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Sample records for rate intraluminal brachytherapy

  1. A method for verification of treatment times for high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy treatment

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    Muhammad Asghar Gadhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was aimed to increase the quality of high dose rate (HDR intraluminal brachytherapy treatment. For this purpose, an easy, fast and accurate patient-specific quality assurance (QA tool has been developed. This tool has been implemented at Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan.Methods: ABACUS 3.1 Treatment planning system (TPS has been used for treatment planning and calculation of total dwell time and then results were compared with the time calculated using the proposed method. This method has been used to verify the total dwell time for different rectum applicators for relevant treatment lengths (2-7 cm and depths (1.5-2.5 cm, different oesophagus applicators of relevant treatment lengths (6-10 cm and depths (0.9 & 1.0 cm, and a bronchus applicator for relevant treatment lengths (4-7.5 cm and depth (0.5 cm.Results: The average percentage differences between treatment time TM with manual calculation and as calculated by the TPS is 0.32% (standard deviation 1.32% for rectum, 0.24% (standard deviation 2.36% for oesophagus and 1.96% (standard deviation 0.55% for bronchus, respectively. These results advocate that the proposed method is valuable for independent verification of patient-specific treatment planning QA.Conclusion: The technique illustrated in the current study is an easy, simple, quick and useful for independent verification of the total dwell time for HDR intraluminal brachytherapy. Our method is able to identify human error-related planning mistakes and to evaluate the quality of treatment planning. It enhances the quality of brachytherapy treatment and reliability of the system.

  2. High-Dose-Rate intraluminal brachytherapy for biliary obstruction by secondary malignant biliary tumors

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    Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yang, Dae Sik; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Yong [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To analyze the survival period, prognostic factors and complications of patients having under gone high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDR-ILB) as a salvage radiation therapy, while having a catheter, for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), inserted due to biliary obstruction caused by a secondary malignant biliary tumor. A retrospective study was performed on 24 patients having undergone HDR-ILB, with PTBD catheter insertion, between December 1992 and August 2001, Their median age was 58.5, ranging from 35 to 82 years. The primary cancer site were the stomach, gallbladder, liver, pancreas and the colon, with 12, 6, 3, 2 and 1 cases, respectively. Eighteen patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy and HDR-ILB, while six were treated with HDR-ILB only. The total external beam, and brachytherapy radiations dose were 30-61.2 and 9-30 Gy, with median doses of 50 and 15 Gy, respectively. Of the 24 patients analyzed, 22 died during the follow-up period, with a median survival of 7.3 months. The 6 and 12 months survival rates were 54.2 (13 patients) and 20.8% (5 patients), respectively. The median survivals for stomach and gallbladder cancers were 7.8 and 10.2 months, respectively. According to the univariate analysis, a significant factor affecting survival of over one year was the total radiation dose (over 50 Gy) (0=0.0200), with all the patients surviving more than one year had been irradiated with more than 50 Gy. The acute side effects during the radiation therapy were managed with conservative treatment. During the follow-up period, 5 patients showed symptoms of cholangitis due to the radiation therapy. An extension to the survival of those patients treated with HDR-ILB is suggested compared to the median historical survival of those patients treated with external biliary drainage. A boost radiation dose could be effectively given, by performing HDR-ILB, which is a prognostic factor. In addition, the acute complications of

  3. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy for paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome.

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    Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Hyu

    2016-09-01

    Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS), also known as paraneoplasic pemphigus, involves the skin, internal organs and mucosa. PAMS-associated mortality may occur as a result of autoantibody formation against internal tumors and their infiltration into organs other than the skin lesions that characterize PAMS. The most common symptoms of PAMS include pain associated with continuous oral ulceration and resistance to pharmacological treatment. The present study reports the case of a 42-year-old female patient who was admitted with an 8-month history of erosive skin lesions within the trunk region, oral mucosa and vaginal mucosa. The patient was diagnosed with PAMS based on computed tomography scans and histological analyses of the lesions. The lymphoid hyperplasia in the retroperitoneum and lesions in the vaginal mucosa and trunk area were improved following pharmacological treatment and resection of the lymph node showing hyperplasia. However, the oral lesion was treated with intraluminal brachytherapy due to its resistance to long-term pharmacological treatment. The majority of the lesions were improved following treatment, in the absence of any severe side effects. In addition, neither worsening nor progression of the oral lesion was observed during the 4-year follow-up period.

  4. Intraluminal brachytherapy in the treatment of bile duct carcinoma

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    Leung, J.T. [Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Kuan, R. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Perth, WA (Australia)

    1997-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the biliary tract have a poor prognosis because the disease is often unresectable at diagnosis. Intraluminal brachytherapy has been reported as an effective treatment for localized cholangiocarcinoma of the biliary tract. The purpose of our study was to analyse the survival of patients treated with brachytherapy and make some recommendations regarding its use. Fifteen patients underwent brachytherapy via a trans-hepatic approach at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital from 1983 to 1993. Eleven patients had low-dose rate brachytherapy and four patients had high-dose rate treatment. There were nine males and six females. The median age was 64 years. Other treatment included bypass procedures in two patients, endoscopic stents in 14 patients and external beam irradiation in one patient. The median survival was 12.5 months and 47% of the patients survived 1 year. The only complication reported was cholangitis which was seen in one patient. There did not seem to be any difference in survival or complications between low- and high-dose rate brachytherapy. It is concluded that the addition of intraluminal brachytherapy after biliary drainage prolongs survival and is a safe and effective treatment, but patients still have a high rate of local failure, and further studies will be needed to address this problem. (authors). 28 refs., 3 figs.

  5. High-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy prior to external radiochemotherapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer: preliminary results.

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    Safaei, Afsaneh Maddah; Ghalehtaki, Reza; Khanjani, Nezhat; Farazmand, Borna; Babaei, Mohammad; Esmati, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma) were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%). Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  6. A single session of intraluminal brachytherapy in palliation of oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, J; Langendijk, H; Pannebakker, M; Rijken, J; deJong, J

    1995-01-01

    Between September 1987 and September 1993, 88 patients with oesophageal cancer were treated by a single session of intraluminal brachytherapy of 15 Gy prescribed at 1 cm distance from the central axis, using MDR Cs-137 (n = 51) during the first part of the study and HDR Ir-192 (n = 37) during the se

  7. Long-term survival after intraluminal brachytherapy for inoperable hilar cholangiocarcinoma: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siu-Yin Chan; Ronnie T. Poon; Kelvin K. Ng; Chi-Leung Liu; Raymond T. Chan; Sheung-Tat Fan

    2005-01-01

    Surgical resection with a tumor-free margin is the onlycurative treatment for hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Klatskin tumor). However, over half of the patients present late with unresectable tumors. Radiotherapy using external beamirradiation or intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) has been used to treat unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma with satisfactory outcome. We reported a patient with unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma surviving more than 6 years after combined external beam irradiation and ILBT.

  8. Clinical Report on Californium-252 Neutron Intraluminal Brachytherapy Combined with External Irradiation for Cervical Carcinoma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyu Zhao; Keming Wang; Jian Sun; Xin Geng; Weiming Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the curative effects and complications of californium-252 (252Cf) neutron intraluminal brachytherapy (IBT) combined with external irradiation (El) for treatment of cervical carcinoma.METHODS From December 2000 to December 2004, 128 cases of cervical carcinoma staged into ⅡA~ⅢB according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) standards were treated with 252Cf neutron IBT using 8~10 Gy per fraction, once a week. The total dose at reference A point was 36~40 Gy in 4~5 fractions. From the second day after 252Cf neutron IBT treatment, the whole pelvic cavity was treated with 60Co γ-ray El, applying 2 Gy per fraction, 4 times per week. After 20~25 Gy of El, the center of the whole pelvic field was blocked with 4 cm of lead in width. The total dose of El was 45~50 Gy.RESULTS The short-term therapeutic effects were CR 95.3% and PR 4.7%. The 3 and 5-year local control rates were 93.5% and 87.9%. The overall 3-year survival rate was 87.5% and for Stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ , 90.9%and 81.5% respectively; the overall 5-year survival rate was 70% and for Stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ, 76.2% and 61% respectively. The rate of radiation complications was 4.7% for radiation cystitis, 7.8% for radiation proctitis, 6.3%for vagina contracture and adhesion and 5.5% for protracted radiation proctitis.CONCLUSION An combination of 252Cf neutron IBT with El for treatment of cervical carcinoma can be well-tolerated by cervical carcinoma patients. The rate of local tumor control is high and radiation complications are few.

  9. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

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    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  10. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. A patient receiving LDR brachytherapy will stay overnight at the hospital. This is so the delivery device can remain in place throughout the treatment period. Pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy is delivered in a similar way, ...

  11. 192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy for the prevention of urethral re-stricture%192Ir腔内放疗预防男性尿道内切开术后再狭窄临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马缠过; 郭辉; 杜春; 杨克强

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨和评价尿道内切开或(和)瘢痕电切术后,192Ir腔内放疗预防男性尿道再狭窄的安全性和临床疗效.方法 2年余内共治疗48例,其中年龄18~81岁,狭窄长度为0.5~5.5cm,90%狭窄长度在3.0 cm以内.外伤性狭窄23例、前列腺增生术后狭窄19例、不明原因狭窄6例.经尿道造影或内窥镜检查确诊.26例首次治疗,22例再次治疗(首次治疗属非放疗疗法).放疗处方剂量为14~18 Gy.结果 48例平均随访10个月,有效率98%.治疗后无复发,无明显副作用.47例排尿均通畅,最大尿流率13.9~36.4(19.2±10.3)ml/s;1例出现轻度尿失禁,可能与多次扩张损伤尿道括约肌有关.结论 尿道内切开或(和)瘢痕电切术后腔内放疗有助于预防尿道再狭窄,明显优于现有其他治疗方法,且副作用小、简便易行.%Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy for the prevention of urethral re-stricture after transurethral incision or transurethral resection of scar. Methods From Mar. 2004 to Jun. 2006,48 patients aging 18-81 years were treated by 192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy. The length of stricture(0.5-5.5 era) was≤3.0 cm in 90% of the patients. The stricture was caused by trauma in 23 patients and prostate hyperplasia operation in 19 patients. The cause of remaining 6 patients was unclear. All patients were diagnosed by urethra photograph or endoscopy. Radiotherapy was the initial treatment in 26 patients and the second time treatment in 22. The irradiation dose was from 14 Gy to 18 Gy.Results The median follow up was 10 months,and the total response rate was 98%. Only one patient recurred and received transurethral incision again. The uresis was fluency in 47 patients and the maximum flow rate was 13.9-36.4(19.2±10.3) ml/s. No secondary urethral bleeding or urethral cancer was observed.Conclusions Being a safe and feasible treatment, ,192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy following transurethral

  12. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

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    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes.

  13. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

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    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  14. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy.

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    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N; Pieters, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose.

  15. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

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    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  16. Modulation of toxicity following external beam irradiation preceded by high-dose rate brachytherapy in inoperable oesophageal cancer

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    Taal, B.G.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Koning, C.C.E.; Boot, H. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    To induce fast relief of dysphagia in inoperable oesephageal cancer, we applied high-dose rate (HDR) intraluminal irradiation followed by external irradiation (EBRT) in a phase II study. 15 patients (group A: n = 15; 10 men, 5 women; median age 66 years) were treated with 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy plus 40 Gy EBRT (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy). Severe side-effects were encountered in 60% of patients: 3 late ulceration, 2 pending fistula and 2 patients with fatal haemorrhage after an interval of 6 months. Overall response was excellent: 9 complete remissions (60%) and 6 partial responses (40%). Because of the high toxicity rate, in a subsequent study (group B: n = 30; 23 mean, 7 women; median age 66 years) the EBRT scheme was changed using smaller fractions (2.0 Gy) to reach the same total dose of 40 Gy. The complication rate (17%) was significantly reduced, while the overall response remained excellent (83%): 17 complete and 8 partial responses. The impressive change in complication rate of HDR brachytherapy and EBRT stresses the impact of the fraction per dose and illustrates the small therapeutic margins. (author).

  17. Intraluminal Gossypiboma

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    Yousuf Aziz Khan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gossypiboma (GP or retained surgical sponge is one of the rare surgical complications which can happen despite precautions. Because of the medico-legal issues, it is under-reported. An 8-year-old thalassemic girl, with a history of splenectomy and cholecystectomy, presented to us with acute intestinal obstruction and required surgical exploration. Intraluminal gossypiboma obstructing the ileum was found. Though a rare cause, gossypiboma should also be included in the differential diagnoses of postoperative intestinal obstruction.

  18. Image-guided high dose rate endorectal brachytherapy.

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    Devic, Slobodan; Vuong, Té; Moftah, Belal; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin B; Poon, Emily; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-11-01

    Fractionated high dose rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDR-EBT) using CT-based treatment planning is an alternative method for preoperative down-sizing and down-staging of advanced rectal adeno-carcinomas. The authors present an image guidance procedure that was developed to ensure daily dose reproducibility for the four brachytherapy treatment fractions. Since the applicator might not be placed before each treatment fraction inside the rectal lumen in the same manner as it was placed during the 3D CT volume acquisition used for treatment planning, there is a shift along the catheter axis that may have to be performed. The required shift is determined by comparison of a daily radiograph with the treatment planning digitally-reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A procedure is developed for DRR reconstruction from the 3D data set used for the treatment planning, and two possible daily longitudinal shifts are illustrated: above and below the planning dose distribution. The authors also describe the procedure for rotational alignment illustrated on a clinical case. Reproduction of the treatment planned dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for the success of fractionated 3D based brachytherapy treatments. Due to the cylindrical symmetry of the applicator used for preoperative HDR-EBT, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dwell position shift along the applicator's longitudinal axis. The impact of the longitudinal applicator shift prior to treatment delivery for 62 patients treated in our institution is also assessed.

  19. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

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    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  20. High dose rate brachytherapy source measurement intercomparison.

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    Poder, Joel; Smith, Ryan L; Shelton, Nikki; Whitaker, May; Butler, Duncan; Haworth, Annette

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a comparison of air kerma rate (AKR) measurements performed by multiple radiotherapy centres for a single HDR (192)Ir source. Two separate groups (consisting of 15 centres) performed AKR measurements at one of two host centres in Australia. Each group travelled to one of the host centres and measured the AKR of a single (192)Ir source using their own equipment and local protocols. Results were compared to the (192)Ir source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer by means of a ratio of measured to certified AKR. The comparisons showed remarkably consistent results with the maximum deviation in measurement from the decay-corrected source certificate value being 1.1%. The maximum percentage difference between any two measurements was less than 2%. The comparisons demonstrated the consistency of well-chambers used for (192)Ir AKR measurements in Australia, despite the lack of a local calibration service, and served as a valuable focal point for the exchange of ideas and dosimetry methods.

  1. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

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    Yamazaki, Hideya [Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Dentistry

    2003-03-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  2. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer: low dose rate to high dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2003-03-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n = 341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer.

  3. Combined external beam and intraluminal radiotherapy for irresectable Klatskin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleicher, U.M. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Staatz, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Alzen, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); Abt. Kinderradiologie, Giessen Univ. (Germany); Andreopoulos, D. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany); BOC Oncology Centre, Nikosia (Cyprus)

    2002-12-01

    Background: In most cases of proximal cholangiocarcinoma, curative surgery is not possible. Radiotherapy can be used for palliative treatment. We report our experience with combined external beam and intraluminal radiotherapy of advanced Klatskin's tumors. Patients and Methods: 30 patients were treated for extrahepatic proximal bile duct cancer. Our schedule consisted for external beam radiotherapy (median dose 30 Gy) and a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost (median dose 40 Gy) delivered in four or five fractions, which could be applied completely in twelve of our patients. 15 patients in the brachytherapy and nine patients in the non-brachytherapy group received additional low-dose chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Results: The brachytherapy boost dose improved the effect of external beam radiotherapy by increasing survival from a median of 3.9 months in the non-brachytherapy group to 9.1 months in the brachytherapy group. The effect was obvious in patients receiving a brachytherapy dose above 30 Gy, and in those without jaundice at the beginning of radiotherapy (p<0.05). Conclusions: The poor prognosis in patients with advanced Klatskin's tumors may be improved by combination therapy, with the role of brachytherapy and chemotherapy still to be defined. Our results suggest that patients without jaundice should be offered brachytherapy, and that a full dose of more than 30 Gy should be applied. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei den meisten Patienten mit proximalen Cholangiokarzinomen ist eine kurative Operation nicht mehr moeglich. Im Rahmen der Palliativbehandlung kann die Strahlentherapie eingesetzt werden. Wir berichten ueber unsere Erfahrungen mit der Kombination aus perkutaner und intraluminaler Strahlentherapie fortgeschrittener Klatskin-Tumoren. Patienten und Methode: 30 Patienten wurden wegen extrahepatischer proximaler Gallengangskarzinome behandelt. Unser Therapieschema umfasste eine perkutane Strahlentherapie (mediane Dosis: 30 Gy) sowie einen

  4. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sungjae; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tanaka, Eiichi; Sumida, Iori; Tamari, Keisuke; Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    We have retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. From 1997 to 2012, salvage HDR brachytherapy was performed in 43 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 41-88 years). HDR brachytherapy was performed by interstitial brachytherapy in 34 patients (79%) and by intracavity brachytherapy in nine patients (21%). Seventeen (40%) of the 43 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy. The median followup period was 58 months (range, 6-179 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates (LC) were 84%, 52%, and 78%, respectively. Patients who received brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy experienced no nodal recurrence (0 of 17 patients), whereas 23% of the patients (6 of 26 patients) who received brachytherapy alone experienced nodal recurrence (p = 0.047). The pathologic grade at the time of initial surgery (G1-2 vs. G3) was found to be a significant prognostic factor for both OS and PFS. The respective 5-year OS was 96% vs. 40% (p endometrial cancer. Pathologic grade, age, and modality were significant prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A case of percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy for superior pulmonary sulcus tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Tamaki; Imamura, Masahiro; Murata, Takashi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old man with advanced superior pulmonary sulcus tumor suffered severe unrelieved pain even after chemotherapy, external irradiation and hyperthermia. So we planned to introduce a percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy using the microselectron HDR {sup 192}Ir. With the estimation using the Pain Score, satisfying pain relief was attainable with a combination of the percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy and conventional treatment. So the percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy had the possibility to contribute to the alleviation of the pain. (author)

  6. Preoperative radiotherapy for advanced lower rectal cancer. Combination of external and high-dose-rate intraluminal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Tsuji, Yoshihiko; Uto, Fumiaki; Ohishi, Hajime; Uchida, Hideo; Fujii, Hisao; Nakano, Hiroshige [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation using a combination of external irradiation and high dose rate intraluminal irradiation using {sup 60}Co aimed at enhancing postoperative local control of advanced rectal cancer. The subjects comprised 38 patients (RT group) in whom {>=} A{sub 1}` lower rectal cancer was suspected and who underwent preoperative irradiation at this hospital. A control group (N-RT group) consisted of 16 patients subjected to operation alone in whom clinical {>=} A{sub 1}` and postoperative histological study revealed {>=} a{sub 1}. Intraluminal irradiation was performed using a balloon applicator. The external irradiation was performed with a 10 MVX delivering 30-40 Gy/15-20 Fr to the entire pelvic cavity. Using the criteria of Ohboshi and Shimozato to judge the histopathological effect, no cases showed Grade I, while of Grade II, 15 cases showed IIA and 19 cases IIB, Grade III in 4 cases. Grade IIB or above was noted in 23 of 38 (61%). Five and 8-year survival rates were 82.5 and 82.5% in the RT group, and were 79.5 and 79.5% in the N-RT group. Although these differences were not significant, a trend to better survival was found in the RT group. The local recurrence rate was 8% (3/38 cases) in the RT group in contrast to 25% (4/16 cases) in the N-RT group. The following complications developed during radiation therapy: diarrhea 19 (50%), anal pain 18 (47%), and others. Postoperative complications consisted of perineal fluid collection 4 (10%), bowel obstruction 3 cases (8%), an anastomotic insufficiency 3 (8%), fistula formation of bladder 2 (5%), ureteral narrowing 1 (3%), and thrombosis of vein 1 cases (3%) of the RT group, while perineal fluid collection 1 (6%), bowel obstruction 1 (6%), an anastomotic insufficiency 4 (25%) of the N-RT group, only one case of RT group (3%) required surgical treatment for the fistula formation of bladder. (K.H.)

  7. Paired observation of californium-252 neutron intraluminal brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy with and without lead shielding for cervical cancer%252 Cf中子腔内照射结合挡铅与不挡铅外照射治疗宫颈癌的配对观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴卓捷; 雷新; 陈永红; 刘佳

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较252 Cf中子腔内照射结合挡铅盆腔对穿野和不挡铅箱式四野外照射治疗宫颈癌的治疗结果。方法2004—2007年本院收治的Ⅱa—Ⅲb 期的宫颈鳞癌患者,按照临床分期、年龄、肿瘤大小、贫血程度为配对条件,共筛选出26对(52例)研究对象,分为挡铅盆腔对穿野组(挡铅组)和不挡铅箱式四野组(不挡铅组)。两组患者外照射期间穿插252 Cf中子后装治疗。 Kaplan?Meier法计算5年LC、OS、DFS 并 Logrank 检验差异,晚期并发症发生率差异行 McNemar 法检验。结果挡铅、不挡铅组5年LC 率分别为85%、81%(P=0??014),OS 率分别为89%、73%(P=0??013),DFS 率分别为89%、73%(P=0??013),晚期并发症发生率分别为12%、23%(P=0??008)。结论腔内照射结合外照射治疗宫颈癌时无论采取对穿野还是箱式四野,后程前后野中央均应挡铅。%Objective To compare the efficacy between californium?252 ( 252 Cf ) neutron intraluminal brachytherapy combined with external?beam radiotherapy with lead?shielding pelvic parallel opposing field technique and non?lead?shielding four?field box technique for cervical cancer. Methods A total of 52 patients with stage Ⅱa?Ⅲb cervical squamous cell carcinoma who were admitted to our hospital from 2004 to 2007 were enrolled as subjects and paired by clinical stage, age, tumor size, and degree of anemia. The 26 pairs of patients were divided into lead?shielding pelvic parallel opposing field group (lead?shielding group) and non?lead?shielding four?field box group (non?lead?shielding group). For all patients in both groups, 252 Cf neutron brachytherapy was added in external?beam radiotherapy. The local control (LC), overall survival (OS), and disease?free survival (DFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan?Meier method and analyzed using the log?rank test. The difference in the incidence of late complications was

  8. Pulsed-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Francesca; Caiazzo, Rossella; Benevento, Ilaria; Musio, Daniela; Rubini, Filippo; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most frequent gynecologic malignancy. The aim of this review is to outline clinical practice recommendations, to suggest a technical solution, and to advise doses selection for pulsed-dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy in EC. Electronic bibliographic databases, including PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Meeting Library, were searched for articles in English. Clinical guidelines and systematic reviews were also considered. The appropriate therapeutic approach should consider risk factors for tumor relapse and PDR brachytherapy and have a convincing role in this multidisciplinary scenario. Performing PDR brachytherapy in EC requires robust training and experience. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  10. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  11. High dose-rate brachytherapy source position quality assurance using radiochromic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M D C; Devic, S; Podgorsak, E B

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, radiographic film has been used to verify high-dose-rate brachytherapy source position accuracy by co-registering autoradiographic and diagnostic images of the associated applicator. Filmless PACS-based clinics that do not have access to radiographic film and wet developers may have trouble performing this quality assurance test in a simple and practical manner. We describe an alternative method for quality assurance using radiochromic-type film. In addition to being easy and practical to use, radiochromic film has some advantages in comparison with traditional radiographic film when used for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance.

  12. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer--a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of high dose rate (HDR and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy in treating early-stage oral cancer. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases, restricted to English language up to June 1, 2012, was performed to identify potentially relevant studies. STUDY SELECTION: Only randomized controlled trials (RCT and controlled trials that compared HDR to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of early-stage oral cancer (stages I, II and III were of interest. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two investigators independently extracted data from retrieved studies and controversies were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. One RCT and five controlled trials (607 patients: 447 for LDR and 160 for HDR met the inclusion criteria. The odds ratio showed no statistically significant difference between LDR group and HDR group in terms of local recurrence (OR = 1.12, CI 95% 0.62-2.01, overall mortality (OR = 1.01, CI 95% 0.61-1.66 and Grade 3/4 complications (OR = 0.86, CI 95% 0.52-1.42. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicated that HDR brachytherapy was a comparable alternative to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of oral cancer. HDR brachytherapy might become a routine choice for early-stage oral cancer in the future.

  13. ``In Vivo'' Dosimetry in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Azcorra, S. A.; Mota-García, A.; Poitevín-Chacón, M. A.; Santamaría-Torruco, B. J.; Rodríguez-Ponce, M.; Herrera-Martínez, F. P.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Ruíz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.

    2008-08-01

    In this prospective study, rectal dose was measured "in vivo" using TLD-100 crystals (3×3×1 mm3), and it has been compared to the prescribed dose. Measurements were performed in patients with cervical cancer classified in FIGO stages IB-IIIB and treated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan).

  14. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ping; Baumann, René; Dunst, Juergen;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immed...

  15. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy. Results and complications in 189 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taulelle, M.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Felix-Faure, C.; Buciarelli, B.; Garcia, R.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte Catherine, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Avignon (France)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the benefit of high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of obstructive lung cancer. Between September 1990 and March 1995, 189 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma were treated with high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy. Most patients (63.3%) had received prior treatment and presented with symptomatic bronchial obstruction due to either recurrent or residual endobronchial disease. A small group (12%) was medically unfit for either surgical resection or thoracic radiotherapy and benefited from endobronchial brachytherapy alone for small endobronchial tumours. The remainder of the patients had not been treated previously and endobronchial brachytherapy was performed for life-threatening symptoms requiring emergency obstruction relief before other therapy. Treatment was performed weekly and consisted of three to four 8 to 10 Gy fractions at a radius of 10 mm from the centre of the source. Major symptomatic relief was obtained for haemoptysis (74%), dyspnoea (54%), and cough (54%). Complete endoscopic response was observed in 54% of cases. Median survival was 7 months for the entire group. For small, strictly endobronchial tumours, complete response rate was 96%, median survival 17 months, and 30 month survival 46%, with a plateau starting at 18 months. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities occurred at a rate of 17% and included massive haemoptysis (n=13), bronchial stenosis (n=12), soft tissue necrosis (n=8), and bronchial fistula (n=3). By univariate analysis, no factor was found to be predictive of late pulmonary toxicity. The present study confirms the usefulness of endobronchial brachytherapy in alleviating symptoms caused by endobronchial recurrence of bronchogenic carcinoma. In addition, this therapy can be tried with curative intent in patients who present with small endobronchial tumours and are not candidates for other forms of therapy. (au). 23 refs.

  16. Current situation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rogerio Matias Vidal da; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento, E-mail: rmv.fisica@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Pinezi, Juliana Castro Dourado [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias (PUC-Goias), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Macedo, Luiz Eduardo Andrade [Hospital Chama, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    To assess the current situation of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix in Brazil, regarding apparatuses, planning methods, prescription, fractionation schedule and evaluation of dose in organs at risk. Materials and methods: in the period between March/2012 and May/2013, a multiple choice questionnaire was developed and sent to 89 Brazilian hospitals which perform HDR brachytherapy. Results: sixty-one services answered the questionnaire. All regions of the country experienced a sharp increase in the number of HDR brachytherapy services in the period from 2001 to 2013. As regards planning, although a three-dimensional planning software was available in 91% of the centers, conventional radiography was mentioned by 92% of the respondents as their routine imaging method for such a purpose. Approximately 35% of respondents said that brachytherapy sessions are performed after teletherapy. The scheme of four 7 Gy intracavitary insertions was mentioned as the most frequently practiced. Conclusion: the authors observed that professionals have difficulty accessing adjuvant three-dimensional planning tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  17. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  18. Brachytherapy applications and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Written by the foremost experts in the field, this volume is a comprehensive text and practical reference on contemporary brachytherapy. The book provides detailed, site-specific information on applications and techniques of brachytherapy in the head and neck, central nervous system, breast, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, as well as on gynecologic brachytherapy, low dose rate and high dose rate sarcoma brachytherapy, vascular brachytherapy, and pediatric applications. The book thoroughly describes and compares the four major techniques used in brachytherapy-intraca

  19. The Preliminary Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satmoko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary prototype of a brachytherapy equipment has been constructed. The work started by developing conceptual design, followed by basic design and detailed design. In the conceptual design, design requirements are stated. In the basic design, technical specifications for main components are determined. In detailed design, general drawings are discussed. The prototype consists of three main systems: a mechanical system, an instrumentation system, and a safety system. The mechanical system assures the movement mechanism of the isotope source position beginning from the standby position until the applicators. It consists of three main modules: a position handling module, a container module, and a channel distribution module. The position handling module serves to move the isotope source position. As shielding, the second module is to store the source when the equipment is in standby position. The prototype provides 12 output channels. The channel selection is performed by the third module. The instrumentation system controls the movement of source position by handling motor operations. It consists of several modules. A microcontroller module serves as a control center whose task includes both controlling motors and communicating with computer. A motor module serves to handle motors. 10 sensors, including their signal conditionings, are introduced to read the environment conditions of the equipment. LEDs are used to display these conditions. In order to facilitate the operators’ duty, communication via RS232 is provided. The brachytherapy equipment can therefore be operated by using computer. Interface software is developed using C# language. To complete both mechanical and instrumentation systems performance, a safety system is developed to make sure that the safety for operator and patients from receiving excessive radiation. An interlock system is introduced to guard against abnormal conditions. In the worst case, a manual intervention

  20. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy in soft tissue sarcomas: technical aspect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Mi Son; Kang, Seung Hee; Kim, Byoung Suck; Oh, Young Taek [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To discuss the technical aspect of interstitial brachytherapy including method of implant, insertion time of radioactive source, total radiation dose, and complication, we reviewed patients who had diagnoses of soft tissue sarcoma and were treated by conservative surgery, interstitial implant and external beam radiation therapy. Between May 1995 and Dec. 1997, the patients with primary or recurrent soft tissue sarcoma underwent surgical resection (wide margin excision) and received radiotherapy including interstitial brachytherapy. Catheters were placed with regular intervals of 1-1.5 cm immediately after tumor removal and covering the critical structures, such as neurovascular bundle or bone, with gelform, muscle, or tissue expander in the cases where the tumors were close to those structures. Brachytherapy consisted of source axis with 2-2.5 Gy/fraction, twice a day, starting on 6th day after the surgery. Within one month after the surgery, total dose of 50-55 Gy was delivered to the tumor bed with wide margin by the external beam radiotherapy. All patients completed planned interstitial brachytherapy without acute side effects directly related with catheter implantation such as infection or bleeding. With median follow up duration of 25 months (range 12-41 months), no local recurrences were observed. And there was no severe form of chromic complication (RTOG/EORTC grade 3 or 4). The high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy is easy and safe way to minimize the radiation dose delivered to the adjacent normal tissue and to decrease radiation induced chronic morbidity such as fibrosis by reducing the total dose of external radiotherapy in the management of soft tissue sarcoma with conservative surgery.

  1. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the cervix uteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Aliyev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the results of examining and treating 246 patients with Stages IIA-IIIB cancer of the cervix uteri (CCU, receiving specific chemoradiotherapy (CRT at the Department of Radiotherapy, National Oncology Center (Baku, has ascertained that CRT using two high-dose (9 Gy rate brachytherapy fractions and competitive cisplatin chemotherapy is an effective, reasonably safe, and economically sound treatment method for locally advanced CCU. The method shows acceptable toxicity and may be used in routine clinical practice.

  2. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  3. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  4. Current topics in the treatment of prostate cancer with low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Richard G; Stone, Nelson N

    2010-02-01

    The treatment of prostate cancer with low dose rate prostate brachytherapy has grown rapidly in the last 20 years. Outcome analyses performed in this period have enriched understanding of this modality. This article focuses on the development of a real-time ultrasound-guided implant technique, the importance of radiation dose, trimodality treatment of high-risk disease, long-term treatment outcomes, and treatment-associated morbidity.

  5. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M.; Van Hecke, H.; Boterberg, T.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  6. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  7. 3D-printed applicators for high dose rate brachytherapy: Dosimetric assessment at different infill percentage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Rosalinda; Vavassori, Andrea; Bazani, Alessia; Ciardo, Delia; Pansini, Floriana; Spoto, Ruggero; Sammarco, Vittorio; Cattani, Federica; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2016-12-01

    Dosimetric assessment of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicators, printed in 3D with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) at different infill percentage. A low-cost, desktop, 3D printer (Hamlet 3DX100, Hamlet, Dublin, IE) was used for manufacturing simple HDR applicators, reproducing typical geometries in brachytherapy: cylindrical (common in vaginal treatment) and flat configurations (generally used to treat superficial lesions). Printer accuracy was investigated through physical measurements. The dosimetric consequences of varying the applicator's density by tuning the printing infill percentage were analysed experimentally by measuring depth dose profiles and superficial dose distribution with Gafchromic EBT3 films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ). Dose distributions were compared to those obtained with a commercial superficial applicator. Measured printing accuracy was within 0.5mm. Dose attenuation was not sensitive to the density of the material. Surface dose distribution comparison of the 3D printed flat applicators with respect to the commercial superficial applicator showed an overall passing rate greater than 94% for gamma analysis with 3% dose difference criteria, 3mm distance-to-agreement criteria and 10% dose threshold. Low-cost 3D printers are a promising solution for the customization of the HDR brachytherapy applicators. However, further assessment of 3D printing techniques and regulatory materials approval are required for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  9. Perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Pasqualetti, Francesco; Grespi, Silvia [Div. of Radiation Oncology, ' ' S. Chiara' ' Pisa Hospital (Italy); Perrone, Franco [Div. of Health Physics, ' ' S. Chiara' ' Pisa Hospital (Italy); De Franco, Lucia; Vannozzi, Riccardo [Div. of Neurosurgery, ' ' S. Chiara' ' Pisa Hospital (Italy); Cionini, Luca [Div. of Radiation Oncology, ' ' S. Chiara' ' Pisa Hospital (Italy); Pisa Univ. (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent malignant gliomas. Patients and Methods: Between 2005 and 2008, 21 patients (14 males and seven females) with relapsed malignant glioma underwent a second surgery followed by a brachytherapy implant in the surgical cavity. Median age was 60 years, and median Karnofsky performance status 80. A single fraction of 18 Gy specified at 5 mm depth was administered perioperatively. Then, the applicator was removed nonsurgically. Mean postoperative hospitalization time was 3 days. Results: At the time of analysis, 15 patients (71%) had died and six (29%) were alive. Median follow-up was 32.3 months. Median overall survival from diagnosis amounted to 21.7 months. Median survival after recurrence was 8.0 months, and 6-month progression-free survival 42%. Patients were stratified into classes according to the prognostic recursive partitioning analysis. Conclusion: Perioperative brachytherapy has proven to be safe and well tolerated in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. No severe toxicity was reported, and the treatment has proven to be effective in symptomatic recurrences of malignant gliomas. (orig.)

  10. Single versus multichannel applicator in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy optimized by inverse treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Yasir A; Constantinescu, Camelia; Hassouna, Ashraf H; Eltaher, Maha M; Ghassal, Noor M; Awad, Nesreen A

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively compare the potential dosimetric advantages of a multichannel vaginal applicator vs. a single channel one in intracavitary vaginal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy after hysterectomy, and evaluate the dosimetric advantage of fractional re-planning. We randomly selected 12 patients with endometrial carcinoma, who received adjuvant vaginal cuff HDR brachytherapy using a multichannel applicator. For each brachytherapy fraction, two inverse treatment plans (for central channel and multichannel loadings) were performed and compared. The advantage of fractional re-planning was also investigated. Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) analysis showed limited, but statistically significant difference (p = 0.007) regarding clinical-target-volume dose coverage between single and multichannel approaches. For the organs-at-risk rectum and bladder, the use of multichannel applicator demonstrated a noticeable dose reduction, when compared to single channel, but statistically significant for rectum only (p = 0.0001). For D2cc of rectum, an average fractional dose of 6.1 ± 0.7 Gy resulted for single channel vs. 5.1 ± 0.6 Gy for multichannel. For D2cc of bladder, an average fractional dose of 5 ± 0.9 Gy occurred for single channel vs. 4.9 ± 0.8 Gy for multichannel. The dosimetric benefit of fractional re-planning was demonstrated: DVH analysis showed large, but not statistically significant differences between first fraction plan and fractional re-planning, due to large inter-fraction variations for rectum and bladder positioning and filling. Vaginal HDR brachytherapy using a multichannel vaginal applicator and inverse planning provides dosimetric advantages over single channel cylinder, by reducing the dose to organs at risk without compromising the target volume coverage, but at the expense of an increased vaginal mucosa dose. Due to large inter-fraction dose variations, we recommend individual fraction treatment plan optimization.

  11. High dose rate brachytherapy in early stage squamous-cell carcinoma of the lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mut, Alejandro; Guinot, José Luis; Arribas, Leoncio; Díez-Presa, Lorena; Tortajada, María Isabel; Santos, Miguel Ángel; Samper, Josefa; Santamaría, Paula; Vendrell, Juan Bosco

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the results obtained after treatment of early stage (T1-T2) squamous cell carcinoma of the lip with high dose rate brachytherapy and evaluate the efficacy of this treatment in both local and regional control. Retrospective analysis of the treatments performed at our department from March 1999 to March 2013 with high dose rate brachytherapy with rigid needles. We included 68 patients, 63 men and 5 women; 37 patients (54.4%) presented a T1 tumour, less than or equal to 2cm, while the other 31 (45.6%) were classified as T2. Median total dose was 45Gy, with a median dose per fraction of 5Gy x 9 fractions twice a day for 5 days. With a mean follow-up of 56.4 months, local control was 96.9%. Stratifying by tumour size, local control of T1 cases was 100%, while T2 achieved 93.2% (2 local recurrences). Regional control at 5 years was 93.8% for T1, and 80.8% for T2. In 11 cases with elective cervical treatment, no regional failure happened. As for toxicity, no patient presented soft tissue, or bone, necrosis. All patients achieved good or excellent cosmetic and functional results. High dose rate brachytherapy allows effective, safe treatments for squamous cell carcinoma of the lip, with good aesthetic and functional results. It can be considered a valid alternative for surgery in early stage tumours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  12. High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T; Devic, S; Podgorsak, E

    2007-11-01

    In the era of total mesorectal surgery, the issue of radiation toxicity is raised. A novel endocavitary brachytherapy technique was tested as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable rectal cancer. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the treatment-related toxicity and effects on local recurrence. A dose of 26 Gy was prescribed to the gross tumour volume and intramesorectal deposits seen on magnetic resonance imaging and given over four daily treatments, using the high dose rate delivery system followed by surgery 6-8 weeks later. The study included 93 T3, four T4 and three T2 tumours. Acute proctitis of grade 2 was observed in all patients, but one required transfusion. At a median follow-up time of 60 months, the 5-year actual local recurrence rate was 5%, disease-free survival was 65%, and overall survival was 70%. High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy seems to prevent local recurrence and has a favourable toxicity pattern compared with external beam radiotherapy.

  13. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer with salvage interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    To assess the long-term results of protocol-based interstitial pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as reirradiation combined with simultaneous chemotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia in selected patients with recurrent head and neck tumors. A total of 104 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with interstitial PDR brachytherapy. Salvage surgery had also been undergone by 53/104 (51 %) patients (R1 or R2 resection in > 80 % of patients). Salvage brachytherapy alone was administered in 81 patients (78 %), with a median total dose of 56.7 Gy. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was performed in 23/104 patients (32 %), using a median total dose of D{sub REF} = 24 Gy. Simultaneously to PDR brachytherapy, concomitant chemotherapy was administered in 58/104 (55.8 %) patients. A single session of interstitial hyperthermia was also used to treat 33/104 (31.7 %) patients. The analysis was performed after a median follow-up of 60 months. Calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, local tumor control rates after 2, 5, and 10 years were 92.5, 82.4, and 58.9 %, respectively. Comparing results of salvage PDR brachytherapy with or without simultaneous chemotherapy, the 10-year local control rates were 76 vs. 39 % (p= 0014), respectively. No other patient- or treatment-related parameters had a significant influence on treatment results. Soft tissue necrosis or bone necrosis developed in 18/104 (17.3 %) and 11/104 (9.6 %) patients, respectively, but only 3 % of patients required surgical treatment. PDR interstitial brachytherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy is a very effective and, in experienced hands, also a safe treatment modality in selected patients with head and neck cancer in previously irradiated areas. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte die Analyse der Langzeitergebnisse einer protokollbasierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (Re-Bestrahlung) mit simultaner Chemotherapie und interstitieller Hyperthermie

  14. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  15. Low dose rate caesium-137 implant time of intracavitary brachytherapy source of a selected oncology center in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    John Owusu Banahene; Emmanuel Ofori Darko; Baffour Awuah

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment time taken for a radioactive source is found to be very important in intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. The duration of the treatment time depends on the prescribed dose requested to a reference point and the calculated dose rate to the same point. The duration of the treatment time of source is found to depend on the tumour stage. In this work, the treatment time of implant has been calculated for a Caesium-137 low dose rate brachytherapy source at an oncology f...

  16. Dosimetry audits in Brazil for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate brachytherapy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, L.A.R. da; Paiva, E. de.; Goncalves, M.G.; Velasco, A.F.; Di Prinzio, R.; Dovales, A.C.M.; Freire, B.L.V.; Brito, R.R.A.; Giannoni, R.A.; Castelo, L.H.R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marechal, M.H.H. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Radiativas (CORAD)

    2005-03-15

    In Brazil, among 200 radiotherapy centres, 30 have high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy systems. In August 2001, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) started a biennial audit program to those centres having HDR systems. This program consists of visiting each centre in order to investigate the radiation protection aspects of the centres and also to measure the intensity of the brachytherapy source, in terms of air kerma strength, with a well type chamber specially designed for HDR {sup 192} Ir sources. The audit dosimetry results are compared to measurements carried out by the local institution physicist and to the source intensity value provided by the manufacturer. Two methods have been used by the Brazilian physicists for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source dosimetry, namely the employment of a farmer type chamber calibrated according to the interpolation methodology and the use of a well type chamber to provide direct intercomparison. The larger difference obtained was 18.9% and it can be explained in terms of the lack of knowledge of the institution physicist about the interpolation methodology using the farmer type chamber. Another difference of 5.82% was found as being the lack of an updated calibration factor for the clinic well type chamber. On the basis of these results, CNEN is able to establish a maximum deviation value for the dosimetry of HDR system. Additionally, with this program the radiotherapy services have an opportunity to have their HDR {sup 192}Ir sources calibrated and to test the validity of the calibration factors for their own well type chambers, using their calibrated sources. (author)

  17. Real-time inverse high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning with catheter optimization by compressed sensing-inspired optimization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, C V; Aschenbrenner, K P; Müller, R; Polster, L; Cormack, R A; Hesser, J W

    2016-08-21

    This paper demonstrates that optimization strategies derived from the field of compressed sensing (CS) improve computational performance in inverse treatment planning (ITP) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following an approach applied to low-dose-rate brachytherapy, we developed a reformulation of the ITP problem with the same mathematical structure as standard CS problems. Two greedy methods, derived from hard thresholding and subspace pursuit are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art ITP solvers. Applied to clinical prostate brachytherapy plans speed-up by a factor of 56-350 compared to state-of-the-art methods. Based on a Wilcoxon signed rank-test the novel method statistically significantly decreases the final objective function value (p  plans are either clinically equivalent or show a better performance with respect to dosimetric measures.

  18. Impact of dose rate on clinical course in uveal melanoma after brachytherapy with ruthenium-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossboeck, G.; Rauscher, T.; Langmann, G. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Opthalmology; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: It has been suggested that the actual dose rate of an irradiating source may be a distinct influencing factor for the biological effect after brachytherapy with ruthenium-106 for uveal melanoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate a hypothesized impact of the dose rate on the clinical and echographic course after brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: In total, 45 patients were included in this retrospective study. According to the actual dose rate, two groups were defined: group 1 with a dose rate < 4 Gy/h and group 2 with a dose rate {>=} 4 Gy/h. Regarding age, tumor height, basal diameter, scleral and apical dose, differences between the groups were not significant. Clinical parameters, including early and late side effects, and echographic courses were compared. Results: A significantly lower metastatic rate was found in group 2. Using univariate Cox proportional hazards regression, only dose rate predicted metastatic spread significantly (p < 0.05), while in a multivariate analysis, using age at the time of treatment, greatest tumor height and greatest basal diameter as covariates, the variable dose rate was of borderline significance (p = 0.077). Patients in group 2 had more early side effects and more pronounced visual decline, but these differences were of borderline significance with p-values of 0.072 and 0.064, respectively. Conclusion: These data suggest that a higher dose rate may confer a lower risk for metastatic spread, but may be associated with more side effects and more pronounced visual decline. (orig.)

  19. Toward endobronchial Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy therapeutic optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, H A [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Allison, R R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Downie, G H [Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Mota, H C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Austerlitz, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jenkins, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Sibata, C H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2007-06-07

    A number of patients with lung cancer receive either palliative or curative high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy. Up to a third of patients treated with endobronchial HDR die from hemoptysis. Rather than accept hemoptysis as an expected potential consequence of HDR, we have calculated the radial dose distribution for an Ir-192 HDR source, rigorously examined the dose and prescription points recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS), and performed a radiobiological-based analysis. The radial dose rate of a commercially available Ir-192 source was calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the linear quadratic model, the estimated palliative, curative and blood vessel rupture radii from the center of an Ir-192 source were obtained for the ABS recommendations and a series of customized HDR prescriptions. The estimated radius at risk for blood vessel perforation for the ABS recommendations ranges from 7 to 9 mm. An optimized prescription may in some situations reduce this radius to 4 mm. The estimated blood perforation radius is generally smaller than the palliative radius. Optimized and individualized endobronchial HDR prescriptions are currently feasible based on our current understanding of tumor and normal tissue radiobiology. Individualized prescriptions could minimize complications such as fatal hemoptysis without sacrificing efficacy. Fiducial stents, HDR catheter centering or spacers and the use of CT imaging to better assess the relationship between the catheter and blood vessels promise to be useful strategies for increasing the therapeutic index of this treatment modality. Prospective trials employing treatment optimization algorithms are needed.

  20. In lower extremity PTAs intraluminal is better than subintimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Callaert, J; Maene, L; Keirse, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2012-04-01

    With subintimal recanalization, a channel is deliberately created by dissecting the vessel wall in order to replace the native occluded lumen. This is opposed to intraluminal recanalization, where passage of an arterial obstructive lesion is performed by central luminal navigation. Both intraluminal and subintimal treatment has its proponents and adversaries. The appreciation of an investigator for a certain technique is commonly related to the training received and the personal experience. Yet, the intraluminal technique uses the clinically preferred route for adjunctive treatment, such as balloon angioplasty or stent deployment. A wide variety of devices designed to obtain intraluminal lesion passage is available and is currently being used in vascular centers worldwide. With intraluminal techniques, success rates of up to 95% have been reported.

  1. Experiences of high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1994-03-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy was conducted for mobile tongue carcinoma using a high dose rate remote afterloading machine with small [sup 192]I source. Detailed method, named as 'linked double-botton technique', is to approach from submandibular skin by an open-ended stainless steel needles to the tongue lesion, and to replace each needle into flexible nylon tube from the oral cavity. Delivered dose was 60 Gy/10 Fr./5-6 days at the distance 5 mm from the source plane. Ten patients with mobile tongue carcinoma Tl-2N0 were treated with this method from October 1991 through August 1992. Local was uncontrolled in one patient, in whom the lesion was combined with leukoplakia at both lateral borders of the tongue. This was in accordance with the result in low dose rate treatment. This can be a substitute to low dose rate system for treatment of mobile tongue carcinoma. (author).

  2. Applicator Attenuation Effect on Dose Calculations of Esophageal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using EDR2 Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Daghigh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Interaluminal brachytherapy is one of the important methods of esophageal cancer treatment. The effect of applicator attenuation is not considered in dose calculation method released by AAPM-TG43. In this study, the effect of High-Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy esophageal applicator on dose distribution was surveyed in HDR brachytherapy. Materials and Methods A cylindrical PMMA phantom was built in order to be inserted by various sizes of esophageal applicators. EDR2 films were placed at 33 mm from Ir-192 source and irradiated with 1.5 Gy after planning using treatment planning system for all applicators. Results The results of film dosimetry in reference point for 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm applicators were 1.54, 1.53, 1.48, and 1.50 Gy, respectively. The difference between practical and treatment planning system results was 0.023 Gy (

  3. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either (60)Co, (192)Ir, or (169)Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for (60)Co and 1 mm for both (192)Ir and (169)Yb. Transmission data for (60)Co and (192)Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898-4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for (169)Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the intraluminal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation and correlation with growth rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behr-Rasmussen, Carsten; Gammelgaard, Lise; Fründ, Ernst T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth remains incompletely understood. MRI is superior to other methods in depicting the morphology of the ILT. This study brings preliminary, but novel information on the presence and morphological charac...

  5. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy based on registered transrectal ultrasound and in-room cone-beam CT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Even, Aniek J.G.; Nuver, Tonnis T.; Westendorp, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Carel J.; Slump, C.H.; Minken, Andre W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy procedure for prostate cancer using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to contour the regions of interest and registered in-room cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for needle reconstruction. To characterize the registration uncertainties between the two ima

  6. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  7. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  8. Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Létourneau, Mélanie [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the

  9. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaprealian, Tania [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Speight, Joycelyn L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I.-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score {>=}7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  10. T3 tongue cancer treated with low- and high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy using two-plane or volume implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Shohei [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Dentistry; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Shimizutani, Kimishige [Osaka Dental Coll., Hirakata (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Fifty-two patients with T3 tongue cancer were treated with low- and high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy using two-plane or volume implant method. Two-year local control rate was 60% and 3-year overall survival rate was 50%. Low- and high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy using two-plane or volume implant was effective treatment for T3 tongue cancer with deep infiltration. (author)

  11. Real-time inverse high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning with catheter optimization by compressed sensing-inspired optimization strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthier, C. V.; Aschenbrenner, K. P.; Müller, R.; Polster, L.; Cormack, R. A.; Hesser, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that optimization strategies derived from the field of compressed sensing (CS) improve computational performance in inverse treatment planning (ITP) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following an approach applied to low-dose-rate brachytherapy, we developed a reformulation of the ITP problem with the same mathematical structure as standard CS problems. Two greedy methods, derived from hard thresholding and subspace pursuit are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art ITP solvers. Applied to clinical prostate brachytherapy plans speed-up by a factor of 56-350 compared to state-of-the-art methods. Based on a Wilcoxon signed rank-test the novel method statistically significantly decreases the final objective function value (p  <  0.01). The optimization times were below one second and thus planing can be considered as real-time capable. The novel CS inspired strategy enables real-time ITP for HDR brachytherapy including catheter optimization. The generated plans are either clinically equivalent or show a better performance with respect to dosimetric measures.

  12. An open-source genetic algorithm for determining optimal seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Madamesila, J; Beauchamp, A; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    An open source optimizer that generates seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy was designed, tested, and validated. The optimizer was a simple genetic algorithm (SGA) that, given a set of prostate and urethra contours, determines the optimal seed distribution in terms of coverage of the prostate with the prescribed dose while avoiding hotspots within the urethra. The algorithm was validated in a retrospective study on 45 previously contoured low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Dosimetric indices were evaluated to ensure solutions adhered to clinical standards. The SGA performance was further benchmarked by comparing solutions obtained from a commercial optimizer (inverse planning simulated annealing [IPSA]) with the same cohort of 45 patients. Clinically acceptable target coverage by the prescribed dose (V100) was obtained for both SGA and IPSA, with a mean ± standard deviation of 98 ± 2% and 99.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. For the prostate D90, SGA and IPSA yielded 177 ± 8 Gy and 186 ± 7 Gy, respectively, which were both clinically acceptable. Both algorithms yielded reasonable dose to the rectum, with V100 open source SGA was validated that provides a research tool for the brachytherapy community. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the VSL and the BIPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, J.T.; De Pooter, J.A.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), The Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the VSL in November 2009. The comparison resu...

  14. Pulsed-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy : Comparison of sparing effects in cells of a radiosensitive and a radioresistant cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, J; Woudstra, EC; Kampinga, HH

    Pulsed-dose-rate regimens are an attractive alternative to continuous low-dose-rate brachytherapy. However, apart from data obtained from modeling, only a few irt vitro results are available for comparing the biological effectiveness of both modalities. Cells of two human cell lines with survival

  15. Measurement uncertainty analysis of low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy: post-implant dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kent J; Pattison, John E; Bibbo, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The minimal dose covering 90 % of the prostate volume--D 90--is arguably the most important dosimetric parameter in low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy. In this study an analysis of the measurement uncertainties in D 90 from low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy was conducted for two common treatment procedures with two different post-implant dosimetry methods. The analysis was undertaken in order to determine the magnitude of D 90 uncertainty, how the magnitude of the uncertainty varied when D 90 was calculated using different dosimetry methods, and which factors were the major contributors to the uncertainty. The analysis considered the prostate as being homogeneous and tissue equivalent and made use of published data, as well as original data collected specifically for this analysis, and was performed according to the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). It was found that when prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted in two separate sessions using only CT images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 25 % at the 95 % confidence interval. When prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted during a single session using CT and ultrasound images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 33 %. Methods for reducing these uncertainty levels are discussed. It was found that variations in contouring the target tissue made the largest contribution to D 90 uncertainty, while the uncertainty in seed source strength made only a small contribution. It is important that clinicians appreciate the overall magnitude of D 90 uncertainty and understand the factors that affect it so that clinical decisions are soundly based, and resources are appropriately allocated.

  16. Online pretreatment verification of high-dose rate brachytherapy using an imaging panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Podesta, Mark; Bellezzo, Murillo; Van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Lutgens, Ludy; Vanneste, Ben G. L.; Voncken, Robert; Van Limbergen, Evert J.; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is employed to treat a wide variety of cancers. However, an accurate treatment verification method is currently not available. This study describes a pre-treatment verification system that uses an imaging panel (IP) to verify important aspects of the treatment plan. A detailed modelling of the IP was only possible with an extensive calibration performed using a robotic arm. Irradiations were performed with a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source within a water phantom. An empirical fit was applied to measure the distance between the source and the detector so 3D Cartesian coordinates of the dwell positions can be obtained using a single panel. The IP acquires 7.14 fps to verify the dwell times, dwell positions and air kerma strength (Sk). A gynecological applicator was used to create a treatment plan that was registered with a CT image of the water phantom used during the experiments for verification purposes. Errors (shifts, exchanged connections and wrong dwell times) were simulated to verify the proposed verification system. Cartesian source positions (panel measurement plane) have a standard deviation of about 0.02 cm. The measured distance between the source and the panel (z-coordinate) have a standard deviation up to 0.16 cm and maximum absolute error of  ≈0.6 cm if the signal is close to sensitive limit of the panel. The average response of the panel is very linear with Sk. Therefore, Sk measurements can be performed with relatively small errors. The measured dwell times show a maximum error of 0.2 s which is consistent with the acquisition rate of the panel. All simulated errors were clearly identified by the proposed system. The use of IPs is not common in brachytherapy, however, it provides considerable advantages. It was demonstrated that the IP can accurately measure Sk, dwell times and dwell positions.

  17. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the performance of high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hayes, John K; Hsu, I-Chow J; Morris, David E; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Tward, Jonathan D; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  18. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  19. High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Consistently Results in High Quality Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Evan C.; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Demarco, John; Park, Sang-June; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kayode, Oluwatosin; Steinberg, Michael L. [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: jdemanes@mednet.ucla.edu [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a dosimetry analysis to determine how well the goals for clinical target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue dose constraints were achieved with high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Cumulative dose-volume histograms for 208 consecutively treated HDR prostate brachytherapy implants were analyzed. Planning was based on ultrasound-guided catheter insertion and postoperative CT imaging; the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) was the prostate, a small margin, and the proximal seminal vesicles. Dosimetric parameters analyzed for the CTV were D90, V90, V100, V150, and V200. Dose to the urethra, bladder, bladder balloon, and rectum were evaluated by the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} of each organ, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose. Analysis was stratified according to prostate size. Results: The mean prostate ultrasound volume was 38.7 {+-} 13.4 cm{sup 3} (range: 11.7-108.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean CTV was 75.1 {+-} 20.6 cm{sup 3} (range: 33.4-156.5 cm{sup 3}). The mean D90 was 109.2% {+-} 2.6% (range: 102.3%-118.4%). Ninety-three percent of observed D90 values were between 105 and 115%. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99.9% {+-} 0.05%, 99.5% {+-} 0.8%, 25.4% {+-} 4.2%, and 7.8% {+-} 1.4%. The mean dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for organs at risk were: Urethra: 107.3% {+-} 3.0%, 101.1% {+-} 14.6%, and 47.9% {+-} 34.8%; bladder wall: 79.5% {+-} 5.1%, 69.8% {+-} 4.9%, and 64.3% {+-} 5.0%; bladder balloon: 70.3% {+-} 6.8%, 59.1% {+-} 6.6%, and 52.3% {+-} 6.2%; rectum: 76.3% {+-} 2.5%, 70.2% {+-} 3.3%, and 66.3% {+-} 3.8%. There was no significant difference between D90 and V100 when stratified by prostate size. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy allows the physician to consistently achieve complete prostate target coverage and maintain normal tissue dose constraints for organs at risk over a wide range of target volumes.

  20. Minimal percentage of dose received by 90% of the urethra (%UD90 is the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Nobumichi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To clarify the significant clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters to predict PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Methods We studied 200 consecutive patients who received LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and November 2008. Of them, 137 patients did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. One hundred and forty-two patients were treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and 58 were treated with LDR-brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy. The cut-off value of PSA bounce was 0.1 ng/mL. The incidence, time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were investigated. Clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters were evaluated to elucidate independent factors to predict PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy alone. Results Fifty patients (25% showed PSA bounce and 10 patients (5% showed PSA failure. The median time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were 17 months, 0.29 ng/mL, and 7.0 months, respectively. In 103 hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and univariate Cox proportional regression hazard model indicated that age and minimal percentage of the dose received by 30% and 90% of the urethra were independent predictors of PSA bounce. With a multivariate Cox proportional regression hazard model, minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant parameter of PSA bounce. Conclusions Minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone.

  1. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. Material and methods This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. Results The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. Conclusions The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected. PMID:27504129

  2. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  3. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Whitaker, May

    2016-06-01

    Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected.

  4. Automated high-dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning for a single-channel vaginal cylinder applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Klages, Peter; Tan, Jun; Chi, Yujie; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Yang, Ming; Hrycushko, Brian; Medin, Paul; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Jia, Xun

    2017-06-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed manually and/or with aids of preplanned templates. In general, the standard of care would be elevated by conducting an automated process to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human error, and reduce plan quality variations. Thus, our group is developing AutoBrachy, an automated HDR brachytherapy planning suite of modules used to augment a clinical treatment planning system. This paper describes our proof-of-concept module for vaginal cylinder HDR planning that has been fully developed. After a patient CT scan is acquired, the cylinder applicator is automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. The target CTV is generated based on physician-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of the dose calculation point, apex point and vaginal surface point, as well as the central applicator channel coordinates, and the corresponding dwell positions are determined according to their geometric relationship with the applicator and written to a structure file. Dwell times are computed through iterative quadratic optimization techniques. The planning information is then transferred to the treatment planning system through a DICOM-RT interface. The entire process was tested for nine patients. The AutoBrachy cylindrical applicator module was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinical grade quality. Computation times varied between 1 and 3 min on an Intel Xeon CPU E3-1226 v3 processor. All geometric components in the automated treatment plans were generated accurately. The applicator channel tip positions agreed with the manually identified positions with submillimeter deviations and the channel orientations between the plans agreed within less than 1 degree. The automatically generated plans obtained clinically acceptable quality.

  5. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica [Department of Radiation Physics, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  6. LOW-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: DIFFERENT INDICATIONS – DIFFERENT RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Biryukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Russia, there is presently a growing interest in low-dose intratissue radiotherapy (brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. Since its inception, current brachytherapy has undergone a number of significant changes in terms of improved visualization and better treatment planning and monitoring, which is sure to have affected the higher quality of their performance and better long-term results. The main purpose of the given paper is to generalize the data of foreign investigators who have the greatest experience with brachytherapy for its further use in the treatment of patients with locally advanced PC under the conditions of Russian clinics.

  7. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  8. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®); it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86), which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21), which is also from BEBIG. Objective and Methods The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the

  9. Implementation of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Androgen Deprivation in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.lilleby@ous-hf.no [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Tafjord, Gunnar; Raabe, Nils K. [Cancer Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radiumhospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome (overall survival [OS], the actuarial 5-year cancer-specific survival [CSS], disease-free survival [DFS], biochemical failure-free survival [BFS]), complications and morbidity in patients treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) boost and hormonal treatment with curative aims. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 275 prospectively followed pN0/N0M0 patients were included: 19 patients (7%) with T2, Gleason score 7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 and 256 patients (93%) with T3 or Gleason score 8-10 or PSA >20 received multimodal treatment with conformal four-field radiotherapy (prostate/vesiculae 2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25) combined with HDR-BT (iridium 192; prostate 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Results: After a median observation time of 44.2 months (range, 10.4-90.5 months) 12 patients had relapsed clinically and/or biochemically and 10 patients were dead, of which 2 patients died from prostate cancer. Five-year estimates of BFS, CSS, DFS, and OS rates were 98.5%, 99.3%, 95.6%, and 96.3%, respectively. None of the patients with either Gleason score <8 or with intermediate risk profile had relapsed. The number of HDR-BT treatments was not related to outcome. Despite of age (median, 65.7 years; range, 45.7-77 years) and considerable pretreatment comorbidity in 39 of 275 patients, Genitourinary treatment-related morbidity was moderate with long-lasting Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 voiding problems in 26 patients (9.5%) and occasionally mucous discharge in 20 patients (7%), none with Grade >2 for gastrointestinal at follow-up. Complications during implantations were related to pubic arch interference (4 patients) and lithotomy time, causing 2 patients to develop compartment syndrome. Conclusion: Despite still preliminary observations, our 5-year outcome estimates favor the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in high-risk patients combined with conformal

  10. Simulation evaluation of NIST air-kerma rate calibration standard for electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Jessica R; Rivard, Mark J; Hughes, H Grady

    2016-03-01

    Dosimetry for the model S700 50 kV electronic brachytherapy (eBT) source (Xoft, Inc., a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) was simulated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods by Rivard et al. ["Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent x-ray source: An electronic brachytherapy source," Med. Phys. 33, 4020-4032 (2006)] and recently by Hiatt et al. ["A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model," Med. Phys. 42, 2764-2776 (2015)] with improved geometric characterization. While these studies examined the dose distribution in water, there have not previously been reports of the eBT source calibration methods beyond that recently reported by Seltzer et al. ["New national air-kerma standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources," J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 119, 554-574 (2014)]. Therefore, the motivation for the current study was to provide an independent determination of air-kerma rate at 50 cm in air K̇air(d=50 cm) using MC methods for the model S700 eBT source. Using CAD information provided by the vendor and disassembled sources, an MC model was created for the S700 eBT source. Simulations were run using the mcnp6 radiation transport code for the NIST Lamperti air ionization chamber according to specifications by Boutillon et al. ["Comparison of exposure standards in the 10-50 kV x-ray region," Metrologia 5, 1-11 (1969)], in air without the Lamperti chamber, and in vacuum without the Lamperti chamber. K̇air(d=50 cm) was determined using the *F4 tally with NIST values for the mass energy-absorption coefficients for air. Photon spectra were evaluated over 2 π azimuthal sampling for polar angles of 0° ≤ θ ≤ 180° every 1°. Volume averaging was averted through tight radial binning. Photon energy spectra were determined over all polar angles in both air and vacuum using

  11. Dose-rate distribution of {sup 32}P-glass microspheres for intra-arterial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carla C.; Moralles, Mauricio; Sene, Frank F.; Martinelli, Jose R. [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais, IPEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Centro do Reator de Pesquisas, Energy and Nuclear Research Institute, IPEN/CNEN, CP 11049, CEP 05422-970, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais, IPEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The intra-arterial administration of radioactive glass microspheres is an alternative therapy option for treating primary hepatocellular carcinoma, the main cause of liver cancer death, and metastatic liver cancer, another important kind of cancer induced in the liver. The technique involves the administration of radioactive microspheres in the hepatic artery, which are trapped preferentially in the tumor. Methods: In this work the GEANT4 toolkit was used to calculate the radial dose-rate distributions in water from {sup 32}P-loaded glass microspheres and also from {sup 90}Y-loaded glass microspheres. To validate the toolkit for this application, the authors compared the dose-rate distribution of {sup 32}P and {sup 90}Y point sources in water with data from the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report 72. Results: Tables of radial dose-rate distributions are provided for practical use in brachytherapy planning with these microspheres. Conclusions: The simulations with the microspheres show that the shape of the beta ray energy spectra with respect to the {sup 32}P and {sup 90}Y sources is significantly modified by the glass matrix.

  12. [Low-dose rate brachytherapy with locally integrated beta emitters after internal urethrotomy. A pilot project using an animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, P; Adam, C; Sroka, R; Lanzl, I; Assmann, W; Stief, C

    2007-09-01

    The treatment of urethral strictures represents an unsolved urological problem. The effect of a (32)P-coated urethral catheter in the sense of low-dose rate brachytherapy to modulate wound healing will be analyzed in an animal experiment. Unfortunately it is not possible to present any results because this is being studied for the first time and there are no experiences with low-dose rate brachytherapy and this form of application in the lower urinary tract. Furthermore the animal experiment will only start in the near future. Both decade-long experiences with radiotherapy to treat benign diseases and our own results of previous studies in otolaryngology and ophthalmology let us expect a significantly lower formation of urethral strictures after internal urethrotomy. This study will contribute to improving the treatment of urethral strictures as demanded in previous papers.

  13. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR -1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR of a reference 137 Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference 137 Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5, and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference 137 Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the 137 Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within ±0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than ±0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  14. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, S; Sharma, S D

    2010-04-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference (137)Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the (137)Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within +/-0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than +/-0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  15. Bladder–Rectum Spacer Balloon in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Patel, Firuza D., E-mail: firuzapatel@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Chakraborty, Santam; Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Aprem, Abi Santhosh [Corporate R and D Division, HLL Lifecare Limited, Karamana, Trivandrum (India)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To compare bladder and rectum doses with the use of a bladder–rectum spacer balloon (BRSB) versus standard gauze packing in the same patient receiving 2 high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy fractions. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized study to compare the reduction in bladder and rectum doses with the use of a BRSB compared with standard gauze packing in patients with carcinoma of the cervix being treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. The patients were randomized between 2 arms. In arm A, vaginal packing was done with standard gauze packing in the first application, and BRSB was used in the second application. Arm B was the reverse of arm A. The International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) point doses and doses to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, 2-cm{sup 3}, 5-cm{sup 3}, and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes of bladder and rectum were compared. The patients were also subjectively assessed for the ease of application and the time taken for application. Statistical analysis was done using the paired t test. Results: A total of 43 patients were enrolled; however, 3 patients had to be excluded because the BRSB could not be inserted owing to unfavorable local anatomy. Thus 40 patients (80 plans) were evaluated. The application was difficult in 3 patients with BRSB, and in 2 patients with BRSB the application time was prolonged. There was no significant difference in bladder doses to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, 2 cm{sup 3}, 5 cm{sup 3}, and 10 cm{sup 3} and ICRU bladder point. Statistically significant dose reductions to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, and 2-cm{sup 3} volumes for rectum were observed with the BRSB. No significant differences in 5-cm{sup 3} and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes and ICRU rectum point were observed. Conclusion: A statistically significant dose reduction was observed for small high-dose volumes in rectum with the BRSB. The doses to bladder were comparable for BRSB and gauze packing. Transparent balloons of

  16. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate 192 Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°. The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (L, radial dose function g L (r and anisotropy function F(r, q of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study.

  17. [Prostate cancer boost using high-dose-rate brachytherapy: impact of the learning curve on the dosimetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaïm, C; Chand, M-È; Gal, J; Hijazi, H; Gautier, M; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M

    2014-11-01

    To analyse the influence of the learning curve on dosimetric data for high-dose-rate brachytherapy prostate cancer boost. From February 2009 to May 2012, after a first course of external beam radiation therapy (46Gy/23 fractions), 124 patients underwent high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost using Plato™ (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). The impact of the learning curve on the dosimetric quality of the prostate implant was assessed. The dosimetric data have been analysed: clinical target volume (CTV), D90 (dose to 90 % of CTV), D100, V100 (part on the CTV receiving 100 % of the dose), V150, V200 and DHI (dose non-homogeneity index). The doses delivered to 0.1, 1 and 2 cm(3) of the rectum and urethra were calculated. During the study period (39 months), a significant reduction of V150 (PD100 (P=0.3). This study confirms that the dosimetric quality of high-dose-rate brachytherapy prostate implant is significantly improved during the learning curve period. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy for High-Dose-Rate Treatment of Cervical Cancer. I: Theoretical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dae Yup [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Webster, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Choi, Dongju; Song, Bongyong [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Devic, Slobodan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, William Y., E-mail: wyjsong@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that utilization of the direction-modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) concept can significantly improve treatment plan quality in the setting of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The new, MRI-compatible, tandem design has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm diameter, grooved along a nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod (ρ = 18.0 g/cm{sup 3}), enclosed in Delrin tubing (polyoxymethylene, ρ = 1.41 g/cm{sup 3}), with a total thickness of 6.4 mm. The Monte Carlo N-Particle code was used to calculate the anisotropic {sup 192}Ir dose distributions. An in-house-developed inverse planning platform, geared with simulated annealing and constrained-gradient optimization algorithms, was used to replan 15 patient cases (total 75 plans) treated with a conventional tandem and ovoids (T and O) applicator. Prescription dose was 6 Gy. For replanning, we replaced the conventional tandem with that of the new DMBT tandem for optimization but left the ovoids in place and kept the dwell positions as originally planned. All DMBT plans were normalized to match the high-risk clinical target volume V100 coverage of the T and O plans. Results: In general there were marked improvements in plan quality for the DMBT plans. On average, D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were reduced by 0.59 ± 0.87 Gy (8.5% ± 28.7%), 0.48 ± 0.55 Gy (21.1% ± 27.2%), and 0.10 ± 0.38 Gy (40.6% ± 214.9%) among the 75 plans, with best single-plan reductions of 3.20 Gy (40.8%), 2.38 Gy (40.07%), and 1.26 Gy (27.5%), respectively. The high-risk clinical target volume D90 was similar, with 6.55 ± 0.96 Gy and 6.59 ± 1.06 Gy for T and O and DMBT, respectively. Conclusions: Application of the DMBT concept to cervical cancer allowed for improved organ at risk sparing while achieving similar target coverage on a sizeable patient population, as intended, by maximally utilizing the anatomic information contained in 3-dimensional

  19. Performance assessment of the BEBIG MultiSource high dose rate brachytherapy treatment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony; Mzenda, Bongile

    2009-12-21

    A comprehensive system characterisation was performed of the Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG GmbH MultiSource High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment unit with an (192)Ir source. The unit is relatively new to the UK market, with the first installation in the country having been made in the summer of 2009. A detailed commissioning programme was devised and is reported including checks of the fundamental parameters of source positioning, dwell timing, transit doses and absolute dosimetry of the source. Well chamber measurements, autoradiography and video camera analysis techniques were all employed. The absolute dosimetry was verified by the National Physical Laboratory, UK, and compared to a measurement based on a calibration from PTB, Germany, and the supplied source certificate, as well as an independent assessment by a visiting UK centre. The use of the 'Krieger' dosimetry phantom has also been evaluated. Users of the BEBIG HDR system should take care to avoid any significant bend in the transfer tube, as this will lead to positioning errors of the source, of up to 1.0 mm for slight bends, 2.0 mm for moderate bends and 5.0 mm for extreme curvature (depending on applicators and transfer tube used) for the situations reported in this study. The reason for these errors and the potential clinical impact are discussed. Users should also note the methodology employed by the system for correction of transit doses, and that no correction is made for the initial and final transit doses. The results of this investigation found that the uncorrected transit doses lead to small errors in the delivered dose at the first dwell position, of up to 2.5 cGy at 2 cm (5.6 cGy at 1 cm) from a 10 Ci source, but the transit dose correction for other dwells was accurate within 0.2 cGy. The unit has been mechanically reliable, and source positioning accuracy and dwell timing have been reproducible, with overall performance similar to other existing HDR equipment. The unit is capable of high

  20. Tandem-ring dwell time ratio in Nigeria: dose comparisons of two loading patterns in standard high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT), the source dwell times and dwell positions are essential treatment planning parameters. An optimal choice of these factors is fundamental to obtain the desired target coverage with the lowest achievable dose to the organs at risk (OARs). This study evaluates relevant dose parameters in cervix brachytherapy in order to assess existing tandem-ring dwell time ratio used at the first HDR BT center in Nigeria, and compare it with an alternative s...

  1. Computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma: safety, efficacy, and effect on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnike, Konrad; Wieners, Gero; Schwartz, Franziska; Seidensticker, Max; Pech, Maciej; Ruehl, Ricarda; Wust, Peter; Lopez-Hänninen, Enrique; Gademann, Günther; Peters, Nils; Berg, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Ricke, Jens

    2010-09-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 83 patients were recruited, presenting with 140 HCC- lesions. Treatment was performed by CT-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints included local tumor control and overall survival (OS). A matched-pair analysis with patients not receiving brachytherapy was performed. Match criteria included the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score, alpha-fetoprotein, presence, and extent of multifocal disease. For statistical analysis, Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression were performed. Mean and median cumulative TTP for all patients (n = 75) were 17.7 and 10.4 months. Five local recurrences were observed. The OS after inclusion reached median times of 19.4 months (all patients), 46.3 months (CLIP score, 0), 20.6 months (CLIP score, 1) 12.7 months, (CLIP score, 2), and 8.3 months (CLIP score, >or=3). The 1- and 3-year OS were 94% and 65% (CLIP score, 0), 69% and 12% (CLIP score, 1), and 48% and 19% (CLIP score, 2), respectively. Nine complications requiring intervention were encountered in 124 interventions. Matched-pair analysis revealed a significantly longer OS for patients undergoing CT-guided brachytherapy. Based on our results the study treatment could be safely performed. The study treatment had a beneficial effect on OS in patients with advanced HCC, with respect to (and depending on) the CLIP score and compared with OS in a historical control group. A high rate of local control was also observed, regardless of applied dose in a range of 15 to 25 Gy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low dose rate caesium-137 implant time of intracavitary brachytherapy source of a selected oncology center in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Owusu Banahene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment time taken for a radioactive source is found to be very important in intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. The duration of the treatment time depends on the prescribed dose requested to a reference point and the calculated dose rate to the same point. The duration of the treatment time of source is found to depend on the tumour stage. In this work, the treatment time of implant has been calculated for a Caesium-137 low dose rate brachytherapy source at an oncology facility in Ghana. Objective: The objective was to determine how the treatment time of tumours depends on the dose rate to the reference point prescribed by the Oncologists and the dose rate determined by the dosimetrists at the facility. Materials and Method: Depending upon the stage of the cancer, the Oncologist determines the type of treatment modality, source configuration for the cancer patient and positions of both tandem and ovoids in the cervix. Depending also on the tumour stage, two orthogonal radiographic X-ray films are taken using a simulator machine. The treatment machine used in the study is AMRA-Curietron. The maximum activity of the source was 259GBq. It has five channels which is a manual remote afterloader. In clinical practice, the treatment time t is very short(only some few days for such low dose rate brachytherapy source like Cs-137 which lasts only for some few days in comparison with the half life of the Cs-137 source. The mathematical equation for the calculation of treatment time is written as t=D/D. Hence t is the treatment time of the radioactive source of patients undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy treatment, D is prescribed dose to a reference point and D is the dose rate to the same reference point. Results: The calculated treatment time of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source for different source arrangements or channels used in clinical practice at the brachytherapy Centre have been determined. Also provided, are the

  3. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy as a Treatment Option in Endobronchial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report our experience with high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDR-EBBT and to assess its efficacy and tolerability with possibility of its use in selected cases with curative intent. Method. Retrospective review of patients with endobronchial tumors treated at our institution in 2007–2013 with HDR-EBBT. Subjective response and treatment related toxicity were extracted from patients’ records. Clinical response was evaluated by chest CT +/− bronchoscopy 2-3 months after treatment. Local control (LC and overall survival (OS were analyzed. Results. Overall 23 patients were identified. Ten patients were treated with curative intent, in 8 of them HDR-EBBT was combined with external beam radiotherapy. Short term palliation was as follows: dyspnea (13/15, cough (12/14, and hemoptysis (3/3. Seventeen patients were evaluated, of whom 9 (53% showed complete response. Four patients developed local failure (only 1 of them treated with curative intent and were salvaged with HDR-EBBT (n=1, chemotherapy (n=2, and laser (n=1. Among patients treated with curative intent, the 2-year LC and OS were 89% and 67%, respectively, and 2 out of 4 deaths were cancer-related. Late toxicity included bronchial stenosis (n=1. Only 1 patient had fatal hemoptysis and postmortem examination indicated local recurrence. Conclusion. HDR-EBBT is promising treatment with tolerable complication if used in properly selected patients.

  4. [A Quality Assurance (QA) System with a Web Camera for High-dose-rate Brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Asako; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Oohira, Shingo; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Inui, Shouki; Masaoka, Akira; Taniguchi, Makoto; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-03-01

    The quality assurance (QA) system that simultaneously quantifies the position and duration of an (192)Ir source (dwell position and time) was developed and the performance of this system was evaluated in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This QA system has two functions to verify and quantify dwell position and time by using a web camera. The web camera records 30 images per second in a range from 1,425 mm to 1,505 mm. A user verifies the source position from the web camera at real time. The source position and duration were quantified with the movie using in-house software which was applied with a template-matching technique. This QA system allowed verification of the absolute position in real time and quantification of dwell position and time simultaneously. It was evident from the verification of the system that the mean of step size errors was 0.31±0.1 mm and that of dwell time errors 0.1±0.0 s. Absolute position errors can be determined with an accuracy of 1.0 mm at all dwell points in three step sizes and dwell time errors with an accuracy of 0.1% in more than 10.0 s of the planned time. This system is to provide quick verification and quantification of the dwell position and time with high accuracy at various dwell positions without depending on the step size.

  5. On the use of multi-dimensional scaling and electromagnetic tracking in high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Theresa Ida; Ermer, Maximilian; Salas-Gonzalez, D; Kellermeier, Markus; Strnad, Vratislav; Bert, Christoph; Hensel, Bernhard; Tome, Ana Maria; Lang, Elmar W

    2017-08-30

    High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT) affords a frequent reassurance of the precise dwell positions of the radiation source. The corresponding dwell position determinations are realized with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMT). Because the treatment extends over several days, repeated dwell position determinations refer to varying coordinate systems centered in the field generator of the EMT system. After surgical implantation of the catheters a computed tomography (CT) X-ray image is taken followed by an immediate dwell position determination by the EMT system. The CT image serves to generate a treatment plan which determines dwell positions and dwell times for the radiation treatment. However, CT - and EMT - coordinates refer to different coordinate systems, hence an external reference is usually employed. The current investigation proposes a multi-dimensional scaling transformation of both data sets to estimate dwell positions without any external reference. Furthermore, the related distributions of dwell positions are characterized by uni - or bi - modal heavy - tailed distributions. The latter are well represented by alpha - stable distributions. The newly proposed data analysis provides dwell position deviations with high accuracy, and, furthermore, offers a convenient visualization of the actual shapes of the catheters which guide the radiation source during the treatment. © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  6. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, Rajib Lochan [Department of Radiation Physics, Indo-American Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Hyderabad (India); Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad (India); Rao, Ramakrishna [Department of Radiation Physics, MNJ Institute of Oncology and Regional Cancer Center, Hyderabad (India); Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R. [Department of Radiation Physics, Indo-American Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Hyderabad (India); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  7. Impact of surface curvature on dose delivery in intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Moonseong; Wang, Zhou; Malhotra, Harish K; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    In intraoperative high-dose-rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy, a 2-dimensional (2D) geometry is typically used for treatment planning. The assumption of planar geometry may cause serious errors in dose delivery for target surfaces that are, in reality, curved. A study to evaluate the magnitude of these errors in clinical practice was undertaken. Cylindrical phantoms with 6 radii (range: 1.35-12.5 cm) were used to simulate curved treatment geometries. Treatment plans were developed for various planar geometries and were delivered to the cylindrical phantoms using catheters inserted into Freiburg applicators of varying dimension. Dose distributions were measured using radiographic film. In comparison to the treatment plan (for a planar geometry), the doses delivered to prescription points were higher on the concave side of the geometry, up to 15% for the phantom with the smallest radius. On the convex side of the applicator, delivered doses were up to 10% lower for small treated areas (5 catheters). Our measurements have shown inaccuracy in dose delivery when the original planar treatment plan is delivered with a curved applicator. Dose delivery errors arising from the use of planar treatment plans with curved applicators may be significant.

  8. SU-C-16A-02: A Beryllium Oxide (BeO) Fibre-Coupled Luminescence Dosimeter for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing and School of Chem and Phys, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Mohammadi, M [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Afshar, V.S. [Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing and School of Chem and Phys, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramics have an effective atomic number, zeff ∼7.1, closely matched to water, zeff ∼7.4. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic fibrecoupled luminescence dosimeter, named RL/OSL BeO FOD, for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dosimetry. In our dosimetry system the radioluminescence (RL) of BeO ceramics is utilized for dose-rate measurements, and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) can be read post exposure for accumulated dose measurements. Methods: The RL/OSL BeO FOD consists of a 1 mm diameter × 1 mm long cylinder of BeO ceramic coupled to a 15 m long silica-silica optical fibre. The optical fibre is connected to a custom developed portable RL and OSL reader, located outside of the treatment suite. The x-ray energy response was evaluated using superficial x-rays, an Ir-192 source and high energy linear accelerators. The RL/OSL BeO FOD was then characterised for an Ir-192 source, investigating the dose response and angular dependency. A depth dose curve for the Ir-192 source was also measured. Results: The RL/OSL BeO FOD shows an under-response at low energy x-rays as expected. Though at higher x-ray energies, the OSL response continued to increase, while the RL response remained relatively constant. The dose response for the RL is found to be linear up to doses of 15 Gy, while the OSL response becomes more supralinear to doses above 15 Gy. Little angular dependency is observed and the depth dose curve measured agreed within 4% of that calculated based on TG-43. Conclusion: This works shows that the RL/OSL BeO FOD can be useful in HDR dosimetry. With the RL/OSL BeO FODs current size, it is capable of being inserted into intraluminal catheters and interstitial needles to verify HDR treatments.

  9. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  10. Radioablation of liver malignancies with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Complications and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohnike, Konrad; Wolf, Steffen; Damm, Robert; Seidensticker, Max; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Fischbach, Frank; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany); Peters, Nils; Hass, Peter; Gademann, Guenther [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate complications and identify risk factors for adverse events in patients undergoing high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (iBT). Data from 192 patients treated in 343 CT- or MRI-guided interventions from 2006-2009 at our institution were analyzed. In 41 %, the largest tumor treated was ≥ 5 cm, 6 % of the patients had tumors ≥ 10 cm. Prior to iBT, 60 % of the patients had chemotherapy, 22 % liver resection, 19 % thermoablation or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Safety was the primary endpoint; survival data were obtained as the secondary endpoints. During follow-up, MRI or CT imaging was performed and clinical and laboratory parameters were obtained. The rate of major complications was below 5 %. Five major bleedings (1.5 %) occurred. The frequency of severe bleeding was significantly higher in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. One patient developed signs of a nonclassic radiation-induced liver disease. In 3 patients, symptomatic gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers were detected. A dose exposure to the GI wall above 14 Gy/ml was a reliable threshold to predict ulcer formation. A combination of C-reactive protein ≥ 165 mg/l and/or leukocyte count ≥ 12.7 Gpt/l on the second day after the intervention predicted infection (sensitivity 90.0 %; specificity 92.8 %.) Two patients (0.6 %) died within 30 days. Median overall survival after the first liver treatment was 20.1 months for all patients and the local recurrence-free surviving proportion was 89 % after 12 months. Image-guided iBT yields a low rate of major complications and is effective. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Komplikationsrate und Identifizierung von Risikofaktoren fuer Komplikationen und Nebenwirkungen bei Patienten mit Lebermalignomen, die mit der hochdosierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (iBT) behandelt wurden. Von 2006 bis 2009 wurden 192 Patienten in 343 CT- oder MRT-gefuehrten Interventionen behandelt und deren Daten ausgewertet. Der groesste behandelte Tumor war in

  11. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: jdemanes@mednet.ucla.edu [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David [California Endocurietherapy, Oakland, CA (United States); Gustafson, Gary [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography-defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis-free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  12. The transit dose component of high dose rate brachytherapy: Direct measurements and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastin, K.T.; Podgorsak, M.B.; Thomadsen, B.R. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The purpose was to measure the transit dose produced by a moving high dose rate brachytherapy source and assess its clinical significance. The doses produced from source movement during Ir-192 HDR afterloading were measured using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeter rods. Transit doses at distances of 0.5-4.0 cm from an endobronchial applicator were measured using a Lucite phantom accommodating 1 x 1 x 6 mm thermoluminescent rods. Surface transit dose measurements were made using esophageal and endobronchial catheters, a gynecologic tandem, and an interstitial needle. No difference was detected in thermoluminescent dosimeter rod responses to 4 MV and Ir-192 spectra (427 nC/Gy) in a range of dose between 2 and 300 cGy. The transit dose at 0.5 cm from an endobronchial catheter was 0.31 cGy/(Curie-fraction) and followed an inverse square fall-off with increasing distance. Surface transit doses ranged from 0.38 cGy/(Curie-fraction) for an esophageal catheter to 1.03 cGy/(Curie-fraction) for an endobronchial catheter. Source velocity is dependent on the interdwell distance and varies between 220-452 mm/sec. A numeric algorithm was developed to calculate total transit dose, and was based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving high dose rate source. This algorithm reliably predicted the empirical transit doses and demonstrated that total transit dose is dependent on source velocity, number of fractions, and source activity. Surface transit doses are dependent on applicator diameter and wall material and thickness. Total transit doses within or outside the desired treatment volume are typically <100 cGy, but may exceed 200 cGy when using a large number of fractions with a high activity source. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy for thick uveal melanoma: reappraisal of apex and base dose radiation and dose rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Naseripour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of ruthenium-106 ( 106 Ru brachytherapy in terms of radiation parameters in patients with thick uveal melanomas. Material and methods: Medical records of 51 patients with thick (thickness ≥ 7 mm and < 11 mm uveal melanoma treated with 106 Ru brachytherapy during a ten-year period were reviewed. Radiation parameters, tumor regression, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, and treatment-related complications were assessed. Results: Fifty one eyes of 51 consecutive patients including 25 men and 26 women with a mean age of 50.5 ± 15.2 years were enrolled. Patients were followed for 36.1 ± 26.5 months (mean ± SD. Mean radiation dose to tumor apex and to sclera were 71 (± 19.2 Gy and 1269 (± 168.2 Gy. Radiation dose rates to tumor apex and to sclera were 0.37 (± 0.14 Gy/h and 6.44 (± 1.50 Gy/h. Globe preservation was achieved in 82.4%. Preoperative mean tumor thickness of 8.1 (± 0.9 mm decreased to 4.5 (± 1.6 mm, 3.4 (± 1.4 mm, and 3.0 (± 1.46 mm at 12, 24, and 48 months after brachytherapy (p = 0.03. Four eyes that did not show regression after 6 months of brachytherapy were enucleated. Secondary enucleation was performed in 5 eyes because of tumor recurrence or neovascular glaucoma. Tumor recurrence was evident in 6 (11.8% patients. Mean Log MAR (magnification requirement visual acuity declined from 0.75 (± 0.63 to 0.94 (± 0.5 (p = 0.04. Best corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or worse was recorded in 37% of the patients at the time of diagnosis and 61.7% of the patients at last exam (p = 0.04. Non-proliferative and proliferative radiation-induced retinopathy was observed in 20 and 7 eyes. Conclusions : Thick uveal melanomas are amenable to 106 Ru brachytherapy with less than recommended apex radiation dose and dose rates.

  14. Brachytherapy in Gynecologic Cancers: Why Is It Underused?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kathy; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-04-01

    Despite its established efficacy, brachytherapy is underused in the management of cervical and vaginal cancers in some parts of the world. Possible reasons for the underutilization of brachytherapy include the adoption of less invasive techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy; reimbursement policies favoring these techniques over brachytherapy; poor physician or patient access to brachytherapy; inadequate maintenance of brachytherapy skills among practicing radiation oncologists; transitioning to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with increased time requirements; and insufficient training of radiation oncology residents.

  15. Fundamental approach to the design of a dose-rate calculation program for use in brachytherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassell, K.J. (Saint Luke' s Hospital, Guildford (UK))

    1983-02-01

    A method, developed from the Quantisation Method, of calculating dose-rate distributions around uniformly and non-uniformly loaded brachytherapy sources is described. It allows accurate and straightforward corrections for oblique filtration and self-absorption to be made. Using this method, dose-rate distributions have been calculated for sources of radium 226, gold 198, iridium 192, caesium 137 and cobalt 60, all of which show very good agreement with existing measured and calculated data. This method is now the basis of the Interstitial and Intracavitary Dosimetry (IID) program on the General Electric RT/PLAN computerised treatment planning system.

  16. CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, Federico; Schreiber, Nadja; Schnapauff, Dirk; Denecke, Timm; Hamm, Bernd; Gebauer, Bernhard [ChariteUniversitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Wust, Peter [ChariteUniversitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Schott, Eckart [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Over a 6-year period, 98 patients with 212 unresectable HCC underwent CT-HDRBT applying a {sup 192}Ir source at our institution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed 6 weeks after the intervention and then every 3 months. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up of 23.1 months (range 4-64 months; median 20 months). Mean tumor diameter was 5 cm (range 1.8-12 cm). Eighteen of 212 (8.5 %) tumors showed local progression after a mean LTC of 21.1 months. In all, 67 patients (68.4 %) experienced distant tumor progression. The mean PFS was 15.2 months. Forty-six patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 29.2 months. Actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 80, 62, and 46 %, respectively. CT-HDRBT is an effective therapy to attain local tumor control in patients with unresectable HCC. Prospective randomized studies comparing CT-HDRBT with the standard treatments like Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and chemoembolization (TACE) are mandatory. (orig.) [German] Zweck der vorliegenden Arbeit war die Analyse der klinischen Effektivitaet der CT-gesteuerten Hochdosis-Brachytherapie (CT-HDRBT) bei Patienten mit inoperablem hepatozellulaeren Karzinom (HCC). Ueber einen Zeitraum von 6 Jahren, wurden an unserer Klinik 98 Patienten mit 212 inoperablen HCC mittels CT-HDRBT mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. MRT-Verlaufskontrollen erfolgten 6 Wochen nach der Intervention und dann alle 3 Monate. Primaerer Endpunkt der Studie war die lokale Tumorkontrolle (LTC); sekundaere Endpunkte waren das progressionsfreie Ueberleben (PFS) und Gesamtueberleben (OS). Die mittlere Nachbeobachtungszeit betrug 23,1 Monate (Spanne 4

  17. Quality control of high-dose-rate brachytherapy: treatment delivery analysis using statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Able, Charles M; Bright, Megan; Frizzell, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) is a quality control method used to ensure that a process is well controlled and operates with little variation. This study determined whether SPC was a viable technique for evaluating the proper operation of a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery system. A surrogate prostate patient was developed using Vyse ordnance gelatin. A total of 10 metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were placed from prostate base to apex. Computed tomography guidance was used to accurately position the first detector in each train at the base. The plan consisted of 12 needles with 129 dwell positions delivering a prescribed peripheral dose of 200 cGy. Sixteen accurate treatment trials were delivered as planned. Subsequently, a number of treatments were delivered with errors introduced, including wrong patient, wrong source calibration, wrong connection sequence, single needle displaced inferiorly 5 mm, and entire implant displaced 2 mm and 4 mm inferiorly. Two process behavior charts (PBC), an individual and a moving range chart, were developed for each dosimeter location. There were 4 false positives resulting from 160 measurements from 16 accurately delivered treatments. For the inaccurately delivered treatments, the PBC indicated that measurements made at the periphery and apex (regions of high-dose gradient) were much more sensitive to treatment delivery errors. All errors introduced were correctly identified by either the individual or the moving range PBC in the apex region. Measurements at the urethra and base were less sensitive to errors. SPC is a viable method for assessing the quality of HDR treatment delivery. Further development is necessary to determine the most effective dose sampling, to ensure reproducible evaluation of treatment delivery accuracy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality Control of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Treatment Delivery Analysis Using Statistical Process Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Able, Charles M., E-mail: cable@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bright, Megan; Frizzell, Bart [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Statistical process control (SPC) is a quality control method used to ensure that a process is well controlled and operates with little variation. This study determined whether SPC was a viable technique for evaluating the proper operation of a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery system. Methods and Materials: A surrogate prostate patient was developed using Vyse ordnance gelatin. A total of 10 metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were placed from prostate base to apex. Computed tomography guidance was used to accurately position the first detector in each train at the base. The plan consisted of 12 needles with 129 dwell positions delivering a prescribed peripheral dose of 200 cGy. Sixteen accurate treatment trials were delivered as planned. Subsequently, a number of treatments were delivered with errors introduced, including wrong patient, wrong source calibration, wrong connection sequence, single needle displaced inferiorly 5 mm, and entire implant displaced 2 mm and 4 mm inferiorly. Two process behavior charts (PBC), an individual and a moving range chart, were developed for each dosimeter location. Results: There were 4 false positives resulting from 160 measurements from 16 accurately delivered treatments. For the inaccurately delivered treatments, the PBC indicated that measurements made at the periphery and apex (regions of high-dose gradient) were much more sensitive to treatment delivery errors. All errors introduced were correctly identified by either the individual or the moving range PBC in the apex region. Measurements at the urethra and base were less sensitive to errors. Conclusions: SPC is a viable method for assessing the quality of HDR treatment delivery. Further development is necessary to determine the most effective dose sampling, to ensure reproducible evaluation of treatment delivery accuracy.

  19. Clinical implementation of a novel applicator in high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In this study, we present the clinical implementation of a novel transoral balloon centering esophageal applicator (BCEA and the initial clinical experience in high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer, using this applicator. Material and methods: Acceptance testing and commissioning of the BCEA were performed prior to clinical use. Full performance testing was conducted including measurements of the dimensions and the catheter diameter, evaluation of the inflatable balloon consistency, visibility of the radio-opaque markers, congruence of the markers, absolute and relative accuracy of the HDR source in the applicator using the radiochromic film and source position simulator, visibility and digitization of the applicator on the computed tomography (CT images under the clinical conditions, and reproducibility of the offset. Clinical placement of the applicator, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient’s response to the treatment were elaborated as well. Results : The experiments showed sub-millimeter accuracy in the source positioning with distal position at 1270 mm. The digitization (catheter reconstruction was uncomplicated due to the good visibility of markers. The treatment planning resulted in a favorable dose distribution. This finding was pronounced for the treatment of the curvy anatomy of the lesion due to the improved repeatability and consistency of the delivered fractional dose to the patient, since the radioactive source was placed centrally within the lumen with respect to the clinical target due to the five inflatable balloons. Conclusions : The consistency of the BCEA positioning resulted in the possibility to deliver optimized non-uniform dose along the catheter, which resulted in an increase of the dose to the cancerous tissue and lower doses to healthy tissue. A larger number of patients and long-term follow-up will be required to investigate if the delivered optimized treatment can

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shwetha, Bondel [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Ravikumar, Manickam, E-mail: drravikumarm@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Supe, Sanjay S.; Sathiyan, Saminathan [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Lokesh, Vishwanath [Department of Radiotherapy, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India); Keshava, Subbarao L. [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai, Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore (India)

    2012-04-01

    Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

  1. Preliminary report of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy in head-and-neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemlewski, A.; Zienkiewicz, J. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Serkies, K.; Badzio, A. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and acute/delayed toxicity of pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR BT) in head-and-neck tumors. Patients and Methods: 45 head and neck cancer patients underwent interstitial or contact PDR BT at a dose of 10.2-70 Gy (median, 70 Gy) and 0.6 or 1.0 Gy/pulse/h. 42 patients were administered BT as part of their curative treatment; 32 of them had sole BT. Three reirradiated patients with recurrent tumor had palliative BT. Results: PDR BT was well tolerated. Intense bleeding was the only complication associated with catheter removal from the tongue and bucca. 44 patients who completed BT experienced acute mucositis. Grade 3 toxicity of skin and oral mucosa occurred in three (6.8%) and six patients (13.6%), respectively. At a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 2-67 months), late serious toxicity (grade 4, for soft tissue and bone) was seen in seven patients (15.9%). Among the parameters analyzed, only dental care performed before BT had a significant impact on mucosal side effects. Acute severe mucositis was observed in 23% of patients without dental care compared to 0% of those with dental care (p = 0.044). Late severe mucositis occurred in 17.7% and 26.9% of the respective patients (p = 0.035), overall in 23%. The larger the volume encompassed by the reference isodose, the more late (p = 0.004) mucosal reactions were observed. Conclusion: PDR BT continued over a few days is a feasible and safe approach in head-and-neck tumors; however, it is accompanied by some toxicity. Dental care should precede isotope application. (orig.)

  2. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwetha, Bondel; Ravikumar, Manickam; Supe, Sanjay S; Sathiyan, Saminathan; Lokesh, Vishwanath; Keshava, Subbarao L

    2012-01-01

    Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

  4. Film dosimetry calibration method for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy with an 192Ir source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwob, Nathan; Orion, Itzhak

    2007-05-01

    192Ir sources have been widely used in clinical brachytherapy. An important challenge is to perform dosimetric measurements close to the source despite the steep dose gradient. The common, inexpensive silver halide film is a classic two-dimensional integrator dosimeter and would be an attractive solution for these dose measurements. The main disadvantage of film dosimetry is the film response to the low-energy photon. Since the photon energy spectrum is known to vary with depth, the sensitometric curves are expected to be dependent on depth. The purpose of this study is to suggest a correction method for silver halide film dosimetry that overcomes the response changes at different depths. Sensitometric curves have been obtained at different depths with verification film near a 1 Ci 192Ir pulsed-dose-rate source. The depth dependence of the film response was observed and a correction function was established. The suitability of the method was tested through measurement of the radial dose profile and radial dose function. The results were compared to Monte Carlo-simulated values according to the TG43 formalism. Monte Carlo simulations were performed separately for the beta and gamma source emissions, using the EGS4 code system, including the low-energy photon and electron transport optimization procedures. The beta source emission simulation showed that the beta dose contribution could be neglected and therefore the film-depth dependence could not be attributed to this part of the source radioactivity. The gamma source emission simulations included photon-spectra collection at several depths. The results showed a depth-dependent softening of the photon spectrum that can explain the film-energy dependence.

  5. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Saurabha; Majumder, Dipanjan; Adurkar, Pranjal; Swamidas, Jamema; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1), after 50 ml (series 2), and 100 ml (series 3) bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results The mean (± SD) bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25) cc, 116.2 (± 28) cc, and 172.9 (± 29) cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm3,1 cm3, 2 cm3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm3, 1 cm3, and 2 cm3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1) compared to full bladder (series 3) (p = 0.03) was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume during cervical

  6. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  7. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bailleux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods: From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age was 56.4 years (27-79. Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%, T3a = 1 pt (3%, T3b = 6 pts (18.2%, and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%. Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27. Median CTVCT (16 pts and HR-CTV MRI (17 pts were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3, 31.9 cc (17.1-58, respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5, 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4, respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9, 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4, and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1, respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51. Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pt, G3 infection = 2 pts, and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts, respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion; no bleeding was

  8. ``In vivo'' Dose Measurements in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Treatments for Cervical Cancer: A Project Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, C. A. Reynoso; Burgos, A. E. Buenfil; Trejo, C. Ruiz; García, A. Mota; Durán, E. Trejo; Ponce, M. Rodríguez; de Buen, I. Gamboa

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this thesis project is to compare doses calculated from the treatment planning system using computed tomography images, with those measured "in vivo" by using thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at different regions of the rectum and bladder of a patient during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma. The experimental dosimeters characterisation and calibration have concluded and the protocol to carry out the "in vivo" measurements has been established. In this work, the calibration curves of two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters (rods and chips) are presented, and the proposed protocol to measure the "in vivo" dose is fully described.

  9. Dosimetric analysis of Co-60 source based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: A case series of ten patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Batra, Manika; Bagdare, Priyusha; Kaushik, Sandeep; Tyagi, Atul; Naik, Ayush; Bhandari, Virendra; Gupta, Krishna Lal

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the dosimetric parameters of Co-60 based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy plans for patients of carcinoma uterine cervix. Co-60 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit has been introduced in past few years and is gaining importance owing to its long half life, economical benefits and comparable clinical outcome compared to Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. A study was conducted on ten patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix (Ca Cx). Computed tomography (CT) images were taken after three channel applicator insertions. The planning for 7 Gray per fraction (7 Gy/#) was done for Co-60 HDR brachytherapy unit following the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines. All the patients were treated with 3# with one week interval between fractions. The mean dose to high risk clinical target volumes (HRCTV) for D90 (dose to 90% volume) was found to be 102.05% (Standard Deviation (SD): 3.07). The mean D2cc (dose to 2 cubic centimeter volume) of the bladder, rectum and sigmoid were found to be 15.9 Gy (SD: 0.58), 11.5 Gy (SD: 0.91) and 4.1 Gy (SD: 1.52), respectively. The target coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were achieved as per the ABS guidelines. Hence, it can be concluded that the Co-60 HDR brachytherapy unit is a good choice especially for the centers with a small number of brachytherapy procedures as no frequent source replacement is required like in an Ir-192 HDR unit.

  10. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy: a curative treatment; La curietherapie endobronchique de haut debit de dose: un traitement curatif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffert, D.; Spaeth, D.; Winnefeld, J. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Menard, O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Nancy-Brabois, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2000-06-01

    New endobronchial techniques of treatment allow a good unblocking. Nevertheless, only high dose rate brachytherapy delivers a curative treatment for invasive carcinomas. This study analyses the results of the first 33 consecutive patients treated with curative intent by this technique from 1994 to 1997, and followed-up more than one year. Thirty-seven lesions were treated, with usual schedule delivering 30 Gy at 1 cm depth in six fractions and three to five weeks. All the patients were meticulously selected on the local involvement of the tumour and absolute contraindications to a surgical treatment. All of them have a pulmonary disease history or a general contraindication. With a 14-month follow-up, the local control at two months after the treatment was 95 % (endoscopic and histologic), and 90 % of the patients presented a prolonged local control. Four patients died of the treated cancer, another of a controlateral cancer. Ten patients died of another disease, five of them from a respiratory insufficiency. The overall survival rate at two years was 53 % and the specific survival rate 80 %. The acute tolerance was good, without incident. Asymptomatic bronchial stenoses, described by endoscopic follow-up, were described for seven patients. We conclude that, on the basis of a good selection of the patients, and a respect of the indications, high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is an effective curative treatment. It offers a new curative option and must be proposed for the small invasive carcinomas in non-operable patients. (author)

  11. Definitive three-dimensional high-dose-rate brachytherapy for inoperable endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghini, Lorena; Casale, Michelina; Trippa, Fabio; Anselmo, Paola; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Fabiani, Stefania; Italiani, Marco; Chirico, Luigia; Muti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report our experience on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer unfit to surgery. Material and methods Seventeen patients underwent HDR-BT as definitive treatment. Median age was 79 years (range, 60-95), median Karnofsky performance status 90% (range, 60-100). Histology was endometrial adenocarcinoma in 14 (82%), and non-endometrial in 3 (18%) patients. In 15 (88%) patients, clinical stage was I and in remaining 2 (12%) was III. All patients were evaluated with computed tomography (CT) and endometrial biopsy. Using the Fletcher applicator, a CT-based planning HDR-BT was delivered. Local control (LC) was obtained when there was an interruption of vaginal bleeding in absence of CT-imaging progression. Results Fourteen patients underwent HDR-BT alone and three external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with HDR-BT. All patients had a clinical LC, after a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 6-131), 3 and 6 years LC rates were 86% and 69%, respectively. Cancer specific survival (CSS) at 1, 2, and 6 years was 93%, 85%, and 85%, respectively. Age, stage, dose, and type of radiotherapy did not result significant prognostic factors for LC and CSS. Only histology significantly influenced LC: for high-risk histology (i.e., non-endometrial carcinoma or grade [G] 3 endometrial adenocarcinoma) LC was 73% at 1 year and 36% at 6 years; for low-risk histology (i.e., G1-2 endometrial adenocarcinoma) was 100% at 1 and 6 years (p = 0.05). Two (12%) patients had G2 acute toxicity and two others (12%) G1 late toxicity. Conclusions Although some limitations of our analysis (relatively few number of patients recruited, retrospective evaluation, and consequent suboptimal patient selection), it confirms effectiveness and safety of definitive HDR-BT for medically inoperable stage I-III endometrial cancer. The best LC was obtained in stage I low-risk histology. PMID:28533799

  12. Definitive three-dimensional high-dose-rate brachytherapy for inoperable endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Draghini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report our experience on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT in patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer unfit to surgery. Material and methods : Seventeen patients underwent HDR-BT as definitive treatment. Median age was 79 years (range, 60-95, median Karnofsky performance status 90% (range, 60-100. Histology was endometrial adenocarcinoma in 14 (82%, and non-endometrial in 3 (18% patients. In 15 (88% patients, clinical stage was I and in remaining 2 (12% was III. All patients were evaluated with computed tomography (CT and endometrial biopsy. Using the Fletcher applicator, a CT-based planning HDR-BT was delivered. Local control (LC was obtained when there was an interruption of vaginal bleeding in absence of CT-imaging progression. Results : Fourteen patients underwent HDR-BT alone and three external beam radiotherapy (EBRT combined with HDR-BT. All patients had a clinical LC, after a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 6-131, 3 and 6 years LC rates were 86% and 69%, respectively. Cancer specific survival (CSS at 1, 2, and 6 years was 93%, 85%, and 85%, respectively. Age, stage, dose, and type of radiotherapy did not result significant prognostic factors for LC and CSS. Only histology significantly influenced LC: for high-risk histology (i.e., non-endometrial carcinoma or grade [G] 3 endometrial adeno­carcinoma LC was 73% at 1 year and 36% at 6 years; for low-risk histology (i.e., G1-2 endometrial adenocarcinoma was 100% at 1 and 6 years (p = 0.05. Two (12% patients had G2 acute toxicity and two others (12% G1 late toxicity. Conclusions : Although some limitations of our analysis (relatively few number of patients recruited, retrospective evaluation, and consequent suboptimal patient selection, it confirms effectiveness and safety of definitive HDR-BT for medically inoperable stage I-III endometrial cancer. The best LC was obtained in stage I low-risk histology.

  13. Clinical experience of high dose rate brachytherapy using Ir-192 remote afterloading system (microSELECTRON-HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Akira; Yamamoto, Koji; Yoshioka, Shinji [Uwajima City Hospital, Ehime (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki; Fujii, Takashi; Ikezoe, Junpei

    1999-03-01

    Twenty-one lesions were reviewed of 20 patients who were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy using Ir-192 remote afterloading system (microSELECTRON-HDR) between August, 1997 and August, 1998. Esophageal cancer (n=6), lung cancer (n=3), cholangioma (n=3), epipharyngeal cancer (n=2) and uterine cervical cancer (n=2) were treated with intracavitary irradiation. Regional skin recurrence of breast cancer (n=3) was treated with interstitial irradiation, and oral cavity cancer (n=2) was treated with the mold method. Eleven lesions were controlled locally with a short follow-up period. There was no significant complication related to the insertion procedures of the applicator or the tubes without pneumothorax in one patient with lung cancer. So far, this treatment is relatively safe and effective not only for curative therapy for early stage cancer but also for palliative therapy for the advanced cancer. Furthermore, it is very important that medical staffs are kept free from radiation exposure. There is no established treatment protocol in high-dose-rate brachytherapy, therefore, a careful longer follow-up is necessary to clarify the true tumor control rate and the development of the late effect on normal tissue. (author)

  14. Dosimetric equivalence of non-standard high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy catheter patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative HDR prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Methods: Prostate HDR brachytherapy uses a grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. On CT data from ten previously-treated patients new catheters were digitized following three catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a p...

  15. Outcomes of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy with or without external beam radiotherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekii, Shuhei; Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Tomoyasu; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Takahashi, Kana; Inaba, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Ryohei; Itami, Jun

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to retrospectively analyze outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in patients with vaginal recurrence of endometrial carcinoma, and to identify factors prognostic of patient outcomes. The medical records of all patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for initial recurrence in the vagina of endometrial cancer after definitive surgery between 1992 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent either intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) or interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) with or without EBRT. Late toxicity was graded using the EORTC (LENT/SOMA) scale, revised in 1995. Thirty-seven patients were identified. The median follow-up time was 48 months (range: 6-225 months). Of these 37 patients, 23 underwent ICBT, 14 underwent ISBT, and 26 underwent EBRT. Tumor size at first examination of initial relapse was significantly larger in the ISBT than in the ICBT group. The 4-year respective overall survival (OS), local control (LC), and progression-free survival (PFS) rates in the entire cohort were 81.0%, 77.9%, and 56.8%, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of first recurrence and radiotherapy (endometrial carcinoma with acceptable morbidity. Early radiotherapy, including brachytherapy, should be considered for women who experience vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

  16. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For high-dose rate conformal brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinugawa, Keigo; Jo, Yoshimasa; Morioka, Masaaki; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    Sixteen patients with localized prostate cancer were referred to our clinic for radiation therapy in combination with HDR brachytherapy using Ir-192 pellets between October 1997 and August 1998. The patients were given external beam radiation of 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in combination with an interstitial HDR brachytherapy implant of 3 fractions each delivering 5.5 Gy during two days. Using an implanting device especially designed for HDR, 10-18 applicator needles (17 gauge) were implanted into the prostate using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) with perineal template guidance under spinal anesthesia. Pathological evaluation was performed at 6 months after treatment. This technique of external beam radiation combined with HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. Serum prostatic antigen (PSA) levels became normalized in 87.5% of the patients (14 out of 16) within 1-14 months (median 2 months) after the irradiation. No significant intraoperative or perioperative complications occurred, however one patient (6.25%) experienced Grade 3 hematuria. Most of the early complications were otherwise Grade 1 or 2. From prospectively planned prostatic rebiopsies performed at 6 months, we can observe the radiation effects in the pathological findings such as fibrosis, basal cell hyperplasia, bizarre cells and intraductal calcifications. (K.H.)

  17. Development of 3D ultrasound needle guidance for high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of gynaecological cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, J.; Tessier, D.; D'Souza, D.; Leung, E.; Hajdok, G.; Fenster, A.

    2016-04-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is often included in standard-of-care for gynaecological cancers. Needles are currently inserted through a perineal template without any standard real-time imaging modality to assist needle guidance, causing physicians to rely on pre-operative imaging, clinical examination, and experience. While two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) is sometimes used for real-time guidance, visualization of needle placement and depth is difficult and subject to variability and inaccuracy in 2D images. The close proximity to critical organs, in particular the rectum and bladder, can lead to serious complications. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) transrectal US system and are investigating its use for intra-operative visualization of needle positions used in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy. As a proof-of-concept, four patients were imaged with post-insertion 3D US and x-ray CT. Using software developed in our laboratory, manual rigid registration of the two modalities was performed based on the perineal template's vaginal cylinder. The needle tip and a second point along the needle path were identified for each needle visible in US. The difference between modalities in the needle trajectory and needle tip position was calculated for each identified needle. For the 60 needles placed, the mean trajectory difference was 3.23 +/- 1.65° across the 53 visible needle paths and the mean difference in needle tip position was 3.89 +/- 1.92 mm across the 48 visible needles tips. Based on the preliminary results, 3D transrectal US shows potential for the development of a 3D US-based needle guidance system for interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  18. Feasibility study of patient-specific quality assurance system for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Sim, Jina; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of establishing a quality-assurance (QA) system for brachytherapy that can ensure patient-specific QA by enhancing dosimetric accuracy for the patient's therapy plan. To measure the point-absorbed dose and the 2D dose distribution for the patient's therapy plan, we fabricated a solid phantom that allowed for the insertion of an applicator for patient-specific QA and used an ion chamber and a film as measuring devices. The patient treatment plan was exported to the QA dose-calculation software, which calculated the time weight of dwell position stored in the plan DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) file to obtain an overall beam quality correction factor, and that correction was applied to the dose calculations. Experiments were conducted after importing the patient's treatment planning source data for the fabricated phantom and inserting the applicator, ion chamber, and film into the phantom. On completion of dose delivery, the doses to the ion chamber and film were checked against the corresponding treatment plan to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy. For experimental purposes, five treatment plans were randomly selected. The beam quality correction factors for ovoid and tandem brachytherapy applicators were found to be 1.15 and 1.10 - 1.12, respectively. The beam quality correction factor in tandem fluctuated by approximately 2%, depending on the changes in the dwell position. The doses measured by using the ion chamber showed differences ranging from -2.4% to 0.6%, compared to the planned doses. As for the film, the passing rate was 90% or higher when assessed using a gamma value of the local dose difference of 3% and a distance to agreement of 3 mm. The results show that the self-fabricated phantom was suitable for QA in clinical settings. The proposed patient-specific QA for the treatment planning is expected to contribute to reduce dosimetric errors in brachytherapy and, thus, to enhancing treatment

  19. 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound system for high-dose-rate interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy needle guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jessica R.; Surry, Kathleen; D'Souza, David; Leung, Eric; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for gynaecological cancers often includes brachytherapy; in particular, in high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted into the tumour and surrounding area through a template in order to deliver the radiation dose. Currently, there is no standard modality for visualizing needles intra-operatively, despite the need for precise needle placement in order to deliver the optimal dose and avoid nearby organs, including the bladder and rectum. While three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging has been proposed for 3D intra-operative needle guidance, anterior needles tend to be obscured by shadowing created by the template's vaginal cylinder. We have developed a 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) system that uses a conventional two-dimensional side-fire TRUS probe rotated inside a hollow vaginal cylinder made from a sonolucent plastic (TPX). The system was validated using grid and sphere phantoms in order to test the geometric accuracy of the distance and volumetric measurements in the reconstructed image. To test the potential for visualizing needles, an agar phantom mimicking the geometry of the female pelvis was used. Needles were inserted into the phantom and then imaged using the 3D TVUS system. The needle trajectories and tip positions in the 3D TVUS scan were compared to their expected values and the needle tracks visualized in magnetic resonance images. Based on this initial study, 360-degree 3D TVUS imaging through a sonolucent vaginal cylinder is a feasible technique for intra-operatively visualizing needles during HDR interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  20. Outcomes of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy with or without external beam radiotherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Sekii

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was designed to retrospectively analyze outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy, with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, in patients with vaginal recurrence of endometrial carcinoma, and to identify factors prognostic of patient outcomes. Material and methods : The medical records of all patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for initial recurrence in the vagina of endometrial cancer after definitive surgery between 1992 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent either intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT or interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT with or without EBRT. Late toxicity was graded using the EORTC (LENT/SOMA scale, revised in 1995. Results : Thirty-seven patients were identified. The median follow-up time was 48 months (range: 6-225 months. Of these 37 patients, 23 underwent ICBT, 14 underwent ISBT, and 26 underwent EBRT. Tumor size at first examination of initial relapse was significantly larger in the ISBT than in the ICBT group. The 4-year respective overall survival (OS, local control (LC, and progression-free survival (PFS rates in the entire cohort were 81.0%, 77.9%, and 56.8%, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of first recurrence and radiotherapy (< 3 months, ≥ 3 months was a significant predictor of LC and PFS. OS and LC rates did not differ significantly in the ICBT and ISBT groups. Two patients experienced grade 2 rectal bleeding, and four experienced grade 2 hematuria. No grade 3 or higher late complications were observed. Conclusions : Salvage HDR brachytherapy is an optimal for treating vaginal recurrence of endometrial carcinoma with acceptable morbidity. Early radiotherapy, including brachytherapy, should be considered for women who experience vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

  1. Time-driven activity-based costing of low-dose-rate and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Annette M; Laviana, Aaron A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Veruttipong, Darlene; Steinberg, Michael; Park, Sang-June; Burke, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick A; Saigal, Christopher

    Cost estimates through traditional hospital accounting systems are often arbitrary and ambiguous. We used time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to determine the true cost of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer and demonstrate opportunities for cost containment at an academic referral center. We implemented TDABC for patients treated with I-125, preplanned LDR and computed tomography based HDR brachytherapy with two implants from initial consultation through 12-month followup. We constructed detailed process maps for provision of both HDR and LDR. Personnel, space, equipment, and material costs of each step were identified and used to derive capacity cost rates, defined as price per minute. Each capacity cost rate was then multiplied by the relevant process time and products were summed to determine total cost of care. The calculated cost to deliver HDR was greater than LDR by $2,668.86 ($9,538 vs. $6,869). The first and second HDR treatment day cost $3,999.67 and $3,955.67, whereas LDR was delivered on one treatment day and cost $3,887.55. The greatest overall cost driver for both LDR and HDR was personnel at 65.6% ($4,506.82) and 67.0% ($6,387.27) of the total cost. After personnel costs, disposable materials contributed the second most for LDR ($1,920.66, 28.0%) and for HDR ($2,295.94, 24.0%). With TDABC, the true costs to deliver LDR and HDR from the health system perspective were derived. Analysis by physicians and hospital administrators regarding the cost of care afforded redesign opportunities including delivering HDR as one implant. Our work underscores the need to assess clinical outcomes to understand the true difference in value between these modalities. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SU-E-T-165: Characterization of Dose Distributions in High-Dose-Rate Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Damato, A; Friesen, S; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize dose distributions in high-dose-rate(HDR) surface brachytherapy using an Ir-125 source for different geometries, field sizes and topology of the clinical targets(CT). To investigate the depth doses at the central axis(CAX), edges of the treatment fields(E), and lateral dose distributions(L) present when using flap applicators in skin cancer treatments. Methods: When malignancies diagnosed on the skin are treated, various geometries of the CT require proper adaptation of the flap or custom-made applicators to the treatment site. Consequently, the dose at the depth on CAX and field edges changes with variation of the curvatures and size of the applicators. To assess the dose distributions, we created a total of 10 treatment plans(TP) for 10×10 and 20×20 field sizes(FS) with a step size of 1cm. The geometry of the applicators was: planar(PA), curved to 30(CA30) and 60(CA60) degrees with respect to the CAX, half-cylinder(HC), and cylindrical shape(CS). One additional TP was created in which the applicators were positioned to form a dome shape(DS) with a diameter of 16cm. This TP was used to emulate treatment of the average sized scalp. All TPs were optimized to deliver a prescription dose at 8mm equidistantly from the planes containing the dwell positions. This optimization is equivalent to the clinical arrangement since the SSD for the flap applicators is 5mm and the prescription depth is 3mm in the majority of clinical cases. Results: The depths (in mm) of the isodose lines were: FS(10×10):PA[90%(9.1CAX,8.0E,7.6L),50%(28.3CAX,20E,17.3L), 25%(51.1CAX,40E,27L)],CA30[90%(10.3CAX,8.2E,7.9L),50%(32.1CAX, 16.2E,15.8L),25%(61.3CAX,36.7E,31.8L)],CA60[90%(12.2CAX,6.1E,6.3L ),50%(47CAX,14E,16.6L),25%(70.8CAX,31.9E,35.4L)],HC[90%(11.1CA X,6.3E,7.3L),50%(38.3CAX,14.6E,16.1L),25%(66.2CAX,33.8E,34.2L)];FS (20×20):PA[90%(11.1CAX,9.0E,7.0L),50%(34.4CAX,21.9E,15.3L),25%(7 0.4CAX,50.9E,34.8L)],CA30[90%(10.9CAX,7.5E,7.1L),50%(38.8CAX,16. 7E,15.4L),25

  3. [Pudendal block or combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate carcinoma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, M; Kliner, S J; Achilles, M; Schenck, C; Berkovic, K; Ruebben, H; Stuschke, M

    2010-01-01

    In male patients the pudendal block has been applied only in rare cases as a therapy for neuralgia of the pudendal nerve. Up to now there is no comparison of pudendal block with an anaesthesia form close to the spinal cord. In this pilot study the bilateral perineal infiltration of the pudendal nerve was compared to combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. In 30 patients (68.8 +/- 5.4 years) who underwent a core needle biopsy for high-risk prostate carcinoma, an HDR brachytherapy in CSE or NPB was carried out. Both anaesthesia forms were examined concerning the perioperative compatibility, the subjective feeling (German school marks principle 1-6), the pain feeling (VAS, 1-10) and the early postoperative course (mobility, complications). Both anaesthesia procedures were offered to all patients. For 2 patients the NPB was favoured primarily, because they had undergone surgery of the lumbal spine, so that the CSE was not applicable. There was no change of anaesthesia form necessary. The expense of time for NPB was 10.5 +/- 2.5 min, for CSE 30.5 +/- 5.5 min (p subjective feeling in the NPB group was described as 2.06 +/- 0.59 and in the CSE group 2.73 +/- 0.79. This is a significant difference (p subjective feeling there are no essential significant differences. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart - New York.

  4. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe...... the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy...

  5. Application of RADPOS in Vivo Dosimetry for QA of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherpak, A.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Gy. Conclusions: In vivo dosimetry can potentially signal errors in catheter placement or numbering before entire dose is delivered. The demonstrated accuracy of RADPOS dose measurements and its ability to simultaneously measure displacement makes it a powerful tool for HDR brachytherapy treatments for prostate...... cancer, where high dose gradients and movement of the prostate gland can present unique in vivo dosimetry challenges. Financial and technical support has been received from Best Medical Canada and Ascension Technology Corporation. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine...

  6. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  7. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  8. Toward a 3D transrectal ultrasound system for verification of needle placement during high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jessica Robin; Surry, Kathleen; Leung, Eric; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Treatment for gynecologic cancers, such as cervical, recurrent endometrial, and vaginal malignancies, commonly includes external-beam radiation and brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy, radiation treatment is delivered via hollow needles that are typically inserted through a template on the perineum with a cylinder placed in the vagina for stability. Despite the need for precise needle placement to minimize complications and provide optimal treatment, there is no standard intra-operative image-guidance for this procedure. While some image-guidance techniques have been proposed, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), these techniques have not been widely adopted. In order to provide intra-operative needle visualization and localization during interstitial brachytherapy, we have developed a three-dimensional (3D) TRUS system. This study describes the 3D TRUS system and reports on the system validation and results from a proof-of-concept patient study. To obtain a 3D TRUS image, the system rotates a conventional 2D endocavity transducer through 170 degrees in 12 s, reconstructing the 2D frames into a 3D image in real-time. The geometry of the reconstruction was validated using two geometric phantoms to ensure the accuracy of the linear measurements in each of the image coordinate directions and the volumetric accuracy of the system. An agar phantom including vaginal and rectal canals, as well as a model uterus and tumor, was designed and used to test the visualization and localization of the interstitial needles under idealized conditions by comparing the needles' positions between the 3D TRUS scan and a registered MR image. Five patients undergoing HDR interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy were imaged using the 3D TRUS system following the insertion of all needles. This image was manually, rigidly registered to the clinical

  9. Dosimetric characterization of the M-15 high-dose-rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy source using the AAPM and ESTRO formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Than, Minh-Tri; Munro Iii, John J; Medich, David C

    2015-05-08

    The Source Production & Equipment Co. (SPEC) model M-15 is a new Iridium-192 brachytherapy source model intended for use as a temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy source for the Nucletron microSelectron Classic afterloading system. The purpose of this study is to characterize this HDR source for clinical application by obtaining a complete set of Monte Carlo calculated dosimetric parameters for the M-15, as recommended by AAPM and ESTRO, for isotopes with average energies greater than 50 keV. This was accomplished by using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code to simulate the resulting source dosimetry at various points within a pseudoinfinite water phantom. These dosimetric values next were converted into the AAPM and ESTRO dosimetry parameters and the respective statistical uncertainty in each parameter also calculated and presented. The M-15 source was modeled in an MCNP6 Monte Carlo environment using the physical source specifications provided by the manufacturer. Iridium-192 photons were uniformly generated inside the iridium core of the model M-15 with photon and secondary electron transport replicated using photoatomic cross-sectional tables supplied with MCNP6. Simulations were performed for both water and air/vacuum computer models with a total of 4 × 109 sources photon history for each simulation and the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove low-energy photons belowδ = 10 keV. Dosimetric data, including D·(r,θ), gL(r), F(r,θ), φan(r), and φ-an, and their statistical uncertainty were calculated from the output of an MCNP model consisting of an M-15 source placed at the center of a spherical water phantom of 100 cm diameter. The air kerma strength in free space, SK, and dose rate constant, Λ, also was computed from a MCNP model with M-15 Iridium-192 source, was centered at the origin of an evacuated phantom in which a critical volume containing air at STP was added 100 cm from the source center. The reference dose rate, D·(r0,θ0) ≡ D· (1cm

  10. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  11. Needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer evaluated by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Lizondo, Maria; Hokland, Steffen; Rylander, Susanne; Pedersen, Erik M; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    2017-09-18

    To quantify needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and propose a threshold for needle migration. Twenty-four high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with an HDR boost of 2 × 8.5 Gy were included. Patients received an MRI for planning (MRI1), before (MRI2), and after treatment (MRI3). Time from needle insertion to MRI3 was ∼3 hours. Needle migration was evaluated from coregistered images: MRI1-MRI2 and MRI1-MRI3. Dose volume histogram parameters from the treatment plan based on MRI1 were related to parameters based on needle positions in MRI2 or MRI3. Regression was used to model the average needle migration per implant and change in D90 clinical target volume, CTVprostate+3mm. The model fit was used for estimating the dosimetric impact in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy. Needle migration was on average 2.2 ± 1.8 mm SD from MRI1-MRI2 and 5.0 ± 3.0 mm SD from MRI1-MRI3. D90 CTVprostate+3mm was robust toward average needle migration ≤3 mm, whereas for migration >3 mm D90 decreased by 4.5% per mm. A 3 mm of needle migration resulted in a decrease of 0.9, 1.7, 2.3, 4.8, and 7.6 equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy, respectively. Substantial needle migration in high-dose-rate brachytherapy occurs frequently in 1-3 hours following needle insertion. A 3-mm threshold of needle migration is proposed, but 2 mm may be considered for dose levels ≥15 Gy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutron dosimetry for low dose rate Cf-252 AT sources and adherence to recent clinical dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    In 1995, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (AAPM TG-43) published a protocol obsoleting all mixed-field radiation dosimetry for Cf-252. Recommendations for a new brachytherapy dosimetry formalism made by this Task Group favor quantification of source strength in terms of air kerma rather than apparent Curies or other radiation units. Additionally, representation of this dosimetry data in terms of radial dose functions, anisotropy functions, geometric factors, and dose rate constants are in an angular and radial (spherical) coordinate system as recommended, rather than the along-away dosimetry data (Cartesian coordinate system) currently available. This paper presents the initial results of calculated neutron dosimetry in a water phantom for a Cf-252 applicator tube (AT) type medical source soon available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  13. Computed-tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Federico; Singh, Anju; Schnapauff, Dirk; Powerski, Maciej Janusz; Denecke, Timm; Wust, Peter; Hamm, Bernd; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate technical feasibility and clinical outcome of computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum. Between November 2007 and May 2012, 32 consecutive patients with 34 metastases adjacent to the liver hilum (common bile duct or hepatic bifurcation ≤5 mm distance) were treated with CT-HDRBT. Treatment was performed by CT-guided applicator placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. MRI follow-up was performed 6 weeks and every 3 months post intervention. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 18.75 months (range: 3-56 months). Mean tumor diameter was 4.3 cm (range: 1.3-10.7 cm). One major complication was observed. Four (11.8%) local recurrences were observed after a local tumor control of 5, 8, 9 and 10 months, respectively. Twenty-two patients (68.75%) experienced a systemic tumor progression during the follow up period. Mean TTP was 12.9 months (range: 2-56 months). Nine patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 20.24 months. Minimally invasive CT-HDRBT is a safe and effective option also for unresectable liver metastases adjacent to the liver hilum that would have been untreatable by thermal ablation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Computed-tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, Federico, E-mail: federico.collettini@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Singh, Anju [Department of Medical Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schnapauff, Dirk [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Powerski, Maciej Janusz [Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate technical feasibility and clinical outcome of computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum. Materials and methods: Between November 2007 and May 2012, 32 consecutive patients with 34 metastases adjacent to the liver hilum (common bile duct or hepatic bifurcation ≤5 mm distance) were treated with CT-HDRBT. Treatment was performed by CT-guided applicator placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. MRI follow-up was performed 6 weeks and every 3 months post intervention. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Results: Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 18.75 months (range: 3–56 months). Mean tumor diameter was 4.3 cm (range: 1.3–10.7 cm). One major complication was observed. Four (11.8%) local recurrences were observed after a local tumor control of 5, 8, 9 and 10 months, respectively. Twenty-two patients (68.75%) experienced a systemic tumor progression during the follow up period. Mean TTP was 12.9 months (range: 2–56 months). Nine patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 20.24 months. Conclusion: Minimally invasive CT-HDRBT is a safe and effective option also for unresectable liver metastases adjacent to the liver hilum that would have been untreatable by thermal ablation.

  15. External beam radiotherapy boosted with high dose rate brachytherapy in completely resected uterine sarcomas. Is this a treatment option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogarolli, Ricardo; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor [Hospital de Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Oncologia de Radiacao]. E-mail: pellizzon@aol.com

    2005-04-15

    Uterine sarcoma (US) is a relative rare tumor, which accounts for only about 3-5% of all uterine cancers. Aggressive cytoreductive surgery at the time of the initial diagnosis with maximum tumor debulking may lead to a prolonged survival or cure. Objective: to identify and review the role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) associated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in the management of patients presenting US with complete resection. Material and methods: this study is a retrospective analysis of 23 patients with US treated from 10/92 to 03/03, with surgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB). The inclusion criteria for study participation included: histologically proven and graded US, completely resection of tumor, Karnofsky status 60-100, absence of significant infection, and recovery from recent surgery. Results: The median age of patients was 62 years (range 39-84); ten-year actuarial disease-free and overall survivals were 42.2% and 63.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, predictive factors for disease-free survival (DFS) were age at initial presentation (p=0.0268), parity (p=0.0441), tumor grade (p= 0.0095), cervical or vaginal invasion (p=0.0014) and node dissection at time of surgery (p= 0.0471). On multivariate analysis, the only predictive factor was cervical or vaginal invasion (p= 0.048), hazard ratio of 4.7. Conclusion: it is quite likely that neither radiotherapy nor chemotherapy alone will appreciably improve survival in US. If radiation therapy provides better locoregional tumor control, hematogenous metastases will assume an even greater proportion of treatment failures. Unfortunately, our small and heterogeneous group analyzed precludes any definitive conclusions about the impact of HDRB associated to EBRT radiation therapy on recurrence or survival. (author)

  16. A novel adaptive needle insertion sequencing for robotic, single needle MR-guided high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Maenhout, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has gained increasing interest as a treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer because of the superior value of MRI for tumor and surrounding tissues localization. To enable needle insertion into the prostate with the patient in the MR bore, a single needle MR-compatible robotic system involving needle-by-needle dose delivery has been developed at our institution. Throughout the intervention, dose delivery may be impaired by: (1) sub-optimal needle positioning caused by e.g. needle bending, (2) intra-operative internal organ motion such as prostate rotations or swelling, or intra-procedural rectum or bladder filling. This may result in failure to reach clinical constraints. To assess the first aforementioned challenge, a recent study from our research group demonstrated that the deposited dose may be greatly improved by real-time adaptive planning with feedback on the actual needle positioning. However, the needle insertion sequence is left to the doctor and therefore, this may result in sub-optimal dose delivery. In this manuscript, a new method is proposed to determine and update automatically the needle insertion sequence. This strategy is based on the determination of the most sensitive needle track. The sensitivity of a needle track is defined as its impact on the dose distribution in case of sub-optimal positioning. A stochastic criterion is thus presented to determine each needle track sensitivity based on needle insertion simulations. To assess the proposed sequencing strategy, HDR prostate brachytherapy was simulated on 11 patients with varying number of needle insertions. Sub-optimal needle positioning was simulated at each insertion (modeled by typical random angulation errors). In 91% of the scenarios, the dose distribution improved when the needle was inserted into the most compared to the least sensitive needle track. The computation time for sequencing was less than 6 s per needle track. The

  17. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  18. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianliang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT combined with high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. Material and methods: For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV, intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D 90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D 2cc < 75 Gy and D 2cc < 90 Gy for bladder in terms of an equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2 for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and brachytherapy boost. The IGRT plan was optimized on top of the ICBT dose distribution. A dosimetric comparison was made between B + I and optimized ICBT (O-ICBT only. Results: The mean D 90% of HRCTV was comparable for B + I and O-ICBT (p = 0.82. For B + I plan, HRCTV D100%, IRCTV D 100% , and IRCTV D 90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The D 2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. Conclusions : B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow

  19. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  20. Validation study of ultrasound-based high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy planning compared with CT-based planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelar, Deidre; Gaztañaga, Miren; Schmid, Matt; Araujo, Cynthia; Bachand, François; Crook, Juanita

    2014-01-01

    The use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to both guide and plan high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for prostate is increasing. Studies using prostate phantoms have demonstrated the accuracy of ultrasound (US) needle tip reconstruction compared with CT imaging standard. We have assessed the in vivo accuracy of needle tip localization by TRUS using cone-beam CT (CBCT) as our reference standard. Needle positions from 37 implants have been analyzed. A median of 16 needles (range, 16-18) per implant were inserted, advanced to the prostate base, and their tips identified using live TRUS images and real-time planning BT software. Needle protrusion length from the template was recorded to allow for reverification before capturing images for planning. The needles remained locked in the template, which was fixed to the stepper, while a set of three-dimensional TRUS images was acquired for needle path reconstruction and HDR-BT treatment planning. Following treatment, CBCT images were acquired for subsequent needle reconstruction using a BT Treatment Planning System. The coordinates of each needle tip were recorded from the Treatment Planning System for CT and US and compared. A total of 574 needle tip positions have been compared between TRUS and CBCT. Of these, 59% agreed within 1 mm, 27% within 1-2 mm, and 11% agreed within 2-3 mm. The discrepancy between tip positions in the two modalities was greater than 3 mm for only 20 needles (3%). The US needle tip identification in vivo is at least as accurate as CT identification, while providing all the advantages of a one-step procedure. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SU-E-T-546: Use of Implant Volume for Quality Assurance of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, D; Kolar, M [Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the application of volume implant (V100) data as a method for a global check of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy plans. Methods: Treatment plans for 335 consecutive patients undergoing permanent seed implants for prostate cancer and for 113 patients treated with plaque therapy for ocular melanoma were analyzed. Plaques used were 54 COMS (10 to 20 mm, notched and regular) and 59 Eye Physics EP917s with variable loading. Plots of treatment time x implanted activity per unit dose versus v100 ^.667 were made. V100 values were obtained using dose volume histograms calculated by the treatment planning systems (Variseed 8.02 and Plaque Simulator 5.4). Four different physicists were involved in planning the prostate seed cases; two physicists for the eye plaques. Results: Since the time and dose for the prostate cases did not vary, a plot of implanted activity vs V100 ^.667 was made. A linear fit with no intercept had an r{sup 2} = 0.978; more than 94% of the actual activities fell within 5% of the activities calculated from the linear fit. The greatest deviations were in cases where the implant volumes were large (> 100 cc). Both COMS and EP917 plaque linear fits were good (r{sup 2} = .967 and .957); the largest deviations were seen for large volumes. Conclusions: The method outlined here is effective for checking planning consistency and quality assurance of two types of LDR brachytherapy treatment plans (temporary and permanent). A spreadsheet for the calculations enables a quick check of the plan in situations were time is short (e.g. OR-based prostate planning)

  2. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianliang; Li, Jie; Wang, Pei; Yuan, Ke; Yin, Gang; Wan, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) combined with high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT) treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT) scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D2cc D100%, IRCTV D100%, and IRCTV D90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01). The D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT) or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up are required to validate the durability.

  3. Implementation of a High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Program for Carcinoma of the Cervix in Senegal: A Pragmatic Model for the Developing World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einck, John P., E-mail: jeinck@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Hudson, Alana [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Shulman, Adam C. [Overlook Medical Center, Summit, New Jersey (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Dieng, Mamadou M.; Diagne, Magatte; Gueye, Latifatou; Gningue, Fama; Gaye, Pape M. [Départemént de Radiothérapie, Institut Joliot-Curie, Hôpital Aristide Le Dantec, Dakar (Senegal); Fisher, Brandon J. [GammaWest Cancer Services, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Mundt, Arno J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Brown, Derek W. [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    West Africa has one of the highest incidence rates of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. The vast majority of women do not have access to screening or disease treatment, leading to presentation at advanced stages and to high mortality rates. Compounding this problem is the lack of radiation treatment facilities in Senegal and many other parts of the African continent. Senegal, a country of 13 million people, had a single {sup 60}Co teletherapy unit before our involvement and no brachytherapy capabilities. Radiating Hope, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide radiation therapy equipment to countries in the developing world, provided a high-dose-rate afterloading unit to the cancer center for curative cervical cancer treatment. Here we describe the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in Senegal requiring a nonstandard fractionation schedule and a novel treatment planning approach as a possible blueprint to providing this technology to other developing countries.

  4. Implementation of a high-dose-rate brachytherapy program for carcinoma of the cervix in Senegal: a pragmatic model for the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einck, John P; Hudson, Alana; Shulman, Adam C; Yashar, Catheryn M; Dieng, Mamadou M; Diagne, Magatte; Gueye, Latifatou; Gningue, Fama; Gaye, Pape M; Fisher, Brandon J; Mundt, Arno J; Brown, Derek W

    2014-07-01

    West Africa has one of the highest incidence rates of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. The vast majority of women do not have access to screening or disease treatment, leading to presentation at advanced stages and to high mortality rates. Compounding this problem is the lack of radiation treatment facilities in Senegal and many other parts of the African continent. Senegal, a country of 13 million people, had a single (60)Co teletherapy unit before our involvement and no brachytherapy capabilities. Radiating Hope, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide radiation therapy equipment to countries in the developing world, provided a high-dose-rate afterloading unit to the cancer center for curative cervical cancer treatment. Here we describe the implementation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in Senegal requiring a nonstandard fractionation schedule and a novel treatment planning approach as a possible blueprint to providing this technology to other developing countries.

  5. Spontaneous intraluminal migration of gossypiboma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Saji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Retained surgical mops following surgery is an avoidable but serious complication. They are seldom reported because of medicolegal implications but clinicians need to be aware about varied presentations of this entity to avoid unnecessary morbidity. We report a case of a 28-year-old woman who presented with chronic diarrhea and lower abdominal pain due to intraluminal migration of the surgical mop into the sigmoid colon 6 months after myomectomy of the uterus. The possibility of gossypiboma was suggested by the contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen. Flexible sigmoidosocpy showed the remnants of the mop inside the lumen of the sigmoid colon. She underwent laparotomy and removal of the surgical mop and became completely asymptomatic. Though gossypiboma is rare clinicians should keep it in mind in patients who had undergone laparotomy previously.

  6. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Zimmerman, George; Jacques, Steven

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

  7. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  8. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  9. Brachytherapy on urethral carcinoma; Braquiterapia no carcinoma da uretra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S. [Fundacao Antonio Prudente, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital A.C. Camargo. Dept. de Radioterapia

    1996-04-01

    From 1954 to 1992 21 patients with primary urethral carcinoma were attended at A.C.Camargo Hospital - Fundacao Antonio Prudente - Sao Paulo. There were 17 female and 4 male with a median age of 58 years old. Eight patients received surgery, 8 radiation therapy and 5 were treated with palliative intention or were not treated. Patients treated by radiotherapy received 60 Gy to 80 Gy. Three patients were submitted to exclusive brachytherapy, 4 to the association of external beam and brachytherapy and 1 to external radiotherapy. Interstitial techniques were employed in 5 patients and intraluminal brachytherapy with special applicator in 2. Seven of 8 patients (87.5%) had local control and disease free survival with a minimum follow-up 4 years. Late effects were not observed. Primary urethral carcinoma is a curable disease by radiotherapy and the association of external irradiation and brachytherapy is the ideal approach. (author) 11 refs.

  10. Design and characterization of a new high-dose-rate brachytherapy Valencia applicator for larger skin lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C., E-mail: ccanjuan@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and National Dosimetry Centre (CND), Valencia 46009 (Spain); Niatsetski, Y. [Elekta Brachytherapy, Veenendaal 3905 TH (Netherlands); Laarse, R. van der [Quality Radiation Therapy BV, Zeist 3707 HB (Netherlands); Granero, D. [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ballester, F. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J. [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and Department of Radiotherapy, Clínica Benidorm, Benidorm 03501 (Spain); Vijande, J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), Burjassot 46100 (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were (i) to design a new high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicator for treating surface lesions with planning target volumes larger than 3 cm in diameter and up to 5 cm in size, using the microSelectron-HDR or Flexitron afterloader (Elekta Brachytherapy) with a {sup 192}Ir source; (ii) to calculate by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method the dose distribution for the new applicator when it is placed against a water phantom; and (iii) to validate experimentally the dose distributions in water. Methods: The PENELOPE2008 MC code was used to optimize dwell positions and dwell times. Next, the dose distribution in a water phantom and the leakage dose distribution around the applicator were calculated. Finally, MC data were validated experimentally for a {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source by measuring (i) dose distributions with radiochromic EBT3 films (ISP); (ii) percentage depth–dose (PDD) curve with the parallel-plate ionization chamber Advanced Markus (PTW); and (iii) absolute dose rate with EBT3 films and the PinPoint T31016 (PTW) ionization chamber. Results: The new applicator is made of tungsten alloy (Densimet) and consists of a set of interchangeable collimators. Three catheters are used to allocate the source at prefixed dwell positions with preset weights to produce a homogenous dose distribution at the typical prescription depth of 3 mm in water. The same plan is used for all available collimators. PDD, absolute dose rate per unit of air kerma strength, and off-axis profiles in a cylindrical water phantom are reported. These data can be used for treatment planning. Leakage around the applicator was also scored. The dose distributions, PDD, and absolute dose rate calculated agree within experimental uncertainties with the doses measured: differences of MC data with chamber measurements are up to 0.8% and with radiochromic films are up to 3.5%. Conclusions: The new applicator and the dosimetric data provided here will be a valuable

  11. Design and characterization of a new high-dose-rate brachytherapy Valencia applicator for larger skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela-Juan, C; Niatsetski, Y; van der Laarse, R; Granero, D; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Vijande, J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to design a new high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicator for treating surface lesions with planning target volumes larger than 3 cm in diameter and up to 5 cm in size, using the microSelectron-HDR or Flexitron afterloader (Elekta Brachytherapy) with a (192)Ir source; (ii) to calculate by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method the dose distribution for the new applicator when it is placed against a water phantom; and (iii) to validate experimentally the dose distributions in water. The penelope2008 MC code was used to optimize dwell positions and dwell times. Next, the dose distribution in a water phantom and the leakage dose distribution around the applicator were calculated. Finally, MC data were validated experimentally for a (192)Ir mHDR-v2 source by measuring (i) dose distributions with radiochromic EBT3 films (ISP); (ii) percentage depth-dose (PDD) curve with the parallel-plate ionization chamber Advanced Markus (PTW); and (iii) absolute dose rate with EBT3 films and the PinPoint T31016 (PTW) ionization chamber. The new applicator is made of tungsten alloy (Densimet) and consists of a set of interchangeable collimators. Three catheters are used to allocate the source at prefixed dwell positions with preset weights to produce a homogenous dose distribution at the typical prescription depth of 3 mm in water. The same plan is used for all available collimators. PDD, absolute dose rate per unit of air kerma strength, and off-axis profiles in a cylindrical water phantom are reported. These data can be used for treatment planning. Leakage around the applicator was also scored. The dose distributions, PDD, and absolute dose rate calculated agree within experimental uncertainties with the doses measured: differences of MC data with chamber measurements are up to 0.8% and with radiochromic films are up to 3.5%. The new applicator and the dosimetric data provided here will be a valuable tool in clinical practice, making treatment of

  12. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO); Programa de verificacion del calculo para un sistema de planificacion de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (PLATO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  13. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications.

  14. Set the initial reference state of a team brachytherapy high dose rate; Establecimiento del estado de referencia inicial de un equipo de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente Gutierrez, F.; Diaz Fuentes, R.; Cabello Murillo, E.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Ferrando Sanchez, A.; Adaimi Hernandez, P.

    2011-07-01

    You have set the initial reference state for a team of high-rate brachytherapy doses according to the recommendations made in the text used as a reference, being always within the functional tolerances established for the team, or the number associated with each test. The team was ready for clinical use under the provisions of Royal Decree 1566/1998 of Quality Control in Radiotherapy.

  15. Use of intraluminal protection in colonic anastomosis in dogs Uso de protetor intraluminal em anastomose colônica em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Lacerda de Abreu Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test the use of intraluminal protection in colonic anastomosis without intestinal cleansing. The intraluminal liner was fashioned from porcine submucosa preserved in glycerin and then fixed 10 cm anteriorly to the anastomotic site. This technique was compared with the one used in termino-terminal colonic anastomosis without intraluminal protection. METHODS: Twenty-eight dogs were divided into two groups of fourteen animals each. Clinical and histopathological tests were performed on the fourth and twenty-first postoperative days. RESULTS: The morbidity and mortality rates were higher in animals that did not receive the intraluminal liner. Histopathological examinations in animals in which the intraluminal liner was used showed better healing, characterized by milder inflammation and increased amount of collagen. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the use of intraluminal protection decreases complication rates in colonic anastomosis and promotes better healing.OBJETIVO: Testar o uso da proteção intraluminal na anastomose colônica sem preparo intestinal. O protetor intraluminal usado foi confeccionado a partir da submucosa de suíno conservada em glicerina, e fixado a 10 cm cranialmente ao sítio anastomótico. Essa técnica foi comparada com a técnica de anastomose colônica término-terminal sem uso do protetor intraluminal. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 28 cães divididos em dois grupos de 14 animais cada. A avaliação foi através de exames clínicos e histopatológicos. A avaliação anatomo-patológica foi realizada no quarto e vigésimo primeiro dias de pós-operatório. RESULTADOS: Um maior número de casos de morbi-mortalidade foi observado nos animais operados sem o protetor intraluminal. O exame histopatológico dos animais nos quais foram usados os protetores intraluminais mostrou melhor cicatrização, caracterizada por processo inflamatório mais discreto e maior quantidade de colágeno. CONCLUSÃO: O uso do protetor

  16. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y; Tward, J; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Huang, L; Szegedi, M; Kokeny, K; Salter, B [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  17. TU-AB-201-08: Rotating Shield High Dose Rate Brachytherapy with 153Gd and 75Se Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, M; Seuntjens, J; Enger, S [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Flynn, R [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) for different cancer sites with {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se isotopes. RSBT is a form of intensity modulated brachytherapy, using shielded rotating catheters to provide a better dose distribution in the tumour while protecting healthy tissue. Methods: BrachySource, a Geant4-based Monte Carlo dose planning system was developed for investigation of RSBT with {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se for different cancer sites. Dose distributions from {sup 153}Gd, {sup 75}Se and {sup 192}Ir isotopes were calculated in a 40 cm radius water phantom by using the microSelectron-v2 source model. The source was placed inside a cylindrical platinum shield with 1.3 mm diameter. An emission window coinciding with the active core of the source was created by removing half (180°) of the wall of the shield. Relative dose rate distributions of the three isotopes were simulated. As a proof of concept, a breast cancer patient originally treated with Mammosite was re-simulated with unshielded {sup 192}Ir and shielded {sup 153}Gd. Results: The source with the lowest energy, {sup 153}Gd, decreased the dose on the shielded side by 91%, followed by {sup 75}Se and {sup 192}Ir with 36% and 16% reduction at 1 cm from the source. The breast cancer patient simulation showed the ability of shielded {sup 153}Gd to spare the chest wall by a 90% dose reduction when only one emission window angle is considered. In this case, fully covering the PTV would require more delivery angles and the chest wall dose reduction would be less, however, the simulation demonstrates the potential of shielded {sup 153}Gd to selectively isolate organs at risk. Conclusion: Introducing {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se sources combined with RSBT will allow escalation of dose in the target volume while maintaining low doses in radiation sensitive healthy tissue. Tailoring treatments to each individual patient by treating all parts of the tumour without over-irradiation of normal

  18. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using μ-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; George, S. P.; Guatelli, S.; Bucci, J. A.; Enari, K. E.; Miller, S.; Siegele, R.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-06-01

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences. Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30-60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2-5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors

  19. Daily computed tomography measurement of needle applicator displacement during high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for previously untreated uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mari; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Aramoto, Kazumasa; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Honda, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    We investigated daily needle applicator displacement during high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Ten patients with previously untreated uterine cervical cancer received 30Gy in five fractions during 3 days of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy using our unique ambulatory technique. To analyze displacement, we obtained daily computed tomography (CT) images for 147 flexible needle applicators at 21 and 45h after implantation. The distance was defined as the length between the center of gravity of titanium markers and the needle applicator tips along the daily CT axis. We adapted dwell positions of the treatment source to cover clinical target volume with a 15-mm cranial margin. The median displacement was 1mm (range, -6 to 12mm) at 21h and 2mm (range, -9 to 14mm) at 45h, respectively. Statistically significant caudal displacement was observed only between the displacement at 0 and 21h (pBrachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High dose rate vaginal brachytherapy in endometrial cancer after surgery; Curietherapie postoperatoire du fond vaginal de haut debit de dose dans le cancer endometrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau-Claeys, M.V.; Brunaud, C.; Hoffstetter, S.; Buchheit, I.; Peiffert, D. [Departement de curietherapie, centre Alexis-Vautrin, avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - This study aimed at analyzing the evolution and type of recurrence in patients treated for stage I endometrial carcinomas, in order to define the respective roles of adjuvant radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Patients and methods. - This mono-centric retrospective study was conducted at Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy, France, between January 1995 and December 2000 on all the patients surgically treated for an endometrial cancer, and then treated with high dose rate vaginal brachytherapy. The brachytherapy was delivered in two or three fractions of 7 Gy at 5 mm from the applicator. Results. - In the good prognosis group, the specific and overall survivals at 5 years were respectively 96.5 and 94.2% with no local recurrence demonstrated. In the intermediate prognostic group, the specific and overall survivals at 5 years were respectively 88 and 85%, with six locoregional recurrences observed among those who did not undergo lymphadenectomy; the overall survival at 5 years was significantly decreased in the absence of external radiation. In the group of poor prognosis (stages II and III), the specific survival at 5 years was respectively 72.8 and 67 %, and the overall survival at 5 years 66.7 and 56.4%. Conclusion. - Results for local control and survival as well as for tolerance were good. So we have decided to deliver high rate brachytherapy for all intermediate or poor prognosis patients and we have abandoned pelvic radiotherapy for good prognosis tumours (stages IA: no myometrium invasion with grade 3 and >50% of myometrium invasion with grades 1 and 2), whatever the lymph nodes surgery they had. We now propose pelvic radiotherapy only for intermediate prognosis tumours (such as IA > 50% of myometrium invasion with grade 3 and IB stages), if patients did not have any lymphatic surgery, or for bad prognosis tumours. (authors)

  1. Daily CT measurement of needle applicator displacement during multifractionated high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for postoperative recurrent uterine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Ueda, Mari; Takenaka, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Aramoto, Kazumasa; Miyake, Shunsuke; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Ban, Chiaki; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated daily needle applicator displacement during multifractionated high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for postoperative recurrent uterine cancer. Eight patients with postoperative recurrent uterine cancer received HDR-ISBT with or without external beam radiotherapy using our unique ambulatory technique. To analyze displacement, we obtained daily computed tomography (CT) images for 122 flexible needle applicators at 21, 45, 69, and 93 hours after implantation. Displacement was defined as the length between the center of gravity of titanium markers and the needle applicator tips along the daily CT axis. For cases in which displacement was not corrected, we also calculated the dose that covered 90% of the clinical target volume (D90(CTV)) using a dose-volume histogram (DVH). Median caudal needle applicator displacement at 21, 45, 69, and 93 hours was 3, 2, 4, and 5 mm, respectively. More than 15 mm displacement was observed for 2% (2 of 122) and 17% (10 of 60) of needle applicators at 21 and 93 hours, respectively. Cases in which dwell positions were not changed to correct the treatment plan, 2 of 8 patients showed more than 10% reduction in D90(CTV) values compared with the initial treatment plan. Correction of dwell positions of the treatment source improves treatment DVH for multifractionated HDR-ISBT.

  2. Computed tomography-guided interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy for centrally located liver tumours: a single institution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, Nikolaos; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Kolotas, Christos [Hirslanden Medical Center, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau (Switzerland); Milickovic, Natasa; Baltas, Dimos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial (IRT) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BRT) in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary liver malignancies. This report updates and expands our previously described experience with this treatment technique. Forty-one patients with 50 tumours adjacent to the liver hilum and bile duct bifurcation were treated in 59 interventions of CT-guided IRT HDR BRT. The tumours were larger than 4 cm with a median volume of 84 cm{sup 3} (38-1,348 cm{sup 3}). The IRT HDR BRT delivered a median total physical dose of 20.0 Gy (7.0-32.0 Gy) in twice daily fractions of median 7.0 Gy (4.0-10.0 Gy) in 19 patients and in once daily fractions of median 8.0 Gy (7.0-14.0 Gy) in 22 patients. With a median follow-up of 12.4 months, the local control for metastatic hepatic tumours was 89 %, 73 % and 63 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. The local control for primary hepatic tumours was 90 %, 81 % and 50 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. Severe side effects occurred in 5.0 % of interventions with no treatment-related deaths. CT-guided IRT HDR BRT is a promising procedure for the radiation treatment of centrally located liver malignancies. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of treatment planning on dosimetric differences between 192Ir sources for high-dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Mokpo Science University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Woo Sang; KIm, Dae Yong; Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangenung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangenung (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate whether the difference in geometrical characteristics between high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir sources would influence the dose distributions of intracavitary brachytherapy. Two types of microSelectron HDR 192Ir sources (classic and new models) were selected in this study. Two-dimensional (2D) treatment plans for classic and new sources were generated by using PLATO treatment planning system. We compared the point A, point B, and bladder and rectum reference points based on ICRU 38 recommendation. The radial dose function of the new source agrees with that of the classic source except difference of up to 2.6% at the nearest radial distance. The differences of anisotropy functions agree within 2% for r=1, 3, and 5 cm and 20°<θ<165°. The largest discrepancies of anisotropy functions reached up to 27% for θ<20° at r=0.25 cm and were up to 13%, 10%, and 7% at r=1, 3, and 5 cm for θ>170°, respectively. There were no significant differences in doses of point A, point B, and bladder point for the treatment plans between the new and classic sources. For the ICRU rectum point, the percent dose difference was on average 0.65% and up to 1.0%. The dose discrepancies between two treatment plans are mainly affected due to the geometrical difference of the source and the sealed capsule.

  4. A hybrid evolutionary algorithm for multi-objective anatomy-based dose optimization in high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahanas, M; Baltas, D; Zamboglou, N

    2003-02-07

    Multiple objectives must be considered in anatomy-based dose optimization for high-dose-rate brachytherapy and a large number of parameters must be optimized to satisfy often competing objectives. For objectives expressed solely in terms of dose variances, deterministic gradient-based algorithms can be applied and a weighted sum approach is able to produce a representative set of non-dominated solutions. As the number of objectives increases, or non-convex objectives are used, local minima can be present and deterministic or stochastic algorithms such as simulated annealing either cannot be used or are not efficient. In this case we employ a modified hybrid version of the multi-objective optimization algorithm NSGA-II. This, in combination with the deterministic optimization algorithm, produces a representative sample of the Pareto set. This algorithm can be used with any kind of objectives, including non-convex, and does not require artificial importance factors. A representation of the trade-off surface can be obtained with more than 1000 non-dominated solutions in 2-5 min. An analysis of the solutions provides information on the possibilities available using these objectives. Simple decision making tools allow the selection of a solution that provides a best fit for the clinical goals. We show an example with a prostate implant and compare results obtained by variance and dose-volume histogram (DVH) based objectives.

  5. A hybrid evolutionary algorithm for multi-objective anatomy-based dose optimization in high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahanas, M [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, D [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Zamboglou, N [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach, 63069 Offenbach (Germany)

    2003-02-07

    Multiple objectives must be considered in anatomy-based dose optimization for high-dose-rate brachytherapy and a large number of parameters must be optimized to satisfy often competing objectives. For objectives expressed solely in terms of dose variances, deterministic gradient-based algorithms can be applied and a weighted sum approach is able to produce a representative set of non-dominated solutions. As the number of objectives increases, or non-convex objectives are used, local minima can be present and deterministic or stochastic algorithms such as simulated annealing either cannot be used or are not efficient. In this case we employ a modified hybrid version of the multi-objective optimization algorithm NSGA-II. This, in combination with the deterministic optimization algorithm, produces a representative sample of the Pareto set. This algorithm can be used with any kind of objectives, including non-convex, and does not require artificial importance factors. A representation of the trade-off surface can be obtained with more than 1000 non-dominated solutions in 2-5 min. An analysis of the solutions provides information on the possibilities available using these objectives. Simple decision making tools allow the selection of a solution that provides a best fit for the clinical goals. We show an example with a prostate implant and compare results obtained by variance and dose-volume histogram (DVH) based objectives.

  6. Chemoradiation in cervical cancer with cisplatin and high-dose rate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results of a phase-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.G.; Laban, C.; Puschmann, D.; Koelbl, H. [Dept. of Gynecology, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin-Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: In 1999, five randomized studies demonstrated that chemoradiation with cisplatin and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has a benefit in locally advanced cervical cancer and for surgically treated patients in high-risk situations. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiation with cisplatin and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Patients and Method: 27 patients were included in our phase-II trial: 13 locally advanced cases (group A) and 14 adjuvant-therapy patients in high-risk situations (group B). A definitive radiotherapy was performed with 25 fractions of external beam therapy (1.8 Gy per fraction/middle shielded after eleven fractions). Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with 7 Gy in point A per fraction (total dose 35 Gy) in FIGO Stages IIB-IIIB. The total dose of external and brachytherapy was 70 Gy in point A and 52-54 Gy in point B. All patients in stage IVA were treated without brachytherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed with external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis with 1.8 Gy single-dose up to 50.4 Gy. Brachytherapy was delivered at HDR schedules with two fractions of 5 Gy only in patients with tumor-positive margins or tumor involvement of the upper vagina. The chemotherapeutic treatment schedule provided six courses of cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly recommended in the randomized studies GOG-120 and -123. Results: A total of 18/27 patients (66.7%) completed all six courses of chemotherapy. Discontinuation of radiotherapy due to therapy-related morbidity was not necessary in the whole study group. G3 leukopenia (29.6%) was the only relevant acute toxicity. There were no differences in toxicity between group A and B. Serious late morbidity occurred in 2/27 patients (7.4%). 12/13 patients (92.3%) with IIB-IVA cervical cancer showed a complete response (CR). 13/14 adjuvant cases (92.8%) are free of recurrence (median follow up: 19.1 months). Conclusion: Concomitant

  7. Sutureless choledochoduodenostomy with an intraluminal degradable stent in dog model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ling-hua; LIANG Xiao; LIN Hui; WANG Yi-fan; ZHU Yi-ping; CAI Xiu-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background It is difficult and time-consuming for carrying out conventional hand-sewn bilioenteric anastomosis, especially for small bile duct anastomosis and laparoscopic procedure. In order to simplify it, we have developed a novel procedure of sutureless bilioenteric anastomosis with an intraluminal degradable stent. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique with cholangioduodenostomy in dog model.Methods A patent intraluminal degradable stent tube for sutureless choledochoduodenostomy in dog model was made with polylactic acid in diameter of 3 mm or 4 mm. Thirty-eight dogs were randomly divided into to a stent group (SG, n=20) and a control group (CG, n=18). Dogs in the SG underwent sutureless choledochoduodenostomy with intraluminal stent, while the CG underwent conventional choledochoduodenostomy (single layer discontinuous anastomosis with absorbable suture). Dogs of each group were divided into 4 subgroups according to time of death (1,3,6, and 12 months postoperatively) to evaluate the healing of anastomosis. Operation time, intraoperative tolerance pressure of anastomosis, rate of postoperative bile leakage, bursting pressure of anastomosis were compared between the two groups. Anastomosis tissue was observed afterwards by pathology evaluation, hydroxyproline content, serum bilirubin, liver enzyme level and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) to assess the stricture.Results All procedures were completed successfully. The surgical time of the SG was significantly less than the CG (SG: (19.2±4.3) minutes, vs. CG: (29.2±7.1) minutes, P=0.000). One bile leakage was occurred in either group. No significant difference of intraoperative tolerance pressure of anastomosis, rate of bile leakage and postoperative bursting pressure of anastomosis, anastomotic stricture, hydroxyproline content, serum bilirubin and liver enzyme level was found between the two groups. MRCP showed no anastomosis stricture and obstruction

  8. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  9. Dosimetric comparison between three dimensional treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation and gel dosimetry in nasopharynx phantom for high dose rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Fazli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For the treatment of nasopharnx carcinoma (NPC using brachytherapy methods and high-energy photon sources are common techniques. In the common three dimensional (3D treatments planning, all of the computed tomography images are assumed homogeneous. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations for non-homogeneous nasopharynx phantom, MAGICA normoxic gel dosimetry and 3D treatment planning system (TPS. Materials and Methods: The head phantom was designed with Plexiglas cylinder, head bone, and nasopharynx brachytherapy silicon applicator. For the simulations, version 5 of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP5 was used. 3D treatment planning was performed in Flexiplan software. A normoxic radiosensitive polymer gel was fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and poured into test tubes (for calibration curve and the head phantom. In addition, the head phantom was irradiated with Flexitron afterloader brachytherapy machine with 192 Ir source. To obtain calibration curves, 11 dosimeters were irradiated with dose range of 0-2000 cGy. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on 1.5T scanner. Results: Two-dimensional iso-dose in coronal plan at distances of z = +0.3, –0.3 cm was calculated. There was a good accordance between 3D TPS and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 2.4% and 6.1%. There was a predictable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 5.7% and 7.4%. Moreover, there was an acceptable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 data and differences in various distances were between 5.2% and 9.4%. Conclusion: The sources of differences in this comparison are divided to calculations variation and practical errors that was added in experimental dosimetry. The result of quality assurance of nasopharynx high dose rate brachytherapy is consistent with international standards.

  10. Dosimetric comparison between three dimensional treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation and gel dosimetry in nasopharynx phantom for high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli, Zeynab; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Zahmatkesh, M H; Mahdavi, Seied Rabei; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    For the treatment of nasopharnx carcinoma (NPC) using brachytherapy methods and high-energy photon sources are common techniques. In the common three dimensional (3D) treatments planning, all of the computed tomography images are assumed homogeneous. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations for non-homogeneous nasopharynx phantom, MAGICA normoxic gel dosimetry and 3D treatment planning system (TPS). The head phantom was designed with Plexiglas cylinder, head bone, and nasopharynx brachytherapy silicon applicator. For the simulations, version 5 of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP5) was used. 3D treatment planning was performed in Flexiplan software. A normoxic radiosensitive polymer gel was fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and poured into test tubes (for calibration curve) and the head phantom. In addition, the head phantom was irradiated with Flexitron afterloader brachytherapy machine with (192)Ir source. To obtain calibration curves, 11 dosimeters were irradiated with dose range of 0-2000 cGy. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on 1.5T scanner. Two-dimensional iso-dose in coronal plan at distances of z = +0.3, -0.3 cm was calculated. There was a good accordance between 3D TPS and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 2.4% and 6.1%. There was a predictable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 5.7% and 7.4%. Moreover, there was an acceptable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 data and differences in various distances were between 5.2% and 9.4%. The sources of differences in this comparison are divided to calculations variation and practical errors that was added in experimental dosimetry. The result of quality assurance of nasopharynx high dose rate brachytherapy is consistent with international standards.

  11. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  12. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  13. Brachytherapy in the Management of Uveal Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuray Tuncer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular tumor in adults. Clinical studies have shown similar patient survival rates after treatment of medium-sized melanomas when comparing plaque brachytherapy with radioactive iodine-125 versus enucleation. This finding further emphasizes the importance of this globe-sparing treatment. Brachytherapy is a special local radiotherapy technique that aims to deliver high-dose radiation directly to the tumor by sparing the periocular structures. Brachytherapy is still the most widely used treatment for uveal melanoma. Iodine-125 and ruthenium-106 are the most common radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. After brachytherapy, sight-threatening complications occur unavoidably in many patients. Brachytherapy is mostly associated with long-term complications. Radiation retinopathy and cataract formation are the most common treatment-related complications. Brachytherapy provides local tumor control (ocular salvage in about 90% of patients. Adjunctive transpupillary thermotherapy (sandwich therapy improves the control rate of local tumors to 97%. About 10% of patients treated with brachytherapy subsequently require enucleation because of local tumor recurrence or neovascular glaucoma at 5 years of follow-up. Metastatic disease occurs in 10% of patients with medium-sized melanoma at 5-year follow-up. This rate increases to 55% at 10-year follow-up in patients with large melanomas (thickness >8 mm. Thus, it is very important to inform the patients under the light of these data prior to brachytherapy. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 43-8

  14. [Treatment of atherosclerosis. New percutaneous intraluminal techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lablanche, J M

    1990-10-06

    Balloon-catheter angioplasty was introduced by Gruntzig in 1977 and has since proved effective, but 3 problems are still encountered: immediate reobstruction, restenosis during the first 3 months and extension of the procedure to a greater number of cases. In an attempt to solve these problems, other percutaneous/technics, associated or not with balloon angioplasty, have been devised. They are: (1) intraluminal stents which perfectly keep the vessel open after balloon angioplasty; (2) vaporization of atheromatous plaques by laser, and notably excimer laser which results in immediate recanalization, later completed by balloon angioplasty; (3) heating balloons which stick dissections and improve the immediate success rate; (4) atheroma-cutting and storing systems, such as Simpson's atherocath, cutting and aspirating systems, such as Stack's transluminal extraction catheter, or erasing systems, such as Auth's rotablator; (5) other sources of energy, such as ultrasounds, microwaves and radiofrequencies, will perhaps, be used in the near future. None of these new technics has solved the restenosis problem, but all have proved effective in suppressing the obstacle, there by giving hopes of reducing immediate complications and gradually widening the indications of percutaneous revascularization.

  15. High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  16. High-dose rate brachytherapy as monotherapy in prostate cancer: A systematic review of its safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, L M; Polo-deSantos, M; Rodríguez-Melcón, J I; Angulo, J C; Luengo-Matos, S

    2017-03-01

    High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is an increasingly popular treatment for patients with localised prostate cancer (PC). To assess the safety and efficacy of HDR-BT as monotherapy in PC. A systematic literature review was conducted through searches on MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane Library, CDR, ClinicalTrials and EuroScan. We assessed safety and efficacy indicators. We selected 2 reviews and 12 uncontrolled studies, included in these 2 reviews. In terms of efficacy, local control in 6 studies was 97-100%. The biochemical progression-free survival varied as follows: 85-100% for low risk and 79-92% for high risk. Survival free of metastases was >95% at 8 years, except in one study where the survival rate was 87% at 5 years. The overall survival was ≥95% in 8 studies. In terms of safety, most of the studies recorded acute and long-term genitourinary and gastrointestinal complications, especially grade ≥2. Only 3 studies found grade 4 complications. All studies, except for one without complications, observed genitourinary complications that were more frequent and severe than the gastrointestinal complications. Two studies assessed the quality of life and showed an initial reduction in various domains and subsequent partial or total recovery, except in the sexual domain. HDR-BT is effective as monotherapy, especially in cases of low to intermediate risk. There is insufficient information on high-risk patients. The short to medium-term toxicity was acceptable. Further research needs to be funded to provide more information on the long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Triple-tandem high-dose-rate brachytherapy for early-stage medically inoperable endometrial cancer: Initial report on acute toxicity and dosimetric comparison to stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Greg; Wu, Tianming; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may be appealing in medically inoperable endometrial cancer to avoid procedural risks. We performed a dosimetric comparison to triple-tandem, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Six consecutive clinical stage I, grade 1-2, medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients were treated with triple-tandem HDR brachytherapy. We report patient factors and acute toxicity. Also, we performed dosimetric comparison to SBRT using both 3D conformal arc (3DArc) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. D2cc values for normal tissues were calculated and compared to the HDR plans. Median age was 57 years. Patient comorbidities included morbid obesity, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and pulmonary emboli. In three patients who received prior external beam radiation (EBRT), median EBRT and HDR doses were 46 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The median dose with HDR brachytherapy monotherapy was 35 Gy. Acute toxicities during EBRT included gastrointestinal (3/3 with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (3/3 with grade 1-2). Acute toxicities during HDR brachytherapy were gastrointestinal (2/6 total with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (2/6 total with grade 1). The mean D2cc/Gy of prescription dose for rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 0.58, 0.40, and 0.47 respectively. Overall, doses to normal tissues were higher for SBRT plans as compared to HDR. Also, the R50 (ratio of the 50% prescription isodose volume to the PTV) was lowest with HDR brachytherapy. In medically inoperable, clinical stage I endometrial cancer patients with multiple comorbidities, definitive triple-tandem, HDR brachytherapy results in mild acute toxicity. In addition, HDR brachytherapy achieves relatively lower doses to surrounding normal tissues as compared to SBRT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost Effect on Local Tumor Control in Young Women With Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinot, Jose-Luis, E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Baixauli-Perez, Cristobal [Health Services Research Unit, Center for Public Health Research, Valencia (Spain); Soler, Pablo; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Moreno, Araceli; Santos, Miguel Angel; Mut, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Gozalbo, Francisco [Department of Pathology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Arribas, Leoncio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rate and complications of a single fraction of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost in women aged 45 yeas and younger after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2007, 167 patients between the ages of 26 and 45 years old (72 were 40 years old or younger), with stages T1 to T2 invasive breast cancer with disease-free margin status of at least 5 mm after breast-conserving surgery received 46 to 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation plus a 7-Gy HDR-BT boost (“fast boost”). An axillary dissection was performed in 72.5% of the patients and sentinel lymph node biopsy in 27.5%. A supraclavicular area was irradiated in 19% of the patients. Chemotherapy was used in 86% of the patients and hormone treatment in 77%. Clinical nodes were present in 18% and pathological nodes in 29%. The pathological stage was pT0: 5%, pTis: 3%, pT1: 69% and pT2: 23%. Intraductal component was present in 40% and 28% were G3. Results: At a median follow-up of 92 months, 9 patients relapsed on the margin of the implant, and 1 patient in another quadrant, resulting in a 10-year local relapse rate of 4.3% and a breast relapse rate of 4.9%, with breast preservation in 93.4%; no case of mastectomy due to poor cosmesis arose. Actuarial 5- and 10-year disease-free, cause-specific, and overall survival rates were 87.9% and 85.8%, and 92.1% and 88.4%, and 92.1% and 87.3%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, triple-negative cases and negative hormone receptors did worse, but in a multivariate analysis, only the last factor was significant for local and breast control. Asymptomatic fibrosis G2 was recorded in 3 cases, and there were no other late complications. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 97% of cases. Conclusions: A single dose of 7 Gy using the fast-boost technique is well tolerated, with a low rate of late complications and improved local tumor control in women aged 45 and younger, compared to published data

  19. Effect of rectal enemas on rectal dosimetric parameters during high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Sevillano, Marimar; Berenguer, Roberto; Aguayo, Manuel; Villas, Maria Victoria [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), Department of Radiation Oncology, Albacete (Spain); Gascon, Marina; Arenas, Meritxell [Hospital Universitari Sant Joan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Reus (Spain); Rovirosa, Angeles; Camacho-Lopez, Cristina [University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Gynecological Cancer Unit, Radiation Oncology Department, ICMHO, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). This prospective trial included 59 patients. Two rectal cleansing enemas were self-administered before the second fraction, and fraction 1 was considered the basal status. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Statistical analyses used paired and unpaired t-tests. Despite a significant 15 % reduction in mean rectal volume (44.07 vs. 52.15 cc, p = 0.0018), 35.6 % of patients had larger rectums after rectal enemas. No significant rectal enema-related DVH differences were observed compared to the basal data. Although not statistically significant, rectal cleansing-associated increases in mean rectal DVH values were observed: D{sub 0.1} {sub cc}: 6.6 vs. 7.21 Gy; D{sub 1} {sub cc}: 5.35 vs. 5.52 Gy; D{sub 2} {sub cc}: 4.67 vs. 4.72 Gy, before and after rectal cleaning, respectively (where D{sub x} {sub cc} is the dose to the most exposed x cm {sup 3}). No differences were observed in DVH parameters according to rectal volume increase or decrease after the enema. Patients whose rectal volume increased also had significantly larger DVH parameters, except for D{sub 5} {sub %}, D{sub 25} {sub %}, and D{sub 50} {sub %}. In contrast, in patients whose rectal volume decreased, significance was only seen for D{sub 25} {sub %} and D{sub 50} {sub %} (D{sub x} {sub %} dose covering x % of the volume). In the latter patients, nonsignificant reductions in D{sub 2} {sub cc}, D{sub 5} {sub cc} and V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (volume receiving at least 5 Gy) were observed. The current rectal enemas protocol was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters for HDR-VCB. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Auswirkungen von rektalen Dosen waehrend postoperativer High-Dose-Rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie an der Scheidenmanschette (''vaginal cuff brachytherapy'', VCB). An

  20. Low dose rate vaginal brachytherapy of endometrial adenocarcinomas; Curietherapie vaginale postoperatoire des adenocarcinomes de l`endometre a bas debit de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charra-Brumaud, C.; Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.; Luporsi, E.; Guillemin, F.; Bey, P. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1998-01-01

    Surgery is the primary treatment for endometrial carcinoma. Methods of complementary treatment are still debated, with the potential association of external radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy before or after surgery. This study was aimed at evaluating local control and complication rates in a series of patients treated by hysterectomy followed by postoperative vaginal low-dose rate brachytherapy (BT) combined with pelvic irradiation in case of poor prognosis factors. From 1978 to 1993, 101 patients were treated at the Centre Alexis-Vautrin, France according to this scheme. Forty five had deep myometrial invasion, and thirteen cervical involvement. Fifty patients received pelvic irradiation (median dose 46 Gy) combined with BT (dose 14 Gy, median volume 127 cm{sup 3}); 51 patients had BT alone (dose 60 Gy, median volume 71 cm{sup 3}). The 5-year overall survival rate was 83 % and the local control rate 97 % with a median follow-up of 7 years. Multivariate analysis showed two factors of bad prognosis, i.e. deep myometrial invasion and cervical involvement. Three severe complications occurred in two patients for whom the treated volume was larger than the theoretical target volume. Eleven patients developed metastases. Results obtained from this series are comparable with those of previous studies, particularly in regard to pre-operative BT. The complication rate is also satisfactory and depends on the irradiation precision and the definition of the target volume. (authors)

  1. Influence of photon energy spectra from brachytherapy sources on Monte Carlo simulations of kerma and dose rates in water and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, La Fe University Hospital, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: For a given radionuclide, there are several photon spectrum choices available to dosimetry investigators for simulating the radiation emissions from brachytherapy sources. This study examines the dosimetric influence of selecting the spectra for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd on the final estimations of kerma and dose. Methods: For {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, the authors considered from two to five published spectra. Spherical sources approximating common brachytherapy sources were assessed. Kerma and dose results from GEANT4, MCNP5, and PENELOPE-2008 were compared for water and air. The dosimetric influence of {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd spectral choice was determined. Results: For the spectra considered, there were no statistically significant differences between kerma or dose results based on Monte Carlo code choice when using the same spectrum. Water-kerma differences of about 2%, 2%, and 0.7% were observed due to spectrum choice for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively (independent of radial distance), when accounting for photon yield per Bq. Similar differences were observed for air-kerma rate. However, their ratio (as used in the dose-rate constant) did not significantly change when the various photon spectra were selected because the differences compensated each other when dividing dose rate by air-kerma strength. Conclusions: Given the standardization of radionuclide data available from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and the rigorous infrastructure for performing and maintaining the data set evaluations, NNDC spectra are suggested for brachytherapy simulations in medical physics applications.

  2. Intravascular brachytherapy for peripheral vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA through balloon dilatation with or without stenting, i.e. vessel expansion through balloons with or without of implantation of small tubes, called stents, are used in the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD. The intravascular vessel irradiation, called intravascular brachytherapy, promises a reduction in the rate of repeated stenosis (rate of restenosis after PTA. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of brachytherapy in PAOD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in August 2007 in the most important medical electronic databases for publications beginning from 2002. The medical evaluation included randomized controlled trials (RCT. The information synthesis was performed using meta-analysis. Health economic modeling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economical assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG-2007. Results: Medical evaluation: Twelve publications about seven RCT on brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy were included in the medical evaluation. Two RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six and/or twelve months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after successful balloon dilatation, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.84. At five years, time to recurrence of restenosis was significantly delayed after brachytherapy. One RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after PTA with optional stenting, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.95. One RCT observed a significantly higher rate of late thrombotic occlusions after brachytherapy in the subgroup of stented patients. A single RCT for brachytherapy

  3. [Innovation in gynaecological brachytherapy: new technologies, pulse dose-rate brachytherapy, image, definition of new volumes of interest and their impact on dosimetry: application in a clinical research programme "STIC"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, C; Peiffert, D

    2006-11-01

    Brachytherapy plays a fundamental role in the therapeutic approach of patients with stage I-IV cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last decades: stepping source technology, imaging modalities development, specially IMN, treatment planning system integrating 3D images. Images from CT-Scan and MRI have contributed to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better definition of tumour volume compared to traditional approaches. The introduction of 3D image based approach for GTV and CTV requires new definitions and a common language. In 2000, a working group within GEC-ESTRO was created to support 3D image based 3D treatment planning approach in cervix cancer BT. The task was to determine a common terminology enabling various groups to use a common language. Recommendations were described and proposed based on clinical experience and dosimetric concepts of different institutions. Two CTVs were described en relation to the risk for recurrence: high-risk CTV and intermediate risk CTV. In order to better define the role of such definitions and their potential impact on the complication incidence in patients with cervical cancer, a special French programme was developed. The aim of this programme is to study the incidence of the severe 2-year complication rate in two comparable patient populations: one population is treated using PDR brachytherapy with CT-Scan or MRI with the applicators in place allowing a 3D dosimetry with optimization, the second population is treated using standard X-rays radiographs without any delineation of the target nor optimisation. Each population arm includes 425 patients. A medicoeconomic assessment is performed, allowing a real cost of the most sophisticated approach compared to a historical dosimetric system.

  4. An evaluation of a Low-Dose-Rate (LDR) brachytherapy procedure using a systems engineering & error analysis methodology for health care (SEABH) - (SAVE)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chadwick, Liam

    2012-03-12

    Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HFMEA®) is an established tool for risk assessment in health care. A number of deficiencies have been identified in the method. A new method called Systems and Error Analysis Bundle for Health Care (SEABH) was developed to address these deficiencies. SEABH has been applied to a number of medical processes as part of its validation and testing. One of these, Low Dose Rate (LDR) prostate Brachytherapy is reported in this paper. The case study supported the validity of SEABH with respect to its capacity to address the weaknesses of (HFMEA®).

  5. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borot, Maxence; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance.

  6. Analysis of the Survival Rate with Cervical Cancer Using 137Cs and 192Ir Aftedoading Brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuixioZhou; GuoxiongChen; DemeiMa; JianpingSun; LinMa

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze and compare the survival rate for stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ cervical cancer treated by external irradiation plus 137Cs or 192Ir. METHODS The patients with cervical cancer were treated by external irradiation plus 137Cs (group A, 427 patients) or plus 192Ir (group B, 156 patients). There were 170 stage Ⅱ cases and 413 stage Ⅲ cases. The number of cancer types were as follows: squamous cell carcinoma, 524; adenocarcinoma, 34; and adenosquamous cell carcinoma, 25. The two groups received the same external irradiation using 8 or 10 MV of X-ray. After the whole pelvis received 25-35 Gy, the focus was given a total of 45-55 Gy by four divided fields. Intracavitary irradiation was performed with one fraction of 6-7 Gy in reference dose at A point every week and a total dose of 40-60 Gy with 6-8 fractions for group A; every fraction of 5-6 Gy in reference dose of A point and total dose of 30-42 Gy with 5-7 fractions for group B.RESULTS The 5-year survival rate of stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ, and total were 82.9%, 62.2%, and 67.2% for group A respectively and 85.1%, 61.5% and 69.2% for group B respectively. There were significant differences between stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ in each group (P 0.05). The late complications of the therapy were rectitis and urocystitis and with an incidence rate of 7.3% and 6.3% for group A and 9.6% and 9.0% for group B (P> 0.05). CONCLUSION The long-term survival rate and complications of stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ cervical cancer are similar when treated with external irradiation plus 137Cs or plus 192Ir.

  7. High dose rate brachytherapy using custom made superficial mould applicators and Leipzig applicators for non melanoma localized skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, A. Cassio A.; Miziara, Daniela; Lima, Flavia Pedroso de; Miziara, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: advances in technology and the commercial production of Leipzig applicators allowed High Dose Rate after-load brachytherapy (HDR-BT) to address a number of the challenges associated with the delivery of superficial radiation to treat localized non melanoma skin cancer (NMSK). We reviewed our uni-institutional experience on the treatment of NMSK with HDR-BT. Methods: data were collected retrospectively from patients attending the Radiation Oncology Department at AV Carvalho Insitute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. HDR-BT was done using the stepping source HDR 192Ir Microselectron (Nucletron BV). The planning target volume consisted of the macroscopic lesion plus a 5mm to 10mm margin.The depth of treatment was 0.5 cm in smaller (< 2.0 cm) tumors and 10 to 15 mm for lesions bigger than that. Results: Thirteen patients were treated with HDR-BT from June, 2007 to June 2013. The median age and follow up time were 72 (38-90) years old and 36 (range, 7-73) months, respectively. There a predominance of males (61.5%) and of patients referred for adjuvant treatment due positive surgical margins or because they have had only a excision biopsy without safety margins (61.5%). Six (46.2%) patients presented with squamous cell carcinoma and 7 (53.8%) patients presented with basal cell carcinoma. The median tumor size was 20 (range, 5-42) mm. Patients were treated with a median total dose of 40 Gy (range, 20 -60), given in 10 (range, 2-15) fractions, given daily or twice a week. All patients responded very well to treatment and only one patient has failed locally so far, after 38 months of the end of the irradiation. The crude and actuarial 3-year local control rates were 100% and 80%, respectively. Moist desquamation, grade 2 RTOG, was observed in 4 (30.8%) patients. Severe late complication, radiation-induced dyspigmentation, occurred in 2 patients and 1 of the patients also showed telangiectasia in the irradiated area. The cosmetic result was considered good in 84% (11/13) patients

  8. CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the interdisciplinary treatment of patients with liver metastases of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieners, Gero; Schippers, Alexander Christian; Collettini, Federico; Schnapauff, Dirk; Hamm, Bernd; Wust, Peter; Riess, Hanno; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) is an interventional radiologic technique for local ablation of primary and secondary malignomas applying a radiation source through a brachycatheter percutaneously into the targeted lesion. The aim of this study was to assess local tumor control, safety and efficacy of CT-HDRBT in the treatment of liver metastases of pancreatic cancer. Twenty consecutive patients with 49 unresectable liver metastases of pancreatic cancer were included in this retrospective trial and treated with CT-HDRBT, applied as a single fraction high-dose irradiation (15-20 Gy) using a 192Ir-source. Primary endpoint was local tumor control and secondary endpoints were complications, progression-free survival and overall survival. The mean tumor diameter was 29 mm (range 10-73). The mean irradiation time was 20 minutes (range 7-42). The mean coverage of the clinical target volume was 98% (range 88%-100%). The mean D100 was 18.1 Gy and the median D100 was 19.78 Gy. Three major complications occurred with post-interventional abscesses, three of which were seen in 15 patients with biliodigestive anastomosis (20%) and overall 15%. The mean follow-up time was 13.7 months (range 1.4-55.0). The median progression-free survival was 4.9 months (range 1.4-42.9, mean 9.4). Local recurrence occurred in 5 (10%) of 49 metastases treated. The median overall survival after CT-HDRBT was 8.6 months (range 1.5-55.3). Eleven patients received chemotherapy after ablation with a median progression-free survival of 4.9 months (mean 12.9). Nine patients did not receive chemotherapy after intervention with a median progression-free survival of 3.2 months (mean 5.0). The rate of local tumor control was 91% in both groups after 12 months. CT-HDRBT was safe and effective for the treatment of liver metastases of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christopher A; Cesaretti, Jamie A; Stone, Nelson N; Stock, Richard G

    2006-10-01

    We report on the follow-up of 24 patients with a prior history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease (17 with ulcerative colitis (UC), 7 with Crohn's disease [CD]) underwent prostate brachytherapy between 1992 and 2004. Fifteen patients were treated with I-125 implantation and 6 patients were treated with Pd-103 alone or in combination with 45 Gy external beam radiation. Charts were reviewed for all patients, and all living patients were contacted by phone. National Cancer Institute common toxicity scores for proctitis were assigned to all patients. Actuarial risk of late toxicity was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 126 months (median, 48.5 months; mean, 56.8 months). None of the patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 rectal toxicity. Four patients experienced Grade 2 late rectal toxicity. The 5-year actuarial freedom from developing late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 81%. At a median follow-up of 48.5 months, 23 patients were alive and had no evidence of disease with a median prostate-specific antigen for the sample of 0.1 ng/mL (range, <0.05-0.88 ng/mL). One patient died of other causes unrelated to his prostate cancer. Prostate brachytherapy is well tolerated in patients with a history of controlled IBD. Therefore, brachytherapy should be considered a viable therapeutic option in this patient population.

  10. Analysis of high–dose rate brachytherapy dose distribution resemblance in CyberKnife hypofractionated treatment plans of localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudahar, H., E-mail: h.sudahar@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy, Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai (India); Kurup, P.G.G.; Murali, V.; Mahadev, P. [Department of Radiotherapy, Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai (India); Velmurugan, J. [Department of Medical Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2013-01-01

    The present study is to analyze the CyberKnife hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of high–dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy equivalent doses to assess the degree of HDR brachytherapy resemblance of CyberKnife dose distribution. Thirteen randomly selected localized prostate cancer cases treated using CyberKnife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. HDR equivalent doses were calculated for 30 Gy in 3 fractions of HDR brachytherapy regimen. The D{sub 5%} of the target in the CyberKnife hypofractionation was 41.57 ± 2.41 Gy. The corresponding HDR fractionation (3 fractions) equivalent dose was 32.81 ± 1.86 Gy. The mean HDR fractionation equivalent dose, D{sub 98%}, was 27.93 ± 0.84 Gy. The V{sub 100%} of the prostate target was 95.57% ± 3.47%. The V{sub 100%} of the bladder and the rectum were 717.16 and 79.6 mm{sup 3}, respectively. Analysis of the HDR equivalent dose of CyberKnife dose distribution indicates a comparable resemblance to HDR dose distribution in the peripheral target doses (D{sub 98%} to D{sub 80%}) reported in the literature. However, there is a substantial difference observed in the core high-dose regions especially in D{sub 10%} and D{sub 5%}. The dose fall-off within the OAR is also superior in reported HDR dose distribution than the HDR equivalent doses of CyberKnife.

  11. A comparison of anatomy-based inverse planning with simulated annealing and graphical optimization for high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Gerard C; Sankreacha, Raxa; Halina, Patrick; Loblaw, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Dose distribution in a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant is optimized by adjusting source dwell positions and dwell times along the implanted catheters. Inverse planning with fast simulated annealing (IPSA) is a recently developed algorithm for anatomy-based inverse planning, capable of generating an optimized plan in less than 1min. The purpose of this study is to compare dose distributions achieved using IPSA to those obtained with a graphical optimization (GrO) algorithm for prostate HDR brachytherapy. This is a retrospective study of 63 consecutive prostate HDR brachytherapy implants planned and treated using on-screen GrO to a dose of 10Gy per implant. All plans were then recalculated using IPSA, without changing any parameters (contours, catheters, number, or location of dwell positions). The IPSA and GrO plans were compared with respect to target coverage, conformality, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue dose. The mean volume of target treated to 100% of prescription dose (V(100)) was 97.1% and 96.7%, and mean Conformal Index 0.71 and 0.68 with GrO and IPSA, respectively. IPSA plans had a higher mean homogeneity index (0.69 vs. 0.63, p<0.001) and lower volume of target receiving 150% (30.2% vs. 35.6%, p<0.001) and 200% (10.7% vs. 12.7%, p<0.001) of the prescription dose. Mean dose to urethra, rectum, and bladder were all significantly lower with IPSA (p<0.001). IPSA plans tended to be more reproducible, with smaller standard deviations for all measured parameters. Plans generated using IPSA provide similar target coverage to those obtained using GrO but with lower dose to normal structures and greater dose homogeneity.

  12. The impact of body mass index on rectal dose in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jihoon; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Valicenti, Richard; Mathai, Matthew; Stern, Robin L; Mayadev, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    The impact of body mass index (BMI) on rectal dose in brachytherapy for cervical cancer is unknown. We assessed the association of BMI on rectal dose and lower gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Between 2007 and 2010, 51 patients with 97 brachytherapy planning images were reviewed. Volumetric measurements of the maximum percentage, mean percentage, dose to 2cc (D2cc), and dose to 1cc (D1cc) of the rectum, and the Internal Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) rectal point were recorded. Linear mixed effect models, analysis of variance, and regression analyses were used to determine the correlation between multiple observations or to detect a difference in the mean. The GI acute and late toxicity were prospectively recorded and retrospectively analyzed. The average BMI (kg/m(2)) was 27.7 with a range of 17.4-46.6. Among the patients, 8% were morbidly obese, 25% obese, 25% overweight, 40% normal weight, and 2% underweight. The mean D1cc, D2cc, mean rectal dose (%), maximum rectal dose (%), and ICRU rectum was 3.03 Gy, 2.78 Gy, 20%, 60%, and 2.99 Gy, respectively. On multivariate analysis, there was a significant decrease in the D1cc and D2cc rectal dose (p=0.016), ICRU rectal point dose (p=0.022), and mean rectal dose percentage (p=0.021) with an increase in BMI. There was, however, no statistically significant relationship between BMI and GI toxicity. Obesity decreases the rectal dose given in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer because of an increase in fatty tissue in the recto-uterine space. There is no significant correlation between BMI and acute or late GI toxicity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Shielding effect of a customized intraoral mold including lead material in high-dose-rate 192-Ir brachytherapy for oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoh, Takaharu; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Honda, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A high-dose-rate (HDR) 192-Ir brachytherapy using a customized intraoral mold is effective for superficial oral cavity cancer, and the surrounding normal tissue is kept away from the radioactive source with gauze pads and/or mouth piece for reducing the dose on the normal tissues. In the Tokushima university hospital, the mold has a lead shield which utilizes the space prepared with sufficient border-molding by a specific dental technique using modeling compound. In HDR 192-Ir brachytherapy using a lead shielded customized intraoral mold, there are no reports measuring the absorbed dose. The purpose of the present study is to measure the absorbed dose and discuss the optimum thickness of lead in HDR 192-Ir brachytherapy using a customized intraoral mold with lead shield using a 1 cm thickness mimic mold. The thickness of lead in the mold could be changed by varying the arrangement of 0.1 cm thickness sheet of the acrylic resin plate and lead. The measured doses at the lateral surface of the mold with thermo-luminescence dosimeter were reduced to 1.12, 0.79, 0.57, 0.41, 0.31, 0.24 and 0.19 Gy and the ratios to the prescription dose were reduced to 56, 40, 29, 21, 16, 12 and 10 percent as lead thickness increased from 0 to 0.6 cm in 0.1 cm increments, respectively. A 0.3 cm thickness lead was considered to be required for a 1 cm thickness mold, and it was necessary to thicken the lead as much as possible with the constraint of limited space in the oral cavity, especially at the fornix vestibule.

  14. Comparison of single and multiple dwell position methods in MammoSite high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G; Miften, Moyed

    2010-05-28

    The purpose of this study is to dosimetrically compare two plans generated using single dwell position method (SDPM) and multiple dwell position methods (MDPM) in MammoSite high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for 19 breast cancer patients. In computed tomography (CT) image-based HDR planning, a surface optimization technique was used in both methods. Following dosimetric parameters were compared for fraction 1 plans: %PTV_EVAL (planning target volume for plan evaluation) coverage, dose homogeneity index (DHI), dose con-formal index (COIN), maximum dose to skin and ipsilateral lung, and breast tissue volume receiving 150% (V150[cc]) and 200% (V200[cc]) of the prescribed dose. In addition, a plan was retrospectively generated for each fraction 2-10 to simulate the clinical situation where the fraction 1 plan was used for fractions 2-10 without modification. In order to create nine derived plans for each method and for each of the 19 patients, the catheter location and contours of target and critical structures were defined on the CT images acquired prior to each fraction 2-10, while using the same dwell-time distribution as used for fraction 1 (original plan). Interfraction dose variations were evaluated for 19 patients by comparing the derived nine plans (each for fractions 2-10) with the original plan (fraction 1) using the same dosimetric parameters used for fraction 1 plan comparison. For the fraction 1 plan comparison, the MDPM resulted in slightly increased %PTV_EVAL coverage, COIN, V150[cc] and V200[cc] values by an average of 1.2%, 0.025, 0.5 cc and 0.7cc, respectively, while slightly decreased DHI, maximum skin and ipsilateral lung dose by an average of 0.003, 3.2 cGy and 5.8 cGy, respectively. For the inter-fraction dose variation comparison, the SDPM resulted in slightly smaller variations in %PTV_EVAL coverage, DHI, maximum skin dose and V150[cc] values by an average of 0.4%, 0.0005, 0.5 cGy and 0.2 cc, respectively, while slightly higher average

  15. 3D CT-based high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy implants: treatment planning and quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak K; Patel, Rakesh; Shah, Hiral; Odau, Heath; Kuske, Robert R

    2004-07-15

    Although accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy has shown promising results for select breast cancer patients, published experiences thus far have provided limited information on treatment planning methodology and quality assurance measures. A novel three-dimensional computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning method for accurate delineation and geometric coverage of the target volume is presented. A correlation between treatment volume and irradiation time has also been studied for quality assurance purposes. Between May 2002 and January 2003, 50 consecutive patients underwent an image-guided interstitial implant followed by CT-based treatment planning and were subsequently treated with APBI with a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy remote afterloader. Target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity +2 cm margin modified to >/=5 mm to the skin surface. Catheter reconstruction, geometric optimization, and manual adjustment of irradiation time were done to optimally cover the target volume while minimizing hot spots. Dose homogeneity index (DHI) and percent of target volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (32 Gy in 8 fractions or 34 Gy in 10 fractions) was determined. Additionally, the correlation between the treatment volume and irradiation time, source strength, and dose was then analyzed for manual verification of the HDR computer calculation. In all cases, the lumpectomy cavity was covered 100%. Target volume coverage was excellent with a median of 96%, and DHI had a median value of 0.7. For each plan, source strength times the treatment time for every unit of prescribed dose had an excellent agreement of +/-7% to the Manchester volume implant table corrected for modern units. CT-based treatment planning allowed excellent visualization of the lumpectomy cavity and normal structures, thereby improving target volume delineation and optimal coverage, relative to conventional orthogonal film

  16. Development of a phantom to validate high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning systems with heterogeneous algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Eduardo S., E-mail: emoura@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Micka, John A.; Hammer, Cliff G.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Rostelato, Maria Elisa C. M.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This work presents the development of a phantom to verify the treatment planning system (TPS) algorithms used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. It is designed to measure the relative dose in a heterogeneous media. The experimental details used, simulation methods, and comparisons with a commercial TPS are also provided. Methods: To simulate heterogeneous conditions, four materials were used: Virtual Water™ (VM), BR50/50™, cork, and aluminum. The materials were arranged in 11 heterogeneity configurations. Three dosimeters were used to measure the relative response from a HDR {sup 192}Ir source: TLD-100™, Gafchromic{sup ®} EBT3 film, and an Exradin™ A1SL ionization chamber. To compare the results from the experimental measurements, the various configurations were modeled in the PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code. Images of each setup geometry were acquired from a CT scanner and imported into BrachyVision™ TPS software, which includes a grid-based Boltzmann solver Acuros™. The results of the measurements performed in the heterogeneous setups were normalized to the dose values measured in the homogeneous Virtual Water™ setup and the respective differences due to the heterogeneities were considered. Additionally, dose values calculated based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine-Task Group 43 formalism were compared to dose values calculated with the Acuros™ algorithm in the phantom. Calculated doses were compared at the same points, where measurements have been performed. Results: Differences in the relative response as high as 11.5% were found from the homogeneous setup when the heterogeneous materials were inserted into the experimental phantom. The aluminum and cork materials produced larger differences than the plastic materials, with the BR50/50™ material producing results similar to the Virtual Water™ results. Our experimental methods agree with the PENELOPE/penEasy simulations for most setups and dosimeters. The

  17. Commissioning of a 3D image-based treatment planning system for high-dose-rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Modrick, Joseph M; Pennington, Edward C; Kim, Yusung

    2016-03-08

    The objective of this work is to present commissioning procedures to clinically implement a three-dimensional (3D), image-based, treatment-planning system (TPS) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for gynecological (GYN) cancer. The physical dimensions of the GYN applicators and their values in the virtual applicator library were varied by 0.4 mm of their nominal values. Reconstruction uncertainties of the titanium tandem and ovoids (T&O) were less than 0.4 mm on CT phantom studies and on average between 0.8-1.0 mm on MRI when compared with X-rays. In-house software, HDRCalculator, was developed to check HDR plan parameters such as independently verifying active tandem or cylinder probe length and ovoid or cylinder size, source calibration and treatment date, and differences between average Point A dose and prescription dose. Dose-volume histograms were validated using another independent TPS. Comprehensive procedures to commission volume optimization algorithms and process in 3D image-based planning were presented. For the difference between line and volume optimizations, the average absolute differences as a percentage were 1.4% for total reference air KERMA (TRAK) and 1.1% for Point A dose. Volume optimization consistency tests between versions resulted in average absolute differences in 0.2% for TRAK and 0.9 s (0.2%) for total treatment time. The data revealed that the optimizer should run for at least 1 min in order to avoid more than 0.6% dwell time changes. For clinical GYN T&O cases, three different volume optimization techniques (graphical optimization, pure inverse planning, and hybrid inverse optimization) were investigated by comparing them against a conventional Point A technique. End-to-end testing was performed using a T&O phantom to ensure no errors or inconsistencies occurred from imaging through to planning and delivery. The proposed commissioning procedures provide a clinically safe implementation technique for 3D image-based TPS for HDR

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of multilumen intracavitary balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G

    2014-01-06

    The objective of this work is to evaluate dosimetric impact of multilumen balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer. Highly asymmetrical dose distribution was generated for patients A and B, depending upon applicator proximity to skin and rib. Both skin and rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for A; only rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for B. Thirty-five rotation scenarios were simulated for each patient by rotating outer lumens every 10° over ± 180° range with respect to central lumen using mathematically calculated rotational matrix. Thirty-five rotated plans were compared with three plans: 1) original multidwell multilumen (MDML) plan, 2) multidwell single-lumen (MDSL) plan, and 3) single-dwell single-lumen (SDSL) plan. For plan comparison, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) coverage (dose to 95% and 90% volume of PTV_EVAL) (D95 and D90), skin and rib maximal dose (Dmax), and normal breast tissue volume receiving 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) of prescribed dose (PD) were evaluated. Dose variation due to device rotation ranged from -5.6% to 0.8% (A) and -6.5% to 0.2% (B) for PTV_EVAL D95; -5.2% to 0.4% (A) and -4.1% to 0.7% (B) for PTV_EVAL D90; -2.0 to 18.4% (A) and -7.8 to 17.5% (B) for skin Dmax; -11.1 to 22.8% (A) and -4.7 to 55.1% (B) of PD for rib Dmax, respectively. Normal breast tissue V150 and V200 variation was < 1.0 cc, except for -0.1 to 2.5cc (B) of V200. Furthermore, 30° device rotation increased rib Dmax over 145% of PD: 152.9% (A) by clockwise 30° rotation and 152.5% (B) by counterclockwise 30° rotation. For a highly asymmetric dose distribution, device rotation can outweigh the potential benefit of improved dose shaping capability afforded by multilumen and make dosimetric data worse than single-lumen plans unless it is properly corrected.

  19. Pulsed-dose-rate peri-operative brachytherapy as an interstitial boost in organ-sparing treatment of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Dziadziuszko, Rafał; Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate peri-operative multicatheter interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) with an intra-operative catheter placement to boost the tumor excision site in breast cancer patients treated conservatively. Material and methods Between May 2002 and October 2008, 96 consecutive T1-3N0-2M0 breast cancer patients underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT) including peri-operative PDR-BT boost, followed by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT). The BT dose of 15 Gy (1 Gy/pulse/h) was given on the following day after surgery. Results No increased bleeding or delayed wound healing related to the implants were observed. The only side effects included one case of temporary peri-operative breast infection and 3 cases of fat necrosis, both early and late. In 11 patients (11.4%), subsequent WBRT was omitted owing to the final pathology findings. These included eight patients who underwent mastectomy due to multiple adverse prognostic pathological features, one case of lobular carcinoma in situ, and two cases with no malignant tumor. With a median follow-up of 12 years (range: 7-14 years), among 85 patients who completed BCT, there was one ipsilateral breast tumor and one locoregional nodal recurrence. Six patients developed distant metastases and one was diagnosed with angiosarcoma within irradiated breast. The actuarial 5- and 10-year disease free survival was 90% (95% CI: 84-96%) and 87% (95% CI: 80-94%), respectively, for the patients with invasive breast cancer, and 91% (95% CI: 84-97%) and 89% (95% CI: 82-96%), respectively, for patients who completed BCT. Good cosmetic outcome by self-assessment was achieved in 58 out of 64 (91%) evaluable patients. Conclusions Peri-operative PDR-BT boost with intra-operative tube placement followed by EBRT is feasible and devoid of considerable toxicity, and provides excellent long-term local control. However, this strategy necessitates careful patient selection and histological confirmation of primary

  20. Interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy for recurrent cervical cancer after radiation therapy; Braquiterapia intersticial para recidivas de cancer de colo uterino pos-radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Feijo, Luiz Fernando Andrade; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Cunha, Maercio de Oliveira [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Atencao Integral a Saude da Mulher (CAISM)]. E-mail: estevesrt@uol.com.br

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the response and potential toxicity of fractionated interstitial high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for post-radiation pelvic recurrence in cervical cancer. Materials And Methods: From 1998 to 2001, 11 patients aged 41 to 71 years with cervical carcinoma stages II to IV who presented pelvic recurrence after radiation therapy were treated wit interstitial HDR. Nine of these patients (82%) had squamous cell carcinoma and two had adenocarcinoma. Radiation consisted of 20 Gy to 30 Gy delivered in fractions of 4 Gy to 5 Gy over three days. The median follow-up was 22.5 months (2 to 54 months), with periodic physical examinations (three months interval). One patient died without evaluation of the response. Results: Ten patients (91%) presented complete clinical response, three patients (27%) were disease free, two were alive with disease, three (27%) died of cancer and three (27%) were lost in the follow-up after the second recurrence. Urinary tract toxicity grade III was 9% (one patient). Conclusion: Interstitial HDR brachytherapy is an alternative approach to selected patients with recurrent cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. High response rates were achieved with low toxicity taking into account the studied group, time of follow-up and re-irradiation. (author)

  1. High-dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy with flexible applicator. A trial toward decrease of stress during treatment and improvement of quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Keiji; Kasahara, Kotaro; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichiro; Kariya, Shinji; Inomata, Taisuke; Yoshida, Shoji; Shuin, Taro [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We tried to improve the materials and methods of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer and evaluated the stress during the treatment in 20 patients with whom the therapy was performed. Rigid applicators made of stainless steel of 1.6 mm in diameter were indwelt with a template as usual for 30 hours in 14 patients (group A). Flexible applicators made of polyoxymethylene rosin (POM) of 2.0 mm in diameter were indwelt without a template for 30 hours after the applicator insertion in 6 patients (group B). We made inquiries about lumbago, inconvenience and necessity of assistant help and sleep in the course of therapy, and urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy as the QOL. The stress during the course of therapy in the patients of group B was obviously less than that of group A. There were no significant differences in urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy between group A and B. In this study, our trial successfully reduced the stress during the course of therapy in the patients with localized prostate cancer in the course of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy. (author)

  2. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Georgina [Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary); Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D{sub min}) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D{sub r}) and urethra (D{sub u}), dose to volume of 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum (D{sub 2ccm}), and 0.1 cm{sup 3} and 1% of the urethra (D{sub 0.1ccm} and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V{sub p}) was 27.1 cm{sup 3}. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D{sub min} was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D{sub 2ccm} = 49% for the rectum, D{sub 0.1ccm} = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D{sub r}, D{sub 2ccm}) = 0.69, R(D{sub u}, D{sub 0.1ccm}) = 0.64, R(D{sub u}, D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose

  3. Dose-volume parameters and clinical outcome of CT-guided free-hand high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Ye, Wei-Jun; Du, Le-Hui; Li, Ai-Ju; Ren, Yu-Feng; Cao, Xin-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Currently, image-based 3-dimentional (3D) planning brachytherapy allows for a better assessment of gross tumor volume (GTV) and the definition and delineation of target volume in cervix cancer. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of our novel computed tomography (CT)-guided free-hand high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDRISBT) technique for cervical cancer by evaluating the dosimetry and preliminary clinical outcome of this approach. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were analyzed according to the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group recommendations for image-based 3D treatment in cervical cancer. Twenty cervical cancer patients who underwent CT-guided free-hand HDRISBT between March 2009 and June 2010 were studied. With a median of 5 (range, 4–7) implanted needles for each patient, the median dose of brachytherapy alone delivered to 90% of the target volume (D90) was 45 (range, 33–54) Gyα/β10 for high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and 30 (range, 20–36) Gyα/β10 for intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV). The percentage of the CTV covered by the prescribed dose (V100) of HR-CTV with brachytherapy alone was 81.9%–99.2% (median, 96.7%). With an additional dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), the median D90 was 94 (range, 83–104) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 77 (range, 70–87) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV; the median dose delivered to 100% of the target volume (D100) was 75 (range, 66–84) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 65 (range, 57–73) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV. The minimum dose to the most irradiated 2 cc volume (D2cc) was 73–96 (median, 83) Gyα/β3 for the bladder, 64–98 (median, 73) Gyα/β3 for the rectum, and 52–69 (median, 61) Gyα/β3 for the sigmoid colon. After a median follow-up of 15 months (range, 3–24 months), two patients experienced local failure, and 1 showed internal iliac nodal metastasis. Despite the relatively small number of needles used, CT-guided HDRISBT for cervical cancer showed favorable

  4. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vordermark, Dirk [Univ. of Wuerzburg (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 {mu}g/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 {mu}g/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles.

  5. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy and endoluminal HDR brachytherapy in esophageal cancer; Simultane Radiochemotherapie mit intraluminaler HDR-Brachytherapie des Oesophaguskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patonay, P.; Naszaly, A.; Mayer, A. [Hauptstaedtisches Zentrum fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: to study efficacy and toxicity of radiochemotherapy in esophageal cancer including initial endoluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Patients and methods: between 01/1995 and 06/2005, 61 patients with esophageal cancer were treated preoperatively with definitive and palliative intent. Treatment started with intraluminal HDR-BT for recanalization of the esophagus (single fraction size of 8 Gy in 0.5 cm depth, three times, q7d) followed by external-beam radiation therapy (50 Gy total dose, 5 x 2 Gy/week, 25 fractions in 5 weeks). Chemotherapy was started simultaneously with external irradiation (three courses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, q21d). Results: swallowing function improved in 55/61 patients (dysphagia classification according to the RTOG), and worsened in 6/61 patients, respectively. Median duration of symptomatic improvement was 11 months, median follow-up 12 months (range 3-68 months). Following simultaneous radiochemotherapy, tumor resectability was achieved in 7/25 patients of the neoadjuvant group, and the histological specimen showed complete remission in 6/7 patients. Conclusion: these results indicate a favorable effect of simultaneous radiochemotherapy starting with endoluminal HDR-after-loading-(AL-)BT in esophageal cancer. (orig.)

  6. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy in Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Smith, Kristin L.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Campbell, Steven; Stephenson, Andrew; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wilkinson, D. Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives: To report long-term efficacy and toxicity for a single-institution cohort of patients treated with low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy permanent implant (PI) monotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2007, 1989 patients with low-risk (61.3%), intermediate-risk (29.8%), high-intermediate-risk (4.5%), and high-risk prostate cancer (4.4%) were treated with PI and followed up prospectively in a registry. All patients were treated with {sup 125}I monotherapy to 144 Gy. Late toxicity was coded retrospectively according to a modified Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 scale. The rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were calculated. We identified factors associated with late grade ≥3 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, bRFS, DMFS, OS, PCSM, and incontinence. Results: The median age of the patients was 67 years, and the median overall and prostate-specific antigen follow-up times were 6.8 years and 5.8 years, respectively. The overall 5-year rates for bRFS, DMFS, OS, and PCSM were 91.9%, 97.8%, 93.7%, and 0.71%, respectively. The 10-year rates were 81.5%, 91.5%, 76.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. The overall rates of late grade ≥3 GU and GI toxicity were 7.6% and 0.8%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, age and prostate length were significantly associated with increased risk of late grade ≥3 GU toxicity. The risk of incontinence was highly correlated with both pre-PI and post-PI transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy is an effective treatment for low-risk and low-intermediate-risk prostate cancer and appears promising as a treatment for high-intermediate-risk and high-risk prostate cancer. Significant long-term toxicities are rare when brachytherapy is performed as monotherapy.

  7. The usefulness of metal markers for CTV-based dose prescription in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ken; Mitomo, Masanori [Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan); Yoshida, Mineo [Sanda City Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We employ a clinical target volume (CTV)-based dose prescription for high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. However, it is not easy to define CTV and organs at risk (OAR) from X-ray film or CT scanning. To solve this problem, we have utilized metal markers since October 1999. Moreover, metal markers can help modify dose prescription. By regulating the doses to the metal markers, refining the dose prescription can easily be achieved. In this research, we investigated the usefulness of the metal markers. Between October 1999 and May 2001, 51 patients were implanted with metal markers at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (OMCC), Osaka National Hospital (ONH) and Sanda City Hospital (SCH). Forty-nine patients (head and neck: 32; pelvis: 11; soft tissue: 3; breast: 3) using metal markers were analyzed. During operation, we implanted 179 metal markers (49 patients) to CTV and 151 markers (26 patients) to OAR. At treatment planning, CTV was reconstructed judging from the metal markers, applicator position and operation records. Generally, we prescribed the tumoricidal dose to an isodose surface that covers CTV. We also planned to limit the doses to OAR lower than certain levels. The maximum normal tissue doses were decided 80%, 150%, 100%, 50% and 200% of the prescribed doses for the rectum, the urethra, the mandible, the skin and the large vessel, respectively. The doses to the metal markers using CTV-based dose prescription were generated. These were compared with the doses theoretically calculated with the Paris system. Treatment results were also investigated. The doses to the 158 metal markers (42 patients) for CTV were higher than ''tumoricidal dose''. In 7 patients, as a result of compromised dose prescription, 9 markers were lower than the tumoricidal dose. The other 12 markers (7%) were excluded from dose evaluation because they were judged as miss-implanted. The doses to the 142 metal markers (24 patients

  8. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Freer, Phoebe [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lawenda, Brian [21st Century Oncology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta (Egypt); Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias {>=}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {<=} .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence

  9. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Murakami

    Full Text Available To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients.First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations.With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant distances to the source.The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT.

  10. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kakimoto, Naoya; Sumida, Iori; Fujiwara, Masateru; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2016-01-01

    To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients. First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations. With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant) distances to the source. The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT.

  11. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G.; Kakimoto, Naoya; Sumida, Iori; Fujiwara, Masateru; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients. Methods First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations. Results With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant) distances to the source. Conclusions The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT. PMID:27128434

  12. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  13. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in head and neck cancer: do we need a look back into a forgotten art - a single institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalavat, Rajendra; Chandra, Manish; Pareek, Vibhay; Nellore, Lalitha; George, Karishma; Nandakumar, P; Bauskar, Pratibha

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes with high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BRT) in head and neck cancers (HNC). Fifty-eight patients with HNC as per American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging criteria were analyzed retrospectively between 2008 and 2015. Forty-two patients received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with HDR-BRT and 16 patients received BRT alone. The survival was calculated with respect to median biological equivalent doses (BED) and median 2 Gy equivalent dose (EQD2), keeping α/β = 10 for tumor. Loco-regional control and disease free survival was assessed. The median follow-up period was 25 months (2-84 months). The disease-free survival (DFS) probability at year 1 was 82.7%, and 68% at year 7. The overall survival probability was 91.3% at year 1 and 85.8% at year 7. The local control rate was 70%. The rate of recurrence was 30%. Distant metastasis rate was 17.2%. The median BED and EQD2, respectively, were 86.78 Gy and 71.6 Gy. The DFS was 74.1% and 75.9% in patients receiving a dose more than median BED and EQD2, respectively, and was 64.8% and 61.5% for less than the median dose. The overall outcome was good with implementation of HDR-BRT used alone or as boost, and shows DFS as better when the dose received is more than the median BED and median EQD2. The role of HDR-BRT in HNC is a proven, effective, and safe treatment method with excellent long term outcome as seen in this study, which reflects the need for reviving the forgotten art and science of interstitial brachytherapy in HNC.

  14. Results of concomitant chemoradiation for cervical cancer using high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy: Study of JROSG (Japan Radiation Oncology Study Group)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Koh-Ichi (Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine, Sapporo (JP)); Sakurai, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki (Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Gunna Univ., School of Medicine, Gunna (JP)) (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify outcome for concurrent chemoradiation (CT-RT) in locally advanced cervix cancer in Japan. This is a non-randomized retrospective analysis of 226 patients treated with definitive CT-RT or radiotherapy alone (RT alone) in nine institutions between 2001 and 2003. External irradiation consisted of whole pelvic irradiation and pelvic side wall boost irradiation, using a central shield during the latter half of the treatment with the anteroposterior parallel opposing technique. The external beam irradiation was performed with 1.8 or 2 Gy per fraction. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR) was performed in all cases. In chemotherapy, platinum based drugs were used alone or in combination with other drugs such as 5FU. Grade of late complications was scaled retrospectively with CTCv2.0. Overall survival rate at 50 months of stage Ib, II and III, IV was 82% and 66% in CR-RT and 81% and 43% in R alone, respectively. Disease-free survival rate at 50 months of stage Ib, II and III, IV was 74% and 59% in CR-RT and 76% and 52% in R alone, respectively. There was no significant difference between CT-RT and RT for overall survival and disease free survival. Univariate analysis suggested that loco-regional control was better with CT-RT, but multivariate analysis could not confirm this finding. Compared to RT alone, CT-RT caused significantly more acute and late complications. Thus, late complication (grade 3-4) free survival rate at 50 month was 69% for CT-RT and 86% for RT alone (p<0.01). The therapeutic window with concomitant radiochemotherapy and HDR brachytherapy may be narrow, necessitating a close control of dose volume parameters and adherence to systems for dose prescription

  15. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy ablation of breast cancer liver metastases: initial experience with 80 lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Federico; Golenia, Mascha; Schnapauff, Dirk; Poellinger, Alexander; Denecke, Timm; Wust, Peter; Riess, Hanno; Hamm, Bernd; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    To analyze initial experience with computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of breast cancer liver metastases (BCLM). Between January 2008 and December 2010, 37 consecutive women with 80 liver metastases were treated with CT-HDRBT in 56 sessions. Mean age was 58.6 years (range, 34-83 y). Treatment was performed by CT-guided applicator placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. The mean radiation dose was 18.57 Gy (standard deviation 2.27). Tumor response was evaluated by gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed before treatment, 6 weeks after treatment, and every 3 months thereafter. Two patients were lost to follow-up; the remaining 35 patients were available for MR imaging evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 11.6 months (range 3-32 mo). Mean tumor diameter was 25.5 mm (range 8-74 mm). Two (2.6%) local recurrences were observed after local tumor control for 10 months and 12 months. Both local progressions were successfully retreated. Distant tumor progression (new metastases or enlargement of nontreated metastases) occurred during the follow-up period in 11 (31.4%) patients. Seven (20%) patients died during the follow-up period. Overall survival ranged from 3-39 months (median 18 months). CT-HDRBT is a safe and effective ablative therapy, providing a high rate of local tumor control in patients with BCLM. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (−9.43 × 10{sup −5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance

  17. SU-F-19A-09: Propagation of Organ at Risk Contours for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer: A Deformable Image Registration Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellon, M; Kumarasiri, A; Kim, J; Shah, M; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for contour propagation and to evaluate the accuracy of DIR for use with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Methods: Five patients undergoing HDR ring and tandem brachytherapy were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent CT simulation and replanning prior to each fraction (3–5 fractions total). CT-to-CT DIR was performed using two commercially available software platforms: SmartAdapt, Varian Medical Systems (Demons) and Velocity AI, Velocity Medical Solutions (B-spline). Fraction 1 contours were deformed and propagated to each subsequent image set and compared to contours manually drawn by an expert clinician. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC), defined as, DSC(A,B)=2(AandB)/(A+B) were calculated to quantify spatial overlap between manual (A) and deformed (B) contours. Additionally, clinician-assigned visual scores were used to describe and compare the performance of each DIR method and ultimately evaluate which was more clinically acceptable. Scoring was based on a 1–5 scale—with 1 meaning, “clinically acceptable with no contour changes” and 5 meaning, “clinically unacceptable”. Results: Statistically significant differences were not observed between the two DIR algorithms. The average DSC for the bladder, rectum and rectosigmoid were 0.82±0.08, 0.67±0.13 and 0.48±0.18, respectively. The poorest contour agreement was observed for the rectosigmoid due to limited soft tissue contrast and drastic anatomical changes, i.e., organ shape/filling. Two clinicians gave nearly equivalent average scores of 2.75±0.91 for SmartAdapt and 2.75±0.94 for Velocity AI—indicating that for a majority of the cases, more than one of the three contours evaluated required major modifications. Conclusion: Limitations of both DIR algorithms resulted in inaccuracies in contour propagation in the pelvic region, thus hampering the

  18. SU-E-T-383: Can Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Mimic the Dose Distribution of High-Dose-Rate Tandem and Ovoids/ring Brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Scanderbeg, D [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can mimic the dosimetry of tandem and ovoids/ring brachytherapy. Methods: We selected 5 patients treated with 3D-CT based high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 4 tandem and ovoid and 1 tandem and ring case. Manual optimization based on the Manchester system followed by graphical optimization (Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan or Varian BrachyVision) was performed to deliver 6.0 Gy per fraction to a high-risk CTV while maintaining dose to organs at risk (OAR) below the ABS recommendations. For theoretical SBRT plans, CT images and OAR contours from the HDR plans were imported into Eclipse (Varian). The SBRT plan was created to mimic the heterogeneity of HDR plans by using a simultaneous integrated boost technique to match the V100, V150, and V200 isodose volumes from HDR. The OAR Dmax from HDR was used to define the OAR dose constraints for SBRT. Target coverage, dose spill-out, and OAR doses (D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) between the HDR and SBRT plans were compared for significance using a two-tail paired ttest. Results: The mean isodose volumes for HDR vs. SBRT were 29.4 cc vs. 29.0 cc (V200, p = 0.674), 49.2 cc vs. 56.3 cc (V150, p = 0.017), 95.4 cc vs. 127.7 cc (V100, p = 0.001), and 271.9 cc vs. 581.6 cc (V50, p = 0.001). The D2cc to OAR for HDR vs. SBRT was 71.6% vs. 96.2% (bladder, p = 0.002), 69.2% vs. 101.7% (rectum, p = 0.0003), and 56.9% vs. 68.6% (sigmoid, p = 0.004). Conclusion: SBRT with VMAT can provide similar dose target coverage (V200), but dose spill-out and doses to OAR were statistically significantly higher than HDR. This study clearly demonstrated that brachytherapy can not be substituted with SBRT in gynecologic cervical cancer treatment.

  19. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sheree, E-mail: shereedst32@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States); Lyden, Maureen [BioStat International, Inc., Tampa, Florida (United States); Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, WellStar Kennestone Hospital, Marietta, Georgia (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  20. The feasibility study and characterization of a two-dimensional diode array in “magic phantom” for high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, A.; Beeksma, B.; Petasecca, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Cutajar, D.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Corde, S.; Jackson, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, New South Wales 2031 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a radiation treatment technique capable of delivering large dose rates to the tumor. Radiation is delivered using remote afterloaders to drive highly active sources (commonly {sup 192}Ir with an air KERMA strength range between 20 000 and 40 000 U, where 1 U = 1 μGy m{sup 2}/h in air) through applicators directly into the patient's prescribed region of treatment. Due to the obvious ramifications of incorrect treatment while using such an active source, it is essential that there are methods for quality assurance (QA) that can directly and accurately verify the treatment plan and the functionality of the remote afterloader. This paper describes the feasibility study of a QA system for HDR brachytherapy using a phantom based two-dimensional 11 × 11 epitaxial diode array, named “magic phantom.”Methods: The HDR brachytherapy treatment plan is translated to the phantom with two rows of 10 (20 in total) HDR source flexible catheters, arranged above and below the diode array “magic plate” (MP). Four-dimensional source tracking in each catheter is based upon a developed fast iterative algorithm, utilizing the response of the diodes in close proximity to the {sup 192}Ir source, sampled at 100 ms intervals by a fast data acquisition (DAQ) system. Using a {sup 192}Ir source in a solid water phantom, the angular response of the developed epitaxial diodes utilized in the MP and also the variation of the MP response as a function of the source-to-detector distance (SDD) were investigated. These response data are then used by an iterative algorithm for source dwelling position determination. A measurement of the average transit speed between dwell positions was performed using the diodes and a fast DAQ.Results: The angular response of the epitaxial diode showed a variation of 15% within 360°, with two flat regions above and below the detector face with less than 5% variation. For SDD distances of between 5 and 30 mm

  1. Application of a pelvic phantom in brachytherapy dosimetry for high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Choi, Wonsik; Shin, Seong Soo; Jung, Jinhong

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluate how the radial dose function is influenced by the source position as well as the phantom size and shape. A pelvic water phantom similar to the pelvic shape of a human body was designed by averaging dimensions obtained from computed tomography (CT) images of patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, for the study of the effects of source position on the dose distribution, the position of the source in the water phantom was determined by using the center of mass of the gross target volume (GTV) in the CT images. To obtain the dosimetric parameter of a high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source, we performed Monte Carlo simulations by using the Monte Carlo n-particle extended code (MCNPX). The radial dose functions obtained using the pelvic water phantom were compared with those of spherical phantom with different sizes, including the Monte Carlo (MC) results of Williamson and Li. Differences between the radial dose functions from this study and the data in the literature increased with the radial distances. The largest differences appeared for spherical phantom with the smallest size. In contrast to the published MC results, the radial dose function of the pelvic water phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction because full scattering was not possible. When the source was located in posterior position 2 cm from the center in the pelvic water phantom, the differences between the radial dose functions rapidly decreased with the radial distance in the lower vertical direction. If the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements bladder and rectum points are considered, doses to these reference points could be underestimated by up to 1%-2% at a distance of 3 to 6 cm. Our simulation results provide a valid clinical reference data and can used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with cervical cancer.

  2. CT computer-optimized high-dose-rate brachytherapy with surface applicator technique for scar boost radiation after breast reconstruction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra J; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Bellon, Jennifer R; Hansen, Jorgen L; Duggan, Catherine; Czerminska, Maria A; Cormack, Robert A; Devlin, Phillip M

    2005-01-01

    Immediate breast reconstruction has become increasingly prevalent after mastectomy for breast cancer. Postoperative scar boost radiation for the reconstructed breast presents many planning challenges due to the shape, size, and curvature of the scar. High-dose-rate (HDR) surface applicator brachytherapy is a novel and effective method of delivering scar boost radiation. Two cases, one with a saline implant and one with a transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap reconstruction, illustrate the method and advantages of HDR optimization of surface applicators. For 2 patients a mold of the breast was made with Aquaplast sheets. A reproducible system was used for arm positioning. Skin fiducials, including tattoos from external beam planning, were matched to fiducials on the mold. HDR catheters were sited on the mold at 1cm intervals, with the central catheter situated along the scar. Topographically, both scars demonstrated extreme curvature in both craniocaudal and mediolateral directions. A CT computer-optimized HDR plan was developed, with the reference dose prescribed at the skin surface. The dosimetry was compared to single-field and matched-field electron plans. This surface applicator technique provided a uniform skin dose of 100% to the entire clinical target volume (CTV) without hot spots in both patients. The patient position and surface applicator setup were consistently reproducible. The patients tolerated the treatment well with minimal skin erythema. In the single-field electron plan, skin dose was decreased to 50% at the periphery of the scar. Matching fields addressed this depth dose decrement, but resulted in large localized hot spots of more than 200% centrally in each field. CT computer-optimized HDR surface applicator brachytherapy provided a reproducible homogeneous method of treating highly curved scars on the reconstructed breast. Electron beam treatment would result in longer and more complex treatments yet still provide a less

  3. Determination of Prognostic Factors for Vaginal Mucosal Toxicity Associated With Intravaginal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Patients With Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahng, Agnes Y.; Dagan, Avner [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients' charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. Results: The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2-3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Conclusion: Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings.

  4. Determination of prognostic factors for vaginal mucosal toxicity associated with intravaginal high-dose rate brachytherapy in patients with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Agnes Y; Dagan, Avner; Bruner, Deborah W; Lin, Lilie L

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients' charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2-3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deshields, Teresa L. [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  6. A generic TG-186 shielded applicator for commissioning model-based dose calculation algorithms for high-dose-rate (192) Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan; Chamberland, Marc J P; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2017-07-19

    A joint working group was created by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the Australasian Brachytherapy Group (ABG) with the charge, among others, to develop a set of well-defined test case plans and perform model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCA) dose calculations and comparisons. Its main goal is to facilitate a smooth transition from the AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) dose calculation formalism, widely being used in clinical practice for brachytherapy, to the one proposed by Task Group No. 186 (TG-186) for MBDCAs. To do so, in this work a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) (192) Ir shielded applicator has been designed and benchmarked. A generic HDR (192) Ir shielded applicator was designed based on three commercially available gynecological applicators as well as a virtual cubic water phantom that can be imported into any DICOM-RT compatible treatment planning system (TPS). The absorbed dose distribution around the applicator with the TG-186 (192) Ir source located at one dwell position at its center was computed using two commercial TPSs incorporating MBDCAs (Oncentra(®) Brachy with Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine, ACE(™) , and BrachyVision ACUROS(™) ) and state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) codes, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, egs_brachy, Geant4, MCNP6, and Penelope2008. TPS-based volumetric dose distributions for the previously reported "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test cases, and the new "source centered in applicator" test case, were analyzed here using the MCNP6 dose distribution as a reference. Volumetric dose comparisons of TPS results against results for the other MC codes were also performed. Distributions of local and global dose difference ratios are reported. The local dose differences among MC codes are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of the reference datasets for the "source centered in water" and "source

  7. Dose reduction trial from 60 Gy in 10 fractions to 54 Gy in 9 fractions schedule in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hironori; Yoshida, Ken; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effects of 60 Gy/10 fractions (twice a day) with those of 54 Gy/9 fractions in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for early tongue cancer, we performed a matched-pair analysis of patients with early tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0), who were treated with 60 or 54 Gy of radiation between 1996 and 2004. Seventeen patients treated with 54 Gy and 34 matched-pair patients treated with 60 Gy were extracted and analyzed. Local recurrence occurred in two patients in the 54-Gy arm and five patients in the 60-Gy arm. The 2-year local control rates were 88% for both the 54-Gy arm and 60-Gy arm (not significant). The 2-year overall survival rates were 88% in the 60-Gy arm and 82% in the 54-Gy arm. Two-year actuarial complication-free rates were 91% in the 60-Gy arm and 83% in the 54-Gy arm (not significant), respectively. There was no significant association between the total dose and local control rate and late complications. The outcome of 54 Gy/ 9 fractions was similar to that of 60 Gy/ 10 fractions in patients with early tongue cancer. PMID:22843365

  8. SU-E-T-232: Custom High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Surface Mold Applicators: The Importance Source to Skin Distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Surface mold applicators can be customized to fit irregular skin surfaces that are difficult to treat with other radiation therapy techniques. Optimal design of customized HDR skin brachytherapy is not well-established. We evaluated the impact of applicator thickness (source to skin distance) on target dosimetry. Methods: 27 patients had 34 treated sites: scalp 4, face 13, extremity 13, and torso 4. Custom applicators were constructed from 5–15 mm thick thermoplastic bolus molded over the skin lesion. A planar array of plastic brachytherapy catheters spaced 5–10 mm apart was affixed to the bolus. CT simulation was used to contour the target volume and to determine the prescription depth. Inverse planning simulated annealing followed by graphical optimization was used to plan and deliver 40–56 Gy in 8–16 fractions. Target coverage parameters (D90, Dmean, and V100) and dose uniformity (V110–200, D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) were studied according to target depth (<5mm vs. ≥5mm) and applicator thickness (5–10mm vs. ≥10mm). Results: The average prescription depth was 4.2±1.5mm. The average bolus thickness was 9.2±2.4mm. The median CTV volume was 10.0 cc (0.2–212.4 cc). Similar target coverage was achieved with prescription depths of <5mm and ≥5mm (Dmean = 113.8% vs. 112.4% and D90 = 100.2% vs. 98.3%). The <5mm prescription depth plans were more uniform (D0.1cc = 131.8% vs. 151.8%). Bolus thickness <10mm vs. ≥10mm plans also had similar target coverage (Dmean = 118.2% vs. 110.7% and D90 = 100.1% vs. 99.0%). Applicators ≥10mm thick, however, provide more uniform target dosimetry (D0.1cc = 146.9% vs. 139.5%). Conclusion: Prescription depth is based upon the thickness of the lesion and upon the clinical needs of the patient. Applicators ≥10mm thick provide more dose uniformity than 5–10mm thick applicators. Applicator thickness is an important variable that should be considered during treatment planning to achieve optimal dose uniformity.

  9. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  10. State-of-the-art: prostate LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgaris, S; Nobes, J P; Laing, R W; Langley, S E M

    2008-01-01

    This article on low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy reviews long-term results, patient selection and quality of life issues. Mature results from the United States and United Kingdom are reported and issues regarding definitions of biochemical failure are discussed. Latest data comparing brachytherapy with radical prostatectomy or no definitive treatment and also the risk of secondary malignancies after prostate brachytherapy are presented. Urological parameters of patient selection and quality of life issues concerning urinary, sexual and bowel function are reviewed. The position of prostate brachytherapy next to surgery as a first-line treatment modality is demonstrated.

  11. Comparison of biochemical failure rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy and radical retropubic prostatectomy as a function of posttherapy PSA nadir plus 'X'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Davis, Brian J; Mynderse, Lance A; Slezak, Jeffrey M; Bergstralh, Eric J; Wilson, Torrence M; Choo, C Richard

    2014-07-29

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir + 2 ng/mL, also known as the Phoenix definition, is the definition most commonly used to establish biochemical failure (BF) after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer management. The purpose of this study is to compare BF rates between permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) as a function of PSA nadir plus varying values of X and examine the associated implications. We retrospectively searched for patients who underwent PPB or RRP at our institution between 1998 and 2004. Only primary patients not receiving androgen-deprivation therapy were included in the study. Three RRP patients were matched to each PPB patient on the basis of prognostic factors. BF rates were estimated for PSA nadirs + different values of X. A total of 1,164 patients were used for analysis: 873 in the RRP group and 291 in the PPB group. Patients were equally matched by clinical stage, biopsy Gleason sum, primary Gleason grade, and pretherapy PSA value. Median follow-up was 3.1 years for RRP patients and 3.6 years in the PPB group (P = .01). Using PSA nadir + 0.1 ng/mL for the definition of BF, the 5-year BF rate was 16.3% for PPB patients and 13.5% for RRP patients (P = .007), whereas at nadir + 2 ng/mL or greater, the BF rates were less than 3% and were indistinguishable between PPB and RRP patients. In a cohort of well-matched patients who had prostatectomy or brachytherapy, we examined BF as a function of nadir + X, where X was treated as a continuous variable. As X increases from 0.1 to 2.0 ng/mL, the BF curves converge, and above 2.0 ng/mL they are essentially indistinguishable. The data presented are of interest as BF definitions continue to evolve.

  12. External-beam radiotherapy and/or HDR brachytherapy in postoperative endometrial cancer patients: clinical outcomes and toxicity rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, V; Agolli, L; Valeriani, M; Narici, S; Osti, M F; Patacchiola, F; Mossa, B; Moscarini, M; Maurizi Enrici, R

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate local disease control, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and local relapse-free survival (LRFS) in patients with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy (VBT )± external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). From September 2007 to February 2011, 40 patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively analysed. Surgery consisted of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy without node dissection (16 patients) or with bilateral pelvic node dissection (24 patients). The stage distribution was as follows: two IA, nine IB, 12 IC, five IIA, eight IIB, two IIIA and two IIIC. Thirty-four patients underwent EBRT and VBT. Six patients received VBT alone. Median follow-up was 26 months. The 5-year OS and DFS were 96.4% and 86.9%, respectively. No local recurrence was observed. Four patients presented distant disease (three had lung metastases and one had hepatic node metastases). Acute EBRT-related toxicities were seen in 15 (38%) patients. We recorded late toxicities in 14 patients (35%). There was no evidence of grade 3-4 toxicity. Adjuvant EBRT and/or VBT in patients with endometrial cancer showed good outcomes in terms of local disease control, with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  13. A dosimetry method for low dose rate brachytherapy by EGS5 combined with regression to reflect source strength shortage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Asanuma, Osamu; Kamo, Ken-ichi; Sato, Kaori; Takeda, Hiromitsu; Takagi, Masaru; Hareyama, Masato; Takada, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The post-implantation dosimetry for brachytherapy using Monte Carlo calculation by EGS5 code combined with the source strength regression was investigated with respect to its validity. In this method, the source strength for the EGS5 calculation was adjusted with the regression, so that the calculation would reproduce the dose monitored with the glass rod dosimeters (GRDs) on a water phantom. The experiments were performed, simulating the case where one of two 125I sources of Oncoseed 6711 was lacking strength by 4–48%. As a result, the calculation without regression was in agreement with the GRD measurement within 26–62%. In this case, the shortage in strength of a source was neglected. By the regression, in order to reflect the strength shortage, the agreement was improved up to 17–24%. This agreement was also comparable with accuracy of the dose calculation for single source geometry reported previously. These results suggest the validity of the dosimetry method proposed in this study. PMID:24449715

  14. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in combination with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Are high-risk patients good candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ken; Narumi, Yoshifumi [Osaka Medical College, Department of Radiology, Takatsuki, Osaka (Japan); Yamazaki, Hideya; Masui, Koji [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Takenaka, Tadashi [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka city, Osaka (Japan); Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Tanaka, Eiichi [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka city, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oka, Toshitsugu [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Department of Urology, Osaka city, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) as the only form of radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer patients. Between July 2003 and June 2008, we retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of 48 high-risk patients who had undergone HDR-ISBT at the National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital. Risk group classification was according to the criteria described in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Median follow-up was 73 months (range 12-109 months). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was administered to all 48 patients; 12 patients also received adjuvant ADT. Maximal androgen blockade was performed in 37 patients. Median total treatment duration was 8 months (range 3-45 months). The planned prescribed dose was 54 Gy in 9 fractions over 5 days for the first 13 patients and 49 Gy in 7 fractions over 4 days for 34 patients. Only one patient who was over 80 years old received 38 Gy in 4 fractions over 3 days. The clinical target volume (CTV) was calculated for the prostate gland and the medial side of the seminal vesicles. A 10-mm cranial margin was added to the CTV to create the planning target volume (PTV). The 5-year overall survival and biochemical control rates were 98 and 87 %, respectively. Grade 3 late genitourinary and gastrointestinal complications occurred in 2 patients (4 %) and 1 patient (2 %), respectively; grade 2 late genitourinary and gastrointestinal complications occurred in 5 patients (10 %) and 1 patient (2 %), respectively. Even for high-risk patients, HDR-ISBT as the only form of radiotherapy combined with ADT achieved promising biochemical control results, with acceptable late genitourinary and gastrointestinal complication rates. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit von interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Hochdosisraten (''high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy'', HDR-ISBT) als einzige Form der Radiotherapie fuer Hochrisiko

  15. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...... in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications....

  16. Under Pressure: Intraluminal Filling Pressures of Postpartum Hemorrhage Tamponade Balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Kathleen M; Racusin, Diana A; Belfort, Michael A; Dildy, Gary A

    2017-04-01

    Objective Uterine tamponade by fluid-filled balloons is now an accepted method of controlling postpartum hemorrhage. Available tamponade balloons vary in design and material, which affects the filling attributes and volume at which they rupture. We aimed to characterize the filling capacity and pressure-volume relationship of various tamponade balloons. Study Design Balloons were filled with water ex vivo. Intraluminal pressure was measured incrementally (every 10 mL for the Foley balloons and every 50 mL for all other balloons). Balloons were filled until they ruptured or until 5,000 mL was reached. Results The Foley balloons had higher intraluminal pressures than the larger-volume balloons. The intraluminal pressure of the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (gastric balloon) was initially high, but it decreased until shortly before rupture occurred. The Bakri intraluminal pressure steadily increased until rupture occurred at 2,850 mL. The condom catheter, BT-Cath, and ebb all had low intraluminal pressures. Both the BT-Cath and the ebb remained unruptured at 5,000 mL. Conclusion In the setting of acute hemorrhage, expeditious management is critical. Balloons that have a low intraluminal pressure-volume ratio may fill more rapidly, more easily, and to greater volumes. We found that the BT-Cath, the ebb, and the condom catheter all had low intraluminal pressures throughout filling.

  17. Workflow efficiency for the treatment planning process in CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Anthony L; Benedict, Stanley; Montemayor, Eliseo; Hunt, Jon Paul; Wright, Cari; Mathai, Mathew; Mayadev, Jyoti S

    2016-01-01

    To investigate process efficiency, we present a prospective investigation of the treatment planning phase of image-guided brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancer using a specific checklist. From October 2012 to January 2014, 76 BT procedures were consecutively performed. Prospective data on the CT-based treatment planning process was collected using a specific checklist which details the following steps: (1) dosimetry planning, (2) physician review start, (3) physician review time, (4) dosimetry processing, (5) physics review start, (6) physics review, and (7) procedural pause. Variables examined included the use of a pre-BT MRI, clinic duty conflicts, resident teaching, and the use of specific BT planners. Analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and analysis of variance. Seventy-five prospectively gathered checklists comprised this analysis. The mean time for treatment planning was 95 minutes (med 94, std 18). The mean intervals in the above steps were (1) = 42, (2) = 5, (3) = 19, (4) = 10, (5) = 6, (6) = 13, and (7) = 26 minutes. There was no statistical difference in patients who had a pre-BT MRI. Resident teaching did not influence time, p = 0.17. Treatment planning time was decreased with a specific planner, p = 0.0015. A skillful team approach is required for treatment planning efficiency in image-guided BT. We have found that the specific BT planners can have a significant effect on the overall planning efficiency. We continue to examine clinical and workflow-related factors that will enhance our safety and workflow process with BT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardev; Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem & ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  20. Patterns of Recurrence After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: A Population-Based Study of 2223 Consecutive Low- and Intermediate-Risk Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Andrea C.; Morris, W. James, E-mail: JMorris@bccancer.bc.ca; Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; McKenzie, Michael; Tyldesley, Scott

    2015-03-15

    Objectives: This study examined patterns of recurrence after low–dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB), estimated local recurrence rate and compared that rate to the estimated local recurrence rate after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A prospective database was maintained with clinical, dosimetric, and outcome data for all LDR-PB implantation procedures performed at our institution. From 1998 to 2008, 2223 patients with prostate cancer received LDR-PB without supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Patients who developed Phoenix-defined biochemical failure were reviewed for sites of relapse and investigations completed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5 years, 108 of 2223 patients (4.8%) developed biochemical relapse. In 1 additional patient, local relapse was found on transurethral prostate resection, but his prostate-specific antigen concentration was well short of triggering Phoenix-defined failure. Of the 109 patients with disease relapse, 18 of 2223 (0.8%) had a proven local recurrence, and 30 of 2223 (1.3%) had a proven distant recurrence. The remaining 61 of 2223 patients (2.7%) had unidentified sites of recurrence; of these, 57 patients (93%) had digital rectal examinations (DREs), 18 (30%) had post-treatment biopsies, 45 (74%) had bone scans, and 34 (56%) had computed tomography imaging of the abdomen and pelvis. If every biochemical failure were local, the local recurrence rate would be as high as 4.9%; however, by excluding those with proven distant failure and those with both a negative DRE and biopsy, we estimate that the local recurrence rate is 2.7% or less. Conclusions: In the context of limitations of the study design, our population-based analysis indicates that the local recurrence rate after LDR-PB is as low or lower than that after RP in our jurisdiction.

  1. Effect of improved TLD dosimetry on the determination of dose rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M., E-mail: manuel.rodriguez@rmp.uhn.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To more accurately account for the relative intrinsic energy dependence and relative absorbed-dose energy dependence of TLDs when used to measure dose rate constants (DRCs) for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds, to thereby establish revised “measured values” for all seeds and compare the revised values with Monte Carlo and consensus values. Methods: The relative absorbed-dose energy dependence, f{sup rel}, for TLDs and the phantom correction, P{sub phant}, are calculated for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds using the EGSnrc BrachyDose and DOSXYZnrc codes. The original energy dependence and phantom corrections applied to DRC measurements are replaced by calculated (f{sup rel}){sup −1} and P{sub phant} values for 24 different seed models. By comparing the modified measured DRCs to the MC values, an appropriate relative intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}{sup rel}, is determined. The new P{sub phant} values and relative absorbed-dose sensitivities, S{sub AD}{sup rel}, calculated as the product of (f{sup rel}){sup −1} and (k{sub bq}{sup rel}){sup −1}, are used to individually revise the measured DRCs for comparison with Monte Carlo calculated values and TG-43U1 or TG-43U1S1 consensus values. Results: In general, f{sup rel} is sensitive to the energy spectra and models of the brachytherapy seeds. Values may vary up to 8.4% among {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed models and common TLD shapes. P{sub phant} values depend primarily on the isotope used. Deduced (k{sub bq}{sup rel}){sup −1} values are 1.074 ± 0.015 and 1.084 ± 0.026 for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively. For (1 mm){sup 3} chips, this implies an overall absorbed-dose sensitivity relative to {sup 60}Co or 6 MV calibrations of 1.51 ± 1% and 1.47 ± 2% for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively, as opposed to the widely used value of 1.41. Values of P{sub phant} calculated here have much lower statistical uncertainties than literature values, but

  2. Evaluation of a real-time BeO ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Alexandre M. Caraça, E-mail: alexandre.santos@adelaide.edu.au [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide 5000, Australia and Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, School of Physical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia); Mohammadi, Mohammad [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide 5000, Australia and Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan 65167-3-8736 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahraam, Afshar V. [Laser Physics and Photonic Devices Laboratories, School of Engineering, The University of South Australia, Adelaide 5095 (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, School of Physical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the capability of a beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimeter, named radioluminescence/optically stimulated luminescence (RL/OSL) BeO FOD, for dosimetric verification of high dose rate (HDR) treatments. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is capable of RL and OSL measurements. Methods: The RL/OSL BeO FOD is able to be inserted in 6F proguide needles, used in interstitial HDR treatments. Using a custom built Perspex phantom, 6F proguide needles could be submerged in a water tank at 1 cm separations from each other. A second background fiber was required to correct for the stem effect. The stem effect, dose linearity, reproducibility, depth-dose curves, and angular and temperature dependency of the RL/OSL BeO FOD were characterised using an Ir-192 source. The RL/OSL BeO FOD was also applied to the commissioning of a 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator. Results: Both the RL and OSL were found to be reproducible and their percentage depth-dose curves to be in good agreement with those predicted via TG-43. A combined uncertainty of 7.9% and 10.1% (k = 1) was estimated for the RL and OSL, respectively. For the 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator, measured percentage depth doses were within 5% agreement of the published reference calculations. The output at the 3 mm prescription depth for a 1 Gy delivery was verified to be 0.99 ± 0.08 Gy and 1.01 ± 0.10 Gy by the RL and OSL, respectively. Conclusions: The use of the second background fiber under the current setup means that the two fibers cannot fit into a single 6F needle. Hence, use of the RL is currently not adequate for the purpose of in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry. While not real-time, the OSL is shown to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  3. A non-rigid point matching method with local topology preservation for accurate bladder dose summation in high dose rate cervical brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Liao, Yuliang; Pompoš, Arnold; Hrycushko, Brian; Albuquerque, Kevin; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-02-07

    GEC-ESTRO guidelines for high dose rate cervical brachytherapy advocate the reporting of the D2cc (the minimum dose received by the maximally exposed 2cc volume) to organs at risk. Due to large interfractional organ motion, reporting of accurate cumulative D2cc over a multifractional course is a non-trivial task requiring deformable image registration and deformable dose summation. To efficiently and accurately describe the point-to-point correspondence of the bladder wall over all treatment fractions while preserving local topologies, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-based non-rigid point matching algorithm. This is achieved by introducing local anatomic information into the iterative update of correspondence matrix computation in the 'thin plate splines-robust point matching' (TPS-RPM) scheme. The performance of the GPU-based TPS-RPM with local topology preservation algorithm (TPS-RPM-LTP) was evaluated using four numerically simulated synthetic bladders having known deformations, a custom-made porcine bladder phantom embedded with twenty one fiducial markers, and 29 fractional computed tomography (CT) images from seven cervical cancer patients. Results show that TPS-RPM-LTP achieved excellent geometric accuracy with landmark residual distance error (RDE) of 0.7  ±  0.3 mm for the numerical synthetic data with different scales of bladder deformation and structure complexity, and 3.7  ±  1.8 mm and 1.6  ±  0.8 mm for the porcine bladder phantom with large and small deformation, respectively. The RDE accuracy of the urethral orifice landmarks in patient bladders was 3.7  ±  2.1 mm. When compared to the original TPS-RPM, the TPS-RPM-LTP improved landmark matching by reducing landmark RDE by 50  ±  19%, 37  ±  11% and 28  ±  11% for the synthetic, porcine phantom and the patient bladders, respectively. This was achieved with a computational time of less than 15 s in all cases

  4. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters; Proposta de um sistema postal para a calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir, utilizadas em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose, com dosimetros termoluminescentes de LiF: Mn: Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. CNEN Caixa Postal 37750, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  5. Three-dimensional dosimetry of the full and empty bladder in high dose rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzda, Justyna D; Cikowska-Wozniak, Ewa; Michalska, Magdalena; Makarewicz, Roman

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess the bladder doses during vaginal cuff brachytherapy and to examine the effect of bladder filling on normal tissue dosimetry by means of computed tomography. A total number of 45 women were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. Patients were treated with the application of a single-line source vaginal cylinder. All the patients were asked to consume 400 mL of water 40 minutes before computed tomography scans were taken. For each patient, 2 treatment plans were performed-one with full bladder and the other one when the bladder was emptied. A dose-volume histogram and the equivalent of 2-Gy dose for full and empty bladder were calculated. Doses to the bowels in 2 states of the bladder were estimated. Thirty-five patients received a lower dose to the empty bladder than to the filled organ. The average dose difference was 0.5 Gy. Ten patients received a lower dose to the full bladder than to the empty one. However, in this case, the difference amounted only to 0.2 Gy on average. Dose parameters (the maximal dose received by 0.1 cm of tissue and the maximal dose received by 2 cm of tissue) were lower in the empty state, but the volumetric parameters (the percent of bladder volume receiving ≥50% of the prescribed dose and the percent of bladder volume receiving ≥80% of the prescribed dose) were higher in the empty state of the bladder. Doses to the bowels seemed to be higher in the empty bladder. However, none of the doses exceeded the limitations. The results have shown that in most cases, the dose to the empty bladder is lower than when the bladder is full. Simultaneously, the doses to the bowels increase proportionally in the empty state of the bladder comparing to the full organ. Protection of the bowels, which are more radiosensitive, suggests treating the patients in the full state of the bladder. Early and late bowel toxicity should be investigated to establish clear standards of treatment.

  6. Incidence of Second Malignancies in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Radical Prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Jiang, Wei Ning [Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lapointe, Vince [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kahnamelli, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Miller, Stacy [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the second malignancy incidence in prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy (BT) relative to radical prostatectomy (RP) and to compare both groups with the cancer incidence in the general population. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 2418 patients were treated with Iodine 125 prostate BT monotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, and 4015 referred patients were treated with RP. Cancer incidence was compared with the age-matched general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Pelvic malignancies included invasive and noninvasive bladder cancer and rectal cancer. Cox multivariable analysis was performed with adjustment for covariates to determine whether treatment (RP vs BT) was associated with second malignancy risk. Results: The median age at BT was 66 years and at RP 62 years. The SIR comparing BT patients with the general population was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.22) for second malignancy and was 1.53 (95% CI 1.12-2.04) for pelvic malignancy. The SIR comparing RP patients with the general population was 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) for second malignancy and was 1.11 (95% CI 0.82-1.48) for pelvic malignancy. On multivariable analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05) and smoking (HR 1.65) were associated with increased second malignancy risk (P<.0001). Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased second malignancy risk relative to BT (HR 0.90, P=.43), even when excluding patients who received postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy (HR 1.13, P=.25). Older age (HR 1.09, P<.0001) and smoking (HR 2.17, P=.0009) were associated with increased pelvic malignancy risk. Radical prostatectomy was not associated with a decreased pelvic malignancy risk compared with BT (HR 0.57, P=.082), even when excluding postprostatectomy external beam radiation therapy patients (HR 0.87, P=.56). Conclusions: After adjustment for covariates, BT patients did not have an increased second

  7. Design and development of an inflatable latex balloon to reduce rectal and bladder doses for patients undergoing high dose rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghukumar P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple fractions of High Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy along with external beam therapy is the common method of treatment for cancer of the uterine cervix. Urinary bladder and rectum are the organs at risk (OARs that receive a significant dose during treatment. To reduce the dose to these organs, a majority of hospitals use vaginal gauze packing, as it is a simple, nontraumatic, and easy method. This article describes the design and development of an inflatable balloon that can be used along with the applicator as a substitute for gauze packing. The balloon has two parts-the bladder part (B-part and the rectum part (R-part, both of them are independently inflatable. The selection of the material, its width, length, and thickness are described. A mould/former for making the balloon was designed. Polished steel was used as the mould. This was dipped in specially prepared natural rubber latex (NRL solution several times; the layers were dried and stripped to get the balloon. The composition of NRL and the compounding recipe of the latex are also described. Physical tests like tensile strength, elongation at break, bursting volume, and radiation attenuation caused by the balloon, were checked. Biological tests for assessing type I and type IV allergies, like dermal irritation and skin irritation tests, were also done.

  8. Clinical application of a OneDose(TM) MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A [Department of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India); Sharma, Pramod K [Department of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India); Tambe, Chandrashekhar M [Department of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India); Mahantshetty, Umesh M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Advanced Centre for Training Research and Education in Cancer, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Deshpande, Deepak D [Department of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India); Shrivastava, Shyam K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012 (India)

    2006-07-21

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose(TM) in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs. (note)

  9. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm(3) for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted.

  10. SU-E-T-413: Examining Acquisition Rate for Using MatriXX Ion Chamber Array to Measure HDR Brachytherapy Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagar, M; Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Friesen, S; Buzurovic, I; Damato, A; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There are unique obstacles to implementing the MatriXX ionchamber array as a QA tool in Brachytherapy given that the device is designed for use in the MV energy range. One of the challenges we investigate is the affect of acquisition rates on dose measurement accuracy for HDR treatment plans. Methods: A treatment plan was optimized in Oncentra Brachy TPS to deliver a planar dose to a 5×5cm region at 10mm depth. The applicator was affixed to the surface of the MatriXX array. The plan was delivered multiple times using a Nucleatron HDR afterloader with a 2.9Ci Ir192 source. For each measurement the sampling rate of the MatriXX movie mode was varied (30ms and 500ms). This experiment was repeated with identical parameters, following a source exchange, with an 11.2Ci Ir192 source. Finally, a single snap measurement was acquired. Analysis was preformed to evaluate the fidelity of the dose delivery for each iteration of the experiment. Evaluation was based on the comparison between the measured and TPS predicted dose. Results: Higher sample rates induce a greater discrepancy between the predicted and measured dose. Delivering the plan using a lower activity source also produced greater discrepancy in the measurement due to the increased delivery time. Analyzing the single snap measurement showed little difference from the 500ms integral dose measurement. Conclusion: The advantage of using movie mode for HDR treatment delivery QA is the ability for real time source tracking in addition to dose measurement. Our analysis indicates that 500ms is an optimal frame rate.

  11. Optimization of deterministic transport parameters for the calculation of the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Kent A; Price, Michael J; Horton, John L; Wareing, Todd A; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number of energy groups, S(n) (angular order), P(n) (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within +/- 3% and +/- 5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S12 was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P2 expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source.

  12. Inhibition of early AAA formation by aortic intraluminal pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) infusion in a novel porcine AAA model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloster, Brian O; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S

    2016-01-01

    to prevent or delay their expansion. In this study, we investigated whether intraluminal delivered pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) can impair the early AAA development in a porcine model. METHODS: The infrarenal aorta was exposed in thirty pigs. Twenty underwent an elastase based AAA inducing procedure and ten...... of these received an additional intraluminal PGG infusion. The final 10 were sham operated and served as controls. RESULTS: All pigs who only had an elastase infusion developed macroscopically expanding AAAs. In pigs treated with an additional PGG infusion the growth rate of the AP-diameter rapidly returned...... and histology. CONCLUSION: In our model, intraluminal delivered PGG is able to penetrate the aortic wall from the inside and impair the early AAA development by stabilizing the elastic lamellae and preserving their integrity. The principle holds a high clinical potential if it can be translated to human...

  13. A quality indicator to evaluate high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix; Determinacao de um indicador de qualidade para avaliar a braquiterapia intracavitaria com alta taxa de dose no cancer do colo uterino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Francisco Contreras; Soboll, Daniel Scheidegger [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radioterapia. Servico de Fisica Medica

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this report is to prevent a simple quality indicator (QI) that can be promptly used to evaluate the high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cancer of the cervix, and if necessary, to correct applicators' geometry before starting the treatment. We selected 51 HDR intracavitary applications of brachytherapy of patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with 60 mm uterine tandem and small Fletcher colpostat, according to the Manchester method (dose prescription on point A). A QI was defined as the ratio between the volume of 100% isodose curve of the study insertion and the volume of the 100% isodose curve of an insertion considered to be ideal. The data obtained were distributed in three groups: the group with tandem placement slippage (67,5%), a group with colpostat placement slippage (21,9%), and a third group, considered normal (10,6%). Each group showed particular characteristics (p < 0.0001). QI can be the best auxiliary method to establish the error tolerance (%) allowed for HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. (author)

  14. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis; Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose no tratamento do carcinoma da prostata: analise da toxicidade aguda e do comportamento bioquimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto [Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital Sao Joaquim. Servico de Radioterapia]. E-mail: estevesrt@uol.com.br; D' Imperio, Marcio [Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital Sao Joaquim. Servico de Urologia

    2006-03-15

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  15. Dosimetry for the brachytherapy; Dosimetrie fuer die Brachytherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Fachbereich ' Dosimetrie fuer Strahlentherapie und Roentgendiagnostik' ; Schneider, Thorsten [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Brachytherapie'

    2013-06-15

    The authors describe the calibration of high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir sources for the use in brachytherapy by means of the air-kerma power, which is determined in the PTB by means of an ionization chamber. For this a primary normal for the representation of the water energy dose was constructed. Furthermore the representation of the reference air-kerma rate for low-dose-rate sources in the PTB by means of a large-volume parallel-plate extrapolation chamber is described. (HSI)

  16. A generic high-dose rate (192)Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank-André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan L; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Vijande, Javier; Ma, Yunzhi; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-06-01

    In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. A hypothetical, generic HDR (192)Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic (192)Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra(®) Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS™ ]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201)(3) voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR (192)Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then

  17. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  18. Monte Carlo validation and optimisation of detector packaging for spectroscopic dosimetry for in vivo urethral dosimetry during low dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbehesht, L K; Cutajar, D L; Guatelli, S; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-09-01

    The urethral mini-dosimeter, developed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, uses spectroscopic dosimetry to provide real time point dose measurements along the urethra during low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Spectroscopic dosimetry uses the measured spectrum of the treatment isotope to estimate the dose rate at the point of measurement, however, the silicon mini-detectors employed in the urethral mini-dosimeter require water proof encapsulation which must be capable of providing electromagnetic shielding without greatly increasing the size of the probe. The introduction of non-tissue equivalent materials within the encapsulation can change the spectrum of radiation incident on the detector, which may influence the application of spectroscopic dosimetry within the urethral dosimeter. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was adopted to study the effect of encapsulation on the operation of the urethral mini-dosimeter, as well as to determine whether an appropriate thickness of aluminium shielding was possible for electromagnetic screening. The depth dose response and angular dependence of the urethral mini-dosimeter with three thicknesses of aluminium shielding (20, 50, 100 µm) was compared with the urethral mini-dosimeter without aluminium shielding. The aluminium shielding had the effect of increasing the depth dose response (up to 3% within 30 mm and up to 5% within 50 mm), slightly reduced the azimuth angular dependence and slightly increased the polar angular dependence. The 100 µm thick shielding provided the least azimuth angular dependence (±2 %) and provided a polar angular dependence of ±1.4 % within the angles of -45° to 45°.

  19. Updated results of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Pellizzon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic factors for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR according to the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The charts of 209 patients treated between 1997 and 2005 with localized RT and HDR as a boost at the Department of Radiation Oncology, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil were reviewed. Clinical and treatment parameters i.e.: patient's age, Gleason score, clinical stage, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group (RG for biochemical failure, doses of RT and HDR were evaluated. Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median RT and HDR doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. RESULTS: Disease specific survival (DSS at 3.3 year was 94.2%. Regarding RG, for the LR (low risk, IR (intermediate risk and HR (high risk, the DSS rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis prognostic factors related to DSS were RG (p = 0.040, Gleason score ≤ 6 ng/mL (p = 0.002, total dose of HDR ≥ 20 Gy (p < 0.001 On multivariate analysis the only statistical significant predictive factor for biochemical control (bNED was the RG, p < 0.001 (CI - 1.147-3.561. CONCLUSIONS: Although the radiation dose administered to the prostate is an important factor related to bNED, this could not be established with statistical significance in this group of patients. To date , in our own experience, HDR associated to RT could be considered a successful approach in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  20. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min-1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  1. The role of brachytherapy in the definitive management of prostate cancer; Place de la curietherapie dans le traitement du cancer prostatique localise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crook, J. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Center for the Southern Interior, 399, Royal Avenue, Kelowna, British Columbia, V1Y 5L33 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Over the past two decades, brachytherapy has played an ever expanding role in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Brachytherapy surpasses external beam radiotherapy in its ability to deliver intense intra-prostatic dose escalation. Although initially low dose rate permanent seed brachytherapy was favored for favorable risk prostate cancers, and high dose rate temporary brachytherapy for intermediate and advanced disease, both types of brachytherapy now have a place across all the risk groups of localized prostate cancer. This article will review indications and patient selection, planning and technical aspects, toxicity and efficacy for both low and high dose rate prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  2. The evaluation of a 2D diode array in "magic phantom" for use in high dose rate brachytherapy pretreatment quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, A; Petasecca, M; Fuduli, I; Howie, A; Bucci, J; Corde, S; Jackson, M; Lerch, M L F; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-02-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a treatment method that is used increasingly worldwide. The development of a sound quality assurance program for the verification of treatment deliveries can be challenging due to the high source activity utilized and the need for precise measurements of dwell positions and times. This paper describes the application of a novel phantom, based on a 2D 11 × 11 diode array detection system, named "magic phantom" (MPh), to accurately measure plan dwell positions and times, compare them directly to the treatment plan, determine errors in treatment delivery, and calculate absorbed dose. The magic phantom system was CT scanned and a 20 catheter plan was generated to simulate a nonspecific treatment scenario. This plan was delivered to the MPh and, using a custom developed software suite, the dwell positions and times were measured and compared to the plan. The original plan was also modified, with changes not disclosed to the primary authors, and measured again using the device and software to determine the modifications. A new metric, the "position-time gamma index," was developed to quantify the quality of a treatment delivery when compared to the treatment plan. The MPh was evaluated to determine the minimum measurable dwell time and step size. The incorporation of the TG-43U1 formalism directly into the software allows for dose calculations to be made based on the measured plan. The estimated dose distributions calculated by the software were compared to the treatment plan and to calibrated EBT3 film, using the 2D gamma analysis method. For the original plan, the magic phantom system was capable of measuring all dwell points and dwell times and the majority were found to be within 0.93 mm and 0.25 s, respectively, from the plan. By measuring the altered plan and comparing it to the unmodified treatment plan, the use of the position-time gamma index showed that all modifications made could be readily detected. The MPh was able to

  3. The evaluation of a 2D diode array in “magic phantom” for use in high dose rate brachytherapy pretreatment quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, A.; Petasecca, M.; Fuduli, I.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B., E-mail: anatoly@uow.edu.au [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Howie, A.; Bucci, J. [St George Hospital Cancer Care Centre, New South Wales 2217 (Australia); Corde, S.; Jackson, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, New South Wales 2031 (Australia)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a treatment method that is used increasingly worldwide. The development of a sound quality assurance program for the verification of treatment deliveries can be challenging due to the high source activity utilized and the need for precise measurements of dwell positions and times. This paper describes the application of a novel phantom, based on a 2D 11 × 11 diode array detection system, named “magic phantom” (MPh), to accurately measure plan dwell positions and times, compare them directly to the treatment plan, determine errors in treatment delivery, and calculate absorbed dose. Methods: The magic phantom system was CT scanned and a 20 catheter plan was generated to simulate a nonspecific treatment scenario. This plan was delivered to the MPh and, using a custom developed software suite, the dwell positions and times were measured and compared to the plan. The original plan was also modified, with changes not disclosed to the primary authors, and measured again using the device and software to determine the modifications. A new metric, the “position–time gamma index,” was developed to quantify the quality of a treatment delivery when compared to the treatment plan. The MPh was evaluated to determine the minimum measurable dwell time and step size. The incorporation of the TG-43U1 formalism directly into the software allows for dose calculations to be made based on the measured plan. The estimated dose distributions calculated by the software were compared to the treatment plan and to calibrated EBT3 film, using the 2D gamma analysis method. Results: For the original plan, the magic phantom system was capable of measuring all dwell points and dwell times and the majority were found to be within 0.93 mm and 0.25 s, respectively, from the plan. By measuring the altered plan and comparing it to the unmodified treatment plan, the use of the position–time gamma index showed that all modifications made could be

  4. High-dose-rate-intracavitary brachytherapy applications and the difference in the bladder and rectum doses: A study from rural centre of Maharashatra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To report the difference in the bladder and rectum doses with different applications by the radiotherapists in the same patient of the carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by multiple fractions of high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. Materials and Methods : Between January 2003 to December 2004, a total of 60 cases of the carcinoma uterine cervix were selected randomly for the retrospective analyses. All 60 cases were grouped in six groups according to the treating radiotherapist who did the HDR-ICBT application. Three radiotherapists were considered for this study, named A, B and C. Ten cases for each radiotherapist in whom all three applications were done by the same radiotherapist. And 10 cases for each radiotherapist with shared applications in the same patient (A+B, A+C and B+C. The bladder and rectal doses were calculated in reference to point "A" dose and were limited to 80% of prescribed point "A" dose, as per ICRU-38 recommendations. Received dose grouped in three groups- less then 80% (< 80%, 80-100% and above 100% (>100%. A total of 180 applications for 60 patients were calculated for the above analyses. Results : There is a lot of difference in the bladder and rectal doses with the application by the different radiotherapists, even in the same patient with multiple fractions of HDR-ICBT. Applications by ′A′ radiotherapist were within the limits in the self as well as in the shared groups more number of times, by ′B′ radiotherapist was more times exceeding the limit and by ′C′ radiotherapist doses were in between the A and B. Discussion and Conclusion : For the rectal and bladder doses most important factors are patient′s age, disease stage, duration between EBRT and HDR-ICRT and patient anatomy, but these differences can be minimized to some extent by careful application, proper packing and proper fixation.

  5. Value of diffusion weighted MR imaging as an early surrogate parameter for evaluation of tumor response to high-dose-rate brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röhl Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI as an early surrogate parameter for treatment response of colorectal liver metastases to image-guided single-fraction 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Methods Thirty patients with a total of 43 metastases underwent CT- or MRI-guided HDR-BT. In 13 of these patients a total of 15 additional lesions were identified, which were not treated at the initial session and served for comparison. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI including breathhold echoplanar DWI sequences was performed prior to therapy (baseline MRI, 2 days after HDR-BT (early MRI as well as after 3 months (follow-up MRI. Tumor volume (TV and intratumoral apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were measured independently by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate comparison, ANOVA and paired t test as well as Pearson's correlation. Results At early MRI no changes of TV and ADC were found for non-treated colorectal liver metastases. In contrast, mean TV of liver lesions treated with HDR-BT increased by 8.8% (p = 0.054 while mean tumor ADC decreased significantly by 11.4% (p p = 0.027 without significant change of mean ADC values. In contrast, mean TV of treated lesions decreased by 47.0% (p = 0.026 while the mean ADC increased inversely by 28.6% compared to baseline values (p Conclusions DWI is a promising imaging biomarker for early prediction of tumor response in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated with HDR-BT, yet the optimal interval between therapy and early follow-up needs to be elucidated.

  6. Dosimetric feasibility of ablative dose escalated focal monotherapy with MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, Ali; Carlone, Marco; Rink, Alexandra; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Peter; Berlin, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    To determine the dosimetric feasibility of dose-escalated MRI-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) focal monotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa). In all patients, GTV was defined with mpMRI, and deformably registered onto post-catheter insertion planning MRI. PTV included the GTV plus 9mm craniocaudal and 5mm in every other direction. In discovery-cohort, plans were obtained for each PTV independently aiming to deliver ⩾16.5Gy/fraction (two fraction schedule) while respecting predefined organs-at-risk (OAR) constraints or halted when achieved equivalent single-dose plan (24Gy). Dosimetric results of original and focal HDR-BT plans were evaluated to develop a planning protocol for the validation-cohort. In discovery-cohort (20-patients, 32-GTVs): PTV D95% ⩾16.5Gy could not be reached in a single plan (3%) and was accomplished (range 16.5-23.8Gy) in 15 GTVs (47%). Single-dose schedule was feasible in 16 (50%) plans. In the validation-cohort (10-patients, 10-GTVs, two separate implants each): plans met acceptable and ideal criteria in 100% and 43-100% respectively. Migration to single-dose treatment schedule was feasible in 7 implants (35%), without relaxing OAR's constraints or increasing the dose (D100% and D35%) to mpMRI-normal prostate (p>0.05). Focal ablative dose-escalated radiation is feasible with the proposed protocol. Prospective studies are warranted to determine the clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical outcome in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and high dose-rate iridium 192 brachytherapy boost: A 6-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaelkner, Karl Mikael; Wahlgren, Thomas; Ryberg, Marianne; Cohn-Cedermark, G abriella; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten [Dept. of Oncology-Pathology, Radi umhemmet, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Zimmerman, Rolf [Dept. of Oncology-Pathology, Soedersjukhuset, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Inst., Stockh olm (Sweden); Nilsson, Josef; Lundell, Marie [Dept. of Medical Physics, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Fowler, Jack [Dept. of Human Oncology , Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison (United States); Levitt, Seymour [Dept. of Therapeutic R adiology, Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hellstroem, Magnus [Dept. o f Urology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    To report the long-term results for treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate using high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D EBRT) and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy (TAB). From 1998 through 1999, 154 patients with localized prostate cancer were entered in the trial. Biologically no evidence of disease (bNED) was defined at PSA levels < 2 {mu}g/l. In order to compare the results of this treatment with other treatment modalities, the patient's pre-treatment data were used to calculate the estimated 5-year PSA relapse free survival using Kattan's nomograms for radical prostatectomy (RP) and 3D EBRT. After 6 years of follow-up, 129 patients remain alive. The actual 5-year relapse-free survival is 84%. None of the patients demonstrated clinical signs of local recurrence. The median PSA at follow-up among the relapse-free patients was 0.05 {mu}g/l. Among the 80 patients who presented with clinical stage T3 tumours, 55 (68%) were relapse-free. The expected 5-year relapse-free survival using nomograms for RP and 3D EBRT was 54% and 70%, respectively. Late rectal toxicity RTOG grade 3 occurred in 1% of the patients. Late urinary tract toxicity RTOG grade 3 developed in 4% of the patients. Combined treatment, utilizing HDR, 3D EBRT and TAB, produces good clinical results. Rectal toxicity is acceptable. Urinary tract toxicity, most likely can be explained by the fact that during the first years of this treatment, no effort was made to localize the urethra, which was assumed to be in the middle of the prostate.

  8. High dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrium carcinoma; Tratamento de cancer do endometrio com braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aisen, Salim; Carvalho, Heloisa A.; Nadalin, Wladimir [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    1995-11-01

    One hundred and four patients with histologic proven carcinoma of the endometrium were referred to our department for treatment. The median age was 65.5 years and the median follow-up was 38 months. Ninety-five was pos-menopaused, 7 peri and 2 were pre-menopaused. Sixteen patients were staged (pos-surgery) IA, 5 GI, 8 G2 and 3 G3. Thirty and four stage IB, 10 G1, 18 G2 and 1 G3. Twenty-five were stage IC, 9 G1, 9 G2 and 7 G3. Six were stage IIA, 2 GI, 3 G2 and 1 G3. Eight were stages IIB, 1 G1,3 G2 and 4 G3. Nine were stage IIA, 2 GI, 5 G2, 2 G3. Three were stage IIIB, 2 GI and 1 G2. One was stage III C G3, and two were IVA G3. Depending of the extension of the disease, patients underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpino-ooforectomy, or total hysterectomy and bilateral salpino-ooforectomy plus omentectomy or Werthein-Megs technique. All the patients IA and IB have no evidence of disease (NED). Twenty-four patients IC are NED and one presented distant metastasis. From the IIB patients, 6 are NED, one shown progressive local disease (PLD) and one died from disease. From the patients IIIA, 7 are NED, one DM and one PLD. From the IIIB patients one is NED and TWO are PLD. From the IIIC patient is NED two months after treatment and the IVA patients are NED three and four month after treatment. Eight patients have shown mild complications of treatment. The results of survival and complications are similar to the therapeutic with low dose rate brachytherapy, with the advantage of an outpatient treatment, without the inconvenience of impatient regime. (author). 22 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Treatment outcomes after intraluminal brachytherapy following definitive chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Sharan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: ILRT boost following concurrent chemoradiotherapy is well tolerated and potentially improves outcomes. It might be beneficial in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma. Further studies are required to identify its role in definitive treatment.

  10. Real-time catheter tracking for high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D-guidance device: A preliminary performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jun; Sebastian, Evelyn; Mangona, Victor; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: In order to increase the accuracy and speed of catheter reconstruction in a high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implant procedure, an automatic tracking system has been developed using an electromagnetic (EM) device (trakSTAR, Ascension Technology, VT). The performance of the system, including the accuracy and noise level with various tracking parameters and conditions, were investigated. Methods: A direct current (dc) EM transmitter (midrange model) and a sensor with diameter of 1.3 mm (Model 130) were used in the trakSTAR system for tracking catheter position during HDR prostate brachytherapy. Localization accuracy was assessed under both static and dynamic analyses conditions. For the static analysis, a calibration phantom was used to investigate error dependency on operating room (OR) table height (bottom vs midposition vs top), sensor position (distal tip of catheter vs connector end of catheter), direction [left-right (LR) vs anterior-posterior (AP) vs superior-inferior (SI)], sampling frequency (40 vs 80 vs 120 Hz), and interference from OR equipment (present vs absent). The mean and standard deviation of the localization offset in each direction and the corresponding error vectors were calculated. For dynamic analysis, the paths of five straight catheters were tracked to study the effects of directions, sampling frequency, and interference of EM field. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the results in different configurations. Results: When interference was present in the static analysis, the error vectors were significantly higher at the top table position (3.3 {+-} 1.3 vs 1.8 {+-} 0.9 mm at bottom and 1.7 {+-} 1.0 mm at middle, p < 0.001), at catheter end position (3.1 {+-} 1.1 vs 1.4 {+-} 0.7 mm at the tip position, p < 0.001), and at 40 Hz sampling frequency (2.6 {+-} 1.1 vs 2.4 {+-} 1.5 mm at 80 Hz and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 at 160 Hz, p < 0.001). So did the mean offset errors in the LR direction (-1.7 {+-} 1.4 vs 0.4 {+-} 0.5 mm in AP and 0

  11. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hualin.zhang@northwestern.edu; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60611 (United States); Qi, Yujin [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0){sup 4} to (13

  12. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate (192)Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualin; Donnelly, Eric D; Strauss, Jonathan B; Qi, Yujin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0)(4) to (13.4)(4) for the radiosensitive normal

  13. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate 192Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualin; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Qi, Yujin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0)4 to (13.4)4 for the

  14. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process. A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and (192)Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α∕β = 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively. For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes∕fraction (min∕fx) assuming a 10 Ci(192)Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min∕fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min∕fx more. If an additional 20 min∕fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D90

  15. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  16. Evaluation of failure modes of computerized planning phase of interstitial implants with high dose rate brachytherapy using HFMEA; Avaliacao dos modos de falha do planejamento computadorizado em implantes intersticiais com braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose usando HFMEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biazotto, Bruna; Tokarski, Marcio, E-mail: bruna@ceb.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Biomedica

    2014-08-15

    This paper evaluates the failure modes of the computerized planning step in interstitial implants with high dose rate brachytherapy. The prospective tool of risk management Health Care Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) was used. Twelve subprocesses were identified, and 33 failure modes of which 21 justified new safety actions, and 9 of them were intolerable risks. The method proved itself useful in identifying failure modes, but laborious and subjective in their assessment. The main risks were due to human factors, which require training and commitment of management to their mitigation. (author)

  17. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmar.Georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hopfgartner, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gòra, Joanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kuess, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kragl, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ({sup 192}Ir) and LDR-BT ({sup 125}I) were D{sub 90%} ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D{sub 90%} ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D{sub mean} around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques

  18. Intraluminal crawling versus interstitial neutrophil migration during inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Robert; Brechtefeld, Doris; Walzog, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    Site-directed trafficking of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to their target regions within the tissue is an important prerequisite for efficient host defense during the acute inflammatory response. This process requires intraluminal crawling of PMN on the activated endothelial cells to their extravasation sites. Upon transendothelial diapedesis, PMN migrate in the interstitial tissue to sites of inflammation. These crucial steps within the recruitment cascade are defined as intraluminal crawling and interstitial migration. In this review, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that control and fine-tune these migratory processes and discuss the role of adhesion molecules of the β2 integrin (CD11/CD18) family for these cellular functions.

  19. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  20. High dose-rate brachytherapy as a treatment option in primary tracheal tumors Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose como opção terapêutica nos tumores primários da traquéia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present experience with high dose-rate endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of primary tracheal tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four patients with nonresected primary tracheal tumors are presented: 2 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea, 1 of recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma, and 1 with recurrent plasmacytoma. All received brachytherapy, alone or as a boost for primary irradiation, in 3 or 4 fractions of 7.5 Gy, calculated at a depth of 1 cm. Follow-up was considered to start from the end of brachytherapy. RESULTS: Local control was achieved in all cases at the time of first bronchoscopic evaluation. Two patients with squamous cell carcinoma died at 6th and 33rd months after brachytherapy, respectively. The first had no evidence of disease, and the latter had local recurrence. The other 2 patients were alive after 64 and 110 months of follow-up, respectively, both with no evidence of disease. Tracheal stenosis developed in these 2 cases, 22 and 69 months after brachytherapy. Tracheal stent placement was needed only for the patient with an adenoid cystic carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: Endobronchial high dose-rate brachytherapy may be used for tracheal tumors, even as a boost for external beam irradiation, or in recurrences. Local control in 3 out of 4 patients indicates that individual cases may benefit from the treatment. Long-term survival may also be expected, mainly for tumors with adenoid cystic histology.OBJETIVO: Apresentar a experiência do tratamento de 4 pacientes com tumores primários de traquéia, não operados, submetidos à braquiterapia endobrônquica de alta taxa de dose. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Dois casos de carcinoma espinocelular, uma recidiva de carcinoma adenóide cístico e uma recidiva de plasmocitoma primário da traquéia. Todos receberam braquiterapia endobrônquica, exclusiva ou como reforço de dose da radioterapia externa. Foram administradas 3 ou 4 frações de 7,5 Gy cada, calculados a 1 cm de

  1. 20-Year Experience With Intraoperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: Outcomes, Toxicity, and Practice Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkert, Michael R.; Tong, William Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Chou, Alexander J.; Magnan, Heather [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To assess outcomes and toxicity of high-dose-rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) in the management of pediatric sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-five pediatric patients underwent HDR-IORT for sarcoma from May 1993 to November 2013. The median age was 9 years old (36 patients were ≤6 years old). HDR-IORT was part of initial therapy in 37 patients (49%) and for recurrent disease in 38 patients (51%). Forty-one patients (55%) received HDR-IORT and postoperative external beam RT (PORT), and 22 patients (29%) were previously treated with external beam radiation therapy to the IORT site. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Results: At a median follow-up of 7.8 years for surviving patients, 5-year projected rates of LC, EFS, and OS were 63% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50%-76%), 33% (95% CI 21%-45%), and 43% (95% CI 30%-55%), with a median survival of 3.1 years. The 5-year LC, EFS, and OS rates for patients with recurrent disease were 46% (95% CI, 28%-64%), 30% (95% CI, 13%-46%), and 36% (95% CI, 18%-54%). Acute toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in 2 (2.5%) treatments; late toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in 4 (5.3%) patients 0.3-9.9 years after HDR-IORT. The incidence of toxicity ≥grade 3 was not associated with HDR-IORT applicator size, HDR-IORT dose, prior RT or PORT, or prior or postoperative chemotherapy, but all toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in patients ≤6 years treated with HDR-IORT doses ≥12 Gy. Conclusions: HDR-IORT is a well-tolerated component of multimodality therapy for pediatric sarcoma, allowing additional local treatment while reducing external beam exposure. Taking clinical considerations into account, doses between 8-12 Gy are appropriate for HDR-IORT in patients ≤6 years of age.

  2. Impact of intraoperative MRI/TRUS fusion on dosimetric parameters in cT3a prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose-rate real-time brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Iturriaga, Alfonso; Crook, Juanita; Casquero, Francisco; Carvajal, Claudia; Urresola, Arantxa; Canteli, Begoña; Ezquerro, Ana; Hortelano, Eduardo; Cacicedo, Jon; Espinosa, Jose Maria; Perez, Fernando; Minguez, Pablo; Bilbao, Pedro

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of intraoperative MRI/TRUS fusion procedure in cT3a prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) real-time brachytherapy. Prostate gland, dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs), and extracapsular extension (ECE) were delineated in the pre-brachytherapy magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 9 consecutive patients. The pre-implant P-CTVUS (prostate clinical target volume) was defined as the prostate seen in the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. The CTVMR includedthe prostate with the ECE image (ECE-CTV) as defined on the MRI. Two virtual treatment plans were performed based on the MRI/TRUS fusion images, the first one prescribing 100% of the dose to the P-PTVUS, and the second prescribing to the PTVMR. The implant parameters and dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters of the prostate, OARs, and ECE were compared between both plans. Mean radial distance of ECE was 3.6 mm (SD: 1.1). No significant differences were found between prostate V100, V150, V200, and OARs DVH-related parameters between the plans. Mean values of ECE V100, V150, and V200 were 85.9% (SD: 15.1), 18.2% (SD: 17.3), and 5.85% (SD: 7) when the doses were prescribed to the PTVUS, whereas ECE V100, V150, and V200 were 99.3% (SD: 1.2), 45.8% (SD: 22.4), and 19.6% (SD: 12.6) when doses were prescribed to PTVMR (p = 0.028, p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively). TRUS/MRI fusion provides important information for prostate brachytherapy, allowing for better coverage and higher doses to extracapsular disease in patients with clinical stage T3a.

  3. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

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    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  4. Modeling normal tissue complication probability from repetitive computed tomography scans during fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, E; Hellebust, T P; Skjønsberg, A; Høgberg, T; Olsen, D R

    2000-07-01

    To calculate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of late radiation effects on the rectum and bladder from repetitive CT scans during fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of the uterine cervix and compare the NTCP with the clinical frequency of late effects. Fourteen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix (Stage IIb-IVa) underwent 3-6 (mean, 4.9) CT scans in treatment position during their course of HDRB using a ring applicator with an Iridium stepping source. The rectal and bladder walls were delineated on the treatment-planning system, such that a constant wall volume independent of organ filling was achieved. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal and bladder walls were acquired. A method of summing multiple DVHs accounting for variable dose per fraction were applied to the DVHs of HDRB and EBRT together with the Lyman-Kutcher NTCP model fitted to clinical dose-volume tolerance data from recent studies. The D(mean) of the DVH from EBRT was close to the D(max) for both the rectum and bladder, confirming that the DVH from EBRT corresponded with homogeneous whole-organ irradiation. The NTCP of the rectum was 19.7% (13.5%, 25. 9%) (mean and 95% confidence interval), whereas the clinical frequency of late rectal sequelae (Grade 3-4, RTOG/EORTC) was 13% based on material from 200 patients. For the bladder the NTCP was 61. 9% (46.8%, 76.9%) as compared to the clinical frequency of Grade 3-4 late effects of 14%. If only 1 CT scan from HDRB was assumed available, the relative uncertainty (standard deviation or SD) of the NTCP value for an arbitrary patient was 20-30%, whereas 4 CT scans provided an uncertainty of 12-13%. The NTCP for the rectum was almost consistent with the clinical frequency of late effects, whereas the NTCP for bladder was too high. To obtain reliable (SD of 12-13%) NTCP values, 3-4 CT scans are needed during 5-7 fractions of HDRB treatments.

  5. Registering prostate external beam radiotherapy with a boost from high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a comparative evaluation of deformable registration algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Calyn R; House, Michael J; Lye, Victoria; Tang, Colin I; Krawiec, Michele; Joseph, David J; Denham, James W; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-12-14

    Registering CTs for patients receiving external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a boost dose from high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) can be challenging due to considerable image discrepancies (e.g. rectal fillings, HDR needles, HDR artefacts and HDR rectal packing materials). This study is the first to comparatively evaluate image processing and registration methods used to register the rectums in EBRT and HDR CTs of prostate cancer patients. The focus is on the rectum due to planned future analysis of rectal dose-volume response. For 64 patients, the EBRT CT was retrospectively registered to the HDR CT with rigid registration and non-rigid registration methods in VelocityAI. Image processing was undertaken on the HDR CT and the rigidly-registered EBRT CT to reduce the impact of discriminating features on alternative non-rigid registration methods applied in the software suite for Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Research (DIRART) using the Horn-Schunck optical flow and Demons algorithms. The propagated EBRT-rectum structures were compared with the HDR structure using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdorff distance (HD) and average surface distance (ASD). The image similarity was compared using mutual information (MI) and root mean squared error (MSE). The displacement vector field was assessed via the Jacobian determinant (JAC). The post-registration alignments of rectums for 21 patients were visually assessed. The greatest improvement in the median DSC relative to the rigid registration result was 35 % for the Horn-Schunck algorithm with image processing. This algorithm also provided the best ASD results. The VelocityAI algorithms provided superior HD, MI, MSE and JAC results. The visual assessment indicated that the rigid plus deformable multi-pass method within VelocityAI resulted in the best rectum alignment. The DSC, ASD and HD improved significantly relative to the rigid registration result if image processing was applied prior

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Pigge, F. Christopher [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  7. Comparison of Different Fractionation Schedules Toward a Single Fraction in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Using 3-Dimensional Radiobiological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Milickovic, Natasa [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Cruz, Wilbert F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Tselis, Nikolaos [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Karabis, Andreas [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens (Greece); Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was the investigation of different fractionation schemes to estimate their clinical impact. For this purpose, widely applied radiobiological models and dosimetric measures were used to associate their results with clinical findings. Methods and Materials: The dose distributions of 12 clinical high-dose-rate brachytherapy implants for prostate were evaluated in relation to different fractionation schemes. The fractionation schemes compared were: (1) 1 fraction of 20 Gy; (2) 2 fractions of 14 Gy; (3) 3 fractions of 11 Gy; and (4) 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy. The clinical effectiveness of the different fractionation schemes was estimated through the complication-free tumor control probability (P{sub +}), the biologically effective uniform dose, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose index. Results: For the different fractionation schemes, the tumor control probabilities were 98.5% in 1 × 20 Gy, 98.6% in 2 × 14 Gy, 97.5% in 3 × 11 Gy, and 97.8% in 4 × 9.5 Gy. The corresponding P{sub +} values were 88.8% in 1 × 20 Gy, 83.9% in 2 × 14 Gy, 86.0% in 3 × 11 Gy, and 82.3% in 4 × 9.5 Gy. With use of the fractionation scheme 4 × 9.5 Gy as reference, the isoeffective schemes regarding tumor control for 1, 2, and 3 fractions were 1 × 19.68 Gy, 2 × 13.75 Gy, and 3 × 11.05 Gy. The optimum fractionation schemes for 1, 2, 3, and 4 fractions were 1 × 19.16 Gy with a P{sub +} of 91.8%, 2 × 13.2 Gy with a P{sub +} of 89.6%, 3 × 10.6 Gy with a P{sub +} of 88.4%, and 4 × 9.02 Gy with a P{sub +} of 86.9%. Conclusions: Among the fractionation schemes 1 × 20 Gy, 2 × 14 Gy, 3 × 11 Gy, and 4 × 9.5 Gy, the first scheme was more effective in terms of P{sub +}. After performance of a radiobiological optimization, it was shown that a single fraction of 19.2 to 19.7 Gy (average 19.5 Gy) should produce at least the same benefit as that given by the 4 × 9.5 Gy scheme, and it should reduce the expected total complication probability by

  8. Clinical transition to model-based dose calculation algorithm: A retrospective analysis of high-dose-rate tandem and ring brachytherapy of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Dayee; Lamberto, Melissa; DeSouza Lawrence, Lana; Mourtada, Firas

    To retrospectively compare clinical dosimetry of CT-based tandem-ring treatment plans using a model-based dose calculation algorithm (MBDCA) with the standard TG-43-based dose formalism. A cohort of 10 cervical cancer cohorts treated using the tandem and ring high-dose-rate applicators were evaluated. The original treatment plans were created using the department CT-based volume optimization clinical standards. All plans originally calculated with TG-43 dose calculation formalism were recalculated using the MBDCA algorithm. The gross target volume and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each data set along with significant heterogeneities like air in cavity and high-density plastic tandem and ring components. The patient tissue was modeled as homogenous liquid water. D90, D95, and D100 for gross target volume, D0.1cm(3), D1.0cm(3), and D2.0cm(3) for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were extracted from dose-volume histograms for TG-43 and MBDCA calculated plans. Mean absolute difference ± 2σ in the above metrics was calculated for each plan. Using the manual applicator contouring method, MBDCA plans (n = 10) showed 2.1 ± 1.1% reduction in dose to Point A average, 2.6 ± 0.9% reduction in Target D90 dose, and 2.1 ± 0.3% dose reduction to OARs. Results from plans using vendor supplied solid applicator models (n = 5) showed 2.2 ± 1.10% reduction in dose to Point A average, 2.7 ± 0.2% reduction in Target D90 dose, and 2.7 ± 1.0% dose reduction on average to OARs. For unshielded plastic gynecologic applicators, minimal dosimetric changes (<5%) were found using MBDCA relative to standard TG-43. Use of solid applicator model is more efficient than manual applicator contouring and also yielded similar MBDCA dosimetric results. Currently, TG-186 dose calculations should be reported along TG-43 until we obtain studies with larger cohorts to fully realize the potential of MBDCA dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by

  9. SU-E-T-579: Impact of Cylinder Size in High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDRBT) for Primary Cancer in the Vagina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Gopalakrishnan, M; Lee, P; Sathiaseelan, V [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of cylinder size in high dose rate Brachytherapy for primary vaginal cancers. Methods: Patients treated with HDR vaginal vault radiation in a list of cylinders ranging from 2.5 to 4 cm in diameter at 0.5 cm increment were analyzed. All patients’ doses were prescribed at the 0.5 cm from the vaginal surface with different treatment lengths. A series of reference points were created to optimize the dose distribution. The fraction dose was 5.5 Gy, the treatment was repeated for 4 times in two weeks. A cylinder volume was contoured in each case according to the prescribed treatment length, and then expanded to 5 mm to get a volume Cylinder-5mm-exp. A volume of PTV-Eval was obtained by subtracting the cylinder volume from the Cylinder-5mm-exp. The shell volume, PTV-Eval serves as the target volume for dosimetric evaluation. Results: DVH curves and average doses of PTV-Eval were obtained. Our results indicated that the DVH curves shifted toward higher dose side when larger cylinder was used instead of smaller ones. When 3.0 cm cylinder was used instead of 2.5 cm, for 3.0 cm treatment length, the average dose only increased 1%, from 790 to 799 cGy. However, the average doses for 3.5 and 4 cm cylinders respectively are 932 and 1137 cGy at the same treatment length. For 5.0 cm treatment length, the average dose is 741 cGy for 2.5 cm cylinder, and 859 cGy for 3 cm cylinder. Conclusion: Our data analysis suggests that for the vaginal intracavitary HDRBT, the average dose is at least 35% larger than the prescribed dose in the studied cases; the size of the cylinder will impact the dose delivered to the target volume. The cylinder with bigger diameter tends to deliver larger average dose to the PTV-Eval.

  10. SU-E-T-620: Dosimetric Compliance Study for a New Prostate Protocol of Combined High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, C; Giaddui, T; Den, R; Harrison, A; Yu, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the adherence of treatment plans of prostate cancer patients with the dosimetric compliance criteria of the new in house phase I trial of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated using this trial. They received one fraction of HDR to 15Gy, followed by external beam(EB) boost of 3.2Gy(Level 1, five patients) or 3.94Gy(level 2, five patients) per fraction for 10 or 7 fractions, respectively, both equivalent to EB treatments of 113.5Gy in 2Gy fractions. The EB plans were either IMRT or VMAT plans. DVH analysis was performed to verify the adherence of treatment plans to the dosimetric criteria of the trial. Results: For Level 1 patients, target coverage were adequate, with CTV V32Gy(%) of 99.0±1.0 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), and PTV V31Gy(%) of 99.6±0.3. PTV V32.9Gy(%) is 1.4±3.1 and PTVmax is 32.9±0.2Gy. Rectum, bladder and femoral heads sparing were well within protocol criteria. For Level 2 patients, CTV V27.6Gy(%) is 98.7±1.8; PTV V26.7Gy(%) is 99.0±1.4. PTV V28.4Gy(%) is 1.3±1.4, with three patients having minor deviation from protocol. Again critical structures were spared compliant to the protocol. The analysis of HDR plans show similar results, with adequate dose coverage to the prostate and sparing of critical structures including urethra and rectum. V100(%) and V90(%) of prostate are 96.0±1.1 and 98.9±0.5. Urethra D10(%) is 113.1±2.9. Rectum V80(cc) is 1.4±0.5. Hotspot in prostate is substantially higher than what the protocol specifies. But the criteria for hotspot are only guidelines, serving to lower the dose to urethra . Conclusion: This new high biological equivalent dose prostate trial has been carried out successfully for ten patients. Based on dosimetric analysis, all HDR and external plans were compliant to the protocol criteria, with only minor deviations.

  11. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} radiochromic plastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. L. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7JP (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, F-Level, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO6 3LY (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7JP (United Kingdom); Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7JP (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibers with 6 {mu}m active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 {mu}m active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental

  12. Validation of Intraluminal and Intraperitoneal microdialysis in ischemic small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pynnönen, Lauri; Minkkinen, Minna; Perner, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    We sought to define the sensitivity and specificity of intraperitoneal (IP) and intraluminal (IL) microdialysate metabolites in depicting ex vivo small intestinal total ischemia during GI-tract surgery. We hypothesized that IL as opposed to IP microdialysis detects small intestinal ischemia...

  13. BRONCHOSCOPIC THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH INTRALUMINAL TYPICAL BRONCHIAL CARCINOID

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SUTEDJA, TG; SCHREURS, AJ; VANDERSCHUEREN, RG; KWA, B; VANDERWERF, TS; POSTMUS, PE

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy of bronchoscopic therapy in patients with intraluminal typical bronchial carcinoid. Design: Retrospective analysis of the data of patients with bronchial carcinoid, treated primarily with bronchoscopic techniques such as Nd-YAG laser in various hospitals in the Nethe

  14. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cohen, Gil' ad N. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  15. Late Urinary Side Effects 10 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Population-Based Results From a Multiphysician Practice Treating With a Standardized Protocol and Uniform Dosimetric Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Mira, E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Miller, Stacy; Pickles, Tom; Halperin, Ross; Kwan, Winkle; Lapointe, Vincent; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid; Pai, Howard; Chan, Elisa K.; Morris, W. James

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine late urinary toxicity (>12 months) in a large cohort of uniformly treated low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2009, 2709 patients with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–defined low-risk and low-tier intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with Iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy; 2011 patients with a minimum of 25 months of follow-up were included in the study. Baseline patients, treatment, implant factors, and late urinary toxicity (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grading system and International Prostate Symptom Score [IPSS]) were recorded prospectively. Time to IPSS resolution, late RTOG genitourinary toxicity was examined with Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests. Cox proportional hazards regression was done for individual covariates and multivariable models. Results: Median follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 2-13 years). Actuarial toxicity rates reached 27% and 10% (RTOG ≥2 and ≥3, respectively) at 9-13 years. Symptoms resolved quickly in the majority of patients (88% in 6-12 months). The prevalence of RTOG 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 toxicity with a minimum of 7 years' follow-up was 70%, 21%, 6.4%, 2.3%, and 0.08%, respectively. Patients with a larger prostate volume, higher baseline IPSS, higher D90, acute toxicity, and age >70 years had more late RTOG ≥2 toxicity (all P≤.02). The IPSS resolved slower in patients with lower baseline IPSS and larger ultrasound prostate volume, those not receiving androgen deprivation therapy, and those with higher D90. The crude rate of RTOG 3 toxicity was 6%. Overall the rate of transurethral resection of the prostate was 1.9%; strictures, 2%; incontinence, 1.3%; severe symptoms, 1.8%; late catheterization, 1.3%; and hematuria, 0.8%. The majority (80%) resolved their symptoms in 6-12 months. Conclusion: Long-term urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is low. Although actuarial rates increase with longer

  16. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  17. Dose-volume parameters and clinical outcome of CT-guided freehand high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Wang; Wei-Jun Ye; Le-Hui Du; Ai-Ju Li; Yu-Feng Ren; Xin-Ping Cao

    2012-01-01

    Currently,image-based 3-dimentional (3D) planning brachytherapy allows for a better assessment of gross tumor volume (GTV) and the definition and delineation of target volume in cervix cancer.In this study,we investigated the feasibility of our novel computed tomography (CT)-guided free-hand high-doserate interstitial brachytherapy (HDRISBT) technique for cervical cancer by evaluating the dosimetry and preliminary clinical outcome of this approach.Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were analyzed according to the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group recommendations for image-based 3D treatment in cervical cancer.Twenty cervical cancer patients who underwent CT-guided free-hand HDRISBT between March 2009 and June 2010 were studied.With a median of 5 (range,4-7) implanted needles for each patient,the median dose of brachytherapy alone delivered to 90% of the target volume (D90) was 45 (range,33-54) Gyα/β10 for high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and 30 (range,20-36)Gyα/β10 for intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV).The percentage of the CTV covered by the prescribed dose (V100) of HR-CTV with brachytherapy alone was 81.9%-99.2% (median,96.7%).With an additional dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT),the median D90 was 94 (range,83-104) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 77 (range,70-87) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV; the median dose delivered to 100% of the target volume (D100) was 75 (range,66-84) Gyα/β10 for HR-CTV and 65 (range,57-73) Gyα/β10 for IR-CTV.The minimum dose to the most irradiated 2 cc volume (D2cc) was 73-96 (median,83) Gyα/β3 for the bladder,64-98 (median,73) Gyα/β3 for the rectum,and 52-69 (median,61) Gyα/β3 for the sigmoid colon.After a median follow-up of 15 months (range,3-24 months),two patients experienced local failure,and 1 showed internal lilac nodal metastasis.Despite the relatively small number of needles used,CT-guided HDRISBT for cervical cancer showed favorable DVH parameters and clinical outcome.

  18. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with local injection of bleomycin for N0 oral tongue cancer. Possibilities of the control of tumor implant by inserting applicators and the decrease in tumor dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohga, Saiji; Uehara, Satoru [National Kyushu Medical Center Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Miyoshi, Makoto [Kitakyushu Municipal Medical Center Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Jingu, Kenichi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with N0 oral tongue cancer were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy combined with local injection of bleomycin between December 1997 and June 2001 at the Department of Radiology, National Kyushu Medical Center Hospital. A median dose of 5 mg of bleomycin was injected locally, and 16-20 Gy was delivered to the area surrounding applicators for control of the tumor implant during the initial two days. The two-year local recurrence-free survival rate was 96% [T1, 2: 100% (8/8, 15/15), T3: 80% (4/5)]. The two-year secondary neck node metastasis rate was 7.1% [T1: 12.5% (1/8), T2: 6.7% (1/15), T3: 0% (0/5)]. There were no tumor implants in any patients. We tried to decrease the minimal tumor dose step by step. The groups with median minimal tumor doses of 60 Gy, 50 Gy, and 40 Gy had local recurrence rates of 12.5% (1/8), 0% (0/14), and 0% (0/6), respectively. Local recurrence rates were not increased by decreasing the minimal tumor dose. Two patients (7%) had secondary neck node metastasis. Late adverse effects were tongue ulcer: 11% (3/28), oral floor ulcer: 4% (1/28), and osteonecrosis: 4% (1/28). These results suggest that control of the tumor implant and the decrease in minimal tumor dose below 60 Gy may be possible with the local injection of bleomycin and delivery of doses to the area surrounding the applicators when N0 tongue cancer is treated using {sup 192}Ir-HDR brachytherapy. (author)

  19. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Doggett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX, an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California. All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up of 23.7 months, the local recurrence rate is 12.5%. The single lesion that failed was not debulked surgically prior to electronic brachytherapy. Conclusions : To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the use of radiation therapy as curative primary treatment for AFX. No contraindication to the use of radiations is found in the literature, with surgery being the sole treatment for AFX noted. Our recurrence rate is 0% for debulked lesions. Risk of recurrence is mitigated with surgical debulking prior to brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy appears to be a safe and effective treatment for debulked AFX. Multiple excisions, skin grafting, and wound care can be avoided in elderly patients by the use of electronic brachytherapy.

  20. Unresectable colorectal liver metastases. Percutaneous ablation using CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDBRT); Nicht resektable kolorektale Lebermetastasen. Perkutane Ablation mittels CT-gesteuerter Hochdosisbrachytherapie (CT-HDBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, F.; Lutter, A.; Schnapauff, D.; Denecke, T.; Gebauer, B. [Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Hildebrandt, B. [Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Puhl, G. [Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery; Wust, P. [Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) of unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs). Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all consecutive patients with unresectable CRLMs treated with CT-HDRBT between January 2008 and November 2012. Treatment was performed by CT-guided catheter placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. MRI follow-up was performed after 6 weeks and then every 3 months post-intervention. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Results: 80 heavily pretreated patients with 179 metastases were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 16.9 months. The mean tumor diameter was 28.5 mm (range: 8 - 107 mm). No major complications were observed. A total of 23 (12.9%) local tumor progressions were observed. Lesions ≥ 4 cm in diameter showed significantly more local progression than smaller lesions (< 4 cm). 50 patients (62.5%) experienced systemic tumor progression. The median TTP was 6 months. 28 (43%) patients died during the follow-up period. The median OS after ablation was 18 months. Conclusion: CT-HDRBT is an effective technique for the treatment of unresectable CRLMs and warrants promising LTC rates compared to thermal ablative techniques. A combination with other local and systemic therapies should be evaluated in patients with lesions > 4 cm in diameter, in which higher progression rates are expected. (orig.)

  1. Intraluminal colonization into the seminiferous tubules in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzmán-Masias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the primordial germ cells transplant technique, we could be able preserve and multiply pluripotent cells in the receptor for a long period of time. In this work, We aim to evaluate intraluminal colonization of a cellular gonocyte suspension from 14.5 dpc fetus. Cellular suspension with PGC's were isolated from fetus male mice by two enzymatic digestion steps, and cellular suspensions were transplanted into the rete testis of the receptor animals that were previously injected with Busulfan to decrease their own spermatogenesis. In this research the intraluminal colonization was identified in 13.27%, demonstrating that transplantation of a cellular suspension from gonocytes of fetus of 14.5 dpc containing PGCs can colonize the seminiferous tubules and support the spermatogenesis.

  2. [Edge effect and late thrombosis -- inevitable complications of vascular brachytherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, T M; Staber, L; Kantlehner, R; Pöllinger, B; Dühmke, E; Theisen, K; Klauss, V

    2002-11-01

    Restenosis is the limiting entity after percutaneous coronary angioplasty. Vascular brachytherapy for the treatment of in-stent restenosis has been shown to reduce the repeat restenosis rate and the incidence of major adverse events in several randomized trials. Besides the beneficial effects, brachytherapy yielded some unwanted side effects. The development of new stenoses at the edges of the target lesion treated with radiation is termed edge effect. It occurs after afterloading brachytherapy as well as after implantation of radioactive stents. It is characterized by extensive intimal hyperplasia and negative remodeling. As contributing factors the axial dose fall-off, inherent to all radioactive sources, and the application of vessel wall trauma by angioplasty have been identified. The combination of both factors, by insufficient overlap of the radiation length over the injured vessel segment, has been referred to as geographic miss. It has been shown to be associated with a very high incidence of the edge effect. Avoidance of geographic miss is strongly recommended in vascular brachytherapy procedures. Late thrombosis after vascular brachytherapy is of multifactorial origin. It comprises platelet recruitment, fibrin deposition, disturbed vasomotion, non-healing dissection and stent malapposition predisposing to turbulent blood flow. The strongest predictors for late thrombosis are premature discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy and implantation of new stents during the brachytherapy procedure. With a consequent and prolonged antiplatelet therapy, the incidence of late thrombosis has been reduced to placebo levels. Edge effect and late thrombosis represent unwanted side effects of vascular brachytherapy. By means of a thorough treatment planning and prolonged antiplatelet therapy their incidences can be largely reduced. With regard to the very favorable net effect, they do not constitute relevant limitations of vascular brachytherapy.

  3. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT for High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten H. Ecke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa. Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79 with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index, Gleason score, D’Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE, PSA value after one/three/five year(s follow-up (FU, time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis (p = 0.009, PSA on date of first HDR-BT (p = 0.033, and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year (p = 0.025 have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities.

  4. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, C.-Y.; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 NE 10th Street, OUPB 1430, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)], E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu

    2009-09-21

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm{sup 3} on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  5. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  6. SU-F-19A-03: Dosimetric Advantages in Critical Structure Dose Sparing by Using a Multichannel Cylinder in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy to Treat Vaginal Cuff Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Zhang, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The multichannel cylindrical vaginal applicator is a variation of traditional single channel cylindrical vaginal applicator. The multichannel applicator has additional peripheral channels that provide more flexibility in the planning process. The dosimetric advantage is to reduce dose to adjacent organ at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum while maintaining target coverage with the dose optimization from additional channels. Methods: Vaginal HDR brachytherapy plans are all CT based. CT images were acquired in 2 mm thickness to keep integrity of cylinder contouring. The CTV of 5mm Rind with prescribed treatment length was reconstructed from 5mm expansion of inserted cylinder. The goal was 95% of CTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose in both single channel planning (SCP)and multichannel planning (MCP) before proceeding any further optimization for dose reduction to critical structures with emphasis on D2cc and V2Gy . Results: This study demonstrated noticeable dose reduction to OAR was apparent in multichannel plans. The D2cc of the rectum and bladder were showing the reduced dose for multichannel versus single channel. The V2Gy of the rectum was 93.72% and 83.79% (p=0.007) for single channel and multichannel respectively (Figure 1 and Table 1). To assure adequate coverage to target while reducing the dose to the OAR without any compromise is the main goal in using multichannel vaginal applicator in HDR brachytherapy. Conclusion: Multichannel plans were optimized using anatomical based inverse optimization algorithm of inverse planning simulation annealing. The optimization solution of the algorithm was to improve the clinical target volume dose coverage while reducing the dose to critical organs such as bladder, rectum and bowels. The comparison between SCP and MCP demonstrated MCP is superior to SCP where the dwell positions were based on geometric array only. It concluded that MCP is preferable and is able to provide certain features superior to SCP.

  7. The Effect of Sparkling Water on Intraluminal Formulation Behaviour and Systemic Drug Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Abeele, Jens; Brouwers, Joachim; Deloose, Eveline; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-04-06

    In the context of mediating intra- and inter-individual variability in systemic drug exposure after oral drug administration, this small-scale, crossover study aimed to investigate the effect of drug intake with sparkling water on fasted state gastric motor function and subsequent (variability in) intraluminal and systemic drug disposition. For this purpose, healthy human volunteers were asked to ingest a conventional paracetamol tablet with either tap or sparkling water, after which antroduodenal motility as well as intraluminal and systemic drug disposition were monitored as a function of time. Ingestion of sparkling water led to the occurrence of transient pressure events in the upper gastrointestinal tract for all volunteers, although the duration and frequency of the observed effect were subject to variability. Based on systemic drug disposition parameters, drug intake with sparkling water resulted in a trend towards faster and less variable absorption of paracetamol from the gastrointestinal tract. Faster and less variable intragastric tablet disintegration, due to (i) a direct effect (i.e. in vivo dissolution rate) and/or (ii) an indirect effect (i.e. gastrointestinal motility) of sparkling water, is likely to contribute to this observation.

  8. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Abbas; Celik, Sebahattin; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection.

  9. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  10. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR, namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  11. Biliary Interventions: Tools and Techniques of the Trade, Access, Cholangiography, Biopsy, Cholangioscopy, Cholangioplasty, Stenting, Stone Extraction, and Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osman; Mathevosian, Sipan; Arslan, Bulent

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic access to the biliary system is generally limited to endoscopic or percutaneous approaches. A variety of percutaneous transhepatic biliary interventions are applicable for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary system pathologies, the majority of which may be performed in conjunction with one another. The backbone of nearly all of these interventions is percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography for opacification of the biliary tree, after which any number of therapeutic or diagnostic modalities may be pursued. We describe an overview of the instrumentation and technical approaches for several fundamental interventional procedures, including percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and internal/external biliary drainage, endobiliary biopsy techniques, cholangioscopy, cholangioplasty and biliary stenting, biliary stone extraction, and intraluminal brachytherapy.

  12. Divertículo intraluminal do duodeno: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Furtado Evaldo; Machado Beatriz Ferreira Furtado

    2003-01-01

    Os autores apresentam um caso de divertículo intraluminal do duodeno em uma paciente de 44 anos de idade, com sintomas escassos e incaracterísticos. O diagnóstico radiológico foi confirmado à cirurgia e houve controle pós-operatório. A anomalia, uma forma rara de duplicação, com diagnóstico radiológico unicamente pelo exame baritado convencional pré-operatório, consiste de uma estrutura em "fundo de saco", revestida de ambos os lados por mucosa normal, projetando-se na luz do duodeno. Após a ...

  13. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, A [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Taylor, M [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Australian Federal Police, Canberra, ACT (Australia); McDermott, L [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  14. Nylon filament coated with paraffin for intraluminal permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xia-Lin; Wu, Ping; Ji, Ai-Min

    2012-06-21

    A variety of intraluminal nylon filament has been used in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) models. However the lesion extent and its reproducibility vary among laboratories. The properties of nylon filament play a part of reasons for these variations. In the present study, we used paraffin-coated nylon filament for rat MCAO model, tested the effects and advanced improvement for making the rat MCAO. Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomized into two groups, MCAO with traditional uncoated nylon filament (uMCAO) and MCAO with paraffin-coated nylon filament (cMCAO), three rats as normal group and sham group respectively. Assessment included mortality rates, model success rates, neurological deficit evaluation, and infarct volume. The study showed two rats died in uMCAO group, no rat died in cMCAO group within the 12h. The model success rate of uMCAO was 100%, while the uMCAO group was 55% (n=20, two died within 12h, seven rats were excluded as the brain slices showed no TTC staining due to subarachanoid hemorrhage). Neurological evaluation demonstrated group cMCAO had more worse neurological outcomes than group uMCAO, and the difference was statistically signification (pparaffin-coated nylon filament intraluminal occlusion provide better occlusion of middle cerebral artery than the uncoated nylon filament, improve the consistent of model, and raise the success rate to reduce the number of experimental animals. These positive results are much encouraging and interesting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun; Yu Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Sherman, Jason [Department of Medical Physics, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Rubens, Deborah; Strang, John [Departments of Imaging Science and Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Messing, Edward [Departments of Urology and Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Ng, Wan-Sing [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2008-03-21

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  16. Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Jamie A; Stone, Nelson N; Skouteris, Vassilios M; Park, Janelle L; Stock, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    Low-dose rate brachytherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for men diagnosed with prostate cancer because of excellent long-term treatment outcomes in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. Largely due to patient lead advocacy for minimally invasive treatment options, high-quality prostate implants have become widely available in the US, Europe, and Japan. The reason that brachytherapy results are reproducible in several different practice settings is because numerous implant quality factors have been defined over the last 20 years, which can be applied objectively to judge the success of the intervention both during and after the procedure. In addition, recent long-term follow-up studies have clarified that the secondary cancer incidence of brachytherapy is not clinically meaningful. In terms of future directions, the study of radiation repair genetics may allow for the counseling physician to better estimate any given patients risk for side effects, thereby substantially reducing the therapeutic uncertainties faced by patients choosing a prostate cancer intervention.

  17. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  18. High dose brachytherapy in pediatric oncology; Braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose em oncologia pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Codjaian, Osanna Esther; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Trippe, Nivaldo [Fundacao Antonio Prudente, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital A.C. Camargo. Dept. de Radioterapia

    1995-05-01

    Brachytherapy is a kind of radiotherapy that has been used in the multidisciplinary approach of some pediatric tumors, such as soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities, head and neck and urogenital tract. Recent technological advances in this area lead to development of computerized high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy. This type of treatment has some advantages compared to low dose rate brachytherapy traditionally used. This article describes not only the characteristics and advantages of this kind of treatment, but also the preliminary results of the first seven children treated with high dose rate at the Hospital A.C.Camargo. (author) 10 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Intraluminal bubble dynamics induced by lithotripsy shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Bai, Jiaming; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been the first option in the treatment of calculi in the upper urinary tract since its introduction. ESWL-induced renal injury is also found after treatment and is assumed to associate with intraluminal bubble dynamics. To further understand the interaction of bubble expansion and collapse with the vessel wall, the finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate intraluminal bubble dynamics and calculate the distribution of stress in the vessel wall and surrounding soft tissue during cavitation. The effects of peak pressure, vessel size, and stiffness of soft tissue were investigated. Significant dilation on the vessel wall occurs after contacting with rapid and large bubble expansion, and then vessel deformation propagates in the axial direction. During bubble collapse, large shear stress is found to be applied to the vessel wall at a clinical lithotripter setting (i.e. 40 MPa peak pressure), which may be the mechanism of ESWL-induced vessel rupture. The decrease of vessel size and viscosity of soft tissue would enhance vessel deformation and, consequently, increase the generated shear stress and normal stresses. Meanwhile, a significantly asymmetric bubble boundary is also found due to faster axial bubble expansion and shrinkage than in radial direction, and deformation of the vessel wall may result in the formation of microjets in the axial direction. Therefore, this numerical work would illustrate the mechanism of ESWL-induced tissue injury in order to develop appropriate counteractive strategies for reduced adverse effects.

  20. Dosimetric results in implant and post-implant and low rate in brachytherapy prostate cancer with loose seeds and attached; Resultados dosimetricos en el implante y post-impante en braquiterapia de baja tasa en cancer de prostata con semillas sueltas y unidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan-Senabre, X. J.; Albert Antequera, M.; Lopez-Tarjuelo, J.; Santos Serra, A.; Perez-Mestre, M.; Sanchez Iglesias, A. L.; Conde Moreno, A. J.; Gonzalez Vidal, V.; Beltran Persiva, J.; Muelas Soria, R.; Ferrer Albiach, C.

    2015-07-01

    The objective is determine differences dosimetry statistics on the dosimetry of the implant and post-implant in brachytherapy of low rate with implants permanent in prostate using seed of 125-I loose and attached Both in lives and in the post-prostatic plans dosimetric coverage is good and restrictions in urethra and rectum for both groups of patients are met. Not migrating with joined is evident, as well as better dosimetric homogeneity. (Author)

  1. SU-E-T-09: A Clinical Implementation and Optimized Dosimetry Study of Freiberg Flap Skin Surface Treatment in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Wu, H; Durci, M [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This case study was designated to confirm the optimized plan was used to treat skin surface of left leg in three stages. 1. To evaluate dose distribution and plan quality by alternating of the source loading catheters pattern in flexible Freiberg Flap skin surface (FFSS) applicator. 2. To investigate any impact on Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) of large superficial surface target volume coverage. 3. To compare the dose distribution if it was treated with electron beam. Methods: The Freiburg Flap is a flexible mesh style surface mold for skin radiation or intraoperative surface treatments. The Freiburg Flap consists of multiple spheres that are attached to each other, holding and guiding up to 18 treatment catheters. The Freiburg Flap also ensures a constant distance of 5mm from the treatment catheter to the surface. Three treatment trials with individual planning optimization were employed: 18 channels, 9 channels of FF and 6 MeV electron beam. The comparisons were highlighted in target coverage, dose conformity and dose sparing of surrounding tissues. Results: The first 18 channels brachytherapy plan was generated with 18 catheters inside the skin-wrapped up flap (Figure 1A). A second 9 catheters plan was generated associated with the same calculation points which were assigned to match prescription for target coverage as 18 catheters plan (Figure 1B). The optimized inverse plan was employed to reduce the dose to adjacent structures such as tibia or fibula. The comparison of DVH’s was depicted on Figure 2. External beam of electron RT plan was depicted in Figure 3. Overcall comparisons among these three were illustrated in Conclusion: The 9-channel Freiburg flap flexible skin applicator offers a reasonably acceptable plan without compromising the coverage. Electron beam was discouraged to use to treat curved skin surface because of low target coverage and high dose in adjacent tissues.

  2. Irradiation and dosimetry of Nitinol stent for renal artery brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbabi, Azim [Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahid Beheshti Medical University, P.O. Box 14335-1419, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Medicine Research Group, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, P.O. Box 31485-498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: msadeghi@nrcam.org; Joharifard, Mahdi [Science and Research Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14515-775, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    This study was conducted to assess the suitability of {sup 48}V radioactive stent for use in renal artery brachytherapy. A nickel-titanium alloy Nitinol stent was irradiated over the proton energy range of up to 8.5 MeV, to obtain {sup 48}V. The depth dose distribution analysis of the activated stent was done with TLD-700GR in a Perspex phantom. We investigated a unique mixed gamma/beta brachytherapy source of {sup 48}V. For a 10 mm outer-diameter {sup 48}V stent, the average measured dose rate to vessel was 37 mGy/h. The dosimetry results of the {sup 48}V stent suggest that the stent is suitable for use in renal artery brachytherapy.

  3. A Customized Finger Brachytherapy Carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa, Supneet Singh; Duggal, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, radiation therapy has been used with increasing frequency in the management of neoplasms of the head and neck region. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation treatment in which sealed radioactive sources are used to deliver the dose a short distance by interstitial (direct insertion into tissue), intracavitary (placement within a cavity) or surface application (molds). Mold brachytherapy is radiation delivered via a custom-fabricated carriers, designed to provide a more consta...

  4. Braquiterapia intersticial de alta tasa de rescate en cáncer cabeza cuello previamente radiado High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Gutiérrez-Bayard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de los avances en el tratamiento de cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CCC, el 15-50% de los pacientes presentan recurrencia locorregional. Para los pacientes que presentan enfermedad localmente recurrente o un segundo tumor primario en un campo previamente irradiado, las opciones terapéuticas de rescate son limitadas, siendo la resección quirúrgica con intención curativa la opción de elección para los pacientes con enfermedad limitada. Reirradiación con o sin la adición de quimioterapia puede ser una buena opción, obteniendo en pacientes seleccionados supervivencia a largo plazo. La braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDRBT puede jugar un papel importante en el tratamiento de rescate en tumores de cabeza y cuello recurrentes. Presentamos un paciente de 56 años diagnosticado de cáncer de lengua sometido a cirugía y radioterapia externa adyuvante, y recurrencia metastásica ganglionar cervical contralateral a los 18 meses. Recibió tratamiento multidisciplinar con quimioterapia, cirugía y braquiterapia intersticial.Despite advances in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC, 15-50% of patients present locoregional disease recurrence. The therapeutic options are limited for patients who present locally recurrent disease or a second primary tumor in a previously irradiated field. Surgical salvage with curative intent is the preferred option for patients with limited-volume disease. Re-irradiation with or without the addition of chemotherapy may hold promise for long-term survival for selected patients. High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer. The case reported was a 56-year old man diagnosed of tongue cancer who presented recurrent metastatic contralateral cervical node 1.5 years after radical treatment with surgery and adjuvant external radiotherapy. He received multidisciplinary treatment with chemotherapy, surgery and HDR

  5. Gafchromic film dosimetry of a new HDR  192Ir brachytherapy source

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayoobian, Navid; Asl, Akbar Sarabi; Poorbaygi, Hosein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High‐dose‐rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a popular modality for treating cancers of the prostate, cervix, endometrium, breast, skin, bronchus, esophagus, and head and neck as well as soft‐tissue sarcomas...

  6. Proposal of a high dose rate brachytherapy model for in vitro radiobiology studies; Proposta de um modelo de braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose para estudos de radiobiologia in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Jony M.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Andrade, Lidia M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Trindade, Cassia [Hospital Luxemburgo, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Furtado, Clascidia A.; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando, E-mail: jony.marques@mariopenna.org.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CTDN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to develop an easy and reproducible approach for experimental HDR brachytherapy allowing in vitro irradiation studies based on clinical parameters. An acrylic platform was designed to attach T25 tissue culture flasks and multi-well tissue culture plates as well as kept the catheters in a fixed position during irradiation. CT images were taken and the irradiation was planned for 550cGy dose applied on adherent tumor cells. Dosimetric measurements were done and all relevant uncertainties were taken into account in order to figure out the correct dose range received by the cells. Tumor cells were irradiated two times over an interval of 24h between irradiations. Proof of concepts of this approach was carried out by biological effects analysis using a radioresistant human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cell line. Cellular proliferation and cell cycle phase were assessed by Trypan blue exclusion assay and DNA content analysis by flow cytometry, respectively. This approach allowed uniform dose distribution around the arrangement in all types of tissue culture plastics evaluated. Corrections due to uncertainties were managed. Regarding in vitro assays there was a significant (p<0.05) decreasing of cellular proliferation rate in irradiated cells. Moreover, increased percentage of cells arrested in G2/M phase (32.3 ± 1.5%) were observed for treated group compared with untreated cells. (author)

  7. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy; Preparacion y determinacion del kerma de fuentes de iridio-192 de baja tasa de dosis para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045-1, Salazar, Esrado de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 {+-} 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 {+-} 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  8. [Permanent implant prostate cancer brachytherapy: 2013 state-of-the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosset, J-M; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D; Delannes, M; Pommier, P; Pierrat, N; Nickers, P; Thomas, L; Chauveinc, L

    2013-04-01

    With an experience of more than 25 years for the pioneers (and more than 14 years in France), permanent implant brachytherapy using iodine 125 seeds (essentially) is now recognized as a valuable alternative therapy for localized low-risk prostate cancer patients. The possible extension of the indications of exclusive brachytherapy towards selected patients in the intermediate-risk group has now been confirmed by several studies. Moreover, for the other patients in the intermediate-risk group and for the patients in the high-risk group, brachytherapy, as an addition to external radiotherapy, could represent one of the best ways to escalate the dose. Different permanent implant brachytherapy techniques have been proposed; preplanning or real-time procedure, loose or stranded seeds (or both), manual or automatic injection of the seeds. The main point here is the ability to perfectly master the procedure and to comply with the dosimetric constraints, which have been recently redefined by the international societies, such as the GEC-ESTRO group. Mid- and long-term results, which are now available in the literature, indicate relapse-free survival rates of about 90% at 5-10 years, the best results being obtained with satisfactory dosimetric data. Comparative data have shown that the incontinence and impotence rates after brachytherapy seemed to be significantly inferior to what is currently observed after surgery. However, a risk of about 3 to 5% of urinary retention is usually reported after brachytherapy, as well as an irritative urinary syndrome, which may significantly alter the quality of life of the patients, and last several months. In spite of those drawbacks, with excellent long-term results, low rates of incontinence and impotence, and emerging new indications (focal brachytherapy, salvage brachytherapy after localized failure of an external irradiation), permanent implant prostate brachytherapy can be expected to be proposed to an increasing number of patients

  9. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD)...

  10. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.;

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  11. [Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P; Martinet, L; Perrot, P; Baraer, F; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J-Y; Malard, O; Ferron, C; Dreno, B

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medicosurgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6h). The median dose was 20Gy (range, 15-40Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early - within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6cm (p=0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Early perioperative LDR brachytherapy delivering 20Gy at 5mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. 2009 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  13. Radioactive seed migration following parotid gland interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of pulmonary seed migration after parotid brachytherapy using a novel migrated seed detection technique. Patients diagnosed with parotid cancer who underwent permanent parotid brachytherapy from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Head and neck CT scans and chest X-rays were evaluated during routine follow-up. Mimics software and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and migrated seed detection from the original implanted region, respectively. Postimplant dosimetry analysis was performed after seeds migration if the seeds were still in their emitting count. Adverse clinical sequelae from seed embolization to the lung were documented. The radioactive seed implants were identified on chest X-rays in 6 patients. The incidence rate of seed migration in 321 parotid brachytherapy patients was 1.87% (6/321) and that of individual seed migration was 0.04% (6/15218 seeds). All migrated seeds were originally from the retromandibular region. No adverse dosimetric consequences were found in the target region. Pulmonary symptoms were not reported by any patient in this study. In our patient set, migration of radioactive seeds with an initial radioactivity of 0.6-0.7 mCi to the chest following parotid brachytherapy was rare. Late migration of a single seed from the central target region did not affect the dosimetry significantly, and patients did not have severe short-term complications. This study proposed a novel technique to localize the anatomical origin of the migrated seeds during brachytherapy. Our evidence suggested that placement of seeds adjacent to blood vessels was associated with an increased likelihood of seed migration to the lungs. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High brachytherapy doses can counteract hypoxia in cervical cancer—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru; Beskow, Catharina; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2017-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia is a well-known adverse factor for the outcome of radiotherapy. For cervical tumours in particular, several studies indicate large variability in tumour oxygenation. However, clinical evidence shows that the management of cervical cancer including brachytherapy leads to high rate of success. It was the purpose of this study to investigate whether the success of brachytherapy for cervical cancer, seemingly regardless of oxygenation status, could be explained by the characteristics of the brachytherapy dose distributions. To this end, a previously used in silico model of tumour oxygenation and radiation response was further developed to simulate the treatment of cervical cancer employing a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. Using a clinically-derived brachytherapy dose distribution and assuming a homogeneous dose delivered by external radiotherapy, cell survival was assessed on voxel level by taking into account the variation of sensitivity with oxygenation as well as the effects of repair, repopulation and reoxygenation during treatment. Various scenarios were considered for the conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the hypoxic region in the target. By using the clinically-prescribed brachytherapy dose distribution and varying the total dose delivered with external beam radiotherapy in 25 fractions, the resulting values of the dose for 50% tumour control, D 50, were in agreement with clinically-observed values for high cure rates if fast reoxygenation was assumed. The D 50 was furthermore similar for the different degrees of conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the tumour, regardless of whether the hypoxic fraction was 10%, 25%, or 40%. To achieve 50% control with external RT only, a total dose of more than 70 Gy in 25 fractions would be required for all cases considered. It can thus be concluded that the high doses delivered in brachytherapy can counteract the increased

  15. Economic assessment of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution for cervix carcinoma;Evaluation economique de la curietherapie de debit pulse gynecologique (PDR) avec optimisation de la dose pour les cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P.; Carrere, M.O. [Lyon Univ., 69 (France); Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P. [Axe Economie de la Sante, GATE, CNRS-UMR 5824, Centre Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Pommier, P. [Centre Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Quetin, P. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kerr, C. [Centre Val-d' Aurelle, parc Euromedecine, 34 - Montpellier (France); Delannes, M. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France); Castelain, B. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France); Peignaux, K. [Centre Georges Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Kirova, Y. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Romestaing, P. [Centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Williaume, D. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Krzisch, C. [Hopital Sud, 80 - Amiens (France); Thomas, L. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Lang, P. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Baron, M.H. [Hopital Jean-Minjoz, 25 - Besancon (France); Cussac, A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes-Saint-Herblain (France); Lesaunier, F. [Centre Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France); Maillard, S. [Institut Jean-Godinot, 51 - Reims (France); Barillot, I. [Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Charra-Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: Our study aims at evaluating the cost of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution versus traditional treatments (iridium wires, cesium, non-optimized P.D.R.). Issues surrounding reimbursement were also explored. Materials and methods: This prospective, multi-centre, non-randomized study conducted in the framework of a project entitled 'Support Program for Costly Diagnostic and Therapeutic Innovations' involved 21 hospitals. Patients with cervix carcinoma received either classical brachytherapy or the innovation. The direct medical costs of staff and equipment, as well as the costs of radioactive sources, consumables and building renovation were evaluated from a hospital point of view using a micro costing approach. Subsequent costs per brachytherapy were compared between the four strategies. Results: The economic study included 463 patients over two years. The main resources categories associated with P.D.R. brachytherapy (whether optimized or not) were radioactive sources (1053 Euros) and source projectors (735 Euros). Optimized P.D.R. induced higher cost of imagery and dosimetry (respectively 130 Euros and 367 Euros) than non-optimized P.D.R. (47 Euros and 75 Euros). Extra costs of innovation over the less costly strategy (iridium wires) reached more than 2100 Euros per treatment, but could be reduced by half in the hypothesis of 40 patients treated per year (instead of 24 in the study). Conclusion: Aside from staff, imaging and dosimetry, the current hospital reimbursements largely underestimated the cost of innovation related to equipment and sources. (authors)

  16. Bladder accumulated dose in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer and its relation to urinary toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Gaudet, Marc; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate locally accumulated dose to the bladder in multi-fraction high-dose-date (HDR) image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy (IG-ICBT) for cervical cancer, and study the locally-accumulated dose parameters as predictors of late urinary toxicity. A retrospective study of 60 cervical cancer patients who received five HDR IG-ICBT sessions was performed. The bladder outer and inner surfaces were segmented for all sessions and a bladder-wall contour point-set was created in MATLAB. The bladder-wall point-sets for each patient were registered using a deformable point-set registration toolbox called coherent point drift (CPD), and the fraction doses were accumulated. Various dosimetric and volumetric parameters were calculated using the registered doses, including r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum dose to the most exposed n-cm3 volume of bladder wall), r V n Gy (wall volume receiving at least m Gy), and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum equivalent biologically weighted dose to the most exposed n-cm3 of bladder wall), where n  =  1/2/5/10 and m  =  3/5/10. Minimum dose to contiguous 1 and 2 cm3 hot-spot volumes was also calculated. The unregistered dose volume histogram (DVH)-summed equivalent of r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} parameters (i.e. s{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} and s\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} ) were determined for comparison. Late urinary toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA scale, with toxicity Grade 0-1 categorized as Controls and Grade 2-4 as Cases. A two-sample t-test was used to identify the differences between the means of Control and Case groups for all parameters. A binomial logistic regression was also performed between the registered dose parameters and toxicity grouping. Seventeen patients were in the Case and 43 patients in the Control group. Contiguous

  17. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  18. Electromagnetically navigated brachytherapy as a new treatment option for peripheral pulmonary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Wolfgang; Krempien, Robert; Grehn, Christian; Hensley, Frank; Debus, Jürgen; Becker, Heinrich D

    2006-02-01

    This technical note describes the principles of navigated brachytherapy for treatment of peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective feasibility trial a first patient with medically inoperable NSCLC in the right upper lobe was treated with external-beam radiotherapy (50 Gy) and navigated endoluminal brachytherapy (15 Gy). Navigated bronchoscopy was performed with an electromagnetic navigation system for localization of a microsensor mounted on the tip of a dedicated catheter placed within the working channel of a bronchoscope. The probe can be actively guided by a steering mechanism to targeted lesions in the periphery of the lung. After successful localization of the NSCLC, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) was performed to confirm the exact position in the center of the lesion. A 6-F brachytherapy catheter was placed within the tumor. Primary 3-D-planned brachytherapy was performed on chest CTs acquired with the inserted catheter. High-dose-rate brachytherapy (370 GBq iridium-192) was applied as a boost three times a week (single dose 5 Gy) and provided highly conformal irradiations of the NSCLC including the draining bronchovascular bundle. The brachytherapy catheter was tolerated well during treatment (5 days) and alimentation was possible without any problems. Repeated CTs showed stable positioning of the catheter. During follow-up (12 months), endoluminal ultrasound and CT demonstrated a partial remission while histology showed a complete remission of the tumor. Navigated brachytherapy for peripheral pulmonary tumors not amenable to conventional bronchoscopy is feasible.

  19. Electromagnetically navigated brachytherapy as a new treatment option for peripheral pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, W.; Krempien, R.; Grehn, C.; Hensley, F.; Debus, J. [Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, H.D. [Dept. of Interdisciplinary Bronchoscopy, Thorax Clinic at Heidelberg Univ. Medical School, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: this technical note describes the principles of navigated brachytherapy for treatment of peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: in a prospective feasibility trial a first patient with medically inoperable NSCLC in the right upper lobe was treated with external-beam radiotherapy (50 Gy) and navigated endoluminal brachytherapy (15 Gy). Navigated bronchoscopy was performed with an electromagnetic navigation system for localization of a microsensor mounted on the tip of a dedicated catheter placed within the working channel of a bronchoscope. The probe can be actively guided by a steering mechanism to targeted lesions in the periphery of the lung. After successful localization of the NSCLC, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) was performed to confirm the exact position in the center of the lesion. A 6-F brachytherapy catheter was placed within the tumor. Primary 3-D-planned brachytherapy was performed on chest CTs acquired with the inserted catheter. High-dose-rate brachytherapy (370 GBq iridium-192) was applied as a boost three times a week (single dose 5 Gy) and provided highly conformal irradiations of the NSCLC including the draining bronchovascular bundle. Results: the brachytherapy catheter was tolerated well during treatment (5 days) and alimentation was possible without any problems. Repeated CTs showed stable positioning of the catheter. During follow-up (12 months), endoluminal ultrasound and CT demonstrated a partial remission while histology showed a complete remission of the tumor. Conclusion: navigated brachytherapy for peripheral pulmonary tumors not amenable to conventional bronchoscopy is feasible. (orig.)

  20. Y-configured metallic stent combined with (125)I seed strands cavity brachytherapy for a patient with type IV Klatskin tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechao, Jiao; Han, Xinwei; Yanli, Wang; Zhen, Li

    2016-08-01

    We report a case in an inoperable patient with type IV Klatskin tumor treated by the use of a novel, two piece, Y-configured self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) combined with two (125)I seed strands via bilateral approach. The placement of the Y-shaped SEMS was successful and resulted in adequate biliary drainage. After 2 months of intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT), both (125)I seed strands and temporary drainage catheter were removed after patency of the expanded stents was confirmed by the cholangiogram. This technique was feasible and could be considered for the treatment of patients with Bismuth type IV Klatskin tumors.

  1. Y-configured metallic stent combined with 125I seed strands cavity brachytherapy for a patient with type IV Klatskin tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechao, Jiao; Yanli, Wang; Zhen, Li

    2016-01-01

    We report a case in an inoperable patient with type IV Klatskin tumor treated by the use of a novel, two piece, Y-configured self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) combined with two 125I seed strands via bilateral approach. The placement of the Y-shaped SEMS was successful and resulted in adequate biliary drainage. After 2 months of intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT), both 125I seed strands and temporary drainage catheter were removed after patency of the expanded stents was confirmed by the cholangiogram. This technique was feasible and could be considered for the treatment of patients with Bismuth type IV Klatskin tumors. PMID:27648091

  2. Angioplasty of symptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis with intraluminal thrombus: therapeutic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Mayol, A. [Seccion de Neurorradiologia Intervencionista, Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Gil-Peralta, A.; Gonzalez-Marcos, J.R. [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Boza, F. [Servicio de Neurofisiologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Ruano, J. [Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain)

    2004-04-01

    Intraluminal thrombus in the internal carotid artery (ICA) is usually found in patients with severe atheromatous stenosis. Having reviewed 300 carotid angioplasties for symptomatic >70% ICA stenosis, we found three patients (1%) with intraluminal thrombus. Conservative treatment with anticoagulants and double antiplatelet coverage can result in lysis of the thrombus without severe risks. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting, preferably with distal protection, can be an excellent alternative to carotid endarterectomy. (orig.)

  3. Tratamento cirúrgico em dois tempos do aneurisma toracoabdominal roto com prótese intraluminal sem sutura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Castro BERNARDES

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento cirúrgico dos aneurismas toracoabominais exige toracofreno laparotomia, períodos prolongados de pinçamento aórtico com isquemia visceral, sangramento abundante de difícil controle, complicações pulmonares, renais, neurológicas e distúrbios de coagulação com morbimortalidade muitas vezes proibitiva para pacientes de idade avançada, ou portadores de distúrbios respiratórios, renais ou cardíacos prévios. A rotura aumenta em muito a já elevada taxa de morbimortalidade. Crawford (1-3 e Borst (4 descreveram operação em dois tempos para tratamento de aneurisma que atinge mais de um segmento da aorta, com bons resultados. O objetivo de nosso trabalho é mostrar a técnica cirúrgica em dois tempos, empregando prótese intraluminal sem sutura (5, 6. Esta técnica nos proporciona uma operação menos agressiva por abordar somente o segmento roto da aorta, portanto apenas uma cavidade é manipulada (tórax ou abdome. A anastomose com prótese intraluminal reduz em muito o tempo de pinçamento da aorta e, conseqüentemente, a isquemia visceral, diminuindo, também, o sangramento. A redução da agressividade cirúrgica sobre estes pacientes já gravemente enfermos nos proporcionou bons resultados cirúrgicos.The surgical management of thoracoabdominal aneurysms requires thoracophrenic laparotomy, prolonged periods of aortic clamping with visceral ischemia, profuse bleeding leading to a difficult postoperative course with pulmonary, renal, neurological complications, coagulation disturbances and others. All this resulting in an elevated morbidity/mortality very often contraindicating it for the very elderly or those with prior respiratory, renal or cardiac symptoms. Rupture of this aneurysm greatly increases the already high rate of morbidity/mortality. Crawford and Borst have described a two-stage surgery with good results, for aneurysms that affect more than one segment of aorta. The objective of our report is to demonstrate

  4. HDR Brachytherapy Dose Distribution is Influenced by the Metal Material of the Applicator

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Hui Wu; Yi-Jen Liao; An-Cheng Shiau; Hsin-Yu Lin; Yen-Wan Hsueh Liu; Shih-Ming Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Applicators containing metal have been widely used in recent years when applying brachytherapy to patients with cervical cancer. However, the high dose rate (HDR) treatment-planning system (TPS) that is currently used in brachytherapy still assumes that the treatment environment constitutes a homogeneous water medium and does not include a dose correction for the metal material of the applicator. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the HDR 192Ir dose distribution in cervical can...

  5. The effect of rib and lung heterogeneities on the computed dose to lung in Ir-192 high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy: Monte Carlo versus a treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Hossein Salehi; Shamsaei, Mojtaba; Jaberi, Ramin; Shabani, Hamid Reza; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Vaezzadeh, Seyed Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates to what extent the dose received by lungs from a commercially available treatment planning system, Ir-192 high-dose-rate (HDR), in breast brachytherapy, is accurate, with the emphasis on tissue heterogeneities, and taking into account the presence of ribs, in dose delivery to the lung. A computed tomography (CT) scan of a breast was acquired and transferred to the 3-D treatment planning system and was also used to construct a patient-equivalent phantom. An implant involving 13 plastic catheters and 383 programmed source dwell positions were simulated, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The Monte Carlo calculations were compared with the corresponding commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the form of percentage isodose and cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH) in the breast, lungs, and ribs. The comparison of the Monte Carlo results and the TPS calculations showed that a percentage of isodose greater than 75% in the breast, which was located rather close to the implant or away from the breast curvature surface and lung boundary, were in good agreement. TPS calculations overestimated the dose to the lung for lower isodose contours that were lying near the breast surface and the boundary of breast and lung and were relatively away from the implant. Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breasts, ribs, and lungs, revealed an average overestimation of the dose by a factor of 8% in the lung for TPS calculations. Therefore, the accuracy of the TPS results may be limited to regions near the implants where the treatment is planned, and is a more conservative approach for regions at boundaries with curvatures or tissues with a different material than that in the breast.

  6. Acute and late vaginal toxicity after adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy in patients with intermediate risk endometrial cancer: is local therapy with hyaluronic acid of clinical benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delishaj, Durim; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gonnelli, Alessandra; Morganti, Riccardo; Perrone, Franco; Tana, Roberta; Paiar, Fabiola; Gadducci, Angiolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the prevention of acute and late vaginal toxicities after high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy (BT). Material and methods Between January 2011 and January 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 126 patients with endometrial cancer who underwent extrafascial hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy and adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT +/– adjuvant chemotherapy. The total dose prescription was 21 Gy in 3 fractions (one fraction for week). Vaginal ovules containing 5 mg of HA were given for whole duration of vaginal BT and for the two following weeks. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated according to CTCAE vs 4.02. Results According to the revised FIGO 2009 classification, most tumors were in stage IA (30.9%) and in stage IB (57.9%). Thirty-three patients (26.2%) received adjuvant chemotherapy before vaginal BT. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and five-year overall survival (OS) were 88% and 93%, respectively. The most common grade 1-2 acute toxicities were vaginal inflammation (18 patients, 14.3%) and dyspareunia (7 patients, 5.5%). Two patients (1.6%) had more than one toxicity. Late toxicity occurred in 20 patients (15.9%). Grade 1-2 late toxicities were fibrosis (14 patients, 11.1%) and telangiectasias (7 patients, 5.5%). Six patients (4.8%) had more than one late toxicity. No grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities were observed. Conclusions These results appear to suggest that the local therapy with HA is of clinical benefit for intermediate risk endometrial cancer patients who receive adjuvant HDR-vaginal BT after surgery. A randomized trial comparing HA treatment vs. no local treatment in this clinical setting is warranted to further evaluate the efficacy of HA in preventing vaginal BT-related vaginal toxicity. PMID:28115957

  7. Single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy using real-time transrectal ultrasound based planning in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: dosimetrics and early clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Olivier; Delouya, Guila; Taussky, Daniel; Menard, Cynthia; Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To validate the feasibility of a single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) boost for prostate cancer using real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) based planning. Material and methods From August 2012 to September 2015, 126 patients underwent a single-fraction HDRBT boost of 15 Gy using real-time TRUS based planning. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 44 Gy/22 fractions, or 45 Gy/25 fractions) was performed before (31%) or after (69%) HDRBT boost. Genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity were assessed 4 and 12 months after the end of combined treatment using the international prostate symptom score scale (IPSS) and the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v3.0. Results All dose-planning objectives were achieved in 90% of patients. Prostate D90 ≥ 105% and ≤ 115% was achieved in 99% of patients, prostate V150 ≤ 40% in 99%, prostate V200 < 11% in 96%, urethra D10 < 120% for 99%, urethra V125 = 0% in 100%, and rectal V75 < 1 cc in 93% of patients. Median IPSS score was 4 at baseline and did not change at 4 and 12 months after combined treatment. No patients developed ≥ grade 2 GI toxicity. With a median follow-up of 10 months, only two patients experienced biochemical failure. Among patients who didn't receive ADT, cumulative percentage of patients with PSA ≤ 1 ng/ml at 4 and 18 months was respectively 23% and 66%. Conclusions Single-fraction HDRBT boost of 15 Gy using real-time TRUS based planning achieves consistently high dosimetry quality. In combination with EBRT, toxicity outcomes appear promising. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities. PMID:27257413

  8. Brachytherapy volume visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Timothy M.; Webber, Richard L.; Hemler, Paul F.; Bettermann, Wolfram; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2000-04-01

    Conventional localization schemes for brachytherapy seed implants using biplane or stereoscopic projection radio- graphs can suffer form scaling distortions and poor visibility of implanted seeds, resulting in compromised source tracking and dosimetric inaccuracies. This paper proposes an alternative method for improving the visualization and thus, localization, of radiotherapy implants by synthesizing, form as few as two radiographic projections, a 3D image free of divergence artifacts. The result produces more accurate seed localization leading to improved dosimetric accuracy. Two alternative approaches are compared. The first uses orthogonal merging. The second employs the technique of tuned-aperture computed tomography (TACT), whereby 3D reconstruction is performed by shifting and adding of well-sampled projections relative to a fiducial reference system. Phantom results using nonlinear visualization methods demonstrate the applicability of localizing individual seeds for both approaches. Geometric errors are eliminated by a calibration scheme derived from the fiducial pattern that is imaged concurrently with the subject. Both merging and TACT approaches enhance seed localization by improving visualization of the seed distribution over biplanar radiographs. Unlike current methods, both alternatives demonstrate continuos one-to-one source tracking in 3D, although elimination of scaling artifacts requires more than two projections when using the merging method.

  9. Prospective evaluation of patient satisfaction after the use of brachytherapy specific educational materials for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Dominique; Hess, Clayton; Lentz, Susan; Tait, Lauren; Michaud, Anthony; Mayadev, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer patients are faced with an enormous amount of medical information in a complex oncology field with sophisticated treatments including brachytherapy. We investigated the use of enhanced vs. standard brachytherapy-specific educational materials on patient-reported satisfaction during the informed consent process for intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. A single-institution, prospective, randomized trial was performed to study patient-reported satisfaction with novel educational materials for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in women undergoing definitive radiation for cervical cancer. Fourteen women receiving informed consent with a customized educational booklet were randomized between no further intervention and take-home educational materials. The weighted average for 10 of 11 survey questions was higher in the intervention arm but ranged between 4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) for all questions in both arms. The mean weighted patient satisfaction scores ± standard deviations in the control arm and the intervention arms were 54.3 ± 6.4 and 57.5 ± 2.7, respectively (p = 0.26). Knowledge acquisition is presumed to be part of the coping process for women facing increased stress during a cancer diagnosis. A brachytherapy-specific, visual, patient-educational booklet and take-home materials used to supplement the informed consent process for high-dose-rate brachytherapy resulted in high levels of patient-reported satisfaction among women treated with cervical cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Dosimetric comparison between a planning system and Radiochromic-EBT2 films in surface brachytherapy treatments of high rate; Comparacion dosimetrica entre un sistema de planificacion y peliculas radiocromicas EBT2 en tratamientos de braquiterapia superficial de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Ramos, S. M.; Carrasco Herrera, M. a.; Vicent, D.; Rodriguez, C.; Herrador, M.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study a situation in which, the accuracy of the calculation of the planner may be limited, superficial brachytherapy treatment. It has relative to the dose obtained with the planner with that obtained with film radiochromic EBT2. (Author)

  11. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  12. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds in ex vivo prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; DeJournett, Travis; Spicer, James; Boctor, Emad

    2011-03-01

    The localization of brachytherapy seeds in relation to the prostate is a key step in intraoperative treatment planning (ITP) for improving outcomes in prostate cancer patients treated with low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) has traditionally been the modality of choice to guide the prostate brachytherapy procedure due to its relatively low cost and apparent ease of use. However, TRUS is unable to visualize seeds well, precluding ITP and producing suboptimal results. While other modalities such as X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging have been investigated to localize seeds in relation to the prostate, photoacoustic imaging has become an emerging and promising modality to solve this challenge. Moreover, photoacoustic imaging may be more practical in the clinical setting compared to other methods since it adds little additional equipment to the ultrasound system already adopted in procedure today, reducing cost and simplifying engineering steps. In this paper, we demonstrate the latest efforts of localizing prostate brachytherapy seeds using photoacoustic imaging, including visualization of multiple seeds in actual prostate tissue. Although there are still several challenges to be met before photoacoustic imaging can be used in the operating room, we are pleased to present the current progress in this effort.

  13. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  14. Clinical study of high dose rate brachytherapy on cervical carcinoma%高剂量率近距离腔内超分割放射治疗宫颈癌的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任锦霞; 王小虎; 赵林; 高力英; 吉宏; 刘志强; 罗莉; 杜瑞琴

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the possibility and biological effect in clinic by applying unconventional fractionation of intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods In vitro radiotherapy + high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) cavity radiotherapy were applied in the treatment: the accelerator 6 MV-X lines by Simens were used in vitro illumination; around entire pelvic cavity 2 wilds central technology illuminations etc were also used; integral dose was 46-50 Gy, 23-25 fractions, for 5 weeks. When external irradiation entire pelvic cavity dosage was 30 Gy, 15 fractions the pelvic cavity central kept off the lead (4 cm×10 cm) and started to work in short-distance cavity treatment. The 192Ir high dose rate breech loading therapeutic equipment was used, without cavity internal radiation in vitro illumination at the same day. In the HDR cavity the ultra divisiongroup: point A (Ⅱb, Ⅲ) received 4 Gy perfraction, twice daily of intracavitary irradiation at point A. The intrafraction interval was more than 6 hours daily. The total dose at point A was 40 Gy in 10 fractions, 5 days, 3-4 weeks. In HDR cavity conventional division group: point A (ⅡI b, Ⅲ) received 6 Gy perfraction. The total dose at point A was 36 Gy in 6 fractions, 6 days, 6 weeks. Results By the end of radiotherapy, local control of 24 patients complete remission + partial remission was 100% and the control was 95.83% after a year. Early vagina reaction was: I degree for 10 cases, Ⅱ degree for 11 cases and Ⅲ degree for 3 cases. The reaction did not cause any break-up of treatment. Conclusion Enough fractionation including fraction number and dose perfraction are very important to improve the treatment effect and decrease the later complications of the HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma. The method is applicable because of its satisfactory early effects. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate its survival rate as well as later tissue injury.%目的 采用非常规的腔内治疗分割方式,探

  15. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Comparative characteristics of procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kanaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of interstitial radiation sources is the «youngest» of the radical method of treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC. The high level of efficiency comparable to prostatectomy at a significantly lower rate of complications causes rapid growth of clinical use of brachytherapy (BT. Depending on the radiation source and the mode of administration into the prostate gland are two types BT – high-dose rate (temporary (HDR-BT and low-dose rate (permanent (LDR-BT brachytherapy. At the heart of these two methods are based on a single principle of direct effect of the quantum gamma radiation on the area of interest. However, the differences between the characteristics of isotopes used and technical aspects of the techniques cause the difference in performance and complication rates for expression HDR-BT and LDR-BT.

  16. Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toita, Takafumi, E-mail: b983255@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Radiology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBT of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were

  17. The relationship between the biochemical control outcomes and the quality of planning of high-dose rate brachytherapy as a boost to external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cassio Assis Pellizzon, João Salvajoli, Paulo Novaes, Maria Maia, Ricardo Fogaroli, Doglas Gides, Rodrigues Horriot

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluated prognostic factors and impact of the quality of planning of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and HDR-BT. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2005, 209 patients with biopsy proven prostate adenocarcinoma were treated with localized EBRT and HDR-BT at the Department of Radiation-Oncology, Hospital A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Patient's age, Gleason score (GS, clinical stage (CS, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group for biochemical failure (GR, doses of EBRT and HDR-BT, use of three-dimensional planning for HDR-BT (3DHDR and the Biological Effective Dose (BED were evaluated as prognostic factors for biochemical control (bC. Results: Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median EBRT and HDR-BT doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. The crude bC at 3.3 year was 94.2%. For the Low, intermediate and high risk patients the bC rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. Overall survival (OS and disease specific survival rates at 3.3 years were 97.8% and 98.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis the prognostic factors related bC were GR (p= 0.040, GS ≤ 6 (p= 0.002, total dose of HDR-BT ≥ 20 Gy (p< 0.001, 3DHDR (p< 0.001, BED-HDR ≥ 99 Gy1.5 (p<0.001 and BED-TT ≥ 185 (p<0.001. On multivariate analysis the statistical significant predictive factors related to bC were RG (p< 0.001, HDR-BT ≥ 20 Gy (p=0.008 and 3DHDR (p<0.001. Conclusions: we observed that the bC rates correlates with the generally accepted risk factors described in the literature. Dose escalation, evaluated through the BED, and the quality of planning of HDR-BT are also important predictive factors when treating prostate cancer.

  18. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik;

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and th...

  19. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses; Estudio de los Niveles de Radiacion en Zonas de Braquiterapia de Baja Tasa de Dosis del Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: navorf01@yahoo.es

    2006-07-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 {mu}Sv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, {mu}Sv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, {mu}Sv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  20. Three-dimensional ultrasound system for guided breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jean, Paul; Beaulieu, Luc; Fenster, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery combined with subsequent radiation therapy is a standard procedure in breast cancer treatment. The disadvantage of whole-breast beam irradiation is that it requires 20-25 treatment days, which is inconvenient for patients with limited mobility or who reside far from the treatment center. However, interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is an irradiation method requiring only 5 treatment days and that delivers a lower radiation dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. It involves delivering radiation through 192Ir seeds placed inside the catheters, which are inserted into the breast. The catheters are attached to a HDR afterloader, which controls the seed placement within the catheters and irradiation times to deliver the proper radiation dose. One disadvantage of using HDR brachytherapy is that it requires performing at least one CT scan during treatment planning. The procedure at our institution involves the use of two CT scans. Performing CT scans requires moving the patient from the brachytherapy suite with catheters inserted in their breasts. One alternative is using three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) to image the patient. In this study, the authors developed a 3DUS translation scanning system for use in breast brachytherapy. The new system was validated using CT, the current clinical standard, to image catheters in a breast phantom. Once the CT and 3DUS images were registered, the catheter trajectories were then compared. The results showed that the average angular separation between catheter trajectories was 2.4 degrees, the average maximum trajectory separation was 1.0 mm, and the average mean trajectory separation was found to be 0.7 mm. In this article, the authors present the 3DUS translation scanning system's capabilities as well as its potential to be used as the primary treatment planning imaging modality in breast brachytherapy.

  1. Non-Contrast-Enhanced Silent Scan MR Angiography of Intracranial Anterior Circulation Aneurysms Treated with a Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, N; Suzuki, M; Irie, R; Yamamoto, M; Teranishi, K; Yatomi, K; Hamasaki, N; Kumamaru, K K; Hori, M; Oishi, H; Aoki, S

    2017-08-01

    The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device comprises a small-cell nitinol structure and a single-wire braided stent that provides greater metal coverage than previously reported intracranial stents, as well as assumed strong susceptibility artifacts. This study aimed to assess the benefits of non-contrast-enhanced MRA by using a Silent Scan (Silent MRA) for intracranial anterior circulation aneurysms treated with Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device stents. Thirty-one aneurysms treated with Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device stents were assessed by using Silent MRA, 3D TOF-MRA, and x-ray DSA. The quality of MRA visualization of the reconstructed artery was graded on a 4-point scale from 1 (not visible) to 4 (excellent). Aneurysm occlusion status was evaluated by using a 2-grade scale (total occlusion/remnant [neck or aneurysm]). Weighted κ statistics were used to evaluate interobserver and intermodality agreement. The mean scores ± SDs for Silent MRA and 3D TOF-MRA were 3.16 ± 0.79 and 1.48 ± 0.67 (P < .05), respectively, with substantial interobserver agreement (κ = 0.66). The aneurysm occlusion rates of the 2-grade scale (total occlusion/remnant [neck or aneurysm]) were 69%/31% for DSA, 65%/35% for Silent MRA, and 92%/8% for 3D TOF-MRA, respectively. The intermodality agreements were 0.88 and 0.30 for DSA/Silent MRA and DSA/3D TOF-MRA, respectively. Silent MRA seems to be useful for visualizing intracranial anterior circulation aneurysms treated with Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device stents. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy as the boost in combination with external beam irradiation in base of tongue cancer. Long-term results from a uniform clinical series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Johansson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate long time outcome with regard to local tumour control, side effects and quality of life of combined pulsed dose rate (PDR boost and hyperfractionated accelerated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT for primary base of tongue (BOT cancers. Material and methods: Between 1994 and 2007, the number of 83 patients were treated with primary T1-T4 BOT cancers. Seven patients (8% were T1-2N0 (AJCC stage I-II and 76 (92% patients were T1-2N+ or T3-4N0-2 (AJCC stage III-IV. The mean estimated primary tumour volume was 15.4 (1-75 cm3. EBRT was given with 1.7 Gy bid to 40.8 Gy to primary tumour and bilateral neck lymph nodes in 2.5 weeks. PDR boost of 35 Gy and a neck dissection in clinical node positive case was performed 2-3 weeks later. The patients were followed for a median of 54 (2-168 months. Results: The 2-, 5- and 10-years rates of actuarial local control were 91%, 89% and 85%, overall survival 85%, 65% and 44%, disease free survival 86%, 80% and 76%, respectively. The regional control rate was 95%. Six patients (7% developed distant metastases. A dosimetric analysis showed a mean of 100% isodose volume of 58.2 (16.7-134 cm3. In a review of late complications 11 cases of minor (13% and 5 of major soft tissue necroses (6%, as well as 6 cases of osteoradionecroses (7% were found. The patients median subjective SOMA/LENT scoring at last follow up was as follow: grade 0 for pain and trismus, grade 1 for dysphagia and taste alteration, and grade 2 for xerostomia. Global visual- analogue-scale (VAS scoring of quality of life was 8. Conclusion: Local and regional tumour control rate was excellent in this treatment protocol. The data shows the PDR boost as at least as effective as published continuous low dose rate (CLDR results.

  3. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anker, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.anker@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); O' Donnell, Kristen [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Boucher, Kenneth M. [Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  4. Modeling of intraluminal heating of biological tissue: implications for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, B; Rastegar, S; Motamedi, M

    1994-09-01

    A computer model for predicting the thermal response of a biological tissue to different intraluminal heating modalities is presented. A practical application of the model is to calculate the temperature distributions during thermal coagulation of prostate by contact heating and radiative heating. The model uses a two-dimensional axisymmetric diffusion approximation method to calculate the light distribution during radiative heating. The traditional Pennes' bio-heat equation is used to calculate the temperatures in the presence of blood flow. An implicit finite difference scheme with nonuniform grid spacings is used to solve the diffusion equation for light distribution and the bio-heat equation. Model results indicate that the radiative heating of prostate by Nd:YAG (1064 mm) and diode (810 mm) lasers can be a more effective and efficient means of coagulating a large volume of prostate, as compared to contact heating of the tissue. Blood perfusion is shown to provide a considerable heat sink as the laser exposure time is increased. Surface cooling by irrigation during the laser irradiation of tissue is shown to be an effective method for delaying tissue explosion and obtaining a large volume of coagulated tissue. The model also shows that the volume of the coagulated tissue is appreciably altered by a change in the rate of energy deposition.

  5. WE-E-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy I: Overview of Clinical Application and QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, B [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Showalter, T

    2014-06-15

    With the increased usage of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the introduction of dedicated image guided brachytherapy suites, it is necessary to review the processes and procedures associated with safely delivering these treatments in the expedited time scales that dedicated treatment suites afford. The speakers will present the clinical aspects of switching from LDR to HDR treatments, including guidelines for patient selection, and the clinical outcomes comparing LDR to HDR. The speakers will also discuss the HDR treatment process itself, because the shortened clinical timeline involved with a streamlined scan/plan/treat workflow can introduce other issues. Safety and QA aspects involved with the streamlined process, including increased personnel required for parallel tasks, and possible interfering tasks causing delays in patient treatments will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical aspects of HDR Brachytherapy, including common clinical indications, patient selection, and the evolving evidence in support of this therapeutic modality To review the current prominent clinical trials for HDR brachytherapy To interpret the established guidelines for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance for implementation into practical clinical settings. To introduce the basic requirements for image guided brachytherapy.

  6. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment; Braquiterapia no tratamento do rabdomiossarcoma da infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-07-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold{sup 198}, Cesium{sup 137} and Iridium{sup 192}. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  7. Results of Castro Bernardes intraluminal ring in surgery for ascending aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rotatori Novaes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate surgical results using Castro Bernardes intraluminal ring in ascending aorta surgery, instead of conventional suture. METHODS: 95 patients underwent ascending aorta surgery from December 2008 to April 2011 at Madre Tereza Hospital (Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, using Castro Bernardes intraluminal ring instead of conventional suture of the aorta. RESULTS: Ninety five patients underwent ascending aorta surgery with Castro-Bernardes intraluminal ring. Thirty patients presented acute dissection and 65 aneurism. Overall postoperative mortality was 15.78% (15/95. Nine patients in 15 (60% died due to acute type A dissection. For acute type A dissection, mortality was 30% and for aneurism mortality was 9.23%. The intraluminal ring was inserted in distal position in 89 patients and in proximal and distal position in 6 patients. Mortality was related to Bentall & De Bono or Cabrol associated techniques. Average extracorporeal circulation time was 57.4 minutes and average aortic cross-clamping time was 37 minutes. CONCLUSION: The use of Castro Bernardes intraluminal ring in ascending aortic surgery avoiding conventional suture reduces extracorporeal circulation time and aortic cross-clamping time, improving surgical results. This approach simplifies ascending aortic surgery whether the disease is type A dissection or aneurysm, and may be considered a good alternative technique.

  8. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy; Comparacion entre metodos de calculo de tasa de dosis en braquiterapia ginecologica8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, E.A.; Biaggio, M.F.; Dr, M.F.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas- (L.C.R.)-D.B.B.- UERJ- R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524- Pav. HLC- sala 136- CEP 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  9. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer - from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tibor Major; Csaba Polgár

    2017-01-01

    .... The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods...

  10. Vaginal brachytherapy for postoperative endometrial cancer: 2014 Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Grover, Surbhi; Erickson, Beth A; Viswanathan, Akila N; Small, Christina; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    Report current practice patterns for postoperative endometrial cancer emphasizing vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). A 38-item survey was e-mailed to 1,598 American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members and 4,329 US radiation oncologists in 2014 totaling 5,710 recipients. Responses of practitioners who had delivered VBT in the previous 12 months were included in the analysis. Responses were tabulated to determine relative frequency distributions. χ(2) analysis was used to compare current results with those from the 2003 ABS survey. A total of 331 respondents initiated the VBT survey, of whom 289 (87.3%) administered VBT in the prior 12 months. Lymph node dissection and number of nodes removed influenced treatment decisions for 90.5% and 69.8%, respectively. High-dose-rate was used by 96.2%. The most common vaginal length treated was 4 cm (31.0%). Three-dimensional planning was used by 83.2% with 73.4% of those for the first fraction only. Doses to normal tissues were reported by 79.8%. About half optimized to the location of dose specification and/or normal tissues. As monotherapy, the most common prescriptions were 7 Gy for three fractions to 0.5-cm depth and 6 Gy for five fractions to the surface. As a boost, the most common prescriptions were 5 Gy for three fractions to 0.5-cm depth and 6 Gy for three fractions to the vaginal surface. Optimization points were placed at the apex and lateral vagina by 73.1%. Secondary quality assurance checks were performed by 98.9%. VBT is a common adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer patients, most commonly with HDR. Fractionation and planning processes are variable but generally align with ABS recommendations. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of 2D and 3D Imaging and Treatment Planning for Postoperative Vaginal Apex High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, James K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Armeson, Kent E. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Richardson, Susan, E-mail: srichardson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate bladder and rectal doses using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D treatment planning for vaginal cuff high-dose rate (HDR) in endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2007 were evaluated. Seventy-one and 20 patients underwent 2D and 3D planning, respectively. Each patient received six fractions prescribed at 0.5 cm to the superior 3 cm of the vagina. International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) doses were calculated for 2D patients. Maximum and 2-cc doses were calculated for 3D patients. Organ doses were normalized to prescription dose. Results: Bladder maximum doses were 178% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were no different than ICRU doses (p = 0.22). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 59% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Rectal maximum doses were 137% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 87% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 64% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final bladder dose to within 10% for 44%, 59%, 83%, 82%, and 89% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 45%, 55%, 80%, 85%, and 85% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 37%, 68%, 79%, 79%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final rectal dose to within 10% for 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 60%, 65%, 70%, 75%, and 75% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 68%, 95%, 84%, 84%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Conclusions: Doses to organs at risk vary depending on the calculation method. In some cases, final dose accuracy appears to plateau after the third fraction, indicating that simulation and planning may not be necessary in all fractions. A clinically relevant level of accuracy should be determined and further research conducted to address

  12. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Mireille, E-mail: mireilleguib@voila.fr [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); David, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Vergez, Sebastien [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); Rives, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Department of Epidemiology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  13. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  14. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  15. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor

  16. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor vol

  17. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  18. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented.

  19. Brachytherapy of endometrial cancers; Curietherapie des cancers de l'endometre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Curietherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2003-04-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinomas rank third as tumoral sites en France. The tumors are confined to the uterus in 80% of the cases. Brachytherapy has a large place in the therapeutic strategy. The gold standard treatment remains extra-fascial hysterectomy with bilateral annexiectomy and bilateral internal iliac lymph node dissection. However, after surgery alone, the rate of locoregional relapses reaches 4-20%, which is reduced to 0-5% after postoperative brachytherapy of the vaginal cuff. This postoperative brachytherapy is delivered as outpatients treatment, by 3 or 4 fractions, at high dose rate. The utero-vaginal preoperative brachytherapy remains well adapted to the tumors which involve the uterine cervix. Patients presenting a localized tumor but not operable for general reasons (< 10%) can be treated with success by exclusive irradiation, which associates a pelvic irradiation followed by an utero-vaginal brachytherapy. A high local control of about 80-90% is obtained, a little lower than surgery, with a higher risk of late complications. Last but not least, local relapses in the vaginal cuff, or in the perimeatic area, can be treated by interstitial salvage brachytherapy, associated if possible with external beam irradiation. The local control is reached in half of the patients, but metastatic dissemination is frequent. We conclude that brachytherapy has a major role in the treatment of endometrial adenocarcinomas, in combination with surgery, or with external beam irradiation for not operable patients or in case of local relapses. It should use new technologies now available including computerized after-loaders and 3D dose calculation. (authors)

  20. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamer Refaat

    2011-06-12

    Jun 12, 2011 ... Generally, radiation therapy for cervical cancer consists of a combination of ...... breast, prostate, skin, lung, and pancreas, NF-jB nuclear expression .... Applicator reconstruction for HDR cervix treatment planning using images ...