WorldWideScience

Sample records for rate jet impact

  1. Perfect fluid flow from granular jet impact

    CERN Document Server

    Ellowitz, Jake; Zhang, Wendy W

    2012-01-01

    Experiments on the impact of a densely-packed jet of non-cohesive grains onto a fixed target show that the impact produces an ejecta sheet comprised of particles in collimated motion. The ejecta sheet leaves the target at a well-defined angle whose value agrees quantitatively with the sheet angle produced by water jet impact. Motivated by these experiments, we examine the idealized problem of dense granular jet impact onto a frictionless target in two dimensions. Numerical results for the velocity and pressure fields within the granular jet agree quantitatively with predictions from an exact solution for 2D perfect-fluid impact. This correspondence demonstrates that the continuum limit controlling the coherent collective motion in dense granular impact is Euler flow.

  2. Jet impact on a soap film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale.

  3. Numerical simulation of high pressure water jet impacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jialiang; Wang, Mengjin; Zhang, Di

    2017-08-01

    High pressure water jet technology is an unconventional concrete crushing technology. In order to reveal the mechanism of high pressure water jet impacting concrete, it built a three-dimensional numerical model of high pressure water jet impacting concrete based on fluid mechanics and damage mechanics. And the numerical model was verified by theoretical analysis and experiments. Based on this model, it studied the stress characteristics in concrete under high pressure water jet impacting at different time, and quantified the damage evolution rules in concrete along the water jet radial direction. The results can provide theoretical basis and guidance for the high pressure water jet crushing concrete technology.

  4. Experiments with large diameter gravity driven impacting liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storr, G. J.; Behnia, M.

    The phenomenon of a liquid jet released under gravity and falling through or impacting onto another liquid before colliding with an obstructing solid surface has been studied experimentally under isothermal conditions. Usually the jet diameter was sufficiently large to ensure jet coherency until collision. Direct flow visualization was used to study jets released into water pools with no air head space and jets impacting onto water pools after falling through an air head space. It is shown that distances predicting the onset of buoyancy and the entrainment of air using derivations from continuous plunging jets, are not applicable for impacting jets. The morphology of jet debris after collision with the solid surfaces correlates with the wetting properties of the jet liquid on the surface.

  5. Associated jet and subjet rates in light-quark and gluon jet discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Nojiri, Mihoko M; Sakaki, Yasuhito; Webber, Bryan R

    2015-01-01

    We show that in studies of light quark- and gluon-initiated jet discrimination, it is important to include the information on softer reconstructed jets (associated jets) around a primary hard jet. This is particularly relevant while adopting a small radius parameter for reconstructing hadronic jets. The probability of having an associated jet as a function of the primary jet transverse momentum ($p_T$) and radius, the minimum associated jet $p_T$ and the association radius is computed upto next-to-double logarithmic accuracy (NDLA), and the predictions are compared with results from Herwig++, Pythia6 and Pythia8 Monte Carlos (MC). We demonstrate the improvement in quark-gluon discrimination on using the associated jet rate variable with the help of a multivariate analysis. The associated jet rates are found to be only mildly sensitive to the choice of parton shower and hadronization algorithms, as well as to the effects of initial state radiation and underlying event. In addition, the number of $k_T$ subjets ...

  6. STUDY ON JETS IMPACT IN AIR FOR ENERGY DISSIPATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the applications of water jet impact in air to energy dissipation. The scattered jet flow impinges into the downstream water plunge pool, which greatly improves the inflow condition of the submerged jet in the pool and make it diffuse very quickly. The model experiments were conducted, which showed that a large jet flow could be scattered by a small one through impacting. The minimum discharge ratio for flow dispersion was studied. The unequal jet impact in air for energy dissipation was brought forward firstly in this paper as a new type of energy dissipator.

  7. Jets at lowest mass accretion rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maitra, D.; Cantrell, A.; Markoff, S.; Falcke, H.; Miller, J.; Bailyn, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of recent observations and theoretical modeling of data from black holes accreting at very low luminosities (L/LEdd ≲ 10−8). We discuss our newly developed time-dependent model for episodic ejection of relativistic plasma within a jet framework, and a successful application of thi

  8. Impact of Jet Veto Resummation on Slepton Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Tackmann, Frank J; Zeune, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Several searches for new physics at the LHC require a fixed number of signal jets, vetoing events with additional jets from QCD radiation. As the probed scale of new physics gets much larger than the jet-veto scale, such jet vetoes strongly impact the QCD perturbative series, causing nontrivial theoretical uncertainties. We consider slepton pair production with 0 signal jets, for which we perform the resummation of jet-veto logarithms and study its impact. Currently, the experimental exclusion limits take the jet-veto cut into account by extrapolating to the inclusive cross section using parton shower Monte Carlos. Our results indicate that the associated theoretical uncertainties can be large, and when taken into account have a sizeable impact already on present exclusion limits. This is improved by performing the resummation to higher order, which allows us to obtain accurate predictions even for high slepton masses. For the interpretation of the experimental results to benefit from improved theory predicti...

  9. Development of an Abrasive Water Jet Optimum Abrasive Flow Rate Model for Titanium Alloy Cutting (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    As the abrasive water jet (AWJ) is used in industry extensively, optimization of the process parameters that determine efficiency, economy and...quality of the process is becoming more and more important for its successful application. However, being a complicated cutting system, an abrasive water ... jet is characterized by a large number of process parameters, which include water pressure, orifice diameter, traverse rate, standoff distance, impact

  10. Impact welding of foils by water jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgutlu, A.; Akyurt, M. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Al-Hassani, S.T.S. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    Impact welding is a practical and economically feasible process for the solid-phase welding of similar and dissimilar metals. The versatile process is applicable to combinations of materials usually considered incompatible using more conventional joining methods. Thus, unlike with other spot welding methods, it is possible to use impact spot welding to join two metals of widely different melting points. Considerable research is needed to gain a thorough understanding of this process, its potential and possible new applications. Impact spot welding is similar to the familiar explosive welding process. Impact spot welding can be brought about by the action of a high-velocity object, such as projectile, on the material comprising the impacting object-target interface. The projectile impinging onto the top surface of a flyer plate at the target provides the energy of collision. Subsequently, the flyer plate moves with the projectile toward the base plate. A second impact occurs between the center of the bulge of the flyer plate and the base plate. The central collision of impact spreads radially out with an angle of collision. This oblique collision is an important feature of this process. The manner in which the flyer plate deforms due to the impact of a high-speed object is significant in defining spot welding geometry. The deformation is produced by a combination of elastic, plastic and hydrodynamic wave propagation involving normal, bending and shear stresses. Metallic materials are forcibly driven together by the use of an impactor in such a way that a strong metallurgical bond is formed. Therefore, the use of either explosives or impactors, which may be water jets or solid projectiles, is incidental. Bonding results, in general, only from the impact of the two or more materials. In this sense the resulting bonding may be called impact bonding instead of explosive bonding.

  11. Mass entrainment rate of an ideal momentum turbulent round jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medrano, Fermın Franco; Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Velte, Clara Marika;

    2017-01-01

    We propose a two-phase-fluid model for a full-cone turbulent round jet that describes its dynamics in a simple but comprehensive manner with only the apex angle of the cone being a disposable parameter. The basic assumptions are that (i) the jet is statistically stationary and that (ii) it can...... of the distance from the nozzle, from which the dynamic pressure and the mass entrainment rate are calculated. Assuming a far-field approximation, we theoretically derive a constant entrainment rate coefficient solely in terms of the cone angle. Moreover, we carry out experiments for a single-phase turbulent air...... jet and show that the predictions of our model compare well with this and other experimental data of atomizing liquid jets....

  12. High-Speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, S.; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; van der Meer, Roger M.; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    A circular disc hitting a water surface creates an impact crater which after collapse leads to a vigorous jet. Upon impact an axisymmetric air cavity forms and eventually pinches off in a single point halfway down the cavity. Two fast sharp-pointed jets are observed shooting up- and downwards from t

  13. High-Speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, Stephan; Gordillo, José Manuel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    A circular disc hitting a water surface creates an impact crater which after collapse leads to a vigorous jet. Upon impact an axisymmetric air cavity forms and eventually pinches off in a single point halfway down the cavity. Two fast sharp-pointed jets are observed shooting up- and downwards from the closure location, which by then has turned into a stagnation point surrounded by a locally hyperbolic flow pattern. This flow, however, is not the mechanism feeding the jets. Using high-speed imaging and numerical simulations we show that jetting is fed by the local flow around the base of the jet, which is forced by the colliding cavity walls. We show how the well-known theory of a collapsing void (using a line of sinks on the symmetry axis) can be continued beyond pinch-off to obtain a new and quantitative model for jet formation which agrees well with numerical and experimental data.

  14. Comparing Three Jet Rates with and without Hadronic Rindler Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffary, Tooraj

    2017-01-01

    Recently, some researchers, (Sepehri and Shoorvazi Chin. Phys. Lett. 30(2), 021301, [2013]), have considered the effect of Rindler horizon on three jet rate. This paper confirms their results and by comparing usual models with this new model for different energies, shows that regarding Rindler horizon gives us the results which more close to experimental data respect to usual models.

  15. Comparing Three Jet Rates With and Without Hadronic Rindler Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffary, Tooraj

    2016-01-01

    Recently some researchers, (A. Sepehri, S. Shoorvazi, CHIN. PHYS. LETT. Vol. 30, No. 2 (2013)), have considered the effect of Rindler horizon on three jet rate. This paper confirms their results and by comparing usual models with this new model for different energies, shows that regarding Rindler horizon gives us the results which more close to experimental data respect to usual models

  16. Impact of jet veto resummation on slepton searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tackmann, Frank J. [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Waalewijn, Wouter J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). ITFA; Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Theory Group; Zeune, Lisa [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Theory Group

    2016-03-15

    Several searches for new physics at the LHC require a fixed number of signal jets, vetoing events with additional jets from QCD radiation. As the probed scale of new physics gets much larger than the jet-veto scale, such jet vetoes strongly impact the QCD perturbative series, causing nontrivial theoretical uncertainties. We consider slepton pair production with 0 signal jets, for which we perform the resummation of jet-veto logarithms and study its impact. Currently, the experimental exclusion limits take the jet-veto cut into account by extrapolating to the inclusive cross section using parton shower Monte Carlos. Our results indicate that the associated theoretical uncertainties can be large, and when taken into account have a sizeable impact already on present exclusion limits. This is improved by performing the resummation to higher order, which allows us to obtain accurate predictions even for high slepton masses. For the interpretation of the experimental results to benefit from improved theory predictions, it would be useful for the experimental analyses to also provide limits on the unfolded visible 0-jet cross section.

  17. Prediction of the growth rates of VDEs in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, R.; Mattei, M.; Villone, F.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we show that the effect of the saddle currents in the rigid sectors slows down the vertical instability of JET elongated plasmas with respect to estimates based on pure axisymmetric models. This, together with an accurate description of the passive structures, significantly improves the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results. Linearized models taking into account the three-dimensional effects of the eddy currents have been applied to various JET pulses; the growth rates have been estimated within an accuracy of less than 5% for plasmas with a growth time longer than 2 ms. This model can be used for JET and extended to ITER-FEAT to provide a reliable test bed for assessing the performance of the vertical control system and obtain an estimate of the loads on the structures during vertical displacement events (VDEs) and plasma disruptions.

  18. Analysis of the effect of impact of near-wall acoustic bubble collapse micro-jet on Al 1060.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linzheng; Zhu, Xijing

    2017-05-01

    The bubble collapse near a wall will generate strong micro-jet in a liquid environment under ultrasonic field. To explore the effect of the impact of near-wall acoustic bubble collapse micro-jet on an aluminum 1060 sheet, the cavitation threshold formula and micro-jet velocity formula were first proposed. Then the Johnson-Cook rate correlation material constitutive model was considered, and a three-dimensional fluid-solid coupling model of micro-jet impact on a wall was established and analyzed. Finally, to validate the model, ultrasonic cavitation test and inversion analysis based on the theory of spherical indentation test were conducted. The results show that cavitation occurs significantly in the liquid under ultrasonic field, as the applied ultrasonic pressure amplitude is much larger than liquid cavitation threshold. Micro pits appear on the material surface under the impact of micro-jet. Pit depth is determined by both micro-jet velocity and micro-jet diameter, and increases with their increase. Pit diameter is mainly related to the micro-jet diameter and dp/dj≈0.95-1.2, while pit's diameter-to-depth ratio is mainly negatively correlated with the micro-jet velocity. Wall pressure distribution is mostly symmetric and its maximum appears on the edge of micro-jet impingement. Obviously, the greater the micro-jet velocity is, the greater the wall pressure is. Micro pits formed after the impact of micro-jet on aluminum 1060 surface were assessed by ultrasonic cavitation test. Inversion analysis results indicate that equivalent stress, equivalent strain of the pit and impact strength, and velocity of the micro-jet are closely related with pit's diameter-to-depth ratio. For the pit's diameter-to-depth ratio of 16-68, the corresponding micro-jet velocity calculated is 310-370m/s. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The three-jet rate in \\(e^{+}e^{-}\\) annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Lovett-Turner, C N

    1994-01-01

    Abstract: Progress has been made on the calculation of \\(R_{3}\\), the three-jet rate in \\(e^{+}e^{-}\\) annihilation, in the \\(k_\\bot \\) (Durham) scheme. Using the coherent branching formalism \\cite{b,c,d}, an explicit expression for \\(R_{3}\\) is calculated. In this, leading and next-to-leading large logarithms (LL and NLL) are resummed to all orders in QCD perturbation theory. In addition to exponentials an error function is involved.

  20. Top-quark mass measurements using jet rates at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moch S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method to measure the top-quark mass in hadronic collisions[1]. The method uses the sensitivity of the tt¯+1$tar t + 1$-jet production on the top-quark mass. In detail we study the ℛ distribution defined as the tt¯+1$tar t + 1$-jet normalized cross section differential in the invariant mass of the total system and calculated at NLO accuracy. We prove that the ℛ distribution has a high sensitivity to the top-quark mass. Furthermore we investigate and quantify the impact of the dominant theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The results obtained show, that the method has the potential to be competitive in precision with established approaches and allows a complementary measurement of the top-quark mass at hadron colliders. We emphasize that in the proposed method the mass parameter is uniquely defined through one-loop renormalization.

  1. Influence of the energy dissipation rate in the discharge of a plasma synthetic jet actuator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinger, A; Cambronne, J P [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE - Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Hardy, P; Barricau, P; Caruana, D, E-mail: daniel.caruana@onera.fr [ONERA Centre Midi-Pyrenees, Departement Modeles pour l' Aerodynamique et l' Energetique, BP74025, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 TOULOUSE CEDEX 4 (France)

    2011-09-14

    A promising actuator for high-speed flow control, referred to as a plasma synthetic jet (PSJ), is being studied by the DMAE department of the ONERA, and the Laplace laboratory of the CNRS, in France. This actuator was inspired by the 'sparkjet' device developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The PSJ, which produces a synthetic jet with high exhaust velocities, no active mechanical components and no mass flow admission, holds the promise of enabling high-speed flows to be manipulated. With this high-velocity jet it is possible to reduce fluid phenomena such as transition and turbulence, thus making it possible to increase an aircraft's performance whilst at the same time reducing its environmental impact. A thermal plasma discharge was created in a micro-cavity, causing the gas to be expelled. It is relevant that the velocity and momentum depend on the energy dispersed by the electric discharge. To control the frequency and energy dispersed in the plasma, the Laplace laboratory has developed two high-voltage power supply systems. These allow two different types of discharge to be produced, with energy being supplied to the discharge in two different manners. In this paper, we focus on the impact of the power supply on the plasma synthetic jet, and in particular on the role of the rate of energy dissipation in the discharge. In order to estimate the influence of the power supply on the machinery of the actuator, specific experimental techniques were used to investigate the electrical (voltage, current), thermal (Infra-red camera) and aerodynamic (jet duration, isentropic pressure, jet velocity) characteristics. These data sets were used to determine which of the two power supplies was more effective, thus allowing us to reach several conclusions concerning the importance of the energy dissipation rate on the PSJ actuator.

  2. Scalar dissipation rate statistics in turbulent swirling jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetsyuk, V.; Soulopoulos, N.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.

    2016-07-01

    The scalar dissipation rate statistics were measured in an isothermal flow formed by discharging a central jet in an annular stream of swirling air flow. This is a typical geometry used in swirl-stabilised burners, where the central jet is the fuel. The flow Reynolds number was 29 000, based on the area-averaged velocity of 8.46 m/s at the exit and the diameter of 50.8 mm. The scalar dissipation rate and its statistics were computed from two-dimensional imaging of the mixture fraction fields obtained with planar laser induced fluorescence of acetone. Three swirl numbers, S, of 0.3, 0.58, and 1.07 of the annular swirling stream were considered. The influence of the swirl number on scalar mixing, unconditional, and conditional scalar dissipation rate statistics were quantified. A procedure, based on a Wiener filter approach, was used to de-noise the raw mixture fraction images. The filtering errors on the scalar dissipation rate measurements were up to 15%, depending on downstream positions from the burner exit. The maximum of instantaneous scalar dissipation rate was found to be up to 35 s-1, while the mean dissipation rate was 10 times smaller. The probability density functions of the logarithm of the scalar dissipation rate fluctuations were found to be slightly negatively skewed at low swirl numbers and almost symmetrical when the swirl number increased. The assumption of statistical independence between the scalar and its dissipation rate was valid for higher swirl numbers at locations with low scalar fluctuations and less valid for low swirl numbers. The deviations from the assumption of statistical independence were quantified. The conditional mean of the scalar dissipation rate, the standard deviation of the scalar dissipation rate fluctuations, the weighted probability of occurrence of the mean conditional scalar dissipation rate, and the conditional probability are reported.

  3. High-speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gekle, Stephan; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    A circular disc impacting on a water surface creates a remarkably vigorous jet. Upon impact an axisymmetric air cavity forms and eventually pinches off in a single point halfway down the cavity. Immediately after closure two fast sharp-pointed jets are observed shooting up- and downwards from the closure location, which by then has turned into a stagnation point surrounded by a locally hyperbolic flow pattern. This flow, however, is {\\it not} the mechanism feeding the two jets. Using high-speed imaging and numerical simulations we show that jetting is fed by the local flow around the base of the jet, which is forced by the colliding cavity walls. Based on this insight, we then show how the analytical description of a collapsing void (using a line of sinks along the axis of symmetry) can be continued beyond the time of pinch-off to obtain a quantitative model for jet formation which is in good agreement with the numerical and experimental data.

  4. Liquid jet rebound upon impact on a soft gel

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, Dan; Brenner, Michael; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    A liquid jet can stably bounce off a sufficiently soft gel, by following the contour of the dimple created due to pressure upon impact. This phenomenon is relatively insensitive to the wetting properties of the liquid and was observed for different liquids over a wide range of surface tensions, $\\gamma$ = 24-72 mN/m. In contrast, other jet rebound phenomena are typically sensitive to $\\gamma$: jet rebound off a hard solid (e.g. superhydrophobic surface) or another liquid is possible only for high and low $\\gamma$ liquids respectively. This is because an air layer must exist between the two interfaces. For a soft gel, no air layer is necessary and jet rebound remains stable even when there is direct liquid-gel contact.

  5. Effect of Pressure, Feed Rate, and Abrasive Mass Flow Rate on Water Jet Cutting Efficiency When Cutting Recombinant Bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of varying pressure, feed rate, and abrasive mass flow rate on the efficiency of an abrasive water jet cutting process was studied in this work. Recombinant bamboo samples with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 15 mm were cut by the abrasive water jet. The upper kerf width, lower kerf width, and the ratio of the upper kerf width to lower kerf width were chosen as the efficiency parameters. Mathematical models were developed to describe the relationship between the input process parameters and the efficiency parameters. The arrangement of experiments and analysis of results were performed based on response surface methodology. The evaluated model yielded predictions in agreement with experimental results.

  6. Jet stream wind power as a renewable energy resource: little power, big impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Miller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jet streams are regions of sustained high wind speeds in the upper atmosphere and are seen by some as a substantial renewable energy resource. However, jet streams are nearly geostrophic flow, that is, they result from the balance between the pressure gradient and Coriolis force in the near absence of friction. Therefore, jet stream motion is associated with very small generation rates of kinetic energy to maintain the high wind velocities, and it is this generation rate that will ultimately limit the potential use of jet streams as a renewable energy resource. Here we estimate the maximum limit of jet stream wind power by considering extraction of kinetic energy as a term in the free energy balance of kinetic energy that describes the generation, depletion, and extraction of kinetic energy. We use this balance as the basis to quantify the maximum limit of how much kinetic energy can be extracted sustainably from the jet streams of the global atmosphere as well as the potential climatic impacts of its use. We first use a simple thought experiment of geostrophic flow to demonstrate why the high wind velocities of the jet streams are not associated with a high potential for renewable energy generation. We then use an atmospheric general circulation model to estimate that the maximum sustainable extraction from jet streams of the global atmosphere is about 7.5 TW. This estimate is about 200-times less than previous estimates and is due to the fact that the common expression for instantaneous wind power 12 ρv3 merely characterizes the transport of kinetic energy by the flow, but not the generation rate of kinetic energy. We also find that when maximum wind power is extracted from the jet streams, it results in significant

  7. Jet stream wind power as a renewable energy resource: little power, big impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Miller

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jet streams are regions of sustained high wind speeds in the upper atmosphere and are seen by some as a substantial renewable energy resource. However, jet streams are nearly geostrophic flow, that is, they result from the balance between the pressure gradient and Coriolis force in the near absence of friction. Therefore, jet stream motion is associated with very small generation rates of kinetic energy to maintain the high wind velocities, and it is this generation rate that will ultimately limit the potential use of jet streams as a renewable energy resource. Here we estimate the maximum limit of jet stream wind power by considering extraction of kinetic energy as a term in the free energy balance of kinetic energy that describes the generation, depletion, and extraction of kinetic energy. We use this balance as the basis to quantify the maximum limit of how much kinetic energy can be extracted sustainably from the jet streams of the global atmosphere as well as the potential climatic impacts of its use. We first use a simple thought experiment of geostrophic flow to demonstrate why the high wind velocities of the jet streams are not associated with a high potential for renewable energy generation. We then use an atmospheric general circulation model to estimate that the maximum sustainable extraction from jet streams of the global atmosphere is about 7.5 TW. This estimate is about 200-times less than previous estimates and is due to the fact that the common expression for instantaneous wind power ½ ρ v3 merely characterizes the transport of kinetic energy by the flow, but not the generation rate of kinetic energy. We also find that when maximum wind power is extracted from the jet streams, it results in significant climatic impacts due to a substantial increase of heat transport across the jet streams in the upper atmosphere. This results in upper atmospheric temperature differences of >20 °C, greater atmospheric stability

  8. A gas jet impacting a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, A. Kent; Bakhsh, Hazoor

    1986-11-01

    A subsonic jet impinging upon a cavity is studied to explain the resultant heating phenomenon. Flow visualization within the cavity shows a large central vortex dominating the flow pattern. Velocity measurements inside the cavity are made using a hot-wire anemometer. Temperature is measured with a copper-constantan thermocouple. The velocity field within the cavity is described by a modified Rankine combined vortex. An uncommon form of the energy equation is used to account for turbulent heating in adverse pressure gradients. A theoretical solution is developed to model the temperature field in the cavity. There is a good agreement between the calculated and measured temperatures. The heating effect is related to Ranque-Hilsch tubes.

  9. Flute growth rate of plasma jet in mirror machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.; Goldstein, G.; Fisher, A.; Ron, A.

    2014-02-01

    The evolution of flute instability in a cold, high-density hydrogen plasma jet, injected into a mirror machine, is studied. The experiment was designed to minimize the interaction of the plasma with the walls, thus bringing it close to the ideal magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability conditions. The modal growth rate was measured in various settings to demonstrate the effects of the finite Larmor radius, Bohm diffusion, conductive limiter, biased limiter and neutral background gas. In this paper we will demonstrate that lowering the magnetic field increases stability, as does the insertion of a conducting ring. However, if the ring is biased, the stability is reduced due to inhomogeneous coupling between the plasma and the limiter. It was also found that heavy background gas dramatically reduces the flute instability growth rate.

  10. Mass entrainment rate of an ideal momentum turbulent round jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medrano, Fermın Franco; Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    We propose a two-phase-fluid model for a full-cone turbulent round jet that describes its dynamics in a simple but comprehensive manner with only the apex angle of the cone being a disposable parameter. The basic assumptions are that (i) the jet is statistically stationary and that (ii) it can...... jet and show that the predictions of our model compare well with this and other experimental data of atomizing liquid jets....

  11. The three-jet rate in e+e- annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett-Turner, C. N.

    1994-06-01

    Progress has been made on the calculation of R3, the three-jet rate in e+e- annihilation, in the k⊥ (Durham) scheme. Using the coherent branching formalism [A.H. Mueller, Phys. Lett. B 104 (1981) 161; B.I. Ermolaev and V.S. Fadin, JETP Lett. 33 (1981) 285; Yu.L. Dokshitzer, V.S. Fadin and V.A. Khoze, Z. Phys. C 15 (1982) 325; C 18 (1983) 37; A. Bassetto, M. Ciafaloni and G. Marchesini, Phys. Rep. 100 (1983) 202; Yu.L. Dokshitzer and S. Troyan, Leningrad Report LNPI-922 (1984); Yu.L. Dokshitzer, V.A. Khoze and S. Troyan, in: Perturbative QCD, ed. A.H. Mueller (World Scientific, Singapore, 1989)], an explicit expression for R3 is calculated. In this, leading and next-to-leading large logarithms (LL and NLL) are resummed to all orders in QCD perturbation theory. In addition to exponentials an error function is involved.

  12. Droplet impaction on solid surfaces exposed to impinging jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zia

    2005-12-15

    The thermal response of hot surfaces exposed to impinging jet fire and subsequent impacting water droplets is investigated. The research was done mainly experimentally by utilizing three different concepts. This included experiments on a laboratory scale steel plate and large outdoor fire tests with a quadratic steel channel and steel plates. Besides the horizontal jet flame itself was characterized in a comprehensive study. As a comparative study, the last three types of the experiment were additionally modeled by the CFD-code Kameleon FireEx for validation of results. The purpose of the experiments done on bench scale steel plate (L x W x T : 300 x 200 x 8 mm) was mainly to map data on wetting temperature, water droplet size, droplet impingement angle, and droplet velocity prior to large scale jet fire tests. The droplet release angle normal to hot surface gives best cooling effect, when the surface is oriented in upright position. The partial wetting begins at about 165 degrees C. When the surface is positioned in horizontal plane, the droplet of about 5 mm in diameter wets the hot surface partially at around 240-250 degrees C within an impaction distance of 20 cm. At about 150 degrees C, the droplet is entirely attached to the surface with almost zero contact angle, and cools down the solid at a critical heat flux equivalent to 1750 kW/m{sup 2}. The cooling effectiveness is about 8 % with a Weber number of 68. Although in the event of horizontal channel (L x W x T : 1000 x 200 x 8 mm) water droplets were not applied, however, the knowledge gained with jet fire tests gave valuable information about temperature progress in solids (steels and insulation) and their response to impinging jet fire during long duration experiments. The temperature of the insulated area of the channel keeps 200 degrees C below that of the exposed surface, as long as the insulation material remained intact. Upon long test fire durations, the insulation either burns or degrades despite

  13. Droplet impaction on solid surfaces exposed to impinging jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zia

    2005-12-15

    The thermal response of hot surfaces exposed to impinging jet fire and subsequent impacting water droplets is investigated. The research was done mainly experimentally by utilizing three different concepts. This included experiments on a laboratory scale steel plate and large outdoor fire tests with a quadratic steel channel and steel plates. Besides the horizontal jet flame itself was characterized in a comprehensive study. As a comparative study, the last three types of the experiment were additionally modeled by the CFD-code Kameleon FireEx for validation of results. The purpose of the experiments done on bench scale steel plate (L x W x T : 300 x 200 x 8 mm) was mainly to map data on wetting temperature, water droplet size, droplet impingement angle, and droplet velocity prior to large scale jet fire tests. The droplet release angle normal to hot surface gives best cooling effect, when the surface is oriented in upright position. The partial wetting begins at about 165 degrees C. When the surface is positioned in horizontal plane, the droplet of about 5 mm in diameter wets the hot surface partially at around 240-250 degrees C within an impaction distance of 20 cm. At about 150 degrees C, the droplet is entirely attached to the surface with almost zero contact angle, and cools down the solid at a critical heat flux equivalent to 1750 kW/m{sup 2}. The cooling effectiveness is about 8 % with a Weber number of 68. Although in the event of horizontal channel (L x W x T : 1000 x 200 x 8 mm) water droplets were not applied, however, the knowledge gained with jet fire tests gave valuable information about temperature progress in solids (steels and insulation) and their response to impinging jet fire during long duration experiments. The temperature of the insulated area of the channel keeps 200 degrees C below that of the exposed surface, as long as the insulation material remained intact. Upon long test fire durations, the insulation either burns or degrades despite

  14. Chondrule Formation via Impact Jetting Triggered by Planetary Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Oshino, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    Chondrules are one of the most primitive elements that can serve as a fundamental clue as to the origin of our Solar system. We investigate a formation scenario of chondrules that involves planetesimal collisions and the resultant impact jetting. Planetesimal collisions are the main agent to regulate planetary accretion that corresponds to the formation of terrestrial planets and cores of gas giants. The key component of this scenario is that ejected materials can melt when the impact velocity between colliding planetesimals exceeds about 2.5 km s$^{-1}$. The previous simulations show that the process is efficient enough to reproduce the primordial abundance of chondrules. We examine this scenario carefully by performing semi-analytical calculations that are developed based on the results of direct $N$-body simulations. As found by the previous work, we confirm that planetesimal collisions that occur during planetary accretion can play an important role in forming chondrules. This arises because protoplanet-p...

  15. Resummed jet rates with heavy quarks in electron-positron collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo, German; Krauss, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Expressions for Sudakov form factors for heavy quarks are presented. They are used to construct resummed jet rates in electron-positron annihilation. Predictions are given for production of bottom quarks at LEP and top quarks at the Linear Collider.

  16. The Rate of Gas Accretion onto Black Holes Drives Jet Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    King, Ashley L; Bietenholz, Michael; Gultekin, Kayhan; Reynolds, Mark; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael; Bartel, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Accreting black holes are observed to launch relativistic, collimated jets of matter and radiation. In some sources, discrete ejections have been detected with highly relativistic velocities. These particular sources typically have very high mass accretion rates, while sources lower knot velocities are predominantly associated with black holes with relatively low mass accretion rates. We quantify this behavior by examining knot velocity with respect to X-ray luminosity, a proxy for mass accretion rate onto the black hole. We find a positive correlation between the mass-scaled X-ray luminosity and jet knot velocity. In addition, we find evidence that the jet velocity is also a function of polar angle, supporting the "spine-sheath" model of jet production. Our results reveal a fundamental aspect of how accretion shapes mechanical feedback from black holes into their host environments.

  17. Energetic Impact of Jet Inflated Cocoons in Relaxed Galaxy Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Vernaleo, John C.; Christopher S. Reynolds

    2007-01-01

    Jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the cores of galaxy clusters have the potential to be a major contributor to the energy budget of the intracluster medium (ICM). To study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves, we present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) ideal hydrodynamic models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere (with varying Mach numbers and kinetic luminosities). We follo...

  18. Measurement of the energy dependence of hadronic jet rates and the strong coupling $\\alpha_{s}$ from the four-jet rate with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2005-01-01

    Hadronic events from the data collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP within the energy range from 89 GeV to 209 GeV are selected, their jet rates are determined and compared to predictions of four different event generators. One of them is the recently developed APACIC++ generator which performs a massive matrix element calculation matched to a parton shower followed by string fragmentation. The four-jet rate is used to measure alpha_s in the next-to-leading-order approximation yielding alpha_s(M_Z^2) = 0.1175 +/- 0.0030. The running of alpha_s determined by using four-jet events has been tested. The logarithmic energy slope is measured to be d\\alpha_s^{-1} / d\\log E_{cm} = 1.14 +/- 0.36. Since the analysis is based on four-jet final states it represents an alternative approach to previous DELPHI alpha_s measurements using event shape distributions.

  19. Twin Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  20. How Archer Fish Achieve a Powerful Impact: Hydrodynamic Instability of a Pulsed Jet in Toxotes jaculatrix

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Vailati; Luca Zinnato; Roberto Cerbino

    2012-01-01

    Archer fish knock down insects anchored to vegetation by hitting them with a precisely aimed jet of water. The striking force of the jet at the impact is such to overcome the strong anchoring forces of insects. The origin of the effectiveness of such hunting mechanism has been long searched for inside of the fish, in the unsuccessful attempt to identify internal structures dedicated to the amplification of muscular power. Here we perform a kinematic analysis of the jet emitted by two specimen...

  1. Using radiative energy losses to constrain the magnetization and magnetic reconnection rate at the base of black hole jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, William J.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the severe radiative energy losses which occur at the base of black hole jets using a relativistic fluid jet model, including in situ acceleration of non-thermal leptons by magnetic reconnection. Our results demonstrate that including a self-consistent treatment of radiative energy losses is necessary to perform accurate magnetohydrodynamic simulations of powerful jets and that jet spectra calculated via post-processing are liable to vastly overestimate the amount of non-thermal emission. If no more than 95 per cent of the initial total jet power is radiated away by the plasma travels as it travels along the length of the jet, we can place a lower bound on the magnetization of the jet plasma at the base of the jet. For typical powerful jets, we find that the plasma at the jet base is required to be highly magnetized, with at least 10 000 times more energy contained in magnetic fields than in non-thermal leptons. Using a simple power-law model of magnetic reconnection, motivated by simulations of collisionless reconnection, we determine the allowed range of the large-scale average reconnection rate along the jet, by restricting the total radiative energy losses incurred and the distance at which the jet first comes into equipartition. We calculate analytic expressions for the cumulative radiative energy losses due to synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission along jets, and derive analytic formulae for the constraint on the initial magnetization.

  2. Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ using Jet Rates at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Hadronic events produced in e+e- collisions by the LEP collider and recorded by the OPAL detector were used to form distributions based on the number of reconstructed jets. The data were collected between 1995 and 2000 and correspond to energies of 91 GeV, 130-136 GeV and 161-209 GeV. The jet rates were determined using four different jet-finding algorithms (Cone, JADE, Durham and Cambridge). The differential two-jet rate and the average jet rate with the Durham and Cambridge algorithms were used to measure alpha(s) in the LEP energy range by fitting an expression in which order alpah_2s calculations were matched to a NLLA prediction and fitted to the data. Combining the measurements at different centre-of-mass energies, the value of alpha_s (Mz) was determined to be alpha(s)(Mz)=0.1177+-0.0006(stat.)+-0.0012$(expt.)+-0.0010(had.)+-0.0032

  3. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  4. Drop impact into a deep pool: Vortex shedding and jet formation

    KAUST Repository

    Agbaglah, Gilou

    2015-01-02

    One of the simplest splashing scenarios results from the impact of a single drop on a deep pool. The traditional understanding of this process is that the impact generates an axisymmetric sheet-like jet that later breaks up into secondary droplets. Recently it was shown that even this simplest of scenarios is more complicated than expected because multiple jets can be generated from a single impact event and there are transitions in the multiplicity of jets as the experimental parameters are varied. Here, we use experiments and numerical simulations of a single drop impacting on a deep pool to examine the transition from impacts that produce a single jet to those that produce two jets. Using high-speed X-ray imaging methods we show that vortex separation within the drop leads to the formation of a second jet long after the formation of the ejecta sheet. Using numerical simulations we develop a phase diagram for this transition and show that the capillary number is the most appropriate order parameter for the transition. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  5. Energetic Impact of Jet Inflated Cocoons in Relaxed Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Vernaleo, John C

    2007-01-01

    Jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the cores of galaxy clusters have the potential to be a major contributor to the energy budget of the intracluster medium (ICM). To study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves, we present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) ideal hydrodynamic models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere (with varying Mach numbers and kinetic luminosities). We follow the passive evolution of the resulting structures for several times longer than the active lifetime of the jet. The simulations fall into roughly two classes, cocoon-bounded and non-cocoon bounded sources. We suggest a correspondence between these two classes and the Faranoff-Riley types. We find that the cocoon-bounded sources inject significantly more entropy into the core regions of the ICM atmosphere, even though the efficiency with which energy is thermalized is independent of the morphological class. In all cases,...

  6. THE COUNTER-JET FORMATION IN AN AIR BUBBLE INDUCED BY THE IMPACT OF SHOCK WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Li-xin; XU Wei-lin; LI Chao; GAO Yan-dong

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of an air bubble (isolated in water or attached to a boundary) with shock waves induced by electric sparks is investigated by high-speed photography.The interaction is closely related to the counter-jet induced by the impact of shock waves.The formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to the liquid jet formed in the same air bubble,but the mechanism is different with that of the counter-jet formation in a collapsing cavitation bubble.The formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to discharge energy,air bubble size and radius of shock wave.With a given energy of the spark discharge,the formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to δ/ε (the ratio of the dimensionless bubble-bubble distance to the dimensionless air bubble radius).The counter-jet will only be produced when δ/ε is in the range of 1.2-2.2.The counter-jet in an air bubble is of an important nuclei-generating mechanism.

  7. Effect of Stand-Off Distance on Impact Pressure of High Speed Water Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiwong, Wuttichai; Seehanam, Wirapan; Pianthong, Kulachate; Matthujak, Anirut

    2010-06-01

    High speed liquid jets may be applied to jet cutting, drilling and cleaning. Recently, in the automotive industries, the spray injection pressure becomes higher and higher to enhance the fuel mixing for the improved combustion efficiency. However, the ultra high injection pressure may cause the damage to the nozzle and also the combustion chamber. In the medical application, the high speed liquid injection might be applied for the drug delivery through the skin where the needle is not required anymore. From the above mentioned application, the investigation on the impact pressure of the high speed liquid jet relative to the stand-off distant is significant. The high speed liquid jets are generated by the projectile impact driven method. The high speed projectile is launched by the horizontal single stage powder gun. The experimental study focuses on the stand-off between 1.5 cm to 6.0 cm, while the nozzle contains approximately 1.5cm3 of water in its cavity. The nozzle conical angles are 30° and 60° with the orifice diameter of 0.7 mm. The jet velocities are measured by laser beam interruptions method. The target material is the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) which the impact pressure is measured by using a piezoelectric Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) film. From the experiments, the maximum water jet velocity of 2290 m/s can be obtained from the 30° conical angle nozzle. The maximum impact pressures of nozzle conical angle of 30° and 60° are 3.4 GPa and 2.6 GPa respectively, at stand-off distance 3 cm. However, at the stand-off distance more than 3 cm, the impact pressure significantly decreases, because of aerodynamic drag, jets core break-up, and atomization of the water.

  8. Absolute production rate measurements of nitric oxide by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipa, A V; Bindemann, T; Foest, R; Kindel, E; Roepcke, J; Weltmann, K-D [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung and Technologie e.V. (INP), Felix-Hausdorff Strasse 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)], E-mail: foest@inp-greifswald.de

    2008-10-07

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been applied to measure the absolute production rate of NO molecules in the gas phase of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) operating at rf (13.56 MHz) in argon with small (up to 1%) admixtures of air. The resulting NO production rates were found to be in the range (0.1-80) x 10{sup -3} sccm or (0.05-35) x 10{sup 18} molecules s{sup -1} depending on the experimental conditions. Maximum rates were obtained at 0.2% air. For TDLAS measurements the APPJ was arranged inside an astigmatic multi-pass cell of Herriott type with 100 m absorption length. The insertion into a closed volume differs slightly from the normal, open operation with the jet propagating freely into air. Therefore, the measuring results are compared with optical emission of the open jet to verify equivalent experimental conditions. The dependence of the optical emission of NO (237 nm) on power and gas mixture has been measured. The similar shape of the dependence of absorption and emission signals gives evidence that the comparability of experimental conditions is sufficiently satisfied. It is concluded that the NO production rate of the APPJ in ambient air can be characterized using TDLAS and provides reliable results in spite of differing experimental conditions due to the set-up.

  9. CFD Analysis of Supersonic Coaxial Jets on Effect of Spreading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kathiresan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevailing high-speed air-breathing propulsion systems invariably banks on coaxial jets which plays a vigorous role in stabilization of flames and combustion emission. Coaxial jets have applications in supersonic ejectors, noise control techniques and enhancement of mixing. Coaxial jet nozzles regulate spreading rates by developing virtuous mean flow and shortening primary flow potential core length. In the present paper, two-dimensional coaxial jet profiles of different area ratios are designed and analyzed. The models were designed in ANSYS Design Modeler and the numerical simulation was done in ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 using the two dimensional density based energy equation and k- ε turbulence model with primary supersonic flow and secondary subsonic flow. The contours of turbulence intensity, acoustics power level and axial-velocity are investigated along the flow direction. This study shows that increasing the area ratio results in less turbulence which in turn increases the potential core length,acoustics power level, turbulent kinetic energy and generates more noise.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Rock Fragmentation under the Impact Load of Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hongxiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the rock fragmentation and its influence factors under the impact load of water jet, a numerical method which coupled finite element method (FEM with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH was adopted to simulate the rock fragmentation process by water jet. Linear and shock equations of state were applied to describe the dynamic characteristics of rock and water, respectively, while the maximum principal stress criterion was used for the rock failure detection. The dynamic stresses at the selected element containing points in rock are computed as a function of time under the impact load of water jet. The influences of the factors of boundary condition, impact velocity, confining pressure, and structure plane on rock dynamic fragmentation are discussed.

  11. How archer fish achieve a powerful impact: hydrodynamic instability of a pulsed jet in Toxotes jaculatrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailati, Alberto; Zinnato, Luca; Cerbino, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Archer fish knock down insects anchored to vegetation by hitting them with a precisely aimed jet of water. The striking force of the jet at the impact is such to overcome the strong anchoring forces of insects. The origin of the effectiveness of such hunting mechanism has been long searched for inside of the fish, in the unsuccessful attempt to identify internal structures dedicated to the amplification of muscular power. Here we perform a kinematic analysis of the jet emitted by two specimens of Toxotes jaculatrix. We estimate that at the impact the jet conveys a typical specific power of about 3000 W/kg, which is well above the maximum specific power of the order of 500 W/kg deliverable by a vertebrate muscle. Unexpectedly, we find that the amplification of muscular power occurs outside of the fish, and is due to a hydrodynamic instability of the jet akin to those occurring in Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing. The investigated fish are found to modulate the velocity of the jet at the orifice to favor the formation of a single, large, water drop that hits the prey abruptly with a large momentum. The observed mechanism represents a remarkable example of use of an external hydrodynamic lever that does possibly not entail the high evolutionary cost needed for the development of highly specialized internal structures dedicated to the storing of mechanical energy.

  12. How archer fish achieve a powerful impact: hydrodynamic instability of a pulsed jet in Toxotes jaculatrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Vailati

    Full Text Available Archer fish knock down insects anchored to vegetation by hitting them with a precisely aimed jet of water. The striking force of the jet at the impact is such to overcome the strong anchoring forces of insects. The origin of the effectiveness of such hunting mechanism has been long searched for inside of the fish, in the unsuccessful attempt to identify internal structures dedicated to the amplification of muscular power. Here we perform a kinematic analysis of the jet emitted by two specimens of Toxotes jaculatrix. We estimate that at the impact the jet conveys a typical specific power of about 3000 W/kg, which is well above the maximum specific power of the order of 500 W/kg deliverable by a vertebrate muscle. Unexpectedly, we find that the amplification of muscular power occurs outside of the fish, and is due to a hydrodynamic instability of the jet akin to those occurring in Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing. The investigated fish are found to modulate the velocity of the jet at the orifice to favor the formation of a single, large, water drop that hits the prey abruptly with a large momentum. The observed mechanism represents a remarkable example of use of an external hydrodynamic lever that does possibly not entail the high evolutionary cost needed for the development of highly specialized internal structures dedicated to the storing of mechanical energy.

  13. Features of deformation of metal body surfaces under impact of a water jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganin, A. A.; Khismatullina, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model and computational results on dynamics of a perfect elastic-plastic body under the load arising during impact of a high-velocity liquid jet with the hemispherical end. The body is simulated by the isotropic linearly-elastic semi-space, its plastic state is described by the von Mises condition. The dependence of features of the body surface deformation on the body material is studied. The problem is considered in the axisymmetric statement. The axis of symmetry is that of the jet. The loaded domain is a circle with its radius rapidly growing from zero to the jet radius. The pressure in the loaded domain is non-uniform both in time and space. Three metal alloys (aluminium, copper-nickel and steel) are considered as the body material. The loading of the body surface in all the cases corresponds to the impact of a water jet with the radius 100 pm and the velocity 300 m/s. It has been shown that under such impact a nanometer pit arises on the body surface at the center of the domain of the jet action. The profile of the pit and its maximal depth depend on the body material.

  14. Impact jetting of water ice, with application to the accretion of icy planetesimals and Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinnon, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Jetting can occur during oblique impacts of water-ice bodies at relative velocities as low as 500 m/sec, because of the low Hugoniot elastic limit and high compressibility of ice compared to rock. In jetted ice, incipient melting, complete melting, and incipient vaporization occur, upon release to low pressure, at impact velocities of 1.3, 2.0, and 2.7 km/sec, respectively, much less than the 3.4, 4.4, and 5.3 km/sec, required in head-on collisions. Uncertainties in the shock equation-of-state may allow complete melting during jetting of relative velocities as low as 1.2 km/sec. Because jet speeds exceed impact speeds during the accretion of icy bodies greater than a few 100 km in radius, there may be a significant loss of icy material. Thus, jetting during a Charon-forming collision (and not vaporization) may account for Pluto-Charon's relatively large rock/ice ratio, should the C/O ratio of the solar nebula turn out to be too low to sufficiently raise the rock/ice ratio of outer solar nebula condensates by formation of noncondensable CO.

  15. Gas entrainment rate coefficient of an ideal momentum atomizing liquid jet

    CERN Document Server

    Medrano, Fermín Franco; Velte, Clara Marika; Hodžić, Azur

    2016-01-01

    We propose a two-phase-fluid model for a turbulent full-cone high speed atomizing liquid jet that describes its dynamics in a simple but comprehensive manner with only the apex angle of the cone being a disposable parameter. The basic assumptions are that (i) the jet is statistically stationary and that (ii) it can be approximated by a mixture of a liquid and a gas with its phases in dynamic equilibrium. To derive the model, we impose conservation of the liquid volume and total momentum fluxes. Our model equation admits analytical solutions for the composite density and velocity of the two-phase fluid, both as functions of the distance from the nozzle, from which the dynamic pressure and gas the entrainment rate coefficient are calculated. Assuming a far-field approximation, we theoretically derive a constant gas entrainment rate coefficient solely in terms of the cone angle. Moreover, we carry out experiments for a single-phase turbulent air jet and show that the predictions of our model compare well with th...

  16. A study of jet rates and measurement of [alpha][sub S] at the Z[sup 0] resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This experiment was performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber were used for the measurement of the jet production rates. The value of the strong coupling [alpha][sub s](M[sub Z][sup o]) is determined from the production rates of jets in hadronic Z[sup 0] decays in e[sup +] e[sup [minus

  17. Impact of nitrogen seeding on carbon erosion in the JET divertor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Jachmich, S.; Rapp, J.; Meigs, A. G.; Nicholas, C.; O' Mullane, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen has been introduced in H-mode plasmas in JET in order to study its radiation cooling capability and impact on the erosion of divertor plasma-facing components made of carbon-fiber composites (CFC). Experiments in the ionizing plasma regime with low nitrogen injection show a reduction of the

  18. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussarie, R. [LPT, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405, Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Szymanowski, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Faculté de Physique, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); LPT, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405, Orsay (France)

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the photon to quark, antiquark and gluon transition within Balitsky’s shock-wave formalism. We also rederive the impact factor for photon to quark and antiquark transition. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering as well as for two and three jets diffractive production which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  19. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  20. Modelling the Evaporation Rate in an Impingement Jet Dryer with Multiple Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Ljung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Impinging jets are often used in industry to dry, cool, or heat items. In this work, a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics model is created to model an impingement jet dryer with a total of 9 pairs of nozzles that dries sheets of metal. Different methods to model the evaporation rate are studied, as well as the influence of recirculating the outlet air. For the studied conditions, the simulations show that the difference in evaporation rate between single- and two-component treatment of moist air is only around 5%, hence indicating that drying can be predicted with a simplified model where vapor is included as a nonreacting scalar. Furthermore, the humidity of the inlet air, as determined from the degree of recirculating outlet air, has a strong effect on the water evaporation rate. Results show that the metal sheet is dry at the exit if 85% of the air is recirculated, while approximately only 60% of the water has evaporated at a recirculation of 92,5%.

  1. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single

  2. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single p

  3. Impact on liquids : void collapse and jet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gekle, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    A spectacular example of free surface flow is the impact of a solid object on a liquid: At impact a “crown” splash is created and a surface cavity (void) emerges which immediately starts to collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding liquid. Eventually the cavity closes in a single p

  4. Public health, climate, and economic impacts of desulfurizing jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Steven R H; Yim, Steve H L; Gilmore, Christopher K; Murray, Lee T; Kuhn, Stephen R; Tai, Amos P K; Yantosca, Robert M; Byun, Daewon W; Ngan, Fong; Li, Xiangshang; Levy, Jonathan I; Ashok, Akshay; Koo, Jamin; Wong, Hsin Min; Dessens, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Sathya; Fleming, Gregg G; Pearlson, Matthew N; Wollersheim, Christoph; Malina, Robert; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Binkowski, Francis S; Leibensperger, Eric M; Jacob, Daniel J; Hileman, James I; Waitz, Ian A

    2012-04-17

    In jurisdictions including the US and the EU ground transportation and marine fuels have recently been required to contain lower concentrations of sulfur, which has resulted in reduced atmospheric SO(x) emissions. In contrast, the maximum sulfur content of aviation fuel has remained unchanged at 3000 ppm (although sulfur levels average 600 ppm in practice). We assess the costs and benefits of a potential ultra-low sulfur (15 ppm) jet fuel standard ("ULSJ"). We estimate that global implementation of ULSJ will cost US$1-4bn per year and prevent 900-4000 air quality-related premature mortalities per year. Radiative forcing associated with reduction in atmospheric sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium loading is estimated at +3.4 mW/m(2) (equivalent to about 1/10th of the warming due to CO(2) emissions from aviation) and ULSJ increases life cycle CO(2) emissions by approximately 2%. The public health benefits are dominated by the reduction in cruise SO(x) emissions, so a key uncertainty is the atmospheric modeling of vertical transport of pollution from cruise altitudes to the ground. Comparisons of modeled and measured vertical profiles of CO, PAN, O(3), and (7)Be indicate that this uncertainty is low relative to uncertainties regarding the value of statistical life and the toxicity of fine particulate matter.

  5. Fuzzy jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Lester [Department of Statistics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nachman, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Schwartzman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stansbury, Conrad [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  6. Impact jetting water ice, with application to the accretion of icy planetesimals and Pluto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, W.B. (Washington Univ., Seattle (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Jetting can occur during oblique impacts of water ice bodies at relative velocities at low as {approximately}500 m s{sup {minus}1}, because of the low Hugoniot elastic limit and high compressibility of ice compared to rock. In jetted ice, incipient melting, complete melting, and incipient vaporization occur, upon release to low pressure, at impact velocities of 1.3, 2.0, and 2.7 km s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, much less than the 3.4, 4.4, and 5.3 km s{sup {minus}1} required in head-on collisions. Uncertainties in the shock equation-of-state may allow complete melting during jetting at relative velocities as low as 1.2 km s{sup {minus}1}. Because jet speeds exceed impact speeds, often by a factor of several, during the accretion of icy bodies greater than a few 100 km in radius there any be a significant loss of icy material. This is more true if the accreting body is large enough to differentiate so that its surface layers are closer to pure ice in composition, and especially true if bodies of comparable size are involved, which emphasizes the obliqueness of the collision. The author suggests that it is jetting during a Charon-forming collision (and not vaporization) that may account for Pluto-Charon's relatively large rock/ice ratio, should the C/O ratio of the solar nebula turn out too low to sufficiently raise the rock/ice ratio of outer solar nebula condensates by formation of non-condensable CO.

  7. Retail Rate Impacts of Renewable Electricity: Some First Thoughts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barbose, Galen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-06-21

    This report summarizes select recent analyses of the retail rate impacts of renewable electricity, introduce core limitations of available literature, as rate impacts remain only partly assessed, and highlight a wide range of estimated historical and possible future rate impacts.

  8. Etude aerodynamique d'un jet turbulent impactant une paroi concave

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Benoit

    Etant donne la demande croissante de temperatures elevees dans des chambres de combustion de systemes de propulsions en aerospatiale (turbomoteurs, moteur a reaction, etc.), l'interet dans le refroidissement par jets impactant s'est vu croitre. Le refroidissement des aubes de turbine permet une augmentation de temperature de combustion, ce qui se traduit en une augmentation de l'efficacite de combustion et donc une meilleure economie de carburant. Le transfert de chaleur dans les au bages est influence par les aspects aerodynamiques du refroidissement a jet, particulierement dans le cas d'ecoulements turbulents. Un manque de comprehension de l'aerodynamique a l'interieur de ces espaces confinees peut mener a des changements de transfert thermique qui sont inattendus, ce qui augmente le risque de fluage. Il est donc d'interet pour l'industrie aerospatiale et l'academie de poursuivre la recherche dans l'aerodynamique des jets turbulents impactant les parois courbes. Les jets impactant les surfaces courbes ont deja fait l'objet de nombreuses etudes. Par contre des conditions oscillatoires observees en laboratoire se sont averees difficiles a reproduire en numerique, puisque les structures d'ecoulements impactants des parois concaves sont fortement dependantes de la turbulence et des effets instationnaires. Une etude experimentale fut realisee a l'institut PPRIME a l'Universite de Poitiers afin d'observer le phenomene d'oscillation dans le jet. Une serie d'essais ont verifie les conditions d'ecoulement laminaires et turbulentes, toutefois le cout des essais experimentaux a seulement permis d'avoir un apercu du phenomene global. Une deuxieme serie d'essais fut realisee numeriquement a l'Universite de Moncton avec l'outil OpenFOAM pour des conditions d'ecoulement laminaire et bidimensionnel. Cette etude a donc comme but de poursuivre l'enquete de l'aerodynamique oscillatoire des jets impactant des parois courbes, mais pour un regime d'ecoulement transitoire, turbulent

  9. The Gluon-Induced Mueller-Tang Jet Impact Factor at Next-to-Leading Order

    CERN Document Server

    Hentschinski, Martin; Murdaca, Beatrice; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2014-01-01

    We complete the computation of the Mueller-Tang jet impact factor at next-to-leading order (NLO) initiated in arXiv:1406.5625 and presented in arXiv:1404.2937 by computing the real corrections associated to gluons in the initial state making use of Lipatov's effective action. NLO corrections for this effective vertex are an important ingredient for a reliable description of large rapidity gap phenomenology within the BFKL approach.

  10. Impact of 50% Alcohol to Jet Blends on Aviation Turbine Fuel Coalescence - Navy Coalescence Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Aviation Turbine Fuels5 are not feasible. The total water concentration of three samples from the influent and effluent of the filter-separator...International. ASTM D3240-11: Standard Test Method for Undissolved Water in Aviation Turbine Fuel, March 2011 6. MIL-DTL-5624V, Detail Specification...Impact of 50% Alcohol to Jet Blends on Aviation Turbine Fuel Coalescence - Navy Coalescence Test NF&LCFT REPORT 441/15-001 17 October 2014

  11. Accretion of Chondrules formed by Impact Jetting in Magnetically Induced Turbulent Solar Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Masiero, Joseph; Wakita, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yuji; Oshino, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites provide valuable opportunities to investigate origins of the solar system. We explore impact jetting as a mechanism to form chondrules and subsequent pebble accretion as a mechanism to accrete them onto parent bodies of chondrites, and investigate how these two processes can account for the currently available meteoritic data. We find that when the solar nebula is $\\le 5$ times more massive than the minimum-mass solar nebula at $a \\simeq 2-3$ AU and parent bodies of chondrites are $\\le 10^{24}$ g ($\\le$ 500 km in radius) there, impact jetting and subsequent pebble accretion can reproduce a number of properties of the meteoritic data. The properties include the present asteroid belt mass, formation timescale of chondrules, and the magnetic field strength of the nebula derived from chondrules in Semarkona. Since this scenario requires a first generation of planetesimals that trigger impact jetting and serve as parent bodies to accrete chondrules, the upper limit of parent bodies' mass lead...

  12. The Impact of Orography and Latent Heating on the Location of the Tropical Easterly Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Samrat

    2013-01-01

    The Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) is a prominent atmospheric circulation feature observed during the Asian Summer Monsoon. It is generally assumed that Tibet is an essential ingredient in determining the location of the TEJ. However studies have also suggested the importance of latent heating in determining the jet location. The relative importance of Tibetan orography and latent heating is explored through simulations with a general circulation model. The simulation of TEJ by the Community Atmosphere Model, version 3.1 (CAM-3.1) has been discussed in detail. Although the simulated TEJ replicated many observed features of the jet, the jet maximum was located too far to the west when compared to observation. The precipitation in the control simulation was high to the west of India and this caused the TEJ to shift westwards by approximately the same amount. Orography was found to have minimal impact on the simulated TEJ hence indicating that latent heating is the crucial parameter. The primacy of latent heating i...

  13. One-dimensional numerical modeling of Blue Jet and its impact on stratospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruisseau, F.; Thiéblemont, R.; Huret, N.

    2011-12-01

    In the stratosphere the ozone layer is very sensitive to the NOx abundance. The ionisation of N2 and O2 molecules by TLE's (Transient Luminous Events) is a source of NOx which is currently not well quantified and could act as a loss of ozone. In this study a one dimensional explicit parameterization of a Blue-Jet propagation based on that proposed by Raizer et al. (2006 and 2007) has been developed. This parameterization considers Blue-Jet as a streamer initiated by a bidirectional leader discharge, emerging from the anvil and sustained by moderate cloud charge. The streamer growth varies with the electrical field induced by initial cloud charge and the initial altitude. This electrical parameterization and the chemical mechanisms associated with the discharge have been implemented into a detailed chemical model of stratospheric ozone including evolution of nitrogen, chlorine and bromine species. We will present several tests performed to validate the electrical code and evaluate the propagation velocity and the maximum altitude attains by the blue jet as a function of electrical parameters. The results obtained giving the spatiotemporal evolution of the electron density are then used to initiate the specific chemistry associated with the Blue Jet. Preliminary results on the impact of such discharge on the ozone content and the whole stratospheric system will be presented.

  14. A new technology for revascularization of cerebral embolism using liquid jet impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, T; Takayama, K; Uenohara, H

    1997-12-01

    Revascularization time is the dominant factor in the treatment of acute cerebral embolism. In this paper we describe a rapid revascularization therapy using liquid jets generated by the interaction of gas bubbles with shock waves, which impact on the thrombi. The interaction of a shock wave with a gas bubble attached to an artificial thrombus which was inserted into a tube model of a cerebral artery was investigated. The shock wave was generated by detonating a microexplosive pellet. The overpressure of the shock wave was 3.0 +/- 0.6 MPa (n = 7) and 12.7 +/- 0.4 MPa (n = 3). The initial air bubble radii were varied from 0.87 mm to 2.18 mm. The subsequent collapse of the bubble was photographed using a high-speed framing camera, and the liquid jet penetrating into the artificial thrombus was visualized using x-ray photography. The penetration depth of the liquid jet increased with increasing bubble size. There was an optimal separation distance between the bubble and the shock wave source to obtain the maximum penetration depth. Liquid jets have the potential to penetrate through thrombi in as little as a few microseconds, and with very efficient ablation.

  15. Impact of surface proximity on flow and acoustics of a rectangular supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Baier, Florian; Mora, Pablo; Kailsanath, Kailas; Viswanath, Kamal; Johnson, Ryan

    2016-11-01

    Advances in jet technology have pushed towards faster aircraft, leading to more streamlined designs and configurations, pushing engines closer to the aircraft frame. This creates additional noise sources stemming from interactions between the jet flow and surfaces on the aircraft body, and interaction between the jet and the ground during takeoff and landing. The paper studies the impact of the presence of a flat plate on the flow structures and acoustics in an M =1.5 (NPR =3.67) supersonic jet exhausting from a rectangular C-D nozzle. Comparisons are drawn between baseline cases without a plate and varying nozzle-plate distance at NPRs from 2.5 to 4.5, and temperature ratios of up to 3.0. At the shielded side and sideline of the plate noise is mitigated only when the plate is at the nozzle lip (h =0). Low frequency mixing noise is increased in the downstream direction only for h =0. Screech tones that exist only for low NTR are fully suppressed by the plate at h =0. However, for h>0 the reflection enhances screech at both reflected side and sideline. Low frequency mixing noise is enhanced by the plate at the reflected side at all plate distances, while broad band shock associated noise is reduced only at the sideline for h =0. Increased temperature mitigates the screech tones across all test conditions. The results are compared to a circular nozzle of equivalent diameter with an adjacent plate.

  16. The Impact of the Greenland Tip Jet on the Subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproson, David; Renfrew, Ian; Heywood, Karen

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, the Irminger Sea has been rediscovered as a site of open ocean convection. It has been shown that a possible mechanism forcing such convection in the Greenland tip jet, a low-level atmospheric jet emanating from the southern tip of Greenland which can have wind speeds of over 30 m/s and heat fluxes in excess of 800 W/m². However, due to the small scale of the jet, it is not well resolved in the global reanalysis datasets which are often used for forcing ocean models. Here, we develop a simple parameterization of the tip jet and insert it into the ECMWF ERA-40 dataset, which is then used to force a global ocean GCM with a high resolution in the subpolar North Atlantic. The parameterization, particularly the enhanced heat fluxes and wind stress curl,are shown to have a significant impact in the North Atlantic including, but not limited to, a deepening of the winter mixed layer in the Irminger Sea and an enhanced production of Labrador Sea Water (LSW).

  17. Observational evidence for the impact of jet condensation trails upon the earths radiation budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinert, D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    Jet condensation trails have been classified in AVHRR images from a couple of month. It was tried to estimate their impact upon the radiation budget from the observed radiances. This has been performed by direct comparison of contrail image points to neighboring image points, assuming a slowly varying background. The classification method, basing on an artificial neural network for pattern recognition is explained. The details of the estimation of the net impact of contrails upon the radiation budget are shown by one example. (author) 5 refs.

  18. A study of jet rates and measurement of {alpha}{sub S} at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This experiment was performed with the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Only charged tracks measured in the central drift chamber were used for the measurement of the jet production rates. The value of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup o}) is determined from the production rates of jets in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays in e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} annihilations. The relative jet rates are obtained using the JADE-type algorithms. The results are compared with the jet rates obtained from a new jet algorithm proposed by N. Brown et al. called the ``Durham`` algorithm. The data can be well described by O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) QCD calculations and by QCD shower model calculations. A fit of the theoretical predictions to the data taken with the SLD yields a value, {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup o}) = 0.120 {plus_minus} 0.002(stat.) {plus_minus} 0.003(exp.){sub {minus}0.009}{sup +0.011}(theor.). The error is dominated by the theoretical uncertainties. The measurement is compared with results from other experiments and it is shown that the value obtained for {alpha}{sub s} agrees well with these results and furthermore supports the evidence for the running of the strong coupling, consistent with the non-Abelian nature of QCD. The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) can deliver partially longitudinally polarized electrons to the interaction point. Jet production rates and values for {alpha}{sub s} are calculated both for right-handed and left-handed initial state electrons. All results are consistent with the unpolarized result, as predicted by the Standard Model.

  19. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  20. Effects of Gas Flow Rate on the Discharge Characteristics of a DC Excited Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong; Bao, Wenting; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-09-01

    A direct current (DC) source excited plasma jet consisting of a hollow needle anode and a plate cathode has been developed to form a diffuse discharge plume in ambient air with flowing argon as the working gas. Using optical and electrical methods, the discharge characteristics are investigated for the diffuse plasma plume. Results indicate that the discharge has a pulse characteristic, under the excitation of a DC voltage. The discharge pulse corresponds to the propagation process of a plasma bullet travelling from the anode to the cathode. It is found that, with an increment of the gas flow rate, both the discharge plume length and the current peak value of the pulsed discharge decrease in the laminar flow mode, reach their minima at about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly increase in the turbulent mode. However, the frequency of the pulsed discharge increases in the laminar mode with increasing the argon flow rate until the argon flow rate equals to about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly decreases in the turbulent mode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805013, 11375051), Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012201045), Department of Education for Outstanding Youth Project of China (No. Y2011120), and Youth Project of Hebei University of China (No. 2011Q14)

  1. EFFECT OF GAS FLOW RATE ON CRYSTAL STRUCTURES OF ELECTROSPUN AND GAS-JET/ELECTROSPUN POLY(VINYLIDENE FLUORIDE) FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lin; Yong-yi Yao; Xiao-zhan Yang; Li-ming Shen; Rui-xia Li; Da-cheng Wu

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gas flow rate on crystal structures of electrospun and gas-jet/electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers was investigated. PVDF fibers were prepared by electrospinning and gas-jet/electrospinning of its N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions. The morphology of the PVDF fibers was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With an increase of the gas flow rate, the average diameters of PVDF fibers were decreased.The crystal structures and thermal properties of the PVDF fibers were investigated by attenuated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (AT-FTIR), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that electrospinning and gas-jet/electrospinning of PVDF from its DMF solutions promoted the formation of β phase. Moreover, gas-jet/electrospun PVDF fibers exhibited higher crystallinity and β phase content than electrospun fibers did. Similar with electrostatic force, the drawing force of gas jet may induce the conformational change to all-trans (TTTT) planar zigzag conformation, and then promote the formation of the β phase.

  2. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  3. The jet impact force of laser-induced bubble under the water-film with different thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beibei; Wang, Bingyang; Liu, Xiumei; He, Jie; Lu, Jian

    2015-05-01

    The effect of water-film on the laser-induced bubble was investigated by a piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) sensor. Both of the collapse time and liquid-jet impact force of the bubble under the water-film were obtained, and the experiments were also completed in different laser energy. The collapse time increase with the thickness of the waterfilm, but the liquid-jet impact force decrease. We consider that the collapse time was affected by both of the rigid boundary and surface, and the increasing of the collapse time is the reason the decreasing of the liquid-jet impact force. The velocity of bubble wall is lower with the longer collapse time for the uniform bubbles energy, so the liquid-jet impact force is lower. For the other reasons, more laser energy would be absorbed by the thicker water-film, but the water was also splashed for the thinner water-film. So, for the thinner water-film, the bubble energy is higher, the liquidjet impact force is higher, but the maximal radius is smaller because of the splash process. In the other hand, both of the collapse time and the liquid-jet impact force are increase with the laser energy. These researches are useful for the laser processing under water.

  4. Inkwells for on-demand deposition rate measurement in aerosol-jet based 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Gutierrez, David; Das, Siddhartha; Hines, D. R.

    2017-09-01

    Aerosol-jet printing (AJP) is an important direct-write printing technology based on additive manufacturing methods. Numerous research groups have utilized AJP for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices. However, there has not been any real-time or even any on-demand method for quantitatively measuring and/or setting the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream by printing into an array of inkwells that were fabricated using photolithography and were characterized using x-ray tomography and optical profilometry. These inkwell arrays were then used to establish a set of deposition rates namely 0.0011, 0.0024, 0.0035, 0.0046 and 0.0059 mm3 s-1 that were subsequently compared with independently-measured deposition rates obtained by printing the ink stream into a weighing pan for a specified time and calculating the resulting deposition rate from the weight of the printed sample. From this comparison, it is observed that, for a human operator, the error in setting a specific deposition rate is less for inkwell fill times greater than 3 s and greater for fill times less than 3 s. This observation indicates that the average volume of an inkwell array should be at least three times the desired deposition rate (V inkwell  >  3R). It was also observed that when the diameter of the inkwell was only slightly larger than the ink stream diameter, the ink uniformly wets the sidewall of the inkwell and results in a well filled inkwell for which the point at which it is just fully filled is easily observable. Finally, the interactions of the ink with both ‘philic’ and ‘phobic’ inkwells were studied illustrating the ability to use inkwells of various materials for setting the desired deposition rates for a variety of AJ printable inks.

  5. Climate Impact and Economic Feasibility of Solar Thermochemical Jet Fuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falter, Christoph; Batteiger, Valentin; Sizmann, Andreas

    2016-01-05

    Solar thermochemistry presents a promising option for the efficient conversion of H2O and CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar energy. To explore the potential of this fuel production pathway, the climate impact and economic performance are analyzed. Key drivers for the economic and ecological performance are thermochemical energy conversion efficiency, the level of solar irradiation, operation and maintenance, and the initial investment in the fuel production plant. For the baseline case of a solar tower concentrator with CO2 capture from air, jet fuel production costs of 2.23 €/L and life cycle greenhouse gas (LC GHG) emissions of 0.49 kgCO2-equiv/L are estimated. Capturing CO2 from a natural gas combined cycle power plant instead of the air reduces the production costs by 15% but leads to LC GHG emissions higher than that of conventional jet fuel. Favorable assumptions for all involved process steps (30% thermochemical energy conversion efficiency, 3000 kWh/(m(2) a) solar irradiation, low CO2 and heliostat costs) result in jet fuel production costs of 1.28 €/L at LC GHG emissions close to zero. Even lower production costs may be achieved if the commercial value of oxygen as a byproduct is considered.

  6. Quality of jet measurements and impact on a search for new physics at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Matthias

    2012-10-15

    The search for new physics beyond the Standard Model is one of the primary enterprises in particle physics today. Many models predict the production of new, coloured particles at the LHC. These particles would eventually decay into quarks and gluons, which manifest as particle jets in the detector. Hence, a precise understanding of the properties of jets is essential to study the underlying hard interaction process of hadronic final-states in order to probe the Standard Model and enter the territory beyond. In this thesis, a measurement of the jet transverse-momentum (p{sub T}) response function at the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC is presented, and its impact on a QCD-background estimation method in a search for new physics is described. The jet-p{sub T} response function is determined in two steps from dijet data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.90 fb{sup -1}. The jets are clustered with the anti-kT algorithm from individually measured particles that are reconstructed with the Particle-Flow algorithm combining the information from all relevant subdetectors. Firstly, the relative jet-p{sub T} resolution {sigma}/p{sub T} is measured using an unbinned maximum-likelihood approach that is based on the p{sub T} balance in QCD-dijet events and incorporates the jet-p{sub T} spectrum. In the central detector region, the relative resolution in data is approximately 10% at p{sub T}=100 GeV and improves to 5.5% at 600 GeV. It is approximately 5% larger on average than in the simulation. Secondly, the tails of the jet-p{sub T} response function are measured studying the dijet p{sub T}-asymmetry. The tails are caused by semileptonically decaying heavy-flavour quarks as well as instrumental effects and contribute at the percent level to the response function. Their relative size in data is larger than in the simulation by 20-60% in the central detector region at medium to high p

  7. Measurements of jet rates with the anti-$k_T$ and SiScone algorithms at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Verbytskyi, A

    2016-01-01

    We study jet production in $e^+e^−$ annihilation to hadrons with data recorded by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 90 GeV and 207 GeV. The jet $e^+e^−$ production rates were measured for the first time with the anti-$k_T$ and SiScone jet clustering algorithms. We compare the data with predictions by modern Monte Carlo event generators.

  8. Studies of the impact and mitigation of pile-up on large-$R$ and groomed jets in ATLAS at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Large radius jets provide one avenue towards efficient reconstruction of massive boosted objects whose decay products are sufficiently collimated so as to make standard reconstruction techniques impractical. The potentially adverse impact of additional proton-proton interactions on such large jets is assessed for a variety of jet types and hadronic final state topologies. The mitigation of these effects via jet grooming algorithms such as trimming, pruning, and filtering is then studied for high transverse momentum jets at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the ATLAS detector. A total of 29 jet algorithms and grooming configuration combinations are studied. The application of jet trimming and filtering significantly improves the robustness of large-$R$ jets and reduces their sensitivity to the intense environment of the high-luminosity LHC. The consequence is an overall improvement in the physics potential of searches for heavy boosted objects.

  9. 水射流冲击压力最佳喷距数值仿真及试验研究%Numerical Simulation and Experimental Research on the Best Jet Distances of Water Jet Impact Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶建友; 吕彦明

    2014-01-01

    基于水射流冲击模型,应用Fluent流体分析软件对喷嘴射流冲击力进行数值仿真,得出不同喷距对射流冲击压力的影响。结果表明:在低压连续水射流条件下,出口直径为2 mm的喷嘴在喷距为50 mm时产生的射流冲击压力最大;并通过实验验证射流仿真模型的正确性和有效性。%Based on water jet impact model,the jet impact numerical simulation was carried out by Fluent. The content include the effect of different jet distances influence on the jet impact pressure. The result shows that in the low pressure continuous water jet ,the jet impact pressure maximum when the nozzle diameter is 2 mm and the jet distances is 50 mm. Finally ,the validity and effectiveness of the jet simulation model were verified.

  10. Impact and cratering rates onto Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Gladman, Brett; McKinnon, William B.

    2015-09-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft fly-through of the Pluto system in July 2015 will provide humanity's first data for the crater populations on Pluto and its binary companion, Charon. In principle, these surfaces could be dated in an absolute sense, using the observed surface crater density (# craters/km2 larger than some threshold crater diameter D). Success, however, requires an understanding of both the cratering physics and absolute impactor flux. The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) L7 synthetic model of classical and resonant Kuiper belt populations (Petit, J.M. et al. [2011]. Astron. J. 142, 131-155; Gladman, B. et al. [2012]. Astron. J. 144, 23-47) and the scattering object model of Kaib et al. (Kaib, N., Roškar, R., Quinn, T. [2011]. Icarus 215, 491-507) calibrated by Shankman et al. (Shankman, C. et al. [2013]. Astrophys. J. 764, L2-L5) provide such impact fluxes and thus current primary cratering rates for each dynamical sub-population. We find that four sub-populations (the q 100km) connects to smaller projectiles, we compute cratering rates using five model impactor size distributions: a single power-law, a power-law with a knee, a power-law with a divot, as well as the "wavy" size distributions described in Minton et al. (Minton, D.A. et al. [2012]. Asteroids Comets Meteors Conf. 1667, 6348) and Schlichting et al. (Schlichting, H.E., Fuentes, C.I., Trilling, D.E. [2013]. Astron. J. 146, 36-42). We find that there is only a small chance that Pluto has been hit in the past 4 Gyr by even one impactor with a diameter larger than the known break in the projectile size distribution (d ≈ 100km) which would create a basin on Pluto (D ⩾ 400km in diameter). We show that due to present uncertainties in the impactor size distribution between d = 1- 100km , computing absolute ages for the surface of Pluto is entirely dependent on the extrapolation to small sizes and thus fraught with uncertainty. We show, however, what the ages would be for several cases

  11. Impact of aviation non-CO₂ combustion effects on the environmental feasibility of alternative jet fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Russell W; Wolfe, Philip J; Hileman, James I

    2011-12-15

    Alternative fuels represent a potential option for reducing the climate impacts of the aviation sector. The climate impacts of alternatives fuel are traditionally considered as a ratio of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to those of the displaced petroleum product; however, this ignores the climate impacts of the non-CO(2) combustion effects from aircraft in the upper atmosphere. The results of this study show that including non-CO(2) combustion emissions and effects in the life cycle of a Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) fuel can lead to a decrease in the relative merit of the SPK fuel relative to conventional jet fuel. For example, an SPK fuel option with zero life cycle GHG emissions would offer a 100% reduction in GHG emissions but only a 48% reduction in actual climate impact using a 100-year time window and the nominal climate modeling assumption set outlined herein. Therefore, climate change mitigation policies for aviation that rely exclusively on relative well-to-wake life cycle GHG emissions as a proxy for aviation climate impact may overestimate the benefit of alternative fuel use on the global climate system.

  12. Impact of reduced near-field entrainment of overpressured volcanic jets on plume development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffaraval, Farhad; Solovitz, Stephen A.; Ogden, Darcy E.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic plumes are often studied using one-dimensional analytical models, which use an empirical entrainment ratio to close the equations. Although this ratio is typically treated as constant, its value near the vent is significantly reduced due to flow development and overpressured conditions. To improve the accuracy of these models, a series of experiments was performed using particle image velocimetry, a high-accuracy, full-field velocity measurement technique. Experiments considered a high-speed jet with Reynolds numbers up to 467,000 and exit pressures up to 2.93 times atmospheric. Exit gas densities were also varied from 0.18 to 1.4 times that of air. The measured velocity was integrated to determine entrainment directly. For jets with exit pressures near atmospheric, entrainment was approximately 30% less than the fully developed level at 20 diameters from the exit. At pressures nearly three times that of the atmosphere, entrainment was 60% less. These results were introduced into Plumeria, a one-dimensional plume model, to examine the impact of reduced entrainment. The maximum column height was only slightly modified, but the critical radius for collapse was significantly reduced, decreasing by nearly a factor of two at moderate eruptive pressures.

  13. Space Weather Receives First "Impact Rating"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2007-08-01

    Journal Citation Reports, published by Thomson Scientific (http://scientific.thomson.com/isi/), has issued its first impact factor for Space Weather. It is 1.610. I consider this number to be very good, strongly validating the impact that Space Weather has already made in its short life within the community of space weather professionals.

  14. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  15. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S. [Associazione EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. [Association FZK-EURATOM Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Loughlin, M. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX (United Kingdom); Secco, A. [Nice Srl Via Serra 33 Camerano Casasco AT (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and

  16. Impact and mitigation of disruptions with the ITER-like wall in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnen, M.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Flanagan, J.; Gerasimov, S. N.; Hartmann, N.; Hender, T. C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kiptily, V.; Kruezi, U.; Matthews, G. F.; Morris, J.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Sieglin, B.; de Vries, P. C.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2013-09-01

    Disruptions are a critical issue for ITER because of the high thermal and magnetic energies that are released on short timescales, which results in extreme forces and heat loads. The choice of material of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) can have significant impact on the loads that arise during a disruption. With the ITER-like wall (ILW) in JET made of beryllium in the main chamber and tungsten in the divertor, the main finding is a low fraction of radiation. This has dropped significantly with the ILW from 50-100% of the total energy being dissipated during disruptions in CFC wall plasmas, to less than 50% on average and down to just 10% for vertical displacement events (VDEs). All other changes in disruption properties and loads are consequences of this low radiation: long current quenches (CQs), high vessel forces caused by halo currents and toroidal current asymmetries as well as severe heat loads. Temperatures close to the melting limit have been locally observed on upper first wall structures during deliberate VDE and even at plasma currents as low as 1.5 MA and thermal energy of about 1.5 MJ only. A high radiation fraction can be regained by massive injection of a mixture of 10% Ar with 90% D2. This accelerates the CQ thus reducing the halo current and sideways impulse. The temperature of PFCs stays below 400 °C. MGI is now a mandatory tool to mitigate disruptions in closed-loop operation for currents at and above 2.5 MA in JET.

  17. Ballistic Impact Response of Kevlar 49 and Zylon under Conditions Representing Jet Engine Fan Containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    A ballistic impact test program was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade out events in fabric containment systems. The impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar 49 (E.I. DuPont Nemours and Company) and Zylon AS (Toyobo Co., Ltd.) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases the tests were designed such that the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models for predicting the response of fabrics under conditions simulating those of a jet engine blade release situation. In addition some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different materials.

  18. Surface activation of polyethylene with an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Influence of applied power and flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Deynse, A., E-mail: Annick.VanDeynse@ugent.be [Department Industrial Technology and Construction, Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Ghent University, Valentin Vaerwyckweg 1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cools, P., E-mail: Pieter.Cools@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Leys, C., E-mail: Christophe.Leys@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Geyter, N., E-mail: Nathalie.DeGeyter@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Morent, R., E-mail: Rino.Morent@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Surface modification of polyethylene by an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. • Investigation of the influence of the applied power and argon flow rate. • Turbulence in the gas flow leads to a shorter afterglow. • Turbulence in the gas flow results in a lower wettability of the polyethylene. • Increasing the applied power increases the wettability of the polyethylene. - Abstract: Atmospheric pressure plasma technology offers attractive perspectives to alter the surface properties of polymers. Within this context, the surface modification of polyethylene (LDPE) by an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is profoundly investigated in this work. The influence of two different parameters (applied power and argon flow rate) on the plasma jet characteristics and the LDPE surface properties is examined in detail. In a first step, the APPJ is electrically and visually characterized and visual inspection of the afterglow clearly shows that mainly a variation in argon flow rate can result in a changing afterglow length. A maximum afterglow length is obtained at an argon flow rate of 1–1.25 slm, while higher gas flows result in turbulence leading to a shorter afterglow. Secondly, the surface modification of LDPE is examined using different analyzing techniques namely water contact angle (WCA) measurements for the wettability, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the chemical composition and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the surface morphology determination. WCA measurements show that by increasing the applied power the wettability of the LDPE increases. Increasing the argon flow rate up to 1.25 slm gives a decrease in WCA value or in other words an increased wettability. From 1.25 slm on, an increase in argon flow rate during plasma treatment decreases the LDPE wettability as can be concluded from the increased WCA values. An increased wettability can be explained by the incorporation of oxygen moieties. By increasing the

  19. Air impacts from three alternatives for producing JP-8 jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kositkanawuth, Ketwalee; Gangupomu, Roja Haritha; Sattler, Melanie L; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M; Billo, Richard; Priest, John W

    2012-10-01

    -thirds of its crude oil, leaving its transportation system especially vulnerable to disruptions in international crude supplies. At current use rates, U.S. coal reserves (262 billion short tons, including 23 billion short tons lignite) would last 236 years. Accordingly, the University of Texas at Arlington (UT Arlington) has developed a process that converts lignite to crude oil, at about half the cost of regular crude. According to the screening analysis presented here, producing jet fuel from UT Arlington crude generates lower levels of pollutants compared to international conventional crude extraction/refining (CCER).

  20. Surface activation of polyethylene with an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Influence of applied power and flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deynse, A.; Cools, P.; Leys, C.; De Geyter, N.; Morent, R.

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma technology offers attractive perspectives to alter the surface properties of polymers. Within this context, the surface modification of polyethylene (LDPE) by an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is profoundly investigated in this work. The influence of two different parameters (applied power and argon flow rate) on the plasma jet characteristics and the LDPE surface properties is examined in detail. In a first step, the APPJ is electrically and visually characterized and visual inspection of the afterglow clearly shows that mainly a variation in argon flow rate can result in a changing afterglow length. A maximum afterglow length is obtained at an argon flow rate of 1-1.25 slm, while higher gas flows result in turbulence leading to a shorter afterglow. Secondly, the surface modification of LDPE is examined using different analyzing techniques namely water contact angle (WCA) measurements for the wettability, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the chemical composition and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the surface morphology determination. WCA measurements show that by increasing the applied power the wettability of the LDPE increases. Increasing the argon flow rate up to 1.25 slm gives a decrease in WCA value or in other words an increased wettability. From 1.25 slm on, an increase in argon flow rate during plasma treatment decreases the LDPE wettability as can be concluded from the increased WCA values. An increased wettability can be explained by the incorporation of oxygen moieties. By increasing the discharge power, the concentrations of all oxygen containing groups such as Csbnd O, Cdbnd O and Osbnd Cdbnd O increase. Increasing the flow rate up to 1.25 slm results mainly in an increase in Osbnd Cdbnd O groups. However, from a flow rate of 1.25 slm on, the concentration of all oxygen groups again decreases. Based on these results, the appropriate settings for an efficient plasma treatment can easily be selected.

  1. Mini-Jet Controlled Turbulent Round Air Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜诚; 米建春; 周裕; 詹杰

    2011-01-01

    We report an investigation of the active control of a round air jet by multiple radial blowing mini-jets.The Reynolds number based on the jet exit velocity and diameter is 8000.It is found that once the continuous minijets are replaced with pulsed ones,the centerline velocity decay rate K can be greatly increased as the pulsing frequency of mini-jets approaches the natural vortex frequency of the main jet.For example,the K value is amplified by more than 50% with two(or four)pulsed mini-jets blowing,compared with the continuous mini-jets at the same ratio of the mass flow rate of the mini-jets to that of the main jet.%We report an investigation of the active control of a round air jet by multiple radial blowing mini-jets. The Reynolds number based on the jet exit velocity and diameter is 8000. It is found that once the continuous mini-jets are replaced with pulsed ones, the centerline velocity decay rate K can be greatly increased as the pulsing frequency of mini-jets approaches the natural vortex frequency of the main jet. For example, the K value is amplified by more than 50% with two (or four) pulsed mini-jets blowing, compared with the continuous mini-jets at the same ratio of the mass Sow rate of the mini-jets to that of the main jet.

  2. Impact of gluon polarization on Higgs boson plus jet production at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider Higgs boson plus jet production as a process that is sensitive to the linear polarization of gluons inside the unpolarized protons of the LHC. The leading order expressions for the transverse momentum distribution of the Higgs boson plus jet pair are provided in terms of tr

  3. Experimental Study of Ignition over Impact-Driven Supersonic Liquid Fuel Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirut Matthujak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study experimentally investigates the mechanism of the ignition of the supersonic liquid fuel jet by the visualization. N-Hexadecane having the cetane number of 100 was used as a liquid for the jet in order to enhance the ignition potential of the liquid fuel jet. Moreover, the heat column and the high intensity CO2 laser were applied to initiate the ignition. The ignition over the liquid fuel jet was visualized by a high-speed digital video camera with a shadowgraph system. From the shadowgraph images, the autoignition or ignition of the supersonic liquid fuel jet, at the velocity of 1,186 m/s which is a Mach number relative to the air of 3.41, did not take place. The ignition still did not occur, even though the heat column or the high intensity CO2 laser was alone applied. The attempt to initiate the ignition over the liquid fuel jet was achieved by applying both the heat column and the high intensity CO2 laser. Observing the signs of luminous spots or flames in the shadowgraph would readily indicate the presence of ignitions. The mechanism of the ignition and combustion over the liquid fuel jet was clearly clarified. Moreover, it was found that the ignition over the supersonic liquid fuel jet in this study was rather the force ignition than being the auto-ignition induced by shock wave heating.

  4. Experimental thermo-aerodynamic characterisation of a jet in crossflow, impacting or not, in channel turbulence; Caracterisation experimentale thermo-aeraulique d'un jet transverse impactant ou non, en turbulence de conduite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fougairolle, P.

    2009-07-15

    This work consists in the experimental study of a jet in crossflow in a closed wind tunnel. Depending on the value of the velocity ratio (r U{sub j}/U{infinity}), this confined rectangular jet can interact or impact with the opposite wall from the one it issues. The jet is slightly heated ({approx}10 C) in order to stay in the passive scalar case. An improvement of the experimental facility has been done to obtain thermal boundary conditions compatible with the measurements of slight differences of temperature, imposed by the passive scalar. Concerning the metrology, hot and cold wire anemometry and thermometry are used, and all the anemometric devices are developed and built in the lab. Probes made with Wollaston wire (Pt-Rh) of 0.35{mu}m diameter are coupled with an anemometer and a thermometer optimized to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The results are obtained both thanks to visualizations by fast camera shots for several velocity ratios (r between 3 and 12), and thanks to local hot and cold wire measurements, in the particular case of two velocity ratios (r = 3.3 and 9.4). Mixing properties of the scalar are studied by the plot of statistical values of velocity and temperature in different plans, perpendicularly to the three axis. The analysis of spectral densities of the signals on several typical locations emphasizes some features of the dynamic behaviour of the jet. (author)

  5. Assessing the Impacts of Low Level Jets' Negative Wind Shear over Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Walter; Ruiz-Columbie, Arquimedes; Tutkun, Murat; Castillo, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    Nocturnal Low Level Jets (LLJs) are defined as relative maxima in the vertical profile of the horizontal wind speed at the top of the stable boundary layer. Such peaks constitute major power resources, since they are observed at altitudes within the heights of commercial-size wind turbines. However, a wind speed maximum implies a transition from a positive wind shear below the maximum height to a negative one above. The effect that such transition inflicts on wind turbines has not been thoroughly studied. Here we focused on the impacts that the LLJ negative wind shears have over commercial size wind turbines. Using actual atmospheric LLJ data of high frequency as input for the NREL aeroelastic simulator FAST, different scenarios were created varying the LLJ maximum height with respect to the wind turbine hub height. We found only slight changes in the deflection and load averages for those scenarios, whereas the corresponding variances appear to decrease when a larger portion of the wind turbine sweeping area is affected by the negative shear. The exception was observed in the junction between the tower top and the nacelle, where a deflection maximum was detected that might reveal a critical structural point. The authors gratefully acknowledge the following Grants for this research: NSFCBET #1157246, NSFCMMI #1100948, NSFOISE1243482.

  6. Next-to-next-leading order correction to 3-jet rate and event-shape distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Ebrahim Zomorrodian; Alireza Sepehri; Tooraj Ghaffary; Parvin Eslami

    2011-01-01

    The hadronic events from the + − annihilation data at the centre-of-mass energies ranging from 60 to 197 GeV were studied. The AMY and OPAL Collaborations offered a unique opportunity to test QCD by measuring the energy dependence of different observables. The coupling constant, , was measured by two different methods: first by employing the three-jet observables. Combining all the data, the value of as at next-to-next leading order (NNLO) was determined to be 0.117 ± 0.004(hard) ± 0.006(theo). Secondly, from the event-shape distributions, the strong coupling constant, , was extracted at NNLO and it’s evaluation was tested with the energy scale. The results were consistent with the running of , expected from QCD predictions. Averaging over different observables, was determined to be 0.115 ± 0.007(hard) ± 0.003(theo).

  7. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  8. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-24

    jet . This jet impacted at 90* a pool of water and, when a threshold velocity was exceeded, it was observed that the plunging liquid jet caused air ... Entrainment by Plunging Laminar Liquid Jets ," AIChE Journal, Vol. 12, No. 3, 563, 1966. McKeogh, E.J. and Ervine, D.A., " Air Entrainment Rate and Diffusion...transmit the fourth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Fuel Jets Injected into a High-Temperature Subsonic Crossflow: High-Data-Rate Laser Diagnostic Investigation under Steady and Oscillatory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucht, Robert [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Anderson, William [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-01-23

    An investigation of subsonic transverse jet injection into a subsonic vitiated crossflow is discussed. The reacting jet in crossflow (RJIC) system investigated as a means of secondary injection of fuel in a staged combustion system. The measurements were performed in test rigs featuring (a) a steady, swirling crossflow and (b) a crossflow with low swirl but significant oscillation in the pressure field and in the axial velocity. The rigs are referred to as the steady state rig and the instability rig. Rapid mixing and chemical reaction in the near field of the jet injection is desirable in this application. Temporally resolved velocity measurements within the wake of the reactive jets using 2D-PIV and OH-PLIF at a repetition rate of 5 kHz were performed on the RJIC flow field in a steady state water-cooled test rig. The reactive jets were injected through an extended nozzle into the crossflow which is located in the downstream of a low swirl burner (LSB) that produced the swirled, vitiated crossflow. Both H2/N2 and natural gas (NG)/air jets were investigated. OH-PLIF measurements along the jet trajectory show that the auto-ignition starts on the leeward side within the wake region of the jet flame. The measurements show that jet flame is stabilized in the wake of the jet and wake vortices play a significant role in this process. PIV and OH–PLIF measurements were performed at five measurement planes along the cross- section of the jet. The time resolved measurements provided significant information on the evolution of complex flow structures and highly transient features like, local extinction, re-ignition, vortex-flame interaction prevalent in a turbulent reacting flow. Nanosecond-laser-based, single-laser-shot coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements of temperature and H2 concentraiton were also performed. The structure and dynamics of a reacting transverse jet injected into a vitiated oscillatory crossflow presents a unique opportunity for

  10. Dynamics of Water Jet in Water Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克让; 陈明

    2001-01-01

    On the base of the study on dynamics of water jet in water jet looms, the parameters of water jet mechanism which affect the speed of water jet are analyzed and optimized. So the stability of the water jet can be improved to raise the speed of water jet as well as weft insertion rate and to enlarge the width of woven fabrics a lot. At the same time it also points out that to increase water jet speed and to prolong its affective jet time depend mainly on the accretion of spring rate (constant)of stiffness and the diminution of plunger's cross sectional area respectively.

  11. Jet Production Rates in Association with W and Z Bosons in pp Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Haensel, Stephan; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Trauner, Christine; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Benucci, Leonardo; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Hreus, Tomas; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Raval, Amita; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; Ceard, Ludivine; Cortina Gil, Eduardo; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Ovyn, Severine; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Mateev, Matey; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; 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Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Cakir, Altan; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Olzem, Jan; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Rosin, Michele; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Bauer, Julia; Berger, Joram; Buege, Volker; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; 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Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mathew, Thomas; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Roselli, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Trentadue, Raffaello; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Polujanskas, Mindaugas; Sabonis, Tomas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Tam, Jason; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Pela, Joao; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bell, Alan James; Benedetti, Daniele; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bolognesi, Sara; Bona, Marcella; Breuker, Horst; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hegner, Benedikt; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Maurisset, Aurelie; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Caminada, Lea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hintz, Wieland; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Punz, Thomas; Rizzi, Andrea; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jaeger, Andreas; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Snoek, Hella; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Demir, Durmus; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Özbek, Melih; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Cheng, Teh Lee; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Hartley, Dominic; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; MacEvoy, Barry C; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Henderson, Conor; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Avetisyan, Aram; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Chou, John Paul; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Mall, Orpheus; Maruyama, Sho; Miceli, Tia; Nikolic, Milan; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Rutherford, Britney; Salur, Sevil; Schwarz, Thomas; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Deisher, Amanda; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Shen, Benjamin C; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Shin, Kyoungha; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Henriksson, Kristofer; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Liu, Yao; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Ryd, Anders; Saelim, Michael; Salvati, Emmanuele; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cooper, William; Eartly, David P; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Esen, Selda; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jensen, Hans; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Limon, Peter; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pivarski, James; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Goldberg, Sean; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Myeonghun, Park; Prescott, Craig; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Schmitt, Michael; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kunde, Gerd J; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Silvestre, Catherine; Smoron, Agata; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferencek, Dinko; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Santanastasio, Francesco; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Everaerts, Pieter; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Loizides, Constantinos; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kelly, Tony; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Smith, Kenneth; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Boeriu, Oana; Chasco, Matthew; Reucroft, Steve; Swain, John; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Gu, Jianhui; Hill, Christopher; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Liu, Chang; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Sakumoto, Willis; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Barker, Anthony; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Patel, Rishi; Richards, Alan; Rose, Keith; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Issah, Michael; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goadhouse, Stephen; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Parker, William; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of jet production rates in association with W and Z bosons for jet transverse momenta above 30 GeV are reported, using a sample of proton-proton collision events recorded by CMS at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The study includes the measurement of the normalized inclusive rates of jets sigma(V + >= n jets)/sigma(V), where V represents either a W or a Z. In addition, the ratio of W to Z cross sections and the W charge asymmetry as a function of the number of associated jets are measured. A test of Berends--Giele scaling at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is also presented. The measurements provide a stringent test of perturbative-QCD calculations and are sensitive to the possible presence of new physics. The results are in agreement with the predictions of a simulation that uses explicit matrix element calculations for final states with jets.

  12. Jet production rates in association with W and Z bosons in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt {s} = 7 {\\text{TeV}} $

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of jet production rates in association with W and Z bosons for jet transverse momenta above 30 GeV are reported, using a sample of proton-proton collision events recorded by CMS at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The study includes the measurement of the normalized inclusive rates of jets sigma(V + >= n jets)/sigma(V), where V represents either a W or a Z. In addition, the ratio of W to Z cross sections and the W charge asymmetry as a function of the number of associated jets are measured. A test of Berends--Giele scaling at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is also presented. The measurements provide a stringent test of perturbative-QCD calculations and are sensitive to the possible presence of new physics. The results are in agreement with the predictions of a simulation that uses explicit matrix element calculations for final states with jets.

  13. Impact of nitrogen seeding on confinement and power load control of a high-triangularity JET ELMy H-mode plasma with a metal wall

    CERN Document Server

    Giroud, C; Jachmich, S; Rimini, F; Beurskens, M N A; Balboa, I; Brezinsek, S; Coelho, R; Coenen, J W; Frassinetti, L; Joffrin, E; Oberkofler, M; Lehnen, M; Liu, Y; Marsen, S; K, K McCormick; Meigs, A; Neu, R; Sieglin, B; van Rooij, G; Arnoux, G; Belo, P; Brix, M; Clever, M; Coffey, I; Devaux, S; Douai, D; Eich, T; Flanagan, J; Grunhagen, S; Huber, A; Kempenaars, M; Kruezi, U; Lawson, K; Lomas, P; Lowry, C; Nunes, I; Sirinnelli, A; Sips, A C C; Stamp, M; Wiesen, S; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the impact on confinement and power load of the high-shape 2.5MA ELMy H-mode scenario at JET of a change from an all carbon plasma facing components to an all metal wall. In preparation to this change, systematic studies of power load reduction and impact on confinement as a result of fuelling in combination with nitrogen seeding were carried out in JET-C and are compared to their counterpart in JET with a metallic wall. An unexpected and significant change is reported on the decrease of the pedestal confinement but is partially recovered with the injection of nitrogen.

  14. Fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion target by jet impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pedro@din.upm.es; Ogando, F. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (Spain); Eliezer, S. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center (Israel); Martinez-Val, J.M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center (Israel)

    2005-05-21

    A new target design for HIF, based on the fast-ignition principles, is proposed. Unlike the previous designs proposed so far, in this case just one energy source is needed to drive the whole process to ignition. The ultra-fast deposition of energy onto the compressed core is produced in this case by hypervelocity jets generated during the process. The collision of jets converts their kinetic energy into thermal energy of the nuclear fuel, which is expected to produce ignition under proper design. The process is studied in this paper, describing its most relevant features like jet production and later collision.

  15. Using radiative energy losses to constrain the magnetisation and magnetic reconnection rate at the base of black hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, William J

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the severe radiative energy losses which occur at the base of black hole jets using a relativistic fluid jet model, including in-situ acceleration of non-thermal leptons by magnetic reconnection. Our results demonstrate that including a self-consistent treatment of radiative energy losses is necessary to perform accurate MHD simulations of powerful jets and that jet spectra calculated via post-processing are liable to vastly overestimate the amount of non-thermal emission. If no more than 95% of the initial total jet power is radiated away by the plasma travels as it travels along the length of the jet, we can place a lower bound on the magnetisation of the jet plasma at the base of the jet. For typical powerful jets, we find that the plasma at the jet base is required to be highly magnetised, with at least 10,000 times more energy contained in magnetic fields than in non-thermal leptons. Using a simple power-law model of magnetic reconnection, motivated by simulations of collisionless reconnecti...

  16. Taguchi versus Full Factorial Design to Determine the Influence of Process Parameters on the Impact Forces Produced by Water Jets Used in Sewer Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medan, N.; Banica, M.

    2016-11-01

    The regular cleaning of the materials deposed in sewer networks is realized, especially with equipment that uses high pressure water jets. The functioning of this equipment is dependent on certain process parameters that can vary, causing variations of the impact forces. The impact force directly affects the cleaning of sewer systems. In order to determine the influence of the process parameters on the impact forces produced by water jets the method of research used is the experiment. The research methods used is that Taguchi design and full factorial design. For the experimental determination of the impact forces a stand for generating water jets and a device for measuring the forces of impact are used. The processing of data is carried out using the Software Minitab 17.

  17. Impact of divertor geometry on radiative divertor performance in JET H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaervinen, A. E.; Brezinsek, S.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Corrigan, G.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Lawson, K. D.; Lipschultz, B.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-04-01

    Radiative divertor operation in JET high confinement mode plasmas with the ITER-like wall has been experimentally investigated and simulated with EDGE2D-EIRENE in horizontal and vertical low field side (LFS) divertor configurations. The simulations show that the LFS divertor heat fluxes are reduced with N2-injection in similar fashion in both configurations, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The simulations show no substantial difference between the two configurations in the reduction of the peak LFS heat flux as a function of divertor radiation, nitrogen concentration, or pedestal Zeff. Consistently, experiments show similar divertor radiation and nitrogen injection levels for similar LFS peak heat flux reduction in both configurations. Nevertheless, the LFS strike point is predicted to detach at 20% lower separatrix density in the vertical than in the horizontal configuration. However, since the peak LFS heat flux in partial detachment in the vertical configurations is shifted towards the far scrape-off layer (SOL), the simulations predict no benefit in the reduction of LFS peak heat flux for a given upstream density in the vertical configuration relative to a horizontal one. A factor of 2 reduction of deuterium ionization source inside the separatrix is observed in the simulations when changing to the vertical configuration. The simulations capture the experimentally observed particle and heat flux reduction at the LFS divertor plate in both configurations, when adjusting the impurity injection rate to reproduce the measured divertor radiation. However, the divertor D α -emissions are underestimated by a factor of 2-5, indicating a short-fall in radiation by the fuel species. In the vertical configuration, detachment is experimentally measured and predicted to start next to the strike point, extending towards the far SOL with increasing degree of detachment. In contrast, in the horizontal configuration, the entire divertor particle flux

  18. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, T W; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, Y-J; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novák, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Orjuela Koop, J D; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T

    2016-03-25

    Jet production rates are measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-k_{t} algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (p_{T}) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12jet production. However, the centrality-selected R_{dAu} values and central-to-peripheral ratios (R_{CP}) show large, p_{T}-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  19. Centrality-dependent modification of jet-production rates in deuteron-gold collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A

    2015-01-01

    Jet production rates are measured in $p$$+$$p$ and $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the $R=0.3$ anti-$k_{t}$ algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multi-wire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with $12jet production. However, the centrality-selected $R_{d{\\rm Au}}$ values and central-to-peripheral ratios ($R_{\\rm CP}$) show large, $p_T$-dependent deviations from unity, which challenge the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in ...

  20. The Energy Dissipation Rate Per Unit Mass of Jet Pump Mixture%射流泵混合的单位质量能量耗散率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李廷浩; 陆宏圻

    2000-01-01

    The formula of jet pump energy dissipation rate per unit mass is derived in this paper related to jet pump axis dimension with energy dissipation rote. Thereby replenishes the lack of basic capability equation only referred to section dimension. By comparing and analyzing the formula of jet pump energy dissipation rate per unit mass with beater and static, it comes to the conclusion that jet pump has great capability of liquid-liquid mixing. Although the efficiency of jet pump is lower, but it can get high intensity when it used for mixing%推导出射流泵单位质量能量耗散率公式,涉及到射流泵轴向尺寸与能耗率,弥补了基本性能方程只涉及截面尺寸的不足。将射流泵的单位质量能量耗散率公式与搅拌器和静态混合器比较,进而分析得出射流泵有较强液一液混合性能的本质。虽然射流泵效率低,但将其用作混合时却强度高。

  1. ATLAS level-1 jet trigger rates and study of the ATLAS discovery potential of the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in b-jet decay channels

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, Kambiz

    2001-01-01

    The response of the ATLAS calorimeters to electrons, photons and hadrons, in terms of the longitudinal and lateral shower development, is parameterized using the GEANT package and a detailed detector description (DICE). The parameterizations are implemented in the ATLAS Level-1 (LVL1) Calorimeter Trigger fast simulation package which, based on an average detector geometry, simulates the complete chain of the LVL1 calorimeter trigger system. In addition, pile-up effects due to multiple primary interactions are implemented taking into account the shape and time history of the trigger signals. An interface to the fast physics simulation package (ATLFAST) is also developed in order to perform ATLAS physics analysis, including the LVL1 trigger effects, in a consistent way. The simulation tools, the details of the parameterization and the interface are described. The LVL1 jet trigger thresholds corresponding to the current trigger menus are determined within the framework of the fast simulation, and the LVL1 jet tr...

  2. Rock failure analysis by combined thermal weakening and water jet impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of preheating on the initiation of fracture in rocks subjected to the impingement of a continuous water jet is studied. Preheating the rock is assumed to degrade its mechanical properties and strength in accordance with existing experimental data. The water jet is assumed to place a quasi-static loading on the surface of the rock. The loading is approximated by elementary functions which permit analytic computation of the induced stresses in a rock half-space. The resulting stresses are subsequently coupled with the Griffith criteria for tensile failure to estimate the change, due to heating, in the critical stagnation pressure and velocity of the water jet required to cause failure in the rock.

  3. Rock failure analysis by combined thermal weakening and water jet impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of preheating on the initiation of fracture in rocks subjected to the impingement of a continuous water jet is studied. Preheating the rock is assumed to degrade its mechanical properties and strength in accordance with existing experimental data. The water jet is assumed to place a quasi-static loading on the surface of the rock. The loading is approximated by elementary functions which permit analytic computation of the induced stresses in a rock half-space. The resulting stresses are subsequently coupled with the Griffith criteria for tensile failure to estimate the change, due to heating, in the critical stagnation pressure and velocity of the water jet required to cause failure in the rock.

  4. On the one loop $\\gamma^{(*)}\\to q\\bar{q}$ impact factor and the exclusive diffractive cross sections for the production of two or three jets

    CERN Document Server

    Boussarie, R; Szymanowski, L; Wallon, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the $\\gamma^{(*)}\\to q\\bar{q}$ transition with one loop accuracy in arbitrary kinematics. The calculation was done within Balitsky's high energy operator expansion. Together with our previous result for the $\\gamma^{(*)}\\to q\\bar{q} g$ Born impact factor it allows one to derive cross-sections for 2- (one loop) and 3-jet (Born) difractive electroproduction. We write such cross sections for the 2 and 3 jet exclusive diffractive electroproduction off a proton in terms of hadronic matrix elements of Wilson lines. For the 2-jet cross section we demonstrate the cancellation of IR, collinear and rapidity singularities. Our result can be directly exploited to describe the recently analyzed data on exclusive dijet production at HERA and used for the study of jet photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton or nuclear scattering.

  5. Modified Regression Rate Formula of PMMA Combustion by a Single Plane Impinging Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneyoshi Matsuoka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified regression rate formula for the uppermost stage of CAMUI-type hybrid rocket motor is proposed in this study. Assuming a quasi-steady, one-dimensional, an energy balance against a control volume near the fuel surface is considered. Accordingly, the regression rate formula which can calculate the local regression rate by the quenching distance between the flame and the regression surface is derived. An experimental setup which simulates the combustion phenomenon involved in the uppermost stage of a CAMUI-type hybrid rocket motor was constructed and the burning tests with various flow velocities and impinging distances were performed. A PMMA slab of 20 mm height, 60 mm width, and 20 mm thickness was chosen as a sample specimen and pure oxygen and O2/N2 mixture (50/50 vol.% were employed as the oxidizers. The time-averaged regression rate along the fuel surface was measured by a laser displacement sensor. The quenching distance during the combustion event was also identified from the observation. The comparison between the purely experimental and calculated values showed good agreement, although a large systematic error was expected due to the difficulty in accurately identifying the quenching distance.

  6. Impact of upper-level jet-generated inertia-gravity waves on surface wind and precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zülicke

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A meteorological case study for the impact of inertia-gravity waves on surface meteorology is presented. The large-scale environment from 17 to 19 December 1999 was dominated by a poleward breaking Rossby wave transporting subtropical air over the North Atlantic Ocean upward and north-eastward. The synoptic situation was characterized with an upper tropospheric jet streak passing Northern Europe. The unbalanced jet spontaneously radiated inertia-gravity waves from its exit region. Near-inertial waves appeared with a horizontal wavelength of about 200 km and an apparent period of about 12 h. These waves transported energy downwards and interacted with large-scale convection.

    This configuration is simulated with the nonhydrostatic Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model. Together with simplified runs without orography and moisture it is demonstrated that the imbalance of the jet (detected with the cross-stream ageostrophic wind and the deep convection (quantified with the latent heat release are forcing inertia-gravity waves. This interaction is especially pronounced when the upper tropospheric jet is located above a cold front at the surface and supports deep frontal convection. Weak indication was found for triggering post-frontal convection by inertia-gravity waves.

    The realism of model simulations was studied in an extended validation study for the Baltic Sea region. It included observations from radar (DWDPI, BALTRAD, satellite (GFZGPS, weather stations (DWDMI and assimilated products (ELDAS, MESAN. The detected spatio-temporal patterns show wind pulsations and precipitation events at scales corresponding to those of inertia-gravity waves. In particular, the robust features of strong wind and enhanced precipitation near the front appeared with nearly the same amplitudes as in the model. In some datasets we found indication for periodic variations in the post-frontal region.

    These findings demonstrate the impact of upper

  7. Composite components under impact load and effects of defects on the loading capacity. [Alpha Jet tail assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, R.; Wurzel, D.

    1979-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on a horizontal tail assembly made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic for the Alpha Jet. The possibility of obtaining a leading edge nose design lighter but not more expensive than a metal version was studied. An important consideration was sufficient resistance of the leading edge against impact of stones and hailstones combined with high degree of stiffness. The improvement of energy reception characteristics of the materials through suitable laminate design was considered. Since certain defects occur in structural components, the effects of such defects on the characteristics of the parts were also studied.

  8. The impact of divertor detachment on carbon sources in JET L-mode discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezinsek, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Jachmich, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Rapp, J.; Felton, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Philipps, V.; Huber, A.; Pugno, R.; Sergienko, G.; Pospieszczyk, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrocarbon injection experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical sputtering yield of carbon-fibre composites at elevated temperatures (T-surface similar or equal to 500 K) and detached plasma conditions in the JET outer divertor. A plasma scenario in L-mode with the outer strike-poi

  9. Impact of nitrogen seeding on confinement and power load control of a high-triangularity JET ELMy H-mode plasma with a metal wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giroud, C.; Maddison, G. P.; Jachmich, S.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Balboa, I.; Brezinsek, S.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Frassinetti, L.; Joffrin, E.; Oberkofler, M.; Lehnen, M.; Liu, Y.; Marsen, S.; McCormick, K.; Meigs, A.; Neu, R.; Sieglin, B.; van Rooij, G. J.; Arnoux, G.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coffey, I.; Devaux, S.; Douai, D.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; S. Grünhagen,; Huber, A.; Kempenaars, M.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K.; Lomas, P.; Lowry, C.; Nunes, I.; Sirinnelli, A.; Sips, A.C.C.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the impact on confinement and power load of the high-shape 2.5 MA ELMy H-mode scenario at JET of a change from all carbon plasma-facing components to an all metal wall. In preparation to this change, systematic studies of power load reduction and impact on confinement as a result

  10. Youth unemployment rate and impact of financial crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choudhry, Misbah Tanveer; Marelli, Enrico; Signorelli, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of financial crises on the youth unemployment rate (YUR). The authors consider different types of financial crises (systemic banking crises, non-systemic banking crises, currency crises and debt crises) and different groups of countries,

  11. Youth unemployment rate and impact of financial crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choudhry, Misbah Tanveer; Marelli, Enrico; Signorelli, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of financial crises on the youth unemployment rate (YUR). The authors consider different types of financial crises (systemic banking crises, non-systemic banking crises, currency crises and debt crises) and different groups of countries, ac

  12. Calibration of light-flavour jet $b$-tagging rates on ATLAS data at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Saimpert, Matthias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A variety of algorithms have been developed to identify jets originating from $b$-quark hadronization within the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We describe the measurement of the false positive rate of the algorithm most commonly used in the LHC Run~2 ATLAS analyses, i.e. the misidentification rate of jets containing no $b$- nor $c$-hadrons. The measurement is based on the full data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV by the ATLAS detector during the year 2015 and 2016 and is performed in various ranges of jet transverse momenta and pseudorapidities. The final data sample used to extract the results is enriched in jets originating from light-flavour quark and gluon hadronization with the application of a dedicated algorithm reversing some of the criteria used in the nominal identification algorithm. The results are compared to the false positive rate predicted by the nominal ATLAS simulation in order to calibrate these.

  13. Relativistic AGN jets I. The delicate interplay between jet structure, cocoon morphology and jet-head propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walg, S.; Achterberg, A.; Markoff, S.; Keppens, R.; Meliani, Z.

    2013-08-01

    . We find that the propagation speed for all three models is less than expected from simple theoretical predictions. We propose this is due to an enlarged cross-section of the jet which impacts with the ambient medium. We show that in these models, the effective surface area is 16 times as large in the case of the homogeneous jet, 30 times as large in the case of the isochoric jet and can be up to 40 times as large in the case of the isothermal jet.

  14. Landau-Squire jet as a versatile probe to measure flow rate through individual nanochannel and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, nanometric sized channels have been intensively investigated since new model of fluid transport are expected due to the flow confinement at the nanometric scale. Nanoconfinement generates new phenomena, such as superfast flows in carbon nanotubes and slippage over smooth surfaces. However, a major challenge of nanofluidics lies in fabricating nanoscale fluidic devices and developing new velocimetry techniques able to measure flow rates down to femtoL/s. In this work we report the experimental study of the velocity fields generated by pressure driven flow from glass nanochannel with a diameter ranging from 1 μm to 100nm. The flow emerging from these channels can be described by the classical Landau-Squire solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for a point jet. We show that due to the peculiarity of this flow, it can be used as an efficient probe to characterize the permeability of nanochannels. Velocity field is measured experimentally seeding the fluid in the reservoir with 500 nm Polystyrene particles and measuring the velocity with a standard PIV algorithm. Predictions are tested for nanochannels of several dimensions and supported by ionic current measurement. This demonstrates that this technique is a powerful tool to characterize the flow through nanochannels. We finally apply this method to the measurement of the flow emerging from a single carbon nanotube inserted in the nanochannels and present first data of permeability measurement through a single nanotube.

  15. Rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings using discrete water jets: Effects of water cushioning, substrate geometry, impact distance, and coating properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Bernad, Pablo L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and reliable rain erosion screening of blade coatings for wind turbines is a strong need in the coatings industry. One possibility in this direction is the use of discrete water jets, where so-called jet slugs are impacted on a coating surface. Previous investigations have mapped...... the influence of water jet slug velocity and impact frequency. In the present work, the effects on coating erosion of water cushioning, substrate curvature, and water nozzle-coating distance were explored. The investigations showed that in some cases water cushioning (the presence of a liquid film...... on the coating surface prior to impact) influences the erosion. Contrary to this, substrate curvature and the water nozzle-coating distance (coatings, including tensile strength, flexibility...

  16. Circular and Elliptic Submerged Impinging Water Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudey, Eric; Benedicto, Olivier; Ravier, Emmanuel; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    Experiments and CFD have been performed to study circular and elliptic jets in a submerged water jet facility. The tests included discharge coefficient measurement to evaluate pressure losses encountered in noncircular nozzles compared to circular ones. Three-dimensional pressure mappings on the impingement surface and PIV measurement of the jet mean and turbulent velocity have been performed at different compound impingement angles relative to the impingement surface and at different stand-off distances. The objective was to investigate the effect of the non-circular geometry on the flow field and on the impact region. The tests were performed in a close loop system in which the water was pumped through the nozzles into a clear Plexiglas tank. The Reynolds numbers were typically in the range of 250000. Discharge coefficients of the elliptic nozzle was somewhat lower than that of the circular jet but spreading rate and turbulence level were higher. Pressure mapping showed that the nozzle exit geometry had an effect on the pressure distribution in the impact region and that high-pressure zones were generated at specific impact points. PIV measurements showed that for a same total exit area, the elliptic jets affected a surface area that is 8the equivalent circular. The turbulence level in the elliptic jet tripled due to the nozzle design. Results of the CFD model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. The Impact of Exchange Rate Volatility on Exports in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Yuksel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically investigates the impact of exchange rate volatility, export prices and weighed GDP of most of the trading partners of Turkey on aggregate exports for the period from 2003:2 to 2010:12. The primary focus is the impact of exchange rate volatility on exports from Turkey. To achieve this purpose, various approaches were employed previously. In line with the previous studies, the OLS regression method was employed. Appropriate tests to ensure the reliability of the analysis were undertaken. Time series data were used for the analysis. Cross correlation to determine the relationship between the pairs of variables was utilized. Our results indicated that there was a negative relationship between exports and volatility; however, this relationship was not significant at a level of 5%. Even though there were many studies exploring the impact of the volatility of the exchange rate on exports, there was no consensus for validation of the results among these various studies. This topic was chosen since there were few studies about Turkey's case, while in contrast, there have been innumerable studies made outside of Turkey.

  18. Impact of 50% Alcohol to Jet Blends on Aviation Turbine Fuel Filtration and Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-20

    50% Alcohol to Jet Blends on Aviation Turbine Fuel Filtration and Coalescence NF&LCFT REPORT 441/14-015 20 June 2014 Prepared By...Aviation Turbine Fuel Filtration and Coalescence 1.0 BACKGROUND In October 2009, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus directed the Navy to decrease its...0 ɛ 1 Existent Gum (mg/100 mL) D381 7.0 5.0 Particulate Matter (mg/L) D5452 1.0 0.2 Filtration Time (minutes) MIL-DTL- 5624V 15 6 Micro

  19. The Impact of Real Exchange Rate on Employment in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmira Cakrani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is a big economical and social issue for each country, in particular for Albania, which is a country that comes from a centralized system where the state ensured full employment. In the struggle of applying the transition to market economy, each government had to face the two-digit levels of unemployment. Because of this, the application of the right policies in order to decrease the level of unemployment has been in the centre of the program of each government in Albania. The objective of this paper is to show if the undervaluation or overvaluation of the real exchange rate can affect in a significant way the level of employment in Albania and that to answer the question, if the real exchange rate can be used as a political instrument for the reduction of the level of unemployment. There are relatively few works that study the impact of real exchange rate on the Albanian economy and in my knowledge there is not a previous work on employment and real exchange rate relationship in Albania, so this can be considered as the first study that attempt to assess this relationship. To evaluate the link between the real exchange rate and the level of employment the Johansen procedure and Vector Error Correction Term method is used. The result of the study demonstrates not statistically significant impact of real exchange rate on level of employment, suggesting that the increase of competition of the country through the real exchange rate doesn’t improve the condition of the employment in Albania, so the Albanian government should implement other strategies to increase the level of employment in the country.

  20. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  1. Impact of temperature dependence of the energy loss on jet quenching observables

    CERN Document Server

    Scardina, F; Greco, V

    2011-01-01

    The quenching of jets (particles with $p_T>>T, \\Lambda_{QCD}$) in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions has been one of the main prediction and discovery at RHIC. We have studied, by a simple jet quenching modeling, the correlation between different observables like the nuclear modification factor $\\Rapt$, the elliptic flow $v_2$ and the ratio of quark to gluon suppression $R_{AA}(quark)/R_{AA}(gluon)$. We show that the relation among these observables is strongly affected by the temperature dependence of the energy loss. In particular the large $v_2$ and and the nearly equal $\\Rapt$ of quarks and gluons can be accounted for only if the energy loss occurs mainly around the temperature $T_c$ and the flavour conversion is significant.Finally we point out that the efficency in the conversion of the space eccentricity into the momentum one ($v_2$) results to be quite smaller respect to the one coming from elastic scatterings in a fluid with a viscosity to entropy density ratio $4\\pi\\eta/s=1$.

  2. Impact of chevron spacing and asymmetric distribution on supersonic jet acoustics and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, N.; Gutmark, E.; Kailasanath, K.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental investigation into the effect of chevron spacing and distribution on supersonic jets was performed. Cross-stream and streamwise particle imaging velocimetry measurements were used to relate flow field modification to sound field changes measured by far-field microphones in the overexpanded, ideally expanded, and underexpanded regimes. Drastic modification of the jet cross-section was achieved by the investigated configurations, with both elliptic and triangular shapes attained downstream. Consequently, screech was nearly eliminated with reductions in the range of 10-25 dB depending on the operating condition. Analysis of the streamwise velocity indicated that both the mean shock spacing and strength were reduced resulting in an increase in the broadband shock associated noise spectral peak frequency and a reduction in the amplitude, respectively. Maximum broadband shock associated noise amplitude reductions were in the 5-7 dB range. Chevron proximity was found to be the primary driver of peak vorticity production, though persistence followed the opposite trend. The integrated streamwise vorticity modulus was found to be correlated with peak large scale turbulent mixing noise reduction, though optimal overall sound pressure level reductions did not necessarily follow due to the shock/fine scale mixing noise sources. Optimal large scale mixing noise reductions were in the 5-6 dB range.

  3. Literacy Rates and its Impact on Birth Rates in Nadia District, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadeb Ghosh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Equality in socio-economic component is essential for human development and social change. Educational inequality reduces economic growth and women's empowerment on the one hand and increases birth rate on the other. In population studies, it has been established that educational level is collinearly related with demographic behaviour. This study aims to investigate inequalities in literacy rates and its impact on birth rates in Nowpara-I Gram Panchayat (GP located in the Krishnagar II C.D. Block, Nadia District of West Bengal using a household survey conducted in 356 households among women aged 49 and above in triangulation with secondary data. The aim of this study is to explore the causes of the spatial inequalities in education and its effect on spatial variations in birth rates. The key finding suggest that in Nowpara-I, negative relationships exist between female education and birth rate because education has a positive impact on empowerment, late marriage, use of contraceptives and family size.

  4. The impact of heating the breakdown bubble on the global mode of a swirling jet: Experiments and linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukes, Lothar; Sieber, Moritz; Paschereit, C. Oliver; Oberleithner, Kilian

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the dynamics of non-isothermal swirling jets undergoing vortex breakdown, with an emphasis on helical coherent structures. It is proposed that the dominant helical coherent structure can be suppressed by heating the recirculation bubble. This proposition is assessed with stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the breakdown region of isothermal and heated swirling jets. The coherent kinetic energy of the dominant helical structure was derived from PIV snapshots via proper orthogonal decomposition. For one set of experimental parameters, mild heating is found to increase the energy content of the dominant helical mode. Strong heating leads to a reduction by 30% of the coherent structures energy. For a second set of experimental parameters, no alteration of the dominant coherent structure is detectable. Local linear stability analysis of the time-averaged velocity fields shows that the key difference between the two configurations is the density ratio at the respective wavemaker location. A density ratio of approximately 0.8 is found to correlate to a suppression of the global mode in the experiments. A parametric study with model density and velocity profiles indicates the most important parameters that govern the local absolute growth rate: the density ratio and the relative position of the density profiles and the inner shear layer.

  5. Unsteady penetration of a target by a liquid jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uth, Tobias; Deshpande, Vikram S

    2013-12-10

    It is widely acknowledged that ceramic armor experiences an unsteady penetration response: an impacting projectile may erode on the surface of a ceramic target without substantial penetration for a significant amount of time and then suddenly start to penetrate the target. Although known for more than four decades, this phenomenon, commonly referred to as dwell, remains largely unexplained. Here, we use scaled analog experiments with a low-speed water jet and a soft, translucent target material to investigate dwell. The transient target response, in terms of depth of penetration and impact force, is captured using a high-speed camera in combination with a piezoelectric force sensor. We observe the phenomenon of dwell using a soft (noncracking) target material. The results show that the penetration rate increases when the flow of the impacting water jet is reversed due to the deformation of the jet-target interface--this reversal is also associated with an increase in the force exerted by the jet on the target. Creep penetration experiments with a constant indentation force did not show an increase in the penetration rate, confirming that flow reversal is the cause of the unsteady penetration rate. Our results suggest that dwell can occur in a ductile noncracking target due to flow reversal. This phenomenon of flow reversal is rather widespread and present in a wide range of impact situations, including water-jet cutting, needleless injection, and deposit removal via a fluid jet.

  6. Impact of W events and dust on JET-ILW operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sertoli, M., E-mail: marco.sertoli@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Flanagan, J.C. [CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bacharis, M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London (United Kingdom); Kardaun, O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jarvinen, A. [Aalto University, Association Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Matthews, G.F. [CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Harting, D.; Cackett, A.; Hodille, E. [CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coffey, I.H. [Queen’s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Lazzaro, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma C.N.R., Milan (Italy); Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    The occurrence of transient impurity events (TIE) leading to intense radiation spikes in JET plasma discharges has been studied since the installation of the ITER-like wall (ILW). To generate the observed average increase in radiated power of 1.5 MW, a spherical particle of solid W of radius >90 μm would be required. The drop in plasma energy caused by W-TIEs is fully recovered in 90% of all cases, only 1% inducing a longer term loss in plasma energy which sometimes leads to the shut-down of plasma operation. TIEs are correlated with disruptions and with measurements of the dust mobilized by disruptions using the high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) diagnostic. The dust characteristics giving rise to TIEs have been studied using the dust transport code DTOKS and the 1D impurity transport code STRAHL.

  7. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Chan, Tucker; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables — jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum — have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their “local” computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

  8. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  9. MIGRATION WITHIN THE EU AND ITS IMPACT ON UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARALAMBIE GEORGE ALIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Migration, recurrent phenomenon in the XXI century knows an unprecedented scale with unpredictable consequences economically, politically and socially. A meaningful analysis of the impact of migratory flows, in terms of employment, on the economy of the countries involved, show both positive and negative effects on the countries of origin and those of destination, which imposed the adoption of public policy at regional and international level aimed at providing the necessary workforce amid demographic change, facilitate transfers of knowledge and technology, but also the increase of competitiveness on the labor market. The fear of host countries regarding migration is linked to fewer jobs available for their citizens. Labour migration also contributes to alleviating labor market imbalances cause by lack of qualified personnel in certain areas, but also by lower interest of the domestic workers for some low-paid sectors. A natural consequence of the increased number of employees is increasing consumption on medium and long term with implications for the creation of new jobs, with impact livelihoods. The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of migration on unemployment rate, using data provided by Eurostat, interpreted using regression and correlation analysis. The results suggest that the unemployment rate was not influenced by migration.

  10. Comparison of the Performance of Chilled Beam with Swirl Jet and Diffuse Ceiling Air Supply: Impact of Heat Load Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Bård; Mustakallio, Panu; Kosonen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    (ventilation effectiveness of 0.4) and the air flow rate had to be above minimum to safeguard the indoor air quality. The radial swirl jet of chilled beam also was not capable of creating complete mixing at high and concentrated heat load (ventilation effectiveness of 0.7)....... (L x W x H)). A window (6.5 m2) was simulated by radiant panels. Four chilled beam units were installed symmetrically on the suspended ceiling together with two exhaust vents. The diffuse ceiling inlet was made of standard perforated acoustic tiles (0.5% total degree of perforation). The room air...... temperature was controlled at 24 °C. The quality of the generated indoor environment as defined in ISO standard 7730 (2005) was assessed based on comprehensive physical measurements. The systems created Category A thermal environment in cooling situations at heat load of 50 W∙m−2 and 78 W∙m−2 (office room...

  11. 掺气水射流应用于低压摇臂喷头的试验%Experiment on aeration water jet applied to low pressure impact sprinkler irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向清江; 许正典; 陈超; 李红

    2016-01-01

    gas suction pipe coincides with the axis of sprinkler tube. The environmental gas is sucked into the impact sprinkler due to the negative pressure formed by jet flow. Performances of PY20 impact sprinkler with and without aeration were compared under the same conditions of working pressure, trajectory angle, flow rate of the sprinkler, and the effect of sub-nozzle has not been taken into account. . The comparison parameters include the ranges of jet, water distribution curves along the radial direction, coefficients of distribution uniformity for square combination with spacing factor equal 1, droplet size distribution and so on. The experiment finds that the outlet diameter of original impact sprinkler is 7 mm; when 2 mm inner diameter gas pipe is installed, the outlet diameter should be changed to 8.3 mm for the aeration impact sprinkler to keep the same flow rate with the original impact sprinkler. Two types of sprinklers nearly have the same jet range under the same working pressure. The negative pressure of gas pipe is measured by U-gauge, and the height difference of mercury column increases with the impact sprinkler working pressure, which means that the intake capacity becomes stronger as the working pressure increases. As the working pressure reduces to 100 kPa, the aeration sprinkler still has the ability of gas suction and it has 76 mm height of mercury column. The aeration method improves the water distribution curve at the middle jet range, and it makes water distribution line a litter higher at the middle jet range, while a little lower at the end of jet range. In order to compare the aeration impact sprinkler with original impact sprinkler when they are used in combination sprinkler irrigation, and to make sure whether the aeration method can improve the uniformity of water distribution or not, the square combination with spacing factor equal 1 is selected to do a test. For the combined 4 sprinklers, its radial direction water distribution curve is

  12. Elevated Temperature Ballistic Impact Testing of PBO and Kevlar Fabrics for Application in Supersonic Jet Engine Fan Containment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Ballistic impact tests were conducted on fabric made from both Poly(phenylene benzobizoxazole) (PBO) and Kevlar 29 which were selected to be similar in weave pattern, areal density, and fiber denier. The projectiles were 2.54-cm- (1-in.-) long aluminum cylinders with a diameter of 1.27 cm (0.5 in.). The fabric specimens were clamped on four sides in a 30.5-cm- (12-in.-) square frame. Tests on PBO were conducted at room temperature and at 260 C (500 F). A number of PBO specimens were aged in air at 204 and 260 C (400 and 500 F) before impact testing. Kevlar specimens were tested only at room temperature and with no aging. The PBO absorbed significantly more energy than the Kevlar at both room and elevated temperatures. However, after aging at temperatures of 204 C (400 F) and above, the PBO fabric lost almost all of its energy absorbing ability. It was concluded that PBO fabric is not a feasible candidate for fan containment system applications in supersonic jet engines where operating temperatures exceed this level.

  13. Magnitude Uncertainties Impact Seismic Rate Estimates, Forecasts and Predictability Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, M J

    2007-01-01

    The Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) aims to prospectively test time-dependent earthquake probability forecasts on their consistency with observations. To compete, time-dependent seismicity models are calibrated on earthquake catalog data. But catalogs contain much observational uncertainty. We study the impact of magnitude uncertainties on rate estimates in clustering models, on their forecasts and on their evaluation by CSEP's consistency tests. First, we quantify magnitude uncertainties. We find that magnitude uncertainty is more heavy-tailed than a Gaussian, such as a double-sided exponential distribution, with scale parameter nu_c=0.1 - 0.3. Second, we study the impact of such noise on the forecasts of a simple clustering model which captures the main ingredients of popular short term models. We prove that the deviations of noisy forecasts from an exact forecast are power law distributed in the tail with exponent alpha=1/(a*nu_c), where a is the exponent of the productivity...

  14. Electron-impact ionization rates for BF3 fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuskovic, L.; Raskovic, M.; Popovic, S.

    2007-06-01

    We calculated electron-impact ionization rates of BF3 and its fragments for electron energy distribution present in sheath mode of the repetitively pulsed d.c. diode system [1]. Data are being used for Ar/BF3 discharge modeling. BF3 and its fragments are reactive species that we are using to interact with niobium surface. The aim is to remove oxides and other impurities from the surface in the form of volatile compounds. This procedure of cleaning and smoothening improves the performance of the superconducting radiofrequency cavities used for particle accelerators. In our calculation electronic structures of BF3 and its fragments were described with several empirical basis sets. After geometry optimization using density functional method B3LYP, MO parameters were calculated with UHF, CCSD(T) and OVGF methods [2]. Electron-impact ionization cross-sections were calculated employing the Binary-Encounter-Bethe approximation. Cross-section results were compared with available experimental data. Relative calculation errors were estimated, which was especially important for cross-sections obtained with CEP-31G basis set that is necessary to describe system containing niobium samples. [1] S. Radovanov, et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 113307 (2005). [2] Y-K. Kim, K.K. Irikura, AIP conferences proceedings, 543, 220 (2000).

  15. An Investigation of the impact of interest rates and interest rate volatility on Australian financial sector stock return distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faff, R.; Kremmer, M.; Hodgson, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the existing literature by analysing the dual impact of changes in the interest rate and interest rate volatility on the distribution of Australian financial sector stock returns. In addition, a multivariate GARCH-M model is used to analyse the impact of deregulation on the

  16. An Investigation of the impact of interest rates and interest rate volatility on Australian financial sector stock return distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faff, R.; Kremmer, M.; Hodgson, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the existing literature by analysing the dual impact of changes in the interest rate and interest rate volatility on the distribution of Australian financial sector stock returns. In addition, a multivariate GARCH-M model is used to analyse the impact of deregulation on the financ

  17. Impact of clinical audits on cesarean section rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fu-Shiang; Lin, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Tu, Fung-Chao; Hsiao, Chin-Fen; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou

    2016-08-01

    Many countries have noted a substantial increase in the cesarean section rate (CSR). Several methods for lowering the CSR have been described. Understanding the impact of clinical audits on the CSR may aid in lowering CSR. Thus, our aim is to elucidate the effect of clinical audits on the CSR. We retrospectively analyzed 3781 pregnant women who gave birth in a medical center between January 2008 and January 2011. Pregnant women who delivered between January 2008 and July 2009 were enrolled as the pre-audit group (n = 1592). After August 2009, all cesarean section cases that were audited were enrolled in the audit group (n = 2189). The CSR was compared between groups. The overall CSR (34.5% vs. 31.1%, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.83, p = 0.008) and the cesarean section rate due to dystocia (9.6% vs. 6.2%, p cesarean section was achieved in 16 (8.2%) of 195 audit cases in the monthly audit conference. In nulliparous pregnant women (n = 2148), multivariate analysis revealed that clinical audit (OR = 0.78), maternal age (OR = 1.10), gestational age at delivery (OR = 0.80), and fetal body weight at birth (OR = 1.0005) were independent predictors of cesarean section (all p cesarean section to reduce the CSR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Impact and mitigation of disruptions with the ITER-like wall in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehnen, M.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Flanagan, J.; Gerasimov, S. N.; Hartmann, N.; Hender, T. C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kiptily, V.; Kruezi, U.; Matthews, G. F.; Morris, J.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Sieglin, B.; de Vries, P. C.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    Disruptions are a critical issue for ITER because of the high thermal and magnetic energies that are released on short timescales, which results in extreme forces and heat loads. The choice of material of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) can have significant impact on the loads that arise during

  19. [Population characteristics and impact on heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure of passive smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; He, Fei; Hu, Da-yi; Ding, Rong-jing; Yu, Xiao-jun; Wang, Long; Zhang, Ping; Li, Xue-bin; Guo, Ji-hong; Liu, Wen-ling; Li, Cui-lan; Li, Lei; Gao, Chuan-yu; Zhao, Luo-sha; Chu, Ying-jie; Huang, Zhen-wen; Wei, Jing-han; Hua, Shao-hua; Liu, Rui-yun; Zhuang, Xiao-feng

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the basic characteristics of passive smoking population, and the impact of passive smoking on heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure. Eighty-six passive smokers [mean age: (52.4 ± 7.6) years] were recruited from patients and their relatives who visited cardiovascular outpatient department and excluded structural heart disease between June 2010 and June 2012, 80 normal subjects who were not exposed to smoking served as controls. Questionnaire survey, 24 hours ambulatory electrocardiogram examination and blood pressure measurement were performed in all recruited subjects. (1) Non-marriage rate [18.60% (16/86) vs. 3.75% (3/80), P professional technology industry employers [20.93% (18/86) vs. 36.25% (29/80), P restaurants (48.84%, 42/86). (2) Standard of the normal sinus RR intervals (SDNN), the normal consecutive sinus RR interval difference between the root-mean-square (rMSSD) and adjacent the difference between the RR interval>50 ms the number of share the percentage (PNN50) were significantly lower in passive smoking group than in the control group (all P 0.05). Ultra-low-frequency power (VLF), low frequency power (LF), high frequency power (HF) and LF/HF were significantly lower in passive smoking group than in the control group (all P 0.05). Marriage status, education level, profession and daily working time are independent determinants for passive smoking. Passive smoking mainly occurred in the workplace, entertainment venues and restaurants. Passive smoking is linked with reduced heart rate variability, increased 24 h average heart rate and diastolic blood pressure.

  20. Jets and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kramer, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-12-15

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in ep and pp/p anti p collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundamental 2-2 quark/gluon scattering processes, but also the impact of jet decays of top quarks, and W{sup {+-}},Z bosons on the electroweak sector. The presentation to a large extent is formulated in a non-technical language with the intent to recall the significant steps historically and convey the significance of this field also to communities beyond high energy physics. (orig.)

  1. Quark and gluon jet properties in symmetric three-jet events

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Quark and gluon jets with the same energy, 24GeV, are compared in symmetric three-jet configurations from hadronic Z decays observed by the ALEPH detector. Jets are defined using the Durham algorithm. Gluon jets are identified using an anti-tag on b jets, based on either a track impact parameter method or a high transverse momentum lepton tag. The comparison of gluon and mixed flavour quark jets shows that gluon jets have a softer fragmentation function, a larger angular width and a higher particle multiplicity. Evidence is also presented which shows that the corresponding differences between gluon and heavy flavour jets are significantly smaller.

  2. Process parameters optimization of increasing depositing rate for jet electrodeposition of engine cylinder%提高发动机气缸电喷镀沉积速度的工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 康敏; 陈超; 杨勇; 傅秀清

    2013-01-01

    described the relations between the experimental index and the influence factors were established. The optimal technological parameters for depositing rate of a deposited layer were obtained through conducting a multivariable function optimization by the method of a quadric spindle gradient. The results suggest that JMP software can obtain more accurate optimal values by calculating than by orthogonal test. Voltage, electrolyte temperature, dipolar space, and dipolar relative velocity affect the depositing rate of a deposited layer markedly. The quadratic term of dipolar space have a high-impact on the surface effect of the depositing rate. And furthermore, voltage and flow velocity of the electrolyte, electrolyte temperature and flow velocity of electrolyte, flow velocity of electrolyte, and dipolar relative velocity have interactive effects on the changes of the depositing rate. The quadratic regression mathematical models reach a significant level and the equation has good fitting effects. So the models can be applied to predict the depositing rate of a deposited layer. The response surface methodology obtained the influences of voltage, electrolyte temperature, dipolar space, flow velocity of the electrolyte, and dipolar relative velocity on depositing rate of a deposited layer. And the optimal parameters are as follow:voltage of 15V, electrolyte temperature of 72℃, dipolar space of 1mm, flow velocity of electrolyte of 1.2 m/s, and dipolar relative velocity of 170 mm/min. Under these conditions, the depositing rate of a deposited layer is 79.13μm/min and the quality of the deposited layer is better. The depositing rate of jet electrodeposition is about 130 times that of a traditional electrodeposition, and use of jet electrodeposition improves production efficiency. It can help to promote the development of high-speed plating.%为提高镀层沉积速度,该文对电喷镀气缸的沉积速度进行多变量工艺参数优化。采用JMP软件对电喷镀进行

  3. Improved inhaled air quality at reduced ventilation rate by control of airflow interaction at the breathing zone with lobed jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Spilak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled air quality at a reduced supply of clean air was studied by controlling the airflow interaction at the breathing zone of a person using lobed jets as part of personalized ventilation (PV). Experiments were performed in a full-scale test room at 23°C (73.4°F) with a breathing thermal manikin......) equivalent diameter. The nozzles were positioned frontally at the face within the boundary layer and centered to the mouth. The enhancement of inhaled air quality by changing the initial velocity (0.2-0.6 m/s, 0.66-1.97 fps) and the distance from the mouth (0.02-0.06 m, 0.07-0.20 ft) was studied. The control...... over the interaction between the inserted jets and the free convection flow was efficient. Over 80% clean PV air was measured in inhalation. The worst performing nozzle was the four-leafed clover: its best performance yielded 23% clean air inhalation, at the shortest distance and the highest velocity...

  4. An Experimental Investigation of Ice-melting and heat transfer rates from submerged warm water jets upward impinging into ice-blocks as analogous for water-filled cavities formed during subglacial eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidnia, Hamidreza; Gudmundsson, Magnus Tumi

    2016-11-01

    Rates of energy transfer in water-filled cavities formed under glaciers by geothermal and volcanic activity are investigated by conducting experiments in which hot water jets (10°- 90°C) impinging into an ice block for jet Reynolds numbers in turbulent regime of 10000 -70000. It is found that heat flux is linearly dependent on jet flow temperature. Water jet melts a cavity into an ice block. Cavities had steep to vertical sides with a doming roof. Some of ice blocks used had trapped air bubbles. In these cases that melting of the ice could have led to trapping of air at the top of cavity, partially insulating the roof from hot water jet. The overall heat transfer rate in cavity formation varied with jet temperature from <100 kW m-2 to 900 kW m-2 while melting rates in the vertical direction yield heat transfer rates of 200-1200 kW m-2. Experimental heat transfer rates can be compared to data on subglacial melting observed for ice cauldrons in Iceland. For lowest temperatures the numbers are comparable to those for geothermal water in cool, subglacial water bodies and above subglacial flowpaths of jökulhlaups. Highest experimental rates for 80-90°C jets are 3-10 times less than inferred from observations of recent subglacial eruptions (2000-4000 kW m-2) . This can indicate that single phase liquid water convection alone may not be sufficient to explain the rates seen in recent subglacial eruptions, suggesting that forced 2 or 3 phase convection can be common.

  5. Self-citation rate and impact factor in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni, Michael; Segal, Ori

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the self-citation rate (SCR) of ophthalmology journals, determine its possible effect on a journal's impact factor (IF) and compare the SCR of subspecialty journals versus general ophthalmology journals. A retrospective consecutive study of ophthalmology journals listed in the Journal Citations Report (JCR) 2013. We retrieved these parameters from each journal's report: IF, total citations, self-citations, SCR and IF without self-citations (corrected IF). A significant correlation was detected between the number of self-citations and publications (R(2) = 86.3, p = 0.000). Subspecialty journals had a significantly higher SCR than general journals (p = 0.017). No significant difference was found in terms of IF and corrected IF between general and subspecialty journals (p = 0.260 and p = 0.108, respectively). No significant correlation between IF and SCR was detected (p = 0.099). The corrected IF was inversely correlated with SCR (R(2) = -32.6, p = 0.013). An inverse correlation was detected between SCR and IF in the 29 ophthalmology journals with the lowest IF (R(2) = -57.3, p = 0.001). Unlike other fields of medicine, the IF of an ophthalmology journal does not correlate with its SCR. Self-citation is found more often in journals with a low corrected IF and is inversely correlated with IF in the bottom half. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Impact of psychiatrists' qualifications on the rate of compulsory admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eytan, Ariel; Chatton, Anne; Safran, Edith; Khazaal, Yasser

    2013-03-01

    Despite efforts to reduce coercion in psychiatry, involuntary hospitalizations remain frequent, representing more than half of all admissions in some European regions. Since October 2006, only certified psychiatrists are authorized to require a compulsory admission to our facility, while before all physicians were, including residents. The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of this change of procedure on the proportion compulsory admissions. All medical records of patients admitted respectively 4 months before and 4 month after the implementation of the procedure were retrospectively analyzed. This search retrieved a total of 2,227 hospitalizations for 1,584 patients. The overall proportions of compulsory and voluntary admissions were 63.9 % and 36.1 % respectively. The average length of stay was 32 days (SD ± 64.4). During the study period, 25 % of patients experienced two hospitalizations or more. The most frequent patients' diagnoses were affective disorders (30 %), psychotic disorders (18.4 %) and substance abuse disorders (15.7 %). Compared with the period before October 2006, patients hospitalized from October 2006 up were less likely to be hospitalized on a compulsory basis (OR = 0.745, 95 % CI: 0.596-0.930). Factors associated with involuntary admission were young age (20 years or less), female gender, a diagnosis of psychotic disorder and being hospitalized for the first time. Our results strongly suggest that limiting the right to require compulsory admissions to fully certified psychiatrists can reduce the rate of compulsory versus voluntary admissions.

  7. Impact of medical therapies on inflammatory bowel disease complication rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine Reenaers; Jacques Belaiche; Edouard Louis

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are progressive diseases associated with a high risk of complications over time including strictures,fistulae,perianal complications,surgery,and colorectal cancer.Changing the natural history and avoiding evolution to a disabling disease should be the main goal of treatment.In recent studies,mucosal healing has been associated with longer-term remission and fewer complications.Conventional therapies with immunosuppressive drugs are able to induce mucosal healing in a minority of cases but their impact on disease progression appears modest.Higher rates of mucosal healing can be achieved with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies that reduce the risk of relapse,surgery and hospitalization,and are associated with perianal fistulae closure.These drugs might be able to change the natural history of the disease mainly when introduced early in the course of the disease.Treatment strategy in inflammatory bowel diseases should thus be tailored according to the risk that each patient could develop disabling disease.

  8. Impact of localized gas injection on ICRF coupling and SOL parameters in JET-ILW H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, E., E-mail: elerche@jet.efda.org [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Goniche, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jacquet, P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Colas, L. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Czarnecka, A. [IPPLM, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Energy Research, Jülich (Germany); Brix, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Crombe, K. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Graham, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Groth, M. [Aalto University, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Monakhov, I. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Mathurin, T. [École des Mines de Paris, 75006 Paris (France); Matthews, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Meneses, L. [Instituto de Plasma e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Noble, C. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Petrzilka, V. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Rimini, F.; Shaw, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Recent JET-ILW [1,2] experiments reiterated the importance of tuning the plasma fuelling in order to optimize ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating in high power H-mode discharges. By fuelling the plasma from gas injection modules (GIMs) located in the mid-plane and on the top of the machine instead of adopting the more standardly used divertor GIMs, a considerable increase of the ICRF antenna coupling resistances was achieved with moderate gas injection rates (<1.5 × 10{sup 22} e/s). This effect is explained by an increase of the scrape-off-layer density in front of the antennas when mid-plane and top fuelling is used. By distributing the gas injection to optimize the coupling of all ICRF antenna arrays simultaneously, a substantial increase in the ICRF power capability and reliability was attained. Although similar core/pedestal plasma properties were observed for the different injection cases, the experiments indicate that the RF-induced impurity sources are reduced when switching from divertor to main chamber gas injection.

  9. Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolini, Daniele; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applicatio...

  10. Possible long-term decline in impact rates. 2. Lunar impact-melt data regarding impact history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, Cathy; Mangold, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Crater counts at lunar landing sites with measured ages establish a steep decline in cratering rate during the period ˜3.8 to ˜3.1 Gyr ago. Most models of the time dependence suggest a roughly constant impact rate (within factor ˜2) after about 3 Gyr ago, but are based on sparse data. Recent dating of impact melts from lunar meteorites, and Apollo glass spherules, clarifies impact rates from ˜3.2 to ˜2 Gyr ago or less. Taken together, these data suggest a decline with roughly 700 Myr half-life around 3 Gyr ago, and a slower decline after that, dropping by a factor ˜3 from about ˜2.3 Gyr ago until the present. Planetary cratering involved several phases with different time behaviors: (1) rapid sweep-up of most primordial planetesimals into planets in the first hundred Myr, (2) possible later effects of giant planet migration with enhanced cratering, (3) longer term sweep-up of leftover planetesimals, and finally (4) the present long-term "leakage" of asteroids from reservoirs such as the main asteroid belt and Kuiper belt. In addition, at any given point on the Moon, a pattern of "spikes" (sharp maxima of relatively narrow time width) will appear in the production rate of smaller craters (≲500 m?), not only from secondary debris from large primary lunar impacts at various distances from the point in question, but also from asteroid breakups dotted through Solar System history. The pattern of spikes varies according to type of sample being measured (i.e., glass spherules vs impact melts). For example, several data sets show an impact rate spike ˜470 Myr ago associated with the asteroid belt collision that produced the L chondrites (see Section 3.6 below). Such spikes should be less prominent in the production record of craters of D≳ few km. These phenomena affect estimates of planetary surfaces ages from crater counts, as discussed in a companion paper [Quantin, C., Mangold, N., Hartmann, W.K., Allemand, P., 2007. Icarus 186, 1-10]. Fewer impact melts and

  11. Performance of $b$-Jet Identification in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    The identification of jets containing $b$ hadrons is important for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Several algorithms to identify jets containing $b$ hadrons are described, ranging from those based on the reconstruction of an inclusive secondary vertex or the presence of tracks with large impact parameters to combined tagging algorithms making use of multi-variate discriminants. An independent $b$-tagging algorithm based on the reconstruction of muons inside jets as well as the $b$-tagging algorithm used in the online trigger are also presented. The $b$-jet tagging efficiency, the $c$-jet tagging efficiency and the mistag rate for light flavour jets in data have been measured with a number of complementary methods. The calibration results are presented as scale factors defined as the ratio of the efficiency (or mistag rate) in data to that in simulation. In the case of $b$ jets, where more than one calibration method exists, the results from the various analyses hav...

  12. Detailed Post-Soft Impact Progressive Damage Assessment for Hybrid Structure Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddens, Aaron; Bayandor, Javid; Celestina, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, certification of engine designs for resistance to bird strike is reliant on physical tests. Predictive modeling of engine structural damage has mostly been limited to evaluation of individual forward section components, such as fan blades within a fixed frame of reference, to direct impact with a bird. Such models must be extended to include interactions among engine components under operating conditions to evaluate the full extent of engine damage. This paper presents the results of a study aim to develop a methodology for evaluating bird strike damage in advanced propulsion systems incorporating hybrid composite/metal structures. The initial degradation and failure of individual fan blades struck by a bird were investigated. Subsequent damage to other fan blades and engine components due to resultant violent fan assembly vibrations and fragmentation was further evaluated. Various modeling parameters for the bird and engine components were investigated to determine guidelines for accurately capturing initial damage and progressive failure of engine components. Then, a novel hybrid structure modeling approach was investigated and incorporated into the crashworthiness methodology. Such a tool is invaluable to the process of design, development, and certification of future advanced propulsion systems.

  13. Impacts of the Zonal Position of the East Asian Westerly Jet Core on Precipitation Distribution During Meiyu of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Yin; ZHANG Yaocun; XIE Zhiqing

    2009-01-01

    The east-west location change of the East Asian westerly jet (EAWJ) at 200 hPa during Meiyu and the associated spatial distribution variation of precipitation in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR) are investigated by using the 40-yr NCEP/NCAR (National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) pentad mean reanalysis data and daily precipitation observation data from 1958 to 1997. The results show that there are two areas over which the 200-hPa EAWJ center appears most frequently during the Meiyu period: one is the western Pacific (WP) and the other is the East Asian continent (EAC). During the Meiyu period, the westerly jet over the EAC is weak, and the core of the westerly jet over the WP splits up with reduced intensity and disappears by the end of Meiyu. The changes in the location and intensity of the westerly jet are associated not only with the starting and ending dates of Meiyu, but also with the spatial distribution and intensity of precipitation in the MLYR. It is found that when the westerly jet core in the upper troposphere is located over the WP and is coupled with an 850-hPa southwesterly jet, heavy precipitation accompanied by strong convergence and plenty supply of water vapor, occurs in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River. If the 200-hPa westerly jet core is located over the EAC, and without an 850-hPa southwesterly jet, only weak precipitation occurs in the MLYR. Therefore, the longitudinal location of the EAWJ core plays an important role in determining the upper- to lower-level circulation structure and the spatial distribution of heavy precipitation in the MLYR during the Meiyu period.

  14. The impact of baroclinic eddy feedback on the persistence of jet variability in the two-layer model

    OpenAIRE

    Zurita-Gotor, Pablo; Blanco-Fuentes, Javier; Gerber, E. P.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that the persistence of extratropical jet shifts is enhanced by a positive eddy feedback, the dynamics of this feedback is still debated. Two types of mechanisms have been proposed: barotropic mechanisms rely on changes in upper-level propagation and baroclinic mechanisms rely on the coupling between barotropic and baroclinic flow. Recent studies have suggested that barotropic models can capture key aspects of the observed jet variability but the role of baroclinic d...

  15. Measurements of inclusive $W+$jets production rates as a function of jet transverse momentum in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    This Letter describes measurements of inclusive W({yields} e{nu}) + n jet cross sections (n = 1-4), presented as total inclusive cross sections and differentially in the n{sup th} jet transverse momentum. The measurements are made using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and achieve considerably smaller uncertainties on W+jets production cross sections than previous measurements. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations in the n = 1-3 jet multiplicity bins and to leading order pQCD calculations in the 4-jet bin. The measurements are generally in agreement with pQCD predictions, although certain regions of phase space are identified where the calculations could be improved.

  16. Simulations of Solar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  17. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  18. Solar coronal jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  19. Population characteristics and impact on heart rate variability,heart rate and blood pressure of passive smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the basic characteristics of passive smoking population,and the impact of passive smoking on heart rate variability,heart rate and blood pressure.Methods Eighty-six passive smokers[mean age: (52.4±7.6) years]were recruited from patients

  20. Decorrelated Jet Substructure Tagging using Adversarial Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    We describe a strategy for constructing a neural network jet substructure tagger which powerfully discriminates boosted decay signals while remaining largely uncorrelated with the jet mass. This reduces the impact of systematic uncertainties in background modeling while enhancing signal purity, resulting in improved discovery significance relative to existing taggers. The network is trained using an adversarial strategy, resulting in a tagger that learns to balance classification accuracy with decorrelation. As a benchmark scenario, we consider the case where large-radius jets originating from a boosted Z' decay are discriminated from a background of nonresonant quark and gluon jets. We show that in the presence of systematic uncertainties on the background rate, our adversarially-trained, decorrelated tagger considerably outperforms a conventionally trained neural network, despite having a slightly worse signal-background separation power. We generalize the adversarial training technique to include a paramet...

  1. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter $\\alpha$. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the $\\alpha$-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum ($p_{\\bot}$) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of $p_{\\bot}$ ordered showers. Such differenc...

  2. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-07

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  3. ANALYSIS OF EXPECTED AND NON-EXPECTED IMPACTS OF INTEREST RATE, EXCHANGE RATE AND INFLATION IN BRAZILIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Brutti Righi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the expected and non-expected impacts for interest rates, exchange and inflation rates in the Brazilian market. For this purpose, was applied the ARIMA model to estimate the expected value of the first differences of these variables, under a sample of 383 weekly observations for the period from 02/03/2003 to 19/12/2007. Finally, the results indicate that only unexpected shocks in the exchange rate on stock returns were significant.

  4. Impact of Exchange Rate on Foreign Private Investment in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on analyzing exchange rates on foreign private investment in Pakistan. Times series data from periods 1973 to 2012 was used for the analysis. The results of estimation suggest that an exchange rate and gross domestic product are the most important variable that affects private foreign investment in Pakistan. Exchange rate was recommended to be more market responsive compared to the other variables of the model

  5. CFD-DEM Analysis of Particle Attrition in a Jet in a Fluidised Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchini, F.; Nan, W.; Ghadiri, M.; Yazdan Panah, M.; Bertholin, S.; Amblard, B.; Cloupet, A.; Gauthier, T.

    2017-06-01

    In fluidised bed processes, the solids are in vigorous motion and thus inevitably subjected to mechanical stresses due to inter-particle and particle-wall impacts. These stresses lead to a gradual degradation of the particles by surface wear, abrasion and body fragmentation commonly termed attrition. One significant contribution of attrition comes from the air jets of the fluidised bed distributor. Particles are entrained into the air jet, where they get accelerated and impacted onto the fluidised bed particles. The jet induced attrition only affects the part of the bed which is limited by the jet length, where the mode of attrition is largely collisional. The overall jet attrition rate is therefore the result of the combination of the single particle damage and the flux of particles entering into that region. The attrition behaviour of particles in the jet region is analysed by evaluating their propensity of breakage experimentally and by simulating an air-jet in a bed of particles by CFD-DEM. The frequency of collisions and impact velocities are estimated from which the attrition due to a single air-jet is predicted.

  6. The "human" statistics of terrestrial impact cratering rate

    CERN Document Server

    Jetsu, L

    1997-01-01

    The most significant periodicities in the terrestrial impact crater record are due to the human-signal: the bias of assigning integer values for the crater ages. This bias seems to have eluded the proponents and opponents of real periodicity in the occurrence of these events, as well as the theorists searching for an extraterrestrial explanation for such periodicity. The human-signal should be seriously considered by scientists in astronomy, geology and paleontology when searching for a connection between terrestrial major comet or asteroid impacts and mass extinctions of species.

  7. Jet engine. Strahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.J.

    1990-11-15

    A gas turbine axial-flow compressor aggregate is mounted in a jet engine consisting of a high-temperature combustion chamber that is composed of conical rings forming slits and set together to a ring column and reaches up to the propelling nozzle, a compressed-air generator supplying the jet engine with compressed air at subsonic speeds and running into the propelling nozzle and a shell encasing the jet engine while leaving a certain intermediate space. The compressor aggregate has a relatively high fuel consumption and high emission rates, involves high production and maintenance costs and puts the blades at a high risk of overheating. The problem basic to the invention was to install a compressed-air generator in the jet engine that has lower fuel consumption and emission rates and is cheaper to manufacture and to service. The invention provides free-piston compressors for compressed-air generators arranged in a circle around the central high-temperature combustion chamber. The ring of compressors can rotate on bearings against the jet engine shell, so that each compressor can be turned to the bottom and serviced there. The jet engine is suitable as an engine for supersonic aircraft.

  8. Interacting Jets from Binary Protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, G C; O'Sullivan, S; Spicer, D; Bacciotti, F; Rosén, A

    2007-01-01

    We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly pa...

  9. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two time step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting rates of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx are obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3). The temperature of the gas entering

  10. Jets and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in $e^+ e^-$ collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in $ep$ and $pp/p\\bar{p}$ collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundam...

  11. Impact of urbanization on detection rates of eating disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, H.W.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Bosveld, J.J.F.; Graaf, Y. van der; Limpens, V.E.L.; Maiwald, M.; Spaaij, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa among patients in primary care and to evaluate the impact of urbanization, age and sex differences, and changes over time. Method: During 1985-1989, 58 general practitioners, trained in diagnosi

  12. Impact of urbanization on detection rates of eating disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, H.W.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Bosveld, J.J.F.; Graaf, Y. van der; Limpens, V.E.L.; Maiwald, M.; Spaaij, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa among patients in primary care and to evaluate the impact of urbanization, age and sex differences, and changes over time. Method: During 1985-1989, 58 general practitioners, trained in diagnosi

  13. Impact of urbanization on detection rates of eating disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, H.W.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Bosveld, J.J.F.; Graaf, Y. van der; Limpens, V.E.L.; Maiwald, M.; Spaaij, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa among patients in primary care and to evaluate the impact of urbanization, age and sex differences, and changes over time. Method: During 1985-1989, 58 general practitioners, trained in

  14. 射流冲击载荷对井底岩石应力场的影响%Influence of water jet impact load on bottom-hole rock stress field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常德玉; 李根生; 沈忠厚; 黄中伟; 田守增; 史怀忠; 宋先知

    2011-01-01

    考虑三向地应力、液柱压力、孔隙压力和射流速度的影响,建立射流冲击井底岩石流固耦合模型,运用有限元及有限体积法进行求解.结果表明:井底压差越大,井底岩石最大主应力越大;射流最大冲击压力与速度平方成正比,孔隙压力在冲击面和冲击轴线上随距离增加均呈"三次抛物线"减小;射流冲击井底岩石存在明显的局部效应,射流主要影响区域在冲击面上约为2倍射流半径,在冲击轴线上约为2.5~3.5倍射流半径,与应力波理论结果相吻合.%The fluid-solid coupling model of jet impacting rock, considering the four factors of three-dimensional in-situ stress, fluid column pressure, pore pressure and jet velocity, was established and calculated by the finite element method and finite volume method. The results show that the maximum principal stress of the rock increases with the increase of bottom-hole differential pressure. The maximum jet impact force is proportional to the square of the jet velocity, and the pore pressure at the impact surface and impact axis decreases in the form of cubic parabola with the increase of the distance. The local effect is obvious when the jet impacting the bottom-hole rock, the affected main district of jet is two times of jet radius at the impact surface

  15. Simulation and Analysis on the Influence Factors of Water Jet Impact Force Based on FLUENT%基于FLUENT的水射流冲击力影响因素仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶建友; 吕彦明

    2014-01-01

    Based on water jet impact model,the jet impact numerical simulation and simulation analysis was carried out by FLUENT. The content include the effect of different jet pressures ,jet distances and the diameters of nozzle outlet on jet impact force and area. The results indicate that impact force increases with the increase of jet pressure ,decreases after first increase with the increase of target distance when other related factors was determined. The ratio of impact is approximately equal to the nozzle exit diameter ratio of the square. Jet impact area is related to the nozzle exit diameter ,its area is about 2.9 times of the exit zone.%基于水射流冲击模型,应用FLUENT流体分析软件对喷嘴射流冲击力数值模拟和仿真,得出不同的射流压强、喷距及喷嘴出口直径对射流冲击力及冲击作用区域的影响。结果表明:其他相关因素确定时,射流冲击力随着射流压强的增加而增大,随着喷距的增加先增大、后减小;不同喷嘴出口直径的射流冲击力的比值约为喷嘴出口直径的平方比,射流冲击的作用区域与喷嘴出口直径有关,其面积约为出口直径的2.9倍。

  16. Study of short-haul aircraft operating economics. Phase 2: An analysis of the impact of jet modernization on local service airline operating costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrastek, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this phase of the study were (1) to assess the 10 year operating cost trends of the local service airlines operating in the 1965 through 1974 period, (2) to glean from these trends the technological and operational parameters which were impacted most significantly by the transition to newer pure jet, short haul transports, and effected by changing fuel prices and cost of living indices, and (3) to develop, construct, and evaluate an operating cost forecasting model which would incorporate those factors which best predicted airline total operating cost behavior over that 10-year period.

  17. Neighbourhood alcohol availability and gonorrhea rates: impact of social capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Theall

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Social capital and income inequality have been proposed as important mediators of the relation between the material environment and health outcomes. We determined whether indicators of social capital are (i associated with neighbourhood gonorrhea rates, and (ii mediate the relation between alcohol outlet density and gonorrhea rate. Longitudinal analyses of age- and sex-adjusted gonorrhea cases reported from 1990 to 1996 in the 445 census tracts affected by the 1992 civil unrest in Los Angeles, California was conducted. The role of alcohol outlets was assessed both as tracts with surrendered off-sale outlets due to the civil unrest and annual off-sale alcohol outlet density rates. Tract level voting rates were used as one indicator of social capital, while neighbourhood structure conducive to social organization was used as another. Neighbourhoods with greater voting over time and greater endogenous social organization experienced 1.9 and 67.2 fewer gonorrhea cases per 100,000. Results also reveal a partial mediating role of social capital on the relationship between alcohol outlet density and gonorrhea rate. The alcohol environment may have a direct or partially mediated role in infectious disease outcomes such as gonorrhea. Our findings support the importance of continuing controls and limits on off-premise alcohol outlet density, as a potential means of reducing gonorrhea rates and increasing social capital.

  18. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to determine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2SO4 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  19. New Reduced Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2004-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes that are being developed at Glenn. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates were then used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx were obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3

  20. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S. [Center for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, INP Greifswald e.V. Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, INP Greifswald e.V. Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  1. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  2. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  3. Investigation of the impact of high liquid viscosity on jet atomization in crossflow via high-fidelity simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Gao, Hui; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2017-08-01

    Atomization of extremely high viscosity liquid can be of interest for many applications in aerospace, automotive, pharmaceutical, and food industries. While detailed atomization measurements usually face grand challenges, high-fidelity numerical simulations offer the advantage to comprehensively explore the atomization details. In this work, a previously validated high-fidelity first-principle simulation code HiMIST is utilized to simulate high-viscosity liquid jet atomization in crossflow. The code is used to perform a parametric study of the atomization process in a wide range of Ohnesorge numbers (Oh = 0.004-2) and Weber numbers (We = 10-160). Direct comparisons between the present study and previously published low-viscosity jet in crossflow results are performed. The effects of viscous damping and slowing on jet penetration, liquid surface instabilities, ligament formation/breakup, and subsequent droplet formation are investigated. Complex variations in near-field and far-field jet penetrations with increasing Oh at different We are observed and linked with the underlying jet deformation and breakup physics. Transition in breakup regimes and increase in droplet size with increasing Oh are observed, mostly consistent with the literature reports. The detailed simulations elucidate a distinctive edge-ligament-breakup dominated process with long surviving ligaments for the higher Oh cases, as opposed to a two-stage edge-stripping/column-fracture process for the lower Oh counterparts. The trend of decreasing column deflection with increasing We is reversed as Oh increases. A predominantly unimodal droplet size distribution is predicted at higher Oh, in contrast to the bimodal distribution at lower Oh. It has been found that both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz linear stability theories cannot be easily applied to interpret the distinct edge breakup process and further study of the underlying physics is needed.

  4. Working While Studying: The Impact of Term-Time Employment on Dropout Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovdhaugen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    There are many possible reasons why students leave university prior to degree completion, and one of the more commonly cited is being employed while studying. This paper analyses the impact of employment status on dropout rates using survival analysis. It finds that employment status does have an impact on dropout rates; students who work full…

  5. Global epidemiology of hysterectomy: possible impact on gynecological cancer rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Rositch, Anne; Kahlert, Johnny Abildgaard

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that hysterectomy is the most common surgical procedure worldwide in gynecology, national reporting of the incidence rate of gynecological cancers rarely removes the proportion no longer at risk of the disease from the population-at-risk-denominator (ie. women who have had a hyst...

  6. A Jet Break in the X-ray Light Curve of Short GRB 111020A: Implications for Energetics and Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Zauderer, B Ashley; Troja, Eleonora; Czekala, Ian; Chornock, Ryan; Gehrels, Neil; Sakamoto, Takanori; Fox, Derek B; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    We present broad-band observations of the afterglow and environment of the short GRB 111020A. An extensive X-ray light curve from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton and Chandra, spanning ~100 seconds to 10 days after the burst, reveals a significant break at t~2 days with pre- and post-break decline rates of alphaX,1 ~ -0.78 and alphaX,224.4 mag at 18 hours after the burst, and reveal a potential host galaxy with i~24.3 mag. The sub-arcsecond localization from Chandra provides a precise offset of 0.80"+/-0.11" (1-sigma) from this galaxy corresponding to an offset of 5-7 kpc for z=0.5-1.5. We find a high excess neutral Hydrogen column density of (7.5+/-2.0)e21 cm^(-2) (z=0). Our observations demonstrate that a growing fraction of short GRBs are collimated which may lead to a true event rate of >100-1000 Gpc^(-3) yr^(-1), in good agreement with the NS-NS merger rate of ~200-3000 Gpc^(-3) yr^(-1). This consistency is promising for coincident short GRB-gravitational wave searches in the forthcoming era of Advanced LIGO/VIRGO.

  7. THE IMPACT OF THE EXCHANGE RATE ON THE COMMERCIALS FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela IAVORSCHI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The liberalization of capital movements between states and of the trade of goods and services, are one of the most important phenomena in the current world economy. The purpose of the present study, in the case of Romania, is to answer the question whether the interventions by means of the exchange rate of the national currency contributes to the fluidization and improvement of the commercial trades. The study demonstrates that the leu devaluation does not lead to a substantial increase of the exports. As a mechanism of influence of the commercials flows, the exchange rate has a short-term influence and the economy requires structural reforms, meant to stimulate the growth of the economic competitiveness.

  8. Numerical Study of A Round Buoyant Jet Under the Effect of JONSWAP Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-ping; LI Chi-wai; ZHANG Chang-kuan; XU Zhen-shan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic behaviours of a round buoyant jet under the effect of JONSWAP random waves.A three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model is developed to simulate the buoyant jet in a stagnant ambient and JONSWAP random waves.By comparison of velocity and concentration fields,it is found that the buoyant jet exhibits faster decay of centedine velocity,wider lateral spreading and larger initial dilution under the wave effect,indicating that wave dynamics improves the jet entrainment and mixing in the near field,and subsequently mitigate the jet impacts in the far field.The effect of buoyancy force on the jet behaviours in the random waves is also numerically investigated.The results show that the wave effect on the jet entrainment and mixing is considerably weakened under the existence of buoyancy force,resulting in a slower decay rate of centerline velocity and a narrower jet width for the jet with initial buoyancy.

  9. InfluenceTracker: Rating the impact of a Twitter account

    OpenAIRE

    Razis, Gerasimos; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Part 2: MHDW Workshop; International audience; This paper describes a methodology for rating the influence of a Twitter account in this famous microblogging service. Then it is evaluated over real accounts, under the belief that influence is not only a matter of quantity (amount of followers), but also a mixture of quality measures that reflect interaction, awareness, and visibility in the social sphere. The authors of this paper have created “InfluenceTracker”, a publicly available website w...

  10. Mechanical properties of transgenic silkworm silk at high rate impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jou-Mei

    Transgenic silkworm silk was created to obtain the quality of spider silk while being mass-producible. Due to the variability in sequencing between the silkworm and spider DNA, the resulting transgenic silkworm silk may have different properties compared to spider silk. Furthermore, the high strain rate mechanical response of this new natural fiber is still unknown and needs to be characterized. In this experimental research, a quasi-static load frame (MTS) and a Kolsky tension bar are used to characterize the tensile stress-strain response of transgenic silkworm silk over a range of strain-rates between 10-3/s to 103/s. The results show that transgenic silkworm silk tends to have high overall elongation and initial stiffness at high strain rates compared to those of spider silk. Furthermore, specimen gage length sensitivity is studied with gage lengths of 3.97 mm (5/32 in), 4.76 mm (3/16 in), and 6.35 mm (1/4 in). Fracture surfaces are examined via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and reveal that the fracture mode is similar to that of spider silk. Therefore, it may be possible for the tensile properties of transgenic silkworm silk be comparable to that of spider silk.

  11. Impact of increased flow rate on specific growth rate of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, Rafinesque 1810)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, E.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Widjaja, R.T.O.B.H.; Kloet, C.J.; Foss, A.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of flow rate on growth was investigated in juvenile turbot. Fish with a mean (SD) initial weight of 102 (10.4) g were reared at 6 different flow rates, equaling 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 or 8 tank volumes/h in 196 L tanks during 29 days at 18 ± 0.29 °C, a salinity of 18.0 ± 0.77¿ and a pH ranging

  12. The impact of heating the breakdown bubble on the global mode of a swirling jet: Experiments and linear stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rukes, Lothar; Paschereit, Oliver; Oberleithner, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamics of non-isothermal swirling jets undergoing vortex breakdown, with an emphasis on helical coherent structures. It is proposed that the dominant helical coherent structure can be suppressed by heating the recirculation bubble. This proposition is assessed with Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the breakdown region of isothermal and heated swirling jets. The coherent kinetic energy of the dominant helical structure was derived from PIV snapshots via Proper Orthogonal Decomposition. For one set of experimental parameters, mild heating is found to increase the energy content of the dominant helical mode. Strong heating leads to a reduction by 30\\% of the coherent structures energy. For a second set of experimental parameters, no alteration of the dominant coherent structure is detectable. Local linear stability analysis of the time-averaged velocity fields shows that the key difference between the two configurations is the density ratio at the respective w...

  13. Analysis of the impact of interest rate liberation on China's banking sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxin Huang; Deng Ma; Jianpeng Sun

    2015-01-01

    Actually China has achieved the liberation of deposit and lending rates to some extent, after the start of the reform, it is expected there may not be a great impact on the banking sector in the short term, but in the long term, the interest rate liberation will undoubtedly increase the cost of capital banks, especially after deposit rates achieve the full realization of market-oriented pricing, which will have long term impact on the banking business.

  14. Does intention to recommend HPV vaccines impact HPV vaccination rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feemster, Kristen A; Middleton, Maria; Fiks, Alexander G; Winters, Sarah; Kinsman, Sara B; Kahn, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Despite recommendations for routine vaccination, HPV vaccination rates among adolescent females have remained low. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether clinician intention to recommend HPV vaccines predicts HPV vaccine series initiation among previously unvaccinated 11 to 18 year-old girls (N=18,083) who were seen by a pediatric clinician (N=105) from a large primary care network within 3 years of vaccine introduction. We used multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations, Cox Regression and standardized survival curves to measure the association between clinician intention and time to and rate of first HPV vaccine receipt among eligible females. All models adjusted for patient age, race/ethnicity, payor category, visit type, and practice location. Eighty-5 percent of eligible 11 to 12 year-old and 95% of 13 to 18 year-old girls were seen by a provider reporting high intention to recommend HPV vaccines. However, only 30% of the cohort initiated the HPV vaccine series and the mean number of days from first eligible visit to series initiation was 190 (95% C.I. 184.2, 195.4). After adjusting for covariates, high clinician intention was modestly associated with girls' likelihood of HPV vaccine series initiation (OR 1.36; 95 % C.I. 1.07, 1.71) and time to first HPV vaccination (HR 1.22; 95% 1.06, 1.40). Despite high intention to vaccinate among this cohort of pediatric clinicians, overall vaccination rates for adolescent girls remained low. These findings support ongoing efforts to develop effective strategies to translate clinician intention into timely HPV vaccine receipt.

  15. On the impact of the plasma jet energy on the product of plasmadynamic synthesis in the Si-C system

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitin, Dmitry Sergeevich; Sivkov, Aleksandr Anatolyevich

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles can be used for ceramics reinforcement, creation of nanostructured ceramics, microelectromechanical systems. The paper presents the results of plasmadynamic synthesis of silicon carbide nanopowders. This method was realized by the synthesis in an electrodischarge plasma jet generated by a high-current pulsed coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator. Powdered carbon and silicon were used as precursors for the reaction. Four experiments with different energy levels ...

  16. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgierska A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Zgierska,1 David Rabago,1 Michael M Miller2–4 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, 2American Society of Addiction Medicine, Chevy Chase, MD, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, 4Herrington Recovery Center, Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI, USA Background: Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective: The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods: A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results: One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state's emergency department [ED] physicians. The respondents were predominantly male (85% and practicing in solo or private practice (45%, hospital (43%, or academia (15%. The majority were ED (57%, followed by primary care (16% physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion

  17. Impact of socioeconomic status on municipal solid waste generation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, D; Kumar, A; Samadder, S R

    2016-03-01

    The solid waste generation rate was expected to vary in different socioeconomic groups due to many environmental and social factors. This paper reports the assessment of solid waste generation based on different socioeconomic parameters like education, occupation, income of the family, number of family members etc. A questionnaire survey was conducted in the study area to identify the different socioeconomic groups that may affect the solid waste generation rate and composition. The average waste generated in the municipality is 0.41 kg/capita/day in which the maximum waste was found to be generated by lower middle socioeconomic group (LMSEG) with average waste generation of 0.46 kg/capita/day. Waste characterization indicated that there was no much difference in the composition of wastes among different socioeconomic groups except ash residue and plastic. Ash residue is found to increase as we move lower down the socioeconomic groups with maximum (31%) in lower socioeconomic group (LSEG). The study area is a coal based city hence application of coal and wood as fuel for cooking in the lower socioeconomic group is the reason for high amount of ash content. Plastic waste is maximum (15%) in higher socioeconomic group (HSEG) and minimum (1%) in LSEG. Food waste is a major component of generated waste in almost every socioeconomic group with maximum (38%) in case of HSEG and minimum (28%) in LSEG. This study provides new insights on the role of various socioeconomic parameters on generation of household wastes.

  18. Impact of traffic states on freeway crash involvement rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hwasoo; Jang, Kitae; Skabardonis, Alexander; Kang, Seungmo

    2013-01-01

    Freeway traffic accidents are complicated events that are influenced by multiple factors including roadway geometry, drivers' behavior, traffic conditions and environmental factors. Among the various factors, crash occurrence on freeways is supposed to be strongly influenced by the traffic states representing driving situations that are changed by road geometry and cause the change of drivers' behavior. This paper proposes a methodology to investigate the relationship between traffic states and crash involvements on the freeway. First, we defined section-based traffic states: free flow (FF), back of queue (BQ), bottleneck front (BN) and congestion (CT) according to their distinctive patterns; and traffic states of each freeway section are determined based on actual measurements of traffic data from upstream and downstream ends of the section. Next, freeway crash data are integrated with the traffic states of a freeway section using upstream and downstream traffic measurements. As an illustrative study to show the applicability, we applied the proposed method on a 32-mile section of I-880 freeway. By integrating freeway crash occurrence and traffic data over a three-year period, we obtained the crash involvement rate for each traffic state. The results show that crash involvement rate in BN, BQ, and CT states are approximately 5 times higher than the one in FF. The proposed method shows promise to be used for various safety performance measurement including hot spot identification and prediction of the number of crash involvements on freeway sections.

  19. Performance of pile-up mitigation techniques for jets in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Marianna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The large rate of multiple simultaneous proton-proton interactions, or pile-up, generated by the Large Hadron Collider in Run I required the development of many new techniques to mitigate the adverse effects of these conditions. This presentation shows the methods employed to correct for the impact of pile-up on jet energy, jet shapes, and even spurious additional jets. Energy correction techniques that incorporate sophisticated estimates of the average pile-up energy density and tracking information are described in detail. Jet-to-vertex association techniques are also presented. We also describe the extension of these techniques to ameliorate the effect of pile-up on jet shapes using both subtraction and grooming procedures. Prospects for pile-up suppression at the HL-LHC will be also discussed.

  20. Quantifying ground impact fatality rate for small unmanned aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour-Harbo, Anders

    2017-01-01

    One of the major challenges of conducting operation of unmanned aircraft, especially operations beyond visual line-of-sight (BVLOS), is to make a realistic and sufficiently detailed risk assessment. An important part of such an assessment is to identify the risk of fatalities, preferably in a qua......One of the major challenges of conducting operation of unmanned aircraft, especially operations beyond visual line-of-sight (BVLOS), is to make a realistic and sufficiently detailed risk assessment. An important part of such an assessment is to identify the risk of fatalities, preferably...... in a quantitative way since this allows for comparison with manned aviation to determine whether an equivalent level of safety is achievable. This work presents a method for quantifying the probability of fatalities resulting from an uncontrolled descent of an unmanned aircraft conducting a BVLOS flight. The method...... is based on a standard stochastic model, and employs a parameterized high fidelity ground impact distribution model that accounts for both aircraft specifications, parameter uncertainties, and wind. The method also samples the flight path to create an almost continuous quantification of the risk...

  1. The emotional impact of nursing student attrition rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Hugh

    Nursing student attrition continues to attract political, organizational and social interest for a number of reasons including: persistent nursing shortages, the age profile of the current nursing population and the economic cost of attrition. While attrition in nursing students is not a new phenomenon, it is surprising that this issue has attracted such little research attention obtained from students who persist, rather than the experiences of students who have withdrawn from pre-registration nursing courses. The emotional impact on students who decide to voluntarily leave has attracted limited theoretical analysis, so a single case study design was selected to help explain the causes of voluntary attrition in nursing students within a School of Nursing and Midwifery. A semi-structured interview method was used to collect data from study participants. The study population was obtained through purposeful sampling and consisted of 15 students who had previously voluntarily withdrawn from pre-registration nursing programmes. The articles describes the range of emotions which many students experienced and the process of gradual disengagement which may precede student decisions to formally withdraw.

  2. Jet quenching via jet collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, J; Wiedemann, U

    2011-01-01

    The strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions measured by ATLAS and CMS provide important constraints on the dynamical mechanisms underlying jet quenching. In this work, we show that the transport of soft gluons away from the jet cone - jet collimation - can account for the observed dijet asymmetry with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude. Further, we show that the energy loss attained through this mechanism results in a very mild distortion of the azimuthal angle dijet distribution.

  3. Rapid Confined Mixing Using Transverse Jets Part 2: Multiple Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forliti, David; Salazar, David

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study has been conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base to investigate the properties of confined mixing devices that employ transverse jets. The experiment considers the mixing of water with a mixture of water and fluorescein, and planar laser induced fluorescence was used to measure instantaneous mixture fraction distributions in the cross section view. Part one of this study presents the scaling law development and results for a single confined transverse jet. Part two will describe the results of configurations including multiple transverse jets. The different regimes of mixing behavior, ranging from under to overpenetration of the transverse jets, are characterized in terms of a new scaling law parameter presented in part one. The level of unmixedness, a primary metric for mixing device performance, is quantified for different jet diameters, number of jets, and relative flow rates. It is apparent that the addition of a second transverse jet provides enhanced scalar uniformity in the main pipe flow cross section compared to a single jet. Three and six jet configurations also provide highly uniform scalar distributions. Turbulent scalar fluctuation intensities, spectral features, and spatial eigenfunctions using the proper orthogonal decomposition will be presented. Distribution A: Public Release, Public Affairs Clearance Number: 12656.

  4. Emerging jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  5. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  6. Impact of Declining Proposal Success Rates on Scientific Productivity

    CERN Document Server

    Cushman, Priscilla; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lowenthal, James; Peterson, Bradley; Stassun, Keivan G; von Hippel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade proposal success rates in the fundamental sciences have dropped significantly. Astronomy and related fields funded by NASA and NSF are no exception. Data across agencies show that this is not principally the result of a decline in proposal merit (the proportion of proposals receiving high rankings is largely unchanged), nor of a shift in proposer demographics (seniority, gender, and institutional affiliation have all remained unchanged), nor of an increase (beyond inflation) in the average requested funding per proposal, nor of an increase in the number of proposals per investigator in any one year. Rather, the statistics are consistent with a scenario in which agency budgets for competed research are flat or decreasing in inflation-adjusted dollars, the overall population of investigators has grown, and a larger proportion of these investigators are resubmitting meritorious but unfunded proposals. This White Paper presents statistics which support this conclusion, as well as recent resea...

  7. Impact of extracorporeal blood flow rate on blood pressure, pulse rate and cardiac output during haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Philip Andreas; Mace, Maria Lerche; Soja, Anne Merete Boas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If blood pressure (BP) falls during haemodialysis (HD) [intradialytic hypotension (IDH)] a common clinical practice is to reduce the extracorporeal blood flow rate (EBFR). Consequently the efficacy of the HD (Kt/V) is reduced. However, only very limited knowledge on the effect of redu...

  8. Growth-rate regulated genes have profound impact on interpretation of transcriptome profiling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Grotkjaer, Thomas; Winther, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Growth rate is central to the development of cells in all organisms. However, little is known about the impact of changing growth rates. We used continuous cultures to control growth rate and studied the transcriptional program of the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with generation time...

  9. CONDITIONAL FLOW STATISTICS AND ALIGNMENT OF PRINCIPAL STRAIN RATES, VORTICITY, AND SCALAR GRADIENTS IN A TURBULENT NONPREMIXED JET FLAME

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2015-06-30

    The alignment of vorticity and gradients of conserved and reactive scalars with the eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor (i.e., the principal strains) is investigated in a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent nonpremixed flame achieving a Taylor’s scale Reynolds number in the range 100≤Reλ≤150 (Attili et al. Comb. Flame, 161, 2014). The vorticity vector displays a pronounced tendency to align with the direction of the intermediate strain. These alignment statistics are in almost perfect agreement with those in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (Ashurst et al. Physics of Fluids 30, 1987) and differ significantly from the results obtained in other nonpremixed flames in which vorticity alignment with the most extensive strain was observed (Boratavet al. Physics of Fluids 8, 1996). The gradients of conserved and reactive scalars align with the most compressive strain. It is worth noting that conditioning on the local values of the mixture fraction, or equivalently conditioning on the distance from the flame sheet, does not affect the statistics. Our results suggest that turbulence overshadows the effects of heat release and chemical reactions. This may be due to the larger Reynolds number achieved in the present study compared to that in previous works.

  10. Electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Mg V

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, K M

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes, calculated with the GRASP code, are reported for an astrophysically important O-like ion Mg~V. Results are presented for transitions among the lowest 86 levels belonging to the 2s$^2$2p$^4$, 2s2p$^5$, 2p$^6$, and 2s$^2$2p$^3$3$\\ell$ configurations. There is satisfactory agreement with earlier data for most levels/transitions, but scope remains for improvement. Collision strengths are also calculated, with the DARC code, and the results obtained are comparable for most transitions (at energies above thresholds) with earlier work using the DW code. In thresholds region, resonances have been resolved in a fine energy mesh to determine values of effective collision strengths ($\\Upsilon$) as accurately as possible. Results are reported for all transitions at temperatures up to 10$^6$~K, which should be sufficient for most astrophysical applications. However, a comparison with earlier data reveals discrepancies of up to two orders of magnitude for over 60\\% o...

  11. Flame spread over electrical wire with AC electric fields: Internal circulation, fuel vapor-jet, spread rate acceleration, and molten insulator dripping

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, Seungjae

    2015-04-01

    The effect of electric field on the characteristics of flame spread along a polyethylene (PE) insulated electrical wire was investigated experimentally by varying the AC frequency and voltage applied to the wire. The results showed that the flame spread rate was accelerated due to the convergence of electric flux near the end of wire, having three distinct regimes depending on applied voltage. In each regime, several subregimes could be identified depending on AC frequency. Flame shape (height and width) and slanted direction of the spreading flame were influenced differently. Fuel-vapor jets were ejected from the molten PE surface even for the baseline case without the application of an electric field; this could be attributed to the bursting of fuel vapor bubbles generated from internal boiling at the molten PE surface. An internal circulation of molten-PE was also observed as a result of non-uniform heating by the spreading flame. In the high voltage regime with a high AC frequency, excessive dripping of molten PE led to flame extinction.

  12. Uniting the family of jets of single cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Tinguely, Marc; Kobel, Philippe; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Farhat, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Micro-jets are high-speed liquid jets that are produced when a cavitation bubble experiences a non-spherical collapse. Such jets may be driven by any anisotropy in the liquid, such as those induced by near surfaces, gravity, pressure gradients in flows or shock waves. Here we unify this diverse family of micro-jets by describing their dynamics with a single anisotropy parameter ζ >= 0 that represents a dimensionless version of the liquid momentum at the collapse point. We observe, experimentally and numerically, that the dimensionless jet parameters describing the jet speed, jet impact time, bubble displacement, bubble volume at jet impact and vapor-jet volume, all reduce to functions of ζ. Consequently, a measurement of a single parameter, such as the bubble displacement, may be used to estimate any other parameter, such as the jet speed. The jets are phenomenologically categorized into three visually distinct regimes: weak jets that hardly pierce the bubble, intermediate jets that pierce the bubble late during the collapse, and strong jets that pierce the bubble at an early stage of the collapse. In the weak and intermediate jet regimes, that is, when ζ < 0 . 1 , the dimensionless jet parameters scale as simple power laws of ζ independently of the jet driver. Swiss National Science Foundation, University of Western Australia Research Collaboration Award, European Space Agency.

  13. Functionalization of polymers using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor and the impact on SLM-processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, M., E-mail: karl-ernst.wirth@fau.de; Schmitt, A., E-mail: karl-ernst.wirth@fau.de; Schmidt, J., E-mail: karl-ernst.wirth@fau.de; Peukert, W., E-mail: karl-ernst.wirth@fau.de; Wirth, K-E, E-mail: karl-ernst.wirth@fau.de [Institute of Particle Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    In order to improve thermoplastics (e.g. Polyamide, Polypropylene and Polyethylene) for Selective Laser Beam Melting (SLM) processes a new approach to functionalize temperature sensitive polymer powders in a large scale is investigated. This is achieved by combining an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a fluidized bed reactor. Using pressurized air as the plasma gas, radicals like OH* are created. The functionalization leads to an increase of the hydrophilicity of the treated polymer powder without changing the bulk properties. Using the polymers in a SLM process to build single layers of melted material leads to an improvement of the melted layers.

  14. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Al X

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, K M

    2013-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes are calculated among the lowest 98 levels of the n <= 4 configurations of Be-like Al X. The GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted and data are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Similar data are also obtained with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) to assess the accuracy of the calculations. Based on comparisons between calculations with the two codes as well as with available measurements, our listed energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.3%. However, the accuracy for radiative rates and lifetimes is estimated to be about 20%. Collision strengths are also calculated for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) is used. A wide energy range (up to 380 Ryd) is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 1.6...

  15. Impact of lyoprotectants for the stabilization of biodegradable nanoparticles on the performance of air-jet, ultrasonic, and vibrating-mesh nebulizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Kleimann, Pia; Schmehl, Thomas; Betz, Thomas; Bakowsky, Udo; Kissel, Thomas; Seeger, Werner

    2012-10-01

    Strategies for further advancements in pulmonary drug delivery include the application of colloidal carriers. Freeze-drying in the presence of lyoprotectants is a valuable approach to improve long-term stability of biodegradable nanoparticles, but possibly constrains aerosol generation after powder rehydration, when employing traditional nebulizers. Here, we investigated the impact of lyoprotectants on both output and aerodynamic performance of air-jet, ultrasonic, and vibrating-mesh nebulization. Additionally, changes in formulation temperature and concentration were monitored, to estimate physicochemical alterations of formulations during nebulization. The stability of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles was maintained for lyoprotectant/nanoparticle ratios above 5/1. All nebulized formulations displayed suitable output and aerodynamic characteristics for peripheral lung deposition. Air-jet- and ultrasonic nebulization was associated with considerable temperature (~10°C) and concentration changes (up to 156%) of the reservoir fluid, which consequently, caused significant shifting of surface tension and viscosity. By contrast, vibrating-mesh nebulization caused marginal temperature increase (~5°C) with no apparent signs of concentration. Thus, the changing surface tension and viscosity were fitted employing Eötvös' rule and the Andrade equation (R(2)>0.98), allowing to predict the physicochemical properties of each formulation for prolonged nebulization periods. In particular, vibrating-mesh nebulization seems to be promising for aerosol application of rehydrated freeze-dried biodegradable nanoparticles to the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-invasive coronary angiography with multislice spiral computed tomography: impact of heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); J. Vos (Jeroen); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); K. Nieman (Koen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of heart rate on the diagnostic accuracy of coronary angiography by multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. PATIENTS: 78 patients who underwent both conventional and MSCT coronary angiograp

  17. The exchange rate arrangements-government finance relationship and the impact on debt management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Trifonova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The choice of exchange rate regime can have a significant impact on the development of the national economy, which affects the main economic indicators. Traditionally, researchers consider the effects of certain types of exchange rate regimes on economic indicators such as gross domestic product, inflation, current account, real exchange rate and investments, but is it possible that the exchange rate regime can also reflect the country's government finance and thus influence the management of public debt?

  18. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  19. Exchange rate volatility and oil prices shocks and its impact on economic sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuram Shaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of exchange rate volatility has received a great attention from the last century, its importance is certain in all sectors of the economy and it affects welfare as well as social life of the economy. Exchange rate between two currencies tells the value of one currency in terms of others one. Depreciation/Appreciation of exchange rate affects economic growth in terms of trade and shifts income to/from exporting countries from/to importing countries. The factors affecting exchange rate are inflation, interest rate, foreign direct investment, government consumption expenditure and balance of trade. This research study examines the impact of oil prices and exchange rate volatility on economic growth in Germany based on 40-year annual data. Cointegration technique is applied to check the impact of macroeconomic variables on exchange rate in the long run and short run. It is estimated that imports, exports, inflation, interest rate, government consumption expenditure and foreign direct investment had significant impacts on real effective exchange rate in the long run and short run. Sin addition, Engle Granger results indicate that relationship was significant for the long run and its error correction adjustment mechanism (ECM in short a run is significant and correctly signed for Germany.

  20. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in C III

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, K M

    2015-01-01

    We report energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes for the astrophysically-important Be-like ion C III. For the calculations, 166 levels belonging to the $n \\le$ 5 configurations are considered and the {\\sc grasp} (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted. Einstein A-coefficients are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions, while lifetimes are compared with available measurements as well as theoretical results, and no large discrepancies noted. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1\\% for a majority of levels, and A-values to better than 20\\% for most transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code ({\\sc darc}) is used. A wide energy range, up to 21 Ryd, is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 8...

  1. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si III

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, K M

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for four types of transitions (E1, E2, M1, and M2) are reported for an astrophysically important Mg-like ion Si~III, whose emission lines have been observed in a variety of plasmas. For the calculations, well-known and widely-used GRASP code has been adopted, and results are listed for transitions among the 141 levels of the 3$\\ell3\\ell'$ and 3$\\ell$4$\\ell$ configurations. Experimental energies are available for only the lowest 58 levels but there is no major discrepancy with theoretical results. Similarly, the A-values and lifetimes show a satisfactory agreement with other available results, particularly for strong E1 transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, with the DARC code, and listed for resonance transitions over a wide energy range, up to 30~Ryd. No similar results are available in the literature for comparisons. However, comparisons are made with the more important parameter, effective collision strength ($\\Upsilon$), for which recent $R$-matr...

  2. Impact of age and basic heart rate on heart rate turbulence in healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jörg Otto; Eichner, Gerrit; Shlevkov, Nikolay; Schrickel, Jan; Yang, Alexander; Balta, Osman; Lewalter, Thorsten; Lüderitz, Berndt

    2005-01-01

    Postextrasystolic acceleration of heart rate (HR), known as HR turbulence (HRT) is attenuated in patients with coronary artery disease at increased risk of adverse events. The influence of age and basic HR on HRT have not been evaluated in a large cohort of persons. In 95 healthy individuals, HRT onset (TO) and slope (TS) were calculated from 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms, as well as the turbulence timing (TT). Gender specific differences in TO and TS were compared in simple, linear, weighted regression model. The influence of age and the basic HR preceding ventricular premature contractions on HRT were examined. We found that, in men and women, TO decreases as basic HR increases (P men, TS decreased as basic HR increases, whereas in women, basic HR influenced TS only slightly (P linear regression model revealed a decrease in HRT with increasing age in men. In conclusion, physiological acceleration of the HR within the first 11 beats after premature ventricular complex (VPC) was observed in >75% of healthy individuals. An accelerating HR preceding the VPC influenced HRT in men. An increasing age was associated with a decrease in HRT in men and a decrease in TO in women. These results illustrate the importance of physiological modulations of HRT when used for risk stratification, especially in older populations.

  3. Partonic energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions jet suppression versus jet fragmentation softening

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhtin, Igor P

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the modification of a jet fragmentation function due to medium-induced partonic energy loss in context of leading particle observables in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions. We also analyze the relation between in-medium softening jet fragmentation function and suppression of the jet rates due to energy loss outside the jet cone. The predicted anti-correlation between two effects allows to probe a fraction of partonic energy loss carried out of the jet cone and truly lost to the jet.

  4. Experimental study on heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids impacted jet%纳米流体冲击射流换热特性实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙斌; 曲艺; 杨迪

    2016-01-01

    以纳米流体为工质对冲击射流冷却系统的综合性能进行实验,主要研究了添加纳米颗粒的纳米流体与水在不同流速、不同射流高度等条件下冲击射流的传热效率,同时也对不同种类的纳米流体的换热效率进行了对比。结果表明:对于添加了纳米颗粒的冲击射流冷却系统,传热效率得到显著提高,但当质量分数达到0.5%时,传热系数变化不明显。对于不同种类的纳米流体:Cu-水、Al2O3-水和Al-水纳米流体,其中Cu-水的换热效率最高,存在一个特定的射流高度,使传热系数达到最大值。研究结果对设计制造轻型紧凑的高效换热器有实用的工程价值。%In this paper,comprehensive performance of impinging jet cooling system heat exchanger was experimentally studied using nanofluids. The heat transfer efficiencies were compared for nanofluids of different flow rates,jet height and types . The results revealed that heat transfer efficiency significantly increased with the introduction of nanofluids in jet,but,when the mass percentage of nanofluids exceeded of 0.5%,the heat transfer coefficient did not change significantly. For different types of nanofluids:Cu- water,Al2O3-water,Al-water nanofluids,the highest heat transfer efficiency was observed for Cu- water. In addition,there was a particular jet height,where the maximum heat transfer coefficient could be reached. The results would be practically valuable in designing and manufacturing light and efficient heat exchanger.

  5. Computational Study of Air Entrainment by Plunging Jets-Influence of Jet Inclination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The process of air entrainment by a continuous liquid jet plunging into a quiescent liquid pool is studied computationally. Our earlier study [APS2011] focused on shallow impacts and the discernible periodicity of air cavity formation. Here, we consider the effect of jet angle. For steep impacts, we see a chaotic formation of small cavities, in agreement with the literature. To explain the difference, we track evolution of the flow from initial impact to quasi-stationary state, for different jet inclinations. The initial impact always yields a large air cavity, regardless of jet angle. Difference emerges in the quasi-stationary state where shallow jets demonstrate the periodicity but the steep jets do not. We show that this is a manifestation of the air entrainment being a function of flow disturbance. For shallow jets, the disturbance originates from strong wavelike motion of the cavity which results in a total disruption of the jet. Thus, the resulting cavities are large and occur periodically. For the steep jets, entrainment happens by collapse of a thin gas film uniformly enshrouding the submerged jet. Such a thin film is very sensitive to the local flow disturbances. Thus, its collapse occurs stochastically all around the jet causing chaotic entrainment of small air pocket.

  6. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  7. Variations in multiple birth rates and impact on perinatal outcomes in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heino, A.; Gissler, M.; Hindori-Mohangoo, A.D.; Blondel, B.; Klungsøyr, K.; Verdenik, I.; Mierzejewska, E.; Velebil, P.; Sól Ólafsdóttir, H.; Macfarlane, A.; Zeitlin, J.; et al.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Infants from multiple pregnancies have higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death and differences in multiple birth rates (MBR) exist between countries. We aimed to describe differences in MBR in Europe and to investigate the impact of these differences on adverse perina

  8. The Impact of Real Exchange Rate on Economic Growth in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmira Cakrani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Real exchange rate is one of the most important economic variables, especially in today's conditions of integration processes, the removal of trade barriers and increasing direct competition between countries. Real exchange rate affects economy, through its impact on key economic variables, such as employment, inflation and especially economic growth. Changes in the real exchange rate affect the competitiveness of domestic products, resulting in increased exports or imports, affecting trade balance e growth. Also changes in the real exchange rate affect investment and capital accumulation, which are directly linked with economic growth. The aim of this paper is to study the possible impact of the real exchange rate on economic growth in Albania, to answer the question whether the real exchange rate can be used as an instrument of policy. Johansen cointegration method and Vector Error Correction Model is used in this paper to identify the longterm and short-term impact of real exchange rate on economic growth in Albania. Results of the study indicate that the real exchange rate has no significant impact on the Albanian economy, suggesting that policies to promote economic growth, both in the short and long term should not rely on this variable.

  9. Modeling of photolysis rates over Europe: impact on chemical gaseous species and aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact of photolysis rate calculation on European air composition and air quality monitoring. In particular, the impact of cloud parametrisation and the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates are analysed. Photolysis rates are simulated using the Fast-JX photolysis scheme and gas and aerosol concentrations over Europe are simulated with the regional model Polair3D of the Polyphemus platform. The photolysis scheme is first use to update the clear sky tabulation used in the previous Polair3D version. Important differences in photolysis rates are simulated, mainly due to updated cross-sections in the Fast-JX scheme. In the previous Polair3D version, clouds were taken into account by multiplying the clear-sky photolysis rates using a correction factor. In a second stage, the impact of clouds is taken into account more accurately by simulating them directly in the photolysis scheme. Differences in photolysis rates inside clouds are as high as differences between simulations with and without clouds. Outside clouds, the differences are small. The largest difference in gas concentrations is simulated for OH with a mean increase of its tropospheric burden of 4 to 5%.

    To take into account the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates, Polair3D and Fast-JX are coupled. Photolysis rates are updated every hour. Large impact on photolysis rates is observed at the ground, decreasing with altitude. The aerosol species that impact the most photolysis rates is dust especially in South Europe. Strong impact is also observed over anthropogenic emission regions (Paris, The Po and the Ruhr Valley where mainly nitrate and sulphate reduced the incoming radiation. Differences in photolysis rates lead to changes in gas concentrations, with the largest impact simulated for OH and NO concentrations. At the ground, monthly mean concentrations of both species are reduced over Europe by around 10 to 14% and their tropospheric burden by around 10

  10. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  11. Study on jet type impact mill for concrete and design for abrasive jet system of pre-mixing type%喷射式混凝土冲磨机及其前混合式磨料喷射系统设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李浩平; 李峰; 张涛

    2011-01-01

    研究了混凝土抗冲刷磨损试验中的旋转喷射式试验原理,分析了磨料水射流工作原理及工作特点,并将前混合式磨料射流原理引入到水砂喷射系统中,研制了旋转喷射式混凝土抗冲耐磨试验机.本喷射系统特点:冲刷状况更接近混凝土真实工况,冲击力大,冲刷范围广,速度高,冲磨效果好,能够有效地对不同配合比混凝土的抗冲磨性能作出比较.%The principle of rotating-jet mode test for concrete under abrasion resistance test is studied in it as well as the working principle and characteristics of abrasive water jet is analyzed,then the principle of abrasive jet of pre-mixing type is introduced into the water sand jet system. Thus rotating-jet mode abrasion resistance testing machine for concrete has been developed which is characterized with erosion much closer to the real condition of concrete ,great impact,large erosion area,high speed,good erosion effect,and comparing on abrasion resistance performance can be effectively carried out for concrete with different proportion.

  12. Jet Quenching via Jet Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration recently reported strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions. In this work, we discuss to what extent these first data constrain already the microscopic mechanism underlying jet quenching. Simple kinematic arguments lead us to identify a frequency collimation mechanism via which the medium efficiently trims away the soft components of the jet parton shower. Through this mechanism, the observed dijet asymmetry can be accomodated with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude.

  13. Testing and Analysis of the Speed of Water Jet in Water Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克让; 麻伟巍; 陈明

    2003-01-01

    In the water jet looms, the distribution of the speed of water jet at the axis of the shed and its regularity are obtained by the Laser Doppler Tester. Based on the above, the water jet system is analyzed and the main effective approaches to increase the filling insertion rate and to widen the reed space of the loom are pointed out.

  14. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  15. Gas Flow and Electric Field Characterization in Plasma Jets for Biomedical Applications: From Single Jet to Multi Jet Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Eric

    2015-09-01

    This work reports first on time-resolved measurement of longitudinal and radial electric fields (EF) associated with plasma propagation in dielectric capillaries. Plasma propagation occurs in a region where longitudinal EF exists ahead the ionization front position revealed from plasma emission with ICCD measurement. The ionization front propagation induces the sudden rise of a radial EF component. Both of these EF components have a few kV/cm in amplitude for helium or neon plasmas. Their amplitude is kept almost constant along a few tens of cm long capillary. The key role of the voltage pulse polarity and the drastic impact of the presence of a target in front of the plasma jet are discussed from Schlieren images. All these experimental measurements are in excellent agreement with model calculations which are used to infer EF data on capillary axis. EF diagnostics in the plasma plume in the free jet mode but also in contact with various targets is proposed. The combination of intense transient EF, both of ns and µs duration, together with significant transient reactive species generation during plasma jet treatments may be reconsidered. Typical EF amplitudes likely to induce electrostimulation, electroporation are indeed probably achieved in many in vivo protocols. Stimulation of tissue oxygenation, blood flow rate modulation and more recently immune system triggering may be examples where EF could play a significant role. The second part of this work is dedicated to the development of multi jets, using two different setups, based on a single plasma source. Plasma splitting in dielectric tubes drilled with sub millimetric orifices, but also plasma transfer across metallic tubes equipped with such orifices are analyzed from ICCD imaging and time resolved EF measurements. This allows for the design of plasma jet arrays but also emphasizes the necessity to account for voltage pulse polarity, target potential status, consecutive helium flow modulation and

  16. The Regional Centralization of Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring and Its Impact on Neonatal Acidemia and the Cesarean Birth Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Michikata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The improvement of the accuracy of fetal heart rate (FHR pattern interpretation to improve perinatal outcomes remains an elusive challenge. We examined the impact of an FHR centralization system on the incidence of neonatal acidemia and cesarean births. Methods. We performed a regional, population-based, before-and-after study of 9,139 deliveries over a 3-year period. The chi-squared test was used for the statistical analysis. Results. The before-and-after study showed no difference in the rates of acidemia, cesarean births, or perinatal death in the whole population. A subgroup analysis using the 4 hospitals in which an FHR centralization system was continuously connected (compliant group and 3 hospitals in which the FHR centralization system was connected on demand (noncompliant group showed that the incidence acidemia was significantly decreased (from 0.47% to 0.11% without a corresponding increase in the cesarean birth rate due to nonreassuring FHR patterns in the compliant group. Although there was no difference in the incidence of nonreassuring FHR patterns in the noncompliant group, the total cesarean birth rate was significantly higher than that in the compliant group. Conclusion. The continuous FHR centralization system, in which specialists help to interpret results and decide clinical actions, was beneficial in reducing the incidence of neonatal acidemia (pH < 7.1 without increasing the cesarean birth rate due to nonreassuring FHR patterns.

  17. The influence of impaction on the rate of third molar mineralisation in male black Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olze, Andreas; van Niekerk, Piet; Schulz, Ronald; Ribbecke, Sebastian; Schmeling, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    One of the main criteria used in dental age diagnostics in living adolescents and young adults is assessment of the mineralisation stage of the third molars. In the case of Europid populations, it has been established that impaction status has an influence on the rate of mineralisation of the third molars. In view of this, a study was undertaken to determine whether the chronological process of wisdom tooth mineralisation is dependent upon impaction status in black Africans too. Orthopantomograms (553) of 437 male and 116 female black South Africans with verified birth dates in the age group between 10 and 26 years were studied. Mineralisation stage and impaction status were determined for all third molars. Statistical measures were calculated for the mandibular wisdom teeth at stages F, G and H and for the maxillary wisdom teeth at stage H in the male gender for both impacted and non-impacted third molars. It was ascertained that the minimum age in persons with impacted third molars, depending on the wisdom tooth observed, was 0.19-2.57 years higher than in those with non-impacted wisdom teeth. Test persons with impacted mandibular wisdom teeth at stage F or G were on average between 0.32 and 1.88 years older than those with non-impacted mandibular wisdom teeth. The 50 % probability values of impacted wisdom teeth at stage H were 1.85-3.31 years higher than those in non-impacted wisdom teeth. The conclusion was drawn that in male black Africans, impacted mandibular wisdom teeth mineralise more slowly than non-impacted lower third molars. The presence of impacted mandibular wisdom teeth in mineralisation stage H in male black Africans does not, however, furnish proof of completion of the 18(th) year of life beyond reasonable doubt.

  18. Experimental study of dynamic mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete under high-strain-rate impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete subjected to compressive impacts with high strain rates ranging from 10 to 1.1×102 s-1 were investigated by means of SHPB (split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar) tests of the cylindrical specimens with five different steel fiber volumetric fractions.The properties of wave stress transmission,failure,strength,and energy consumption of RPC with varied fiber volumes and impact strain rates were analyzed.The influences of impact strain rates and fiber volumes on those properties were characterized as well.The general forms of the dynamic stress-strain relationships of RPC were modeled based on the experimental data.The investigations indicate that for the plain RPC the stress response is greater than the strain response,showing strong brittle performance.The RPC with a certain volume of fibers sustains higher strain rate impact and exhibits better deformability as compared with the plain RPC.With a constant fiber fraction,the peak compressive strength,corresponding peak strain and the residual strain of the fiber-reinforced RPC rise by varying amounts when the impact strain rate increases,with the residual strain demonstrating the greatest increment.Elevating the fiber content makes trivial contribution to improving the residual deformability of RPC when the impact strain rate is constant.The tests also show that the fiber content affects the peak compressive strength and the peak deformability of RPC in a different manner.With a constant impact strain rate and the fiber fraction less than 1.75%,the peak compressive strength rises with an increasing fiber volume.The peak compressive strength tends to decrease as the fiber volume exceeds 1.75%.The corresponding peak strain,however,incessantly rises with the increasing fiber volume.The total energy Edisp that RPC consumed during the period from the beginning of impacts to the time of residual strains elevates with the fiber volume increment as long as the fiber

  19. A study on the decreasing trend in tropical easterly jet stream (TEJ) and its impact on Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekala, P. P.; Bhaskara Rao, S. V.; Arunachalam, M. S.; Harikiran, C.

    2014-10-01

    Using the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind and temperature data (1948-2011) and India Meteorological Department (IMD) rainfall data, a long-term trend in the tropical easterly jet stream and its effect on Indian summer monsoon rainfall has been explained in the present study. A decreasing trend in zonal wind speed at 100 mb (maximum decrease), 150 mb, and 200 mb (minimum) is observed. The upper-level (100, 150, and 200 mb) zonal wind speed has been correlated with the surface air temperature anomaly index (ATAI) in the month of May, which is taken as the difference in temperature anomaly over land (22.5°N-27.5°N, 80°E-90°E) and Ocean (5°S-0°S, 75°E-85°E). Significant high correlation is observed between May ATAI and tropical easterly jet stream (TEJ) which suggests that the decreasing land-sea temperature contrast could be one major reason behind the decreasing trend in TEJ. The analysis of spatial distribution of rainfall over India shows a decreasing trend in rainfall over Jammu and Kashmir, Arunachal Pradesh, central Indian region, and western coast of India. Increasing trend in rainfall is observed over south peninsular and northeastern part of India. From the spatial correlation analysis of zonal wind with gridded rainfall, it is observed that the correlation of rainfall is found to be high with the TEJ speed over the regions where the decreasing trend in rainfall is observed. Similarly, from the analysis of spatial correlation between rainfall and May ATAI, positive spatial correlation is observed between May ATAI and summer monsoon rainfall over the regions such as south peninsular India where the rainfall trend is positive, and negative correlation is observed over the places such as Jammu and Kashmir where negative rainfall trend is observed. The decreased land-sea temperature contrast in the pre-monsoon month could be one major reason behind the decreased trend in TEJ as well as the observed spatial variation in the summer monsoon rainfall trend. Thus

  20. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2016-03-08

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact-prone automotive structures. However, basic mechanical properties and corresponding damage of IPP and GFIPP at different rates, which are of keen interest in the material development stage and numerical tool validation, have not been reported. Here, we applied monotonic and cyclic tensile loads to IPP and GFIPP at different strain rates (0.001/s, 0.01/s and 0.1/s) to study the mechanical properties, failure modes and the damage parameters. We used monotonic and cyclic tests to obtain mechanical properties and define damage parameters, respectively. We also used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to visualize the failure mode. We found that IPP generally exhibits brittle fracture (with relatively low failure strain of 2.69-3.74%) and viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior. GFIPP [90]8 is generally insensitive to strain rate due to localized damage initiation mostly in the matrix phase leading to catastrophic transverse failure. In contrast, GFIPP [±45]s is sensitive to the strain rate as indicated by the change in shear modulus, shear strength and failure mode.

  1. Impact of land use on weathering rates in Guadeloupe, Caribbean islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, S.; Cerdan, O.; Gaillardet, J.; Grandjean, G.; Allegre, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Guadeloupe is located in Lesser Antilles with a tropical climate with very high precipitation, temperature, very dense vegetation (forest on the steepest slopes, agricultural on the lowlands) and sharp relief. Rivers present torrential hydrological regime with extreme erosion conditions. The tropical context contributes to important development of saprolitic profile, with extreme chemical weathering rates (e.g. 100 to 600 t/km2/yr). As for many volcanic islands erodible lithology such as pyroclastic flows with ashes or even massif lava flows involve important material transported during the erosion processes. The lithyology is also very porous with high infiltration rates, which induces that most of the elements fluxes are produced on subsurface as the chemical erosion rates are 2 to 5 time higher than the rates from surface water (Rad et al., 2007). Moreover kinetic of chemical weathering rates depends on the age of the lava flows (with a NS gradient of age) and subsurface circulation with local hydrothermal springs, which highly increases chemical weathering rates. It appears that first stage of erosion are characterized by high chemical denudation rates and high physical denudation rates, the erosion products chemical compositions are then close to the bedrock one. It is then followed in a second stage by constant chemical weathering rates and lower mechanical denudation rates. Moreover Guadeloupe islands is highly impacted by agriculture (banana and sugar cane plantations), which significantly influence the hydrological cycle. It is therefore interesting to asses the impact of such influence on the weathering rates on this island. Chemical and physical weathering rates will be correlated to the different land use to quantify the impact of human activities and explain its role in the evolution of the Critical Zone.

  2. On the impact of the plasma jet energy on the product of plasmadynamic synthesis in the Si-C system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, D.; Sivkov, A.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles can be used for ceramics reinforcement, creation of nanostructured ceramics, microelectromechanical systems. The paper presents the results of plasmadynamic synthesis of silicon carbide nanopowders. This method was realized by the synthesis in an electrodischarge plasma jet generated by a high-current pulsed coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator. Powdered carbon and silicon were used as precursors for the reaction. Four experiments with different energy levels (from 10.0 to 30.0 kJ) were carried out. The synthesized products were analysed by several modern techniques including X-ray diffractometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. According to analysis results all the products mainly composed of cubic silicon carbide (b-SiC) with a small amount of unreacted precursors. Silicon carbide particles have a clear crystal structure, a triangular shape and sizes to a few hundred nanometers. Comparison of the results of experiments with different energy levels made it possible to draw conclusions on ways to control product phase composition and dispersion. The silicon carbide content and particles sizes increase with increasing the energy level.

  3. Impact of Exchange Rate Fluctuation to the Romanian Foreign Currency Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Diana Vasile

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we intend to indentify the impact of the currency rate of exchange variation of the two main currencies which represent Romania’s foreign currency reserve and the stress test it submits the latter. Up to the present moment there not established a cause-effect relationship or correlation between the foreign currency exchage rate was variation and the foreign currency reserve. In this respect we used an econometrics model based on cointegration analysis of the three series of data corresponding to the period of time 31.01.1995-31.06.2006 (the EURO exchange rate, the USD exchange rate and the foreign currency reserve.

  4. Investigation into the Impact of Hold Time, Thermal Mechanical Fatigue, Shotpeen, and Retardation on Fatigue Crack Growth in Inconel Dovetail Slots in Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Josiah W.

    2011-12-01

    Current jet engine industry studies are ongoing to develop a generic Inconel dovetail slot test case that will be used for calibrating a manufacturing-induced surface damage anomaly distribution curve for future probabilistic life assessments. The stress and temperature profile during the mission have been defined. This analysis will consist of a design of experiments on the Inconel dovetail slot test data. The test case includes thermal and mechanical stresses, as well as variations in hold time, stress and temperature regimes. Several DOEs will be created and run to help assess the impact of four crack growth mechanisms on the damage tolerance life for the different mission profiles: hold time, thermal mechanical fatigue, shotpeen, and retardation. For the sake of this study a parametric study is considered to be a DOE. Calculations will be completed for both surface and corner cracks. For surface cracks, a 2:1 aspect ratio semicircular initial flaw size of 15 x 30 mils will be used. For corner cracks, a 1:1 aspect ratio semicircular initial flaw size of 15 x 15 mils will be used. The calculations will be completed using a proprietary crack propagation code. The results of this study will reveal the mission profile at which each of the aforementioned effects begins to have a significant impact on the damage tolerance life. These studies are critical to ensuring the final test case adequately addresses each of these critical crack propagation drivers.

  5. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  6. An Analysis of the Most Adopted Rating Systems for Assessing the Environmental Impact of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bernardi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rating systems for assessing the environmental impact of buildings are technical instruments that aim to evaluate the environmental impact of buildings and construction projects. In some cases, these rating systems can also cover urban-scale projects, community projects, and infrastructures. These schemes are designed to assist project management in making the projects more sustainable by providing frameworks with precise criteria for assessing the various aspects of a building’s environmental impact. Given the growing interest in sustainable development worldwide, many rating systems for assessing the environmental impact of buildings have been established in recent years, each one with its peculiarities and fields of applicability. The present work is motivated by an interest in emphasizing such differences to better understand these rating systems and extract the main implications to building design. It also attempts to summarize in a user-friendly form the vast and fragmented assortment of information that is available today. The analysis focuses on the six main rating systems: the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology (BREEAM, the Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficiency (CASBEE, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltiges Bauen (DGNB, the Haute Qualité Environnementale (HQETM, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED, and the Sustainable Building Tool (SBTool.

  7. Impact of pitching rate on yeast fermentation performance and beer flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, P J; Dekoninck, T M L; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Thevelein, J M; Delvaux, F R

    2009-02-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e. higher inoculum size). However, the impact of the pitching rate on crucial fermentation and beer quality parameters has never been assessed systematically. In this study, five pitching rates were applied to lab-scale fermentations to investigate its impact on the yeast physiology and beer quality. The fermentation rate increased significantly and the net yeast growth was lowered with increasing pitching rate, without affecting significantly the viability and the vitality of the yeast population. The build-up of unsaturated fatty acids in the initial phase of the fermentation was repressed when higher yeast concentrations were pitched. The expression levels of the genes HSP104 and HSP12 and the concentration of trehalose were higher with increased pitching rates, suggesting a moderate exposure to stress in case of higher cell concentrations. The influence of pitching rate on aroma compound production was rather limited, with the exception of total diacetyl levels, which strongly increased with the pitching rate. These results demonstrate that most aspects of the yeast physiology and flavour balance are not significantly or negatively affected when the pitching rate is changed. However, further research is needed to fully optimise the conditions for brewing beer with high cell density populations.

  8. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  9. Modelling the impact of changes in the interest rates on the economy: An Austrian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Le Roux

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Even though econometric models and yield curve analysis are useful in assessing the impact of interest rate changes on the economic structure, their power to predict the magnitude and direction of swings in the business cycle is often restricted to the use of short-term interest rates. From an Austrian school perspective on interest rates, empirical evidence suggests that the profitability of heavy industries further downstream outperforms that of light industries in the initial stages of monetary easing, due to a rising demand for investment goods and a rise in capacity utilisation levels. This paper assesses the impact of interest rates changes on the productive structure of the economy by taking into account the effect thereof on sector earnings and ultimately share prices.

  10. Electron-impact vibrational excitation rates in the flow field of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the vibrational excitation rate processes expected in the flow field of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs). An analysis of the multiple-quantum vibrational excitation processes by electron impact is made to predict the vibrational excitation cross sections, rate coefficients, and relaxation times which control vibrational temperature. The expression for the rate of electron-vibration energy transfer is derived by solving the system of master equations which account for the multiple-level transitions. The vibrational excitation coefficients, which are the prerequisite physical quantities in solving the obtained vibrational equation, are calculated based on the theoretically predicted cross sections. These cross sections are obtained from quantum mechanical calculations, based on the concept that vibrational excitation of molecules by electron impact occurs through formation of an intermediate negative ion state. Finally, the modified Landau-Teller-type rate equation, which is suitable for the numerical calculations for the AOTV flow fields, is suggested.

  11. Collection of an electrospinning jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Reneker, Darrell

    2006-03-01

    Electrospinning [1, 2] of polymer nanofibers involves an electrically driven bending instability of the elongating jet. If the jet is collected on a stationary surface immediately before or after the bending instability occurs, the jet buckles as it stops. Bending and buckling are distinct phenomena. The determination of the behavior of the jet path in the vicinity of the onset of the first bending instability is important for the orderly collection of the nanofiber. Precise adjustment of the fluid flow, the electrical current, and the shape of the region from which the jet issued, produced a very stable jet which was observed with a high frame rate, short exposure time camera. The fluid jet and the resulting nanofibers were collected on a solid, electrically conducting substrate which was moved laterally, and simultaneously, away from the tip. This collected material preserved a record of the straight segment and the bending and buckling instabilities with a minimum of overlapping. The occurrence of a second bending instability was sometimes observed in the dry fiber. 1. Doshi, J.; Reneker, D.H., Journal of Electrostatics; 35, 151, 1995 2. Reneker, D.H. ;Yarin,A.L.Fong, H.; Koombhongse, S., Journal of Applied Physics, 87, 4531, 2000

  12. Cross Sections and Rate Coefficients for Vibrational Excitation of HeH+ Molecule by Electron Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ayouz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross sections and thermally-averaged rate coefficients for vibration (de-excitation of HeH + by an electron impact are computed using a theoretical approach that combines the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the UK R-matrix code. Fitting formulas with a few numerical parameters are derived for the obtained rate coefficients. The interval of applicability of the formulas is from 40 to 10,000 K.

  13. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  14. Study on the breakup length of circular impinging jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Circular impinging jet, which is widely used in accelerated control cooling (ACC) equipment to accelerate the cooling of hot rolled plates, is subject to breakup, and may result in undesirable cooling effect. Therefore, the jet breakup should be avoided as possible in industrial production. The objective of this study is to find the relation of the processing parameters of the ACC equipment versus the breakup length of jet with weaker turbulence. To obtain quantitative findings, not only relative experimental study but also numerical simulation was carried out. For a weaker turbulent water jet, the breakup length increases with the increase of jet diameter, as well as with the jet velocity; jet diameter has a significant effect on the breakup length for a certain flow rate when compared with jet velocity; finally a suggested correlation of the jet breakup length versus jet Weber number is presented in this study.

  15. Associations of hospital characteristics with nosocomial pneumonia after cardiac surgery can impact on standardized infection rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagou, M; Leder, K; Cheng, A C; Pilcher, D; Reid, C M; Wolfe, R

    2016-04-01

    To identify hospital-level factors associated with post-cardiac surgical pneumonia for assessing their impact on standardized infection rates (SIRs), we studied 43 691 patients in a cardiac surgery registry (2001-2011) in 16 hospitals. In a logistic regression model for pneumonia following cardiac surgery, associations with hospital characteristics were quantified with adjustment for patient characteristics while allowing for clustering of patients by hospital. Pneumonia rates varied from 0·7% to 12·4% across hospitals. Seventy percent of variability in the pneumonia rate was attributable to differences in hospitals in their long-term rates with the remainder attributable to within-hospital differences in rates over time. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the pneumonia rate was found to be higher in hospitals with more registered nurses (RNs)/100 intensive-care unit (ICU) admissions [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·2, P = 0·006] and more RNs/available ICU beds (aOR 1·4, P pneumonia. SIRs calculated on the basis of patient characteristics alone differed substantially from the same rates calculated on the basis of patient characteristics and the hospital characteristic of RNs/100 ICU admissions. Since SIRs using patient case-mix information are important for comparing rates between hospitals, the additional allowance for hospital characteristics can impact significantly on how hospitals compare.

  16. Ejector Noise Suppression with Auxiliary Jet Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Charles H.; Andersen, Otto P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental program to reduce aircraft jet turbulence noise investigated the interaction of small auxiliary jets with a larger main jet. Significant reductions in the far field jet noise were obtained over a range of auxiliary jet pressures and flow rates when used in conjunction with an acoustically lined ejector. While the concept is similar to that of conventional ejector suppressors that use mechanical mixing devices, the present approach should improve thrust and lead to lower weight and less complex noise suppression systems since no hardware needs to be located in the main jet flow. A variety of auxiliary jet and ejector configurations and operating conditions were studied. The best conditions tested produced peak to peak noise reductions ranging from 11 to 16 dB, depending on measurement angle, for auxiliary jet mass flows that were 6.6% of the main jet flow with ejectors that were 8 times the main jet diameter in length. Much larger reductions in noise were found at the original peak frequencies of the unsuppressed jet over a range of far field measurement angles.

  17. Results of the JET real-time disruption predictor in the ITER-like wall campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Madrid (Spain); Dormido-Canto, Sebastián [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); López, Juan M. [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAEND UPM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Murari, Andrea [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM/ENEA per la Fusione, Padua (Italy); Ramírez, Jesús M. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); Moreno, Raúl [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Madrid (Spain); Ruiz, Mariano [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAEND UPM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Alves, Diogo [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear – Laboratório Associado, Instituto Superior Técnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Felton, Robert [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Center, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •JET real-time disruption predictor with metallic wall 991 discharges analyzed. •Predictor training has been carried out with JET C wall data. •Success, false alarm and missed alarm rates are 98.4%, 0.9% and 1.6%, respectively. •Alarms are triggered in average 426 ms before the disruption. -- Abstract: The impact of disruptions in JET became even more important with the replacement of the previous Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) wall with a more fragile full metal ITER-like wall (ILW). The development of robust disruption mitigation systems is crucial for JET (and also for ITER). Moreover, a reliable real-time (RT) disruption predictor is a pre-requisite to any mitigation method. The Advance Predictor Of DISruptions (APODIS) has been installed in the JET Real-Time Data Network (RTDN) for the RT recognition of disruptions. The predictor operates with the new ILW but it has been trained only with discharges belonging to campaigns with the CFC wall. 7 real-time signals are used to characterize the plasma status (disruptive or non-disruptive) at regular intervals of 32 ms. After the first 3 JET ILW campaigns (991 discharges), the success rate of the predictor is 98.36% (alarms are triggered in average 426 ms before the disruptions). The false alarm and missed alarm rates are 0.92% and 1.64%.

  18. Impact of bank competition on the interest rate pass-through in the euro area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuvensteijn, M.; Kok Sørensen, C.; Bikker, J.A.; van Rixtel, A.A.R.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of loan market competition on the interest rates applied by euro area banks to loans and deposits during the 1994-2004 period, using a novel measure of competition called the Boone indicator. We find evidence that stronger competition implies significantly lower spread

  19. Beyond reduced-impact logging: silvicultural treatments to increase growth rates of tropical trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peña-Claros, M.; Fredericksen, T.S.; Alarcón, A.; Blate, G.M.; Choque, U.; Leaño, C.; Licona, J.C.; Mostacedo, B.; Pariona, W.; Villegas, Z.; Putz, F.E.

    2008-01-01

    Use of reduced-impact logging (RIL) techniques has repeatedly been shown to reduce damage caused by logging. Unfortunately, these techniques do not necessarily ameliorate the low growth rates of many commercial species or otherwise assure recovery of the initial volume harvested during the next cutt

  20. Impact of spore biology on the rate of kill and suppression of resistance in Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusano, G L; Okusanya, O O; Okusanya, A O; van Scoy, B; Brown, D L; Fregeau, C; Kulawy, R; Kinzig, M; Sörgel, F; Heine, H S; Louie, A

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis is complex because of its spore form. The spore is invulnerable to antibiotic action. It also has an impact on the emergence of resistance. We employed the hollow-fiber infection model to study the impacts of different doses and schedules of moxifloxacin on the total-organism population, the spore population, and the subpopulations of vegetative- and spore-phase organisms that were resistant to moxifloxacin. We then generated a mathematical model of the impact of moxifloxacin, administered by continuous infusion or once daily, on vegetative- and spore-phase organisms. The ratio of the rate constant for vegetative-phase cells going to spore phase (K(vs)) to the rate constant for spore-phase cells going to vegetative phase (K(sv)) determines the rate of organism clearance. The continuous-infusion drug profile is more easily sensed as a threat; the K(vs)/K(sv) ratio increases at lower drug exposures (possibly related to quorum sensing). This movement to spore phase protects the organism but makes the emergence of resistance less likely. Suppression of resistance requires a higher level of drug exposure with once-daily administration than with a continuous infusion, a difference that is related to vegetative-to-spore (and back) transitioning. Spore biology has a major impact on drug therapy and resistance suppression. These findings explain why all drugs of different classes have approximately the same rate of organism clearance for Bacillus anthracis.

  1. Dynamics of Rate of Returns for Postgraduate Education in Taiwan: The Impact of Higher Education Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Hai; Lin, Chun-Hung A.; Lin, Chien-Ru

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of rate of returns for postgraduate education and the determinants of wage premiums for postgraduate labor, especially for the impact of higher education expansions, in terms of quantity and quality, since the late 1990s in Taiwan. Utilizing quasi-panel data over the 1990-2004 period and employing the double fixed…

  2. The Impact of rising international interest rates on developing countries: The South Korean experience

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Bernhard; Mayer, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of rising international interest rates on the South Korean economy during the seventies with the help of an econometric macro model. The results show that there was an induced reduction of investment and GDP, yet inflationary pressures were somewhat mitigated by a lowering of capital inflows.

  3. Impact of temperature on ammonium and nitrite removal rates in RAS moving bed biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinyage, John Peter Hewa; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The impact of temperature on bacterial processes is well known; however temperature related data on nitrification rates in aquaculture systems are fragmented and compiled from different studies. We sought to determine ammonium and nitrite removal kinetics over a temperature range from 6 to 36 °C ...

  4. Impact of a Career Planning Course on Academic Performance and Graduation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Byron; Peterson, Gary W.; Reardon, Robert C.; Mann, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of a career-planning course in terms of time taken to graduate, graduation rate, credit hours taken, number of course withdrawals, and cumulative GPAs. Student course participants (N = 544) were compared to a matched sample of non-course participants (N = 544) after 5 years. Results showed that the 2…

  5. Impact of ideal health behaviors and health factors on the detection rate of the carotid plaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高竞生

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of ideal health behaviors and health factors on the detection rate of the carotid plaques. Methods Subjects with previous stroke,TIA,myocardial infarction were excluded from the study.A total of 5 852 employees(active and retired employers

  6. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Colliding Jets: Modeling 3C 75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, S. M.; Schive, H.-Y.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiueh, T.; Musoke, G.; Young, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Radio observations suggest that 3C 75, located in the dumbbell shaped galaxy NGC 1128 at the center of Abell 400, hosts two colliding jets. Motivated by this source, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations using a modified version of the GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement hydrodynamical parallel code (GAMER) to study colliding extragalactic jets. We find that colliding jets can be cast into two categories: (1) bouncing jets, in which case the jets bounce off each other keeping their identities, and (2) merging jets, when only one jet emerges from the collision. Under some conditions the interaction causes the jets to break up into oscillating filaments of opposite helicity, with consequences for their downstream stability. When one jet is significantly faster than the other and the impact parameter is small, the jets merge; the faster jet takes over the slower one. In the case of merging jets, the oscillations of the filaments, in projection, may show a feature that resembles a double helix, similar to the radio image of 3C 75. Thus we interpret the morphology of 3C 75 as a consequence of the collision of two jets with distinctly different speeds at a small impact parameter, with the faster jet breaking up into two oscillating filaments.

  7. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  8. Impact of nosocomial infections surveillance on nosocomial infection rates: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Gong, Zhenyu; Lu, Ye; Hu, Guoqing; Cai, Ran; Chen, Zhiping

    2017-06-01

    According to previously studies, nosocomial infections (NIs) surveillance could effectively reduce infection rates. As NIs surveillance systems have been implemented in some hospitals for several years, their impact on NIs need to be explored. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the tendency of NI rates during the surveillance period and the impact of surveillance on NI rates. A systematic literature search of the PubMed database to identify papers that evaluated effect of surveillance on NIs, all kinds of NIs occurred during hospitalization or discharged were included. Exclude articles investigated the surveillance combined with other infection control measures. Twenty-five articles were included. NI rates had different levels of reduction during surveillance period, the reduction were not limited by state, department, surveillance system, and NI type. Continuous surveillance had a positive impact on NI, OR/RR were ranged from 0.43 to 0.95. Participation in NI surveillance is associated with reducing infection rates, though RCTs need to further prove the effective role of surveillance. Hospitals may consider to perform NIs surveillance systems according to its own conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Jet algorithms performance in 13 TeV data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The performance of jet algorithms with data collected by the CMS detector at the LHC in 2015 with a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to 2.3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, is reported. The criteria used to reject jets originating from detector noise are discussed and the efficiency and noise jet rejection rate are measured. A likelihood discriminant designed to differentiate jets initiated by light-quark partons from jets initiated from gluons is studied. A multivariate discriminator is built to distinguish jets initiated by a single high $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ quark or gluon from jets originating from the overlap of multiple low $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ particles from non-primary vertices (pileup jets). Algorithms used to identify large radius jets reconstructed from the decay products of highly Lorentz boosted W bosons and top quarks are discussed, and the efficiency and background rejection rates of these algorithms are measured.

  10. PIV Measurements and Mechanisms of Adjacent Synthetic Jets Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhen-Bing; XIA Zhi-Xun

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of adjacent synthetic jet actuators with varying relative amplitude and the relative phase of driving voltage are measured using a particle image velocimetry(PIV).Varying relative amplitude or relative phase of driving voltage of the adjacent actuators vectors the direction of the ensuing merged jet of the adjacent synthetic jets.The vectoring mechanism of the adjacent vortex pairs,attract-impact causing deflection(AICD),is provided to explain why the merged jet is generally vectored to the side of the phase-leading synthetic jet or the synthetic jet with higher driving voltage.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Bouncing Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Bonito, Andrea; Lee, Sanghyun

    2015-01-01

    Bouncing jets are fascinating phenomenons occurring under certain conditions when a jet impinges on a free surface. This effect is observed when the fluid is Newtonian and the jet falls in a bath undergoing a solid motion. It occurs also for non-Newtonian fluids when the jets falls in a vessel at rest containing the same fluid. We investigate numerically the impact of the experimental setting and the rheological properties of the fluid on the onset of the bouncing phenomenon. Our investigations show that the occurrence of a thin lubricating layer of air separating the jet and the rest of the liquid is a key factor for the bouncing of the jet to happen. The numerical technique that is used consists of a projection method for the Navier-Stokes system coupled with a level set formulation for the representation of the interface. The space approximation is done with adaptive finite elements. Adaptive refinement is shown to be very important to capture the thin layer of air that is responsible for the bouncing.

  12. Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on the Unemployment Rate in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhd Irpan, Hamidah; Mat Saad, Rosfadzimi; Nor, Abu Hassan Shaari Md; Noor, Abd Halim Md; Ibrahim, Noorazilah

    2016-04-01

    Malaysia as a developing country needs support from other countries for economic growth. This is done by receiving massive foreign direct investment (FDI) which contributes to a higher employment rate. Higher employment leads to a better living among Malaysians while increasing its gross domestic product (GDP). During 2009, Malaysia faced a downward trend on the FDI. In many studies, decreasing FDI affects employment rate significantly. This study focuses on the impact of FDI on employment rate in Malaysia. Other factors such as the number of foreign workers, gross domestic product (GDP) and exchange rate (EXCR) are also included in the study. Data used in the study is annual data spanning from 1980 to 2012. Autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model is used to determine the long run relationship between the variables. The study finds that FDI, number of foreign workers, and GDP significantly influence the unemployment rate in Malaysia.

  13. Adding fuel to fire: the impact of followers' arousal on ratings of charisma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Juan Carlos; Mayo, Margarita; Shamir, Boas

    2007-11-01

    The authors conducted an experimental laboratory study and a longitudinal field study to investigate the impact of followers' arousal on ratings of charisma. Both studies examined 2 contrasting hypotheses: (a) the misattribution hypothesis, which posits a direct effect of arousal, and (b) the response-facilitation hypothesis, which posits an interactive effect of arousal and leaders' charismatic appeal on ratings of charisma. The overall results from both studies provide support for the response-facilitation hypothesis. In addition, the authors tested the hypothesis that arousal effects are limited to ratings of charisma. As expected, ratings of transactional leadership, in contrast with ratings of charisma, were not influenced by followers' arousal states. The authors discuss the implications of these results and offer suggestions for future research.

  14. Multiple Jets at the LHC with High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    -level accuracy for multiplicities up to 4 jets. The resummation includes all-order hard corrections, which become important for increasing centre-of-mass energy of the hadronic collision. We discuss observables relevant for confronting the perturbative framework with 7 TeV data from the LHC, and the impact...

  15. Estimating shoulder injury risk using low rate lateral impacts to dummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Craig P; Bieryla, Kathleen; Gabler, Hampton C

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an investigation of low rate loading of the shoulder. The paper first presents a review of the literature on the impact tolerance of the shoulder in high and low rate loading conditions. Currently, there are no injury criteria, nor biofidelic anthropomorphic test dummies for these low rate scenarios. This study investigates dummy loading situations that are known to be non-injurious using both the 5th percentile female and 50th percentile male Hybrid III ATDs. Correlating the non-injurious loading conditions outlined in the literature with ATD tests provides a methodology for relating dummy impact forces as they pertain to human lateral shoulder impact loads. The differences in the human shoulder response and the dummy shoulder response will be resolved through the relationships established with similar loading methods. The ATD tests are compared to a previous testing methodology, resulting in a relationship between non-injurious shoulder loads of the human and the corresponding impact loads of the ATD.

  16. Numerical simulation on influence of jet angle on jets characteristics in flowing ambient fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feng; SUN Zhao-chen; LIANG Shu-xiu

    2008-01-01

    Based on the stress-algebraic model, the turbulent buoyant jet with variable density was studied by the relation between density and concentration. A simple expression for buoyancy coefficient was proposed. The governing equations of turbulent buoyant jet with variable density were closed by introducing the expression of?and the relation between density and concentration. Numerical results for the jet axis with density difference a-gree well with experimental ones. By finite volume method, the 2 - D vertical jet's flow field with different jet angles was studied. The analysis of the relation among the vortex center, the position of separation point and jet angles shows that the circumfluence field is the largest when the jet angle is 90? The area turbulent kinetic en-ergy kA is proposed and the relationship between mixing intensity and jet angles is analyzed based on it. Results show that the jet angle of is the optimum condition for jet water mixing with environment water;and the reduced rate of difference between the centerline density of jet and the density of ambient water is the largest at the jet angle of 90?

  17. Electro-hydrodynamic Stability of Electrified Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmansh, -; Chokshi, Paresh

    2014-11-01

    The axisymmetric stability of the straight jet in electrospinning process is examined for both Newtonian and polymeric fluids using leaky dielectric model. Contrary to previous studies which consider cylindrical jet as the base-state, in the present study the thinning jet profile obtained as steady-state solution of the 1D model is considered as the base-state. The linear stability of the thinning jet is analyzed for axisymmetric disturbances, which are believed to be responsible for the bead formation. The growth rate eigen-specturm is constructed using Chebyshev collocation method. Two different types of axisymmetric instability modes are observed, the Rayleigh mode and the conducting mode. Competition between these two modes is revealed for the thinning jet. The most unstable growth rate for thinning jet is found to be significantly different from that for the uniform jet. The role of various material and process parameters is also investigated. For the viscoelastic fluids, the thinning jet with non-uniform extension rate captures the role of nonlinear rheology of fluid in the stability behavior. The viscoelastic jet profile obtained from steady-state 1D model is analyzed for stability. The role of fluid elasticity on various instability modes is studied. Interestingly, the strain hardening behavior in polymer solution tends to suppress the instability producing smooth fibers. Also, increasing the polymer concentration exhibits stabilizing effect on the axisymmetric instability modes.

  18. Impact of Oil Price Shocks and Exchange Rate Volatility on Stock Market Behavior in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedoyin I. Lawal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of exchange rate and oil prices fluctuation on the stock market has been a subject of hot debate among researchers. This study examined the impact of both the exchange rate volatility and oil price volatility on stock market volatility in Nigeria, so as to guide policy formulation based on the fact that the nation’s economy was foreign induced and mono-cultured with heavy dependence on oil. EGARCH estimation techniques were employed to examine if either the volatility in exchange rate, oil price volatility or both experts on stock market volatility in Nigeria. The result shows that share price volatility is induced by both the exchange rate volatility and oil price volatility. Thus, it is recommended that policymakers should pursue policies that tend to stabilize the exchange rate regime on the one hand, and guarantee the net oil exporting position for the economy, that market practitioners should formulate portfolio strategies in such a way that volatility in both exchange rates and oil price will be factored in time when investment decisions are being made.

  19. Impact of exchange rate depreciation on the balance of payments: Empirical evidence from Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Iyoboyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the impact of exchange rate depreciation on the balance of payments (BOP in Nigeria over the period 1961–2012. The analysis is based on a multivariate vector error correction framework. A long-term equilibrium relationship was found between BOP, exchange rate and other associated variables. The empirical results are in favour of bidirectional causality between BOP and other variables employed. Results of the generalized impulse response functions suggest that one standard deviation innovation on exchange rate reduces positive BOP in the medium and long term, while results of the variance decomposition indicate that a significant variation in Nigeria’s BOP is not due to changes in exchange rate movements. The policy implication is that exchange rate depreciation which has been preponderant in Nigeria since the mid-1980s has not been very useful in promoting the country’s positive BOP. It is recommended that growth in the real sector should be improved to enhance exports, create employment, curb inflation and reduce poverty, while cutting non-productive imports, attracting foreign private investment and implementing well coordinated macroeconomic policies that impact inflation positively and stimulate exchange rate stability.

  20. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  1. The impact of latent heating on the location, strength and structure of the Tropical Easterly Jet in the Community Atmosphere Model, version 3.1: Aqua-planet simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Samrat

    2015-01-01

    The Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) is a prominent atmospheric circulation feature observed during the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM). The simulation of TEJ by the Community Atmosphere Model, version 3.1 (CAM-3.1) has been discussed in detail. Although the simulated TEJ replicates many observed features of the jet, the jet maximum is located too far to the west when compared to observation. Orography has minimal impact on the simulated TEJ hence indicating that latent heating is the crucial parameter. A series of aqua-planet experiments with increasing complexity was undertaken to understand the reasons for the extreme westward shift of the TEJ. The aqua-planet simulations show that a single heat source in the deep tropics is inadequate to explain the structure of the observed TEJ. Equatorial heating is necessary to impart a baroclinic structure and a realistic meridional structure. Jet zonal wind speeds are directly related to the magnitude of deep tropical heating. The location of peak zonal wind is influenced by o...

  2. The impact of assimilating radar-estimated rain rates on simulation of precipitation in the 17-18 July 1996 Chicago floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingbao; Yau, M. K.; Nagarajan, B.; Fillion, Luc

    2010-03-01

    Rainfall prediction remains one of the most challenging problems in weather forecasting. In order to improve high-resolution quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF), a new procedure for assimilating rainfall rate derived from radar composite reflectivity has been proposed and tested in a numerical simulation of the Chicago floods of 17-18 July 1996. The methodology is based on the one-dimensional variation scheme (1DVAR) assimilation approach introduced by Fillion and Errico but applied here using the Kain-Fritsch convective parameterization scheme (KF CPS). The novel feature of this work is the continuous assimilation of radar estimated rain rate over a three hour period, rather than a single assimilation at the initial (analysis) time. Most of the characteristics of this precipitation event, including the propagation, regeneration of mesoscale convective systems, the frontal boundary across the Midwest and the evolution of the low-level jet are better captured in the simulation as the radar-estimated precipitation rate is assimilated. The results indicate that precipitation assimilation during the early stage can improve the simulated mesoscale feature of the convection system and shorten the spin-up time significantly. Comparison of precipitation forecasts between the experiments with and without the 1DVAR indicates that the 1DVAR scheme has a positive impact on the QPF up to 36 hours in terms of the bias and bias equalized threat scores.

  3. Self-citation rate and impact factor in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shimpei

    2017-05-09

    Journal ranking based on the impact factor (IF) can be distorted by self-citation. The aim of this study is to investigate the present status of self-citation in the plastic surgery journals and its effect on the journals' IFs. IF, IF without self-citations (corrected IF), self-cited rate, and self-citing rate for 11 plastic surgery journals were investigated from 2009-2015, by reviewing the Journal Citation Report(®). The correlations of the IF with the self-cited rate and the self-citing rate were statistically assessed. In addition, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was compared with 15 top journals from other surgical specialties in 2015. IF was significantly correlated with the self-cited rate (R: 0.594, p = 0.001) and the self-citing rate (R: 0.824, p journals from other surgical specialties. The IFs of Microsurgery and Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery increased greatly in recent years, but they were inflated by high self-cited and self-citing rates. The self-citation rate positively affects the IF in plastic surgery journals. A high concentration of self-citation of some journals could distort the ranking among plastic surgery journals in general.

  4. The time aspect of bioenergy. Climate impacts of bioenergy due to differences in carbon uptake rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zetterberg, Lars [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Chen, Deliang [Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    This paper investigates the climate impacts from bioenergy due to how they influence carbon stocks over time and more specifically how fast combustion related carbon emissions are compensated by uptake of atmospheric carbon. A set of fuel types representing different uptake rates are investigated, namely willow, branches and tops, stumps and coal. Net emissions are defined as emissions from utilizing the fuel minus emissions from a reference case of no utilisation. In the case of forest residues, the compensating 'uptake' is avoided emissions from the reference case of leaving the residues to decompose on the ground. Climate impacts are estimated using the measures radiative forcing and global average surface temperature, which have been calculated by an energy balance climate model. We conclude that there is a climate impact from using bioenergy due to how fast the emission pulse is compensated by uptake of atmospheric carbon (or avoided emissions). Biofuels with slower uptake rates have a stronger climate impact than fuels with a faster uptake rate, assuming all other parameters equal. The time perspective over which the analysis is done is crucial for the climate impact of biofuels. If only biogenic fluxes are considered, our results show that over a 100 year perspective branches and tops are better for climate mitigation than stumps which in turn are better than coal. Over a 20 year time perspective this conclusion holds, but the differences between these fuels are relatively smaller. Establishing willow on earlier crop land may reduce atmospheric carbon, provided new land is available. However, these results are inconclusive since we haven't considered the effects, if needed, of producing the traditional agricultural crops elsewhere. The analysis is not a life cycle assessment of different fuels and does therefore not consider the use of fossil fuels for logging, transportation and refining, other greenhouse gases than carbon or energy

  5. Eloquence is The Key – the Impact of Monetary Policy Speeches on Exchange Rate Volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Cantemir Călin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last years the monetary policy initiatives of the main central banks have been profoundly influenced by quantitative easing (QE. Blessing, curse, effective instruments or a simple fad, these unconventional measures have occupied the center stage of academic and public attention. In this context, this paper focuses on a wide set of public speeches delivered by officials belonging to the most relevant central banks. These statements cover a large pallet of topics including areas such as QE, tapering, financial stability, unemployment or interest rates. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact that these speeches have on the volatility of exchange rates. For this purpose, the methodology relies on an econometric event study that incorporates three volatility models and intraday five-minute frequencies. The results indicate the fact that public statements have a clear, evident, significant and robust impact on the observed assets.

  6. Methodology for assessing the impacts of alternative rate designs on industrial energy use. Draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-11

    A task was undertaken to develop a method for analyzing industrial user responses to alternative rate designs. The method described considers the fuel switching and conservation responses of industrial users and the impact to a hypothetical utility regarding revenue stability, annual gas demand, and seasonal fluctuations. Twenty-seven hypothetical industrial plant types have been specified. For each combustor in the plant, the fuel consumption by season, initial fuel type, fuel switching costs, conservation costs, and amount of fuel conservable is provided. The decision making takes place at the plant level and is aggregated to determine the impact to the utility. Section 2 discusses the factors affecting an industrial user's response to alternative rate designs. Section 3 describes the methodology, includes an overview of the model and an example industrial user's response to a set of fuel prices. The data describing the 27 hypothetical firms is in an appendix.

  7. The Impact of a Sovereign Default within the Euro Zone on the Exchange Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Arne Breuer; Oliver Sauter

    2012-01-01

    We use quanto credit default swaps to analyse the impact of a credit event in the Eurozone on the Dollar-Euro exchange rate. In light of the European debt crisis, market participants are willing to pay more for protection against a sovereign credit event if it is denominated in US Dollars rather than in Euro, because they expect the Euro to depreciate in the wake of the credit event. We use this CDS price difference to calculate the implied exchange rate conditional on a credit event, i.e., t...

  8. Impact of stretching-segment on saturated flow rate of signalized intersection using cellular automation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 陈宽民; 过秀成

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the impact of stretching-segment on the saturated flow rate of signalized intersection approach, an improved cellular automation model was proposed to estimate its saturated flow rate. The NaSch model was improved by adding different slow probabilities, turning deceleration rules and modified lane changing rules. The relationship between the saturated flow rate of stretching-segments and adjacent lanes was tested in numerical simulation. The length of stretching-segment, cycle length and green time were selected as impact factors of the cellular automation model. The simulation result indicates that the geometrics design of stretching-segment and the traffic signal timing scenario have major effects on the saturated flow rate of the intersection approach. The saturated flow rate will continually increase with increasing stretching-segment length until it reaches a threshold. After reaching the threshold, the stretching-segment can be treated as a separate lane. The green time is approximately linearly related to the threshold length of the stretching-segment. An optimum cycle length exists when the length of the stretching-segment is not long enough, and it is approximately linearly related to the length of stretching-segment.

  9. Bouncing and Merging of Liquid Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Li, Minglei; Law, Chung K.

    2014-11-01

    Collision of two fluid jets is a technique that is utilized in many industrial applications, such as in rocket engines, to achieve controlled mixing, atomization and sometimes liquid phase reactions. Thus, the dynamics of colliding jets have direct impact on the performance, efficiency and reliability of such applications. In analogy with the dynamics of droplet-droplet collision, in this work we have experimentally demonstrated, for n-alkane hydrocarbons as well as water, that with increasing impact inertia obliquely colliding jets also exhibit the same nonmonotonic responses of merging, bouncing, merging again, and merging followed by disintegration; and that the continuous entrainment of the boundary layer air over the jet surface into the colliding interfacial region leads to two distinguishing features of jet collision, namely: there exists a maximum impact angle beyond which merging is always possible, and that merging is inhibited and then promoted with increasing pressure. These distinct response regimes were mapped and explained on the bases of impact inertia, deformation of the jet surface, viscous loss within the jet interior, and the thickness and pressure build-up within the interfacial region in order to activate the attractive surface van der Waals force to effect merging.

  10. Whipping Instabilities in Electrified Liquid Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Loscertales, Ignacio G; Barrero, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A liquid jet may develop different types of instabilities, like the so-called Rayleigh-Plateau instability, which breaks the jet into droplets. However, another type of instabilities may appear when we electrify a liquid jet and induce some charge at his surface. Among them, the most common is the so-called Whipping Instability, which is characterized by violent and fast lashes of the jet. In the submitted fluid dynamic video(see http://hdl.handle.net/1813/11422), we will show an unstable charged glycerine jet in a dielectric liquid bath, which permits an enhanced visualization of the instability. For this reason, it is probably the first time that these phenomena are visualized with enough clarity to analyze features as the effect of the feeding liquid flow rate through the jet or as the surprising spontaneous stabilization at some critical distance to the ground electrode.

  11. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalev, Artem Vladimirovich; Ryabchikov, Sergey Yakovlevich; Isaev, Evgeniy Dmitrievich; Ulyanova, Oksana Sergeevna

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling t...

  12. Characteristics of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of multi air jets within scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Fallah, Keivan; Pourmirzaagha, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, three-dimensional simulation is performed to investigate the effects of micro air jets on mixing performances of cascaded hydrogen jets within a scramjet combustor. In order to compare the efficiency of this technique, constant total fuel rate is injected through one, four, eight and sixteen arrays of portholes in a Mach 4.0 crossflow with a fuel global equivalence ratio of 0.5. In this method, micro air jets are released within fuel portholes to augment the penetration in upward direction. Extensive studies were performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Numerical studies on various air and fuel arrangements are done and the mixing rate and penetration are comprehensively investigated. Also, the flow feature of the fuel and air jets for different configuration is revealed. According to the obtained results, the influence of the micro air jets is significant and the presence of micro air jets increases the mixing rate about 116%, 77%, 56% and 41% for single, 4, 8 and 16 multi fuel jets, respectively. The maximum mixing rate of the hydrogen jet is obtained when the air jets are injected within the sixteen multi fuel jets. According to the circulation analysis of the flow for different air and fuel arrangements, it was found that the effects of air jets on flow structure are varied in various conditions and the presence of the micro jet highly intensifies the circulation in the case of 8 and 16 multi fuel jets.

  13. Effect of Flyer Plate Velocity and Rate of Crater Expansion on Performance of Explosive Reactive Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Yadav

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available "The reduction in the penetration power of the jet due to its interaction with an obliquely moving plate of explosive reactive armour (ERA sandwich has been studied. It has been assumed that the length of the jet, which gets disturbed due to its interaction with the edge of the hole made by the impact of the tip of the jet when the plate was stationary, does not contribute to penetration in the target. The jet length, which comes out of the hole undisturbed, penetrates the target. This length of the jet has been calculated considering the variation in plate velocity and rate of expansion of the crater in the plate with time. The time taken by the jet to shift its position from the centre to the wall of the hole has been determined for different velocities of the sandwich plate and varying expansion rates of the hole produced by the jet in the plate, corresponding to a constant velocity of the jet. This analysis has been used to obtain the length of undisturbed jet coming out of the hole and its penetration in the target. The present study establishes the effect of the plate velocity and rate of crater expansion on the performance of the ERA. It has been found that both these parameters affect the performance of the ERA, and the metal plates of lower density and higher strength make the ERA more effective.

  14. Mandated recycling rates: Impacts on energy consumption and municipal waste volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, L.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-03-01

    In 1992, Congress sought to rewrite its comprehensive solid waste legislation the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging, materials and newsprint. In this paper, we compare the impacts on energy, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at those rates to the impacts associated with alternative methods of disposition to determine, the optimal method for each material. Alternative paths for material disposition include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfilling. The recovery rates considered during RCRA reauthorization are summarized. Combustion was specifically excluded by Congress to meet recovery goals. This exclusion is probably based on the idea that combustion is a form of disposal and therefore wastes resources and has negative environmental effects. Our paper does not make that assumption. A report by Gaines and Stodolsky, from which this paper is derived, offers a more complete discussion of energy and S impacts.

  15. Performance of pile-up mitigation techniques for jets in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Marianna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The large rate of multiple simultaneous proton-proton interactions, or pile-up, generated by the Large Hadron Collider in Run I required the development of many new techniques to mitigate the adverse effects of these conditions. The methods employed to correct for the impact of pile-up on jet energy, shapes and multiplicity with the ATLAS detector are here presented. They include energy correction techniques based on estimates of the average pile-up energy density and jet-to-vertex association techniques. Extensions of these methods to reduce the impact of pile-up on jet shapes use both subtraction and grooming procedures. Prospects for pile-up suppression at the HL-LHC are also shown.

  16. Performance of pile-up mitigation techniques for jets in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, M.

    2016-07-01

    The large rate of multiple simultaneous proton-proton interactions, or pile-up, generated by the Large Hadron Collider in Run 1 required the development of many new techniques to mitigate the adverse effects of these conditions. The methods employed to correct for the impact of pile-up on jet energy, shapes and multiplicity with the ATLAS detector are presented here. They include energy correction techniques based on estimates of the average pile-up energy density and jet-to-vertex association techniques. Extensions of these methods to reduce the impact of pile-up on jet shapes use both subtraction and grooming procedures. Prospects for pile-up suppression at the HL-LHC are also shown.

  17. Performance of pile-up mitigation techniques for jets in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, M., E-mail: marianna.testa@lnf.infn.it

    2016-07-11

    The large rate of multiple simultaneous proton–proton interactions, or pile-up, generated by the Large Hadron Collider in Run 1 required the development of many new techniques to mitigate the adverse effects of these conditions. The methods employed to correct for the impact of pile-up on jet energy, shapes and multiplicity with the ATLAS detector are presented here. They include energy correction techniques based on estimates of the average pile-up energy density and jet-to-vertex association techniques. Extensions of these methods to reduce the impact of pile-up on jet shapes use both subtraction and grooming procedures. Prospects for pile-up suppression at the HL-LHC are also shown.

  18. Measurements of jet-related observables at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkas, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the first years of the LHC operation a large amount of jet data was recorded by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In this review several measurements of jet-related observables are presented, such as multi-jet rates and cross sections, ratios of jet cross sections, jet shapes and event shape observables. All results presented here are based on jet data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Data are compared to various Monte Carlo generators, as well as to theoretical next-to-leading-order calculations allowing a test of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics in a previously unexplored energy region.

  19. ATLAS jet trigger update for the LHC run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, A. T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Lisbon, (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 105. The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intensive reconstruction algorithms. In order to reduce the resources needed for the reconstruction step, a partial detector readout scheme was developed, which effectively suppresses the low activity regions of the calorimeter. In this paper we describe the overall ATLAS trigger software, and the jet trigger in particular, along with the improvements made on the system. We then focus on detailed studies of the algorithm timing and the performance impact of the full and partial calorimeter readout schemes. We conclude with an outlook of the jet trigger plans for the next LHC data-taking period. (authors)

  20. Strain rate dependence of impact properties of sintered 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Lin, Chi-Feng; Liu, Tsung-Ju

    2006-12-01

    This paper uses a material testing system (MTS) and a compressive split-Hopkinson bar to investigate the impact behaviour of sintered 316L stainless steel at strain rates ranging from 10 -3 s -1 to 7.5 × 10 3 s -1. It is found that the true stress, the rate of work hardening and the strain rate sensitivity vary significantly as the strain rate increases. The flow behaviour of the sintered 316L stainless steel can be accurately predicted using a constitutive law based on Gurson's yield criterion and the flow rule proposed by Khan, Huang and Liang (KHL). Microstructural observations reveal that the degree of localized grain deformation increases, but the pore density and the grain size decrease, with increasing strain rate. Adiabatic shear bands associated with cracking are developed at strain rates higher than 5.6 × 10 3 s -1. The fracture surfaces exhibit ductile dimples. The depth and density of these dimples decrease with increasing strain rate.

  1. Strain rate dependence of impact properties of sintered 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: wslee@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Lin, C.-F. [National Center for High-Performance Computing, Hsin-Shi Tainan County 744, Taiwan (China); Liu, T.-J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-15

    This paper uses a material testing system (MTS) and a compressive split-Hopkinson bar to investigate the impact behaviour of sintered 316L stainless steel at strain rates ranging from 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} to 7.5 x 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. It is found that the true stress, the rate of work hardening and the strain rate sensitivity vary significantly as the strain rate increases. The flow behaviour of the sintered 316L stainless steel can be accurately predicted using a constitutive law based on Gurson's yield criterion and the flow rule proposed by Khan, Huang and Liang (KHL). Microstructural observations reveal that the degree of localized grain deformation increases, but the pore density and the grain size decrease, with increasing strain rate. Adiabatic shear bands associated with cracking are developed at strain rates higher than 5.6 x 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The fracture surfaces exhibit ductile dimples. The depth and density of these dimples decrease with increasing strain rate.

  2. Impact of Interactive Aerosol on the African Easterly Jet in the NASA GEOS-5 Global Forecasting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, O.; Lau, K. M.; da Silva, A.

    2010-01-01

    The real-time treatment of interactive realistically varying aerosol in a global operational forecasting system, as opposed to prescribed (fixed or climatologically varying) aerosols, is a very difficult challenge that only recently begins to be addressed. Experiment results from a recent version of the NASA GEOS-5 forecasting system, inclusive of interactive aerosol treatment, are presented in this work. Four sets of 30 5-day forecasts are initialized from a high quality set of analyses previously produced and documented to cover the period from 15 August to 16 September 2006, which corresponds to the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA) observing campaign. The four forecast sets are at two different horizontal resolutions and with and without interactive aerosol treatment. The net impact of aerosol, at times in which there is a strong dust outbreak, is a temperature increase at the dust level and decrease in the near-surface levels, in complete agreement with previous observational and modeling studies. Moreover, forecasts in which interactive aerosols are included depict an African Easterly (AEJ) at slightly higher elevation, and slightly displace northward, with respect to the forecasts in which aerosols are not include. The shift in the AEJ position goes in the direction of observations and agrees with previous results.

  3. Growth rates and ages of deep-sea corals impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Fisher, Charles R.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill on deep-sea coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) is still under investigation, as is the potential for these communities to recover. Impacts from the spill include observation of corals covered with flocculent material, with bare skeleton, excessive mucous production, sloughing tissue, and subsequent colonization of damaged areas by hydrozoans. Information on growth rates and life spans of deep-sea corals is important for understanding the vulnerability of these ecosystems to both natural and anthropogenic perturbations, as well as the likely duration of any observed adverse impacts. We report radiocarbon ages and radial and linear growth rates based on octocorals (Paramuricea spp. and Chrysogorgia sp.) collected in 2010 and 2011 from areas of the DWH impact. The oldest coral radiocarbon ages were measured on specimens collected 11 km to the SW of the oil spill from the Mississippi Canyon (MC) 344 site: 599 and 55 cal yr BP, suggesting continuous life spans of over 600 years for Paramuricea biscaya, the dominant coral species in the region. Calculated radial growth rates, between 0.34 μm yr−1 and 14.20 μm yr−1, are consistent with previously reported proteinaceous corals from the GoM. Anomalously low radiocarbon (Δ14C) values for soft tissue from some corals indicate that these corals were feeding on particulate organic carbon derived from an admixture of modern surface carbon and a low 14C carbon source. Results from this work indicate fossil carbon could contribute 5–10% to the coral soft tissue Δ14C signal within the area of the spill impact. The influence of a low 14C carbon source (e.g., petro-carbon) on the particulate organic carbon pool was observed at all sites within 30 km of the spill site, with the exception of MC118, which may have been outside of the dominant northeast-southwest zone of impact. The quantitatively assessed extreme longevity and slow growth rates documented

  4. Reconnection and Spire Drift in Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    It is observed that there are two morphologically-different kinds of X-ray/EUV jets in coronal holes: standard jets and blowout jets. In both kinds: (1) in the base of the jet there is closed magnetic field that has one foot in flux of polarity opposite that of the ambient open field of the coronal hole, and (2) in coronal X-ray/EUV images of the jet there is typically a bright nodule at the edge of the base. In the conventional scenario for jets of either kind, the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade, the downward product of interchange reconnection of closed field in the base with impacted ambient open field, and the upper product of this reconnection is the jet-outflow spire. It is also observed that in most jets of either kind the spire drifts sideways away from the bright nodule. We present the observed bright nodule and spire drift in an example standard jet and in two example blowout jets. With cartoons of the magnetic field and its reconnection in jets, we point out: (1) if the bright nodule is a compact flare arcade made by interchange reconnection, then the spire should drift toward the bright nodule, and (2) if the bright nodule is instead a compact flare arcade made, as in a filament-eruption flare, by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting sheared-field core of a lobe of the closed field in the base, then the spire, made by the interchange reconnection that is driven on the outside of that lobe by the lobe’s internal convulsion, should drift away from the bright nodule. Therefore, from the observation that the spire usually drifts away from the bright nodule, we infer: (1) in X-ray/EUV jets of either kind in coronal holes the interchange reconnection that generates the jet-outflow spire usually does not make the bright nodule; instead, the bright nodule is made by reconnection inside erupting closed field in the base, as in a filament eruption, the eruption being either a confined eruption for a standard jet or a blowout eruption (as

  5. Low frequency variability of Southern Ocean jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. F.; Richards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Both observations and high resolution numerical models show that the Southern Ocean circumpolar flow is concentrated in a large number (approximately 8 to 12) of narrow filamentary jets. It is shown here that coherent jets exhibit a range of low frequency variability, on time scales of months to years, that can lead to displacement and to intermittent formation and dissipation of jets. Using output from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model in local regions near topographic features, the impact of energy exchange between eddy and mean flow components on jet persistence and variability is examined. A novel approach that uses a time-dependent definition of the mean flow provides a clearer picture of eddy-mean flow interactions in regions with spatially and temporally varying flow structure. The dynamics are largely consistent with those in idealized quasi-geostrophic models, including topographically-organized and surface-enhanced Reynolds stress forcing of the mean flow. Jets form during periods of enhanced eddy activity, but may persist long after the eddy activity has decayed. Similarly, jets may evolve in a downstream sense, with jet formation localized near topography and undergoing modification in response to changing bathymetry. The evolution of both temperature and potential vorticity is used to show that the low-frequency variability of the jets impacts water mass structure and tracer transport. This study highlights various examples of Southern Ocean dynamics that will prove difficult to capture through existing parameterizations in coarser climate models.

  6. The Impact of Government Debt Issuance on Short-Term interest rates in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Adiningsih

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes whether the expansionary fiscal policy funded by issuing debt instruments in financial markets will increase short-term interest rates. If  the expansionary fiscal policy increases interest rates, which decrease private spending especially investment, crowding out occurs. This is interesting because global economic crisis has encouraged many countries to run large budget deficits to stimulate the economy. Indonesia has also run budget deficit during this crisis and even in years before. The impact of such a policy can be significant because Indonesia’s debt market is still narrow and shallow. Therefore, its capability of absorbing the government debt instruments without influencing the private sector funding is limited. This study tests whether the crowding out occurs in Indonesia using a time series econometric model inspired by Cebula and Cuellar’s model. The Cointegration Regression and Error Correction Model (ECM are used in this study. Monthly data from April 2000 to December 2008 are used for overnight real interbank call money interest rates, real net government bond issues in trading, real narrow money supply, real rate of one-month Certificate of Bank Indonesia, growth of Gross Domestic Product, and real net international capital flows. This empirical study shows that the crowding out problem occurred in Indonesia during the period. This indicates that financing budget deficit in Indonesia by issuing debt instruments in the financial markets has a negative impact on the private sector.

  7. Rate Dependent Multicontinuum Progressive Failure Analysis of Woven Fabric Composite Structures under Dynamic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine composite materials typically exhibit significant rate dependent response characteristics when subjected to extreme dynamic loading conditions. In this work, a strain-rate dependent continuum damage model is incorporated with multicontinuum technology (MCT to predict damage and failure progression for composite material structures. MCT treats the constituents of a woven fabric composite as separate but linked continua, thereby allowing a designer to extract constituent stress/strain information in a structural analysis. The MCT algorithm and material damage model are numerically implemented with the explicit finite element code LS-DYNA3D via a user-defined material model (umat. The effects of the strain-rate hardening model are demonstrated through both simple single element analyses for woven fabric composites and also structural level impact simulations of a composite panel subjected to various impact conditions. Progressive damage at the constituent level is monitored throughout the loading. The results qualitatively illustrate the value of rate dependent material models for marine composite materials under extreme dynamic loading conditions.

  8. Heat and mass transfers in the jets; Transferts de chaleur et de masse dans les jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This day on the heat and mass transfers in the jets, was organized by the SFT (French Society of Thermic) to present the state of the art in the domain. Fifteen presentations allowed the participants to discuss about turbulent flows, simulation of fluid flow and jets impacts. (A.L.B.)

  9. Impacts of Two Types of Northward Jumps of the East Asian Upper-tropospheric Jet Stream in Midsummer on Rainfall in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhongda

    2013-01-01

    The East Asian upper-tropospheric jet stream (EAJS) typically jumps north of 45°N in midsummer.These annual northward jumps are mostly classified into two dominant types:the first type corresponds to the enhanced westerly to the north of the EAJS's axis (type A),while the second type is related to the weakened westerly within the EAJS's axis (type B).In this study,the impacts of these two types of northward jumps on rainfall in eastern China are investigated.Our results show that rainfall significantly increases in northern Northeast China and decreases in the Yellow River-Huaihe River valleys,as well as in North China,during the type A jump.As a result of the type B jump,rainfall is enhanced in North China and suppressed in the Yangtze River valley.The changes in rainfall in eastern China during these two types of northward jumps are mainly caused by the northward shifts of the ascending air flow that is directly related to the EAJS.Concurrent with the type A (B) jump,the EAJS-related ascending branch moves from the Yangtze-Huai River valley to northern Northeast (North) China when the EAJS's axis jumps from 40°N to 55°N (50°N).Meanwhile,the type A jump also strengthens the Northeast Asian low in the lower troposphere,leading to more moisture transport to northern Northeast China.The type B jump,however,induces a northwestward extension of the lower-tropospheric western North Pacific subtropical high and more moisture transport to North China.

  10. Performance of pile-up mitigation techniques for jets in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Piqueras, D. Álvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Dos Santos, S. P. Amor; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bylund, O. Bessidskaia; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Madden, W. D. Breaden; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.

    2016-11-01

    The large rate of multiple simultaneous proton-proton interactions, or pile-up, generated by the Large Hadron Collider in Run 1 required the development of many new techniques to mitigate the adverse effects of these conditions. This paper describes the methods employed in the ATLAS experiment to correct for the impact of pile-up on jet energy and jet shapes, and for the presence of spurious additional jets, with a primary focus on the large 20.3 fb^{-1} data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s} = 8 TeV. The energy correction techniques that incorporate sophisticated estimates of the average pile-up energy density and tracking information are presented. Jet-to-vertex association techniques are discussed and projections of performance for the future are considered. Lastly, the extension of these techniques to mitigate the effect of pile-up on jet shapes using subtraction and grooming procedures is presented.

  11. Performance of pile-up mitigation techniques for jets in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    The large rate of multiple simultaneous proton--proton interactions, or pile-up, generated by the Large Hadron Collider in Run 1 required the development of many new techniques to mitigate the adverse effects of these conditions. This paper describes the methods employed in the ATLAS experiment to correct for the impact of pile-up on jet energy and jet shapes, and for the presence of spurious additional jets, with a primary focus on the large 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. The energy correction techniques that incorporate sophisticated estimates of the average pile-up energy density and tracking information are presented. Jet-to-vertex association techniques are discussed and projections of performance for the future are considered. Lastly, the extension of these techniques to mitigate the effect of pile-up on jet shapes using subtraction and grooming procedures is presented.

  12. The Impact of Reviews and Average Rating on Hotel-Booking-Intention: A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Line Thomassen; Jensen, Charlotte Thodberg; Jessen, Anne Mette Karnøe

    2016-01-01

    User-generated information types (ratings and reviews) are highly used when booking hotel rooms on Online Travel Agency (OTA) websites. The impact of user-generated information on decision-making is often investigated through quantitative research, thereby not examining in depth how and why...... travelers use this information. This paper therefore presents a qualitative study conducted to achieve a deeper understanding. We investigated the use of reviews and average rating in a hotel-booking-context through a laboratory experiment, which involved a task of examining a hotel on a pre-designed OTA...... website followed by an interview. We processed the data from the interview, and the analysis resulted in a model generalizing the use of reviews and average rating in the deliberation phase of a hotel-booking. The findings are overall consistent with related research. Yet, beyond this, the qualitative...

  13. The impact of a supermarket nutrition rating system on purchases of nutritious and less nutritious foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Sweeney, Matthew J; Sobal, Jeffery; Just, David R; Kaiser, Harry M; Schulze, William D; Wethington, Elaine; Wansink, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The current study examines the impact of a nutrition rating system on consumers' food purchases in supermarkets. Aggregate sales data for 102 categories of food (over 60 000 brands) on a weekly basis for 2005-2007 from a supermarket chain of over 150 stores are analysed. Change in weekly sales of nutritious and less nutritious foods, after the introduction of a nutrition rating system on store shelves, is calculated, controlling for seasonality and time trends in sales. One hundred and sixty-eight supermarket stores in the north-east USA, from January 2005 to December 2007. Consumers purchasing goods at the supermarket chain during the study period. After the introduction of the nutrition ratings, overall weekly food sales declined by an average of 3637 units per category (95 % CI -5961, -1313; Psystems, researchers should focus on the entire market basket, not just sales of nutritious foods.

  14. LS-DYNA Implementation of Polymer Matrix Composite Model Under High Strain Rate Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-Hua; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model is implemented into LS-DYNA as a user defined material model (UMAT) to characterize the nonlinear strain rate dependent behavior of polymers. By utilizing this model within a micromechanics technique based on a laminate analogy, an algorithm to analyze the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of a fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite is then developed as a UMAT to simulate the response of these composites under high strain rate impact. The models are designed for shell elements in order to ensure computational efficiency. Experimental and numerical stress-strain curves are compared for two representative polymers and a representative polymer matrix composite, with the analytical model predicting the experimental response reasonably well.

  15. Impact of different discharge patterns on bed occupancy rate and bed waiting time: a simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhecheng

    2011-01-01

    Beds are one of the most important resources in a healthcare system. How to manage beds efficiently is an important indicator of the efficiency of the healthcare system. Bed management is challenging to many healthcare service providers in many aspects. In recent years, population growth and aging society impose extra pressure on bed requirement. There are usually two key performance indicators of a bed management system: bed occupancy rate and bed waiting time. In this paper, different discharge patterns and their impacts on the bed occupancy rate and bed waiting time are studied. A discrete event simulation model is constructed to evaluate the existing discharge pattern in a Singapore regional hospital using actual hospital admission and discharge transaction data. Then different discharge patterns are tested in the same context. Simulation results show that a proper discharge pattern significantly smoothes the fluctuation of bed occupancy rate and reduce the bed waiting time.

  16. Impinging Jet Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, Ray-tracing data visualization technique was used to obtain realistic and detailed flow motions during impinging of two liquid jets. Different patterns of sheet and rim configurations were presented to shed light into the underlying physics, including liquid chain, closed rim, open rim, unstable rim and flapping sheet. In addition, stationary asymmetrical waves were observed and compared with existing theories. The generation of stationary capillary wave in respect to the liquid rim were explained by the classic shallow water wave theory. The atomization process caused by development of the impact waves were observed in detail, including fragmentation of liquid sheet, formation of liquid ligaments, and breakup of ligament into droplet. The locking-on feature of the wavelength of impact wave were also found to be similar to that of perturbed free shear layers.

  17. The Giant Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  18. Impact of dose rate on clinical course in uveal melanoma after brachytherapy with ruthenium-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossboeck, G.; Rauscher, T.; Langmann, G. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Opthalmology; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: It has been suggested that the actual dose rate of an irradiating source may be a distinct influencing factor for the biological effect after brachytherapy with ruthenium-106 for uveal melanoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate a hypothesized impact of the dose rate on the clinical and echographic course after brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: In total, 45 patients were included in this retrospective study. According to the actual dose rate, two groups were defined: group 1 with a dose rate < 4 Gy/h and group 2 with a dose rate {>=} 4 Gy/h. Regarding age, tumor height, basal diameter, scleral and apical dose, differences between the groups were not significant. Clinical parameters, including early and late side effects, and echographic courses were compared. Results: A significantly lower metastatic rate was found in group 2. Using univariate Cox proportional hazards regression, only dose rate predicted metastatic spread significantly (p < 0.05), while in a multivariate analysis, using age at the time of treatment, greatest tumor height and greatest basal diameter as covariates, the variable dose rate was of borderline significance (p = 0.077). Patients in group 2 had more early side effects and more pronounced visual decline, but these differences were of borderline significance with p-values of 0.072 and 0.064, respectively. Conclusion: These data suggest that a higher dose rate may confer a lower risk for metastatic spread, but may be associated with more side effects and more pronounced visual decline. (orig.)

  19. Impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy on the postoperative complication rate in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruschewski M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT on the postoperative complication rate is discussed controversially. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the postoperative complication rate in our patient population. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to examine all patients documented online who had undergone conventionally fractionated adjuvant or neoadjuvant CRT from 2001 to 2009 in conjunction with curative resection (R0 for sporadic primary colorectal cancer in the middle or lower third. A total of 246 patients were included and analyzed. Two groups were formed: Group I, 2001-2004, adjuvant CRT, n=108, and Group II, 2005-2009, neoadjuvant CRT, n=138. Results: The two groups had comparable patient-, tumor- and therapy-related characteristics. No difference was found in the anastomotic leak rate (Group I vs. II: 10% vs. 11%. The rate of perineal wound healing problems differed significantly (Group I vs. II: 5% vs. 36%, p=0.016. While no patient died in Group I, lethality amounted to 1.5% (2/138 in Group II. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant CRT does not lead to a higher anastomotic leak rate or lethality in comparison to patients who were primarily operated and received adjuvant CRT in the further course. The rate of perineal wound healing problems is significantly increased.

  20. Measurement of peak impact loads differ between accelerometers - Effects of system operating range and sampling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Christina; Giangregorio, Lora M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Levine, Iris C; Tung, James; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-06-14

    A wide variety of accelerometer systems, with differing sensor characteristics, are used to detect impact loading during physical activities. The study examined the effects of system characteristics on measured peak impact loading during a variety of activities by comparing outputs from three separate accelerometer systems, and by assessing the influence of simulated reductions in operating range and sampling rate. Twelve healthy young adults performed seven tasks (vertical jump, box drop, heel drop, and bilateral single leg and lateral jumps) while simultaneously wearing three tri-axial accelerometers including a criterion standard laboratory-grade unit (Endevco 7267A) and two systems primarily used for activity-monitoring (ActiGraph GT3X+, GCDC X6-2mini). Peak acceleration (gmax) was compared across accelerometers, and errors resulting from down-sampling (from 640 to 100Hz) and range-limiting (to ±6g) the criterion standard output were characterized. The Actigraph activity-monitoring accelerometer underestimated gmax by an average of 30.2%; underestimation by the X6-2mini was not significant. Underestimation error was greater for tasks with greater impact magnitudes. gmax was underestimated when the criterion standard signal was down-sampled (by an average of 11%), range limited (by 11%), and by combined down-sampling and range-limiting (by 18%). These effects explained 89% of the variance in gmax error for the Actigraph system. This study illustrates that both the type and intensity of activity should be considered when selecting an accelerometer for characterizing impact events. In addition, caution may be warranted when comparing impact magnitudes from studies that use different accelerometers, and when comparing accelerometer outputs to osteogenic impact thresholds proposed in literature. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berteau C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cecile Berteau,1 Orchidée Filipe-Santos,1 Tao Wang,2 Humberto E Rojas,2 Corinne Granger,1 Florence Schwarzenbach1 1Becton-Dickinson Medical Pharmaceutical Systems, Le Pont de Claix, France; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Aim: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC injection pain tolerance. Methods: The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s. All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain. The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results: Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003. Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm than medium (VAS =16.6 mm or low (VAS =22.1 mm viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002. Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89. Slow (0.02 mL/s or fast (0.30 mL/s injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79. In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High

  2. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Cecile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Wang, Tao; Rojas, Humberto E; Granger, Corinne; Schwarzenbach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC) injection pain tolerance. The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8-10, and 15-20 cP) combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s). All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain). The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003). Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm) than medium (VAS =16.6 mm) or low (VAS =22.1 mm) viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002). Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89). Slow (0.02 mL/s) or fast (0.30 mL/s) injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79). In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15-20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High viscosity injections were shown to be the most tolerated, whereas injection volume and flow rates did not impact perceived pain.

  3. Investigation the Impact of Exchange Rate Volatility on the Export of Agricultural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamalipour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Agricultural commodity export is a main attribute of developing countries and it is the basic force of development, however, developing countries have faced domestic and international instability in their markets and monetary and fiscal policies and these instabilities create a difficult condition for most of producers and exporters. Volatility in exchange market is one of the most important factor and vital concentrate for international trade especially agricultural commodity export. Because of this concern many studies have been conducted in this filed; (Aristotelous, 2001; Chen, 2009 and Sabuhoi and Piri, 2009 .Many of these studies has stated that exchange rate fluctuation has a negative impact on aggregated agricultural export; however, none of them has been focused on the effects of exchange rate fluctuation on exported value of important commodities in long run and short run. In recent years, exchange rate fluctuation has been raised about 6 percent since 2007 to 2010 and it seemed that this phenomenon has a negative impact on agricultural commodity export in Iran. To test this hypothesis exported value of three important commodity (date, orange and grape and exchange rate volatility since 1970 to 2013 have been used. Material and Methods: In order to examine the relation between real exchange rate volatility and export values of date, orange and grapes, first GARCH method has been used to draw out exchange rate volatility; then, Panel unite root test has been used to check the level of integration. Since real exchange rate is not heterogeneous for different cross sections Levi-Lin and Chow unit root test has been used for this variable and IPS test has been applied to export value. Pederoni co-integration test has been used to check the integration between these variables. Finally, FMOLS (Fully Modified Ordinary Least Square and DOLS (Dynamic Ordinary Least Square methods have been used to estimate long run and short run

  4. Jet vetoes versus giant K factors in the exclusive Z +1 -jet cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughezal, Radja; Focke, Christfried; Liu, Xiaohui

    2015-11-01

    We perform a detailed study of the exclusive Z +1 -jet cross section at the 13 TeV LHC, motivated by the importance of similar exclusive cross sections in understanding the production of the Higgs boson in the W+W- final state. We point out a feature of the ATLAS analysis that has significant impact on the theoretical predictions: the jet isolation criterion implemented by ATLAS effectively allows dijet events where an energetic jet is collinear to a final-state lepton. This process contains a giant K factor arising from the collinear emission of a Z boson from the dijet configuration. This overwhelms the effect of the jet-veto logarithms, making it difficult to test their resummation in this process. We provide numerical results that demonstrate the interplay between the jet-veto logarithms and the giant K factor in the theoretical prediction. We study several observables, including the transverse momentum distributions of the leading jet and the Z boson, in the exclusive Z +1 -jet process, and discuss their sensitivity to both the giant K factor and the jet-veto logarithms. We suggest a modified isolation criterion that removes the giant K factor and allows for a direct test of the jet-veto resummation framework in the exclusive Z +1 -jet process.

  5. Twin Jet Effects on Noise of Round and Rectangular Jets: Experiment and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic aircraft concepts proposed by NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program have asymmetric, integrated propulsion systems. The asymmetries in the exhaust of these propulsion systems create an asymmetric acoustic field. The asymmetries investigated in the current study are from twin jets and rectangular nozzles. Each effect produces its own variation of the acoustic field. An empirical model was developed to predict the acoustic field variation from round twin jets with twin jet spacing from 2.6 to 5.6, where s is the center-to-center spacing over the jet diameter. The model includes parameters to account for the effects of twin jet spacing, jet static temperature ratio, flight Mach number, frequency, and observer angle (both polar and azimuthal angles). The model was then applied to twin 2:1 and 8:1 aspect ratio nozzles to determine the impact of jet aspect ratio. For the round and rectangular jets, the use of the model reduces the average magnitude of the error over all frequencies, observation angles, and jet spacings by approximately 0.5dB when compared against the assumption of adding two jets incoherently.

  6. Investigation of the impact of electricity rate and mix on optimum green building design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Zmeureanu, R. [Concordia Univ., Centre for Building Studies, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Rivard, H. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Construction Engineering

    2004-07-01

    The basic principle of the green building philosophy is to design buildings that consider environmental performance. Residential and commercial buildings in Canada consume about 30 per cent of the total secondary energy use and are responsible for approximately 29 per cent of carbon dioxide equivalent greenhouse gas emissions and many other wastes. An optimization model was developed which minimizes life cycle cost and life cycle environmental impact. The model distinguishes different energy sources and incorporates their impacts, such as resource depletion, global warming and acidification. The model also considers design variables such as window type, orientation, building orientation, window-to-wall ratio, wall type and roof type. The model can be used to identify optimum green building designs for given conditions. The model uses expanded cumulative exergy consumption as the indicator for life cycle environmental performance. As such, it can be simplified by incorporating impact categories into one objective function. The model was applied to 3 electricity scenarios for buildings in Montreal. The study showed that electricity rates and mix have a significant impact on the trade-off association between economical and environmental performance. 20 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  7. Impact of mixtures of different fresh-cut fruits on respiration and ethylene production rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Pramod V; Luca, Alexandru; Edelenbos, Merete

    2014-07-01

    Packaging and storage of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables are a challenging task, since fresh produce continue to respire and senesce after harvest and processing accelerates the physiological processes. The response on respiration and ethylene production rates of fresh produce to changes in O2 and CO2 concentrations and temperature has been extensively studied for whole fruits but literature is limited on processed and mixed fresh-cut fruits. This study aimed to investigate the effects of mixing various proportions of fresh-cut fruits (melon chunks, apple slices, and pineapples cubes) on respiration and ethylene production rates and to develop predictive models for modified atmosphere packaging. The experiment was designed according to a simplex lattice method and respiration and ethylene production rates were measured at 10 °C. Results showed that single component pineapple cubes, apple slices, and melon chunks, in this order, had significant constant coefficients (P = 0.05) and the greatest impact on respiration rate while the interactive binary and tertiary coefficients were insignificant. For ethylene production rates, single component apple slices, melon chunks, and pineapple cubes, and their 3-component mixtures, in this order, had significant constant coefficients (P = 0.05) while binary coefficients were insignificant. Mathematical models were developed and validated; the cubical model was the best to describe the influence of proportion of fruit on respiration and ethylene production rates, however, considering simplicity the linear part of the model is recommended to quantify respiration and ethylene production rates of mixed fresh-cut fruits. This research helps to quantify the ethylene production and respiration rates of multicomponent mixed fresh-cut fruit, which then can be used for packaging design of fresh-cut produce. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Impact of updraft on neutralized charge rate by lightning in thunderstorms: A simulation case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yijun; Zheng, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The rate of neutralized charge by lightning (RNCL) is an important parameter indicating the intensity of lightning activity. The total charging rate (CR), the CR of one kind of polarity (e.g., negative) charge (CROP), and the outflow rate of charge on precipitation (ORCP) are proposed as key factors impacting RNCL, based on the principle of conservation of one kind of polarity charge in a thunderstorm. In this paper, the impacts of updraft on CR and CROP are analyzed by using a 3D cloud resolution model for a strong storm that occurred in Beijing on 6 september 2008. The results show that updraft both promotes and inhibits RNCL at the same time. (1) Updraft always has a positive influence on CR. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CR can reach 0.96. Strengthening of the updraft facilitates strengthening of RNCL through this positive influence. (2) Strengthening of the updraft also promotes reinforcement of CROP. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CROP is high (about 0.9), but this promotion restrains the strengthening of RNCL because the strengthening of CROP will, most of the time, inhibit the increasing of RNCL. (3) Additionally, increasing of ORCP depresses the strengthening of RNCL. In terms of magnitude, the peak of ORCP is equal to the peak of CR. Because precipitation mainly appears after the lightning activity finishes, the depression effect of ORCP on RNCL can be ignored during the active lightning period.

  9. The impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates: global data review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Maki; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Ferronato, Angela Esposito; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates in countries that implemented universal vaccination against the disease. Data source: We identified countries that implemented universal vaccination against varicella at the http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/schedules site of the World Health Organization and selected articles in Pubmed describing the changes (pre/post-vaccination) in the varicella-related hospitalization rates in these countries, using the Keywords "varicella", "vaccination/vaccine" and "children" (or) "hospitalization". Publications in English published between January 1995 and May 2015 were included. Data synthesis: 24 countries with universal vaccination against varicella and 28 articles describing the impact of the vaccine on varicella-associated hospitalizations rates in seven countries were identified. The US had 81.4%–99.2% reduction in hospitalization rates in children younger than four years, 6–14 years after the onset of universal vaccination (1995), with vaccination coverage of 90%; Uruguay: 94% decrease (children aged 1–4 years) in six years, vaccination coverage of 90%; Canada: 93% decrease (age 1–4 years) in 10 years, coverage of 93%; Germany: 62.4% decrease (age 1–4 years) in 8 years, coverage of 78.2%; Australia: 76.8% decrease (age 1–4 years) in 5 years, coverage of 90%; Spain: 83.5% decrease (age <5 years) in four years, coverage of 77.2% and Italy 69.7%–73.8% decrease (general population), coverage of 60%–95%. Conclusions: The publications showed variations in the percentage of decrease in varicella-related hospitalization rates after universal vaccination in the assessed countries; the results probably depend on the time since the implementation of universal vaccination, differences in the studied age group, hospital admission criteria, vaccination coverage and strategy, which does not allow direct comparison between data. PMID

  10. The impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates: global data review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Hirose

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates in countries that implemented universal vaccination against the disease. Data source: We identified countries that implemented universal vaccination against varicella at the http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/schedules site of the World Health Organization and selected articles in Pubmed describing the changes (pre/post-vaccination in the varicella-related hospitalization rates in these countries, using the Keywords "varicella", "vaccination/vaccine" and "children" (or "hospitalization". Publications in English published between January 1995 and May 2015 were included. Data synthesis: 24 countries with universal vaccination against varicella and 28 articles describing the impact of the vaccine on varicella-associated hospitalizations rates in seven countries were identified. The US had 81.4%–99.2% reduction in hospitalization rates in children younger than four years, 6–14 years after the onset of universal vaccination (1995, with vaccination coverage of 90%; Uruguay: 94% decrease (children aged 1–4 years in six years, vaccination coverage of 90%; Canada: 93% decrease (age 1–4 years in 10 years, coverage of 93%; Germany: 62.4% decrease (age 1–4 years in 8 years, coverage of 78.2%; Australia: 76.8% decrease (age 1–4 years in 5 years, coverage of 90%; Spain: 83.5% decrease (age <5 years in four years, coverage of 77.2% and Italy 69.7%–73.8% decrease (general population, coverage of 60%–95%. Conclusions: The publications showed variations in the percentage of decrease in varicella-related hospitalization rates after universal vaccination in the assessed countries; the results probably depend on the time since the implementation of universal vaccination, differences in the studied age group, hospital admission criteria, vaccination coverage and strategy, which does not allow direct comparison between

  11. Impact of fine debris on ice melt rates at Russell Glacier, central-west Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Rachel; Linighan, James; Cumming, Alex M. J.

    2017-04-01

    Losses from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) have increased sharply in recent years, due to accelerated glacier discharge and increased surface melting. In 2012, 99% of the Greenland ice sheet experienced melt, which was exceptional on centennial timescales, but is expected to occur frequently in the future, as climate warms. Ice albedo is a primary control on melt rates and remotely sensed data shows that the GrIS has darkened substantial in recent decades, due to both inorganic and biological material. This has been particularly marked in south- and central-west Greenland and can lead to the development of positive feedbacks. Consequently, it is important to understand the relationship between melt and surface albedo on the GrIS. Here we use a combination of satellite remote sensing and field data to assess the impact of fine debris on melt rates at Russell Glacier, central-west Greenland. Our field data demonstrate that areas with a greater percentage coverage of fine, largely inorganic debris experienced higher melt rates than in areas with a sparse coverage. However, the relationship between melt and debris cover was highly spatially variable. Furthermore, the debris cover evolved substantially over time and we saw marked changes over a period of a few days. Using ASTER imagery, we show that the spatial extent of debris has expanded markedly in this section of the GrIS during the last decade, which could substantially accelerate melting. However, the complex and variable relationship between debris cover and melt rates highlights the need for further research, in order to accurately forecast its impact on GrIS melt rates.

  12. The impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates: global data review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Maki; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Ferronato, Angela Esposito; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta

    2016-09-01

    to describe the impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates in countries that implemented universal vaccination against the disease. we identified countries that implemented universal vaccination against varicella at the http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/schedules site of the World Health Organization and selected articles in Pubmed describing the changes (pre/post-vaccination) in the varicella-related hospitalization rates in these countries, using the Keywords "varicella", "vaccination/vaccine" and "children" (or) "hospitalization". Publications in English published between January 1995 and May 2015 were included. 24 countries with universal vaccination against varicella and 28 articles describing the impact of the vaccine on varicella-associated hospitalizations rates in seven countries were identified. The US had 81.4% -99.2% reduction in hospitalization rates in children younger than four years after 6-14 years after the onset of universal vaccination (1995), with vaccination coverage of 90%; Uruguay: 94% decrease (children aged 1-4 years) in six years, vaccination coverage of 90%; Canada: 93% decrease (age 1-4 years) in 10 years, coverage of 93%; Germany: 62.4% decrease (age 1-4 years) in 8 years, coverage of 78.2%; Australia: 76.8% decrease (age 1-4 years) in 5 years, coverage of 90%; Spain: 83.5% decrease (age <5 years) in four years, coverage of 77.2% and Italy 69.7% -73.8% decrease (general population), coverage of 60%-95%. The publications showed variations in the percentage of decrease in varicella-related hospitalization rates after universal vaccination in the assessed countries; the results probably depend on the time since the implementation of universal vaccination, differences in the studied age group, hospital admission criteria, vaccination coverage and strategy, which does not allow direct comparison between data. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por

  13. Comparison of animated jet stream visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocke, Thomas; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The visualization of 3D atmospheric phenomena in space and time is still a challenging problem. In particular, multiple solutions of animated jet stream visualizations have been produced in recent years, which were designed to visually analyze and communicate the jet and related impacts on weather circulation patterns and extreme weather events. This PICO integrates popular and new jet animation solutions and inter-compares them. The applied techniques (e.g. stream lines or line integral convolution) and parametrizations (color mapping, line lengths) are discussed with respect to visualization quality criteria and their suitability for certain visualization tasks (e.g. jet patterns and jet anomaly analysis, communicating its relevance for climate change).

  14. Cometary impact rates on the Moon and planets during the late heavy bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Wiśniowski, T.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The Nice model predicts that the trans-planetary planetesimal disk made a large or even dominant contribution to the cratering in the inner solar system during the late heavy bombardment (LHB). In the presence of evidence that lunar craters and mare basins may be mainly of asteroidal origin, there is a dilemma of the missing comets that is not yet resolved. Aims: We aim to revisit the problem of cometary impact rates on the Moon and the terrestrial planets during the LHB with a flexible model, allowing us to study the influences of physical destruction of comets, the mass of the primordial disk, and the distribution of this mass over the entire size range. Methods: We performed a Monte Carlo study of the dynamics of the cometary LHB projectiles and derive the impact rates by calculating individual collision probabilities for a huge sample of projectile orbits. We used Minimum Orbit Intersection Distances (MOIDs) according to a new scheme introduced here. Different calculations were performed using different models for the physical evolution of comet nuclei and for the properties of the primordial, trans-planetary disk. Results: Based on the capture probability of Jupiter Trojans, we find a best fit radius of the largest LHB comet impacting the Moon for a low-mass primordial disk. For this disk mass, the LHB cratering of the Moon, Mercury and Mars were dominated by asteroids. However, some smaller lunar maria were likely preceded by comet impacts. The volatile delivery to the Earth and Mars by LHB comets was much less than their water inventories. Conclusions: There is no excessive cometary cratering, if the LHB was caused by a late planetary instability in the Nice Model. The Earth and Mars obtained their water very early in their histories. The Noachian water flows on Mars cannot be attributed to the arrival of LHB-related H2O or CO2.

  15. Microstructure and nanohardness distribution in a polycrystalline Zn deformed by high strain rate impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirras, G., E-mail: dirras@univ-paris13.fr [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France); Ouarem, A. [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France); Couque, H. [Nexter-Munitions, 7 route de Guerry, 18023 Bourges Cedex (France); Gubicza, J.; Szommer, P. [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest, P.O.B. 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Brinza, O. [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France)

    2011-05-15

    Polycrystalline Zn with an average grain size of about 300 {mu}m was deformed by direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar at a velocity of 29 m/s. An inhomogeneous grain structure was found consisting of a center region having large average grain size of 20 {mu}m surrounded by a fine-grained rim with an average grain size of 6 {mu}m. Transmission electron microscopy investigations showed a significant dislocation density in the large-grained area while in the fine-grained rim the dislocation density was negligible. Most probably, the higher strain yielded recrystallization in the outer ring while in the center only recovery occurred. The hardening effect of dislocations overwhelms the smaller grain size strengthening in the center part resulting in higher nanohardness in this region than in the outer ring. - Graphical Abstract: (a): EBSD micrograph showing the initial microstructure of polycrystalline Zn that was subsequently submitted to high strain rate impact. (b): an inhomogeneous grain size refinement was obtained which consists of a central coarse-grained area, surrounded by a fine-grained recrystallized rim. The black arrow points to the disc center. Research Highlights: {yields} A polycrystalline Zn specimen was submitted to high strain rate impact loading. {yields} Inhomogeneous grain refinement occurred due to strain gradient in impacted sample. {yields} A fine-grained recrystallized rim surrounded the coarse-grained center of specimen. {yields} The coarse-grained center exhibited higher hardness than the fine-grained rim. {yields} The higher hardness of the center was caused by the higher dislocation density.

  16. Recombination and Electron Impact Excitation Rate Coefficients for S XV and S XVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, S.; Ali, S.; Orban, I.; Tashenov, S.; Lindroth, E.; Schuch, R.

    2012-08-01

    Recombination and electron impact excitation of S14+ and S15+ ions was measured at the Stockholm refrigerated electron beam ion trap. The collision energy range was 1.4-3 keV, in which we covered the KLL, KLM, KLN, and KLO dielectronic recombination resonances resulting in S13+ and S14+ ions. The recombination rates were obtained by detecting the charge state distribution with a newly developed time-of-flight technique. Resonance energies and cross-sections calculated within the relativistic many-body perturbation theory for S15+ agree well with the experimental data. The temperature-dependent rate coefficients were extracted from the measured rates and compared with calculations from the literature used for studies of collisionally ionized astrophysical plasmas. Good agreement for S15+ was obtained, while the plasma rates for S14+ were 23% lower than the current published values. In addition to the time-of-flight spectra, the X-ray spectra, produced mainly by photo-recombination and excitation, were also collected. The combination of these two measurements allowed us to separate the photo-recombination and the excitation spectra, and the excitation rate coefficients for summed intensities with known fractions of S14+ and S15+ ions were extracted.

  17. The impact of a text messaging service on orthopaedic clinic Did Not Attend rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Lebur; Maruswezki, Daniel; Boyce Cam, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Missed clinic appointments cause delays in treatment of other patients, under utilization of clinical manpower or facilities and impact upon hospital finances. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate whether a text messaging reminder service reduces the Did Not Attend rate. The secondary aim is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a mobile text message reminder service. The study focused on the outpatient department of a district general hospital. In January 2011 a patient text messaging reminder service was implemented across the outpatient departments in the trust. Data were collected prospectively 24 months prior and 24 months following the implementation of this service. A reminder was sent to patients one week prior to the scheduled appointment as a text message. All patients attending the orthopaedic department were included in the study. Patients who had an appointment and cancelled/rescheduled it prior to their original consultation date were excluded. Children were also excluded from the study. The overall Did Not Attend rate was reduced by 12% following the intervention (p < 0.0001). The new appointment follow-up rate was reduced by 2% (p = 0.74) and the follow-up rate decreased by 13.7% (p < 0.0001). The economic analysis revealed a saving of £19,853 over a two-year period following the intervention. Thus mobile technology is a feasible tool in improving attendance rates at outpatient clinics and is economically viable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Primordial star formation: relative impact of H2 three-body rates and initial conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, S; Grassi, T

    2013-01-01

    Population III stars are the first stars in the Universe to form at z=20-30 out of a pure hydrogen and helium gas in minihalos of 10^5-10^6 M$_\\odot$ . Cooling and fragmentation is thus regulated via molecular hydrogen. At densities above 10^8 cm$^{-3}$, the three-body H2 formation rates are particularly important for making the gas fully molecular. These rates were considered to be uncertain by at least a few orders of magnitude. We explore the impact of new accurate three-body H2 formation rates derived by Forrey (2013) for three different minihalos, and compare to the results obtained with three-body rates employed in previous studies. The calculations are performed with the cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO (release 2.2) coupled with the chemistry package KROME (including a network for primordial chemistry), which was previously shown to be accurate in high resolution simulations. While the new rates can shift the point where the gas becomes fully molecular, leading to a different thermal evolution, th...

  19. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-07-03

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV

  20. The impact of cooling rates on the microstructure of Al-U alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munitz, A.; Zenou, V.Y.; Cotler, C. [Nuclear Research Center-Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Talyanker, M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1997-04-01

    The impact of cooling rates on the microstructure of Al-U alloys was studied by optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. A variety of solidification techniques were employed to obtain cooling rates ranging between 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} and 10{sup 6} K/s. High-purity uranium (99.9 pct) and high-purity aluminum (99.99 pct), or commercially pure type Al-1050 aluminum alloys were used to prepare Al-U alloys with U concentration ranging between 3 and 22 wt pct. The U concentration at which a coupled eutectic growth was observed depends on the cooling rates imposed during solidification and ranged from 13.8 wt pct for the slower cooling rates to more than 22 wt pct for the fastest cooling rates. The eutectic morphology and its distribution depends on the type of aluminum used in preparing the alloys and on the cooling rates during solidification. The eutectic in alloys prepared from pure aluminum was evenly distributed, while for those prepared from Al-1050, the eutectic was unevenly distributed, with eutectic colonies of up to 3 mm in diameter. Two lamellar eutectic structures were observed in alloys prepared from pure aluminum containing more than 18 wt pct U, which solidified by cooling rates of about 10 K/s. One structure consisted of the stable eutectic between UAl{sub 4} and Al lamella. The other structure consisted of a metastable eutectic between UAl{sub 3} and Al lamella. At least three different eutectic morphologies were observed in alloys prepared from Al-1050.

  1. Testing the impact of local alcohol licencing policies on reported crime rates in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vocht, F; Heron, J; Campbell, R; Egan, M; Mooney, J D; Angus, C; Brennan, A; Hickman, M

    2017-01-01

    Background Excessive alcohol use contributes to public nuisance, antisocial behaviour, and domestic, interpersonal and sexual violence. We test whether licencing policies aimed at restricting its spatial and/or temporal availability, including cumulative impact zones, are associated with reductions in alcohol-related crime. Methods Reported crimes at English lower tier local authority (LTLA) level were used to calculate the rates of reported crimes including alcohol-attributable rates of sexual offences and violence against a person, and public order offences. Financial fraud was included as a control crime not directly associated with alcohol abuse. Each area was classified as to its cumulative licensing policy intensity for 2009–2015 and categorised as ‘passive’, low, medium or high. Crime rates adjusted for area deprivation, outlet density, alcohol-related hospital admissions and population size at baseline were analysed using hierarchical (log-rate) growth modelling. Results 284 of 326 LTLAs could be linked and had complete data. From 2009 to 2013 alcohol-related violent and sexual crimes and public order offences rates declined faster in areas with more ‘intense’ policies (about 1.2, 0.10 and 1.7 per 1000 people compared with 0.6, 0.01 and 1.0 per 1000 people in ‘passive’ areas, respectively). Post-2013, the recorded rates increased again. No trends were observed for financial fraud. Conclusions Local areas in England with more intense alcohol licensing policies had a stronger decline in rates of violent crimes, sexual crimes and public order offences in the period up to 2013 of the order of 4–6% greater compared with areas where these policies were not in place, but not thereafter. PMID:27514936

  2. Estimating the impact of birth control on fertility rate in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaiya, Gafar T; Raheem, Usman A; Olatinwo, Abdulwaheed O; Ijaiya, Munir-Deen A; Ijaiya, Mukaila A

    2009-12-01

    Using a cross-country data drawn from 40 countries and a multiple regression analysis, this paper examines the impact of birth control devices on the rate of fertility in sub-Saharan Africa. Our a-priori expectations are that the more women used birth control devices, the less will be the fertility rate in sub-Saharan Africa. The result obtained from the study indicates that except for withdrawal method that fall contrary to our expectation other variables (methods) like the use of pills, injection, intra uterine device (IUD), condom/diaphragm and cervical cap, female sterilization and periodic abstinence/rhythm fulfilled our a-priori expectations. These results notwithstanding, the paper suggests measures, such as the need for massive enlightenment campaign on the benefit of these birth control devices, the frequent checking of the potency of the devices and good governance in the delivery of the devices

  3. The Impact of Mutation Rate on the Computation Time of Evolutionary Dynamic Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Tianshi; Tang, Ke; Chen, Guoliang; Yao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Mutation has traditionally been regarded as an important operator in evolutionary algorithms. In particular, there have been many experimental studies which showed the effectiveness of adapting mutation rates for various static optimization problems. Given the perceived effectiveness of adaptive and self-adaptive mutation for static optimization problems, there have been speculations that adaptive and self-adaptive mutation can benefit dynamic optimization problems even more since adaptation and self-adaptation are capable of following a dynamic environment. However, few theoretical results are available in analyzing rigorously evolutionary algorithms for dynamic optimization problems. It is unclear when adaptive and self-adaptive mutation rates are likely to be useful for evolutionary algorithms in solving dynamic optimization problems. This paper provides the first rigorous analysis of adaptive mutation and its impact on the computation times of evolutionary algorithms in solving certain dynamic optimizatio...

  4. The impact of sex ratio and economic status on local birth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, A; Morrison, E

    2013-04-23

    Human mating and reproductive behaviour can vary depending on various mechanisms, including the local sex ratio. Previous research shows that as sex ratios become female-biased, women from economically deprived areas are less likely to delay reproductive opportunities to wait for a high-investing mate but instead begin their reproductive careers sooner. Here, we show that the local sex ratio also has an impact on female fertility schedules. At young ages, a female-biased ratio is associated with higher birth rates in the poorest areas, whereas the opposite is true for the richest areas. At older ages, a female-biased ratio is associated with higher birth rates in the richest, but not the poorest areas. These patterns suggest that female-female competition encourages poorer women to adopt a fast life-history strategy and give birth early, and richer women to adopt a slow life-history strategy and delay reproduction.

  5. IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-04-26

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and

  6. Nanofluid impingement jet heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Obida; Ali, Mohamed

    2012-02-17

    Experimental investigation to study the heat transfer between a vertical round alumina-water nanofluid jet and a horizontal circular round surface is carried out. Different jet flow rates, jet nozzle diameters, various circular disk diameters and three nanoparticles concentrations (0, 6.6 and 10%, respectively) are used. The experimental results indicate that using nanofluid as a heat transfer carrier can enhance the heat transfer process. For the same Reynolds number, the experimental data show an increase in the Nusselt numbers as the nanoparticle concentration increases. Size of heating disk diameters shows reverse effect on heat transfer. It is also found that presenting the data in terms of Reynolds number at impingement jet diameter can take into account on both effects of jet heights and nozzle diameter. Presenting the data in terms of Peclet numbers, at fixed impingement nozzle diameter, makes the data less sensitive to the percentage change of the nanoparticle concentrations. Finally, general heat transfer correlation is obtained verses Peclet numbers using nanoparticle concentrations and the nozzle diameter ratio as parameters.

  7. Rock Breaking Performance of a Pick Assisted by High-pressure Water Jet under Different Configuration Modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Songyong; LIU Xiaohui; CHEN Junfeng; LIN Mingxing

    2015-01-01

    In the process of rock breaking, the conical pick bears great cutting force and wear, as a result, high-pressure water jet technology is used to assist with cutting. However, the effect of the water jet position has not been studied for rock breaking using a pick. Therefore, the models of rock breaking with different configuration modes of the water jet are established based on SPH combined with FEM. The effect of the water jet pressure, distance between the jet and the pick bit, and cutting depth on the rock breaking performance as well as a comparison of the tension and compression stress are studied via simulation; the simulation results are verified by experiments. The numerical and experimental results indicate that the decrease in the rates of the pick force obviously increases from 25 MPa to 40 MPa, but slowly after 40 MPa, and the optimal distance between the jet and the pick bit is 2 mm under the JFP and JSP modes. The JCP mode is proved the best, followed by the modes of JRP and JFP, and the worst mode is JSP. The decrease in the rates of the pick force of the JCP, JRP, JFP, and JSP modes are up to 30.96%, 28.96%, 33.46%, 28.17%, and 25.42%, respectively, in experiment. Moreover, the JSP mode can be regarded as a special JFP model when the distance between the pick-tip and the jet impact point is 0 mm. This paper has a dominant capability in introducing new numerical and experimental method for the study of rock breaking assisted by water jet and electing the best water jet position from four different configuration modes.

  8. An Investigation of Different Material on Abrasive Water jet Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav.j.limbachiya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive water jet machine (AWJM is a nontraditional machining process. Abrasive water jet machining is a process of removal of material by impact erosion of high pressure (1500-4000 bar, high velocity of water and entrained high velocity of grit abrasives on a work piece. It’s a non-conventional machining process. At herefirst works on theoretical work after it make some experimental work and then analyses both results. Theoretical MRR found equal to the experimental MRR. In this paper investigation for three different materials like en8,acrylic and aluminum is carried out using Taguchi design of experiment method. Experiments are carried out using L25 Orthogonal array by varying Material traverse speed and abrasive mass flow rate for each material respectively. Anova carried out for identifies significant parameters.

  9. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Sabariego

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The usual approach in disability surveys is to screen persons with disability upfront and then ask questions about everyday problems. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the impact of screeners on disability rates, to challenge the usual exclusion of persons with mild and moderate disability from disability surveys and to demonstrate the advantage of using an a posteriori cut-off. Using data of a pilot study of the WHO Model Disability Survey (MDS in Cambodia and the polytomous Rasch model, metric scales of disability were built. The conventional screener approach based on the short disability module of the Washington City Group and the a posteriori cut-off method described in the World Disability Report were compared regarding disability rates. The screener led to imprecise rates and classified persons with mild to moderate disability as non-disabled, although these respondents already experienced important problems in daily life. The a posteriori cut-off applied to the general population sample led to a more precise disability rate and allowed for a differentiation of the performance and needs of persons with mild, moderate and severe disability. This approach can be therefore considered as an inclusive approach suitable to monitor the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

  10. Impact of rate control tools on very fast non-embedded wavelet image encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, O.; Martínez-Rach, M.; Oliver, J.; Malumbres, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the design of very fast wavelet image encoders focused on applications (interactive real-time image&video applications, GIS systems, etc) and devices (digital cameras, mobile phones, PDAs, etc) where coding delay and/or available computing resources (working memory and power processing) are critical for proper operation. Most of these fast wavelet image encoders are non-embedded in order to reduce complexity, so no rate control tools are available for scalable coding applications. In this work, we analyze the impact of simple rate control tools for these encoders in order to determine if the inclusion of rate control functionality is worth enough with respect to popular embedded encoders like SPIHT and JPEG2000. We perform the study by adding rate control to the nonembedded LTW encoder, showing that the increase in complexity still maintains LTW competitive with respect SPIHT and JPEG2000 in terms of R/D performance, coding delay and memory consumption.

  11. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabariego, Carla; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Posarac, Aleksandra; Bickenbach, Jerome; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Chatterji, Somnath; Officer, Alana; Coenen, Michaela; Chhan, Lay; Cieza, Alarcos

    2015-08-25

    The usual approach in disability surveys is to screen persons with disability upfront and then ask questions about everyday problems. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the impact of screeners on disability rates, to challenge the usual exclusion of persons with mild and moderate disability from disability surveys and to demonstrate the advantage of using an a posteriori cut-off. Using data of a pilot study of the WHO Model Disability Survey (MDS) in Cambodia and the polytomous Rasch model, metric scales of disability were built. The conventional screener approach based on the short disability module of the Washington City Group and the a posteriori cut-off method described in the World Disability Report were compared regarding disability rates. The screener led to imprecise rates and classified persons with mild to moderate disability as non-disabled, although these respondents already experienced important problems in daily life. The a posteriori cut-off applied to the general population sample led to a more precise disability rate and allowed for a differentiation of the performance and needs of persons with mild, moderate and severe disability. This approach can be therefore considered as an inclusive approach suitable to monitor the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

  12. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabariego, Carla; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Posarac, Aleksandra; Bickenbach, Jerome; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Chatterji, Somnath; Officer, Alana; Coenen, Michaela; Chhan, Lay; Cieza, Alarcos

    2015-01-01

    The usual approach in disability surveys is to screen persons with disability upfront and then ask questions about everyday problems. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the impact of screeners on disability rates, to challenge the usual exclusion of persons with mild and moderate disability from disability surveys and to demonstrate the advantage of using an a posteriori cut-off. Using data of a pilot study of the WHO Model Disability Survey (MDS) in Cambodia and the polytomous Rasch model, metric scales of disability were built. The conventional screener approach based on the short disability module of the Washington City Group and the a posteriori cut-off method described in the World Disability Report were compared regarding disability rates. The screener led to imprecise rates and classified persons with mild to moderate disability as non-disabled, although these respondents already experienced important problems in daily life. The a posteriori cut-off applied to the general population sample led to a more precise disability rate and allowed for a differentiation of the performance and needs of persons with mild, moderate and severe disability. This approach can be therefore considered as an inclusive approach suitable to monitor the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PMID:26308039

  13. Study of Water Jet Impulse in Water-Jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-rang; MA Wei-wei; CHEN Ming

    2005-01-01

    The water jet impulse is brought forward to study the traction force of the water jet to the flying weft in water-jet looms. The distribution of the water jet impulse in the shed is tested by a sensor, and the influence of water jet parameters on the water jet impulse is analyzed.

  14. Crop failure rates in a geoengineered climate: impact of climate change and marine cloud brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, B.; Challinor, A.; Nicklin, K.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of geoengineering on crops has to date been studied by examining mean yields. We present the first work focusing on the rate of crop failures under a geoengineered climate. We investigate the impact of a future climate and a potential geoengineering scheme on the number of crop failures in two regions, Northeastern China and West Africa. Climate change associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide increases the number of crop failures in Northeastern China while reducing the number of crop failures in West Africa. In both regions marine cloud brightening is likely to reduce the number crop failures, although it is more effective at reducing mild crop failure than severe crop failure. We find that water stress, rather than heat stress, is the main cause of crop failure in current, future and geoengineered climates. This demonstrates the importance of irrigation and breeding for tolerance to water stress as adaptation methods in all futures. Analysis of global rainfall under marine cloud brightening has the potential to significantly reduce the impact of climate change on global wheat and groundnut production.

  15. Impact of Community-Based Dental Education on Attainment of ADEA Competencies: Students' Self-Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Kimberly K; Nayar, Preethy; Ojha, Diptee; Chandak, Aastha; Gupta, Niodita; Lange, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Fourth-year dental students at the College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center participate in a community-based dental education (CBDE) program that includes a four-week rotation in rural dental practices and community health clinics across Nebraska and nearby states. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of participation in the CBDE program on the self-rated competencies of these students. A retrospective survey was administered to students who participated in extramural rotations in two academic years. The survey collected demographic data and asked students to rate themselves on a scale from 1=not competent at all to 5=very competent on attainment of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Competencies for the New General Dentist for before and after the rotations. A total of 92 responses were obtained: 43 students for 2011-12 and 49 students for 2012-13 (95% response rate for each cohort). The results showed that the students' mean pre-program self-ratings ranged from 3.28 for the competency domain of Practice Management and Informatics to 3.93 for Professionalism. Their mean post-program self-ratings ranged from 3.76 for Practice Management and Informatics to 4.31 for Professionalism. The students showed a statistically significant increase in self-ratings for all six competency domains. The increase was greatest in the domain of Critical Thinking and least in Communication and Interpersonal Skills. Overall, these results suggest that the CBDE program was effective in improving the students' self-perceptions of competence in all six domains and support the idea that a competency-based evaluation of CBDE programs can provide valuable information to dental educators about program effectiveness.

  16. The impact of rate reduction and increased vocal intensity on coarticulation in dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, Kris

    2003-04-01

    The dysarthrias are a group of speech disorders resulting from impairment to nervous system structures important for the motor execution of speech. Although numerous studies have examined how dysarthria impacts articulatory movements or changes in vocal tract shape, few studies of dysarthria consider that articulatory events and their acoustic consequences overlap or are coarticulated in connected speech. The impact of rate, loudness, and clarity on coarticulatory patterns in dysarthria also are poorly understood, although these prosodic manipulations frequently are employed as therapy strategies to improve intelligibility in dysarthria and also are known to affect coarticulatory patterns for at least some neurologically healthy speakers. The current study examined the effects of slowed rate and increased vocal intensity on anticipatory coarticulation for speakers with dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis (MS), as inferred from the acoustic signal. Healthy speakers were studied for comparison purposes. Three repetitions of twelve target words embedded in the carrier phrase ``It's a -- again'' were produced in habitual, loud, and slow speaking conditions. F2 frequencies and first moment coefficients were used to infer coarticulation. Both group and individual speaker trends will be examined in the data analyses.

  17. Laser-induced break-up of water jet waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couty, P.; Hoffmann, P. [EPFL/STI/IOA/Advanced Photonics Laboratory, Lausanne BM, 1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Spiegel, A.; Vago, N. [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki ut 8, 1111, Budapest (Hungary); Ugurtas, B.I. [EPFL/STI/IMHEF/Laboratory Fluid Mechanics, Lausanne, 1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-06-01

    In this article, an optical method to control the break-up of high-speed liquid jets is proposed. The method consists of focusing the light of a pulsed laser source into the jet behaving as a waveguide. Experiments were performed with the help of a Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:Yag laser ({lambda}=532 nm). The jet diameter was 48 {mu}m and jet velocities from 100 to 200 m/s. To study the laser-induced water jet break-up, observations of the jet coupled with the high power laser were performed for variable coupling and jet velocity conditions. Experimentally determined wavelength and growth rate of the laser-generated disturbance were also compared with the ones predicted by linear stability theory of free jets. (orig.)

  18. Energetics, Physics and Impact of Large-Scale Jets: Fast and Super-Eddington or Slow and Multi-TeV Accelerators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georganopoulos, Markos

    We propose to answer a long-standing, important question on the nature of quasar largescale jets: are they fast (Lorentz factors 10-20) and powerful (in many cases superEddington) or slow, sub-Eddington, and multi-TeV particle accelerators?. The answer has direct bearing on the physics of cluster gas heating by powerful jets, an important feedback mechanism in the structure formation process. Also, for slow jets the beamingcorrected radiated power of the large scale jet may be comparable to, or even exceed that of the blazar (core) with important implications for the GeV background radiation and the heating of intergalactic gas by TeV photons, something that has been suggested as the reason for the dearth of dwarf galaxies compared with the cold dark matter predictions. The question of the jet nature has been open since the 2000s, when Chandra detected anomalously high levels of X-rays from dozens of powerful kpc-scale radio/optical jets, indicating a separate origin from the radio-optical synchrotron emission. The widely accepted model for these X-rays has been a very powerful highly-relativistic kpc-scale jet producing inverse Compton emission by up-scattering the cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB), though the X-rays could also be synchrotron emission from a multi-TeV electron population accelerated in situ, as both models can reproduce the observed radio to X-ray spectra. However, very recent work by our group has ruled out the IC/CMB model in two cases. In the case of 3C 273, the uniquely determined GeV flux predicted by the IC/CMB model overproduces the 99.9% flux limit obtained from Fermi gamma-ray observations. These results do not, however, rule out IC/CMB in general, although they do bring synchrotron, slow, multi-TeV accelerator jets to the forefront. In conjunction with radio-to-X-ray multi-wavelength archival imaging, we will extend our study to a much larger sample of over 70 quasar-hosted jets, using the Fermi method we pioneered, while also

  19. 水力喷砂割缝设备微型流量控制阀的特性计算%FLOW RATE CALCULATION OF MINIATURE FLOW CONTROL VALVE OF THE WATER JETTING SLIT-CUT EQUIPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学滨; 李成全; 张永利; 邰英楼; 章梦涛

    2001-01-01

    利用流体力学有关原理,导出阿基米德螺线槽流量特性方程,为水力喷砂割缝设备微型流量控制阀的设计、制造、实验、应用提供了初步理论依据。%Based on the principle of hydrodynamics,this paper deduces an equation,which shows a flow rate-relative pressure relation of Archimedes spiral groove.The equation has preliminarily supplied a theoretical foundation for design,manufacture,experiment and application of miniature flow control valve of the water jetting slit-cut equipment.

  20. Operation of JET as a user facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, Alan S. E-mail: ask@jet.uk; Cox, M.; Farthing, J.W.; Hitchin, M.; Lomas, P

    2003-09-01

    Since the beginning of 2000, the Joint European Torus (JET) has been operated under the European fusion development agreement (EFDA) as a user facility. The UKAEA as 'operator' maintains and operates the facility and installs enhancements on behalf of EFDA under contract to the European Commission. The experimental programme is proposed and implemented by the 'users', scientists and engineers on secondment from the European fusion laboratories, which also supply equipment for enhancement of the facility. The overall programme is co-ordinated by the close support unit (CSU). During the five experimental campaigns to date, the historical rate of successful pulsing has been largely maintained. One major shutdown has been completed with substantial in-vessel and ex-vessel tasks, and various small enhancements have been installed. The first major enhancement is imminent. The UKAEA is independently responsible for safety and the environmental impact of the project. This paper reviews the requirements and procedures for control of the interface between the operator, the CSU and users, presents performance measures for key aspects, and summarises the experience of the UKAEA in the operation of JET.

  1. Mixing in plasma and low density jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, S.; Strykowski, P. J.; Pfender, E.

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the mechanisms which produce the large entrainment measured near the exit of thermal plasma torches. A research facility was constructed to examine low density jet behavior under similar dimensionless conditions as those produced by thermal plasma spray torches; the Reynolds number based on jet diameter and average properties was 1000, and the ratio of jet to ambient density was 0.07. This very low density jet produced organized vortex structures which were partially responsible for the rapid entrainment of external air. The formation of these organized structures could be disrupted by introducing turbulence, but the rapid entrainment process was not significantly affected. The structure of the jet produced by a commercial plasma torch was examined and compared to the low density research jet. At low gas flow rates the plasma jet also displayed the formation of coherent vortex structures, the passage frequency of which compared favorably with that measured in the low density research jet. At higher gas flow rates the shear layer of the plasma jet rapidly broke down producing relatively small scale turbulence. Visualizations of the hot plasma core were compared against measurements of the torch voltage fluctuations caused by arc instabilities. At low flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations were quite low and the plume was very steady. At higher flow rates the arc voltage fluctuations increased and produced “surging” and “whipping” in the hot potential core. It is believed that this low frequency unsteadiness is partially responsible for the rapid entrainment measured in plasma torches.

  2. The Impact Rate on Solar System Satellites During the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-10-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) found that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts was calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). We are calculating impact rates onto the giant planets and their moons in the context of the "Nice II" model (Levison et al. 2011). We find that NK12's assumed influx is an overestimate, by an amount we are quantifying. We will discuss implications for the origin of icy satellites. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Tsiganis, K., Nesvorný, D., Gomes, R., Astron. J. 142, article id. 152 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus 219, 508-510 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  3. A Rate-Dependent Viscoelastic Damage Model for Simulation of Solid Propellant Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, E. R.; Nguyen, D. Q.

    2006-07-01

    A viscoelastic deformation and damage model (VED) for solid rocket propellants has been developed based on an extensive set of mechanical properties experiments. Monotonic tensile tests performed at several strain rates showed rate and dilatation effects. During cyclic tensile tests, hysteresis and a rate-dependent shear modulus were observed. A tensile relaxation experiment showed significant stress decay in the sample. Taylor impact tests exhibited large dilatations without significant crack growth. Extensive modifications to a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model (VEP) necessary to capture these experimental results have led to development of the VED model. In particular, plasticity has been eliminated in the model, and the multiple Maxwell viscoelastic formulation has been replaced with a time-dependent shear modulus. Furthermore, the loading and unloading behaviors of the material are modeled independently. To characterize the damage and dilatation behavior, the Tensile Damage and Distention (TDD) model is run in conjunction with VED. The VED model is connected to a single-cell driver as well as to the CTH shock physics code. Simulations of tests show good comparisons with tensile tests and some aspects of the Taylor tests.

  4. Trends in the modes of delivery and their impact on perinatal mortality rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Geraldo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine changes in the incidence of vaginal deliveries, cesarean sections, and forceps deliveries and their potential association with fetal, early neonatal, and perinatal mortality rates over time. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out and the occurrence of deliveries supervised by university services between January 1991 and December 2000 was determined. Data regarding fetal, early neonatal, and perinatal deaths were assessed using obstetric and pediatric records and autopsy reports. RESULTS: Of a total of 33,360 deliveries, the incidence of vaginal deliveries, cesarean sections, and forceps deliveries was relatively steady (around 60, 30, and 10%, respectively while, at the same time, there was a marked reduction in fetal mortality (from 33.3 to 13.0?, early neonatal mortality (from 30.6 to 9.0?, and perinatal mortality (from 56.4 to 19.3?. CONCLUSIONS: The marked reduction in perinatal mortality rates seen during the study period without an increase in cesarean sections indicates that the decrease in perinatal mortality was not impacted by cesarean section rates. The plausible hypothesis seems to be that the reduction in perinatal mortality of deliveries performed under the supervision of university services was more likely to be associated with better neonatal care rather than the mode of delivery.

  5. Impact of the Solidification Rate on the Chemical Composition of Frozen Cryolite Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor Poncsák

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Solidification of cryolite (Na3AlF6-based bath takes place at different rates along the sideledge, and around alumina rafts and new anodes. The solidification rate has a significant impact on the structure and the chemical composition that determine the thermal conductivity and thus the thickness of sideledge, or the duration of the existence of the temporary frozen bath layers in other cases. Unfortunately, samples that can be collected in industrial cells are formed under unknown, spatially and temporally varying conditions. For this reason, frozen bath samples were created under different heat flux conditions in a well-controlled laboratory environment using the so-called cold finger technique. The samples were analyzed by X-ray Diffractometer (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM in Back Scattering (BS mode in order to obtain spatial distribution of chemical composition. Results were correlated with structural analysis. XRD confirmed our earlier hypothesis of recrystallization of cryolite to chiolite under medium heat flux regime. Lower α-alumina, and higher γ-alumina content in the samples obtained with very high heating rate suggest that fast cooling reduces α–γ conversion. In accordance with the expectation, SEM-BS revealed significant variation of the Na/Al ratio in the transient sample.

  6. The impact of foreign direct investment on the unemployment rate in the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the Republic of Serbia in the period of transition from a planned economy with special social, political and economic conditions towards an open economy through the inflow of FDI and their impact on the unemployment rate. Creating the conditions for an inflow of FDI started in order to increase the employment rate. Since 2000, most FDI had entered the sector of non-tradeable goods which led towards increasing unemployment. That has had negative effects on Serbia from the development viewpoint, since the country needs FDI in the sector of non-tradeable goods, as they encourage productivity, technological progress and employment. Foreign investors in Serbia were primarily interested in profiting from the privatization (brownfield investments of former state-owned companies which led to the rationalization of the privatized companies through redundancies. The benefits that Serbia has had from the inflow of FDI are significant transfers of technology and enhancement of competition on the local market. On the other hand, negative effect is increase of the unemployment rate at the national level.

  7. CHANGES OF TAX RATES AND THEIR IMPACT ON REVENUES OF THE TAX AMINISTRATION OF KOSOVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shefqet Dervishaj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the early postwar years, Kosovo was faced with a destroyed economy and an inexperienced tax system and was mainly based on the experiences of other countries and not in accordance with the real situation and needs of post-war Kosovo which had to start from “zero” in many areas.The post-war tax policy in Kosovo started with the tax system in accordance with UNMIK Regulations, which were almost all copied from other countries such as from countries in transition as well as from EU Countries,  therefore these regulations were inconsistent with the current situation in Kosovo.The Agency which deals with tax administration is the Tax Administration in Kosovo (TAK.  From the beginning of the work of TAK, from 2000 until today, Kosovo`s tax system has been constantly adapting changes in tax laws aswell as in tax rates.  The main focus of this paper is how changes affect the applicable tax rates in Kosovo and how much impact has this change on the TAK revenues. The current applicable taxes in Kosovo are: Value added tax (VAT; Personal income tax (PIT, and Corporate income tax (CIT.  All these different kinds of taxes have undergone changes in their application as well as in their level of tax rates.

  8. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Rodriguez, C. A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Owen, A. T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Jansik, D. P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Lang, J. B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-11-12

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185+-155 {mu}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  9. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  10. ANALYSIS OF ACTIVITIES PROVIDING IMPACT ON TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY RATE ESTIMATION IN THE REGIONS WITHIN SIBERIAN FEDERAL DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Revyakina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the data about achievement of targeted rates for efficiency evaluation of the actions aimed at tuberculosis mortality reduction in 2015 and statistic rates for 2014-2015 in 12 regions within Siberian Federal District, the impact of organizational medical activities performed by primary medical services and tuberculosis control services was analyzed in the respect of tuberculosis mortality rate. The article presents results of ranging of regions within Siberian Federal District as per tuberculosis mortality rate and indicators providing impact on the number of those died of tuberculosis.

  11. Do State-Based Policies Have an Impact on Teen Birth Rates and Teen Abortion Rates in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrette, Marianne; Abenhaim, Haim Arie

    2015-10-01

    The United States has one of the highest teen birth rates among developed countries. Interstate birth rates and abortion rates vary widely, as do policies on abortion and sex education. The objective of our study is to assess whether US state-level policies regarding abortion and sexual education are associated with different teen birth and teen abortion rates. We carried out a state-level (N = 51 [50 states plus the District of Columbia]) retrospective observational cross-sectional study, using data imported from the National Vital Statistics System. State policies were obtained from the Guttmacher Institute. We used descriptive statistics and regression analysis to study the association of different state policies with teen birth and teen abortion rates. The state-level mean birth rates, when stratifying between policies protective and nonprotective of teen births, were not statistically different-for sex education policies, 39.8 of 1000 vs 45.1 of 1000 (P = .2187); for mandatory parents' consent to abortion 45 of 1000, vs 38 of 1000 when the minor could consent (P = .0721); and for deterrents to abortion, 45.4 of 1000 vs 37.4 of 1000 (P = .0448). Political affiliation (35.1 of 1000 vs 49.6 of 1000, P abortion rates were, however, associated with restrictive abortion policies, specifically lower in states with financial barriers, deterrents to abortion, and requirement for parental consent. While teen birth rates do not appear to be influenced by state-level sex education policies, state-level policies that restrict abortion appear to be associated with lower state teen abortion rates. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stocking rate impact on soil water repellency and erodibility of burnt lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavi, Ilan; Zaady, Eli

    2017-04-01

    Wildfires and prescribed burnings are common, modifying the functioning of geo-ecosystems. Such fires have been extensively studied, and reported to considerably affect soil properties. Yet, understanding of the impact of livestock grazing, or more precisely, trampling, in fire-affected lands is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of livestock trampling (hoof action) on the functioning of burnt vs. non-burnt lands. This was studied by focusing on the effects on wettability and related properties of solid soil, as well as on the quantity of unconsolidated material (detached matter) lying on the solid ground surface. The study was implemented in the semi-arid northern Negev of Israel, in lands which experienced a one cycle of (unintended) low- to moderate-fire severity. The study was conducted by allowing livestock to access plots under high, medium, and low stocking rates. Also, livestock exclusion plots were assigned as a control treatment. Soil wettability was studied by water drop penetration time (WDPT) and critical surface tension (CST) tests. Results show that fire slightly decreased the soil wettability. However, WDPT was negatively related to the stocking rate, and CST was 13% smaller in the control plots than in the livestock-presence treatments. Also, the results show that following burning, the resistance of soil to shear decreased by 70%. Mass of unconsolidated material was similar in the control plots of the burnt and non-burnt plots. At the same time, it was three-, eight-, and nine- fold greater in the plots of the burnt × low, burnt × medium, and burnt × high stocking rates, respectively, than in the corresponding non-burnt ones. This study shows that livestock trampling in low- to moderate-intensity fire-affected lands increases the shearing of the ground surface layer. On the one hand, this increases soil wettability. On the other hand, this impact considerably increases risks of on-site soil erosion and land

  13. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  14. The Edge of Jets and Subleading Non-Global Logs

    CERN Document Server

    Neill, Duff

    2015-01-01

    A persistent and fascinating problem at the high energy colliders are jets. Often trying to observe physics underlying the hard interactions at colliders requires experimental cuts in phase space, defining several jet or beam regions. QCD being a gauge theory that readily decays into infra-red modes, correlations between jet regions is almost inevitable, spoiling the predictivity of fixed order QCD calculations. One is faced with the task of calculating the evolution of a reduced density matrix, where successively less energetic (jet) regions are integrated out, to gain control of the calculation. I relate the decay rates governing the flow into the IR to an effective field theory expansion in soft jets, allowing a systematic and resummed calculation of these rates, while further relating them to physically observable features of the QCD cascade. To demonstrate the utility of the soft jet expansion, I present a factorization theorem for a soft subjet collinearly splitting in and out of a parent fat jet. Using...

  15. Study on the breakup lengths of free round liquid jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; WAN Yun-xia; HUANG Yong; PENG Xin-ke

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the breakup lengths of water jets with a high-speed video camera for Weber numbers from 0 to about 1.1 × 103. The initial jet diameters are changed from 0.3mm to 1.0mm. The results indicate that at low jet velocity the breakup lengths of the jets are increased linearly from 0 to a maximum value. At the Weber number about 20 the breakup length of the jet reaches its maximum value for different initial jet diameter. A computation based on the dispersion equation is conducted to study the relationship between the growth rate of the jet surface wave and the maximum breakup length. The computations show that the maximum growth rate for the axisymmetric surface wave has a turning point at Weber number about 20, and that agrees well with the experiments.

  16. Numerical simulation on submerged gas jet scouring pit morphology in impingement water bath dust removers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Huijie; WU Xuan; ZHAO Yuxiang; WU Wenfei; LI Baowei

    2014-01-01

    The VOF interface tracking method was adopted to simulate the two-dimensional submerged gas jet scouring pit morphology in an impingement water bath dust remover.The interaction of gas/liquid two-phase was obtained by force balance and momentum exchange.On the self-designed impingement water bath dust remover test bench,the submerged gas jet flushing with different gas velocities was simulated. The results show that,the gas inlet velocity is one of the main factors affecting the submerged gas jet scou-ring pit characteristics.The unique nature of gas/liquid two-phase determines their unique way of move-ment,thus affects the morphological character of the scouring pit in the expansion lag phase.Within the study range,the characteristic radius and impact depth of the scouring pit increases with the gas velocity, and so are their growth rates.

  17. Impact of Increased Academic Intensity on Transfer Rates: An Application of Matching Estimators to Student-Unit Record Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, William R.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of increased academic intensity on transfer rates from community colleges to 4-year institutions has been estimated only from observational data, with the possibility of selection bias. This study uses matching estimators to overcome possible selection bias and estimate the causal impact of increased academic intensity on transfer…

  18. Potential population impact of antidepressant use on hip fractures rate in Denmark (DK), Norway (NO) and the Netherlands (NL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldenberg, Jennifer S.B.; Petri, Hans; Khong, Phuong T.; Klungel, Olaf H.; De Vries, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of antidepressants has been associated with an increased hip fracture risk in observational studies. However, the potential impact of antidepressant consumption on the population rate of hip fractures has not been estimated. Objectives: To evaluate the population impact of antide

  19. A Study of the Impact of Thirteen Celebrity Suicides on Subsequent Suicide Rates in South Korea from 2005 to 2009

    OpenAIRE

    King-wa Fu; C H Chan

    2013-01-01

    A number of ecological studies have found a pattern of increasing suicide rates after suicides of several Asian entertainment celebrities. However, the finding may be subject to positive outcome bias where cases with no perceived impact may be routinely excluded. In this study, we deploy interrupted time-series analysis using ARIMA transfer function models to investigate systematically the impact of thirteen celebrity suicides on subsequent suicide rates in South Korea. We find that three out...

  20. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  1. Low-energy electron impact cross-sections and rate constants of $NH_2$

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANAND BHARADVAJA; SAVINDER KAUR; K L BALUJA

    2017-08-01

    This systematic study reports various electron impact cross-sections, rate constants and transport properties of $NH_2$ radical in the low-energy limit. The collision study is based on $R$-matrix formalism and involves the use of various scattering models employing different active spaces. Both electron excited inelasticcross-sections and resonances are found influenced by correlation and polarization effects. The non-relativistic molecular bremsstrahlung radiation cross-section for soft photons, binary encounter Bethe model-based ionization cross-sections and a few molecular properties of the target radical are also reported. The present calculations are found to be in agreement with the available results. This theoretical study provides a pathway to understand collision dynamics and generates data required in various fields of applied physics.

  2. Lumpectomy cavity shaved margins do not impact re-excision rates in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopey, Suzanne B; Buckley, Julliette M; Smith, Barbara L; Hughes, Kevin S; Gadd, Michele A; Specht, Michelle C

    2011-10-01

    The benefits of taking shaved cavity margins (SCM) at the time of lumpectomy are unclear. We sought to determine if taking SCM decreases re-excision rates by increasing the total breast tissue volume excised. We undertook a retrospective review of breast cancer patients who underwent lumpectomy from 2004 to 2006. Patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 had lumpectomy alone, group 2 had lumpectomy plus select (1-3) SCM, and group 3 had lumpectomy plus complete (≥4) SCM. Pathologic findings and surgical outcomes were compared between groups. 773 cancers treated by lumpectomy were included in this study; 197 were in group 1, 130 were in group 2, and 446 were in group 3. The mean total volume of breast tissue excised in group 1 (106.6 cm(3)) was significantly larger than the volume excised in groups 2 (79.3 cm(3)) and 3 (76.3 cm(3)). Rates of re-excision and successful breast-conservation therapy (BCT) were not significantly different between groups. Despite a lower total volume of breast tissue excised in groups 2 and 3, there was no significant increase in locoregional recurrence rates (LRR) at median follow-up of 54 months. Taking additional SCM during lumpectomy resulted in a significantly lower overall volume of breast tissue excised, with no increase in LRR. Contrary to prior studies, we found that SCM did not decrease re-excision rates or impact the success of BCT. Therefore, the main advantage of taking SCM appears to be that less breast tissue is excised, which could potentially improve cosmetic outcomes.

  3. Impact of visual repetition rate on intrinsic properties of low frequency fluctuations in the visual network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chia Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual processing network is one of the functional networks which have been reliably identified to consistently exist in human resting brains. In our work, we focused on this network and investigated the intrinsic properties of low frequency (0.01-0.08 Hz fluctuations (LFFs during changes of visual stimuli. There were two main questions to be discussed in this study: intrinsic properties of LFFs regarding (1 interactions between visual stimuli and resting-state; (2 impact of repetition rate of visual stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed scanning sessions that contained rest and visual stimuli in various repetition rates with a novel method. The method included three numerical approaches involving ICA (Independent Component Analyses, fALFF (fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuation, and Coherence, to respectively investigate the modulations of visual network pattern, low frequency fluctuation power, and interregional functional connectivity during changes of visual stimuli. We discovered when resting-state was replaced by visual stimuli, more areas were involved in visual processing, and both stronger low frequency fluctuations and higher interregional functional connectivity occurred in visual network. With changes of visual repetition rate, the number of areas which were involved in visual processing, low frequency fluctuation power, and interregional functional connectivity in this network were also modulated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To combine the results of prior literatures and our discoveries, intrinsic properties of LFFs in visual network are altered not only by modulations of endogenous factors (eye-open or eye-closed condition; alcohol administration and disordered behaviors (early blind, but also exogenous sensory stimuli (visual stimuli with various repetition rates. It demonstrates that the intrinsic properties of LFFs are valuable to represent physiological states of human brains.

  4. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-WahbiDepartment of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyahd, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetic foot complications are a leading cause of lower extremity amputation. With the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the Arab world, specifically in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the rate of amputation will rise significantly. A diabetic foot care program was implemented at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2002. The program was directed at health care staff and patients to increase their awareness about diabetic foot care and prevention of complications. The purpose of this study was to perform a primary evaluation of the program’s impact on the rate of lower extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications.Method: This pilot study was the first analysis of the diabetic foot care program and examined two groups of participants for comparison, ie, a “before” group having had diabetic foot ulcers managed between 1983, when the hospital was first established, and 2002 when the program began and an “after group” having had foot ulcers managed between 2002 and 2004, in the program’s initial phase. A total of 41 charts were randomly chosen retrospectively. A data sheet containing age, gender, medical data, and the presentation, management, and outcome of diabetic foot cases was used for the analysis.Results: The before group contained 20 patients (17 males and the after group contained 21 patients (16 males. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to age and comorbidities. The rate of amputation was 70% in the before group and 61.9% in the after group. There was a decrease in the percentage of toe amputation in the after group and an increase in the percentage of below-knee amputation in the before group. However, these changes were not significant.Conclusion: The program, although evaluated at an early

  5. Advanced Modified High Performance Synthetic Jet Actuator with Curved Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The advanced modified high performance synthetic jet actuator with optimized curvature shape chamber (ASJA-M) is a synthetic jet actuator (SJA) with a lower volume reservoir or chamber. A curved chamber is used, instead of the conventional cylinder chamber, to reduce the dead volume of the jet chamber and increase the efficiency of the synthetic jet actuator. The shape of the curvature corresponds to the maximum displacement (deformation) profile of the electroactive diaphragm. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the ASJA-M will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  6. Forced distribution rating systems: when does "rank and yank" lead to adverse impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giumetti, Gary W; Schroeder, Amber N; Switzer, Fred S

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread use of forced distribution rating systems (FDRSs), the potential for this performance appraisal method to lead to adverse impact (AI) in a layoff context has yet to be examined empirically. Thus, the current study uses a Monte Carlo simulation to examine the likelihood of encountering AI violations when an FDRS is used in the context of layoffs. The primary research questions included an examination of how AI violations change depending on the definition of the employment action (i.e., retention vs. layoff), the length of the repeated layoffs, and whether or not laid off employees are replaced each year. The current study also examined the impact of the size of the organization, the percentage of the workforce laid off, and the type of AI calculation method used on the likelihood of AI violations. Results suggest that defining the employment action as layoffs (rather than as retentions) may result in a greater likelihood of AI violations, and AI violations are likely to peak in the 1st year of use. Further, replacing laid off employees may result in higher levels of AI over time as compared with not replacing layoffs. Additionally, the greatest risk for AI occurs when the organization size is large (i.e., N = 10,000) and when certain AI calculation methods are used. Results are discussed in terms of their practical and legal implications for organizations.

  7. Electron Impact Ionization cross sections and rate coefficients for α-tetra hydro furfuryl alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Pal, Satyendra

    2013-09-01

    α - tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA; C5H10O2) is an aromatic compound having the molecular structure similar to that of 2-deoxy-D-ribose (deoxyribose). This molecule has attracted enormous interest in the field of research because its electron charge cloud possesses a quite significant spatial extent (dipole polarizability, α = 70.18 au) and has a relatively strong permanent dipole moment (μ ~ 2D). In the present work, we have extended and generalized the modified Jain-Khare semi-empirical formalism for the evaluation of the total ionization cross sections corresponding to the formation of the cations in the electron impact ionization of molecules to the electron impact ionization of α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA; C5H10O2) , in the energy range varying from ionization threshold to 1000 eV. The evaluated cross sections revealed a reasonably good agreement with the experimental and theoretical data, wherever available. We have also calculated the ionization rate coefficients as a function of electron energy, using the evaluated total ionization cross sections and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution.

  8. The rate of change of acceleration: implications to head kinematics during rear-end impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Loriann M; Dickey, James P

    2008-05-01

    Whiplash is a mechanism of injury commonly associated with rear-impact vehicle collisions. To date, research has focused primarily on changes in velocity and acceleration as key factors for determining injuries due to whiplash mechanisms, but other characteristics of the acceleration pulse may be important. This study assessed whether the head acceleration response to whiplash-like perturbation profiles were affected by a change in the rate of the applied acceleration, or jerk. Twenty-one subjects were exposed to different low-velocity rear-impact whiplash-like perturbations using a precisely controlled robotic platform. The perturbations were divided into two groupings of peak acceleration (approximately 10 (high) and 5.7 (low) m/s2) and three groupings of jerk (approximately 260, 310, and 360 m/s3). These six profiles were repeated twice. Results demonstrated that the jerk magnitude significantly affected forehead acceleration in the vertical and horizontal directions. Increasing the magnitude of the platform acceleration also differentially affected the horizontal and vertical forehead accelerations. This indicates that the level of jerk influences the resulting head kinematics and should be considered when designing or interpreting experiments that are attempting to predict injury from whiplash-like perturbations.

  9. Interaction of a hot jet with two cold side jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouali Nassira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spreading of the multijet in terms of both the velocity and temperature field depends strongly on the flow type related to the velocity and temperature ratios between the cold side jets to the hot central one. This is the reason why the present work focuses on numerical investigation of non isothermal three parallel non-ventilated turbulent plane jets. As well, it seems natural to pick as reference the available experimental data. The numerical predictions confirm the three types (A, B, C of flow patterns given by the available flow visualization and reveal a fourth that will be called type D. The purpose of the present study is to explore the effect of the velocity ratio on the decay rates of the velocity and temperature in the fully developed region. It is found that the addition of side jets increase the rate of decrease of the centerline velocity for the flow of type A and decreases in the other cases. The effect of various types of flow on the rate of decrease of the velocity and the temperature in the fully developed flow region are investigated in details: This led to establish several correlations of the rate of decrease that play an important role in the diffusion of momentum and temperature.

  10. Impact of patient training patterns on peritonitis rates in a large national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth; Moraes, Thyago Proença de; Bernardini, Judith; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo; Barretti, Pasqual; Olandoski, Marcia; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Ideal training methods that could ensure best peritoneal dialysis (PD) outcome have not been defined in previous reports. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of training characteristics on peritonitis rates in a large Brazilian cohort. Incident patients with valid data on training recruited in the Brazilian Peritoneal Dialysis Multicenter Study (BRAZPD II) from January 2008 to January 2011 were included. Peritonitis was diagnosed according to International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis guidelines; incidence rate of peritonitis (episodes/patient-months) and time to the first peritonitis were used as end points. Two thousand two hundred and forty-three adult patients were included in the analysis: 59 ± 16 years old, 51.8% female, 64.7% with ≤4 years of education. The median training time was 15 h (IQI 10-20 h). Patients were followed for a median of 11.2 months (range 3-36.5). The overall peritonitis rate was 0.29 per year at risk (1 episode/41 patient-months). The mean number of hours of training per day was 1.8 ± 2.4. Less than 1 h of training/day was associated with higher incidence rate when compared with the intervals of 1-2 h/day (P = 0.03) and >2 h/day (P = 0.02). Patients who received a cumulative training of >15 h had significantly lower incidence of peritonitis compared with peritonitis incidence rate. Training in the immediate 10 days after implantation of the catheter was associated with the highest peritonitis rate (0.32 per year), compared with training prior to catheter implantation (0.28 per year) or >10 days after implantation (0.23 per year). More experienced centers had a lower risk for the first peritonitis (P = 0.003). This is the first study to analyze the association between training characteristics and outcomes in a large cohort of PD patients. Low training time (particularly peritonitis. These results support the recommendation of a minimum amount of training hours to reduce peritonitis incidence regardless of the

  11. Shortening a survey and using alternative forms of prenotification: Impact on response rate and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Sarah

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that survey response rates are decreasing and that the level of survey response can be influenced by questionnaire length and the use of pre-notification. The goal of the present investigation was determine the effect of questionnaire length and pre-notification type (letter vs. postcard on measures of survey quality, including response rates, response times (days to return the survey, and item nonresponse. Methods In July 2008, the authors randomized 900 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota aged 25-65 years to one of two versions of the Talley Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a survey designed to assess the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID. One version was two pages long and the other 4 pages. Using a 2 × 2 factorial design, respondents were randomized to survey length and one of two pre-notification types, letter or postcard; 780 residents ultimately received a survey, after excluding those who had moved outside the county or passed away. Results Overall, the response rates (RR did not vary by length of survey (RR = 44.6% for the 2-page survey and 48.4% for the 4-page or pre-notification type (RR = 46.3% for the letter and 46.8% for the postcard. Differences in response rates by questionnaire length were seen among younger adults who were more likely to respond to the 4-page than the 2-page questionnaire (RR = 39.0% compared to 21.8% for individuals in their 20s and RR = 49.0% compared to 32.3% for those in their 30s. There were no differences across conditions with respect to item non-response or time (days after mailing to survey response. Conclusion This study suggests that the shortest survey does not necessarily provide the best option for increased response rates and survey quality. Pre-notification type (letter or postcard did not impact response rate suggesting that postcards may be more beneficial due to the lower associated costs of this method of contact.

  12. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  13. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidson, Carolyn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McLaren, Joyce [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Miller, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  14. Solar Active Region Coronal Jets. II. Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/X-ray telescope, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets. The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ≲ 2\\prime\\prime ) miniature-filament (minifilament) “strands” from a magnetic neutral line where magnetic flux cancelation is ongoing, consistent with the magnetic configuration presented for coronal-hole jets in Sterling et al. (2016). Some jets strands are difficult/impossible to detect, perhaps due to, e.g., their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ˜ 1.5× {10}19 Mx hr-1. An average flux of ˜ 5× {10}18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ˜1028-1029 erg of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption build up and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  15. The Interactions of Two Cold Atmospheric Plasma Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Daotan; REN Chunsheng; WANG Dezhen; NIE Qiuyue

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the interactions between two cold atmospheric plasma jets. By changing the experimental conditions including the gas flow rate, the applied voltage, the power supply frequency and the inter-electrode distance d, three different interaction modes, attraction, repulsion and combination, were observed. It is shown that the interaction modes of the two jets are principally affected by the electrodes, the gas flow rate, the plasma jets and the power supply frequency.

  16. The Impact of Changes to the Unemployment Rate on Australian Disability Income Insurance Claim Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Khemka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the extent to which claim incidence in Disability Income Insurance (DII is affected by changes in the unemployment rate in Australia. Using data from 1986 to 2001, we fit a hurdle model to explore the presence and magnitude of the effect of changes in unemployment rate on the incidence of DII claims, controlling for policy holder characteristics and seasonality. We find a clear positive association between unemployment and claim incidence, and we explore this further by gender, age, deferment period, and occupation. A multinomial logistic regression model is fitted to cause of claim data in order to explore the relationship further, and it is shown that the proportion of claims due to accident increases markedly with rising unemployment. The results suggest that during periods of rising unemployment, insurers may face increased claims from policy holders with shorter deferment periods for white-collar workers and for medium and heavy manual workers. Our findings indicate that moral hazard may have a material impact on DII claim incidence and insurer business in periods of declining economic conditions.

  17. WORLD OIL PRICE IMPACT ON INTEREST RATE AND UNEMPLOYMENT: EVIDENCE FROM EURO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnirokhim N Alim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tingginya harga minyak dunia telah dipercaya sebagai faktor yang mempengaruhi aktifitas ekonomi dan kebijakan makroekonomi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis hubungan antara harga minyak dan kebijakan makroekonomi dengan menganalisis dampak harga minyak pada tingkat bunga riil dan pengangguran. Studi ini menguji hubungan tersebut di negara-negara Eropa dengan menggunakan data tahunan mulai tahun 1970- 2009 dengan database AWM. Inovasi dan tingginya harga minta akan mempengaruhi suku bunga riil dan pengangguran mulai dari periode awal dan berakhir dalam jangka waktu yang lama. Notable increases in the world price of oil have been generally recognized implies economic activities and macroeconomic policies. This paper tries to analyze the oil price and macroeconomic policy relationship by means of analyzing the impact of oil prices on real interest rate and unemployment. This paper tests these relationships in Europe Area Countries using annual data from 1970 to 2009 by using AWM database. Innovation or shock in world price of oil will affect the real interest rate and unemployment from initial period and fade away in very long time horizon. 

  18. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, John B.; Jensen, Nicholas R.; Domke, Grant M.; D’Amato, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior National Forest, in northern Minnesota. Forest inventory data from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program were used to characterize current forest age structure and quantify the relationship between age and carbon stocks for eight forest types. Using these findings, we simulated the impact of alternative management scenarios and natural disturbance rates on forest-wide terrestrial carbon stocks over a 100-year horizon. Under low natural mortality, forest-wide total ecosystem carbon stocks increased when 0% or 40% of planned harvests were implemented; however, the majority of forest-wide carbon stocks decreased with greater harvest levels and elevated disturbance rates. Our results suggest that natural disturbance has the potential to exert stronger influence on forest carbon stocks than timber harvesting activities and that maintaining carbon stocks over the long-term may prove difficult if disturbance frequency increases in response to climate change.

  19. Agglomeration in a fluidized bed using multiple jet streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, J. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kothari, M.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the overall temperature distribution, temperature in the vicinity of the jets, and the rate of agglomeration in a fluidized bed containing multiple jet streams. Agglomeration of ash during coal gasification increases carbon utilization efficiency considerably. The agglomeration requires a fluidized-bed reactor with a specially designed distributor equipped with a jet to yield a hot zone confined within the bed. The rate of agglomeration depends upon the size and the intensity of the zone. This rate, and hence the unit capacity, could be increased by adding multiple jets to the distributor. The purpose of this study was to verify this phenomenon. The temperature distribution inside the agglomerating fluidized-bed reactor with a single jet was studied by Hariri et al. Various parameters were involved in agglomeration phenomena -- bed material, fluidization velocity, bed temperature, jet velocity, jet temperature, bed geometry, and distributor geometry. Controlled agglomerates were produced in the fluidized bed when a sloped gas distributor consisting of a central jet and a porous plate was used. Gas at temperatures above the melting temperature of a bed material was introduced into the jet and gas at temperatures below the softening temperature was introduced into the distributor. The rate of agglomerate formation was significantly influenced by an increase in either jet air or auxiliary (grid) air temperature. The extent of agglomeration also depended strongly upon the volume of the hot zone confined within the isotherms with temperatures higher than the melting point of the bed material.

  20. Agglomeration in a fluidized bed using multiple jet streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kothari, M.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Tests were conducted to determine the overall temperature distribution, temperature in the vicinity of the jets, and the rate of agglomeration in a fluidized bed containing multiple jet streams. Agglomeration of ash during coal gasification increases carbon utilization efficiency considerably. The agglomeration requires a fluidized-bed reactor with a specially designed distributor equipped with a jet to yield a hot zone confined within the bed. The rate of agglomeration depends upon the size and the intensity of the zone. This rate, and hence the unit capacity, could be increased by adding multiple jets to the distributor. The purpose of this study was to verify this phenomenon. The temperature distribution inside the agglomerating fluidized-bed reactor with a single jet was studied by Hariri et al. Various parameters were involved in agglomeration phenomena -- bed material, fluidization velocity, bed temperature, jet velocity, jet temperature, bed geometry, and distributor geometry. Controlled agglomerates were produced in the fluidized bed when a sloped gas distributor consisting of a central jet and a porous plate was used. Gas at temperatures above the melting temperature of a bed material was introduced into the jet and gas at temperatures below the softening temperature was introduced into the distributor. The rate of agglomerate formation was significantly influenced by an increase in either jet air or auxiliary (grid) air temperature. The extent of agglomeration also depended strongly upon the volume of the hot zone confined within the isotherms with temperatures higher than the melting point of the bed material.

  1. New Jet Substructure Techniques at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Swiatlowski, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Q-jets technique introduces the idea of interpreting jets through multiple sets of possible showering histories. This approach allows jet observables, such as the jet mass, to be evaluated not simply as single values, but rather as distributions. The resulting distributions can be interpreted statistically to form new observables, allowing the separation of boosted, hadronically-decaying particles from light quark and gluon backgrounds. We present a study of Q-jets in boosted, hadronically-decaying $W$ boson and dijet samples, demonstrating the discriminating power of this technique. Different Q-jet parameters and observables are studied, and an optimal configuration based on physics performance and computational efficiency is proposed, leading to a factor of 15 in dijet rejection at a 50\\% efficiency for jets from boosted, hadronically decaying $W$ bosons. The impact of pile-up on the performance of this method is tested up to an average of 40 additional interactions per event and found to be weak. A per...

  2. General review of flashing jet studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Geanette; Holdø, Arne Erik; Munday, George

    2010-01-15

    The major concern on the management of superheated liquids, in industrial environments, is the large potential hazards involved in cases of any accidental release. There is a possibility that a violent phase change could take place inside the fluid released generating a flashing jet. This violent phase change might produce catastrophic consequences, such as explosions, fires or toxic exposure, in the installations and in the surroundings. The knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms involved in those releases become an important issue in the prevention of these consequences and the minimization of their impact. This work presents a comprehensive review of information about flashing processes. The review begins with a description of the single phase jet followed by a description of the two-phase flashing jet. The concepts and implications of the thermodynamic and mechanical effects on the behaviour of the jets are considered at the beginning of the review. Following the review is devoted to the classification of the different study approaches used to understand flashing processes in the past, highlighting various critical parameters on the behaviour and the hazard consequences of flashing jets. The review also contains an extensive compilation of experimental, theoretical and numerical data relating to these phenomena, which includes information on the distinct characteristics of the jet, since type of jet, velocity distribution, expansion angle and mass phase change all require individual estimation.

  3. General review of flashing jet studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polanco, Geanette, E-mail: gpolanco@usb.ve [Simon Bolivar University, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Holdo, Arne Erik, E-mail: Erik.Holdo@coventry.ac.uk [Narvik University College, Narvik (Norway); Munday, George, E-mail: G.Munday@isaaconsult.co.uk [Coventry University, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    The major concern on the management of superheated liquids, in industrial environments, is the large potential hazards involved in cases of any accidental release. There is a possibility that a violent phase change could take place inside the fluid released generating a flashing jet. This violent phase change might produce catastrophic consequences, such as explosions, fires or toxic exposure, in the installations and in the surroundings. The knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms involved in those releases become an important issue in the prevention of these consequences and the minimization of their impact. This work presents a comprehensive review of information about flashing processes. The review begins with a description of the single phase jet followed by a description of the two-phase flashing jet. The concepts and implications of the thermodynamic and mechanical effects on the behaviour of the jets are considered at the beginning of the review. Following the review is devoted to the classification of the different study approaches used to understand flashing processes in the past, highlighting various critical parameters on the behaviour and the hazard consequences of flashing jets. The review also contains an extensive compilation of experimental, theoretical and numerical data relating to these phenomena, which includes information on the distinct characteristics of the jet, since type of jet, velocity distribution, expansion angle and mass phase change all require individual estimation.

  4. Hydro-Jet technology in urologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarriz, Bijan

    2005-05-01

    Hydro-Jet technology utilizes an extremely thin, high-pressure stream of water. This technology has been routinely used in industry as a cutting tool for different materials such as metal, ceramic, wood and glass. Recently, Hydro-Jet technology has been used for dissection and resection during open and laparoscopic surgical procedures. A high-pressure jet of water allows selective dissection and isolation of vital structures such as blood vessels and nerves. This has resulted in improved dissection and decreased complication rate in recent experimental and clinical studies. This technology has been successfully applied during open and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, cholecystecomy and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy.

  5. Mass loading and knot formation in AGN jets by stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martin; Hubbard, Alex; Frank, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Jets from active galaxies propagate from the central black hole out to the radio lobes on scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. The jets may encounter giant stars with strong stellar winds and produce observable signatures. For strong winds and weak jets, the interaction may truncate the jet flow during its transit via the mass loading. For weaker jets, the interaction can produce knots in the jet. We present recent 3DMHD numerical simulations to model the evolution of this jet-wind interaction and its observational consequences. We explore (i) the relative mechanical luminosity of the radio jets and the stellar winds (ii) the impact parameter between the jets' axis and the stellar orbital path (iii) the relative magnetic field strength of the jets and the stellar winds.

  6. The Impact of Celebrity Suicide on Subsequent Suicide Rates in the General Population of Korea from 1990 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juhyun; Choi, Nari; Kim, Seog Ju; Kim, Soohyun; An, Hyonggin; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Lee, Yu Jin

    2016-04-01

    The association between celebrity suicide and subsequent increase in suicide rates among the general population has been suggested. Previous studies primarily focused on celebrity suicides in the 2000s. To better understand the association, this study examined the impacts of celebrity suicides on subsequent suicide rates using the data of Korean celebrity suicides between 1990 and 2010. Nine celebrity suicides were selected by an investigation of media reports of suicide deaths published in three major newspapers in Korea between 1990 and 2010. Suicide mortality data were obtained from the National Statistical Office of Korea. Seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models with intervention analysis were used to test the impacts of celebrity suicides, controlling for seasonality. Six of the 9 celebrity suicides had significant impacts on suicide rates both in the total population and in the same gender- or the same age-subgroups. The incident that occurred in the 1990s had no significant impact on the overall suicide rates, whereas the majority of the incidents in the 2000s had significant influences for 30 or 60 days following each incident. The influence of celebrity suicide was shown to reach its peak following the suicide death of a renowned actress in 2008. The findings may suggest a link between media coverage and the impact of celebrity suicide. Future studies should focus more on the underlying processes and confounding factors that may contribute to the impact of celebrity suicide on subsequent suicide rates.

  7. Effects of the cooling rate on the shear behavior of continuous glass fiber/impact polypropylene composites (GF-IPP)

    KAUST Repository

    Wafai, Husam

    2016-09-20

    Fiber-reinforced composites with improved dissipation of energy during impact loading have recently been developed based on a polypropylene copolymer commonly called impact polypropylene (IPP). Composites made of IPP reinforced with glass fibers (GF) are particularly attractive to the automotive industry due to their low cost and good impact resistance. In such composites, the cooling rate varies depending on processing techniques and manufacturing choices. Here, we study the effects of the cooling rate of GF-IPP composites on shear behavior, which is critical in impact applications, using [±45]s monotonic and cyclic (load/unload) tensile specimens. The specimens were manufactured under a wide range of cooling rates (3 °C/min, 22 °C/min, 500–1000 °C/min). Mainly dominated by the properties of the matrix, the global shear behavior of GF-IPP composites differed considerably with respect to the cooling rate. However, the performance of the fiber-matrix interface (chemically modified) appeared to be unaffected by the range of cooling rates used in this study. We found that the cooling rate has a minor effect on the rate of damage accumulation, while it strongly modifies the shear-activated rate-dependant viscoelastic behavior. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  8. Determining the Macroscopic Properties of Relativistic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, P. E.

    2004-08-01

    The resolved relativistic jets contain structures whose observed proper motions are typically assumed to indicate the jet flow speed. In addition to structures moving with the flow, various normal mode structures such as pinching or helical and elliptical twisting can be produced by ejection events or twisting perturbations to the jet flow. The normal mode structures associated with relativistic jets, as revealed by numerical simulation, theoretical calculation, and suggested by observation, move more slowly than the jet speed. The pattern speed is related to the jet speed by the sound speed in the jet and in the surrounding medium. In the event that normal mode structures are observed, and where proper motions of pattern and flow speed are available or can be estimated, it is possible to determine the sound speed in the jet and surrounding medium. Where spatial development of normal mode structures is observed, it is possible to make inferences as to the heating rate/macroscopic viscosity of the jet fluid. Ultimately it may prove possible to separate the microscopic energization of the synchrotron radiating particles from the macroscopic heating of the jet fluid. Here I present the relevant properties of useful normal mode structures and illustrate the use of this technique. Various aspects of the work presented here have involved collaboration with I. Agudo (Max-Planck, Bonn), M.A. Aloy (Max-Planck, Garching), J. Eilek (NM Tech), J.L. Gómez (U. Valencia), P. Hughes (U. Michigan), A. Lobanov (Max-Planck, Bonn), J.M. Martí (U. Valencia), & C. Walker (NRAO).

  9. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  10. Impact of Health Research Systems on Under-5 Mortality Rate: A Trend Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Parsaeian, Mahboubeh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nikooee, Sima

    2016-11-26

    Between 1990 and 2015, under-5 mortality rate (U5MR) declined by 53%, from an estimated rate of 91 deaths per 1000 live births to 43, globally. The aim of this study was to determine the share of health research systems in this decrease alongside other influential factors. We used random effect regression models including the 'random intercept' and 'random intercept and random slope' models to analyze the panel data from 1990 to 2010. We selected the countries with U5MRs falling between the first and third quartiles in 1990. We used both the total articles (TA) and the number of child-specific articles (CSA) as a proxy of the health research system. In order to account for the impact of other factors, measles vaccination coverage (MVC) (as a proxy of health system performance), gross domestic product (GDP), human development index (HDI), and corruption perception index (CPI) (as proxies of development), were embedded in the model. Among all the models, 'the random intercept and random slope models' had lower residuals. The same variables of CSA, HDI, and time were significant and the coefficient of CSA was estimated at -0.17; meaning, with the addition of every 100 CSA, the rate of U5MR decreased by 17 per 1000 live births. Although the number of CSA has contributed to the reduction of U5MR, the amount of its contribution is negligible compared to the countries' development. We recommend entering different types of researches into the model separately in future research and including the variable of 'exchange between knowledge generator and user.'

  11. Impact of Health Research Systems on Under-5 Mortality Rate: A Trend Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Yazdizadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Between 1990 and 2015, under-5 mortality rate (U5MR declined by 53%, from an estimated rate of 91 deaths per 1000 live births to 43, globally. The aim of this study was to determine the share of health research systems in this decrease alongside other influential factors. Methods We used random effect regression models including the ‘random intercept’ and ‘random intercept and random slope’ models to analyze the panel data from 1990 to 2010. We selected the countries with U5MRs falling between the first and third quartiles in 1990. We used both the total articles (TA and the number of child-specific articles (CSA as a proxy of the health research system. In order to account for the impact of other factors, measles vaccination coverage (MVC (as a proxy of health system performance, gross domestic product (GDP, human development index (HDI, and corruption perception index (CPI (as proxies of development, were embedded in the model. Results Among all the models, ‘the random intercept and random slope models’ had lower residuals. The same variables of CSA, HDI, and time were significant and the coefficient of CSA was estimated at -0.17; meaning, with the addition of every 100 CSA, the rate of U5MR decreased by 17 per 1000 live births. Conclusion Although the number of CSA has contributed to the reduction of U5MR, the amount of its contribution is negligible compared to the countries’ development. We recommend entering different types of researches into the model separately in future research andincluding the variable of ‘exchange between knowledge generator and user.’

  12. Head-on collisions of dense granular jets

    CERN Document Server

    Ellowitz, Jake

    2015-01-01

    When a dense stream of dry, non-cohesive grains hits a fixed target, a collimated sheet is ejected from the impact region, very similar to what happens for a stream of water. In this study, as a continuation of the investigation why such remarkably different incident fluids produce such similar ejecta, we use discrete particle simulations to collide two unequal-width granular jets head-on in two dimensions. In addition to the familiar coherent ejecta, we observe that the impact produces a far less familiar quasi-steady-state corresponding to a uniformly translating free surface and flow field. Upon repeating such impacts with multiple continuum fluid simulations, we show that this translational speed is controlled only by the total energy dissipation rate to the power $1.5$, and is independent of the details of the jet composition. Our findings, together with those from impacts against fixed targets, challenge the principle of scattering in which material composition is inferred from observing the ejecta prod...

  13. [Voluntary alpha-power increasing training impact on the heart rate variability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, O M; Balioz, N V; Muravleva, K B; Skoraia, M V

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the effect of the alpha EEG power increasing training at heart rate variability (HRV) as the index of the autonomic regulation of cognitive functions there were follow tasks: (1) to figure out the impact of biofeedback in the voluntary increasing the power in the individual high-frequency alpha-band effect on heart rate variability and related characteristics of cognitive and emotional spheres, (2) to determine the nature of the relationship between alpha activity indices and heart rate variability, depending on the alpha-frequency EEG pattern at rest (3) to examine how the individual alpha frequency EEG pattern is reflected in changes HRV as a result of biofeedback training. Psychometric indicators of cognitive performance, the characteristics of the alpha-EEG activity and heart rate variability (HRV) as LF/HF and pNN50 were recorded in 27 healthy men aged 18-34 years, before, during, and after 10 sessions of training of voluntary increase in alpha power in the individual high-frequency alpha band with eyes closed. To determine the biofeedback effect on the alpha power increasing training, data subjects are compared in 2 groups: experimental (14) with the real and the control group (13 people)--with mock biofeedback. The follow up effect of trainings was studied through month over the 10 training sessions. Results showed that alpha biofeedback training enhanced the fluency and accuracy in cognitive performance, decreased anxiety and frontal EMG, increased resting frequency, width and power in individual upper alpha range only in participants with low baseline alpha frequency. While mock biofeedback increased resting alpha power only in participants with high baseline resting alpha frequency and did change neither cognitive performance, nor HRV indices. Biofeedback training eliminated the alpha power decrease in response to arithmetic task in both with high and low alpha frequency participants and this effect was followed up over the month. Mock

  14. The exhalant jet of mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgard, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann; Lundgreen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    detailed 2-component velocity distributions near the exhalant siphon in 5 planes parallel to the axis of the jet and the major axis of the oval aperture, and hence estimates of momentum and kinetic energy flows in addition to mean velocity. Data obtained on particles inside the exhalant jet of filtered...... shell lengths. Here, we present results of a detailed study of fully open mussels Mytilus edulis in terms of filtration rate, exhalant siphon aperture area, jet velocity, gill area and body dry weight, all as a function of shell length (mean +/- SD) over the range 16.0 +/- 0.4 to 82.6 +/- 2.9 mm......, with the corresponding scaling laws also presented. The exhalant jet velocity was determined by 3 methods: (1) measured clearance rate divided by exhalant aperture area, (2) manual particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using video-microscope recordings, and (3) particle image velocimetry (PIV). The latter provides...

  15. Impact of birth rate, seasonality and transmission rate on minimum levels of coverage needed for rubella vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C J E; Lessler, J; Klepac, P; Cutts, F; Grenfell, B T

    2012-12-01

    Childhood rubella infection in early pregnancy can lead to fetal death or congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) with multiple disabilities. Reduction of transmission via universal vaccination can prevent CRS, but inadequate coverage may increase CRS numbers by increasing the average age at infection. Consequently, many countries do not vaccinate against rubella. The World Health Organization recommends that for safe rubella vaccination, at least 80% coverage of each birth cohort should be sustained. The nonlinear relationship between CRS burden and infection dynamics has been much studied; however, how the complex interaction between epidemic and demographic dynamics affects minimum safe levels of coverage has not been quantitatively evaluated across scales necessary for a global assessment. We modelled 30-year CRS burdens across epidemiological and demographic settings, including the effect of local interruption of transmission via stochastic fadeout. Necessary minimum vaccination coverage increases markedly with birth and transmission rates, independent of amplitude of seasonal fluctuations in transmission. Susceptible build-up in older age groups following local stochastic extinction of rubella increased CRS burden, indicating that spatial context is important. In low birth-rate settings, 80% routine coverage is a conservative guideline, particularly if supplemented with campaigns and vaccination of women of childbearing age. Where birth and transmission rates are high, immunization coverage must be well above 80% and campaigns may be needed. Policy-makers should be aware of the potential negative effect of local extinction of rubella, since heterogeneity in vaccination coverage will shape extinction patterns, potentially increasing CRS burdens.

  16. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  17. Multi-scale modeling of the impact response of a strain-rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel

    OpenAIRE

    Canadinç, Demircan; Önal, Orkun; Özmenci, Cemre

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry, and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial ten...

  18. Impact of leukapheresis on early death rate in adult acute myeloid leukemia presenting with hyperleukocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bug, Gesine; Anargyrou, Konstantinos; Tonn, Torsten; Bialleck, Heike; Seifried, Erhard; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2007-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with hyperleukocytosis of at least 100 x 10(9) per L are at high risk of early death due to pulmonary or cerebral leukostasis. Although the efficacy of leukapheresis in terms of prompt cytoreduction is generally accepted, published data regarding the clinical value of immediate therapeutic leukapheresis are limited and conflicting. To determine whether leukapheresis has a favorable impact on early mortality, the clinical course of 53 newly diagnosed patients with AML and hyperleukocytosis admitted between 1995 and 2005 was analyzed retrospectively. Before August 2001, 28 patients received chemotherapy without leukoreduction (Cohort A). Thereafter, all AML patients with hyperleukocytosis were scheduled to receive leukapheresis, which was performed in 25 patients (Cohort B). There were no procedure-related adverse events. By Day 21 of therapy, 13 of 53 patients had died, resulting in an overall early death rate of 25 percent. In a multivariate logistic regression model, patients in Cohort B had a significantly lower risk of early death than patients in Cohort A (16% vs. 32%, respectively; p = 0.015). Dyspnea (p = 0.005), elevated creatinine (p = 0.028), and higher lactate dehydrogenase serum levels (p = 0.021) were independent risk factors for early death. With a median follow-up of 24.2 months, the overall survival was similar in both cohorts (Cohort A, 7.5; Cohort B, 6.5 months). Thus, leukapheresis had no impact on patients' long-term survivals. Our experience suggests that AML patients with hyperleukocytosis receiving leukapheresis had a significantly lower risk for early death by Day 21 than patients treated without leukapheresis. We therefore have adopted leukapheresis as a standard procedure in our department.

  19. Evaluating the Impacts of Climate Change on Soil Erosion Rates in Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Martínez-Santiago

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although water-eroded soil (WES resulting from human activities has been recognized as the leading global cause of land degradation, the soil erosion risks from climate change are not clear. Studies have reported that WES is the second most significant cause of soil loss in Mexico, and its future trajectory has not been sufficiently evaluated. The aims of this study are to 1 determine the impacts of climate change on WES and its distribution for the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico, and to 2 compare the present and future soil loss rates for the study unit (SU. The State of Aguascalientes is located in the “Region del Bajio.” The impact of climate change on WES was evaluated using the near-future divided world scenario (A2 presented in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. Daily temperature and precipitation data from 18 weather stations were downscaled to model historic laminar water erosion (HLWE and changes therein in the A2 near-future scenario for 2010–2039 (LWEScA2. Due to future changes in mean annual rainfall (MAR levels, a change in the LWEScA2 of between 1.6 and 8.9% could result in average soil losses up to 475.4 t ha-1 yr-1, representing a loss of slightly more than a 30-mm layer of mountain soil per year. The risk zones, classified as class 4 for LWE, are located to western of the State in part of municipalities of Calvillo, Jesus María, San José de Gracia y Cosio, where there are typical hills and falls with soil very sensitive to rain erosion.

  20. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Fedorov, Andrei G., E-mail: agf@gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 μm inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits of focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon “halo” deposition due to secondary electrons from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.

  2. The emergence of zonal jets in forced rotating shallow water turbulence: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espa, S.; Di Nitto, G.; Cenedese, A.

    2010-11-01

    The emergence of a sequence of alternating intense and elongated eastward-westward bands i.e. zonal jets in the atmosphere of the giant planets and in Earth's oceans have been widely investigated. Nevertheless jets formation and role as material barriers remain still unclear. Jets are generated in a quasi-2D turbulent flow due to the latitudinal variation of the Coriolis parameter (the so-called β-effect) which modifies the inverse cascade process channeling energy towards zonal modes. In previous experiments we have investigated the impact of the variation of the rotation rate, of the domain geometry and of the initial spectra on jets organization in a decaying regime. In this work we investigate the formation of jets in a continuously forced flow, we characterize the observed regime and also we attempt to verify the existence of an universal regime corresponding to the so-called zonostrophic turbulence. The experimental set-up consists of a rotating tank where turbulence is generated by electromagnetically forcing a shallow layer of an electrolyte solution, and the variation of the Coriolis parameter has been simulated by the parabolic profile assumed by the free surface of the fluid under rotation. Flow measurements have been performed using image analysis.

  3. TASI Lectures on Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

  4. Jet propagation and deceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2013-01-01

    Extragalactic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are divided into two morphological types, namely Fanaroff-Riley I (FRI) and Fanaroff-Riley II (FRII). The former show decollimated structure at the kiloparsec scales and are thought to be decelerated by entrainment within the first kiloparsecs of evolution inside the host galaxy. The entrainment and deceleration can be, at least partly, due to the interaction of jets with stellar winds and gas clouds that enter in the jet as they orbit around the galactic centre. In this contribution, I review recent simulations to study the dynamic effect of entrainment from stellar winds in jets and the direct interaction of jets with gas clouds and stellar winds. I also briefly describe the importance of these interactions as a possible scenario of high-energy emission from extragalactic jets.

  5. What ignites optical jets?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  6. The Impact of Resonance Frequency Breathing on Measures of Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure, and Mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Steffen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB significantly improves heart rate variability (HRV. Breathing at resonance frequency (RF, approximately 6 breaths/min constitutes a key part of HRVB training and is hypothesized to be a pathway through which biofeedback improves HRV. No studies to date, however, have experimentally examined whether RF breathing impacts measures of HRV. The present study addressed this question by comparing three groups: the RF group breathed at their determined RF for 15 min; the RF + 1 group breathed at 1 breath/min higher than their determined RF for 15 min; and the third group sat quietly for 15 min. After this 15-min period, all groups participated in the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT for 8 min, and then sat quietly during a 10-min recovery period. HRV, blood pressure, and mood were measured throughout the experiment. Groups were not significantly different on any of the measures at baseline. After the breathing exercise, the RF group reported higher positive mood than the other two groups and a significantly higher LF/HF HRV ratio relative to the control group, a key goal in HRVB training (p < 0.05. Additionally, the RF group showed lower systolic blood pressure during the PASAT and during the recovery period relative to the control group, with the RF + 1 group not being significantly different from either group (p < 0.05. Overall, RF breathing appears to play an important role in the positive effect HRVB has on measures of HRV.

  7. Impact of Increased Football Field Width on Player High-Speed Collision Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob R; Khalsa, Siri S; Smith, Brandon W; Park, Paul

    2017-07-01

    High-acceleration head impact is a known risk for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on studies using helmet accelerometry. In football, offensive and defensive players are at higher risk of mTBI due to increased speed of play. Other collision sport studies suggest that increased playing surface size may contribute to reductions in high-speed collisions. We hypothesized that wider football fields lead to a decreased rate of high-speed collisions. Computer football game simulation was developed using MATLAB. Four wide receivers were matched against 7 defensive players. Each offensive player was randomized to one of 5 typical routes on each play. The ball was thrown 3 seconds into play; ball flight time was 2 seconds. Defensive players were delayed 0.5 second before reacting to ball release. A high-speed collision was defined as the receiver converging with a defensive player within 0.5 second of catching the ball. The simulation counted high-speed collisions for 1 team/season (65 plays/game for 16 games/season = 1040 plays/season) averaged during 10 seasons, and was validated against existing data using standard field width (53.3 yards). Field width was increased in 1-yard intervals up to 58.3 yards. Using standard field width, 188 ± 4 high-speed collisions were seen per team per season (18% of plays). When field width increased by 3 yards, high-speed collision rate decreased to 135 ± 3 per team per season (28% decrease; P football field width can lead to substantial decline in high-speed collisions, with potential for reducing instances of mTBI in football players. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and impact on breastfeeding rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Stern, Ariel Dora; Baum, Christopher F; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) as well as evaluate the BFHI and its components on breastfeeding initiation and duration overall and according to maternal education level. Design Quasi-experimental study using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2004 to 2008. Setting Birth facilities in Maine. Participants 915 mothers who gave birth in four hospitals that were BFHI-accredited or became accredited and 1099 mothers from six matched non-BFHI facilities. Mothers reported on seven (of 10) BFHI practices (breastfeeding practice score 0–7) and receipt of a gift pack with formula (yes/no). Main outcome measures Self-report of breastfeeding initiation, any breast feeding for ≥4 weeks, exclusive breast feeding for ≥4 weeks. Results 34.6% of mothers from BFHI-accredited facilities reported experiencing all seven BFHI breastfeeding practices, while 28.4% reported being given a gift pack with formula. Among mothers with lower education, the BFHI increased breastfeeding initiation by 8.6 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.086 [95% CI, 0.01 to 0.16]) and, independently, each additional breastfeeding practice was associated with an average increase in breastfeeding initiation of 16.2 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.162 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.18]). Among all mothers and mothers with higher education, there was no effect of the BFHI on breastfeeding rates. Conclusions Compliance with BFHI practices among BFHI-accredited facilities is not optimal and needs to be monitored, as greater compliance may have an even larger impact on breastfeeding rates and potentially reduce socio-economic disparities in breast feeding. PMID:24277661

  9. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', G; Patsourakos, S; Zimbardo, G

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km/s, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km/s2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 minutes, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and eq...

  10. Experimental investigation of influence of Reynolds number on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; He, GuoSheng; Kulkarni, Varun; Wang, JinJun

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was employed to study the effect of Reynolds number ( Re sj) on synthetic jet vortex rings impinging onto a solid wall. Four Reynolds numbers ranging from 166 to 664 were investigated for comparison while other parameters were kept constant. It is found that the Reynolds number has a significant impact on the spatial evolution of near-wall vortical structures of the impinging synthetic jet. Velocity triple decomposition reveals that periodic Reynolds shear stresses produced by both impinging and secondary vortex rings agree well with a four-quadrant-type distribution rule, and the random velocity fluctuations are strengthened as Re sj increases. For radial wall jet, radial velocity profiles exhibit a self-similar behavior for all Re sj, and this self-similar profile gradually deviates from the laminar solution as Re sj is increased. In particular, the self-similar profile for low Re sj (166) coincides with the laminar solution indicating that periodic velocity fluctuations produced by vortex rings have little effect on the velocity profile of the laminar wall jet. This also provides evidence that the impinging synthetic jet is more effective in mixing than the continuous jet for the laminar flow. For the high Re sj, the mean skin friction coefficient has a slower decay rate after reaching peak, and the radial momentum flux has a higher value at locations far away from the impingement region, both of these can be attributed to the enhanced random fluctuations.

  11. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  12. Predicting the Effects of Powder Feeding Rates on Particle Impact Conditions and Cold Spray Deposited Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozan C.; Widener, Christian A.; Carter, Michael J.; Johnson, Kyle W.

    2017-08-01

    As the industrial application of the cold spray technology grows, the need to optimize both the cost and the quality of the process grows with it. Parameter selection techniques available today require the use of a coupled system of equations to be solved to involve the losses due to particle loading in the gas stream. Such analyses cause a significant increase in the computational time in comparison with calculations with isentropic flow assumptions. In cold spray operations, engineers and operators may, therefore, neglect the effects of particle loading to simplify the multiparameter optimization process. In this study, two-way coupled (particle-fluid) quasi-one-dimensional fluid dynamics simulations are used to test the particle loading effects under many potential cold spray scenarios. Output of the simulations is statistically analyzed to build regression models that estimate the changes in particle impact velocity and temperature due to particle loading. This approach eases particle loading optimization for more complete analysis on deposition cost and time. The model was validated both numerically and experimentally. Further numerical analyses were completed to test the particle loading capacity and limitations of a nozzle with a commonly used throat size. Additional experimentation helped document the physical limitations to high-rate deposition.

  13. Impact of Economic Freedom on the Growth Rate: A Panel Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ershad Hussain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study looks at some non-conventional determinants of economic growth, with the help of the newly developed economic freedom index datasets of the Heritage Foundation/Wall Street Journal(HF/WSJ, which is a cumulative index derived from several sub-indices (trade freedom index, financial freedom, labor freedom, business and fiscal freedom index. The cumulative economic freedom index show us how open and business friendly a country is. The sub-indices show us openness across different sector of the economy, for example, the financial sector or the trade sector etc. Traditional neo-classical economic theories have explained economic growth looking at the supply of labor, capital and state of technology, with little attention being paid to institutional factors. The study presents evidence based on two panel data-sets. The first set consists of 186 countries over the period 2013, 2014 and 2015 that show institutional factors play a crucial role in economic growth. A second data-set with data for 57 countries for the period 2004–2014 also show a positive impact on the index on the growth rate of per capita GDP.

  14. The effects of framing and fear on ratings and impact of antimarijuana PSAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Rick S; Cupp, Pamela K; Abadi, Melissa; Donohew, R Lewis; Gray, Carla; Gordon, Leonard; Grossl, A Bailey

    2014-06-01

    A laboratory experiment, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, involved 243 U.S. undergraduate students and employed a 2 (gain-framed vs. loss-framed) × 2 (high vs. low threat) plus control group pretest-posttest experimental design to assess the combined effects of frame (gain vs. loss) and level of threat of public service announcements (PSAs) about marijuana on attitudes, beliefs, and intentions related to marijuana, as well as the relationship of message condition to ratings of PSAs. Results suggest that loss-framed messages may lead to greater perceived threat, as well as reactance, and gain-framed messages may lead to a greater reduction in positive attitudes toward marijuana than loss-framed messages. Finally, frame and threat may interact in a complex way. Further research is suggested to replicate these findings. A substantial body of carefully crafted and systematic research studies examining both content and features of messages increasingly informs mass media prevention efforts, including the development of public service announcements (PSAs). Although the significance of messages on commercial broadcast stations may be diminishing with the increasing role and impact of new media, many of the basic questions addressed by this research are likely to apply across media channels. Nonetheless, important questions about what makes a message effective in changing an individual's attitudes or behavior remain to be answered. In this paper, the authors focus on two theoretically derived strategies that offer possibilities for developing persuasive messages: framing and threat.

  15. The impact of reduced mass loss rates on the evolution of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschi, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Mass loss is a very important aspect of the life of massive stars. After briefly reviewing its importance, we discuss the impact of the recently proposed downward revision of mass loss rates due to clumping (difficulty to form Wolf-Rayet stars and production of critically rotating stars). Although a small reduction might be allowed, large reduction factors around ten are disfavoured. We then discuss the possibility of significant mass loss at very low metallicity due to stars reaching break-up velocities and especially due to the metal enrichment of the surface of the star via rotational and convective mixing. This significant mass loss may help the first very massive stars avoid the fate of pair-creation supernova, the chemical signature of which is not observed in extremely metal poor stars. The chemical composition of the very low metallicity winds is very similar to that of the most metal poor star known to date, HE1327-2326 and offer an interesting explanation for the origin of the metals in this star. W...

  16. The Structure of A Turbulent Jet in A Crossfiow--Effect of Jet-Crossfiow Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李行伟; 匡翠萍; 陈国谦

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical study on the three-dimensional structure of a turbulent jet in crossflow is performed. Thejet-to-crossflow velocity ratio (R) varies in the range of 2 ~ 16; both vertical jets and inclined jets without excess streamwisemomentum are considered. The numerical results of the standard two-equation k-~ model show that the turbulent structurecan be broadly categorised according to the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio. For strong to moderate jet discharges, i.e. R >4, the jet is characterized by a longitudinal transition through a bent-over phase during which the jet becomes almost parallelwith the main freestream, to a sectional vortex-pair flow with double concentration maxima; the computed flow details andscalar mixing characteristics can be described by self-similar relations beyond a dimensionless distance of around 20 ~ 60.The similarity coefficients are only weakly dependent on R. The cross-section scalar field is kidney-shaped and bifurcated,with distinct double concentration maxima; the aspect ratio is found to be around 1.2. A loss in vertical momentum is ob-served and the added mass coefficient of the jet motion is found to be approximately 1. On the other hand, for weak jets instrong crossflow, i.e. R≤ 2, the lee of the jet is characterized by a negative pressure region. Although the double vortexflow can still be noted, the scalar field becomes more symmetrical and no longer bifurcated. The similarity coeffcients are al-so noticeably different. The predicted jet flow characteristics and mixing rates are well supported by experimental and field data

  17. Properties of gluon jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  18. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  19. Recent ATLAS results on jet suppression and modification in Pb+Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad jet physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. The parton shower of hard scattered partons, produced early in the collision, develops as the medium cools and expands, and thus the properties of final-state reconstructed jets are a sensitive probe of medium properties over a variety of temperature and length scales. Recent technical advances in jet reconstruction and calibration in a heavy ion underlying event background have allowed for precise and differential measurements of inclusive jet production, of jet-jet pT and multi-jet production rate correlations, and of internal jet structure. In particular, a recent set of new measurements have focused on better elucidating the flavor, centrality and pT dependence of jet suppression and modification. This talk will give a summary of the latest heavy ion jet results from ATLAS.

  20. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Bashitialshaaer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow rate. Five geometric quantities describing the jet trajectory that are useful in the design of brine discharge systems were determined. Dimensional analysis demonstrated that the geometric jet quantities studied, if normalized with the jet exit diameter, could be related to the densimetric Froude number. Analysis of the collected data showed that this was the case for a Froude number less than 100, whereas for larger values of the Froude number the scatter in the data increased significantly. As has been observed in some previous investigations, the slope of the best-fit straight line through the data points was a function of the initial jet angle (θ, where the slope increased with θ for the maximum levels (Ym studied, but had a more complex behavior for horizontal distances.

  1. Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors in Metallic Materials under High Strain-Rates Using Taylor Bar Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To ensure the reliability and safety of various mechanical systems in accordance with their high-speed usage, it is necessary to evaluate the dynamic deformation behavior of structural materials under impact load. However, it is not easy to understand the dynamic deformation behavior of the structural materials using experimental methods in the high strain-rate range exceeding 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. In this study, the Taylor bar impact test was conducted to investigate the dynamic deformation behavior of metallic materials in the high strain-rate region, using a high-speed photography system. Numerical analysis of the Taylor bar impact test was performed using AUTODYN S/W. The results of the analysis were compared with the experimental results, and the material behavior in the high strain-rate region was discussed.

  2. First principles transport coefficients and reaction rates of Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ions in argon for cold plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicheportiche, Alexandre; Benhenni, Malika; Yousfi, Mohammed, E-mail: yousfi@laplace.univ-tlse.fr [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d’Energie, LAPLACE and UMR5213 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Stachoň, Martin; Kalus, René, E-mail: rene.kalus@vsb.cz [Center of Excellence IT4Innovations and Department of Applied Mathematics, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Gadéa, Florent Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie et de Physique Quantiques, IRSAMC and UMR5626 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2014-10-07

    Momentum-transfer collision cross-sections and integral collision cross-sections for the collision-induced dissociation are calculated for collisions of ionized argon dimers with argon atoms using a nonadiabatic semiclassical method with the electronic Hamiltonian calculated on the fly via a diatomics-in-molecules semiempirical model as well as inverse-method modeling based on simple isotropic rigid-core potential. The collision cross-sections are then used in an optimized Monte Carlo code for evaluations of the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} mobility in argon gas, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and collision-induced dissociation rates. A thorough comparison of various theoretical calculations as well as with available experimental data on the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} mobility and collision cross-sections is performed. Good agreement is found between both theoretical approaches and the experiment. Analysis of the role of inelastic processes in Ar{sub 2}{sup +}/Ar collisions is also provided.

  3. Graviton production with 2 jets at the LHC in large extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Li, Qiang; Mawatari, Kentarou; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    We study Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in the large extra dimensions model via 2 jets plus missing transverse momentum signatures at the LHC. We make predictions for both the signal and the dominant Zjj and Wjj backgrounds, where we introduce missing P_T-dependent jet selection cuts that ensure the smallness of the 2-jet rate over the 1-jet rate. With the same jet selection cuts, the distributions of the two jets and their correlation with the missing transverse momentum provide additional evidence for the production of an invisible massive object.