjacent to or located far from the irradiated cells/tissues demonstrate similar responses to that of the directly irradiated cells. Understanding the cancer cell responses during the fractions or after the course of irradiation will lead to improvements in therapeutic efficacy and potentially, benefitting a significant proportion of cancer patients. In this review, the clinical implications of radiation induced direct and bystander effects on the cancer cell are discussed.

  12. Treatment of carcinoma of uterine cervix with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using Ralstron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, C.O.; Kim, G.E.; Loh, J.J.K.

    1988-01-01

    From May 1979 through December 1981, a total of 530 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Of the 530 patients, 365 were treated with a high-dose-rate remote-controlled afterloading system (RALS) using a cobalt source, and 165 patients received a low dose rate using a radium source. External pelvic irradiation with a total of 40-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by intracavitary radiation (ICR) with a total dose of 30-39 Gy in ten to 13 fractions to point A was the treatment protocol. ICR was given three times a week with a dose of 3 Gy per fraction. Five-year actuarial survival rate with high-dose-rate ICR by stage was as follows: stage I:82.7% (N = 19) stage II:69.6% (N = 184), and stage III:52.2% (N = 156). The above results were comparable with those with conventional low-dose-rate ICR treatment, and late complications were far less. The application of high-dose-rate ICR was technically simple and easily performed on an outpatient basis without anesthesia, and the patients tolerated it very well. Radiation exposure to personnel was virtually none as compared with that of low-dose-rate ICR. Within a given period of time, more patients can be treated with high-dose-rate ICR because of the short treatment time. The authors therefore conclude that high-dose-rate ICR is suitable for a cancer center where a large number of patients are to be treated

  13. Treatment of radiation-induced vesicovaginal fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parm Ulhoei, B.; rosgaard, A.; Harling, H.

    1994-01-01

    The records of 23 patients with vesicovaginal fistulae (VVF) probably caused by irradiation treatment for cancer of the uterine cervix were analyzed. The median latency between irradiation and fistula formation was 17 years. Ten patients had histologically verified cancer recurrence besides a VVF. In addition, nine patients had a rectovaginal- and one an ileovaginal fistula. Twelve patients were treated primarily with ureteroileocutaneostomy a.m. Bricker. Six had bladder drainage, and four of these had ureteroileocutaneostomy performed at a later stage. Four patients initially underwent percutaneous nephrostomy. One patients had a unilateral ureteroileocutaneostomy performed. Eight patients are alive today (median observation time 2.5 years), and all of these had had ureteroileocutaneostomy performed. Three of these patients (39%) were completely relieved of symptoms while the rest occasionally experienced pain, vaginal discharge and bladder empyema. We conclude that ureteroilocutaneostomy a.m. Bricker is a satisfactory procedure for vesicovaginal fistulae because the socially incapacitating symptoms disappear or are considerably diminished. (au) (9 refs.)

  14. Treatment of radiation dental caries with fixed dental prosthetic constructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dachev, B [Vissh Meditsinski Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of clinical observations for many years the author established that the covering of the teeth, progressively developing radiation caries, with crowns of precious metal and plastics is a safe way for their protection. The crown isolates the teeth from the saliva with its changed composition, quantity and changed pH. A prophylactic effect is obtained with the covering of the morbid teeth with radiation caries, concerning the possibilities of osteoradionecrosis development, due to the restriction of the ways of secondary infection penetration. The carried out treatment with fixed crowns preserves the anatomical teeth shape, radiation caries stops its development and the masticatory function of the dentition is recovered. After radiation treatment in the maxillofacial region with hard dental tissues affection which cannot be restored by way of ordinary definite fillings--indications for crown covering exist. The carried out observations reveal that complex cares are necessary in the radiation caries treatment on the part of specialists in therapeutic and orthopedic stomatology with consultations with radiologists. (auth)

  15. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Vicioso, E.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.

    2001-01-01

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  16. Treatment of Radiation Induced Biological Changes by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Missiry, M.A.; Shehata, G.; Roushdy, H.M; Fayed, Th.A.

    1999-01-01

    Preventing the propagation of radiation induced oxidative damage has been a subject of considerable investigations. The ultimate goal of the present study is to use bone marrow cells to ameliorate or to treat the radiation sickness. Transplantation of bone marrow cell has shown promising results in the present experimental radiation treatment. In this report, suspension of bone marrow cells was injected into rats 12 h. after exposure to 4.5 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. Significant results were recorded on the successful control of the radiation induced disorders in a number of biochemical parameters including certain enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione) and certain parameters related to kidney function including creatinine, urea as well as Atpase Activity in blood serum, urine and kidney tissue

  17. Slaughterhouse sewage treatment using gamma radiation - economical feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Rita; Botelho, M. Luisa; Branco, Joaquim

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a financial viability study for the implementation of gamma radiation technology on a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment industry. Five scenarios were studied, including the current practice, representing different types of treatments and goals, e.g.: water reuse and/or sludge add value as agriculture fertilizers. Cost-benefit analysis, including the net present value (NPV) of each scenario, was used as a technique to compare the relative value of various strategies. Taking in account that the initial investment is amortized after 20 years, the implementation of Co-60 treatment with 20% water reuse and sludge application as agriculture fertilizers represents the most profitable project with the highest NPV. Therefore, the implementation of gamma radiation technology on a slaughterhouse wastewater treatment industry is not only technically viable as well as economically feasible. (author)

  18. 21 CFR 179.39 - Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and..., PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.39 Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food. Ultraviolet radiation for the processing and treatment of food may be...

  19. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma; Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, S.C.S.; Corgozinho, K.B.; Holguin, P.G.; Ferreira, A.M.R., E-mail: simonecsc@gmail.co [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, L.A.V. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canary, P.C.; Reisner, M. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, A.N.; Souza, H.J.M. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of hypofractionated radiation protocol for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was applied to five cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of ten histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, two were staged as T{sub 1}, four as T{sub 2}, two as T{sub 3}, and two as T{sub 4}. The animals were submitted to four radiation fractions from 7.6 to 10 grays each, with one week intervals. The equipment was a linear accelerator with electrons beam. The cats were evaluated weekly during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 40% of the lesions had complete remission, 40% partial remission, and 20% did not respond to the treatment. Response rates were lower as compared to other protocols previously used. However, hypofractionated radiation protocol was considered safe for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen as sole treatment for severe radiation - induced haemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellis, Athanasios, E-mail: aedellis@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaieion Academic Hospital, Athens (Greece); Papatsoris, Athanasios; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Skolarikos, Andreas [Department of Urology, University of Athens, Sismanoglio General Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kalentzos, Vasileios [Department of Diving and Hyperbaric Oxygen, Naval and Veterans Hospital, Athens (Greece)

    2017-05-15

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary and sole treatment for severe radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and methods: Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as primary treatment in 38 patients with severe radiation cystitis. Our primary endpoint was the incidence of complete and partial response to treatment, while the secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival. Results: All patients completed therapy without complications with a mean follow-up of 29.33 months. Median number of sessions needed was 33. Complete and partial response rate was 86.8% and 13.2%, respectively. All 33 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset. One patient needed cystectomy, while 33 patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Our study suggests the early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen for radiation-induced severe cystitis as an effective and safe treatment option. (author)

  1. Enhanced escape rate for Hg 254 nm resonance radiation in fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, James E; Raizen, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    The potential of the low-cost MAGIS isotopic separation method to improve fluorescent lamp efficacy is explored using resonance radiation transport simulations. New Hg isotopic mixes are discovered that yield escape rates for 254 nm Hg I resonance radiation equal to 117% to 122% of the rate for a natural isotopic mix under the same lamp conditions. (paper)

  2. Radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy in dealing with cancer of the cervix lies in the understanding of its natural history and staging as well as the major forms of treatment. It is, therefore, imperative that all gynecological and radiation oncologists have at their command a thorough understanding of carcinoma of the cervix

  3. Radiation injuries to the skeleton and their orthopedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, R.; Rahnfeld, R.

    1978-01-01

    70 patients subjected to orthopedic treatment and radiotherapy for skeletal tumors have been examined. It was found that serious radiation injuries frequently occurred. Above all there were contractures, disordered healing of wounds, ulcerations, and scolioses and kyphoses of the growing skeleton. Therefore, in the case of diseases of the skeleton, it is recommended to restrain radiotherapy. It has to be rejected in child's age

  4. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, Akos; Kocsis, Bela; Jozsef, Gabor

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of the techniques, equipment, recent results and application fields of radiation therapy in the treatment of lung cancer is given, based on literature data and on the authors' own experiences. Side effects and patient-doctor relationship are also dealt with. (R.P.)

  5. Influence of atmospheric rainfall to γ radiation Kerma rate in surface air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhe; Wan Jun; Yu Rongsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence rule of the atmospheric Rainfall to the γ radiation Kerma rate in surface air in order to revise the result of its measurement during rainfall. Methods: The influence factors of rainfall to the measurement of the γ radiation Kerma rate in air were analyzed and then the differential equation of the correlation factors was established theoretically, and by resolving the equation, the mathematical model Was obtained. The model was discussed through several practical examples. Results: The mathematical model was coincided with the tendency of curve about the measured data on the influence rule of rainfall to the γ radiation Kerma rate in surface air. Conclusion: By using the theoretical formula in this article which is established to explain the relationship between the rainfall and the γ radiation Kerma rate in surface air, the influence of rainfall to the γ radiation Kerma rate in surface air could be correctly revised. (authors)

  6. Synergic effect of gamma radiation with thermal treatment for conserving natural apple juice from Gala variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, L.; Domarco, R.E.; Spoto, M.H.F.; Walder, J.M.M.; Matraia, C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper aims at the feasibility of a new method for conserving natural apple juice using no chemicals. The apple juice was extract from Gala apple variety and was bottled in sterile 100 ml amber vials. The samples were treated by: heat at 60 0 C for 20 minutes; heat at 80 0 C for 20 minutes; radiation; radiation plus heat (60 0 ); radiation plus heat 80 0 C. The radiation doses were 0,2,4 and 6 kGy at the dose rate of 1.6 kGy/h. The juice quality control was carried out by chemical analysis (total soluble solids, pH, acidity, ascorbic acid) following the AOAC methodology. The samples were stored under refrigeration conditions 5±3 0 C) up to 180 days. It was observed an alteration of the total soluble solids and the pH during the storage period for all treatments. The pH was also affected by the combined treatments (radiation plus heat). The acidity was affected by the interaction of storage period and heat temperature. The ascorbic acid was affected by the synergic effect of heat and radiation and by the interaction radiation and storage period. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs

  7. Rate and duration of seed filling and yield of soybean affected by water and radiation deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem GHASSEMI-GOLEZANI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed filling and yield of soybean under water and radiation deficits were investigated during 2011 and 2012. Treatments were irrigations (I1, I2, I3 and I4 for irrigation after 60, 90, 120 and 150 mm evaporation from class A pan, respectively in main plots and light interceptions (L1: 100 %, L2: 65 % and L3: 25 % sunlight in sub-plots. Seeds per plant under I1 and I2 decreased, but under I3 and I4 increasedas a result of radiation deficit. Maximum seed weight and seed filling duration of plants under 25 % light interception (L3 were higher than those under full sunlight (L1 and 65 % light interception (L2. In contrast, plants under full sunlight had the highest seed filling rate, particularly under water stress. Seed filling duration under severe light deficit (L3 was about 9 days longer than that under full sunlight (L1, leading to 15.8 % enhancement in maximum seed weight. Decreasing seed yield of soybean under well watering and mild water stress and improving it under moderate and severe water deficit due to low solar radiation are directly related with changes in seed filling duration and consequently in seed weight and number of seeds per plant under these conditions.

  8. Development, Implementation and Compliance of Treatment Pathways in Radiation Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis ePotters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While much emphasis on safety in the radiation oncology clinic is placed on process, there remains considerable opportunity to increase safety, enhance outcomes and avoid ad-hoc care by instituting detailed treatment pathways. The purpose of this study was to review the process of developing evidence and consensus-based, outcomes-oriented treatment pathways that standardize treatment and patient management in a large multicenter radiation oncology practice. Further, we reviewed our compliance in incorporating these directives into our day-to-day clinical practice. METHODS: Using the Institute of Medicine guideline for developing treatment pathways, 87 disease specific pathways were developed and incorporated into the electronic medical system in our multi-facility radiation oncology department. Compliance in incorporating treatment pathways was assessed by mining our EMR data from January 1, 2010 through February 2012 for patients with breast and prostate cancer. RESULTS: This retrospective analysis of data from electronic medical records found overall compliance to breast and prostate cancer treatment pathways to be 97% and 99%, respectively. The reason for non-compliance proved to be either a failure to complete the prescribed care based on grade II or III toxicity (n=1 breast, 3 prostate or patient elected discontinuance of care (n=1 prostate or the physician chose a higher dose for positive/close margins (n=3 breast. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that consensus and evidence-based treatment pathways can be developed and implemented in a multi-center department of radiation oncology. And that for prostate and breast cancer there was a high degree of compliance using these directives. The development and implementation of these pathways serve as a key component of our safety program, most notably in our effort to facilitate consistent decision-making and reducing variation between physicians.

  9. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O'Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h -1 (1 rad d -1 ). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h -1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h -1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  10. Anti-infection treatment of iatrogenic acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shulan; Ke Xiaoyan; Jia Tengzhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To occumulatle experience of anti-infection treatment in acute radiation sickness (ARS) induced by medical treatment in order to provide beneficial help for victims of accidental of acute radiation sickness. Methods: The changes of peripheral blood indices, body temperature and clinical symptoms of 17 cases who were clinically irradiated with 6.0-7.2 Gy X-rays were observed both before peripheral blood stem cell transplantation(PBSCT) and after anti-infection treatment. Results: WBC count began to decrease to below 1 x 10 9 /L from the 8th to 10th days after irradiation and maintained at row level for 4 days or for 13.3 days if the patients had not received rhG-CSF treatment. In 29.4% of patients the body temperature was higher than 38.5 degree C. After comprehensive enviromental protection and anti-infection treatment, all patients could successfully tide over the period of bone marrow depression without appearance of the typical critical phase of ARS. Conclusion: PBSCT and rhG-CSF treatment can reduce the time span for reconstruction of bone marrow. Comprehensive enviromental protection and combined anti-infection treatment are key points fm successful treatment. (authors)

  11. Radiation treatment of brain tumors: Concepts and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has demonstrated clinical value for a multitude of CNS tumors. Application of the different physical modalities available has made it possible for the radiotherapist to concentrate the radiation in the region of the tumor with relative sparing of the surrounding normal tissues. Correlation of radiation dose with effect on cranial soft tissues, normal brain, and tumor has shown increasing effect with increasing dose. By using different physical modalities to alter the distribution of radiation dose, it is possible to increase the dose to the tumor and reduce the dose to the normal tissues. Alteration of the volume irradiated and the dose delivered to cranial soft tissues, normal brain, and tumor are strategies that have been effective in improving survival and decreasing complications. The quest for therapeutic gain using hyperbaric oxygen, neutrons, radiation sensitizers, chemotherapeutic agents, and BNCT has met with limited success. Both neoplastic and normal cells are affected simultaneously by all modalities of treatment, including ionizing radiation. Consequently, one is unable to totally depopulate a tumor without irreversibly damaging the normal tissues. In the case of radiation, it is the brain that limits delivery of curative doses, and in the case of chemical additives, it is other organ systems, such as bone marrow, liver, lung, kidneys, and peripheral nerves. Thus, the major obstacle in the treatment of malignant gliomas is our inability to preferentially affect the tumor with the modalities available. Until it is possible to directly target the neoplastic cell without affecting so many of the adjacent normal cells, the quest for therapeutic gain will go unrealized.72 references

  12. Present and future prospects of external radiation cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuckas, K. P.; Aleknavicius, E.; Grybauskas, M.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the most applicable method in the treatment of cancer patients. Rapid advances in radiotherapy and imaging techniques allow improvement in definition of target margins, volumes, and organs at risk. Conformal radiotherapy using multileaf collimator was introduced towards the end of the 1980s. Further improvements in dose distribution were possible through intensity modulation radiation therapy based on the use of computer-controlled multileaf collimators for creating the desired dose variation inside a radiation field. The dose of definite radiotherapy is limited by dose tolerance of organs or tissues at risk near the target. In the last 50 years radiotherapy modalities achieved rapid developments, particularly in field of treatment planning and dose distribution. The main goal of that development is to apply definite radiotherapy dose to target and minimize normal tissue irradiation, leaving the patient free of treatment related morbidity. (author)

  13. Treatment and Recycling Process for Biosolids by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Yoo, D. H.; Lee, B. J.; Park, C. K.; Lee, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The volume of sludge is increasing rapidly on a yearly basis in Korea. Liquid sewage sludge generated in Korea has been treated as reuse (7%), landfill (5%), incineration (12%) and ocean dump (72%) in 2003 [1]. Ocean dump is the main treatment of sewage sludge up to date but incineration and landfill will be increased because Korean government will restrict ocean dump in the near future. Desirable treatment of sewage sludge is still a sensitive issue though many scientists have vigorously studied the safe and environmentally sound treatment of sewage sludge and reducing sludge cake. Therefore reduction of moisture content in sludge and recycling by radiation is the main objective in this work. Here we studied the radiation technique as a pretreatment process to enhance sludge dewaterability, to disinfect micro-organisms, and to remove the toxic organics in sewage sludge simultaneously. The improvement of sludge compost after irradiation was also observed to develop the method for recycling of sludge

  14. Why heavy and light quarks radiate energy with similar rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The dead-cone effect has been predicted to reduce the magnitude of energy loss and jet quenching for heavy flavors produced with large p T in heavy-ion collisions. On the contrary, data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider demonstrate a strong suppression of high-p T electrons from charm and bottom decays. We show that vacuum radiation of a highly virtual quark produced at high p T with a stripped-off color field develops a much wider dead cone, which screens the one related to the quark mass. Lacking the field, gluons cannot be radiated within this cone until the color field is regenerated and the quark virtuality cools down to the scale of the order of the quark mass. However, this takes longer than is essential for the observed jet quenching, leading to similar nuclear effects for the light and charm quark jets. Open beauty is expected to radiate much less within the p T range studied so far in heavy-ion collisions.

  15. The Effect of Dose Rate on Composite Durability When Exposed to a Simulated Long-Term Lunar Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; O'Rourke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Nutt, Steven; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) requires a safe living and working environment for crew. Composite materials are one type of material being investigated by NASA as a multi-functional structural approach to habitats for long-term use in space or on planetary surfaces with limited magnetic fields and atmosphere. These materials provide high strength with the potential for decreased weight and increased radiation protection of crew and electronics when compared with conventional aluminum structures. However, these materials have not been evaluated in a harsh radiation environment, as would be experienced outside of LEO or on a planetary surface. Thus, NASA has been investigating the durability of select composite materials in a long-term radiation environment. Previously, NASA exposed composite samples to a simulated, accelerated 30-year radiation treatment and tensile stresses similar to those of a habitat pressure vessel. The results showed evidence of potential surface oxidation and enhanced cross-linking of the matrix. As a follow-on study, we performed the same accelerated exposure alongside an exposure with a decreased dose rate. The slower dose ]rate is comparable to a realistic scenario, although still accelerated. Strain measurements were collected during exposure and showed that with a fastdose rate, the strain decreased with time, but with a slow ]dose rate, the strain increased with time. After the radiation exposures, samples were characterized via tensile tests, flexure tests, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results of these tests will be discussed.

  16. Ionizing radiation treatment to improve postharvest life and maintain quality of fresh guava fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Pal, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the potential of ionizing radiation for improving physiological responses, quality, and storage time of fresh guava fruit. Ionizing radiation treatment suppressed the respiration and ethylene production rates and thus retarded the process of fruit ripening during storage. Irradiation treatment also retarded the physical and biochemical changes associated with ripening such as firmness, titratable acidity, soluble solids content, and vitamin C during storage, but for doses higher than 0.25 kGy the vitamin C content decreased. The positive effects of ionizing radiation treatment on delayed fruit ripening and other quality attributes diminished during 22 days of storage at 10 deg. C. Thus, a combination of ionizing radiation with low-temperature storage (10 deg. C) did not have much synergistic effect on storage life and quality of guava fruit. In conclusion, ionizing radiation treatment of guava fruit with 0.25 kGy dose increased the postharvest life by 3-4 days, maintained fruit quality, and reduced the decay incidence. The optimal dose (0.25 kGy) for postharvest life extension of guava fruit may be exploited to provide phytosanitary security against many insect pests including fruit flies

  17. Radiation therapy in the multimodal treatment approach of pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G. [Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology and Radiation Therapy; Radiooncologic Univ. Clinic, Tuebingen (Germany); Kocher, M.; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Clinic of Radiation Therapy; Kortmann, R.D.; Paulsen, F.; Jeremic, B.; Bamberg, M. [Radiooncologic Univ. Clinic, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, literature will be reviewed to assess the role of modern radiotherapy and radiosurgery in the management of pituitary adenomas. Material and Methods: Nowadays, magnetic resonance imaging for the definition of the target volume and a real three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning with field conformation and the possibility for non-coplanar irradiation has to be recommended. Most groups irradiate these benign tumors with single doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy up to a total dose of 45 Gy or 50.4 Gy in extensive parasellar adenomas. Adenomas are mostly small, well circumscribed lesions, and have, therefore, attracted the use of stereotactically guided high-precision irradiation techniques which allow extreme focussing and provide steep dose gradients with selective treatment of the target and optimal protection of the surrounding brain tissue. Results: Radiation therapy controls tumor growth in 80-98% of patients with non-secreting adenomas and 67-89% for endocrine active tumors. Reviewing the recent literature including endocrine active and non-secreting adenomas, irradiated postoperatively or in case of recurrence the 5-, 10- and 15-year local control rates amount 92%, 89% and 79%. In cases of microprolactinoma primary therapy consists of dopamine agonists. Irradiation should be preferred in patients with macroprolactinomas, when drug therapy and/or surgery failed or for patients medically unsuitable for surgery. Reduction and control of prolactin secretion can be achieved in 44-70% of patients. After radiotherapy in acromegaly patients somatomedin-C and growth hormone concentrations decrease to normal levels in 70-90%, with a decrease rate of 10-30% per year. Hypercortisolism is controlled in 50-83% of adults and 80% of children with Cushing's disease, generally in less than 9 months. Hypopituitarism is the most common side effect of pituitary irradiation with an incidence of 13-56%. Long-term overall risk for brain necrosis in a total of 1,388 analyzed

  18. Radiation therapy in the multimodal treatment approach of pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Kocher, M.; Mueller, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, literature will be reviewed to assess the role of modern radiotherapy and radiosurgery in the management of pituitary adenomas. Material and Methods: Nowadays, magnetic resonance imaging for the definition of the target volume and a real three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning with field conformation and the possibility for non-coplanar irradiation has to be recommended. Most groups irradiate these benign tumors with single doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy up to a total dose of 45 Gy or 50.4 Gy in extensive parasellar adenomas. Adenomas are mostly small, well circumscribed lesions, and have, therefore, attracted the use of stereotactically guided high-precision irradiation techniques which allow extreme focussing and provide steep dose gradients with selective treatment of the target and optimal protection of the surrounding brain tissue. Results: Radiation therapy controls tumor growth in 80-98% of patients with non-secreting adenomas and 67-89% for endocrine active tumors. Reviewing the recent literature including endocrine active and non-secreting adenomas, irradiated postoperatively or in case of recurrence the 5-, 10- and 15-year local control rates amount 92%, 89% and 79%. In cases of microprolactinoma primary therapy consists of dopamine agonists. Irradiation should be preferred in patients with macroprolactinomas, when drug therapy and/or surgery failed or for patients medically unsuitable for surgery. Reduction and control of prolactin secretion can be achieved in 44-70% of patients. After radiotherapy in acromegaly patients somatomedin-C and growth hormone concentrations decrease to normal levels in 70-90%, with a decrease rate of 10-30% per year. Hypercortisolism is controlled in 50-83% of adults and 80% of children with Cushing's disease, generally in less than 9 months. Hypopituitarism is the most common side effect of pituitary irradiation with an incidence of 13-56%. Long-term overall risk for brain necrosis in a total of 1,388 analyzed patients

  19. Role of radiation in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeyman, L D; Morgan, D E [Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1982-06-01

    The article deals with the radiation treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia. The contribution of radiotherapy can be considered in three parts: a) irradiation of blood packs for patient support; b) irradiation of laboratory animals in order to improve existing knowledge and techniques; c) total body irradiation of the patient on the day of the transplant using a dose large enough to destroy the bone marrow and the immune system. The radiation effects, post graft immunosuppression and the supporting of the patient after transplantation are also discussed.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation treatment machine heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of radiation treatment machine heads provide practical means for obtaining energy spectra and angular distributions of photons and electrons. So far, most of the work published in the literature has been limited to photons and the contaminant electrons knocked out by photons. This chapter will be confined to megavoltage photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators and 60 Co teletherapy units. The knowledge of energy spectra and angular distributions of photons and contaminant electrons emerging from such machines is important for a variety of applications in radiation dosimetry

  1. Radiation safety issues in the water treatment plant - Indoor radon and gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantsikene, A.; Kiisk, M.; Suursoo, S.; Koch, R. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Lumiste, L. [Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    In order to reduce the indicative dose from drinking water consumption in Viimsi parish, Estonia, a new water treatment plant was launched in 2012 serving about 15 000 consumers. The promising new technology for groundwater purification consists of air injector, oxidation tank, patented venturi-type centrifugal degassing separation unit GDT and two-stage filtration in open filter columns. In each of the five parallel lines, approximately 95 tons of catalytic (FMH and sand) and 45 tons of non-catalytic (zeolite) filter materials were used. These filter materials proved to be very effective adsorbents of incoming radium isotopes. As a result, the columns emit direct gamma radiation. Moreover, columns' exposure to indoor air makes them radon generators that affect all rooms in the building. During the study period of two years the filter materials were not replaced and their lifespan has not been estimated yet. In order to minimize radiation risks for the workers inside the water treatment plant, a complex study and a long-term monitoring is needed. For the measurements of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra concentrations in water and in solid filter materials gamma-ray spectroscopy was used. According to the results, the annual input of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra is 325 MBq and 420 MBq, respectively. The average incoming concentration of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra isotopes is 0.5 Bq/L and 0.6 Bq/L, respectively, and the radium content in the output water is below the limit of detection (about 10-15 mBq/L). This means strong accumulation of radium isotopes in the filter materials, thus causing an increase of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the outgoing treated water. External dose rates throughout the length of the filter columns were measured with the portable dosimeter to estimate the {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra depth distribution. The results showed that distribution of these radionuclides is uneven with the maximum of 0.5 μSv/h for the first stage and 3 μSv/h for

  2. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. (paper)

  3. A consideration of distributions and treatment schedules in high dose rate intracavitary therapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Suoh; Sato, Sigehiro; Nakano, Masao; Iida, Koyo; Yui, Nobuharu

    1979-01-01

    A remotely controlled afterloading device for high dose rate intracavitary radiation, the remote afterloader Shimadzu Ralstron MTSW-20, was installed at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital in 1973 and put into clinical use for the treatment of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Before the clinical use, isodose distributions and treatment schedules were investigated, compared with the low dose rate intracavitary radiation by linear sources of 137 Cs used hitherto. The isodose distributions, calculated by using an electronic computer, for various combinations of the length of uterine canal and the separation of vaginal applicators, were the same as those obtained with linear sources. As for the treatment schedules, by using PT (partial tolerance) which was derived from NSD concept of Ellis, a number of fractional radiation regimes with high dose rate, equivalent to continuous low dose rate radiation, was calculated. From these, a dose of 600 rad per fraction to point A every week has been chosen as the standard radiation schedule. The number of fractions has been varied with the clinical stages. Furthermore, some changes of total dose or small modification of dose distribution have been made for individual lesions. According to the preliminary results, three-year cumulative survival rate was 68.7% and complication rate was 15.2%. Comparing these results with those of the treatment at low dose rate, the former is nearly equal, while the latter is lower. The reduction of complication rate is probably due to the improvement of therapeutic techniques such as continuous observation by fractionated intracavitary radiation, variety of isodose distributions and accuracy of source placement by a short treatment time. (author)

  4. Low dose rate and high dose rate intracavitary treatment for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    From 1984 through 1993, 144 previous untreated patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with either low dose rate 137 Cs therapy (LDR) or high dose rate 60 Co therapy (HDR). The local failure rates for more than 2-years for the primary lesions were 11.8% (8 of 63 patients) for LDR and 18.0% (11 of 61 patients). Rectal complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (14.3% VS. 32.8%. p<0.01). Also, bladder complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (0% VS. 10.4%, p<0.005). Treatment results in term of local control were equivalent for HDR and LDR treatment. However, the incidence of complications was higher for the LDR group than for the HDR group. (author)

  5. Comparison of surgical, radiation and cytostatic treatment of gastric carcinomas in world literature from 1973 to 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcker, A.

    1982-01-01

    Among the three possible therapeutic methods, surgical treatment gives the best results from a three-year survival time onwards. The five-year survival rate is between 8 and 18.6 pc. With radiation therapy the survival rate is already at 8.3 pc after three years. In cases of cytostatic treatment of locally restricted tumors, the rate of survival three years after the inception of the therapy is zero. The one-year survival rate with additional cytostatic treatment is 73.9 pc, without it there are 46.7 pc survivals. Surgery plus radiation therapy accounts for a one-year survival rate of 55.5 pc. This is more than with surgery alone (33 pc respectively 46.7 pc), but less than the one-year survival rate for surgical and cytostatic treatment (73.9 pc). Where radiation plus chemical therapy is applied, the percentage of survivals after two years is 28.5, respectively 40 for local tumors. None of the patients with metastases had survived two years after the treatment was started. (Comparison with surgery alone: five-year survival rate 9.4 pc of patients with affected lymph nodes). The best results are obtained by surgical combined with cytostatic treatment, possibly also by surgery in combination with radiation therapy. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Total dose and dose rate radiation characterization of EPI-CMOS radiation hardened memory and microprocessor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, B.L.; Hermsen, J.M.; Lee, J.C.; Schroeder, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The process, circuit discription, and total dose radiation characteristics are presented for two second generation hardened 4K EPI-CMOS RAMs and a first generation 80C85 microprocessor. Total dose radiation performance is presented to 10M rad-Si and effects of biasing and operating conditions are discussed. The dose rate sensitivity of the 4K RAMs is also presented along with single event upset (SEU) test data

  7. Design And Measurement Of Radiation Exposure Rates At An X-Ray Diagnostic Radiological Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tito-Sutjipto

    2003-01-01

    Every radiation employees suffers radiation exposure risk while doing his job. It is important therefore to investigate the occupational health and safety of radiation employees on its relationship with the design and measurement of radiation exposure rates at an X-ray diagnostic radiological unit in this work, a case study was held on the radiological unit at BP-4 Yogyakarta for patient diagnostics, This research armed to investigate the relationship between the design of radiological unit for X-ray diagnostics and the location of the X-ray machine, based on the distance variable and radiation exposure rate during patient diagnostics. This was performed using radiological unit design data for X-ray diagnostics and the measurement of radiation exposure rates throughout patient diagnostics. The design data can then be used for determining the requirement of primary and secondary shielding materials for radiological unit as well as a calculation basis of radiation exposure rates during patient diagnostics. From the result of the research, it can be concluded that from the occupational health and safety point of view, radiation exposure around the X-ray machines are fairly good, both for the shielding materials in each X-ray room and the radiation exposures received by the workers, because they are far beyond the maximum permittable average limit (16.67 m R/days). (author)

  8. Dissolution rate and radiation dosimetry of metal tritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jow, Hong-Nian; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1993-01-01

    Metal tritides including titanium tritide (Ti 3 H x ) and erbium tritide (Er 3 H x ) have been used as components of neutron generators. These compounds can be released to the air as aerosols during fabrication, assembling and testing of components or in accidental or fugitive releases. As a result, workers could be exposed to these compounds by inhalation. A joint research project between SNL and ITRI (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute) was initiated last fall to investigate the solubility of metal tritides, retention and translocation of inhaled particles and internal dosimetry of metal tritides. The current understanding of metal tritides and their radiation dosimetry for internal exposure are very limited. There is no provision in the ICRP-30 for tritium dosimetry in metal tritide form. However, a few papers in the literature suggested that the solubility of metal tritide could be low. The current radiation protection guidelines for metal tritide particles are based on the assumption that the biological behavior is similar to tritiated water which behaves like body fluid with a relative short biological half life (10 days). If the solubility of metal tritide is low, the biological half life of metal tritide particles and the dosimetry of inhalation exposure to these particles could be quite different from tritiated water. This would have major implications in current radiation protection guidelines for metal tritides Including annual limits of intakes and derived air concentrations. The preliminary results of metal tritide dissolution study at ITRI indicate that the solubility of titanium tritide is low. The outlines of the project, the preliminary results and future work will be discussed in presentation

  9. Radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Tomoko; Mandai, Michiko; Honjo, Megumi; Matsuda, Naoko; Miyamoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Sasai, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Fifteen eyes of age-related macular degeneration were treated by low-dose radiation. All the affected eyes had subfoveal neovascular membrane. Seventeen nontreated eyes with similar macular lesion served as control. Radiation was performed using photon beam at 6MV. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy for 5 consecutive days. When evaluated 9 to 12 months after treatment, the size of neovascular membrane had decreased in 47% of treated eyes and 7% of control eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 13% of treated eyes and in none of control eyes. When the initial neovascular membrane was less than 1.5 disc diameter in size, the visual acuity had improved or remained stationary in 90% of treated eyes and in 36% of control eyes. The findings show the potential beneficial effect of radiation for age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  10. Failure Rate of Pediatric Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effat Khodadadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the failure rates of various pediatric dental treatments performed under general anesthesia (GA after six months to five years of follow-up. Design: This multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed on patients treated by five pedodontists in two private hospitals located in northern Iran during 2010–2013 and comprised 155 patients. The patients were recalled and clinically examined. During the clinical examination of the primary teeth, oral hygiene, dmft index, and failure of previous treatments was evaluated. The data were analyzed using the Chi square and regression analyses with a significance level of 0.05. Results: 114 patients (74 males and 40 females, mean age: 37.17 ± 10.75 months with 1155 primary teeth treated under GA participated in the follow-up. The overall failure rate was 6.59%. The failure rates of pulpectomy, pulopotomy, fissure sealant, stainless steel crown (SSC, amalgam, and composite fillings were 2.90%, 3.03%, 4.83%, 5.26%, 5.33%, and 9.63%, respectively. Among the confounding factors, only gender had a significant effect on the anterior composite failure rate (p = 0.029 and age had a significant effect on the failure rate of fissure sealant therapy (p = 0.015 and SSC (p = 0.018. Conclusion: The overall rate of treatment failure in pediatric patients, treated under GA, was 6.59%.

  11. Conservative treatment of rectal cancer with local excision and postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    The conventional surgical treatment for patients with potentially curable transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer is a low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy as primary therapy for selected rectal cancers. The limited data suggest that the approach of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy should be limited to patients with either T 1 tumours with adverse pathological factors or T 2 tumours. Transmural tumours, which have a 24% local failure rate, are treated more effectively with standard surgery and pre- or postoperative therapy. The results of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy are encouraging, but more experience is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as standard surgery. (author)

  12. A case of central type early stage lung cancer receiving 60Co high dose-rate postoperative endobronchial radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Syouji; Kodama, Ken; Kurokawa, Eiji; Doi, Osamu; Terasawa, Toshio; Chatani, Masashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Tateishi, Ryuhei

    1985-01-01

    Right middle-lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed for a case of central type early stage lung cancer. Tumor extended very closely to the line of incision margin of the resected specimen, appearing as carcinoma in situ. To inprove curativity, postoperative radiation therapy was performed with 60 Co high dose-rate endobronchial radiation by a remote afterloading system. A total dose of 40Gy was administered to the target area without any severe side effects. The patient is healthy and has no evidence of metastasis. This procedure is considered to be an effective treatment for postoperative lung cancer with possible residual malignancy. (author)

  13. Phenomenological modelling of second cancer incidence for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaffenberger, Asja; Oelfke, Uwe; Schneider, Uwe; Poppe, Bjoern

    2009-01-01

    It is still an unanswered question whether a relatively low dose of radiation to a large volume or a higher dose to a small volume produces the higher cancer incidence. This is of interest in view of modalities like IMRT or rotation therapy where high conformity to the target volume is achieved at the cost of a large volume of normal tissue exposed to radiation. Knowledge of the shape of the dose response for radiation-induced cancer is essential to answer the question of what risk of second cancer incidence is implied by which treatment modality. This study therefore models the dose response for radiation-induced second cancer after radiation therapy of which the exact mechanisms are still unknown. A second cancer risk estimation tool for treatment planning is presented which has the potential to be used for comparison of different treatment modalities, and risk is estimated on a voxel basis for different organs in two case studies. The presented phenomenological model summarises the impact of microscopic biological processes into effective parameters of mutation and cell sterilisation. In contrast to other models, the effective radiosensitivities of mutated and non-mutated cells are allowed to differ. Based on the number of mutated cells present after irradiation, the model is then linked to macroscopic incidence by summarising model parameters and modifying factors into natural cancer incidence and the dose response in the lower-dose region. It was found that all principal dose-response functions discussed in the literature can be derived from the model. However, from the investigation and due to scarcity of adequate data, rather vague statements about likelihood of dose-response functions can be made than a definite decision for one response. Based on the predicted model parameters, the linear response can probably be rejected using the dynamics described, but both a flattening response and a decrease appear likely, depending strongly on the effective cell

  14. Radiation protection in brachytherapic treatment of prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannino, G.; Bona, R.; Occhipinti, A. [Catania Univ. Hospital, ' Vittorio Emanuele, Ferrarotto e Santo Bambino' (Italy); Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G. [Messina Univ., Dept. of Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate absorbed doses for medical staff and general public deriving from prostate brachytherapy with I-125 seeds. Methods And Materials: Radiation exposure measurements were made for staff and on a subset of 64 patients of the 100 trans perineal I-125 implanted seeds implants at the Vittorio Emanuele, Ferrarotto e Santo Bambino Universitary Hospital. Results: Absorbed doses for operators are very low when using radiation safety devices. The exposure rate at the anterior skin surface due to I-125 implanted seeds ranged from 32 to 120 {mu}Sv/hour. Conclusions: The evaluation of dose measurements shows that radiation risk associated to this practice is very low, both for staff that for critical group of population, if they follow the specific radioprotection statements supplied by health physicists. (authors)

  15. Radiation protection in brachytherapic treatment of prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannino, G.; Bona, R.; Occhipinti, A.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate absorbed doses for medical staff and general public deriving from prostate brachytherapy with I-125 seeds. Methods And Materials: Radiation exposure measurements were made for staff and on a subset of 64 patients of the 100 trans perineal I-125 implanted seeds implants at the Vittorio Emanuele, Ferrarotto e Santo Bambino Universitary Hospital. Results: Absorbed doses for operators are very low when using radiation safety devices. The exposure rate at the anterior skin surface due to I-125 implanted seeds ranged from 32 to 120 μSv/hour. Conclusions: The evaluation of dose measurements shows that radiation risk associated to this practice is very low, both for staff that for critical group of population, if they follow the specific radioprotection statements supplied by health physicists. (authors)

  16. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer: Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and Head and Neck Group (111 institutions) to evaluate the widespread use of cetuximab and radiotherapy in HNC and to estimate the frequency of grades III and IV skin reactions in the radiation portals associated with this protocol. Co-morbidities, RT schedules and co-medications were also recorded. Results: We received responses from 28 institutions in 11 countries. A total of 125 HNC patients from 15 institutions were treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. Information about the skin reactions was available from 71 patients. Of these 36 had no grade III/IV adverse effects in the RT field, 15 had a grade III and 20 had grade IV radiation dermatitis. No detectable relation of grades III and IV radiation dermatitis with co-morbidities such as liver insufficiency or renal dysfunction was found. Conclusion: According to the results of the questionnaire, grade III/IV radiation dermatitis is observed in 49% of HNC patients treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. A systematic clinical monitoring of cutaneous side effects during RT plus cetuximab is advised to ensure the safety of this protocol

  17. Imaging modalities in radiation treatment planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, D.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation therapy is a standard treatment after surgery for most of malignant and some of benignant brain tumors. The restriction in acquiring local tumor control is an inability in realization of high dose without causing radiation necrosis in irradiated area and sparing normal tissues. The development of imaging modalities during the last years is responsible for better treatment results and lower early and late toxicity. Essential is the role of image methods not only in the diagnosis and also in the precise anatomical (during last years also functional) localisation, spreading of the tumor, treatment planning process and the effects of the treatment. Target delineation is one of the great geometrical uncertainties in the treatment planning process. Early studies on the use of CT in treatment planning documented that tumor coverage without CT was clearly inadequate in 20% of the patients and marginal in another 27 %. The image fusion of CT, MBI and PET and also the use of contrast materia helps to get over those restrictions. The use of contrast material enhances the signal in 10 % of the patients with glioblastoma multiform and in a higher percentage of the patients with low-grade gliomas

  18. Dose rate from the square volume radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    The expression for determining the dose rate from a three-dimensional square flat-parallel source of any dimensions is obtained. A simplified method for integrating the resultant expression is proposed. A comparison of the calculation results with the results by the Monte Carlo method has shown them to coincide within 6-8%. Since buildings and structures consist of rectangular elements, the method is recommended for practical calculations of dose rates in residential buildings

  19. The application of ionising radiation in industrial wastewater treatment technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kos, L. [Inst. of Knitting Technology and Techniques, Lodz (Poland); Perkowski, J. [Inst. of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Technical Univ. of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Ledakowicz, S. [Dept. of Bioprocess Engineering, Technical Univ. of Lodz, Lodz (Poland)

    2003-07-01

    An attempt was made to apply radiation techniques in the treatment of industrial wastewater from a dairy, brewery and sugar factory. For degradation of pollutants present in the wastewater, the following methods were used: irradiation, irradiation combined with aeration, ozonation, and combined irradiation and ozonation. For all three types of wastewater, the best method among these listed above appeared to be the method of irradiation combined with ozonation. Most degradable was the wastewater produced in sugar factories, and the least biodegradable appeared to be dairy wastewater. Depending on the dose of ozone and radiation, a maximum 60% reduction of COD was obtained. No effect of the wastewater aeration on its degradation by radiation was found. Changes in the content of mineral compounds were observed in none of the cases. The process of biological treatment of wastewater was carried out in a low-loaded, wetted bed. Pretreatment of the wastewater had no significant effect on the improvement of the biological step operation. Some effect was observed only in the case of the wastewater coming from a sugar factory. For medium concentrated wastewater from food industry, it is not economically justified to apply the pretreatment with the use of ionising radiation. (orig.)

  20. Recommended de minimis radiation dose rates for Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    A de minimis dose or dose rate as used in this report represents a level of risk which is generally accepted as being of no significance to an individual, or in the case of a population, of no significance to society. The doses corresponding to these levels of risk are based on current scientific knowledge. Dose rates recommended in this report are as follows: a de minimis individual dose rate of 10 μSv a -1 , based on a risk level that would generally be regarded as negligible in comparison with other risks; and a de minimis collective dose rate of 1 person-Sv a -1 , based on an imperceptible increase above the normal incidences of cancer and genetic defects in the exposed population. The concept of de minimis is to be distinguished from 'exempt from regulation' (below regulatory concern). The latter involves broader social and economic factors which encompass but are not limited to the purely risk-based factors addressed by the de minimis dose. De minimis is one of the factors that determine the exemption of sources or practices that may result in doses below or above the de minimis level. Although these de minimis dose rates should be considered in developing criteria and guidelines for deriving quantities and concentrations of radioactive substances that may be exempted from regulation, this document is only concerned with establishing de minimis dose rates, not with exempting sources and practices

  1. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, Charles, E-mail: c.dupin@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux (France); Lang, Philippe [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France); Dessard-Diana, Bernadette [Department of Radiotherapy, Hopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.9-243 cm{sup 3}) and 116 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-731 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas.

  2. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, Charles; Lang, Philippe; Dessard-Diana, Bernadette; Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm 3 (range, 0.9-243 cm 3 ) and 116 cm 3 (range, 24-731 cm 3 ), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas

  3. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  4. Bone marrow transplantation for treatment of radiation disease. Problems involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells still is one of the major means available for treatment of radiation injuries. The decisive indication is the diagnostic of irreversible damage to the hemopoietic stem cells, which becomes manifest about 5 or 6 days after exposure, by severe granulocytopenia and simultaneous, progressive thrombopenia. The radiation dose provoking such severe injury is estimated to be at least 9-10 Gy of homogeneous whole-body irradiation. Preparatory measures for transplantation include proof of tissue compatibility of donor and patient, sufficient immunosuppression prior to and/or after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. The donor's marrow should be free of T-cells. In spite of preparatory treatment, complications such as immunological reactions or disturbance of organ functions are to be very probable. These are treated according to therapy protocols. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Performance of slow rate systems for treatment of domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanakakis, V E; Paranychianakis, N V; Angelakis, A N

    2007-01-01

    The performance of slow rate (SR) systems in terms of treatment efficiency, environmental and health risks, and land sustainability was investigated over a three-year period in a rural community close to Iraklio, Greece. Four plant species (Acacia cyanophylla, Eucalyptus camandulensis, Populus nigra and Arundo donax) were used in order to investigate the role of vegetation in the treatment of wastewater and in biomass production. Wastewater effluent was pre-treated in a septic tank before its application to land. Applied hydraulic loading rates were based on crop water requirements which were determined separately for each plant species. The evaluation of treatment performance was accomplished by measuring COD, TKN, NH3-N, NO3-N, total and reactive P, TC and FC in soil solution samples taken at different depths (15, 30 and 60 cm). SR systems showed great potential for COD, TKN and NH4-N removal which reached 89, 90 and 94%, respectively at a depth of 15 cm. An outstanding removal was also observed for TC and FC which reached 99.99%. The concentration of both P and NO3-N in soil solution increased with the passage of time, but it was lower in winter. Despite the differences in the application rates among the SR systems planted with different plant species, the treatment efficiency was not affected. Moreover, increasing the soil depth from 15 to 60 cm had no effect on the treatment efficiency of the SR systems.

  6. An energy-independent dose rate meter for beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzelmann, M.; Keller, M.

    1986-01-01

    An easy to handle dose rate meter has been developed at the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre with a small probe for the energy-independent determination of the dose rate in mixed radiation fields. The dose rate meter contains a small ionisation chamber with a volume of 15.5 cm 3 . The window of the ionisation chamber consists of an aluminised plastic foil of 7 mg.cm -2 . The dose rate meter is suitable for determining the dose rate in skin. With a supplementary depth dose cap, the dose rate can be determined in tissue at a depth of 1 cm. The dose rate meter is energy-independent within +-20% for 147 Pm, 204 Tl and 90 Sr/ 90 Y beta radiation and for gamma radiation in the energy range above 35 keV. (author)

  7. Exposure rate measurements and radiation control in post therapy with I131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez A, M.; Castillo D, C.; Flores U, H.; Cespedes C, L.; Morgan N, C.; Sifuentes D, Y.; Marin R, K.

    2015-10-01

    During hyperthyroidism treatment, 131 I activities from 111 MBq up to 296 MBq are used. In the aim to determine if the 131 I uptake by the patient is a radiological risk to family members and public around the patient exposure rate measurements were carried out, using a limit 1.8 m R/h. Measurements were carried out in the Nuclear Medicine department of Almenara hospital in Lima, Peru. The exposure rate was measured to 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 m from the patient from 0 to 11 days after post-administrated dose (Pda). In this study measurements were carried out in 21 hyperthyroid patients. Measurements to 1 meter, along 2-4 (16/16), 5-7 (15/15), and 8-11 (14/14) days after Pda, indicate the dose rate around 100% of patients is ≤ 1.8 m R /h. Measurements to 0.6 meters along 2-4 (16/16), 5 -7 (15/15), and 8-11 (14/14) days after Pda, indicate that the dose rate around 44% (7/16), 93% (14/15), and 100% (14/14) of patients is ≤ 1.8 m R h. On the other hand, dose rate measurements to 0.3 meters, along 2-4 (16/16), 5-7 (15/15), and 8 -11 (14/14) days after Pda, indicate that de dose rate is 13% (2/16), 6% (1/15), and 43% (6/14) of patients is ≤ 1.8 m R/h. Measured exposure rates are alike to values reported in the literature, and were used to define radiation control recommendations. (Author)

  8. Applying Ionizing Radiation for the Treatment of Sewage Sludge for Reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elammari, M.; Mashai, M.; Dehmani, K.; Abokhabta, S.; Akrim, M.

    2004-01-01

    The increased waste production by human activities world wide raised the problem of how to get red of this waste which cause undesirable impact on human and the surrounding environment. Sewage sludge generally contains high concentrations of pathogens even after digestion or after treating with other conventional methods. This paper brings to light the radiation treatment of sludge by ionizing radiation as a simple and reliable process for sludge disinfection and also the effect of Gamma radiation on sludge characteristics and heavy metals which exist in the sludge. Samples of moist sludge were brought from Elhadba Elkhadra waste water treatment plant, the main sewage water treatment plant in the City of Tripoli; they were collected in sterile plastic bags from different locations. Samples were then irradiated using gamma irradiator at Tajura Research Centre with a dose rate of 10 Gy/min, using a Co60 Gamma irradiator. They received a dose ranged between 0 -5 kGy with an increment of 1 kGy. Microorganisms are damaged when exposed to gamma radiation and the extent of damage is proportional to the radiation dose absorbed by the organism. Gamma irradiation greatly reduced the pathogen density in the investigated samples, as the 5 kGy dose was sufficient to terminate the total bacterial count for all microorganisms. A 3 kGy was only needed to demolish Enterobacter ease, Total coliform and Fecal coliform, whereas spore forming needed a dose of 4 kGy for complete elimination. (authors)

  9. Effect of radiation doses rate on SOS response induction in irradiated Escherichia coli Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuetara Lugo, Elizabeth B.; Fuentes Lorenzo, Jorge L.; Almeida Varela, Eliseo; Prieto Miranda, Enrique F.; Sanchez Lamar, Angel; Llagostera Casal, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to study the effect of radiation dose rate on the induction of SOS response in Escherichia coli cells. We measured the induction of sul A reporter gene in PQ-37 (SOS Chromotest) cells. Lead devises were built with different diameter and these were used for diminishing the dose rate of PX- -30M irradiator. Our results show that radiation doses rate significantly modifies the induction of SOS response. Induction factor increases proportionally to doses rate in Escherichia coli cells defective to nucleotide excision repair (uvrA), but not in wild type cells. We conclude that the dose rate affects the level of induction of SOS response

  10. HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLIC WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment processes are rapidly becoming popular for industrial wastewater treatment. However, until recently stable process conditions could not be guaranteed for alcoholic wastewaters containing higher concentrations of methanol. Although methanol can be directly converted into methane by methanogens, under specific conditions it can also be converted into acetate and butyrate by acetogens. The accumulation of volatile fatty acids can lead to reactor instability in a weakly buffered reactor. Since this process was insufficiently understood, the application of high-rate anaerobic reactors was highly questionable. This research investigated the environmental factors that are of importance in the predominance of methylotrophic methanogens over acetogens in a natural mixed culture during anaerobic wastewater treatment in upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors. Technological and microbiological aspects were investigated. Additionally, the route by which methanol is converted into methane is also presented

  11. Sucralfate for the treatment of radiation induced mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belka, C.; Hoffmann, W.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy, a cornerstone in the management of head and neck cancer, pelvic cancer, and esophageal cancer is associated with a marked mucosal toxicity. Pain, malnutrition and diarrhea are the most prevalent clinical symptoms of radiation induced mucosal damage. Because there is no known way to obviate radiation mucositis all efforts to prevent aggravation and accelerate healing of mucosal changes are of great importance. Numerous agents including antimicrobials, local and systemic analgesics, antiinflammatory drugs, antidiarrheal drugs, in combination with intensive dietetic care are used to relieve symptoms. Recently coating agents like the polyaluminum-sucrose complex sucralfate were suggested for the prevention and treatment of mucosal reactions. Since sucralfate protects ulcerated epithelium by coating, liberates protective prostaglandins and increases the local availability of protective factors this drug might directly interact with the pathogenesis of mucositis. Patients and Method: The results of available studies are analysed and discussed. Results: The results of several studies indicate that sucralfate treatment especially during radiotherapy for pelvic cancer leads to a significant amelioration of clinical symptoms and morphological changes. An application of sucralfate during radiotherapy of head and neck cancer reveals only limited benefits in most studies performed. Conclusion: Nevertheless sucralfate is a save, cheap and active drug for the prevention and treatment of radiation mucositis especially in patients with pelvic irradiation. (orig.) [de

  12. Pharmacogenetic analysis of opioid dependence treatment dose and dropout rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Richard C; Li, James; Doyle, Glenn A; Gilbert, Alex; Dechairo, Bryan M; Berrettini, Wade H

    2018-01-01

    Currently, no pharmacogenetic tests for selecting an opioid-dependence pharmacotherapy have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Determine the effects of variants in 11 genes on dropout rate and dose in patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00315341). Variants in six pharmacokinetic genes (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4) and five pharmacodynamic genes (HTR2A, OPRM1, ADRA2A, COMT, SLC6A4) were genotyped in samples from a 24-week, randomized, open-label trial of methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence (n = 764; 68.7% male). Genotypes were then used to determine the metabolism phenotype for each pharmacokinetic gene. Phenotypes or genotypes for each gene were analyzed for association with dropout rate and mean dose. Genotype for 5-HTTLPR in the SLC6A4 gene was nominally associated with dropout rate when the methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone groups were combined. When the most significant variants associated with dropout rate were analyzed using pairwise analyses, SLC6A4 (5-HTTLPR) and COMT (Val158Met; rs4860) had nominally significant associations with dropout rate in methadone patients. None of the genes analyzed in the study was associated with mean dose of methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. This study suggests that functional polymorphisms related to synaptic dopamine or serotonin levels may predict dropout rates during methadone treatment. Patients with the S/S genotype at 5-HTTLPR in SLC6A4 or the Val/Val genotype at Val158Met in COMT may require additional treatment to improve their chances of completing addiction treatment. Replication in other methadone patient populations will be necessary to ensure the validity of these findings.

  13. Radiation therapy as definitive treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Like surgery, radiation therapy is a local treatment modality, and also like surgery, the objective of therapy is to eradicate all cancer in the treated area, ensuring no recurrence. In addition, this objective should be achieved with maintenance of a cosmetically intact breast. If these two goals can be attained simultaneously, the ultimate result should be a substantial reduction in the physical and psychologic morbidity of treatment and an improvement in the patients's quality of life. It is to be hoped that by reducing women's fear of potentially disfiguring surgery, they will be encouraged to seek medical attention for breast cancer at an earlier, and hence potentially more curable, stage of the disease

  14. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  15. Study on the evaluation method of radiation dose rate around spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakoshi, Hisao

    1986-01-01

    This study aims at developing a simple calculation method which can evaluate radiation dose rate around casks with high accuracy in a short time. The method is based on a concept of the radiation shielding characteristics of cask walls. The concept was introduced to replace for ordinary radiation shielding calculation which requires a long calculation time and a large memory capacity of a computer in the matrix calculation. For the purpose of verifying the accuracy and reliability of the new method, it was applied to the analysis of the dose rate distribution around actual casks, which had been measured. The results of the analysis revealed that the newly proposed method was excellent for the forecast of radiation dose rate distribution around casks in view of the accuracy and calculation time. The short calculation time and high accuracy by the proposed method were attained by dividing the whole procedure of ordinary fine radiation shielding calculation into the calculation of radiation dose rate on a cask surface by the matrix expression of the characteristic function and the calculation of dose rate distribution using the simple analytical expression of dose rate distribution around casks. The effect of the heterogeneous array of spent fuel in different burnup state on dose rate distribution around casks was evaluated by this method. (Kako, I.)

  16. Radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Bonnin, X.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative losses and electron cooling rates are calculated for carbon and oxygen ions under conditions relevant to fusion plasmas. Both rates are calculated with the most recent recommended atomic data. A modified coronal model which includes the effects of metastable states is described and used to calculate the rates. Comparisons with other approaches are also discussed. (author). 36 ref, figs

  17. Comparative influence of dose rate and radiation nature, on lethality after big mammals irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombe, C.; Le Fleche, Ph.; Grasseau, A.; Reynal, A.

    1997-01-01

    For the same dose and the 30 days lethality as biological criterion, the dose rate influence is more important than the radiation nature on the results of an big mammals total body irradiation. (authors)

  18. Investigations on commercial semiconductor diodes as possible high dose rate radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenhuber, L.; Kindl, P.; Obenaus, B.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations concerning the relevant properties of commercial semiconductor diodes such as their sensitivity and its dependence on accumulated dose, dose rate, energy, temperature and direction have been made in order to obtain their usefullness as radiation detectors. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  20. Palliative or curative treatment intent affects communication in radiation therapy consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, L.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Leer, J.W.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether communication in radiotherapy consultations is affected by palliative or curative treatment intent. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study involved 160 patients and 8 radiation oncologists. Eighty patients visited the radiation oncologist (RO) for palliative treatment and 80

  1. Survival rate of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer without early postoperative external radiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saur, H.B.; Lerch, H.; Schober, O.

    1996-01-01

    Results of survival rates in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and comparison with a review of literature are given. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with differentiated cancer of the thyroid (354 female, 110 male, range: 6 to 84 years, median: 46.8 years; 275 patients with papillary and 190 with follicular cancer) were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated with ablative doses of radioiodine after thyroidectomy including compartment oriented lymphadenectomy in 27 patients. All patients passed an individual systematic follow-up according to risk: 'Low risk' pT≤3NxM0 vs. 'high risk' pT4 and/or M1. Early postoperative radiation was not included even in patients with local invasion (pT4). The corrected 5- and 10-year survival rates for papillary cancer are 0.91 and 0.91, for follicular cancer 0.94 resp. 0.78 (p=0.55), age (≤40 years 0.96 and 0.96, >40 years 0.90 and 0.80; p=0.008), gender (female 0.93 and 0.92, male 0.90 and 0.70; p=0.06) and invasion/distant metastases (pT4 and/or M1 0.83 and 0.71, other 0.97 and 0.97; p=0.0001). A systematic follow-up with an individually adapted standardized scheme is associated with high survival rates in patients with differentiated cancer of the thyroid. Early diagnosis of recurrences, locoregional lymph node and distant metastases with early surgical treatment including compartment oriented lymphadenectomy and radioiodine therapy yield high survival even without external radiation. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Impact of Boost Radiation in the Treatment of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Population-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovitch, Eileen, E-mail: Eileen.rakovitch@sunnybrook.ca [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Narod, Steven A. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Women’s College Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Nofech-Moses, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Thiruchelvam, Deva; Saskin, Refik; Taylor, Carole [Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tuck, Alan [London Health Sciences Center, London, Ontario (Canada); Youngson, Bruce; Miller, Naomi; Done, Susan J. [University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sengupta, Sandip [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Elavathil, Leela [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Henderson General Hospital, 711 Concession Street, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jani, Prashant A. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Bonin, Michel [Sudbury Regional Hospital, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Metcalfe, Stephanie [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Paszat, Lawrence [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of a population of women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation and to evaluate the independent effect of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence. Methods and Materials: All women diagnosed with DCIS and treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy in Ontario from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatments and outcomes were identified through administrative databases and validated by chart review. The impact of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence was determined using survival analyses. Results: We identified 1895 cases of DCIS that were treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy; 561 patients received boost radiation. The cumulative 10-year rate of local recurrence was 13% for women who received boost radiation and 12% for those who did not (P=.3). The 10-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate among women who did and who did not receive boost radiation was 88% and 87%, respectively (P=.27), 94% and 93% for invasive LRFS (P=.58), and was 95% and 93% for DCIS LRFS (P=.31). On multivariable analyses, boost radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local recurrence (hazard ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.15) (P=.25). Conclusions: Among a population of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation for DCIS, additional (boost) radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local or invasive recurrence.

  3. A photocurrent compensation method of bipolar transistors under high dose rate radiation and its experimental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xuesong; Liu Zhongli; Li Chunji; Yu Fang

    2005-01-01

    Experiment using discrete bipolar transistors has been performed to verify the effect of the photocurrent compensation method. The theory of the dose rate effects of bipolar transistors and the photocurrent compensation method are introduced. The comparison between the response of hardened and unhardened circuits under high dose rate radiation is discussed. The experimental results show instructiveness to the hardness of bipolar integrated circuits under transient radiation. (authors)

  4. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  5. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-01-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio® treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  6. Radiation therapy for malignant gliomas in adults. Analysis of treatment results regarding factors on the radiation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Kawamori, Jiro; Saito, Tsutomu; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Shitara, Nobuyuki; Matsutani, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    During 19 years, 309 patients with astrocytic tumors (173 of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 41 of anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), and 95 of astrocytoma) were treated with radiation therapy. Initially a dose of 50 Gy was given with an extended field, then the target volume was decreased to the contrast enhancing lesion plus 1-2 cm margin and treated to the total dose ranging from 60 Gy to 66 Gy for GBM and about 60 Gy for AA. Fifty-four patients underwent surgical resection combined with a single dose of 15-20 Gy by intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The one-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates and the median survival time (MST) of patients with GBM were 56%, 27%, 16%, and 495 days, respectively. For patients with AA, these were 63%, 50%, 33%, and 762 days, respectively. From analysis on GBM, patients treated with IORT were survived longer than without IORT, significantly (p 2 , were significantly inferior than with less portal size (p<0.05). Patients treated with conformation radiotherapy (CFRT) were superior on survival rates than without it on GBM, however, there was no difference on AA. The treatment factors for radiation therapy which affected for prolonging survival time were considered as dose, size of irradiated portals, application of IORT and CFRT, especially on patients with GBM. (author)

  7. Geographic access to radiation therapy facilities and disparities of early-stage breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Few studies of breast cancer treatment have focused on the Northern Plains of the United States, an area with a high mastectomy rate. This study examined the association between geographic access to radiation therapy facilities and receipt of breast cancer treatments among early-stage breast cancer patients in South Dakota. Based on 4,209 early-stage breast cancer patients diagnosed between 2001 and 2012 in South Dakota, the study measured geographic proximity to radiation therapy facilities using the shortest travel time for patients to the closest radiation therapy facility. Two-level logistic regression models were used to estimate for early stage cases i the odds of mastectomy versus breast conserving surgery (BCS; ii the odds of not receiving radiation therapy after BCS versus receiving follow-up radiation therapy. Covariates included race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis, tumour grade, tumour sequence, year of diagnosis, census tract-level poverty rate and urban/rural residence. The spatial scan statistic method was used to identify geographic areas with significantly higher likelihood of experiencing mastectomy. The study found that geographic accessibility to radiation therapy facilities was negatively associated with the likelihood of receiving mastectomy after adjustment for other covariates, but not associated with radiation therapy use among patients receiving BCS. Compared with patients travelling less than 30 minutes to a radiation therapy facility, patients travelling more than 90 minutes were about 1.5 times more likely to receive mastectomy (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.11 and patients travelling more than 120 minutes were 1.7 times more likely to receive mastectomy (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.42. The study also identified a statistically significant cluster of patients receiving mastectomy who were located in south-eastern South Dakota, after adjustment for other factors. Because

  8. Solar radiation increases suicide rate after adjusting for other climate factors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yu Jin; Choi, Nari; An, Hyonggin; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that suicide rates have significant seasonal variations. There is seasonal discordance between temperature and solar radiation due to the monsoon season in South Korea. We investigated the seasonality of suicide and assessed its association with climate variables in South Korea. Suicide rates were obtained from the National Statistical Office of South Korea, and climatic data were obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration for the period of 1992-2010. We conducted analyses using a generalized additive model (GAM). First, we explored the seasonality of suicide and climate variables such as mean temperature, daily temperature range, solar radiation, and relative humidity. Next, we identified confounding climate variables associated with suicide rate. To estimate the adjusted effect of solar radiation on the suicide rate, we investigated the confounding variables using a multivariable GAM. Suicide rate showed seasonality with a pattern similar to that of solar radiation. We found that the suicide rate increased 1.008 times when solar radiation increased by 1 MJ/m 2 after adjusting for other confounding climate factors (P Solar radiation has a significant linear relationship with suicide after adjusting for region, other climate variables, and time trends. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana; Silva, Luanna R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60 Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD 50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  10. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  11. [High complication rate after surgical treatment of ankle fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars; Lind, Marianne; Mersø, Camilla

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quality and re-operation rate of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures at a large university hospital. X-rays and patient records of 137 patients surgically treated for ankle fractures were analyzed for: 1) correct classification according to Lauge-Hansen, 2) if congruity of the ankle joint was achieved, 3) selection and placement of the hardware, and 4) the surgeon's level of education. Totally 32 of 137 did not receive an optimal treatment, 11 were re-operated. There was no clear correlation between incorrect operation and the surgeon's level of education.

  12. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  13. Gamma radiation treatment activates glucomoringin synthesis in Moringa oleifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsifhiwa Ramabulana

    Full Text Available Abstract Plants are a very rich source of pharmacologically relevant metabolites. However, the relative concentrations of these compounds are subject to the genetic make-up, the physiological state of the plant as well as environmental effects. Recently, metabolic perturbations through the use of abiotic stressors have proven to be a valuable strategy for increasing the levels of these compounds. Oxidative stress-associated stressors, including ionizing radiation, have also been reported to induce metabolites with various biological activities in plants. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on the induction of purported anti-cancerous metabolites, glucomoringin and its derivatives, in Moringa oleifera Lam., Moringaceae. Here, an UHPLC-qTOF-MS-based targeted metabolic fingerprinting approach was used to evaluate the effect of gamma radiation treatment on the afore-mentioned health-beneficial secondary metabolites of M. oleifera. Following radiation, an increase in glucomoringin and three acylated derivatives was noted. As such, these molecules can be regarded as components of the inducible defense mechanism of M. oleifera as opposed to being constitutive components as it has previously been assumed. This might be an indication of a possible, yet unexplored role of moringin against the effects of oxidative stress in M. oleifera plants. The results also suggest that plants undergoing photo-oxidative stress could accumulate higher amounts of glucomoringin and related molecules.

  14. Generating AN Optimum Treatment Plan for External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabus, Irwin

    1990-01-01

    The application of linear programming to the generation of an optimum external beam radiation treatment plan is investigated. MPSX, an IBM linear programming software package was used. All data originated from the CAT scan of an actual patient who was treated for a pancreatic malignant tumor before this study began. An examination of several alternatives for representing the cross section of the patient showed that it was sufficient to use a set of strategically placed points in the vital organs and tumor and a grid of points spaced about one half inch apart for the healthy tissue. Optimum treatment plans were generated from objective functions representing various treatment philosophies. The optimum plans were based on allowing for 216 external radiation beams which accounted for wedges of any size. A beam reduction scheme then reduced the number of beams in the optimum plan to a number of beams small enough for implementation. Regardless of the objective function, the linear programming treatment plan preserved about 95% of the patient's right kidney vs. 59% for the plan the hospital actually administered to the patient. The clinician, on the case, found most of the linear programming treatment plans to be superior to the hospital plan. An investigation was made, using parametric linear programming, concerning any possible benefits derived from generating treatment plans based on objective functions made up of convex combinations of two objective functions, however, this proved to have only limited value. This study also found, through dual variable analysis, that there was no benefit gained from relaxing some of the constraints on the healthy regions of the anatomy. This conclusion was supported by the clinician. Finally several schemes were found that, under certain conditions, can further reduce the number of beams in the final linear programming treatment plan.

  15. MONTEC, an interactive fortran program to simulate radiation dose and dose-rate responses of populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.A.; Szekely, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    The computer program MONTEC was written to simulate the distribution of responses in a population whose members are exposed to multiple radiation doses at variable dose rates. These doses and dose rates are randomly selected from lognormal distributions. The individual radiation responses are calculated from three equations, which include dose and dose-rate terms. Other response-dose/rate relationships or distributions can be incorporated by the user as the need arises. The purpose of this documentation is to provide a complete operating manual for the program. This version is written in FORTRAN-10 for the DEC system PDP-10

  16. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokosz, Anita [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)]. E-mail: krokosz@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Koziczak, Renata [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Gonciarz, Marta [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2006-01-15

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with {gamma}-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min{sup -1} in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect.

  17. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Koziczak, Renata; Gonciarz, Marta; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with γ-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min -1 in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect

  18. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  19. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of Kelantan State, Malaysia. Relationship between the geological formation and soil type to radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garba, N.N.; Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (TGRD) of Kelantan State were measured in situ using a portable [NaI(TI)] micro roentgen (μR) survey meter. The TGRD rates ranged between 44 and 500 nGy h -1 with a mean value of 209 ± 8 nGy h -1 . The distribution of these measurements in various districts of the state shows the statistically the influence of geology and soil types on the dose rate values. The data obtained could be used in formulating safety standard and radiological guidelines. (author)

  20. Usefulness of radiation treatment planning allpied respiration factor for streotatic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Hyung; So, Woon Young; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Medical Health Science, Graduate School, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We are evaluated the usefulness of radiation treatment planning applied respiration factor for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer. Four dimensional computed tomography images were obtained in 10 patients with lung cancer. The radiation treatment plans were established total lung volume according to respiration images (new method) and conventional method. We was analyzed in the lung volume, radiation absorbed dose of lung and main organs (ribs, tracheobronchus, esophagus, spinal cord) around the tumor, respectively. We were confirmed that lung volume and radiation absorbed dose of lung and main organs around the tumor deference according to applied respiration. In conclusion, radiation treatment planning applied respiration factor seems to be useful for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer.

  1. Advantages of three-dimensional treatment planning in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalla, E.M.; ELSAyed, A.A.; ElGantiry, M.; ElTahher, Z.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning in-patients maxilla, breast, bladder, and lung tumors to explore its potential therapeutic advantage over the traditional dimensional (2-D) approach in these diseases. Conventional two-dimensional (2-D) treatment planning was compared to three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning. In five selected disease sites, plans calculated with both types of treatment planning were compared. The (3-D) treatment planning system used in this work TMS version 5.1 B from helax AB is based on a monte Carlo-based pencil beam model. The other treatment planning system (2-D 0, introduced in this study was the multi data treatment planning system version 2.35. For the volumes of interest; quality of dose distribution concerning homogeneity in the target volume and the isodose distribution in organs at risk, was discussed. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons between the two planning systems were made using dose volume histograms (DVH's) . For comparisons of dose distributions in real-patient cases, differences ranged from 0.8% to 6.4% for 6 MV, while in case of 18 MV photon, it ranged from 1,8% to 6.5% and was within -+3 standard deviations for the dose between the two planning systems.Dose volume histogram (DVH) shows volume reduction of the radiation-related organs at risk 3-D planning

  2. Effect of solar radiation on the lipid characterization of biomass cultivated in high-rate algal ponds using domestic sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Calijuri, Maria Lúcia; Santiago, Anibal da Fonseca; do Couto, Eduardo de Aguiar; Leite, Mauricio de Oliveira; Sierra, Jose Jovanny Bermudez

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the lipid content and composition ofbiomass produced by a consortium of microalgae and bacteria, cultivated under different solar radiation intensities and tropical conditions in pilot-scale high-rate ponds (HRPs) using domestic sewage as culture medium. The treatment system consisted of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by UV disinfection and six HRPs covered with shading screens that blocked 9%, 18%, 30%, 60% and 80% of the solar radiation. The total lipid content does not vary significantly among the units, showing a medium value of 9.5%. The results show that blocking over 30% of the solar radiation has a negative effect on the lipid productivity. The units with no shading and with 30% and 60% of solar radiation blocking have statistically significant lipid productivities, varying from 0.92 to 0.96 gm(-2) day(-1). Besides radiation, other variables such as volatile suspended solids and chlorophyll-a are able to explain the lipid accumulation. The lipid profile has a predominance of C16, C18:1 and C18:3 acids. The unsaturation of fatty acids increases with the reduction in solar radiation. On the other hand, the effect of polyunsaturation is not observed, which is probably due to the presence of a complex and diverse biomass.

  3. Survey of Radiation Oncology Centres in Australia: report of the radiation oncology treatment quality program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klybaba, M.; Kenny, L.; Kron, T.; Harris, J.; O'Brien, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the first steps towards the development of a comprehensive quality program for radiation oncology in Australia has been a survey of practice. This paper reports on the results of the survey that should inform the development of standards for radiation oncology in Australia. A questionnaire of 108 questions spanning aspects of treatment services, equipment, staff, infrastructure and available quality systems was mailed to all facilities providing radiation treatment services in Australia (n = 45). Information of 42 sites was received by June 2006 providing data on 113 operational linear accelerators of which approximately 2/3 are equipped with multi-leaf collimators. More than 75% of facilities were participating in a formal quality assurance (QA) system, with 63% following a nationally or internationally recognised system. However, there was considerable variation in the availability of policies and procedures specific to quality aspects, and the review of these. Policies for monitoring patient waiting times for treatment were documented at just 71% of all facilities. Although 85% of all centres do, in fact, monitor machine throughput, the number and types of efficiency measures varied markedly, thereby limiting the comparative use of these results. Centres identified workload as the single most common factor responsible for limiting staff involvement in both QA processes and clinical trial participation. The data collected in this 'snapshot' survey provide a unique and comprehensive baseline for future comparisons and evaluation of changes

  4. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    The extrapolation chamber measurement method is the basic method for the determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields and the method has been used for the establishment of beta calibration fields. The paper describes important details of the method and presents results from the measurements of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E max values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value of the dose rate. (Author)

  5. The log mean heat transfer rate method of heat exchanger considering the influence of heat radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.-L.; Ke, M.-T.; Ku, S.-S.

    2009-01-01

    The log mean temperature difference (LMTD) method is conventionally used to calculate the total heat transfer rate of heat exchangers. Because the heat radiation equation contains the 4th order exponential of temperature which is very complicate in calculations, thus LMTD method neglects the influence of heat radiation. From the recent investigation of a circular duct in some practical situations, it is found that even in the situation of the temperature difference between outer duct surface and surrounding is low to 1 deg. C, the heat radiation effect can not be ignored in the situations of lower ambient convective heat coefficient and greater surface emissivities. In this investigation, the log mean heat transfer rate (LMHTR) method which considering the influence of heat radiation, is developed to calculate the total heat transfer rate of heat exchangers.

  6. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  7. Radiation-beam technologies of structural materials treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    Considered in the paper are the most advanced and prospective radiation-beam technologies (RBT) for treatment of structural materials, as applied to modifying the structural-phase state in the surface layers of half-finished products and articles with the purpose to improve their service properties. Ion-beam, plasma, and ion-plasma, as well as the technologies based on the use of concentrated fluxes of energy, generated by laser radiation, high-power pulsed electron and ion beams, and high-temperature pulsed plasma fluxes are analysed. As applied to improvement of the corrosion and erosion resistance, breaking strength, friction and wear resistance, and crack resistance, the directions of the choice and the use of RBT have been considered for changes of the surface layer state by applying covers and films, and by a change of the surface topography (relief), surface structure and defects, and the element composition and phase state of materials [ru

  8. Risk of radiation-induced cancer at low doses and low dose rates for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an updated, comprehensive review of the data available for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer for radiation protection purposes. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing risks at low doses and low dose rates. The review brings together the results of epidemiological investigations and fundamental studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in radiation damage. Additionally, this information is supplemented by studies with experimental animals which provide further guidance on the form of the dose-response relationship for cancer induction, as well as on the effect of dose rate on the tumour yield. The emphasis of the report is on cancer induction resulting from exposure to radiations with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The work was performed under contract for the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris, France, whose agreement to publish is gratefully ackowledged. It extends the advice on radiation risks given in Documents of the NRPB, 4 No. 4 (1993). (Author)

  9. Radiation dosemeters and ambient dose rate measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maushart, R.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturers have got the feeling that the PTB only reluctantly accepts complex dosimetric systems or systems with modern digital and microprocessor technology. Especially the fact that the PTB demands a restriction to a defined system configuration which must not be changed after design approval is felt to be a severe handicap. The rigid frame of design qualification forces manufacturers to adopt a two-tier development line, at least for ambient dose rate measuring systems, and frequently it is not necessarily the 'nature' system, i.e. equipment with modern technology, that is sent in to the PTB for testing. The way of solving the problem could be that PTB more readily accepts less familiar technologies, for instance by more frequently approving equipment at least preliminarily or for a restricted period of time, in order to collect experience. Another way could be to grant licence for system components, especially detectors. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Treatment of waste water by a combined technique of radiation and conventional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakumoto, A.; Miyata, T.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of waste water by radiation in combination with a conventional method such as biological oxidation, coagulation with Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , and ozonation has been studied for reducing necessary dose. Ethylene glycol ethers, polyoxyethylene n-nonyl phenyl ether (NPE), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), ethylene glycol, phenol, and oxalic acid were used as a model pollutant. The combined use of radiation and biological oxidation markedly improved the removal of TOC in aqueous oxygenated solution of ethylene glycol ethers. The combined use of radiation and coagulation had remarkable effects on the reduction of TOC in aqueous deoxygenated solution of NPE or PVA. The simultaneous use of radiation and ozone gave a synergistic effect on oxidative degradation of organic pollutants. The synergistic effect was suggested to arise from chain reactions having a powerful oxidizing agent (OH radical). The rate of TOC removal by the process depended on dose rate. Aqueous solution of 150 mg/l oxalic acid was treated by the combined use of electron beams and ozone using a new type of irradiation vessel to reduce TOC with G(-TOC) of 87 at 2.3 x 10 7 rad/h. The simultaneous use of radiation and ozone is superior to the removal of TOC by other combined methods and can be applied irrespective of the type of organic matter. (author)

  11. Treatment of retinoblastoma by precision megavoltage radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipper, J.; Peperzeel, H.A. van; Tan, K.E.W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The principal treatment concept in the Utrecht Retinoblastoma Centre is megavoltage irradiation, followed by light coagulation and/or cryotherapy if there is any doubt as to whether the residual tumour is still active. Radiation therapy is administered by means of a simple but highly accurate temporal beam technique. A standardized dose of 45 Gy is given in 15 fractions of 3 Gy at 3 fractions per week. From 1971 to 1982, 39 children with retinoblastoma have been irradiated in at least one eye. Of the 73 affected eyes, 18 were primarily enucleated, one received light coagulation only, and 54 received radiation therapy. Of the 54 irradiated eyes, 32 were additionally treated by light coagulation and/or cryotherapy for suspicious residual tumour (in 29 eyes), recurrent tumour (in 1 eye), and/or new tumour (in 3 eyes) and 10 were ultimately enucleated. Two eyes also received hyperthermia. The percentages of cure of the irradiated eyes with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were 100% (14/14), 100% (9/9,) 83% (10/12), 79% (11/14) and 0% (0/5) in the Reese-Ellsworth groups I to V-A, respectively. Of the saved eyes 95% achieved useful vision. Eighteen eyes developed a clinically detectable radiation cataract; in five of these the lens was aspirated. Cataracts developed exclusively in those lenses of which a posterior portion of more than 1 mm had to be included in the treatment field. The likelihood and the degree of cataract formation was found to be directly related to the dose of radiation to the germinative zone of the lens epithelium. The minimum cataractogenic dose found in this series was 8 Gy. (Auth.)

  12. Treatment of retinoblastoma by precision megavoltage radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipper, J.; Peperzeel, H.A. van (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Tan, K.E.W.P. (Royal Dutch Eye Hospital, Utrecht, Netherlands)

    1985-02-01

    The principal treatment concept in the Utrecht Retinoblastoma Centre is megavoltage irradiation, followed by light coagulation and/or cryotherapy if there is any doubt as to whether the residual tumour is still active. Radiation therapy is administered by means of a simple but highly accurate temporal beam technique. A standardized dose of 45 Gy is given in 15 fractions of 3 Gy at 3 fractions per week. From 1971 to 1982, 39 children with retinoblastoma have been irradiated in at least one eye. Of the 73 affected eyes, 18 were primarily enucleated, one received light coagulation only, and 54 received radiation therapy. Of the 54 irradiated eyes, 32 were additionally treated by light coagulation and/or cryotherapy for suspicious residual tumour (in 29 eyes), recurrent tumour (in 1 eye), and/or new tumour (in 3 eyes) and 10 were ultimately enucleated. Two eyes also received hyperthermia. The percentages of cure of the irradiated eyes with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were 100% (14/14), 100% (9/9), 83% (10/12), 79% (11/14) and 0% (0/5) in the Reese-Ellsworth groups I to V-A, respectively. Of the saved eyes 95% achieved useful vision. Eighteen eyes developed a clinically detectable radiation cataract; in five of these the lens was aspirated. Cataracts developed exclusively in those lenses of which a posterior portion of more than 1 mm had to be included in the treatment field. The likelihood and the degree of cataract formation was found to be directly related to the dose of radiation to the germinative zone of the lens epithelium. The minimum cataractogenic dose found in this series was 8 Gy.

  13. Place of radiation therapy for the treatment of gynecologic and urologic tumors in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulard-Durdux, C.; Housset, M.

    1995-01-01

    External-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy are currently used both as curative and as palliative therapy in patients with gynecologic and urologic tumors. Ionizing radiation plays a key role in the locoregional control of uterine and prostatic tumors, in particular in combination with surgery. External-beam radiation therapy in combination with concomitant radiosensitizing chemotherapy may allow conservation of the bladder in patients with infiltrating vesical tumors classically treated by cystectomy. It has beneficial effects on some of the most incapacitating complications of these cancers: its hemostatic effect is valuable in patients with vaginal bleeding or hematuria and it relieves the pain due to bone metastases, which are particularly common in prostatic cancer. Furthermore, use of high energy accelerators, development of better imaging techniques, and advances in dosimetry have substantially reduced the rate of delayed radiation-induced complications. Thus, external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy are important tools for the treatment of gynecologic and urologic tumors. A discussion is provided of the role of radiation therapy in the four most common types of gynecologic and urologic cancer: cancers of the prostate, bladder, uterine cervix, and uterine corpus. (authors). 52 refs., 2 tabs

  14. High-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy for local advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.B.; Mychalczak, B.; Enker, W.; Anderson, L.; Cohen, A.E.; Minsky, B.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to improve the local control for advanced and recurrent cancers of the rectum, we have integrated high-dose rate intra-operative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) into the treatment program. Between 11/92 and 10/95, 47 patients (pts) were treated. There were 26 males and 21 females whose ages ranged from 30-80 (median = 62) years. There were 19 pts with primary unresectable rectal cancer, and 28 pts who were treated for recurrent rectal cancer. Histology was adenocarcinoma - 45 pts, squamous cancer - 2 pts. The range of follow-up is 1-34 months (median = 14 months). The majority of primary unresectable pts received pre-operative radiation therapy (4500-5040 cGy) with chemotherapy (5-FU with Leucovorin) 4-6 weeks later, they underwent resection + HDR-IORT (1200 cGy). For the 28 pts with recurrent cancer, the majority received surgery and HDR-IORT alone because they had received prior RT. For the pts with primary unresectable disease, actuarial 2-year local control was 77%, actuarial distant metastasis-free survival was 71%, disease free survival was 66%, and overall survival was 84%. For those pts with recurrent disease, actuarial 2-year local control rate was 65%, distant metastasis-free survival was 65%, disease free survival was 47%, and overall survival was 61%. Complications occurred in 36%. There were no cases where the anatomical distribution of disease, or technical limitations prevented the adequate delivery of HDR-IORT. We conclude that this technique was most versatile, and enabled all appropriate pts to receive IORT. The preliminary data in terms of local control are encouraging, even for the poor prognostic sub-group of pts with recurrent cancer

  15. Dietary flaxseed administered post thoracic radiation treatment improves survival and mitigates radiation-induced pneumonopathy in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Cengel, Keith A; Tyagi, Sonia; Tan, Kay-See; Hagan, Sarah; Pietrofesa, Ralph; Dukes, Floyd; Arguiri, Evguenia; Heitjan, Daniel F; Solomides, Charalambos C

    2011-01-01

    Flaxseed (FS) is a dietary supplement known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Radiation exposure of lung tissues occurs either when given therapeutically to treat intrathoracic malignancies or incidentally, such as in the case of exposure from inhaled radioisotopes released after the detonation of a radiological dispersion devise (RDD). Such exposure is associated with pulmonary inflammation, oxidative tissue damage and irreversible lung fibrosis. We previously reported that dietary FS prevents pneumonopathy in a rodent model of thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT). However, flaxseed's therapeutic usefulness in mitigating radiation effects post-exposure has never been evaluated. We evaluated the effects of a 10%FS or isocaloric control diet given to mice (C57/BL6) in 2 separate experiments (n = 15-25 mice/group) on 0, 2, 4, 6 weeks post a single dose 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT and compared it to an established radiation-protective diet given preventively, starting at 3 weeks prior to XRT. Lungs were evaluated four months post-XRT for blood oxygenation levels, inflammation and fibrosis. Irradiated mice fed a 0%FS diet had a 4-month survival rate of 40% as compared to 70-88% survival in irradiated FS-fed mouse groups. Additionally, all irradiated FS-fed mice had decreased fibrosis compared to those fed 0%FS. Lung OH-Proline content ranged from 96.5 ± 7.1 to 110.2 ± 7.7 μg/ml (Mean ± SEM) in all irradiated FS-fed mouse groups, as compared to 138 ± 10.8 μg/ml for mice on 0%FS. Concomitantly, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and weight loss associated with radiation cachexia was significantly decreased in all FS-fed groups. Inflammatory cell influx to lungs also decreased significantly except when FS diet was delayed by 4 and 6 weeks post XRT. All FS-fed mice (irradiated or not), maintained a higher blood oxygenation level as compared to mice on 0%FS. Similarly, multiplex cytokine analysis in the BAL fluid revealed a significant decrease

  16. Dietary flaxseed administered post thoracic radiation treatment improves survival and mitigates radiation-induced pneumonopathy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arguiri Evguenia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flaxseed (FS is a dietary supplement known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Radiation exposure of lung tissues occurs either when given therapeutically to treat intrathoracic malignancies or incidentally, such as in the case of exposure from inhaled radioisotopes released after the detonation of a radiological dispersion devise (RDD. Such exposure is associated with pulmonary inflammation, oxidative tissue damage and irreversible lung fibrosis. We previously reported that dietary FS prevents pneumonopathy in a rodent model of thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT. However, flaxseed's therapeutic usefulness in mitigating radiation effects post-exposure has never been evaluated. Methods We evaluated the effects of a 10%FS or isocaloric control diet given to mice (C57/BL6 in 2 separate experiments (n = 15-25 mice/group on 0, 2, 4, 6 weeks post a single dose 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT and compared it to an established radiation-protective diet given preventively, starting at 3 weeks prior to XRT. Lungs were evaluated four months post-XRT for blood oxygenation levels, inflammation and fibrosis. Results Irradiated mice fed a 0%FS diet had a 4-month survival rate of 40% as compared to 70-88% survival in irradiated FS-fed mouse groups. Additionally, all irradiated FS-fed mice had decreased fibrosis compared to those fed 0%FS. Lung OH-Proline content ranged from 96.5 ± 7.1 to 110.2 ± 7.7 μg/ml (Mean ± SEM in all irradiated FS-fed mouse groups, as compared to 138 ± 10.8 μg/ml for mice on 0%FS. Concomitantly, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL protein and weight loss associated with radiation cachexia was significantly decreased in all FS-fed groups. Inflammatory cell influx to lungs also decreased significantly except when FS diet was delayed by 4 and 6 weeks post XRT. All FS-fed mice (irradiated or not, maintained a higher blood oxygenation level as compared to mice on 0%FS. Similarly, multiplex cytokine analysis in the

  17. Dietary flaxseed administered post thoracic radiation treatment improves survival and mitigates radiation-induced pneumonopathy in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo [Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Allergy and Critical Care Division, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Cengel, Keith A [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Tyagi, Sonia [Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Allergy and Critical Care Division, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Tan, Kay-See [Biostatistics & Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hagan, Sarah [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pietrofesa, Ralph; Dukes, Floyd; Arguiri, Evguenia [Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Allergy and Critical Care Division, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Heitjan, Daniel F [Biostatistics & Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Solomides, Charalambos C [Department of Pathology, Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-06-24

    Flaxseed (FS) is a dietary supplement known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Radiation exposure of lung tissues occurs either when given therapeutically to treat intrathoracic malignancies or incidentally, such as in the case of exposure from inhaled radioisotopes released after the detonation of a radiological dispersion devise (RDD). Such exposure is associated with pulmonary inflammation, oxidative tissue damage and irreversible lung fibrosis. We previously reported that dietary FS prevents pneumonopathy in a rodent model of thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT). However, flaxseed's therapeutic usefulness in mitigating radiation effects post-exposure has never been evaluated. We evaluated the effects of a 10%FS or isocaloric control diet given to mice (C57/BL6) in 2 separate experiments (n = 15-25 mice/group) on 0, 2, 4, 6 weeks post a single dose 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT and compared it to an established radiation-protective diet given preventively, starting at 3 weeks prior to XRT. Lungs were evaluated four months post-XRT for blood oxygenation levels, inflammation and fibrosis. Irradiated mice fed a 0%FS diet had a 4-month survival rate of 40% as compared to 70-88% survival in irradiated FS-fed mouse groups. Additionally, all irradiated FS-fed mice had decreased fibrosis compared to those fed 0%FS. Lung OH-Proline content ranged from 96.5 ± 7.1 to 110.2 ± 7.7 μg/ml (Mean ± SEM) in all irradiated FS-fed mouse groups, as compared to 138 ± 10.8 μg/ml for mice on 0%FS. Concomitantly, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and weight loss associated with radiation cachexia was significantly decreased in all FS-fed groups. Inflammatory cell influx to lungs also decreased significantly except when FS diet was delayed by 4 and 6 weeks post XRT. All FS-fed mice (irradiated or not), maintained a higher blood oxygenation level as compared to mice on 0%FS. Similarly, multiplex cytokine analysis in the BAL fluid revealed a significant decrease of

  18. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  19. New developments in the treatment of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemaker, G.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation accidents associated with the use of nuclear power, radiation devices and industrial applications have resulted in a number of individuals with significant partial or total body exposures, in a limited number with lethal outcome. Such exposures generally result in life-threatening suppression of bone marrow and immune functions and may be accompanied by high doses to the skin and underlying tissues. In recent years, new methods of diagnosis and treatment of such patients have entered development, while experience with relatively large-scale accidents, such as the Chernobyl cases, have clearly demonstrated the limitations of previous approaches. In particular bone marrow transplantation has met with limited success, mostly due to the inhomogeneous nature of accidental exposures as well as the frequent occurrence of other injuries other man bone marrow damage. Present day technology allows for direct estimates of the number of residual bone marrow stem cells to enable a rapid decision on the type of treatment indicated, while some twenty-five recombinant hemopoietic growth factors are under investigation to accelerate the recovery of white blood cells and platelets, as well as immune functions. If applied appropriately, such growth factor treatment will successfully replace bone marrow transplantation in the majority of accident cases. Advances in hemopoietic stem cell biology, both in terms of source of stem cells as well as their isolation, will on the other hand make stem cell infusion a much less risky operation than bone marrow transplantation has been in the past

  20. The management of radiation treatment error through incident learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Brenda G.; Brown, Robert J.; Ploquin, Jodi L.; Kind, Anneke L.; Grimard, Laval

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess efficacy of an incident learning system in the management of error in radiation treatment. Materials and methods: We report an incident learning system implementation customized for radiation therapy where any 'unwanted or unexpected change from normal system behaviour that causes or has the potential to cause an adverse effect to persons or equipment' is reported, investigated and learned from. This system thus captures near-miss (potential) and actual events. Incidents are categorized according to severity, type and origin. Results: Our analysis spans a period of 3 years with an average accrual of 11.6 incidents per week. We found a significant reduction in actual incidents of 28% and 47% in the second and third year when compared to the first year (p < 0.001), which we attribute to the many interventions prompted by the analysis of incidents reported. We also saw a similar significant reduction in incidents generated at the treatment unit correlating with the introduction of direct treatment parameter transfer and electronic imaging (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Implementation of an incident learning system has helped us to establish a just environment where all staff members report deviations from normal system behaviour and thus generate evidence to initiate safety improvements.

  1. Interfractional Uncertainty in the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer With Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayachandran, Priya; Minn, A. Yuriko; Van Dam, Jacques; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the interfractional variation in pancreatic tumor position using bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Five consecutively treated patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who received definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Stanford University (Stanford, CA) underwent fiducial seed placement and treatment on the Varian Trilogy system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) with respiratory gating. Daily orthogonal kilovoltage imaging was performed to verify patient positioning, and isocenter shifts were made initially to match bony anatomy. Next, a final shift to the fiducial seeds was made under fluoroscopic guidance to confirm the location of the pancreatic tumor during the respiratory gated phase. All shifts were measured along three axes, left (+)-right (-), anterior (-)-posterior (+), and superior (+)-inferior (-), and the overall interfractional tumor movement was calculated based on these values. Results: A total of 140 fractions were analyzed. The mean absolute shift to fiducial markers after shifting to bony anatomy was 1.6 mm (95th percentile, 7 mm; range, 0-9 mm), 1.8 mm (95th percentile, 7 mm; range, 0-13 mm), and 4.1 mm (95th percentile, 12 mm; range, 0-19 mm) in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. The mean interfractional vector shift distance was 5.5 mm (95th percentile, 14.5 mm; range, 0-19.3 mm). In 28 of 140 fractions (20%) no fiducial shift was required after alignment to bony anatomy. Conclusions: There is substantial residual uncertainty after alignment to bony anatomy when radiating pancreatic tumors using respiratory gating. Bony anatomy matched tumor position in only 20% of the radiation treatments. If bony alignment is used in conjunction with respiratory gating without implanted fiducials, treatment margins need to account for this uncertainty.

  2. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  3. Recovery and permanent radiation damage of plastic scintillators at different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicken, B.; Holm, U.; Marckmann, T.; Wick, K.; Rhode, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the radiation stability of plastic scintillators and wavelength shifters for the calorimeter of the ZEUS detector by irradiating them with protons, a 60 Co-source, and depleted uranium. Changes in light yield, absorption length and absorption coefficient have been measured for storage in inert and oxygen atmospheres during and after irradiation. Radiation doses up to 40 kGy with dose rates of 30 up to 2000 Gy/h have been applied. The polystyrene based scintillator SCSN-38 and the wavelength shifters Y-7 and K-27 in PMMA show an additional absorption but a recovery in air to a low permanent damage (at 10 kGy) which is proportional to the applied dose. Series investigations on samples of all production cycles of the ZEUS scintillators with high dose rates show only minor differences in radiation hardness. The recovery is described by a simple oxygen diffusion model for high and medium dose rates down to 30 Gy/h. During long term irradiations at low dose rates (<100 Gy/h) of 3 mm thick SCSN-38 in air the radiation damage recovers to a permanent damage which does not depend on the dose rate. On the other hand the radiation damage at very low dose rates (17 Gy/a) seems to be higher than expected for the accumulated dose

  4. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation

  5. Radiation retinopathy following treatment of posterior nasal space carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.M.; Migdal, C.S.; Whittle, R.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Posterior nasal space carcinoma has a high mortality and most patents are treated with radiotherapy. Radiation retinopathy was encountered in 7 out of 10 survivors included in this study. Five of the affected patients lost vision as a result of the retinopathy. One patient required laser photocoagulation and responded well to this treatment. There was a variation in the severity of the retinopathy among the patients studied despite the fact that all patients received a similar dose of radiotherapy. We suspect that previously unrecognised factors in the planning of radiotherapy fields may explain this difference. (author)

  6. Radiation recall dermatitis after docetaxel chemotherapy. Treatment by antioxidant ointment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Freund, Ulrich; Momm, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an acute skin toxicity caused by different anticancer or antibiotic drugs within a former completely healed irradiation field. Predictive factors for RRD are not known and its mechanisms are not completely understood. A case of RRD induced by docetaxel and successfully treated by an antioxidant ointment (Mapisal registered ) is presented here. Such an ointment might be useful not only in RRD therapy, but also in the treatment of high-grade dermatitis induced by radiotherapy and thus may contribute to the improvement of patients' quality of life and to the scheduled completion of cancer therapies. (orig.) [de

  7. Treatment philosophy and retreatment rates following piezoelectric lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, J; Camp, L A; Wilson, W T; Miller, G L; Preminger, G M

    1993-01-01

    Second generation lithotriptors offer the advantage of anesthesia-free fragmentation of renal and ureteral calculi but they frequently require multiple treatments to attain a stone-free status. However, excessive single lithotripsy sessions or multiple treatments may be associated with significant damage to the kidney. For some clinicians a common treatment philosophy involves evaluation of serial plain abdominal films every 24 hours after lithotripsy and immediate retreatment of all patients with incomplete fragmentation. To avoid unnecessary retreatments and, thus, minimize potential renal damage, we prospectively evaluated 100 patients undergoing lithotripsy on a Wolf Piezolith 2300 device. Patients were routinely treated with 4,000 shocks at 1,100 bar. Serial plain abdominal films were obtained at 1 day and 2 weeks after lithotripsy. The need for retreatment was determined by the plain abdominal film results. Additional therapy was considered necessary if there was no stone fragmentation or if residual fragments measured greater than 4 mm. Of the patients whose plain abdominal film at 24 hours indicated the need for a repeat treatment 43% were stone-free on the 2-week film. Thus, these patients were spared an unnecessary treatment by allowing adequate time for the stone fragments to pass spontaneously. Our data suggest that repeat treatments on second generation lithotriptors should not be performed within 24 hours. Rather, the patient should be reevaluated at least 1 to 2 weeks later to avoid unnecessary retreatment with the attendant potential for renal injury. In addition, when comparing the retreatment rates of various lithotriptors, one should also consider the treatment philosophy used at the particular institution and the timing of the radiographic studies used to determine the stone-free status.

  8. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter cell cycle progression but not radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells treated with low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Hedrick, Lora; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate radiation therapy has been widely used in the treatment of urogenital malignancies. When continuously exposed to low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, target cancer cells typically exhibit abnormalities in replicative cell-cycle progression. Cancer cells that arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle when irradiated may become exquisitely sensitive to killing by further low-dose-rate radiation treatment. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which play a major role in the pathogenesis of uterine cervix cancers and other urogenital cancers, encode E6 and E7 transforming proteins known to abrogate a p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by conventional acute-dose radiation exposure. This study examined whether expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins by cancer cells alters the cell-cycle redistribution patterns accompanying low-dose-rate radiation treatment, and whether such alterations in cell-cycle redistribution affect cancer cell killing. Methods and Materials: RKO carcinoma cells, which contain wild-type P53 alleles, and RKO cell sublines genetically engineered to express HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, were treated with low-dose-rate (0.25-Gy/h) radiation and then assessed for p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 polypeptide induction by immunoblot analysis, for cell-cycle redistribution by flow cytometry, and for cytotoxicity by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Low-dose-rate radiation of RKO carcinoma cells triggered p53 polypeptide elevations, p21WAF1/CIP1 induction, and arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, RKO cells expressing E6 and E7 transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs (HPV 16) arrested in G2, but failed to arrest in G1, when treated with low-dose-rate ionizing radiation. Abrogation of the G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by low-dose-rate radiation exposure appeared to be a characteristic feature of transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs: RKO cells expressing E6 from a low

  9. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  10. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D.; Jones, J.; Gonda, S.; Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G.; Kirchin, V.; Rachael, C.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  11. Results of radiation therapy for uterine cervical cancer using high dose rate remote after loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, radiotherapy with high dose rate remote after loading system (HDR-RALS) for intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard treatment for more than 30 years. This report showed the usefulness of HDR-RALS for uterine cervical cancer. From 1980 through 1999, 442 patients with uterine cervical cancers (stage I: 66, stage II: 161, stage III: 165, stage IV: 50) were treated. Radiotherapy was performed both external teletherapy and HDR-RALS. Overall survival rate at 5 years was 60.2%. The 5-year actuarial incidence of all complications was 16.4%. The 5-year actuarial incidence of all complications in cases treated with the sum doses of whole pelvic irradiation (without central shield) and RALS up to 49 Gy, 50 to 59 Gy or larger doses were 7.5%, 11.0% and 25.2%, respectively. Radiation therapy using HDR-RALS was very effective. While the dose of whole pelvic irradiation was increased, the actuarial incidence of all complications was increased. (author)

  12. A computer aided treatment event recognition system in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Junyi; Mart, Christopher; Bayouth, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated system to safeguard radiation therapy treatments by analyzing electronic treatment records and reporting treatment events. Methods: CATERS (Computer Aided Treatment Event Recognition System) was developed to detect treatment events by retrieving and analyzing electronic treatment records. CATERS is designed to make the treatment monitoring process more efficient by automating the search of the electronic record for possible deviations from physician's intention, such as logical inconsistencies as well as aberrant treatment parameters (e.g., beam energy, dose, table position, prescription change, treatment overrides, etc). Over a 5 month period (July 2012–November 2012), physicists were assisted by the CATERS software in conducting normal weekly chart checks with the aims of (a) determining the relative frequency of particular events in the authors’ clinic and (b) incorporating these checks into the CATERS. During this study period, 491 patients were treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for a total of 7692 fractions. Results: All treatment records from the 5 month analysis period were evaluated using all the checks incorporated into CATERS after the training period. About 553 events were detected as being exceptions, although none of them had significant dosimetric impact on patient treatments. These events included every known event type that was discovered during the trial period. A frequency analysis of the events showed that the top three types of detected events were couch position override (3.2%), extra cone beam imaging (1.85%), and significant couch position deviation (1.31%). The significant couch deviation is defined as the number of treatments where couch vertical exceeded two times standard deviation of all couch verticals, or couch lateral/longitudinal exceeded three times standard deviation of all couch laterals and longitudinals. On average, the application takes about 1 s per patient when

  13. A computer aided treatment event recognition system in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Junyi, E-mail: junyi-xia@uiowa.edu; Mart, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Bayouth, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, K4/B55, Madison, Wisconsin 53792-0600 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated system to safeguard radiation therapy treatments by analyzing electronic treatment records and reporting treatment events. Methods: CATERS (Computer Aided Treatment Event Recognition System) was developed to detect treatment events by retrieving and analyzing electronic treatment records. CATERS is designed to make the treatment monitoring process more efficient by automating the search of the electronic record for possible deviations from physician's intention, such as logical inconsistencies as well as aberrant treatment parameters (e.g., beam energy, dose, table position, prescription change, treatment overrides, etc). Over a 5 month period (July 2012–November 2012), physicists were assisted by the CATERS software in conducting normal weekly chart checks with the aims of (a) determining the relative frequency of particular events in the authors’ clinic and (b) incorporating these checks into the CATERS. During this study period, 491 patients were treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for a total of 7692 fractions. Results: All treatment records from the 5 month analysis period were evaluated using all the checks incorporated into CATERS after the training period. About 553 events were detected as being exceptions, although none of them had significant dosimetric impact on patient treatments. These events included every known event type that was discovered during the trial period. A frequency analysis of the events showed that the top three types of detected events were couch position override (3.2%), extra cone beam imaging (1.85%), and significant couch position deviation (1.31%). The significant couch deviation is defined as the number of treatments where couch vertical exceeded two times standard deviation of all couch verticals, or couch lateral/longitudinal exceeded three times standard deviation of all couch laterals and longitudinals. On average, the application takes about 1 s per patient when

  14. Possibility of radiation application to sludge treatment in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehisa, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1980-01-01

    Interest in the effective use of sludge, which is generated increasingly with the propagation of sewage, is being enhanced in Japan. On the other hand, attention is given to the return of sludge to soil in agriculture for the purpose of putting organic material into agricultural land. For this purpose, of course, heavy metals and toxic chemicals must not be contained in sludge, but further inactivation of the pathogens, parasite ova and seeds in sludge is considered to be required. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute investigated the radiation disinfection of dehydrated cake forming 80% of the sludge taken out of treatment plants in Japan. As a result of the examination of the change in the number of bacteria by ..gamma.. irradiation, 0.5 Mrad was decided to be the suitable dose for sanitating sludge regardless of season, at which dose the coliform group decreased greatly. It seems that sludges are required to be composted in Japan. Radiation disinfection has the advantage of composting under the optimum temperature condition for fermentation, because it does not require high temperature during fermentation aiming at the sterilization of pathogens. However, it is desirable to use large output accelerators combining with the radiation process for the purpose of reusing treated water in order to reduce the process cost.

  15. Utility of an Australasian registry for children undergoing radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Verity

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of an Australasian registry ('the Registry') for children undergoing radiation treatment (RT). Children under the age of 16years who received a course of radiation between January 1997 and December 2010 and were enrolled on the Registry form the subjects of this study. A total of 2232 courses of RT were delivered, predominantly with radical intent (87%). Registrations fluctuated over time, but around one-half of children diagnosed with cancer undergo a course of RT. The most prevalent age range at time of RT was 10–15years, and the most common diagnoses were central nervous system tumours (34%) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (20%). The Registry provides a reflection of the patterns of care of children undergoing RT in Australia and a mechanism for determining the resources necessary to manage children by RT (human, facilities and emerging technologies, such as proton therapy). It lacks the detail to provide information on radiotherapy quality and disease outcomes which should be the subject of separate audit studies. The utility of the Registry has been hampered by its voluntary nature and varying needs for consent. Completion of registry forms is a logical requirement for inclusion in the definition of a subspecialist in paediatric radiation oncology.

  16. Possibility of radiation application to sludge treatment in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takehisa, Masaaki

    1980-01-01

    Interest in the effective use of sludge, which is generated increasingly with the propagation of sewerage, is being enhanced in Japan. On the other hand, attention is given to the return of sludge to soil in agriculture for the purpose of putting organic material into agricultural land. For this purpose, of course heavy metals and toxic chemicals must not be contained in sludge, but further inactivation of the pathogens, parasite ova and seeds in sludge is considered to be required. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute investigated the radiation disinfection of dehydrated cake forming 80% of the sludge taken out of treatment plants in Japan. As a result of the examination of the change in the number of bacteria by γ irradiation, 0.5 Mrad was decided to be the suitable dose for sanitating sludge regardless of season, at which coliform group decreased greatly. It seems that sludges are required to be composted in Japan. Radiation disinfection has the advantage of composting under the optimum temperature condition for fermentation, because it is not required to keep high temperature during fermentation aiming at the sterilization of pathogens. However, it is desirable to use large output accelerators combining with the radiation process for the purpose of reusing treated water in order to reduce the process cost. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Bone marrow transplantation and other treatment after radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balner, H.

    1977-01-01

    This review deals mainly with current concepts about bone marrow transplantation as therapy for serious radiation injury. Such injury can be classified according to the following broadly defined dose ranges: (1) the supralethal range, leading mainly to the cerebral and intestinal syndromes; (2) the potentially lethal or therapeutic range which causes the bone marrow syndrome, and (3) the sublethal range which rarely leads to injury requiring therapy. The bone marrow syndrome of man and animals is discussed in detail. The optimal therapy for this syndrome is bone marrow transplantation in conjunction with conventional supportive treatment. The principal complications of such therapy are Graft versus Host Disease and a slow recovery of the recipient's immune system. Concerted research activities in a number of institutions have led to considerable progress in the field of bone marrow transplantation. Improved donor selection, new techniques for stem-cell separation and preservation, as well as effective barrier-nursing and antibiotic decontamination, have made bone marrow transplantation an accepted therapy for marrow depression, including the aplasia caused by excessive exposure to radiation. The review also contains a number of guidelines for the handling of serious radiation accidents. (Auth.)

  18. SOS switch system (SSS) in the radiation treatment room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Takafumi; Motoyama, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Koji; Onishi, Hiroshi; Araya, Masayuki; Sano, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    We applied patient's self-breath hold irradiation system to a device to declare the patient's intentions (SOS switch system: SSS) in the radiation room and examined a utility for problem recognition and improvement of risk management during radiation therapy by induction of SSS. Between May 2005 and October 2006, we used SSS with 65 patients. The study involved 32 men and 33 women with a median age of 65 (range, 26-88) years. The reason for using SSS was as a shell in 57, a history of laryngectomy in 2, a cough in 6, convulsions in 1, and anxiety in 3. The treatment with SSS was performed 1,120 times. The hand switch was pushed 11 times. The reasons the switch was pushed were for nausea, aspiration, pain, and cough one time each. For the others, the reasons were unclear, and it was thought due to the clouding of consciousness from brain metastases. No problems were observed with the use of SSS. SSS was a useful device for improvement of risk management during the radiation therapy. (author)

  19. TEN-YEAR RECURRENCE RATES IN YOUNG WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER BY LOCOREGIONAL TREATMENT APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach. PMID:18707822

  20. Ten-Year Recurrence Rates in Young Women With Breast Cancer by Locoregional Treatment Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials: Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results: Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach

  1. A method for radiobiological investigations in radiation fields with different LET and high dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundler, W.

    1976-01-01

    For investigations: 1. Performed in the field of radiobiology with different LET-radiation and a relatively high background dose rate of one component (e.g. investigations with fast and intermediate reactor neutrons) 2. Concerning radiation risk studies within a wide range 3. Of irradiations, covering a long time period (up to 100 days) a test system is necessary which on the one hand makes it possible to analyze the influence of different LET radiation and secondly shows a relative radiation resistant behaviour and allows a simple cell cycle regulation. A survey is given upon the installed device of a simple cell observation method, the biological test system used and the analysis of effects caused by dose, repair and LET. It is possible to analyze the behaviour of the nonsurvival cells and to demonstrate different reactions of the test parameters to the radiation of different LET. (author)

  2. Classification system for acute and chronic radiation treatment sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmiedt, M.H.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    A classification system in German language is proposed for scoring of acute and chronic treatment sequelae after radiotherapy. It includes all important organs and organ systems. The proposed grading corresponds to the four-scale-system of the WHO and UICC. The system is also compatible to the RTOG and EORTC acute and late radiation morbidity scoring criteria. This facilitates the data transfer for retrospective and prospective analysis of monomodal and multimodal radiotherapy treatment regimes. We recommend to use this scoring system in all German speaking countries for multicentric prospective studies. It is possible, that organ-specific sophistications of the toxicity grading will be developed in the future. These additions should conform with (inter)national standards and apply the same four-scale grading of this classification system. (orig.) [de

  3. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  4. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  5. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Clinical evaluation of the partition model for estimating radiation doses from yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of hepatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.; Lau, W.Y.; Leung, T.W.T.; Chan, M.; Johnson, P.J.; Li, A.K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation doses to the tumour and non-tumorous liver compartments from yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of hepatic cancer, as estimated by a partition model, have been verified by correlation with the actual doses measured with a beta probe at open surgery. The validity of the doses to the lungs, the tumour and non-tumours liver compartment as estimated by the partition model was further evaluated in clinical settings. On the basis of the observation that one of three patients who received more than 30 Gy from a single treatment and one of two patients who received more than 50 Gy from multiple treatments developed radiation pneumonitis, it was deduced that an estimated lung dose 30 Gy as estimated by the partition model and were predicted to develop radiation pneumonitis, did so despite the use of partial hepatic embolization to reduce the degree of lung shunting. Furthermore, a higher radiological response rate and prolonged survival were found in the group of patients who received higher tumour doses, as estimated by the partition model, than in the group with lower estimated tumour doses. Thus the radiation doses estimated by the partition model can be used to predict (a) complication rate, (b) response rate and (c) duration of survival in the same manner as the actual radiation doses measured with a beta probe at open surgery. The partition model has made selective internal radiation therapy using 90 Y microspheres safe and repeatable without laparotomy. (orig.)

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation-induced burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portas, Mercedes; Pomerane, Armando; Genovese, Jorge; Perez, Maria R.; Gisone, Pablo

    2002-01-01

    The utilization of radioactive sources in medicine, industry and research is associated with a probability of accidental overexposures to ionizing radiation, among which localized irradiation are the most frequent events. Moreover, between 5 and 8 % of the patients undergoing therapeutical irradiations could exhibit a higher individual radiosensitivity which could account for severe skin reactions. Localized overexposures may damage not only epidermis and dermis but also deeper connective tissue, vessels, muscles and even bones. Within the framework of a cooperation agreement between the Buenos Aires Burn Hospital and the National Board of Nuclear Regulation, a Radio pathology Committee has been established in 1997 with the purpose of carrying out a collaborative project concerning diagnosis and treatment of radiological burns. The present document particularly considers radiological burns form the point of view of their physiopathology, physical and biological dosimetry, diagnosis prognosis and treatment. It also includes basic concepts of radiation biology and radio pathology. It could be an useful tool for training medical practitioners and also a practical guidance for organizing medical response in accidental overexposures. (author)

  8. Decontamination of waste radioactive polluted solutions in radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simova, G.; Boyadzhiev, A.; Mikhajlov, M.G.; Shopov, N.

    1979-01-01

    The decontamination capacity of solutions of the trivial cleaning Bulgarian preparations ''Mipro'', ''Sana'', ''Synthek'' and ''Univer'' for different surfaces (steel, glass, PVC and linoleum) contaminated with cesium-134, strontium-85 or cerium-144 chlorides, was studied. Concentrations from 5 to 15 g/l of the solutions used in this study displayed a degree of cleaning over 90%. Higher concentration of the solution does not improve its cleaning capacity. For evaluation of foam formation by the solutions, the so called ''foam column stability coefficient'' has been adopted. This coefficient represents the ratio between the height of the foam column and the time of its half life, referred to the time for the foam column formation when blown through with a constant air current. On the basis of this index, solutions of the preparation ''Mipro'' proved to be the best ones for decontamination - in the whole investigated concentration span, the foam column stability coefficient for the solutions of this preparation is with two orders lower than the respective coefficient of the other preparations. It was experimentally established that radiation treatment of radio-contaminated solutions reduces the foam column stability coefficient. Radiation treatment should be carried out in a gamma field, realizing at least one megarad within an acceptable for the liquid wastes time period. (A.B.)

  9. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E(max) values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high...... sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value...

  10. Influence of Parotid from Various Dose Rate in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Joo Wan; Jeong, Yun Ju; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Choi, Ji Hun; Seok, Jin Yong

    2010-01-01

    There are various beam parameter in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to investigate how various dose rate affect the parotid in treatment plan of IMRT. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who have undergone IMRT. CT images were scanned 3 mm of thickness in the same condition and the treatment plan was performed by Eclipse (Ver.7.1, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The parameters for planning used 6 MV energy and 8 beams under the same dose volume constraint. The variation of dose rates were used 300, 400, 500 MU/min. The mean dose of both parotid was accessed from the calculated planning among the 10 patients. The mean dose of parotid was verificated by 2D diode array (Mapcheck from Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, Florida). Also, Total monitor unit (MU) and beam-on time was analysed. Results: According to the dose rate, the mean dose of parotid was increased by 0.8%, 2.0% each, when dose rate was changed from 300 MU/min to 400, 500 MU/min, moreover Total MU was increased by 5.4% and 10.6% each. There was also a dose upward trend in the dose measurement of parotid by 2D diode array. However, beam - on time difference of 1-2 minutes was no significant in the dose rate increases. From this study, when the dose rates increase, there was a significant increase of Total MU and the parotid dose accordingly, however the shortened treatment time was not significant. Hence, it is considered that there is a significant decrease of late side effect in parotid radiation therapy, if the precise dose rate in IMRT is used.

  11. Image registration: An essential part of radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenman, Julian G.; Miller, Elizabeth P.; Tracton, Gregg; Cullip, Tim J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We believe that a three-dimensional (3D) registration of nonplanning (diagnostic) imaging data with the planning computed tomography (CT) offers a substantial improvement in tumor target identification for many radiation therapy patients. The purpose of this article is to review and discuss our experience to date. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts and treatment planning records of all patients that underwent 3D radiation treatment planning in our department from June 1994 to December 1995, to learn which patients had image registration performed and why it was thought they would benefit from this approach. We also measured how much error would have been introduced into the target definition if the nonplanning imaging data had not been available and only the planning CT had been used. Results: Between June 1994 and December 1995, 106 of 246 (43%) of patients undergoing 3D treatment planning had image registration. Four reasons for performing registration were identified. First, some tumor volumes have better definition on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) than on CT. Second, a properly contrasted diagnostic CT sometimes can show the tumor target better than can the planning CT. Third, the diagnostic CT or MR may have been preoperative, with the postoperative planning CT no longer showing the tumor. Fourth, the patient may have undergone cytoreductive chemotherapy so that the postchemotherapy planning CT no longer showed the original tumor volume. In patients in whom the planning CT did not show the tumor volume well an analysis was done to determine how the treatment plan was changed with the addition of a better tumor-defining nonplanning CT or MR. We have found that the use of this additional imaging modality changed the tumor location in the treatment plan at least 1.5 cm for half of the patients, and up to 3.0 cm for ((1)/(4)) of the patients. Conclusions: Multimodality and/or sequential imaging can substantially aid in better tumor

  12. Estimating the effect of treatment rate changes when treatment benefits are heterogeneous: antibiotics and otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Ryong; Brooks, John M; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Bergus, George

    2008-01-01

    Contrast methods to assess the health effects of a treatment rate change when treatment benefits are heterogeneous across patients. Antibiotic prescribing for children with otitis media (OM) in Iowa Medicaid is the empirical example. Instrumental variable (IV) and linear probability model (LPM) are used to estimate the effect of antibiotic treatments on cure probabilities for children with OM in Iowa Medicaid. Local area physician supply per capita is the instrument in the IV models. Estimates are contrasted in terms of their ability to make inferences for patients whose treatment choices may be affected by a change in population treatment rates. The instrument was positively related to the probability of being prescribed an antibiotic. LPM estimates showed a positive effect of antibiotics on OM patient cure probability while IV estimates showed no relationship between antibiotics and patient cure probability. Linear probability model estimation yields the average effects of the treatment on patients that were treated. IV estimation yields the average effects for patients whose treatment choices were affected by the instrument. As antibiotic treatment effects are heterogeneous across OM patients, our estimates from these approaches are aligned with clinical evidence and theory. The average estimate for treated patients (higher severity) from the LPM model is greater than estimates for patients whose treatment choices are affected by the instrument (lower severity) from the IV models. Based on our IV estimates it appears that lowering antibiotic use in OM patients in Iowa Medicaid did not result in lost cures.

  13. Current state of methodological and decisions for radiation treatment of blood, its components and products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordeev A.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents currently used blood transfusion media — components and blood products, therapeutic effects, reactions and complications of blood transfusion, use of radiation treatment for blood transfusion fluids. There had been discussed in detail the practice of radiation processing of blood components and for the prevention of reaction "graft versus host" and studies of plasma radiation treatment for its infectious safety. There was presented the current state of techniques and technical solutions of radiation treatment of transfusion-transmissible environments. There were also considered an alternative to radiation treatment of blood.

  14. Dichromatic and monochromatic laser radiation effects on antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and division rate of Pantoea agglomerans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, A. M. C.; Souza, B. P.; Mendes, J. P. M.; Cardoso, A. F. R.; Soares, L. C.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2018-06-01

    Since infection is a common cause of delayed wound healing, it is important to understand the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in bacterial mechanisms. In this study we evaluated the effects of LLLT on antibiotic resistance, division rate, and biofilm formation of Pantoea agglomerans. P. agglomerans samples were isolated from human pressure injuries in humans and cultures were exposed to low-level monochromatic and simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation to study the susceptibility of an antimicrobial to ampicillin and piperacillin  +  tazobactam, quantification of areas of bacterial colonies, and biofilm formation of bacterial cells. Fluence, wavelength, and emission mode were used in the therapeutic protocols for wound healing. The data showed no changes in the areas of the colonies, but dichromatic laser radiation decreased biofilm formation, while a monochromatic red laser at low dose increased biofilm formation and infrared at high dose decreased antibiotic resistance to ampicillin. LLLT modulates antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation of P. agglomerans, but these depend on the laser irradiation parameters, since dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation. Thus, simultaneous dichromatic low-level red and infrared lasers could be a new option for the treatment of infected wounds, reducing biofilm formation, without altering antibiotic resistance and the division rate of P. agglomerans cultures.

  15. Combined treatment of ionizing radiation with genistein on cervical cancer HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bei; Liu Jiayin; Han Suping; Pan Jinshun; Yin Xiaoxing; Wang Bing; Hu Gang

    2006-01-01

    The anticancer agent genistein inhibits cell growth of tumor cell lines from various malignancies. In our study, we investigated the effectiveness of combined treatment of ionizing radiation (IR) with genistein on cervical HeLa cells and its possible mechanism. It was found that the inhibitory rate in cells with combined treatment was significantly higher than that of the cells treated with IR or genistein alone. After treatments of IR (4 Gy) combined with genistein (40 μmol/L), the apoptotic index of the cells was significantly increased and the cells were arrested in the G2/M phase. Survivin mRNA expression increased after IR (4 Gy), while it significantly decreased after combined treatment. These findings indicated that genistein enhanced the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer HeLa cells, and the mechanisms for this action might include increase of apoptosis, decrease of survivin expression, and prolongation of cell cycle arrest. (author)

  16. Radiation exposure rate and liquid level measurement inside a high level liquid waste (HLLW) storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, B.; Yue, S.; Thekkevarriam, A.

    2007-01-01

    An instrument based on an inexpensive, small silicon diode has been developed and used to measure, for the first time, the gamma radiation exposure rate profile inside a 6.4 mm diameter reentrant thermo-well tube, immersed in the highly radioactive liquid solution in an HLLW storage tank. The measurement agrees with previous calculations of exposure rate, and provides confirmation for safe and effective radiation work plans and material selection for investigations and remediation of the storage tank facility. The measured radiation exposure rate profile is also used to confirm that the position of tank internal structures have not changed because of aging and corrosion, and to obtain, within a few mm, the level of liquid inside the tank. (author)

  17. Radiation and Reason Why radiation at modest dose rates is quite harmless and current radiation safety regulations are flawed

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Data on the impact of ionising radiation on life are examined in the light of evolutionary biology. This comparison confirms that fear of nuclear radiation is not justified by science itself; rather it originates in a failure of public trust in nuclear science, a relic of the international politics of the Cold War era. Current ionisation safety regulations appease this fear but without scientific support and they need fundamental reformulation. This should change the reaction to accidents like Fukushima, the cost of nuclear energy and the application of nuclear technology to the supply of food and fresh water. Such a boost to the world economy would require that more citizens study and appreciate the science involved – and then tell others -- not as much fun as the Higgs, perhaps, but no less important! www.radiationandreason.com

  18. MINERVA - a multi-modal radiation treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, C.A. E-mail: cew@enel.gov; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Cogliati, J.J.; Milvich, M.L.; Frederickson, C.; Perkins, M.; Harkin, G.J

    2004-11-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Montana State University have undertaken development of MINERVA, a patient-centric, multi-modal, radiation treatment planning system. This system can be used for planning and analyzing several radiotherapy modalities, either singly or combined, using common modality independent image and geometry construction and dose reporting and guiding. It employs an integrated, lightweight plugin architecture to accommodate multi-modal treatment planning using standard interface components. The MINERVA design also facilitates the future integration of improved planning technologies. The code is being developed with the Java Virtual Machine for interoperability. A full computation path has been established for molecular targeted radiotherapy treatment planning, with the associated transport plugin developed by researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Development of the neutron transport plugin module is proceeding rapidly, with completion expected later this year. Future development efforts will include development of deformable registration methods, improved segmentation methods for patient model definition, and three-dimensional visualization of the patient images, geometry, and dose data. Transport and source plugins will be created for additional treatment modalities, including brachytherapy, external beam proton radiotherapy, and the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc codes for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy.

  19. Radiation and combined treatment of Itsenko -Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkanov, A.I.; Morozov, A.I.; Pirogov, A.I.; Postnikov, D.A.; Shadyeva, M.M.; Roshchina, V.S.; Devyatykh, Yu.N.

    1980-01-01

    The authors made observations of 123 patients with the Itsenko - Cushing disease. The mild form of the disease was diagnosed in 27.7 per cent of the patients; moderate in 52 percent, and severe in 20.3 per cent of the patients. A total of 78 patients underwent tele-gamma-therapy in doses of 40-45 Gy, and 45 patients underwent combined treatment consisting in unilateral adrenalectomy and irradiation with the same doses. Protracted remissions with a reverse development of the symptoms of the disease were reached in 69.2 per cent of the patients who had undergone radiation treatment and in 64.4 per cent of the patients who had undergone combined treatment. Radiotherapy was most effective in patients with mild and moderate forms of Itsenko-Cushing's disease, in case of a severe form combined treatment is indicated. Optimal single focal doses are 1.6-1.8 Gy, and cumulative ones 40-45 Gy

  20. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laspas, Fotios; Tsantioti, Dimitra; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John

    2011-04-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR ≤65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure.

  1. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanusi, M.S.M.; Ramli, A.T.; Gabdo, H.T.; Garba, N.N.; Heryanshah, A.; Wagiran, H.; Said, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h −1 to 500 nGy h −1 . The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h −1 . This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h −1 (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. - Highlights: • A methodology is presented to reduce terrestrial gamma dose rate field survey. • Geological background of acid intrusive of granitic type has the highest dose rates. • The mean dose rate is 2 times higher than the world average. • Isodose map of terrestrial gamma radiation for Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was produced

  2. Comparison of the measured radiation dose-rate by the ionization chamber and G (Geiger-Mueller) counter after radioactive lodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radioactive iodine(131I) treatment reduces recurrence and increases survival in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, it is important in terms of radiation safety management to measure the radiation dose rate generated from the patient because the radiation emitted from the patient may cause the exposure. Research methods, it measured radiation dose-rate according to the elapsed time from 1 m from the upper abdomen of the patient by intake of radioactive iodine. Directly comparing the changes over time, high dose rate sensitivity and efficiency is statistically significant, and higher chamber than GM counter(p<0.05). Low dose rate sensitivity and efficiency in the chamber had lower levels than gm counter, but not statistically significant(p>0.05). In this study confirmed the characteristics of calibrated ionization chamber and GM counter according to the radiation intensity during high-dose radioactive iodine therapy by measuring the accurate and rapid radiation dose rate to the patient explains, discharged patients will be reduced to worry about radiation hazard of family and others person.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nyssa F; Xiao, Christopher; Sood, Amit J; Lovelace, Tiffany L; Nguyen, Shaun A; Sharma, Anand; Day, Terry A

    2015-07-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia is one of the most common morbidities of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. However, in spite of its high rate of occurrence, there are few effective therapies available for its management. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen on the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia and xerostomia-related quality of life. PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library were searched for retrospective or prospective trials assessing subjective xerostomia, objective xerostomia, or xerostomia-related quality of life. To be included, patients had to have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, but not hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The systematic review initially identified 293 potential articles. Seven studies, comprising 246 patients, qualified for inclusion. Of the included studies, 6 of 7 were prospective in nature, and 1 was a retrospective study; and 2 of the 7 were controlled studies. HBOT may have utility for treating radiation-induced xerostomia refractory to other therapies. Additionally, HBOT may induce long-term improvement in subjective assessments of xerostomia, whereas other therapies currently available only provide short-term relief. The strength of these conclusions is limited by the lack of randomized controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  5. Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga prefectures, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamia, Kazuyuki; Shimo, Michikuni; Oka, Mitsuaki; Ejiri, Kazutaka; Sugino, Masato; Minato, Susumu; Hosoda, Masahiro; Yamada, Junya; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    We have measured environmental radiation dose rates in several Prefectures, such as Ai chi Prefecture, Gifu Prefecture, and Mie Prefecture, in central Japan. Recently, we measured the environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures that are also located in central Japan with a car-borne survey system. At the time of measurement, Kyoto Prefecture (area: 4,613 km 2 ) had a total of 36 districts, and Shiga Prefecture (area: 3,387 km 2 ) a total of 26. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates and secondary cosmic ray dose rates were measured by a 2 inches ψ x 2 inches NaI(Tl) scintillation counter and a handy-type altimeter (GPS eTrex Legend by Gamin), respectively. The following factors were taken into consideration the shielding effect of the car body, the effect of the road pavement, radon progeny borne by precipitation, and increases in tunnels and near the walls. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were estimated to be 51.7 ± 6.0 n Gy/h (district average: 52.4 ± 4.7 n Gy/h), 52.2 ± 10.5 n Gy/h (district average: 51.9 ± 8.1 n Gy/h), respectively. Secondary cosmic ray dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were 30.0 ± 0.6 n Gy/h (district average: 29.9 ±0.3 n Gy/h), 30.1 ± 0.3 n Gy/h (district average: 30.0 ± 0.2 n Gy/h), respectively. The environmental radiation dose rates due to the sum dose rates of terrestrial gamma ray and secondary cosmic ray in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were 81.7 ± 6.2 n Gy/h (district average: 82.3 ± 4.8 n Gy/h), 82.3 ± 10.6 n Gy/h (district average: 82.0 ± 8.1 n Gy/h), respectively. We confirmed that the environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures mainly depended on the change of the terrestrial gamma ray dose rates, since the secondary cosmic ray dose rates had little change. Therefore, radiation dose-rate maps of the terrestrial gamma rays as well as maps of the environmental radiation dose-rate were drawn. (author)

  6. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congzheng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS CMOS image sensor (CIS with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB. The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  7. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2018-02-08

    In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD) industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CMOS image sensor (CIS) with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR) versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB). The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  8. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Haga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-11-11

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59-95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40-1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p =0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p =0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications.

  9. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for lung stereotactic radiation therapy can achieve high local control rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Haga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the outcome of primary or metastatic lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). From October 2010 to December 2013, consecutive 67 lung cancer patients received single-arc VMAT-SBRT using an Elekta-synergy system. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on 10 respiratory phases computed tomography (CT) datasets from 4-dimensional (4D) CT and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The planning target volume (PTV) margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy (43 cases) or 55 Gy (12 cases) in 4 fractions for peripheral tumor or 56 Gy in 7 fractions (12 cases) for central tumor. Among the 67 patients, the median age was 73 years (range, 59–95 years). Of the patients, male was 72% and female 28%. The median Karnofsky performance status was 90-100% in 39 cases (58%) and 80-90% in 20 cases (30%). The median follow-up was 267 days (range, 40–1162 days). Tissue diagnosis was performed in 41 patients (61%). There were T1 primary lung tumor in 42 patients (T1a in 28 patients, T1b in 14 patients), T2 in 6 patients, three T3 in 3 patients, and metastatic lung tumor in 16 patients. The median mean lung dose was 6.87 Gy (range, 2.5-15 Gy). Six patients (9%) developed radiation pneumonitis required by steroid administration. Actuarial local control rate were 100% and 100% at 1 year, 92% and 75% at 2 years, and 92% and 75% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.59). Overall survival rate was 83% and 84% at 1 year, 76% and 53% at 2 years, and 46% and 20% at 3 years in primary and metastatic lung cancer, respectively (p = 0.12). Use of VMAT-based delivery of SBRT in primary in metastatic lung tumors demonstrates high local control rates and low risk of normal tissue complications

  10. Quantifying public radiation exposure related to lutetium-177 octreotate therapy for the development of a safe outpatient treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Craig; Cruz, Kyle; Stodilka, Robert; Zabel, Pamela; Wolfson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Radionuclide therapies, including treatment of neuroendocrine tumors with lutetium-177 (Lu-177) octreotate, often involve hospital admission to minimize radiation exposure to the public. Overnight admission due to Lu-177 octreotate therapy incurs additional cost for the hospital and is an inconvenience for the patient. This study endeavors to characterize the potential radiation risk to caregivers and the public should Lu-177 octreotate therapies be performed on an outpatient basis. Dose rate measurements of radiation emanating from 10 patients were taken 30 min, 4, and 20 h after initiation of Lu-177 octreotate therapy. Instadose radiation dose measurement monitors were also placed around the patients' rooms to assess the potential cumulative radiation exposure during the initial 30 min-4 h after treatment (simulating the hospital-based component of the outpatient model) as well as 4-20 h after treatment (simulating the discharged outpatient portion). The mean recorded dose rate at 30 min, 4, and 20 h after therapy was 20.4, 14.0, and 6.6 μSv/h, respectively. The majority of the cumulative dose readings were below the minimum recordable threshold of 0.03 mSv, with a maximum dose recorded of 0.18 mSv. Given the low dose rate and cumulative levels of radiation measured, the results support that an outpatient Lu-177 octreotate treatment protocol would not jeopardize public safety. Nevertheless, the concept of ALARA still requires that detailed radiation safety protocols be developed for Lu-177 octreotate outpatients to minimize radiation exposure to family members, caregivers, and the general public.

  11. Analysis of the clinical benefit of 5-fluorouracil and radiation treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Perera, Francisco E.; Kocha, Walter; Tomiak, Anna; Taylor, Marianne; Vincent, Mark; Bauman, Glenn S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the palliative benefit of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy in patients with surgically unresectable localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced surgically unresectable symptomatic pancreatic cancer received 5-FU chemotherapy and local radiation therapy. They were retrospectively reviewed in regard to their clinical benefit response (a composite of measurement of pain assessment, weight, and Karnofsky performance status [KPS]), as well as radiological response, time to progression, and overall survival. Results: Median survival for the 25 patients was 9 months and median progression-free survival was 6 months. Thirty-two percent of patients survived in excess of 1 year. Analgesic requirements increased >50% in 2 patients and KPS deteriorated in 10 patients. Of the 13 remaining patients, 2 sustained a >7% weight loss and 2 gained weight post-treatment. Six patients improved in one parameter of analgesic consumption, weight loss or KPS without deteriorating in any others. Thus, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 6/25 (24%). In terms of tumor response, 8 patients (44%) demonstrated a reduction in tumor volume post-treatment, 4 of whom (22%) experienced a >50% reduction. Four additional patients had radiologically stable disease. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 24%, a value similar to the 23.8% reported for single agent gemcitabine. The median survival of 7 months was also similar to the 5.65 months reported for gemcitabine. The radiological partial response rate of 22% and the 1-year survival of 32% were higher for 5-FU-radiation than the reported values for gemcitabine. A randomized trial would be necessary to compare 5-FU-radiation to gemcitabine directly; however, from this review it did not appear that the overall palliative benefit of 5-FU-radiation was inferior to gemcitabine

  12. Radiation Treatment for Ewing Family of Tumors in Adults: University of Florida Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Wenyin; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Morris, Christopher G.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, Parker C.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with Ewing family of tumors treated with radiation at University of Florida. Methods and Materials: Clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of 47 patients older than 18 years with Ewing family of tumors treated with combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy from 1970 to 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was stratified by age older or younger than 30 years. Patients with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis were excluded from the study. Results: The 29 men and 18 women had a median age of 24 years. Thirty-three patients were 18-30 years old and 14 patients were older than 30 years. Median follow-up of living patients was 8.2 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all patients was 43% (p = 0.8523). The 5-year local control rate for all patients was 75% (p = 0.9326). The 5-year rate of freedom from distant metastasis for all patients was 45% (p = 0.5471). There were no significant differences in 5-year overall survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastasis rates; patterns of distant failure; or toxicity profiles between older adult patients and younger adult patients. Conclusions: We found that the natural history and treatment outcomes of the Ewing family of tumors were consistently similar in adults (young and old) and children. Thus, aggressive combined modality approaches should be considered for adult patients

  13. Experimental study of radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the BAEC TRIGA Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajijul Hoq, M; Malek Soner, M A; Salam, M A; Haque, M M; Khanom, Salma; Fahad, S M

    2017-12-01

    The 3MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been under operation for about thirty years since its commissioning at 1986. In accordance with the demand of fundamental nuclear research works, the reactor has to operate at different power levels by utilizing a number of experimental facilities. Regarding the enquiry for safety of reactor operating personnel and radiation workers, it is necessary to know the radiation level at different strategic points of the reactor where they are often worked. In the present study, neutron, beta and gamma radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the reactor facility with reactor power level of 2.4MW was measured to estimate the rising level of radiation due to its operational activities. From the obtained results high radiation dose is observed at the measurement position of the piercing beam port which is caused by neutron leakage and accordingly, dose rate at the stated position with different reactor power levels was measured. This study also deals with the gamma dose rate measurements at a fixed position of the reactor pool top surface for different reactor power levels under both Natural Convection Cooling Mode (NCCM) and Forced Convection Cooling Mode (FCCM). Results show that, radiation dose rate is higher for NCCM in compared with FCCM and increasing with the increase of reactor power. Thus, concerning the radiological safety issues for working personnel and the general public, the radiation dose level monitoring and the experimental analysis performed within this paper is so much effective and the result of this work can be utilized for base line data and code verification of the nuclear reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The method of treatment cessation and recurrence rate of amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Leah A; Hahn, Erik K; LaRoche, G Robert

    2009-09-01

    To date, much of the research regarding amblyopia has been focused on which therapeutic modality is the most efficacious in amblyopia management. Unfortunately, there is a lack of research into which method of treatment cessation is the most appropriate once therapy has been completed. The purpose of this study is to investigate if the cessation method affects the recurrence rate of amblyopia. This study was a prospective randomized clinical trial of 20 subjects who were wearing full-time occlusion and were at the end point of their therapy. The subjects were randomized into one of two groups: abrupt cessation or therapy tapering. All subjects were followed for 3 consecutive 4-week intervals, for a total of 12 weeks, to assess the short-term recurrence rate of amblyopia. Subjects who were in the tapered group had their occlusion reduced from full-time occlusion (all waking hours minus one) to 50% of waking hours at study enrollment (i.e., from 12 hours/day to 6 hours per day); occlusion was reduced by an additional 50% at the first 4-week study visit (i.e., from 6 hours/day to 3 hours), with occlusion being discontinued completely at the week 8 visit. All subjects who were in the abrupt cessation group had their full-time occlusion discontinued completely at the start of the study (i.e., from 12 hours/day to none). Additional assessments were also conducted at week 26 and week 52 post-therapy cessation to determine the longer term amblyopia regression rate. For the purposes of this study, recurrence was defined as a 0.2 (10 letters) or more logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) loss of visual acuity. A recurrence of amblyopia occurred in 4 of 17 (24%; CI 9%-47%) participants completing the study by the week 52 study end point. There were 2 subjects from each treatment group who demonstrated a study protocol-defined recurrence. There was a 24% risk of amblyopia recurrence if therapy was discontinued abruptly or tapered in 8 weeks. In this small

  15. Treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotman, M.; Choi, K.; Isaacson, S.; Rosenthal, J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation with concomitant infusion chemotherapy has proved more effective in treating several epithelial malignancies than radiation alone. Hyperfractionated radiation was combined with concomitant infusion cis-platinum chemotherapy in an attempt to obtain still better control rates. This paper presents the early results of a pilot study using this combination in the treatment of advanced and recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses as well as a case that showed response of large fixed cervical nodes having metastasized from a previously treated carcinoma of the maxillary antrum

  16. Quantitative evaluation of radiation oncologists' adaptability to lower reimbursing treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Beant S; Beriwal, Sushil; Rajagopalan, Malolan S; Wang, Hong; Hodges, Kimberly; Greenberger, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    Rapid development of sophisticated modalities has challenged radiation oncologists to evaluate workflow and care delivery processes. Our study assesses treatment modality use and willingness to alter management with anticipated limitations in reimbursement and resources. A web-based survey was sent to 43 radiation oncologists in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center network. The survey contained 7 clinical cases with various acceptable treatment options based on our institutional clinical pathways. Each case was presented in 3 modules with varying situations: (1) unlimited resources with current reimbursement, (2) restricted reimbursement (bundled payment), and (3) both restricted reimbursement and resources. Reimbursement rates were based on the 2013 Medicare fee schedule. Adoption of lower reimbursing options (LROs) was defined as the percentage of scenarios in which a respondent selected an LRO compared with baseline. Forty-three physicians completed the survey, 11 (26%) at academic and 32 (74%) at community facilities. When bundled payment was imposed (module 1 vs 2), an increase in willingness to adopt LROs was observed (median 11.1%). When physicians were limited to both bundled payment and resource restriction, adoption of LROs was more pronounced (module 1 vs 3; median 22.2%, P 25 years, P = .02). Radiation oncologists were more likely to choose lower reimbursing treatment options when both resource restriction and bundled payment were presented. Those with fewer years of clinical practice were less inclined to alter management, perhaps reflecting modern residency training. Future cost-utility analyses may help to better guide radiation oncologists in selection of LROs. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation treatment for medulloblastoma. A review of 64 cases at a single institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueping; Gao Li; Xu Guozhen; Yi Junhin; Liu Xinfan; Li Yexiong

    2005-01-01

    Although the optimal treatment mode for medulloblastoma is frequently discussed, results based on large series of cases, especially those treated in Asia, have rarely been reported. Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiation therapy, and to identify prognostic factors, in a relatively large cohort of patients with limited-stage medulloblastoma treated at a single institute in China. Between January 1996 and April 2001, 69 patients with Chang stage M0/M1 medulloblastoma were referred to our hospital for radiation therapy after total or subtotal resection of the primary tumor. All patients received 30 Gy to the craniospinal axis followed by a 20-25 Gy boost to the posterior fossa (median fraction, 1.8 Gy). Sixty-four patients were followed for a median period of 38.5 months. The rates of 3-year and 5-year overall survival were 68.8% and 55.7%, respectively; corresponding disease-free survival were 57.8% and 51.4%, respectively. Patients who had received radiation treatment within 25 days after resection had a greater probability of 3-year survival (81.5% versus 59.5%; P=0.11) and 3-year disease-free survival (74.1% versus 46.0%; P=0.03) than patients who began radiation treatment later. No relationship was found between survival and age, sex or tumor size. This regimen was comparatively ineffective in preventing recurrence of postoperative medulloblastoma; however, we found that the interval between surgery and radiation is a significant prognostic factor for disease-free survival. (author)

  18. Assessing patient characteristics and radiation-induced non-targeted effects in vivo for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Christine; Timotin, Emilia; Wong, Raimond; Sur, Ranjan K; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    To test whether blood, urine, and tissue based colony-forming assays are a useful clinical detection tool for assessing fractionated treatment responses and non-targeted radiation effects in bystander cells. To assess patients' responses to radiation treatments, blood serum, urine, and an esophagus explant-based in vivo colony-forming assay were used from oesophageal carcinoma patients. These patients underwent three fractions of high dose rate (HDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT). Human keratinocyte reporters exposed to blood sera taken after the third fraction of brachytherapy had a significant increase in cloning efficiency compared to baseline samples (p fractions for the blood sera data only. Patient characteristics such as gender had no statistically significant effect (p > 0.05). Large variability was observed among the patients' tissue samples, these colony-forming assays showed no significant changes throughout fractionated brachytherapy (p > 0.05). Large inter-patient variability was found in the urine and tissue based assays, so these techniques were discontinued. However, the simple blood-based assay had much less variability. This technique may have future applications as a biological dosimeter to predict treatment outcome and assess non-targeted radiation effects.

  19. Radiation treatment planning techniques for lymphoma of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Biancia, Cesar; Hunt, Margie; Furhang, Eli; Wu, Elisa; Yahalom, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Involved-field radiation therapy of the stomach is often used in the curative treatment of gastric lymphoma. Yet, the optimal technique to irradiate the stomach with minimal morbidity has not been well established. This study was designed to evaluate treatment planning alternatives for stomach irradiation, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to determine which approach resulted in improved dose distribution and to identify patient-specific anatomic factors that might influence a treatment planning choice. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with lymphoma of the stomach (14 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and 1 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were categorized into 3 types, depending on the geometric relationship between the planning target volume (PTV) and kidneys. AP/PA and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans were generated for each patient. IMRT was planned for 4 patients with challenging geometric relationship between the PTV and the kidneys to determine whether it was advantageous to use IMRT. Results: For type I patients (no overlap between PTV and kidneys), there was essentially no benefit from using 3DCRT over AP/PA. However, for patients with PTVs in close proximity to the kidneys (type II) or with high degree of overlap (type III), the 4-field 3DCRT plans were superior, reducing the kidney V 15Gy by approximately 90% for type II and 50% for type III patients. For type III, the use of a 3DCRT plan rather than an AP/PA plan decreased the V 15Gy by approximately 65% for the right kidney and 45% for the left kidney. In the selected cases, IMRT led to a further decrease in left kidney dose as well as in mean liver dose. Conclusions: The geometric relationship between the target and kidneys has a significant impact on the selection of the optimum beam arrangement. Using 4-field 3DCRT markedly decreases the kidney dose. The addition of IMRT led to further incremental improvements in the left kidney and liver

  20. Treatment Effects and Sequelae of Radiation Therapy for Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Masaharu, E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Tomita, Naoto [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Iijima, Yasuhito [Department of Ophthalmology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Minagawa, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Among extranodal lymphomas, orbital mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a relatively rare presentation. We performed a review to ascertain treatment efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy for orbital MALT lymphoma. We also evaluated changes in visual acuity after irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with orbital MALT lymphoma underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. Clinical stages at diagnosis were stage I{sub E}A in 29 patients and stage II{sub E}A in 1 patient. Total doses of 28.8 to 45.8 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 15 to 26 fractions (median, 16 fractions) were delivered to the tumors. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period of 2 to 157 months (median, 35 months) after treatment. Two patients had relapses that arose in the cervical lymph node and the ipsilateral palpebral conjunctiva outside the radiation field at 15 and 67 months after treatment, respectively. The 5-year local progression-free and relapse-free rates were 100% and 96%, respectively. All 30 patients are presently alive; the overall and relapse-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 96%, respectively. Although 5 patients developed cataracts of grade 2 at 8 to 45 months after irradiation, they underwent intraocular lens implantation, and their eyesight recovered. Additionally, there was no marked deterioration in the visual acuity of patients due to irradiation, with the exception of cataracts. No therapy-related toxicity of grade 3 or greater was observed. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was effective and safe for patients with orbital MALT lymphoma. Although some patients developed cataracts after irradiation, visual acuity was well preserved.

  1. Treatment Effects and Sequelae of Radiation Therapy for Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Masaharu; Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi; Tomita, Naoto; Iijima, Yasuhito; Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Minagawa, Yumiko; Ogino, Ichiro; Inoue, Tomio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Among extranodal lymphomas, orbital mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a relatively rare presentation. We performed a review to ascertain treatment efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy for orbital MALT lymphoma. We also evaluated changes in visual acuity after irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with orbital MALT lymphoma underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. Clinical stages at diagnosis were stage I E A in 29 patients and stage II E A in 1 patient. Total doses of 28.8 to 45.8 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 15 to 26 fractions (median, 16 fractions) were delivered to the tumors. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period of 2 to 157 months (median, 35 months) after treatment. Two patients had relapses that arose in the cervical lymph node and the ipsilateral palpebral conjunctiva outside the radiation field at 15 and 67 months after treatment, respectively. The 5-year local progression-free and relapse-free rates were 100% and 96%, respectively. All 30 patients are presently alive; the overall and relapse-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 96%, respectively. Although 5 patients developed cataracts of grade 2 at 8 to 45 months after irradiation, they underwent intraocular lens implantation, and their eyesight recovered. Additionally, there was no marked deterioration in the visual acuity of patients due to irradiation, with the exception of cataracts. No therapy-related toxicity of grade 3 or greater was observed. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was effective and safe for patients with orbital MALT lymphoma. Although some patients developed cataracts after irradiation, visual acuity was well preserved.

  2. Estimation of daily flow rate of photovoltaic water pumping systems using solar radiation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Benghanem

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple model which allows us to contribute in the studies of photovoltaic (PV water pumping systems sizing. The nonlinear relation between water flow rate and solar power has been obtained experimentally in a first step and then used for performance prediction. The model proposed enables us to simulate the water flow rate using solar radiation data for different heads (50 m, 60 m, 70 m and 80 m and for 8S × 3P PV array configuration. The experimental data are obtained with our pumping test facility located at Madinah site (Saudi Arabia. The performances are calculated using the measured solar radiation data of different locations in Saudi Arabia. Knowing the solar radiation data, we have estimated with a good precision the water flow rate Q in five locations (Al-Jouf, Solar Village, AL-Ahsa, Madinah and Gizan in Saudi Arabia. The flow rate Q increases with the increase of pump power for different heads following the nonlinear model proposed. Keywords: Photovoltaic water pumping system, Solar radiation data, Simulation, Flow rate

  3. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  4. External exposure rates from terrestrial radiation at Guarapari and Meaipe in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, N.; Koga, T.; Morishima, H.

    2000-01-01

    Recently epidemiological and cytogenetic studies on inhabitants living in high background radiation areas have been carried out in order to examine health effects of exposure to low dose radiation. Guarapari and Meaipe are towns built on the monazite sand region along the Atlantic coast in Brazil, which is one of the widely known high background radiation areas in the world. As an initial step toward studies on health effects of high background radiation on inhabitants living in Guarapari and Meaipe, we surveyed absorbed dose rates in air in these towns with a portable NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in September 1998. Sand and soil were also sampled there so as to determine the concentrations of Th-232 and Ra-226 in them. In Guarapari and Meaipe, dose rates in the streets ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 μ Gy/h except for a few places such as near the Areia Preta beach and Meaipe beach. Dose rates inside houses were lower than 0.2 μ Gy/h except that two houses attained a dose rate of 0.4 μ Gy/h. Our effective dose rate from external terrestrial irradiation (outdoors and indoors) was 0.17 μ Sv/h on the average, during the period of our three day stay in Guarapari and Meaipe. From comparison of our present values with those observed in the 1960s, which were cited in UNSCEAR reports, it is indicated that dose rate levels have decreased clearly in downtown, while the levels have scarcely changed in beaches and unpaved beach streets which have not been developed yet. This fact suggests that the natural radiation environment of Guarapari and Meaipe has varied with urbanization which brought paved streets, and changes in the structure and building materials of houses. A detailed survey is necessary in order to evaluate present absorbed dose rates in air in this area. (author)

  5. Ileal perforation induced by acute radiation injury under gefitinib treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Takayuki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    Enteritis is one of the side effects of radiotherapy to the abdominal cavity. Radiation enteritis involves damage to mucous membranes in the acute phase and to stromal tissues in the late phase. Perforation of the intestine tends to occur in the late phase, and rarely in the acute phase. However, we describe here a case of intestinal perforation occurring in the acute phase after irradiation in a patient who received gefitinib treatment. Gefitinib, one of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), is widely used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but is simultaneously known to inhibit wound healing. We suspect that gefitinib may affect regeneration of the small intestinal mucosa injured by irradiation. A 76-year-old woman had NSCLC with metastases to the 5th lumbar, sacral, and right iliac bones. To control the pain from bone metastasis, anterior-posterior opposing portal irradiation (total 35 Gy) was started, and was completed over 22 days. On day 25 after starting radiotherapy, the patient began to take gefitinib. On day 35, she presented with acute peritonitis, and an emergency laparotomy was performed. The terminal ileum was affected by radiation enteritis and there were two pin-hole perforations. In the surgical specimen, no cancerous lesions were detected, and immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR) was negative. pEGFR has an important role in mucous membrane repair after irradiation. Intestinal perforation in the acute phase of radiation enteritis may be associated with impaired mucosal repair mechanisms due to the use of an EGFR-TKI such as gefitinib, as evidenced by the absence of pEGFR. (author)

  6. Treatment of Wastewater Containing Organic Pollutants by Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, A.; Taguchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Maruyama, A. [Gunma Prefectural Sewerage Manegement General Office (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated the treatment of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and halogented organic compounds (HOCs) in wastewater by ionizing radiation in the CRP. Three samples of the actual wastewater having estrogen activity were analyzed by the yeast two-hybrid assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Treatment of the wastewater is required to decrease the estrogen activity to less than 1 ng / L; the lower limit concentration of appearance of endocrine disrupting property. Medaka estrogen activity (mEA) initially increased and then decreased by β-ray irradiation, indicating that decomposition products in the real wastewaters also have the estrogen activity. The doses required to decrease in mEA of samples 1 to 3 below 1 ng / L, D{sub 1ng}, were estimated to be 100, 200 and 150 Gy (J kg{sup -1}), respectively. Since the D{sub 1ng} of 17 β-stradiol (E2) at 500 ng/L (1.8 nmol/L) in pure water was estimated to be 5 Gy as mentioned in the previous CRP, the elimination of estrogen activity of real wastewater is considered to be interfered by organic impurities. The economic cost of the treatment process of EDCs using electron beam was estimated at 17 yen m{sup -3}. (author)

  7. Application of radiation technology in healthcare: cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a standard treatment used as part of the multimodality treatment of several cancers. It is frequently employed in the role of primary and adjuvant therapy for cancers. Historically, RT planning was guided by fluoroscopic or X-ray imaging that provided two dimensional data to determine areas to be treated by using bony landmarks. Limited soft tissue delineation was sometimes possible, for example, by instilling contrast into the bowel and bladder. Definitive/Radical Chemoradiation in cancers significantly improved the local control and survival even in locally advanced cases, but at the cost of increased toxicity due to combined modality of treatment. For the past few years, there was increasing focus on attempts to reduce normal tissue toxicity especially in pelvic tumors. This concept leads to a major transition in radiotherapy techniques; from classical 2-dimensional approach to 3-dimensional high precision approach. These radiation techniques, involve various steps and each step plays a pivotal role in their successful implementation. The delivery technique is a critical part of the success of radiotherapy for these patients. Careful consideration of the related factors involved and critical assessment of the techniques available are fundamental to good and effective practice. Number of linear accelerators are growing rapidly in India especially in private centres, however there is need to keep same pace in government institutions

  8. Immobilization for the radiation therapy treatment of the pelvic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Heuvel, F; De Beukeleer, M; Nys, F; Bijdekerke, P; Robberechts, M; Van Cauwenbergh, R [Brussels Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    Previous experience with the treatment of the pelvic region has shown that geometric setup errors are considerable in extent and incidence. A proposal to alleviate this problem is the introduction of immobilization devices in analogy with head and neck treatment. The practicality and efficacy of such a technique is investigated and compared with an earlier proposed technique using interactive adjustment and Electronic Portal Imaging (EPI). A group of 13 patients treated in the pelvic region using external radiation therapy was immobilized using an Orfit-like cast. Every fraction for every patients was imaged using an EPID. Immediately after obtaining an image it was compared to a digitized simulation image using the in-house developed OPIDUM system. Patient position was adjusted when an error in one of the main directions (transversal or longitudinal) exceeded 5 mm. Time measurements were carried out in order to asses the impact of the immobilization procedure on the patient throughput. In 68% of the cases a corrective action was necessary. The fraction of total treatment time was 50% for 26% of the fields. The range of errors measured in the longitudinal direction was between 29 and -22 mm. In the transversal direction the range was from -7 to 60 mm. A full analysis 13 patients yielding statistics for more than 200 fields is presented. Special attention has been paid to the determination of the nature of the errors (random or systematic) and the impact on patient throughput.

  9. Treatment of Wastewater Containing Organic Pollutants by Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, A.; Taguchi, M.; Maruyama, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the treatment of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and halogented organic compounds (HOCs) in wastewater by ionizing radiation in the CRP. Three samples of the actual wastewater having estrogen activity were analyzed by the yeast two-hybrid assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Treatment of the wastewater is required to decrease the estrogen activity to less than 1 ng / L; the lower limit concentration of appearance of endocrine disrupting property. Medaka estrogen activity (mEA) initially increased and then decreased by β-ray irradiation, indicating that decomposition products in the real wastewaters also have the estrogen activity. The doses required to decrease in mEA of samples 1 to 3 below 1 ng / L, D 1ng , were estimated to be 100, 200 and 150 Gy (J kg -1 ), respectively. Since the D 1ng of 17 β-stradiol (E2) at 500 ng/L (1.8 nmol/L) in pure water was estimated to be 5 Gy as mentioned in the previous CRP, the elimination of estrogen activity of real wastewater is considered to be interfered by organic impurities. The economic cost of the treatment process of EDCs using electron beam was estimated at 17 yen m -3 . (author)

  10. Immobilization for the radiation therapy treatment of the pelvic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Heuvel, F.; De Beukeleer, M.; Nys, F.; Bijdekerke, P.; Robberechts, M.; Van Cauwenbergh, R.

    1995-01-01

    Previous experience with the treatment of the pelvic region has shown that geometric setup errors are considerable in extent and incidence. A proposal to alleviate this problem is the introduction of immobilization devices in analogy with head and neck treatment. The practicality and efficacy of such a technique is investigated and compared with an earlier proposed technique using interactive adjustment and Electronic Portal Imaging (EPI). A group of 13 patients treated in the pelvic region using external radiation therapy was immobilized using an Orfit-like cast. Every fraction for every patients was imaged using an EPID. Immediately after obtaining an image it was compared to a digitized simulation image using the in-house developed OPIDUM system. Patient position was adjusted when an error in one of the main directions (transversal or longitudinal) exceeded 5 mm. Time measurements were carried out in order to asses the impact of the immobilization procedure on the patient throughput. In 68% of the cases a corrective action was necessary. The fraction of total treatment time was 50% for 26% of the fields. The range of errors measured in the longitudinal direction was between 29 and -22 mm. In the transversal direction the range was from -7 to 60 mm. A full analysis 13 patients yielding statistics for more than 200 fields is presented. Special attention has been paid to the determination of the nature of the errors (random or systematic) and the impact on patient throughput

  11. Radiation induced sarcoma after treatment of glioblastoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Victor Domingos Lisita; Anjos, Caroline Souza dos; Candido, Priscila Barile Marchi; Dias Junior, Antonio Soares; Santos, Evandro Airton Sordi dos; Godoy, Antonio Carlos Cavalcante; Saggioro, Fabiano P.; Carlotti Junior, Carlos Gilberto; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glioblastoma multiform is the most lethal central nervous system neoplasm, with a median survival of around 13 months and the worst prognosis among all gliomas. The therapeutic approach of glioblastoma consists in neurosurgery with maximum possible resection of tumor volume, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy reduces the risk of tumor recurrence through direct and indirect damage to tumor deoxyribonucleic acid. The long-term effects of radiation therapy include tissue necrosis, vasculopathy, and radiation-induced neoplasia. The most reported secondary intracranial malignant tumors include meningiomas, gliomas, and sarcomas. The latency period between skull radiotherapy and the appearance of radioinduced lesions varies in the literature from six months to 47 years, with an average of 18.7 years. Case report: The present report describes the appearance of high-grade spindle cell sarcoma after ten months in a patient who received glioblastoma treatment at Hospital das Clínicas of Ribeirão Preto of the University of São Paulo. Conclusion: The rarity of this association is probably due to the poor survival of patients with glioblastoma, thus limiting the time to development of secondary neoplasia

  12. Photocoagulation treatment for clinically significant radiation macular oedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Zamber, R.W.; Lawrence, B.S.; Barlow, W.E.; Arnold, A.M. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Macular oedema is a leading cause of vision loss in patients with radiation retinopathy. In an effort to find an effective treatment for this vision threatening complication, 12 eyes (eight patients) were treated with photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular oedema (CSRMO) defined as central macular thickening, exudates threatening the macular centre, or one disc area of thickening in the macula. Median visual acuity improved from 20/100 pre-operatively to 20/90 at the initial post-operative examination (mean follow up 5 months) and to 20/75 at the final post-operative examination (mean follow up 39 months). At the final post-operative examination, visual acuity had improved in eight (67%) eyes and six (50%) eyes had complete resolution of the CSRMO; two (17%) other eyes had improved anatomically in that fewer CSRMO criteria were present. These results suggest that macular photocoagulation is effective in decreasing macular oedema and improving vision in eyes with CSRMO. (author).

  13. Photocoagulation treatment for clinically significant radiation macular oedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Zamber, R.W.; Lawrence, B.S.; Barlow, W.E.; Arnold, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Macular oedema is a leading cause of vision loss in patients with radiation retinopathy. In an effort to find an effective treatment for this vision threatening complication, 12 eyes (eight patients) were treated with photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular oedema (CSRMO) defined as central macular thickening, exudates threatening the macular centre, or one disc area of thickening in the macula. Median visual acuity improved from 20/100 pre-operatively to 20/90 at the initial post-operative examination (mean follow up 5 months) and to 20/75 at the final post-operative examination (mean follow up 39 months). At the final post-operative examination, visual acuity had improved in eight (67%) eyes and six (50%) eyes had complete resolution of the CSRMO; two (17%) other eyes had improved anatomically in that fewer CSRMO criteria were present. These results suggest that macular photocoagulation is effective in decreasing macular oedema and improving vision in eyes with CSRMO. (author)

  14. An exploration of the feasibility of radiation therapist participation in treatment reviews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monk, Clare Maree; Wrightson, Stephanie Jane [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Smith, Tony Neil [Department of Rural Health, University of Newcastle, Taree, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    As radiation oncologists' (ROs') workload has increased over time, treatment review clinics have become recognized as an area of RO practice into which radiation therapist (RT) practice could extend. There has been limited utilization of RTs in this role in Australia and a paucity of data on the acceptability and opinions regarding RTs practising in this role in an Australian context. The purpose of this audit was to investigate the feasibility of RT participation in review clinics at Calvary Mater Newcastle. Feasibility was determined by two methods: an audit of 200 treatment reviews to determine medical intervention (MI) levels required and a survey of 80 clinical staff to explore attitudes towards RT participation in clinics. Medical intervention was required in 59% (n = 118) of observed reviews, with the lowest being for breast (33%) and prostate (28%) cancers. MI peaked at 73% between fractions 16–20 and was lowest early and late in the treatment period at 48%. There were 60 responses to the staff survey. All but one respondent agreed that RTs would be willing to participate in treatment review clinics, but all five consultant ROs indicated they would not be willing to delegate reviews to RTs. Neither feasibility measure reached acceptable levels to recommend RT participation in treatment review clinics. Further investigation and RT education are required to help meet the future RO workforce shortfall. As MI rates are lowest for breast and prostate cancer RT participation could be targeted to these clinics.

  15. An exploration of the feasibility of radiation therapist participation in treatment reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monk, Clare Maree; Wrightson, Stephanie Jane; Smith, Tony Neil

    2013-01-01

    As radiation oncologists' (ROs') workload has increased over time, treatment review clinics have become recognized as an area of RO practice into which radiation therapist (RT) practice could extend. There has been limited utilization of RTs in this role in Australia and a paucity of data on the acceptability and opinions regarding RTs practising in this role in an Australian context. The purpose of this audit was to investigate the feasibility of RT participation in review clinics at Calvary Mater Newcastle. Feasibility was determined by two methods: an audit of 200 treatment reviews to determine medical intervention (MI) levels required and a survey of 80 clinical staff to explore attitudes towards RT participation in clinics. Medical intervention was required in 59% (n = 118) of observed reviews, with the lowest being for breast (33%) and prostate (28%) cancers. MI peaked at 73% between fractions 16–20 and was lowest early and late in the treatment period at 48%. There were 60 responses to the staff survey. All but one respondent agreed that RTs would be willing to participate in treatment review clinics, but all five consultant ROs indicated they would not be willing to delegate reviews to RTs. Neither feasibility measure reached acceptable levels to recommend RT participation in treatment review clinics. Further investigation and RT education are required to help meet the future RO workforce shortfall. As MI rates are lowest for breast and prostate cancer RT participation could be targeted to these clinics

  16. Hypofractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma - A prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Niveditha B.; Lakier, Roy H.; Donde, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare a conventional fractionation regimen with a hypofractionated regimen in the treatment of Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma with radiation therapy. Materials and methods: Sixty patients were randomized to receive a standard regimen of 24 Gy in 12 fractions (ARM A) or the study regimen of 20 Gy in five fractions (ARM B). Radiation technique was individualized. Treatment response, local control and toxicity were recorded. Results: Thirty five sites were treated in ARM A and 30 sites in ARM B. Treatment arms were similar for gender, ECOG performance score, treated site, antiretroviral therapy usage, T stage, I stage and S stage. The overall survival using the Kaplan Meier method was 37% at 1 year. Complete responses were recorded at 28 sites (13 Arm A, 15 Arm B), partial responses at 19 sites (8 Arm A, 11 Arm B) and stable disease at three sites (2 Arm A, 1 Arm B). The mean time to maximum objective response was 3 months (range: 1-14 months). Response rates and local control were equal in the two arms (p = 0.73 and 0.77, respectively, log rank test). Acute skin toxicity (p = 0.77) and late skin toxicity (p = 0.24) were equal in the two arms. Conclusion: The two treatment regimens produced equivalent results for treatment response, local recurrence-free survival and toxicity

  17. Experimental treatment of gastrointestinal radiation syndrome in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Bingzhi; Chen Dezheng; Liu Zuobin

    1986-01-01

    Gastrointestinal radiation syndrome occurred in 27 mongrel dogs irradiated with 9-12 Gy of 60 Co γ-rays. Six of them received autologous bone marrow transplantation (auto-BMT), 10 animals were treated with symptomatic and supportive measures only, and the remaining 11 dogs served as controls without any treatment. All animals of the latter two groups died between 3 and 11 days after irradiation without any evidence of hematopoietic recovery. Recovery of gastrointestinal injury was found in 7 dogs treated with symptomatic and supportive measures only. Of 6 dogs having received auto-BMT 2 died 15 days after irradiation, 3 survived over 30 days with recovery of gastrointestinal and hematopoietic injury but died of distemper later, and the other one, still alive, has survived for more than 4 years. The results show that the effective measures for gastrointestinal radiatin syndrome are BMT and symptomatic therapy

  18. Present status of radiation treatment of animal feeds in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Iizuka, H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the studies in Japan on the irradiation of laboratory animal diets and farm animal feedstuffs. From the microbiological inactivation curve of laboratory animal diets, the irradiation doses of 2.5 approximately 3.5 Mrad seem to be suitable for sterilization of animal diets. The absence of toxic effects on animals can be demonstrated by feeding studies. The elimination of salmonellae and other species of Enterobacteriaceae in feedstuffs could be achieved by irradiation with 0.5 approximately 0.6 Mrad. The growth of moulds in feeds would not occur at this dose level. However, an adverse effect is observed on chicks fed with fatty diet irradiated at 3 and 6 Mrad. It is suggested that a promising application of radiation treatment to the feeding of farm animals is irradiation at low dose levels of 0.5 approximately 0.6 Mrad. (author)

  19. Software Design for Interactive Graphic Radiation Treatment Simulation Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalet, Ira J.; Sweeney, Christine; Jacky, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    We examine issues in the design of interactive computer graphic simulation programs for radiation treatment planning (RTP), as well as expert system programs that automate parts of the RTP process, in light of ten years of experience at designing, building and using such programs. An experiment in object-oriented design using standard Pascal shows that while some advantage is gained from the design, it is still difficult to achieve modularity and to integrate expert system components. A new design based on the Common LISP Object System (CLOS) is described. This series of designs for RTP software shows that this application benefits in specific ways from object-oriented design methods and appropriate languages and tools.

  20. BNCT-RTPE: BNCT radiation treatment planning environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessol, D.E.; Wheeler, F.J.; Babcock, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Several improvements have been developed for the BNCT radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) during 1994. These improvements have been incorporated into Version 1.0 of BNCT-Rtpe which is currently installed at the INEL, BNL, Japanese Research Center (JRC), and Finland's Technical Research Center. Platforms supported by this software include Hewlett-Packard (HP), SUN, International Business Machines (IBM), and Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI). A draft version of the BNCT-Rtpe user manual is available. Version 1.1 of BNCT-Rtpe is scheduled for release in March 1995. It is anticipated that Version 2.x of BNCT-Rtpe, which includes the nonproprietary NURBS library and data structures, will be released in September 1995

  1. Radiation treatment of refractory substances in wastewater for recycling water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Tanabe, Hiroko; Sawai, Teruko

    1997-01-01

    The refractory substances such as molasses pigments and lignin in sewage interfere with recycle system from the secondary effluents from sewage sludge plants, so we investigated the effects of radiation treatment on these substances in sewage. The dialyzed molasses pigments in the wastewater, discharged from baker's yeast factory were easily decomposed and decolorized. When the artificial sewage sample, containing lignin, fumic acid and tannic acid, was irradiated with gamma rays, the TOC was reduced to one-half of its initial value at 10 kGy, and then the pH dropped to near the minimum value. On the other hand, the pH and TOC of sewage influent sample were little affected by gamma ray irradiation. However, the increases of organic acid formation by gamma rays irradiation were observed for both samples: oxalic acid for the artificial sewage sample, and the formic acid and lactic acid for sewage influent sample were produced at lower absorbed doses, respectively. (author)

  2. Reporting success rates in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas: are we accounting for the natural history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; Lau, Tsz; Vasan, Rohit; Danner, Christopher; Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry; Agazzi, Siviero

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is generally accepted as one of the best treatment options for vestibular schwannomas. We question whether growth control is an accurate measure of success in vestibular schwannoma treatment. We aim to clarify the success rate of stereotactic radiosurgery and adjust the reported results to the benign natural history of untreated tumors. All articles were taken from a PubMed search of the English literature from the years 2000-2011. Inclusion criteria were articles containing the number of patients treated, radiation technique, average tumor size, follow-up time, and percentage of tumors growing during follow-up. Data were extracted from 19 articles. Success rates were adjusted using published data that 17% to 30% of vestibular schwannomas grow. The average reported success rate for stereotactic radiosurgery across all articles was 95.5%. When considering 17% or 30% natural growth without intervention, the adjusted success rates became 78.2% and 86.9% respectively. These rates were obtained by applying the natural history growth percentages to any tumors not reported to be growing before radiosurgical intervention. Success in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas with stereotactic radiosurgery is often defined as lack of further growth. Recent data on the natural growth history of vestibular schwannomas raise the question of whether this is the best definition of success. We have identified a lack of continuity regarding the reporting of success and emphasize the importance of the clarification of the success of radiosurgery to make informed decisions regarding the best treatment options for vestibular schwannoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Because of biological responses to ionizing radiation are dependent on irradiation time or dose rate as well as dose, simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose rates. We previously published a novel statistical model for dose rate effect, modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response to low dose rate ionizing radiation, by analyzing micronucleus formation and growth inhibition in a human osteosarcoma cell line, exposed to wide range of doses and dose rates of gamma-rays. MOE model demonstrates that logarithm of median effective dose exponentially increases in low dose rates, and thus suggests that the risk approaches to zero at infinitely low dose rate. In this paper, we extend the analysis in various kinds of human cell lines exposed to ionizing radiation for more than a year. We measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in human cell lines including an osteosarcoma, a DNA-dependent protein kinase-deficient glioma, a SV40-transformed fibroblast derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient, a normal fibroblast, and leukemia cell lines. Cells were exposed to gamma-rays in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci of cobalt-60. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a fluorescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [ 3 H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk. While dose and dose rate relationship cultured within one month followed MOE model in cell lines holding wild-type DNA repair system, dose rate effect was greatly impaired in DNA repair-deficient cell lines

  4. SU-F-J-45: Sparing Normal Tissue with Ultra-High Dose Rate in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Y [DCH Reg. Medical Center, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue by reducing the location uncertainty of a moving target, we proposed an ultra-high dose rate system and evaluated. Methods: High energy electrons generated with a linear accelerator were injected into a storage ring to be accumulated. The number of the electrons in the ring was determined based on the prescribed radiation dose. The dose was delivered within a millisecond, when an online imaging system found that the target was in the position that was consistent with that in a treatment plan. In such a short time period, the displacement of the target was negligible. The margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced that was evaluated by comparing of volumes between CTV and ITV in 14 cases of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. A design of the ultra-high dose rate system was evaluated based clinical needs and the recent developments of low energy (a few MeV) electron storage ring. Results: This design of ultra-high dose rate system was feasible based on the techniques currently available. The reduction of a target volume was significant by reducing the margin that accounted the motion of the target. ∼50% volume reduction of the internal target volume (ITV) could be achieved in lung SBRT treatments. Conclusion: With this innovation of ultra-high dose rate system, the margin of target is able to be significantly reduced. It will reduce treatment time of gating and allow precisely specified gating window to improve the accuracy of dose delivering.

  5. The analogy research study on gamma radiation dose rate of radioisotopes 131Ba and 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Youhua; Feng Guangwen

    2013-01-01

    Analogy is a inference method ,according some properties of a class of things to inferring the similar things should also have the similar properties. The analogy of same radionuclides is widely used in radioisotope logging environment impact assessment so far. This paper is to provide fFor future providing a theoretical calculation method and analogy method between different radionuclides in radioisotope logging environment impact assessment. In this paper, using the latest decay scheme, through theoretical modeling, the aim is the the establishment of 131 Ba and 131 I radioisotopes gamma radiation dose rate calculation method, and try to carry out analogy research on gamma radiation dose rate of different radioisotopes with the same activity. The results show that the analogy of different radionuclides is feasible, which provides the new method reference for carrying out such radiation environmental impact assessment in future. (authors)

  6. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Ryukyu Islands, subtropical region of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Shiroma, M.; Motomura, D.; Fujioka, S.; Kawakami, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Arakawa, K.; Fukahori, K.; Jyunicho, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Ohomoto, T.; Kina, S.; Shiroma, Y.; Masuda, N.; Hiraoka, H.; Shingaki, R.; Akata, N.; Zhuo, W.; Tokonami, S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to explain the distribution of natural radiation level in the Asia, in situ measurements of dose rate in air due to terrestrial gamma radiation have been conducted in a total of 21 islands that belong to Ryukyu Islands (Ryukyu Archipelago), subtropical rejoin of southwest Japan. Car-borne surveys have also been carried out in Okinawa-jima, the biggest island of the archipelago. Based on the results for these measurements, arithmetic mean, the maximum and the minimum of the dose rates at 1 m in height from the unpaved soil ground in the archipelago were estimated to be 47, 165 and 8 nGy h -1 , respectively. A comparative study of car-borne data obtained prior to and subsequent to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, as for Okinawa-jima, indicated that the nuclear accident has no impact on the environmental radiation at the present time. (authors)

  7. Remote Sensing of Radiation Dose Rate by Customizing an Autonomous Robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T; Nakahara, M; Morisato, K; Takashina, T; Kanematsu, H

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of radiation dose was measured by customizing an autonomous cleaning robot 'Roomba' and a scintillation counter. The robot was used as a vehicle carrying the scintillation survey meter, and was additionally equipped with an H8 micro computer to remote-control the vehicle and to send measured data. The data obtained were arranged with position data, and then the distribution map of the radiation dose rate was produced. Manual, programmed and autonomous driving tests were conducted, and all performances were verified. That is, for each operational mode, the measurements both with moving and with discrete moving were tried in and outside of a room. Consequently, it has been confirmed that remote sensing of radiation dose rate is possible by customizing a robot on market.

  8. Surgical treatment of radiation injuries of the colon and rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, S.W.; Beart, R.W. Jr.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1950 and 1983, radiation-induced proctitis was diagnosed proctoscopically in 720 patients at the Mayo Clinic. Sixty-two patients with severe colorectal symptoms were treated surgically. The interval from cessation of radiotherapy to onset of symptoms ranged from 3 weeks to 24 months (mean 33 months). The 62 patients underwent a total of 143 operations with 8 operative deaths (13 percent), and 40 patients (65 percent) had 61 complications. The morbidity rate was lower after colostomy alone (44 percent in 27 patients) than after more aggressive operations (80 percent in 35 patients). Transverse loop colostomy and descending colostomy were safer than sigmoid colostomy. The dissection adhesions, opening of tissue planes, and careless manipulation of intestine may result in necrosis and perforation of the intestine, bladder, or vaginal wall; these were the main causes of fecal and other internal fistulas in our study

  9. Effects of radiation treatment on foodstuffs. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, W.; Boegl, W.

    1980-01-01

    In the herewith presented study of literature the results of irradiation experiments on 34 foodstuffs are reported and evaluated. The only objective was to obtain a survey of the chemical changes of irradiated foodstuffs; therefore, neither microbiological nor toxicological aspects were considered. The results were taken from the original publications and compiled in a type of dictionary of foodstuffs listing all relevant data in each case (foodstuff, source of irradiation, irradiation conditions, methods, results etc.) in a defined order. The main radiation source was Co 60 and doses ranged between 0,005 and 10 Mrad. In a part of the studies (18 foodstuffs) the irradiation doses were varied to find an eventual relation between the doses applied and the chemical changes. The dose rate was only varied on purpose in one case (2.20.). The effects of the storage were investigated in 15 cases, the temperature in 8 and the way and kind of packing also in 8 cases. (orig.) [de

  10. Monitoring of dose rates and radiation flux density in working rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajtor, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    The problems of determining the neutron field characteristics (dose equivalent rate and flux density) in relation to the environmental monitoring by radiation protection services. The measurement devices used for measuring dose equivalent rate and neutron flux density RUS-U8 multi-purpose scintillation radiometer and RUP-1 multi-purpose transportable radiometer as well as measurement technique are described. Recommendations are given for checking measuring devices calibration, registering measurement results [ru

  11. The correlation schemes in calculations of the rate constants of some radiation chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorets, P.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Kim, V.

    1983-01-01

    The various correlation relationships of the evaluation of the rate constants of radiation chemical reactions of addition, abstraction and isomerization were considered. It was shown that neglection of the influence of solvent can result in errors in calculations of rate constants equalling two orders in magnitude. Several examples of isokinetic relationship are given. The methods of calculation of transmission coefficient of reaction addition have been discussed. (author)

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF HEATING RATE PRODUCT AT HIGH HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Akhmedova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of computing and mathematical modeling are all widely used in the study of various heat exchange processes that provide the ability to study the dynamics of the processes, as well as to conduct a reasonable search for the optimal technological parameters of heat treatment.This work is devoted to the identification of correlations among the factors that have the greatest effect on the rate of heating of the product at hightemperature heat sterilization in a stream of hot air, which are chosen as the temperature difference (between the most and least warming up points and speed cans during heat sterilization.As a result of the experimental data warming of the central and peripheral layers compote of apples in a 3 liter pot at high-temperature heat treatment in a stream of hot air obtained by the regression equation in the form of a seconddegree polynomial, taking into account the effects of pair interaction of these parameters. 

  13. Modified Exponential (MOE) Models: statistical Models for Risk Estimation of Low dose Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose-rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose-rates, since biological responses to radiation are complex processes that depend both on irradiation time and total dose. Consequently, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose,dose-rate and irradiation time to estimate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and (3H) thymidine uptake in U2OS, human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological response to gamma radiation. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a florescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and (3h) thymidine was pulsed for 4h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/dose-rate. (Author)

  14. Nested radiations and the pulse of angiosperm diversification: increased diversification rates often follow whole genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, David C; Eastman, Jonathan M; Pennell, Matthew W; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Hinchliff, Cody E; Brown, Joseph W; Sessa, Emily B; Harmon, Luke J

    2015-07-01

    Our growing understanding of the plant tree of life provides a novel opportunity to uncover the major drivers of angiosperm diversity. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny, we characterized hot and cold spots of lineage diversification across the angiosperm tree of life by modeling evolutionary diversification using stepwise AIC (MEDUSA). We also tested the whole-genome duplication (WGD) radiation lag-time model, which postulates that increases in diversification tend to lag behind established WGD events. Diversification rates have been incredibly heterogeneous throughout the evolutionary history of angiosperms and reveal a pattern of 'nested radiations' - increases in net diversification nested within other radiations. This pattern in turn generates a negative relationship between clade age and diversity across both families and orders. We suggest that stochastically changing diversification rates across the phylogeny explain these patterns. Finally, we demonstrate significant statistical support for the WGD radiation lag-time model. Across angiosperms, nested shifts in diversification led to an overall increasing rate of net diversification and declining relative extinction rates through time. These diversification shifts are only rarely perfectly associated with WGD events, but commonly follow them after a lag period. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Influence of mobility and annihilation of forest dislocations on radiation creep rate of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatiletov, Yu.S.; Tyupkina, O.G.

    1988-01-01

    Dependence of radiation creep rate ε of metals on stress σ is calculated. It is established that account of mobility and annihilation of 'forest' dislocations leads to the increase of calculational value ε and the effect increases with the growth of σ, reaching 10-15% at σ ∼ 0.8 σ cr (σ cr - critical shear stress)

  16. On the radiative corrections α2lnα to the positronium decay rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khriplovich, I.B.; Elkhovskij, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    The radiative corrections ∼α 2 ln α to the positronium decay rate are calculated in the Breit approximation which is shown to be quite adequate for the problem. For orthopositronium the result coincides with the previous one, for parapositronium it differs from the old results. 9 refs

  17. Geological influence on terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in the Malaysian State of Johore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, A.T.; Hussein, A.W.M.A.; Lee, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose-rate (TGRD) have been made in Johore, Malaysia. The focus is on determining a relationship between geological type and TGRD levels. Data were compared using the one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), in some instances revealing significant differences between TGRD measurements and the underlying geological structure

  18. Calculation of radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide contained in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Tien Thinh; Nguyen Hao Quang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some results that we used MCNP5 program to calculate radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide in building materials. Since then, the limits of radionuclide content in building materials are discussed. The calculation results by MCNP are compared with those calculated by analytical method. (author)

  19. Radiation therapy treatment of acute refractory renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinez, J.; Thisted, R.A.; Woodle, E.S.; Thistlethwaite, J.R.; Powers, C.; Haraf, D.

    1996-01-01

    radiation treatment (median 4, range 1-22), number of transplants (one transplant in 77 %), and concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Independent factors by the Cox regression model were: Sex (P=0.005), Creatinine levels (P=0.000), HLA-DR (P=0.05), PRA-Max > 70% (P=0.014). Each factor was scored using the integral coefficients to generate four different groups. The overall actuarial graft survival from the initiation of RT was 83% at 1 month, 60% at 1 year and 36% at 5 years. The Kaplan-Meier survival analyzed by groups seems to produce an interpretable separation of the risk factors for graft loss. The number of rejections of pre-RT range from 1-6 (median 2) and post-RT range from 0-3 (median 0). Conclusions: Our experience indicates that radiation therapy provides effective treatment for acute refractory renal allograft rejection. The response to radiation therapy in patients treated with acute refractory renal graft rejection can be predicted by a new scoring system

  20. Rates of change in natural and anthropogenic radiative forcing over the past 20,000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joos, Fortunat; Spahni, Renato

    2008-02-05

    The rate of change of climate codetermines the global warming impacts on natural and socioeconomic systems and their capabilities to adapt. Establishing past rates of climate change from temperature proxy data remains difficult given their limited spatiotemporal resolution. In contrast, past greenhouse gas radiative forcing, causing climate to change, is well known from ice cores. We compare rates of change of anthropogenic forcing with rates of natural greenhouse gas forcing since the Last Glacial Maximum and of solar and volcanic forcing of the last millennium. The smoothing of atmospheric variations by the enclosure process of air into ice is computed with a firn diffusion and enclosure model. The 20th century increase in CO(2) and its radiative forcing occurred more than an order of magnitude faster than any sustained change during the past 22,000 years. The average rate of increase in the radiative forcing not just from CO(2) but from the combination of CO(2), CH(4), and N(2)O is larger during the Industrial Era than during any comparable period of at least the past 16,000 years. In addition, the decadal-to-century scale rate of change in anthropogenic forcing is unusually high in the context of the natural forcing variations (solar and volcanoes) of the past millennium. Our analysis implies that global climate change, which is anthropogenic in origin, is progressing at a speed that is unprecedented at least during the last 22,000 years.

  1. Calculation of radiation dose rates from a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation doses from a spent nuclear fuel cask are usually from various phases of operations during handling, shipping, and storage of the casks. Assessment of such doses requires knowledge of external radiation dose rates at various locations surrounding a cask. Under current practices, dose rates from gamma photons are usually estimated by means of point- or line-source approaches incorporating the conventional buildup factors. Although such simplified approaches may at times be easy to use, their accuracy has not been verified. For example, those simplified methods have not taken into account influencing factors such as the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface, and the effects of these factors on the calculated dose rates are largely unknown. Moreover, similar empirical equations for buildup factors currently do not exist for neutrons. The objective of this study is to use a more accurate approach in calculating radiation dose rates for both neutrons and gamma photons from a spent fuel cask. The calculation utilizes the more sophisticated transport method and takes into account the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface. The results of a detailed study of dose rates in the near field (within 20 meters) are presented and, for easy application, the cask centerline dose rates are fitted into empirical equations at cask centerline distances up to 2000 meters from the surface of the cask

  2. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kyung Mi

    2012-01-01

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ( 137 Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  3. The short term effects of Low-dose-rate Radiation on EL4 Lymphoma Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chull; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine the biological effects of low-dose-rate radiation ({sup 137}Cs, 2.95 mGy/h) on EL4 lymphoma cells during 24 h, we investigated the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, iron transport, and ribonucleotide reductase. EL4 cells were continuously exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (total dose: 70.8 mGy) for 24 h. We analyzed cell proliferation and apoptosis by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, gene expression by real-time PCR, and protein levels with the apoptosis ELISA kit. Apoptosis increased in the Low-dose-rate irradiated cells, but cell number did not differ between non- (Non-IR) and Low-dose-rate irradiated (LDR-IR) cells. In concordance with apoptotic rate, the transcriptional activity of ATM, p53, p21, and Parp was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Similarly, Phospho-p53 (Ser15), cleaved caspase 3 (Asp175), and cleaved Parp (Asp214) expression was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. No difference was observed in the mRNA expression of DNA repair-related genes (Msh2, Msh3, Wrn, Lig4, Neil3, ERCC8, and ERCC6) between Non-IR and LDR-IR cells. Interestingly, the mRNA of Trfc was upregulated in the LDR-IR cells. Therefore, we suggest that short-term Low-dose-rate radiation activates apoptosis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

  4. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  5. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andjelković, Marko S; Ristić, Goran S; Jakšić, Aleksandar B

    2015-01-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h −1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose. (paper)

  6. Radiation treatment compliance in the indigenous population: the pilot of Northern Territory experience and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Hien; Carruthers, Scott; Penniment, Michael; Roos, Daniel; Sullivan, Thomas; Baxi, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    There is a perception that Indigenous patients are less likely to attend radiotherapy treatment. This study sought to determine if a difference in radiotherapy treatment compliance rates exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. Secondly, we aimed to ascertain which patient, disease and treatment factors affect compliance in Indigenous patients. All patients treated with radiotherapy at the Alan Walker Cancer Care Centre between March and October 2010 were analysed. Data regarding compliance rates (defined as those who chose and completed the recommended course of treatment), patient, disease and treatment factors were collected, and chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were applied. A total of 41 courses were delivered to Indigenous patients and 224 courses delivered to non-Indigenous patients in this period. There was no difference in compliance between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients (83% vs. 81%, P=0.75). Of the factors assessed, it was found that there was an association between toxicity grade and compliance (P=0.048). From this cohort, we cannot support the perception that Indigenous patients have overall poorer compliance with recommended radiation treatment courses. In this study, the only factor which correlated significantly with compliance was toxicity grade. It is felt that a number of factors, which negatively impact on compliance, can potentially be counteracted by a culturally sensitive model of care.

  7. The use of postoperative beta radiation in the treatment of pterygia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaniz-Camino, F.

    1982-01-01

    Results of 483 cases of pterygia treated with surgery and prophylactic postoperatory beta therapy are discussed. Distribution by age and sex show the predominant age range to be between 20 to 50 years with an almost equal proportion of males and females. The postoperative dose administrated was 2800 rads in four to five days overall time, with a recurrence rate of 4.32%. Of this group of recurrent cases, only one patient received the first irradiation treatment immediately after surgery; the rest were treated 24 hours after being operated. We have found no undesirable side effects or damage produced by beta radiation

  8. Treatment results of non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas in adults treated by surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Masao; Nishikawa, Ryo; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Fujimaki, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Osamu

    1999-01-01

    Non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas in adults are oncopathologically defined as well-differentiated carcinoma of the brain. They grow invasively and can not be cured by extensive surgery followed by radiation therapy. We performed multidisciplinary treatments consisting of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy in 26 adult patients with non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas. The 5- and 10-year survival rates of the patients were 90.9% and 75.6%, respectively; these were better than reported survival rates of patients treated by postoperative radiation therapy alone. Precise analysis of clinical findings of astrocytic tumors suggested that glioblastomas growing superficially might be derived from preexisting astrocytomas. This hypothesis proposes that multidisciplinary treatments for astrocytomas in early stages could cure the disease and could ultimately decrease a number of glioblastomas. (author)

  9. Preliminary radiation-oxidizing treatment influence on radiation-catalytic activity of zirconium during water decomposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibov, A.A.; Aliyev, A.G.; Agayev, T.N.; Aliyev, S.M.; Velibekova, G.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The study of physical-chemical processes proceeding in contact of metal constructional materials nuclear reactors with water at simultaneous influence of temperature and radiation represents the large interest at the decision of problems material authority and safety of work of nuclear -power installations [1-2]. One of the widely widespread materials of active zone nuclear reactors is metal zirconium and its alloys. The influence of preliminary radiation processing on radiation, radiation -thermal and thermal processes of accumulation of molecular hydrogen and oxidation zirconium in contact with water is investigated at T=673 K and ρ=5mg/sm 3 [3-4]. Initial samples zirconium previously has been exposed by an irradiation in medium H 2 O 2 at D=20-410 kGy. The contribution of radiation processes in these contacts in process thermo-radiation decomposition of water and oxidation of materials of zirconium is revealed. It is established that the interaction of Zr metal, preliminary treated by radiation, with water at radiation -heterogeneous processes leads to passivity of a surface. The rate meanings of thermal, radiation -thermal processes and radiation-chemical yields of hydrogen are determined. It is revealed, that at radiation-heterogeneous processes in system Zr +H 2 O (ρ =5mg/sm 3 T=673 K) the increase of the absorbed doze up to 123 kGy results to reduction of a radiation -chemical yield of molecular hydrogen. The further increase of the absorbed doze results to increase of a radiation -chemical yield of hydrogen. The observable effect at the preliminary radiation of zirconium is connected to formation of oxide phase on a surface. The mechanism of radiation -heterogeneous processes proceeding in system Zr+H 2 O is suggested. (author)

  10. Custom-made micro applicators for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of chronic psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we present the treatment of the psoriatic nail beds of patients refractory to standard therapies using high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. The custom-made micro applicators (CMMA were designed and constructed for radiation dose delivery to small curvy targets with complicated topology. The role of the HDR brachytherapy treatment was to stimulate the T cells for an increased immune response. Material and methods: The patient diagnosed with psoriatic nail beds refractory to standard therapies received monthly subunguinal injections that caused significant pain and discomfort in both hands. The clinical target was defined as the length from the fingertip to the distal interphalangeal joint. For the accurate and reproducible setup in the multi-fractional treatment delivery, the CMMAs were designed. Five needles were embedded into the dense plastic mesh and covered with 5 mm bolus material for each micro applicator. Five CMMAs were designed, resulting in the usage of 25 catheters in total. Results: The prescription dose was planned to the depth of the anterior surface of the distal phalanx, allowing for the sparing of the surrounding tissue. The total number of the active dwell positions was 145 with step size of 5 mm. The total treatment time was 115 seconds with a 7.36 Ci activity of the 192Ir source. The treatment resulted in good pain control. The patient did not require further injections to the nail bed. After this initial treatment, additional two patients with similar symptoms received HDR brachytherapy. The treatment outcome was favorable in all cases. Conclusions : The first HDR brachytherapy treatment of psoriasis of the nail bed is presented. The initial experience revealed that brachytherapy treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in adequate control of the disease. A larger cohort of patients will be required for additional conclusions related to the long-term clinical benefits.

  11. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  12. Occurrence of chronic esophageal ulcer after high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology of the Hyogo Medical Center for Adults between January 1982 and December 1993. Twenty patients with complete response after intraluminal radiation therapy, who were followed up with esophageal fiberscopy in our institute, were reviewed. The one-year cumulative rate of occurrence of esophageal ulcers was 81%, and in 69% of the cases the ulcers occurred from 4 to 8 months after completion of intraluminal radiation therapy. We graded esophageal ulcer by fiberscopic findings. Grade 0 was defined as no ulcer, grade 1 as superficial ulcer, grade 2 as deep ulcer, grade 3 as circumferencial ulcer, and severe stenosis. Factors related to grade were studied, and shorter distances from the source to the surface of the mucosa and lower surface doses of intraluminal radiation therapy appear to reduce the severity as graded on the above scale, of the esophageal ulcer. Four of the five 2-year recurrence-free patients suffered esophageal ulcers, which were cured from 15 to 22 months after intraluminal radiation therapy. However ulcers recurred in two patients, ong term care was thought to be necessary. (author)

  13. Economic evaluation of radiation processing in urban solid wastes treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carassiti, F.; Lacquaniti, L.; Liuzzo, G.

    During the last few years, quite a number of studies have been done, or are still in course, on disinfection of urban liquid wastes by means of ionizing radiations. The experience gained by SANDIA pilot plant of irradiation on dried sewage sludge, together with the recently presented conceptual design of another plant handling granular solids, characterized by high efficiency and simple running, have shown the possibility of extending this process to the treatment of urban solid wastes. As a matter of fact, the problems connected to the pathogenic aspects of sludge handling are often similar to those met during the disposal of urban solid wastes. This is even more so in the case of their reuse in agriculture and zootechny. The present paper introduces the results of an analysis carried out in order to evaluate the economical advantage of inserting irradiation treatment in some process scheme for management of urban solid wastes. Taking as an example a comprehensive pattern of urban solid wastes management which has been analysed and estimated economically in previous works, we first evaluated the extra capital and operational costs due to the irradiation and then analysed economical justification, taking into account the increasing commercial value of the by-products.

  14. The role of PET/CT in radiation treatment planning for cancer patient treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and, more recently, integrated positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) have appeared as significant diagnostic imaging systems in clinical medicine. Accurate recognition of cancers in patients by means of PET scanning with Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) has illustrated a need to determine a mode of therapy to achieve better prognoses. The clinical management of cancer patients has improved dramatically with the introduction of clinical PET. For treatment of cancer patients, on the other hand, radiation therapy (RT) plays an important role as a non-invasive therapy. It is crucial that cancers are encompassed by high dose irradiation, particularly in cases of curative RT. Irradiation should precisely target the entire tumour and aim to minimise the size of microscopic extensions of the cancer, as well as minimize radiation damage to normal tissues. A new imaging technique has therefore been sought to allow precise delineation of the cancer target to be irradiated. Clinical PET, combined with utilization of 18 F-FDG, may have an important role in radiation treatment planning (RTP) in lung cancer. In addition to determining if RT is appropriate and whether therapy will be given with curative or palliative intent, 18 F-FDG-PET is useful for determining therapy ports. It can be used both to limit ports to spare normal tissue and to include additional involved regions. Several studies have shown that PET has an impact on RTP in an important proportion of patients. It is to be hoped that treatment plans that include all the 18 F-FDG-avid lesions or the 18 F-FDG-avid portions of a complex mass will result in more effective local control with less unnecessary tissue being treated. The IAEA has placed emphasis on the issue of application of clinical PET for radiation treatment planning in various cancer patients. Two consultants meetings were held in 2006 and their results are summarized into this IAEA

  15. Relationships betwen mitotic delay and the dose rate of X radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, P.N.; Rha, C.K.; Evans, H.H.; Beer, J.Z.

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure of cells to radiation delivered at a continuous low dose rate, cell proliferation may be sustained with the cells exhibiting a constant doubling time that is independent of the total dose. The doubling time or mitotic delay under these conditions has been shown to depend on the dose rate in HeLa, V79 and P388F cells. Reanalysis of the data for these particular cell lines shows that there is a threshold dose rate for mitotic delay, and that above the threshold there is a linear relationship between the length of mitotic delay and the logarithm of the dose rate which is referred to as the dose-rate response. We have observed the same relationships for L5178Y (LY)-R and LY-S cells exposed to low-dose-rate radiation. The threshold dose rates for LY-R, LY-S and P388F cells are similar (0.01-0.02 Gy/h) and are much lower than for V79 and HeLa cells. The slope of the dose-rate response curve is the greatest for HeLa cells, followed in order by LY-S, V79 and P388F cells, and finally by LY-R cells. The slopes for HeLa and LY-R cells differ by a factor of 35. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Malignant mesothelioma after radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Burgers, Jacobus A; Baas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a relatively uncommon malignancy. Although the pathogenesis is primarily related to asbestos, the disease may be associated with radiation exposure. Recently, increased risks for second primary mesothelioma after radiation for lymphoma have been reported. Because these f...

  17. Plastic and reconstructive surgical treatment of the radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Nobutaka; Ogo, Ken; Uchiyama, Kanenari; Fukushima, Hisaki

    1977-01-01

    Eleven cases of radiation injury are reported. Three of them were relatively superficial ''radiation dermatitis''. They received radical excision and free skin-grafting to the cosmetic and functional satisfaction. Eight patients had deeper injury, ''radiation ulcer''. Six cases were treated by ''local flap''. The local flap technique is the simplest and the most effective way to treat the radiation ulcer. The reason is 1) it is a one stage operation, 2) it has a permanent pedicle supplying good blood flow, 3) it has very close texture and color match to the area. However, a skin-grafting performed on one patient of radiation ulcer ended up with failure. The indication of the skin-grafting and the local flap was discussed from the point of the stage or degree of radiation injuries and the recommendable method is the skin-grafting to the radiation dermatitis and the local flap to the radiation ulcer. (auth.)

  18. Malignant mesothelioma after radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marie L.; Burgers, Jacobus A.; Baas, Paul; van 't Veer, Mars B.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Louwman, Marieke W. J.; Zijlstra, Josée M.; van den Berg, Hendrik; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a relatively uncommon malignancy. Although the pathogenesis is primarily related to asbestos, the disease may be associated with radiation exposure. Recently, increased risks for second primary mesothelioma after radiation for lymphoma have been reported. Because these

  19. Treatment of radiation burns, 1987 [videorecording][Radiation injuries following an accident at a nuclear power plant, 1986. Medical aspects of Chernobyl, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-07-01

    After the accident at Chernobyl, patients with various degrees of radiation burns were given treatment at Moscow hospital No. 6. The video shows the radiation injuries as well as therapy and treatment in detail.

  20. Dose rate effect on the yield of radiation induced response with thermal fading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Rogalev, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-01-01

    A model describing the dependences of the accumulation of thermally unstable radiation induced defects on the dose and dose rate is proposed. The model directly takes into account the track nature of the ionizing radiation represented as accumulation processes of defects in tracks averaged over a crystal volume considering various degrees of overlapping in space and time. The accumulation of the defects in the tracks is phenomenologically described. General expressions are obtained that allows radiation yield simulation of defects involving known creation and transformation processes. The cases considered, of linear accumulation (constant increment of the defects in tracks) and accumulation with saturation (complete saturation of the defects in one track), lead to a set of linear dose dependences with saturation, which are routinely used in luminescence and ESR dating. The accumulation, with increase of sensitivity in regions overlapped by two or more tracks, gave a set of dose dependences, from linear-sublinear-linear-saturation, distinctive of quartz up to linear-supralinear-linear-saturation. It is shown that the effect of the dose rate on dose dependences is determined by a dimensionless parameter a=Pτ/D0, where P is the dose rate, τ is the defect lifetime and D0 is the track dose. At a-bar 1 the dose rate influences basically the accumulation of thermally unstable defects. In the reverse case the dose dependences did not seems to be influenced by the dose rate

  1. Use of virtual reality to estimate radiation dose rates in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Jorge, Carlos A.F.; Couto, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    Operators in nuclear plants receive radiation doses during several different operation procedures. A training program capable of simulating these operation scenarios will be useful in several ways, helping the planning of operational procedures so as to reduce the doses received by workers, and to minimize operations' times. It can provide safe virtual operation training, visualization of radiation dose rates, and estimation of doses received by workers. Thus, a virtual reality application, a free game engine, has been adapted to achieve the goals of this project. Simulation results for Argonauta research reactor of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear are shown in this paper. A database of dose rate measurements, previously performed by the radiological protection service, has been used to display the dose rate distribution in the region of interest. The application enables the user to walk in the virtual scenario, displaying at all times the dose accumulated by the avatar. (author)

  2. Recent international regulations: low dose-low rate radiation protection and the demise of reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkalides, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    The radiation protection measures suggested by the International Committee for Radiation Protection (ICRP), national regulating bodies and experts, have been becoming ever more strict despite the decrease of any information supporting the existence of the Linear no Threshold model (LNT) and of any adverse effects of Low Dose Low Rate (LDLR) irradiation. This tendency arises from the disproportionate response of human society to hazards that are currently in fashion and is unreasonable. The 1 mSv/year dose limit for the public suggested by the ICRP corresponds to a 1/18,181 detriment-adjusted cancer risk and is much lower than other hazards that are faced by modern societies such as e.g. driving and smoking which carry corresponding rate risks of 1/2,100 and 1/2,000. Even worldwide deadly work accidents rate is higher at 1/ 8,065. Such excessive safety measures against minimal risks from man made radiation sources divert resources from very real and much greater hazards. In addition they undermine research and development of radiation technology and tend to subjugate science and the quest for understanding nature to phobic practices.

  3. Alternative high-level radiation sources for sewage and waste-water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantine, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The choice of an energy source for the radiation treatment of waste-water or sludge is between an electron accelerator or a gamma-ray source of radioactive cobalt or caesium. A number of factors will affect the ultimate choice and the potential future adoption of radiation as a treatment technique. The present and future availability of radioactive sources of cobalt and caesium is closely linked to the rate of nuclear power development and the assumption by uranium fuel reprocessors of a role as radioactive caesium suppliers. Accelerators are industrial machines which could be readily produced to meet any conceivable market demand. For energy sources in the 20-30 kW range, electron accelerators appear to have an initial capital cost advantage of about seven and an operating cost advantage of two. While radioisotope sources are inherently more reliable, accelerators at voltages to 3 MeV have achieved a reliability level adequate to meet the demands of essentially continuous operations with moderate maintenance requirements. The application of either energy source to waste-water treatment will be significantly influenced by considerations of the relative penetration capability, energy density and physical geometrical constraints of each option. The greater range of the gamma rays and the lower energy density of the isotopic sources permit irradiation of a variety of target geometrics. The low penetration of electrons and the high-energy density of accelerators limit application of the latter to targets presented as thin films of several centimetres thickness. Any potential use of radiation must proceed from a clear definition of process objectives and critical comparison of the radiation energy options for that specific objective. (Author)

  4. Dose Rate Effect on Grafting by Gamma Radiation of DMAEMA onto Flexible PVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzarini, L.C.G.A.; Araujo, F.D.C.; Martinello, V.C.; Somesari, E.; Manzoli, J.E.; Silveira, C.; Paes, H.A.; Moura, E.

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous tubing, blood bags and catheters stays in contact with blood and body fluids. They are normally made by flexible PVC. The contact of PVC with this fluid is not possible for long periods and there is the necessity of addition of non-thrombogenic substances into blood. This work shows the radiation grafting process to produce copolymer PVC-g-DMAEMA, a new material that allows a future grafting of Heparin on it, and will have the perspective of avoiding undesirable substances additions to blood or body fluid contact. In this preliminary work, only radiation dose rate effect on grafting was studied

  5. Nonlinear radiative heat flux and heat source/sink on entropy generation minimization rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Khan, M. Waleed Ahmed; Khan, M. Ijaz; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-06-01

    Entropy generation minimization in nonlinear radiative mixed convective flow towards a variable thicked surface is addressed. Entropy generation for momentum and temperature is carried out. The source for this flow analysis is stretching velocity of sheet. Transformations are used to reduce system of partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Total entropy generation rate is determined. Series solutions for the zeroth and mth order deformation systems are computed. Domain of convergence for obtained solutions is identified. Velocity, temperature and concentration fields are plotted and interpreted. Entropy equation is studied through nonlinear mixed convection and radiative heat flux. Velocity and temperature gradients are discussed through graphs. Meaningful results are concluded in the final remarks.

  6. Treatment of Vascular Soft Tissue Sarcomas With Razoxane, Vindesine, and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhomberg, Walter; Wink, Anna; Pokrajac, Boris; Eiter, Helmut; Hackl, Arnulf; Pakisch, Brigitte; Ginestet, Angela; Lukas, Peter; Poetter, Richard Prof.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In previous studies, razoxane and vindesine together with radiotherapy was proved to be effective in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Because razoxane leads to a redifferentiation of pathological tumor blood vessels, it was of particular interest to study the influence of this drug combination in vascular soft tissue sarcomas. Methods and Materials: This open multicenter Phase II study was performed by the Austrian Society of Radiooncology. Among 13 evaluable patients (10 angiosarcomas and 3 hemangio-pericytomas), 9 had unresectable measurable disease, 3 showed microscopic residuals, and 1 had a resection with clear margins. They received a basic treatment with razoxane and vindesine supported by radiation therapy. Outcome measures were objective response rates, survival time, and the incidence of distant metastases. Results: In nine patients with measurable vascular soft tissue sarcomas (eight angiosarcomas and one hemangiopericytoma), 6 complete remissions, 2 partial remissions, and 1 minor remission were achieved, corresponding to a major response rate of 89%. A maintenance therapy with razoxane and vindesine of 1 year or longer led to a suppression of distant metastases. The median survival time from the start of the treatment is 23+ months (range, 3-120+) for 12 patients with macroscopic and microscopic residual disease. The progression-free survival at 6 months was 75%. The combined treatment was associated with a low general toxicity, but attention must be given to increased normal tissue reactions. Conclusions: This trimodal treatment leads to excellent response rates, and it suppresses distant metastases when given as maintenance therapy.

  7. Radiation treatment in older patients: a framework for clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Smith, Benjamin D

    2014-08-20

    In older patients, radiation treatment plays a vital role in curative and palliative cancer therapy. Radiation treatment recommendations should be informed by a comprehensive, personalized risk-benefit assessment that evaluates treatment efficacy and toxicity. We review several clinical factors that distinctly affect efficacy and toxicity of radiation treatment in older patients. First, locoregional tumor behavior may be more indolent in older patients for some disease sites but more aggressive for other sites. Assessment of expected locoregional relapse risk informs the magnitude and timeframe of expected radiation treatment benefits. Second, assessment of the competing cancer versus noncancer mortality and morbidity risks contextualizes cancer treatment priorities holistically within patients' entire spectrum and time course of health needs. Third, assessment of functional reserve helps predict patients' acute treatment tolerance, differentiating those patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment or who are at high risk for treatment complications. Potential radiation treatment options include immediate curative treatment, delayed curative treatment, and no treatment, with additional consideration given to altered radiation target, dose, or sequencing with chemotherapy and/or surgery. Finally, when cure is not feasible, palliative radiation therapy remains valuable for managing symptoms and achieving meaningful quality-of-life improvements. Our proposed decision-making framework integrates these factors to help radiation oncologists formulate strategic treatment recommendations within a multidisciplinary context. Future research is still needed to identify how advanced technologies can be judiciously applied in curative and palliative settings to enhance risk-benefit profiles of radiation treatment in older patients and more accurately quantify treatment efficacy in this group. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. A study on radiation treatment of wastewater using an electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Shoji

    1982-02-01

    A study on radiation oxidation treatment of refractory or toxic wastewater using an electron accelerator was carried out from the viewpoint of reaction engineering. For the process using electron beams, oxygen supply to the penetration range of electron (reaction zone) where the dose rate is extremely high, is significantly important. A concentric dual-tube-type bubbling column reactor was shown to be most suitable to maintain the dissolved oxygen at a high concentration. Rate expressions of pollutant reduction and oxygen consumption in the reactor were derived. The efficiency of active species utilization for oxidation, phi, was defined and shown to be an important design parameter. A new wastewater treatment system (Electron Accelerator-Dual tube Bubbling Reactor system) was proposed, and successfully demonstrated for the treatment of wastewater involving dyes and phenol. The dissolved oxygen was maintained at a high concentration by using this type of reactor for the high dose rate irradiation. phi was obtained as a function of dissolved oxygen concentration for the dye solution and was also obtained as functions of the oxygen concentration and dose rate for the phenol solution. By these experimental results, the effectiveness of EA-DBR system was proved. (author)

  9. Dose-rate effects on mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the life cycle and on cell survival was studied for a range of different dose rates. Log phase, plateau phase and synchronized cultures of different mammalian cells were used. Cell cycle redistribution during the radiation exposure was found to be a very important factor in determining the overall dose-rate effect for log phase and synchronized cells. In fact, cell cycle redistribution during the exposure, in some instances, resulted in a lower dose rate being more effective in cell killing per u